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At the Lincoln: Blues legend Curtis Salgado PAGE 3

Skagit Valley Herald Thursday November 15, 2012

Recreation

Reviews

Roger Ebert

Thanksgiving time means more than just hunting for turkeys in the state

Music: Judy Garland, “Twilight Saga” Video Games: “Assassin’s Creed III”

“Anna Karenina” an exquisite film – and perhaps too exquisite

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Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E2 - Thursday, November 15, 2012

NEW ON DVD THIS WEEK “The Amazing Spider-Man”: Director Marc Webb and screen writers James Vanderbilt, Alvin Sargent and Steve Kloves found a way to spin the story of the comic book hero with enough originality to appease fans while not straying too far from the well-known Spidey mythology created by Stan Lee and Steve Ditko a half-century ago. The film has a few bugs. Spider-Man purists will have to deal with the adjustments made to the character’s history, especially the spider bite not being as random as before. And there’s a key story element never resolved, and it’s not a plot point that’s necessary for a sequel. Otherwise, this reboot of Spider-Man is amazing. “Brave”: A young Scottish girl rebels against family traditions. With a string of well-written and dazzlinglooking movies, it seemed like Pixar could do no animation wrong. But the company’s latest effort shows it isn’t perfect. The animation is still amazing, but an ill-conceived story leaves this production as appealing as a two-leaf clover. The animation is eyepopping. The animals look so real it’s almost impossible to tell whether they are animated or filmed. Each background is a beautiful tapestry of earth tones that give the movie an inviting warmth. The visuals are far more stunning in 2-D; the 3-D does little except to muddle the color. But the character designs lack any originality. “Savages”: This is Oliver Stone’s film based on Don Winslow’s bestselling crime novel. Most of Stone’s latest film is a gritty and gruesome look at the lives of two entrepreneurs who end up being forced to work with a Mexican cartel. The film is diminished by a contrived ending and Blake Lively’s weak narration. “The Incredible Mel Brooks: An Irresistible Collection of Unhinged Comedy”: The 5-DVD set contains interviews, film clips and TV footage. “Lost Girl: The Complete Second Season”: Anna Silk stars. “2 Days in New York”: Julie Delpy’s sequel to “2 Days in Paris.” “Paul McCartney: Live Kisses”: Music special starring the legendary singer. “Storage Wars Texas: Season 1”: Bidders fight for storage lockers in the Lone Star State. “The Watch”: Comedy about a neighborhood watch. “Doctor Who: Series Seven, Part

YOUR ARTS, ENTERTAINMENT AND RECREATION GUIDE TO WHAT’S GOING ON IN SKAGIT COUNTY AND THE SURROUNDING AREAS

Upcoming movie releases Following is a partial schedule of com-

ing movies on DVD. Release dates are subject to change: NOV. 20 The Expendables 2 - Lionsgate

This Weekend / Page 5

NOV. 27 The Apparition - Warner The Day - Anchor Bay Lawless - Anchor Bay ParaNorman - Universal NOV. 30 Men in Black 3 - Sony Sparkle - Sony DEC. 4 Beasts of the Southern Wild - Fox Butter - Anchor Bay Hope Springs - Sony The Odd Life of Timothy Green - Disney DEC. 11 The Bourne Legacy - Universal Ice Age: Continental Drift - Fox Ted - Universal DEC. 18 Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Dog Days - Fox 10 Years - Anchor Bay Trouble With the Curve - Warner

Check out the Skagit Wine Festival on Saturday in Mount Vernon.

Inside

DEC. 21 Arbitrage - Lionsgate Premium Rush - Sony n McClatchy-Tribune News Service

One”: Matt Smith plays the time-traveling doctor. “Alice: The Complete Second Season”: Linda Lavin stars. “Primetime”: Frank Sinatra 1968 TV special. “Minds in the Water”: Surfers look to protect the oceans. “Empire of the Sun”: Steven Spielberg film is being re-released to mark its 25th anniversary. “My Big Fat Greek Wedding: 10th Anniversary Special Edition”: Stars Nia Vardalos and John Corbett. “Doctor Who: The Claws of Axos Special Edition”: Features Jon Pertwee as the doctor. “Pixar Short Films Collection: Volume 2”: Includes 12 short films. “The Ghostmaker”: There’s a price to pay when you cheat death. “Dust Up”: An act of kindness goes very wrong. “The Astonishing X-Men”: Latest in the Marvel Knights Animation series. “Dark Horse”: Lonely guy takes a shot at love. n Rick Bentley, The Fresno Bee

SUBMISSIONS Email features@skagitpublishing.com vrichardson@skagitpublishing. com (recreation items) Phone 360-416-2135 Hand-deliver 1215 Anderson Road Mount Vernon, WA 98274 Mailing address P.O. Box 578 Mount Vernon, WA 98273

Music, Game Reviews..................6-7 On Stage........................................ 10 Tuning Up..................................... 11 Get Involved.................................. 12 Hot Tickets.................................... 14 At the Lincoln Theatre.................. 14 Roger Ebert.................................... 16 Movie Mini-Reviews................16-17 Movie Listings............................... 17 Out & About.............................18-19

Online events calendar To list your event on our website, visit goskagit.com and look for the Events Calendar on the home page HAVE A STORY IDEA? w For arts and entertainment, contact Features Editor Craig Parrish at 360-416-2135 or features@skagitpublishing.com w For recreation, contact staff writer Vince Richardson at 360-416-2181 or vrichardson@ skagitpublishing.com TO ADVERTISE 360-424-3251


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Thursday, November 15, 2012 - E3

MUSIC

A blues legend comes to the Lincoln

Curtis Salgado Curtis Salgado in concert Opening act: Bobby Holland and Breadline When: 8 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 17 Where: Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon Tickets: $15-$27. Proceeds benefit the Rick Epting Foundation for the Arts. 360-336-8955, www.ilovethe lincoln.com or www.lincolntheatre.org.

Rick Epting

Skagit Valley Herald staff

One of the Northwest’s iconic blues artists comes to Mount Vernon this weekend to help celebrate the birthday of a local arts pioneer. Singer/harmonica player Curtis Salgado brings his band to the Lincoln Theater on Saturday to perform in a fundraiser for The Rick Epting Foundation for the Arts. Bobby Holland and Breadline, a favorite local blues band, will open for Salgado. Epting, who died in 2005, was a champion for local arts and music programs. According to a news release for Saturday’s concert, he was one of the founding members of the Lincoln Theatre Center Foundation and the Skagit Performing Arts Council. He was also instrumental in the restoration campaign for the Lincoln Theatre and the planning and organization for McIntyre Hall in Mount Vernon, the release said. Salgado’s story is widely known and as unique as any in the entertainment business. He’s originally from Everett and has been playing regionally, nationally and internationally for decades. He’s performed and recorded with Bonnie Raitt, Muddy Waters, Albert Collins, Robert Cray and countless others; toured with Steve Miller and The Doobie Brothers; and sang lead vocals for a time with Carlos Santana. Salgado uncovered what would eventually become an international phenomenon in the late 1970s. While performing in Eugene, Ore., Salgado’s performance was seen by comedian John Belushi, the red-hot “Saturday Night Live” star who was filming “Animal House” in town. Belushi was transfixed by Salgado’s performance, the two became friends, and Salgado became Belushi’s musical inspiration. Belushi soon teamed with SNL’s Dan Aykroyd — also a huge blues fan — and formed the Blues Brothers, resulting in a hugely successful album (“Briefcase Full of Blues”) and a classic movie. Salgado, who has endured some health problems in recent years, still tours heavily and plays blues festivals around the world. He was awarded the 2010 Blues Music Award for Soul Blues Artist Of The Year. His latest CD “Soul Shot” (Alligator), alternately swings and stomps between classic R&B and heartwrenching soul.


E4 - Thursday, November 15, 2012

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

RECREATION

Plenty of bounty available for the Thanksgiving feast By VINCE RICHARDSON Staff Writer

There’s more than one way to put a turkey on your table for Thanksgiving. Thousands of hunters plan to get their bird during the hunting season for wild turkey, which gets under way Tuesday, Nov. 20, in Eastern Washington. November is also prime time to hunt ducks, geese, elk, deer, pheasant, forest grouse and a variety of other game around the state. “Waterfowl hunting usually picks up around the middle of the month, when the wet and windy weather starts pushing more migrating birds into the area from the north,” said Don Kraege, waterfowl manager for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). “That’s good news for waterfowl hunters from the Skagit Valley to the Columbia Basin.” November is also prime time to hunt deer and elk on both sides of the Cascades. For anglers, Thanksgiving traditionally marks the start of winter steelhead fishing in Western Washington, where coho and chum salmon also start moving in from the ocean. On the eastside, anglers are still reeling in high numbers of hatchery-reared summer steelhead from the upper Columbia River and several major tributaries. Most areas of Puget Sound are open for crab fishing, and two multiday razor clam digs are scheduled at various ocean beaches in November. Meanwhile, birders throughout the nation are making preparations for the 113th Christmas Bird Count, scheduled for Dec. 14 through Jan. 5, 2013. Sponsored by the National Audubon Society, the event enlists tens of thousands of volunteers throughout the Americas to count and categorize the birds they see for science. The rainy season is setting in and the days are getting shorter, but anglers still have a variety of fishing opportunities from which

n Christmas Bird Count: birds. audubon.org/christmas-bird-count

3 in Skagit and Snohomish counties (Goose Management Area 1); snow, Ross and blue geese seasons there run continuously through Jan. 29. The duck hunting season continues through Jan. 27. Upland bird hunters have through Nov. 30 to hunt pheasants, California quail and bobwhite, while the forest grouse season runs through Dec. 31. The late modern firearm season for deer runs today through Sunday. The modern firearm season for elk closed Thursday. Archers and muzzleloaders also have late-season opportunities in select game management units. Archery hunts for deer and elk get started Nov. 21, when muzzleloader hunts for elk also get under way. Late muzzleloader hunts for elk open Nov. 21 in select Western Washington game management units, and deer muzzleloader hunts open Nov. 22. Before heading out, hunters should check the WDFW’s Big Game Hunting pamphlet and the Waterfowl and Upland Game Skagit Valley Herald file pamplets for details. More and more birders are to choose in November. Three (Port Susan and Port Gardner), Snoqualmie and Green. making their way to the region to more areas open for chinook salm- 9 (Admiralty Inlet), 12 (Hood The Skagit, Snohomish and view snow geese, which continue on fishing in Puget Sound, where Canal) and 13 (South Puget Green are also good spots for to arrive in increasing numbers. the winter Dungeness crab fishery Sound). winter steelhead fishing, said Bob Thousands of snow geese winter is also under way. Steelhead fishThe daily catch limit in Puget Leland, WDFW’s steelhead proin Western Washington each year. ing should catch fire by the end of Sound is five Dungeness crab, gram manager. Most of those birds congregate in the month. males only, in hard-shell condition “Anglers can certainly find the Skagit Valley, and can be found Chinook salmon fishing began with a minimum carapace width of some hatchery steelhead early in in the area from mid-October Nov. 1 in marine areas 8-1 (Decep- 6¼ inches. In addition, fishers may the month,” he said. “But fishing through early May. tion Pass, Hope Island, and Skagit catch six red-rock crab of either usually starts to pick up around A great place to view the snow Bay), 8-2 (Port Susan and Port gender per day, provided those Thanksgiving.” geese is at the Fir Island Farms Gardner) and 9 (Admiralty Inlet). crab measure at least 5 inches Because regulations vary for Reserve Unit of WDFW’s Skagit There is a two-salmon daily limit, across. each river, anglers should check Wildlife Area. and wild chinook salmon must be All crab caught in the late-sea- WDFW’s sportfishing regulations With hunting seasons under way released. son fishery should be recorded on pamphlet before heading out. in parts of the region, some birders Anglers are reminded that winter catch cards, which are valid This month is prime time for have called WDFW to ask whether Marine Area 7 (San Juan Islands) until Dec. 31. Winter cards are waterfowl hunting in the region, they should wear hunter-orange closed to salmon retention Nov. 1. available at license vendors across where more birds are expected clothing while in the field. Meanwhile, sport crabbing is the state, and catch reports are due to arrive as the month progresses. “It’s not a legal requirement open seven days a week through to WDFW by Feb. 1, 2013. After a typical late-October lull in for bird watchers,” said Bill Tweit, Dec. 31 in marine areas 4 (Neah Several rivers are open in activity, hunting usually improves a WDFW policy analyst and avid Bay), 5 (Sekiu), 6 (eastern Strait November for salmon fishing, in mid-November, when the num- birder. “But it only makes sense of Juan de Fuca), 7 (San Juan including the Nooksack, Samish, bers of migrating birds pick up to make every effort to let hunters Islands), 8-1 (Deception Pass, Skagit, Cascade, Stillaguamish, along with wet and windy weather. know where you are when you’re Hope Island, and Skagit Bay), 8-2 Snohomish, Skykomish, Wallace, Goose hunting resumed Nov. sharing the same area.”


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, November 15, 2012 - E5

THIS WEEKENDin the area TELLABRATION! A WORLDWIDE EVENING OF STORYTELLING Enjoy an open-mic format story swap at 6 p.m. Friday, Nov. 16, at the Stanwood Public Library, 9701 271st St. NW, Stanwood. Signup begins at 5:45 p.m. Bring a 5- to 7-minute story to share, including folk tales, tall tales, personal stories, fish stories, funny or scary stories, or just come to listen. Free. 360-629-3132.

HOLIDAY FARMERS MARKET 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 17-18, Port of Anacortes Warehouse, 100 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. Shop for produce, cheese, honey, bread, pies, sweet treats, fudge, jams, syrups, mustards, granola, local meats, jewelry, clothing, fabric art, wood carvings, home decor, pottery, handcrafted soap, candles, brooms, knitted hats, scarves, socks and more. Door prizes and live music all day. Free admission. www.anacortesfarmersmarket.org

“HONKY TONKIN’ HOOTENANNY” Enjoy toetapping, two-stepping honky tonk music at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 17, at the Historic Everett Theatre, 2911 Colby Ave., Everett. Performers include Marcia Kester, Liam Fitzgerald and The Rainieros, The Hometown Band and more. $16.50, $13 seniors and students, $5 for kids ages 12 and younger. 425-258-6766 or www.redcurtainfoundation. org.

FISHING DERBY The Stanwood Hotel Blackmouth Fishing Derby will take place Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 17-18, with weigh-ins from 3 to 4:30 p.m. each day at the Stanwood Hotel Saloon, 26926 102nd Ave. NW, Stanwood. First- through fourth-place cash prizes for biggest fish, drawings for other prizes. $60 entry fee, everyone in boat must be entered. State fishing regulations apply. Fishing allowed in areas 8-1 and 8-2 only. 360-6292888 or www.stanwoodhotelsaloon.com

Skagit Wine Festival

Enjoy live music, wine tasting, gourmet appetizers, chocolates and cheeses from 3 to 9 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 17, at the Best Western CottonTree Inn, 2300 Market St., Mount Vernon. $35, $60 couple; $40 per person at the door. Includes souvenir glass and wine charm, food, wine, chocolate and cheese tastings. Ages 21 and older. 360-428-8547 or www.mount vernonchamber.com


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E6 - Thursday, November 15, 2012

REVIEWS MUSIC CDS Compiled from news services

One Direction

a tense confrontation between vampire factions. Yet the album is more focused on “Take Me Home” delivering a soulful sound that is neither too arcane, nor too mainstream. It’s just quirky One Direcenough to be embraced by the hordes of tion’s sophomore teenagers who’ve grown up alongside Bella album, “Take and Edward. Me Home,” Nikki Reed, who plays Rosalie Hale comes one year in the film, makes an appearance on the after the group instrument-stripped piano ballad “All I’ve released its Ever Needed,” alongside her husband and debut, “Up All Night,” in the United Kingformer “American Idol” contestant Paul dom. The latter came out in America just McDonald. Green Day, the biggest act on eight months ago, has already sold 1.3 milthe soundtrack, is bland on “Forgotten.” lion units and is still in the Top 25. The rest of the songs alternate between The wholesome-looking quintet has diaphanous guitars like POP ETC’s “Speak joined Justin Bieber in the affections of girls Up” or dreamy tunes like Feist’s “Fire in everywhere, with their puppy eyes, trendy the Water” and James Vincent McMorrow’s haircuts and rather good voices. And the “Ghosts.” There’s also haunting strings, like boy band’s new album delivers on the brief, on “New for You” by Reeve Carney, best vaguely catchy songs that appeal to both the known for playing the lead in Broadway’s romantic and the wild side of teenage girls. “Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark.” The record relies heavily on perky and It’s all a bit wailing, like a highly enjoymelancholic guitars, and on romantic invitaable mourning parade that performs at its tions like “I want to be your last first kiss” own death. on “Last First Kiss,” which then veer into the n Cristina Jaleru, Associated Press leery “Tonight let’s get some” on the very honest and upbeat first single, “Live While We’re Young.” It’s full of riffs that haven’t Lana Del Rey been heard since the 1990s boy bands took “Paradise” their final bows. The album feels relentless in rhythm, Lana Del sometimes even during the ballads, with a Rey’s new eighthomogenous sound and message — like a track EP “Parateenage boy who says all the right words in dise” shows the a rush to get what he wants. But this time singer is still in they’re only singing the right words to get the same emoto your wallets and adoration. And they’re tional flux she most likely going to get it. was when she released her debut album 10

months ago. She’s lamenting the pains of love. Del Rey has an almost affected vulner‘The ability in her voice, at certain points its Twilight quivering adds to the gravitas of the lyrics, like when she sings “Don’t turn around, Saga: leave me high and dry” on the Rick RubinBreaking produced first single, “Ride.” The song was Dawn ...’ co-written by Justin Parker, who helmed Various artists most of her debut, “Born to Die,” along with Emile Haynie. “Ride” is as perfect as “Video Games,” the single that propelled her into It’s a sad the limelight. goodbye from “The Twilight Saga,” which “American” uses simple strings and piano, sees its last installment, “Breaking Dawn which allows her smoky, effortless vocals to — Part 2,” hit the big screen this week. The soundtrack reflects a chocked-up melancho- take control. “Cola” continues the Amerilia that lingers over the sound like dust over cana theme, but in a playful, tongue-incheek way. And “Body Electric” sounds like old boxes of family photos. it’s straight from a Western film, where Del This final film steps away from the romantic dilemmas of previous outings into Rey is again playfully poking fun at America n Cristina Jaleru, Associated Press

— “Elvis is my daddy, Marilyn’s my mother,” she claims. The 26-year-old’s entrancing vocals make it almost hypnotic to listen to anything she sings, but that’s not always the case: “Bel Air” and “Yayo” are just fillers. n Sian Watson, Associated Press

Beres Hammond “One Love, One Life”

Legendary crooner Beres Hammond, one of the most recognizable voices in all of Jamaica, is back with “One Love, One Life,” a 20-track double album with steady grooves and some bonafide classics. Self-produced and recorded in his Kingston studio, Hammond has organized a record that splits into matters of the heart (“One Love”) and social consciousness (“One Life.”) “No Candle Light” is instantly amazing, Hammond is ever the gentleman on the tender midtempo groove “In My Arms,” and the romantic ballad “Lonely Fellow” is sincere. The second album is calm and refreshing, full of songs that will uplift. One bright spot is the title track, where Hammond makes it clear that he isn’t “singing for fame.” The 57-year-old came on the music scene in 1970s and he has a voice that doesn’t seem to age. He adds another jewel in his crown with his new album.

volume released by First Hand, was recorded by Dutch radio four months before New York with Garland in excellent voice and sounding incredibly relaxed and playful. The repertoire is close to “Carnegie Hall,” but tempos are less driven. After an uncertain beginning, there are superior readings of such songs as “You Go to My Head” and “Come Rain or Come Shine.” During the latter, she runs out of breath on the final note (as at Carnegie Hall) but later explains how she usually disguises such things. It’s all very candid and homey, especially during encores: “We’ve got an old thing that I sang in 1783 in a movie — and that was the last one I was in, by the way …” n David Patrick Stearns, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Bobby Bare “Darker Than Light”

He has scored more than 30 Top 20 hits, but at 77 Bobby Bare has maintained a lower profile, and been lioned less, than such contemporaries as Willie Nelson and Merle Haggard. This album, his first in seven years, is a reminder of how good he is. With backing that features members of Robert Plant’s Band of Joy, including Buddy Miller on guitar, and covers of U2’s “I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For” and Dylan’s “Farewell, Angelina” (not the first time Bare has covered the Bard), “Darker Than Light” obviously aims to earn Bare some cachet among hip tastemakers. n Bianca Roach, Associated Press Yet he remains his unpretentious, downhome self. Judy The two aforementioned numbers notwithstanding, the album relies heavily on Garland folk and blues standards. It’s a measure “The Amsterdam of the still-robust Bare’s deeply engaging Concert — manner and expressive abilities that he can December 1960” make such familiar fare as “House of the Rising Sun,” “Dark as a Dungeon,” and You might call “Tom Dooley” sound fresh and compelthis “The Road ling. Meanwhile, his own poignant “I Was a to Carnegie Hall Part 2.” After a near-death experience from Young Man Once” showcases songwriting hepatitis late in 1959, Garland decamped to skills that remain sharp, and “The Devil and London, where a series of recording sessions Billy Markham,” a poem by Shel Silverstein set to music, echoes the pair’s landmark coland concerts led up to her return to New York in her famous “Live at Carnegie Hall” laborations of the ’70s. concert and album. This live set, the second n Nick Cristiano, The Philadelphia Inquirer


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, November 15, 2012 - E7

REVIEWS VIDEO GAMES Chris Campbell, Scripps Howard News Service

‘Assassin’s Creed III’

Platforms: Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, PC Genre: Adventure Publisher: Ubisoft ESRB Rating: M, for Mature Grade: 4.5 stars (out of 5) Few gaming franchises could take on an epic challenge like the forging of America. “Assassin’s Creed III” not only weaves its hero into the retelling of the American Revolution, but does so in beautiful and often-gruesome fashion. The New World wasn’t all bonnets and cornucopias. It was a young land filled with eagerness and colored with blood. “AC3” alternates between future and past with our long-running series hero, Desmond, and his connection to the past, in this edition a half-British, half-Native American warrior named Connor. Connor’s life is amazingly intertwined with major moments of America’s birth in New York and Boston. Paul Revere, the Boston Tea Party and other major (and minor) elements of colonial times make appearances and interact with him. You’ll sneak around forests eliminating groups of soldiers, while in other set pieces engage in thrilling sea battles aboard enormous cannon-laden ships. There are quieter moments as well, slyly assassinating targets while sneaking around the city’s rooftops, or making a life for yourself as you expand your countryside homestead. A game this ambitious in scope (and trust me, its scale is grandiose) means inconsistencies are bound to show up. Tree branches rarely sway or bend even with humans running along them; some clipping occurs with characters getting stuck in walls and missions need restarting when a required event never happens. These gameplay and presentation hiccups show up more often than you’d like, but they don’t ruin the flow. Online multiplayer returns, with an impressive expansion of content and modes that were first introduced in “Brotherhood.” Nothing raises the tension more than skulking around a city looking for a player to silently kill while knowing there are others aiming to do the same to you.

‘LittleBigPlanet Karting’

Skagit valley hoSpital FouNdatioN and aSSociated petroleum productS Present the tweNty-Fourth annual

Platform: PlayStation 3 Genre: Racing Publisher: Sony ESRB Rating: E, for Everyone Grade: 3 stars Going for that second helping of Thanksgiving pie. It’s that kind of playful gluttony that infuses “LittleBigPlanet Karting,” a new entry that brightens your day just when you thought that the world had exhausted itself gorging on kart racing. Racers would do well to begin their journey in the story mode, as it provides a nice setup to what comes down the pike. The racing is pretty standard fare on the surface. Intricate track layouts feature hidden shortcuts and weapons dot the track to help make things interesting. The unhinged goofiness of the “LBP” franchise litters the screen, with racetracks designed from cardboard cutouts and customizable karts of every variety. Other karting games encourage pandemonium, with explosions and high-speed turns littering the track, but “LBP Karting” tends to favor more strategic racing, saving weapons until they are most needed and focusing on proper drifting when hitting the curves at high speed. Sometimes you sense that fun is sacrificed for precision. Of course, no “LBP” game stops at the story mode. Creating and sharing your own levels and minigames is a franchise staple. But viewing the complex tutorial for level creation takes longer than watching some Hollywood films. This leaves gamers relying on others with more time and skill to share their creations. “LBP” games thrive on strong user-generated content, and “Karting” will need dedicated fans for it to have staying power. n Follow Chris Campbell @campbler or email him at game_on_games@mac.com.

Please recycle this newspaper

Festival

trees

family festival days Saint Joseph Center • 215 North 15th Street • Mount Vernon, WA

Friday, Nov. 23, 2012 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Sunday, Nov. 25, 2012 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

sponsored by

Admission

Skagit State Bank Thomas Cuisine Management

Adults - $5 Kids 18 and under - $3 Seniors - $2

Advertising sponsor

Festival proceeds benefit Cardiac Care Services/ Special Observation Unit at Skagit Valley Hospital. For more information, call (360) 814-5747.

SKAGIT VALLEY

HOSPITAL

For more information call 360-814-5747


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E8 - Thursday, November 15, 2012

TRAVEL

New Orleans streetcar line to get Super Bowl debut By CAIN BURDEAU Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS — With the Super Bowl less than three months away, New Orleans is rushing to lay streetcar tracks through one of its busiest corridors to connect by trolley the Louisiana Superdome and the French Quarter. The Big Easy — which will be the site of the big game Feb. 3 — is no stranger to Super Bowls. In the 47 years of game’s history, this will be the 10th time for New Orleans to play host. But this will be the city’s first Super Bowl since Hurricane Katrina struck in August 2005, killing hundreds and leaving 80 percent of the city under water at the time. The snarled traffic, construction crews and flying dust along Loyola Avenue where the new streetcar line is being laid embodies the frantic pace of preparations for the Super Bowl. Streets are being repaved in the French Quarter, the airport is undergoing a major renovation, and crews are fixing sidewalks, lights and potholes. For many locals, the streetcar is seen as more than a show of Super Bowl pizazz. “For anybody who’s trying to cut down on gas, walk out their front door,

go a few blocks and catch the transit system, it’ll be good,” said Robert Miles, a 47-year-old chef at one of the big hotels on Loyola. “It was not a waste of money.” The line will run nearly a mile down Loyola from the Union Passenger Terminal, where Amtrak trains and intercity buses are based, to Canal Street. On Canal Street, travelers will be able to hop onto other streetcars and get to the nearby French Quarter, the National World War II Museum, the Cemetery District, the oaks of Audubon Park, the mansions of St. Charles Avenue and the art museum, golf courses and lagoons of City Park. The last new streetcar line opened in 2004 when the Canal Street streetcar, which had been discontinued in 1964, was restored to service. The riverfront streetcar started service in 1988. Funding comes from a $45 million federal transportation grant. The U.S. Department of Transportation is funding similar lines in other cities to connect long-distance railway travelers to streetcars. The target is a traveler like Lawrence Freeman, a 50-year-old photographer from Seattle. He had recently arrived at the

Workers work on streetcar track construction Nov. 8 on Loyola Avenue in New Orleans. With the Super Bowl less than three months away, New Orleans is rushing to lay streetcar tracks through one of its busiest corridors to connect by trolley the Louisiana Superdome, where the game will be played Feb. 3, and the French Quarter.

Photos by Gerald Herbert / AP

Union Passenger Terminal by train from Washington, getting in late one evening. He walked from the train station to his hotel. “I’m a walker, it was no big deal, except that I don’t know what this area is, I don’t know where I’m going,” he said about his

viewed as a downtown revitalization tool. “Until the streetcar was announced, there was little activity, or anticipation of development along Loyola,” said James Amdal, senior fellow at the Transportation Institute at the University of New Orleans. “That has walk into downtown. “I just definitely changed.” headed for the tall buildThe changes along ings.” Loyola are palpable. If there had been a High-rises that had been streetcar, he said he would empty for years — vacant have taken it. Travelers well before Katrina hit will be able to do just that — are being renovated. by mid-January, when the An upscale supermarket Loyola line is completed. opened nearby and a $75 But the project also is million residential and

retail project called the South Market District is set to start soon. “Streetcars have proven to be an incredible source for revitalizing commercial corridors,” said Rachel Heiligman, executive director of the advocacy group Transport for NOLA. Still, it hasn’t all gone smoothly. The work is running over budget and is behind schedule. The New Orleans Regional Transit Authority pegs the cost at $52 million, about $7 million more than projected.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, November 15, 2012 - E9

TRAVEL “When you open up a street in a city this old you find things that you don’t expect,” said RTA spokeswoman Patrice Bell Mercadel. “This has become more than a streetcar project.” Power company Entergy New Orleans and the city’s sewerage department have been brought in and utilities have had to be relocated. Workers found a petrified cypress log and an old underground ice house no one knew existed, she said. The work also has run into an old arched brick sewer main. Also, some streetcar advocates say putting a line down Loyola was a silly proposition in the first place. “I told them they should have gone down Rampart

Street where there had already been a streetcar line,” said Jack Stewart, a local streetcar historian. He also was unhappy with the decision to place the streetcar tracks on Loyola’s roadway instead of on the median like other streetcars in the city. Even the city’s new master plan calls for streetcars to run on their own lanes separate from vehicular traffic. “It’s a grand mess,” Stewart said. “It’s a streetcar from nowhere to nowhere that will get mired in traffic. During the football game it will not be able to operate because there will be so many cars.” There’s also the fear this project — designed to appeal to downtown tourists— is using up money

Local travel DAY TRIPS: Camano Center is offering the Dickens Carolers Lunch Cruise on Tuesday, Dec. 11, for seniors and others, departing from and returning to the center, 606 Arrowhead Road, Camano Island. Enjoy a holiday feast accompanied by Christmas carolers. $52-$57. Pay by Nov. 26. 360-387-0222 or www.camanocenter. org. SENIOR CENTER TRIPS: Skagit County senior centers offer short, escorted trips departing from and returning to local senior centers. For information, call the Anacortes Senior Center at 360-293-7473 or sign up at your local senior center. Next up: Dim Sum and Then Some!: Thursday, Nov. 29. Visit the Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience and enjoy shopping and a guided tour of Seattle’s historic International District. Lunch included. Wear comfortable, weatherappropriate clothing and sturdy walking shoes. Leave Anacortes Senior Activity Center at 8:30 a.m. or Burlington Senior Center at 9:00 and return around 4:30 to 5 p.m. $82. Victoria, B.C., Holiday Getaway: Tuesday and Wednesday, Dec. 4-5. Head to Victoria via van and ferry and visit Butchart Gardens to see Christmas displays featuring tens of thousands of twinkling lights and festive seasonal decorations; tour Parliament Building and Royal B.C. Museum; enjoy shops, cafes and more within walking distance of the hotel. Leave Burlington Senior Center at 7 a.m. or Anacortes Senior Activ-

that might have been spent on streetcar projects with greater benefits for struggling neighborhoods. For years, plans for a streetcar to run down St. Claude Avenue into the city’s older immigrant neighborhoods have been foiled. “If the priorities are directed to the local resident and the local economy and not the tourist economy, then you strengthen your real city, and you keep it strong for tourism, versus creating a downtown that is increasingly like Disneyland,” said Roberta Brandes Gratz, a New York writer and urban critic who recently bought a house in New Orleans. “If tourism is your most important economic driver, you have a bankruptcy of ideas.”

ity Center at 7:30 a.m. Tuesday, and return around 7 p.m. Wednesday. $249, includes transportation, accommodations, breakfast on Wednesday and all entry fees. Proof of citizenship required (current passport, enhanced driver’s license or NEXUS card). Register by Nov. 19. SHORT TRIPS: Mount Vernon Parks and Recreation offers travel opportunities for participants ages 12 and older (adult supervision required for ages 18 and younger). For information or to register, call 360-336-6215. Next up: Bainbridge Island Winter Artist Studio Tour: 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 30, departing from Hillcrest Park, 1717 S. 13th St., Mount Vernon. Travel by van and ferry to Bainbridge Island for the 29th annual show and sale. Located in unique studios and historic community halls, the tour features work by some 70 artists showcasing pottery, glass, photography, woodworking, paintings, jewelry, fiber arts and more. Nohost lunch. $63-$65. Register by Nov. 21. Country Village and Garden D’Lights: 12:30 to 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 12, departing from Hillcrest Park, 1717 S. 13th St., Mount Vernon. Visit the historic Country Village Shops in Bothell, home to more than 40 boutiques, specialty stores and cafes. After exploring the holiday-decorated shops and enjoying a no-host late lunch/ early dinner, head over to the Garden D’Lights, comprised of more than half a million tiny lights, which transform the Bellevue Botanical Garden into a blossoming winter wonderland. $53-$55. Register by Dec. 5.


E10 Thursday, November 15, 2012

ON STAGE in the Skagit Valley and surrounding area November 15-22

TUNING UP Playing at area venues November 15-21

THURSDAY.15

THURSDAY-SATURDAY.15-17

Amara Grace and Phil Nakano: 7 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/ Main, Conway. 360-445-3000.

“FOOTLOOSE: THE MUSICAL” 7:30 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $10-$40. 360-416-7727, ext. 2, or www.mcintyrehall.org.

Thursday.15

Friday.16

Saturday.17

Sunday.18

MUSIC

COMEDY

COMEDY

MUSIC

“Music from the British Isles”: WWU Wind Symphony, 8 p.m., Performing Arts Center Concert Hall, Western Washington University, Bellingham. Free. 360650-3130 or www.wwu.edu/music.

THEATER

“Footloose: The Musical”: 7:30 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $10-$40. 360-416-7727, ext. 2, or www.mcintyrehall.org. “Motherhood Out Loud”: Anacortes High School Theatre Department, 7:30 p.m., Brodniak Hall, 1600 20th St., Anacortes. Admission by donation. 360-5031369.

Thursday, November 15, 2012 E11

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

33rd annual Seattle International Comedy Competition semifinals: 8 p.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Pacific Showroom, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. $18-$24. 877-275-2448 or www.theskagit. com.

THEATER

“Footloose: The Musical”: 7:30 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $10-$40. 360-416-7727, ext. 2, or www.mcintyrehall.org. “Motherhood Out Loud”: Anacortes High School Theatre Department, 7:30 p.m., Brodniak Hall, 1600 20th St., Anacortes. Admission by donation. 360-5031369. “Murder at Club Babalu”: an “I Love Lucy” murder mystery parody, 7:30 p.m., RiverBelle Theatre, Old Town Grainery, 100 E. Montgomery, Mount Vernon. $40 dinner and show; $30 dessert buffet and show, $20 show only. Reservations required: 360-336-3012 or www.riverbelle dinnertheatre.com.

Chris Alpine, Owen Straw: 8 p.m., Max Dale’s Martini Lounge, 2030 Riverside Drive, Mount Vernon. $10. 360-424-7171 or www.maxdales.com.

MUSIC

“Honky Tonkin’ Hootenanny,” with Marcia Kester, Liam Fitzgerald and The Rainieros, The Hometown Band and more: 7:30 p.m., Historic Everett Theatre, 2911 Colby Ave., Everett. $16.50, $13 seniors and students, $5 for ages 12 and younger. 425-258-6766 or www.redcurtain foundation.org.

THEATER

“Footloose: The Musical”: 7:30 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $10-$40. 360-416-7727, ext. 2, or www.mcintyrehall.org. “Murder at Club Babalu”: an “I Love Lucy” murder mystery parody, 7:30 p.m., RiverBelle Theatre, Old Town Grainery, 100 E. Montgomery, Mount Vernon. $40 dinner and show; $30 dessert buffet and show, $20 show only. Reservations required: 360-336-3012 or www.riverbelle dinnertheatre.com.

Holiday Concert: Western Washington University Concert Choir and Advanced Women’s Chorale, 3 and 7 p.m., St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 2117 Walnut St., Bellingham. $10-$15. 360-650-6146 or www. tickets.wwu.edu.

Monday-Thursday.19-22 No local events submitted

FRIDAY.16

WEDNESDAY.21

TONY & THE TIGERS 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Varsity Inn, 112 N. Cherry St., Burlington. No cover. 360-755-0165.

SPOONSHINE DUO 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-588-1720.

FRIDAY.16 Kimball & The Fugitives, with Stickshift Annie: 8 p.m., Big Rock Café & Grocery, 14779 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-4247872.

Tony & The Tigers: 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Varsity Inn, 112 N. Cherry St., Burlington. No cover. 360-7550165.

Steve Meyer and Ben Starner (piano): 7:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360766-6266.

Dirty Rice: 9 p.m. to midnight, Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360588-1720.

Jammin’ Jeff: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

Buckaroo Blues (country, rock, blues): 9 p.m. to midnight, Cyndy’s Broiler, 27021 102nd Ave NW, Stanwood. 360-6294800 or www. cyndysbroiler. com.

Nick Vigarino’s Back Porch Stomp: 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $7. 360445-3000.

Chris Eger Band: Producer’s Night — Blues Brothers style!: 6:30 to 9:30 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. Ages 21 and older. Proceeds benefit the Lincoln. $25-$35. 360-336-8955 or www.lincolntheatre.org.

Sera Cahoone, The Parson Red Heads, Thimble vs Needle: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $8-$10. 360-778-1067.

Massy Ferguson: 8:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-7666266.

Jon Mutchler (piano): 6 to 9 p.m., Stars Restaurant at Semiahmoo Resort, 9565 Semiahmoo Parkway, Blaine. www. semiahmoo.com.

Jasmine Green: 9 p.m. to midnight, Packers Lounge at Semiahmoo Resort, 9565 Semiahmoo Parkway, Blaine. www. semiahmoo.com.

CD Woodbury: 9 p.m. to midnight, Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-5881720.

Little Big Band: 9:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave. 360-7553956.

Jammin’ Jeff: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

Buckaroo Blues (country, rock, blues): 9 p.m. to midnight, Cyndy’s Broiler, 27021 102nd Ave NW, Stanwood. 360-6294800 or www. cyndysbroiler. com.

Alice Stuart & The Formerlys (blues): 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $10. 360-445-3000.

Art Vandelay, The Hashtronaut, White Licorice: 9 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. 360-778-1067.

SATURDAY.17 Curtis Salgado, Bobby Holland and Breadline: 8 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $15-$27. Proceeds benefit the Rick Epting Foundation for the Arts. 360-336-8955 or www.lincoln theatre.org.

SUNDAY.18 Ron Bailey: 5:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-766-6266.

TUESDAY.20 Sunday Jam with Terry Nelson & Lumpkins, Go Slowpoke, Sarah in Ben Starner (piano): 6:30 p.m., the Wild: 9 p.m., The Shakedown, Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Friends: Patti Allen (vocals), Rich Rorex (guitar) and Wedge Michaels 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $3. Conway. $5. 360-445-3000. (drums). Station House, 325 E. 360-778-1067.

Morris, La Conner. 360-466-4488.

WEDNESDAY.21 Spoonshine Duo: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-588-1720.


E10 Thursday, November 15, 2012

ON STAGE in the Skagit Valley and surrounding area November 15-22

TUNING UP Playing at area venues November 15-21

THURSDAY.15

THURSDAY-SATURDAY.15-17

Amara Grace and Phil Nakano: 7 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/ Main, Conway. 360-445-3000.

“FOOTLOOSE: THE MUSICAL” 7:30 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $10-$40. 360-416-7727, ext. 2, or www.mcintyrehall.org.

Thursday.15

Friday.16

Saturday.17

Sunday.18

MUSIC

COMEDY

COMEDY

MUSIC

“Music from the British Isles”: WWU Wind Symphony, 8 p.m., Performing Arts Center Concert Hall, Western Washington University, Bellingham. Free. 360650-3130 or www.wwu.edu/music.

THEATER

“Footloose: The Musical”: 7:30 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $10-$40. 360-416-7727, ext. 2, or www.mcintyrehall.org. “Motherhood Out Loud”: Anacortes High School Theatre Department, 7:30 p.m., Brodniak Hall, 1600 20th St., Anacortes. Admission by donation. 360-5031369.

Thursday, November 15, 2012 E11

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

33rd annual Seattle International Comedy Competition semifinals: 8 p.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Pacific Showroom, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. $18-$24. 877-275-2448 or www.theskagit. com.

THEATER

“Footloose: The Musical”: 7:30 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $10-$40. 360-416-7727, ext. 2, or www.mcintyrehall.org. “Motherhood Out Loud”: Anacortes High School Theatre Department, 7:30 p.m., Brodniak Hall, 1600 20th St., Anacortes. Admission by donation. 360-5031369. “Murder at Club Babalu”: an “I Love Lucy” murder mystery parody, 7:30 p.m., RiverBelle Theatre, Old Town Grainery, 100 E. Montgomery, Mount Vernon. $40 dinner and show; $30 dessert buffet and show, $20 show only. Reservations required: 360-336-3012 or www.riverbelle dinnertheatre.com.

Chris Alpine, Owen Straw: 8 p.m., Max Dale’s Martini Lounge, 2030 Riverside Drive, Mount Vernon. $10. 360-424-7171 or www.maxdales.com.

MUSIC

“Honky Tonkin’ Hootenanny,” with Marcia Kester, Liam Fitzgerald and The Rainieros, The Hometown Band and more: 7:30 p.m., Historic Everett Theatre, 2911 Colby Ave., Everett. $16.50, $13 seniors and students, $5 for ages 12 and younger. 425-258-6766 or www.redcurtain foundation.org.

THEATER

“Footloose: The Musical”: 7:30 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $10-$40. 360-416-7727, ext. 2, or www.mcintyrehall.org. “Murder at Club Babalu”: an “I Love Lucy” murder mystery parody, 7:30 p.m., RiverBelle Theatre, Old Town Grainery, 100 E. Montgomery, Mount Vernon. $40 dinner and show; $30 dessert buffet and show, $20 show only. Reservations required: 360-336-3012 or www.riverbelle dinnertheatre.com.

Holiday Concert: Western Washington University Concert Choir and Advanced Women’s Chorale, 3 and 7 p.m., St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 2117 Walnut St., Bellingham. $10-$15. 360-650-6146 or www. tickets.wwu.edu.

Monday-Thursday.19-22 No local events submitted

FRIDAY.16

WEDNESDAY.21

TONY & THE TIGERS 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Varsity Inn, 112 N. Cherry St., Burlington. No cover. 360-755-0165.

SPOONSHINE DUO 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-588-1720.

FRIDAY.16 Kimball & The Fugitives, with Stickshift Annie: 8 p.m., Big Rock Café & Grocery, 14779 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-4247872.

Tony & The Tigers: 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Varsity Inn, 112 N. Cherry St., Burlington. No cover. 360-7550165.

Steve Meyer and Ben Starner (piano): 7:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360766-6266.

Dirty Rice: 9 p.m. to midnight, Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360588-1720.

Jammin’ Jeff: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

Buckaroo Blues (country, rock, blues): 9 p.m. to midnight, Cyndy’s Broiler, 27021 102nd Ave NW, Stanwood. 360-6294800 or www. cyndysbroiler. com.

Nick Vigarino’s Back Porch Stomp: 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $7. 360445-3000.

Chris Eger Band: Producer’s Night — Blues Brothers style!: 6:30 to 9:30 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. Ages 21 and older. Proceeds benefit the Lincoln. $25-$35. 360-336-8955 or www.lincolntheatre.org.

Sera Cahoone, The Parson Red Heads, Thimble vs Needle: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $8-$10. 360-778-1067.

Massy Ferguson: 8:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-7666266.

Jon Mutchler (piano): 6 to 9 p.m., Stars Restaurant at Semiahmoo Resort, 9565 Semiahmoo Parkway, Blaine. www. semiahmoo.com.

Jasmine Green: 9 p.m. to midnight, Packers Lounge at Semiahmoo Resort, 9565 Semiahmoo Parkway, Blaine. www. semiahmoo.com.

CD Woodbury: 9 p.m. to midnight, Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-5881720.

Little Big Band: 9:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave. 360-7553956.

Jammin’ Jeff: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

Buckaroo Blues (country, rock, blues): 9 p.m. to midnight, Cyndy’s Broiler, 27021 102nd Ave NW, Stanwood. 360-6294800 or www. cyndysbroiler. com.

Alice Stuart & The Formerlys (blues): 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $10. 360-445-3000.

Art Vandelay, The Hashtronaut, White Licorice: 9 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. 360-778-1067.

SATURDAY.17 Curtis Salgado, Bobby Holland and Breadline: 8 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $15-$27. Proceeds benefit the Rick Epting Foundation for the Arts. 360-336-8955 or www.lincoln theatre.org.

SUNDAY.18 Ron Bailey: 5:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-766-6266.

TUESDAY.20 Sunday Jam with Terry Nelson & Lumpkins, Go Slowpoke, Sarah in Ben Starner (piano): 6:30 p.m., the Wild: 9 p.m., The Shakedown, Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Friends: Patti Allen (vocals), Rich Rorex (guitar) and Wedge Michaels 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $3. Conway. $5. 360-445-3000. (drums). Station House, 325 E. 360-778-1067.

Morris, La Conner. 360-466-4488.

WEDNESDAY.21 Spoonshine Duo: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-588-1720.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E12 - Thursday, November 15, 2012

GET INVOLVED ART

pickup two weeks after the workshop. For children ages 6 to 12 and adults of all ages. $75 per parent/child pair, $30 each additional child. Includes clay, glazes and firing. john

CALL FOR CRAFTERS: The Skagit Valley Eagles Auxiliary seeks vendors for its Christmas Craft Bazaar, set for 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 1, at 119 N. Cherry St., Burlington. Tables are MR. YUK POSTER CONTEST: available for $10 plus one donated Young Washington artists ages 6 item for the Auxiliary table. 360to 12 are invited to create poison 391-9741. safety-awareness posters for the Washington Poison Center’s 2012 ART CLASSES Mr. Yuk Poster Contest. Entries on the theme “Be Safe With Mr. FAMILY ART DAYS AT MoNA: Yuk!” must be postmarked by Jan. Skagit Artists Together and the 4, 2013. A $500 grand prize and Museum of Northwest Art offer four $100 runner-up prizes will be Family Art Days each month at awarded. All contest participants MoNA, 121 S. First St., La Conner. Sessions are open to all ages will receive a small gift from Mr. and skill levels and include guided Yuk in the mail. The winning design will be featured as the walk-throughs of MoNA exhibiposter for Washington Poison Pretions. Limited to 15 participants vention Week in March. Contest per session. rules and the required entry form To register: 360-466-4446, ext. are available online at www.wapc. 108, or FAD@museumofnwart. org. org. Information: www.museumofnwart.org. Workshops are free ART CLASSES: Sign up for a with museum admission. Admisvariety of art classes at A Guilsion: $8 adults, $5 seniors, $3 students, free for members and ages ded Gallery (formerly Gallery by the Bay), 8700 271st St. NW, 11 and younger. Stanwood. To register, stop by the Next up: Stanwood Camano Art Guild’s Make a Star Book and Ornacooperative gallery from 10 a.m. ment: with Mary Quintrall, 11 to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Satura.m. to 1 p.m. or 2 to 4 p.m. Satday. 360-629-2787 or www.stan urday, Nov. 17. Use collage techwoodcamanoarts.com. niques to create unique papers, Next up: then turn them into a one-of-aHoliday Ikebana, Japanese kind book, which doubles as a Flower Arranging: 11 a.m. to 2 holiday decoration. p.m. Saturday, Nov. 17. $20. ART CLASSES: Dakota Art PAPER PLAYSHOPS: Join Kari offers a variety of art classes and workshops at 17873 Highway 536, Bishay to get creative and “play Mount Vernon. 360-416-6556, ext. with stuff” at the Anacortes Center for Happiness, 619 Commer5, or www.dakotaartcenter.com. cial Ave., Anacortes. Workshops are held from 2 to 4 p.m. Sundays. CLAY CLASSES: Ceramic artist Sue Roberts offers a variety of All materials are provided. $15 each, $40 for all three. Preregisclasses and workshops at Tower Arts Studio, 5424 S. Shore Drive, tration required: 360-464-2229 or Guemes Island. For information, www.anacortescenterforhappi ness.org. call 360-293-8878 or visit www. Next up: towerartsstudio.com. Little Books: Nov. 18. Create Next up: Parent & Child Clay Workshop: and embellish three different 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Nov. little books: a perfect little photo 17. A child and their special adult album, a notebook made with recycled papers and a third one will learn basic hand-building that opens up to form a star. techniques and surface decoration while working together on ART AT THE Y: PAINTING: 4:30 animal-inspired mugs and plates. Pieces will be fired and ready for to 6 p.m. or 6:15 to 7:45 p.m. Mon-

days and Wednesdays through Dec. 5 at the Skagit Valley Family YMCA, 215 E. Fulton St., Mount Vernon. Kids will learn the basics of painting with watercolors. $50 members, $65 program members. 360-336-9622 or www.skagitymca. org. CARTOONING FOR KIDS: 4 to 6 p.m. Tuesdays, Nov. 27-Dec. 18, Burlington Parks and Recreation Center, 900 E. Fairhaven Ave., Burlington. Kids ages 7 to 12 will learn basic drawing skills and leave with a portfolio of their favorite cartoon characters. $40, includes supplies. Register by Nov. 20: 360-755-9649.

AUDITIONS “ARMS AND THE MAN: AN ANTI-ROMANTIC COMEDY”: The Alger Lookout Thespian Association will hold auditions at 6:30 p.m. Saturday, and 3 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 17-18, at Alger Community Church, 1475 Silver Run Lane, Alger. Parts are available for five men and three women in this wartime romance that satirizes both the glory of the battle and a young girl’s idealistic notions of love. The play will run Jan. 25-Feb. 10, 2013. For information call 360424-5144 or visit www.altatheatre. com.

will run March 29-April 27. 360293-4373 or www.acttheatre.com.

TURKEY TROT 5K RACE: Registration will begin at 7:30 a.m. and the fifth annual race will get under way at 8 a.m. Thanksgiving DANCE day, Thursday, Nov. 22, at La ConCONTRA DANCE: 7 to 9:30 p.m. ner Middle School, 305 N. Sixth Saturday, Dec. 1, at the Depot St., La Conner. Participants preArts Center, 611 R Ave., Anadict their running time, with prizes cortes. Learn the fundamentals of for those finishing closest to their contra dance and practice dancing predictions. No watches (or other to live music. No partner needed. timepieces) allowed. $15 per $8 at the door. 360-755-3969 or racer, $30 families. 360-466-4778 www.skagitcontra.org. or www.laconnerchamber.com. BELLY DANCING CLASSES: 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Thursdays, through Jan. 17, at Physical, Occupational & Speech Therapy at Island Hospital, 1015 25th St., Anacortes. No experience required. Attend any or all classes. $12 per class. To register, call 360299-4204.

MUSIC FREE MUSIC JAMS: Come and play or just watch the fun at Cyndy’s Broiler, 27021 102nd Ave. NW, Stanwood. Free for participants and spectators. Teen Jam: 7 p.m. second and fourth Tuesday each month. Jam Night: 8 p.m. Thursdays. 360-629-4800 or www.cyndysbroiler.com. OPEN MIC: Share your music or enjoy the musical talents of others at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 29, at the Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. 360-4453000 or www.theconwaymuse. com.

THEATER THEATER CLASSES: Anacortes Community Theatre’s Class Act School for the Performing Arts is enrolling kids from preschool through 12th grade for winter classes on acting and theater arts. Classes are held at ACT, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. 360-293-6829 or www.acttheatre.com/classact

WORKSHOPS QUILTING FOR BEGINNERS: Learn how to hand quilt from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Mondays at the Concrete Center, 45821 Railroad Ave., Concrete. Bring a flat edge thimble, round-needle puller, small scissors and No. 9 go-betweens quilting needles. Tips and technique how-tos on the last Monday each month. 360-853-8400.

WREATH-MAKING: Learn how to make holiday wreaths at these workshops at Christianson’s Nursery, 15806 Best Road, Mount Vernon. For information or to register, call 360-466-3821 or visit www.christiansonsnursery.com. RECREATION Holiday Wreath Making: 11 RESTORE SALMON HABITAT: a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 24. Help Skagit Fisheries EnhanceUse wreath-making machines and ment Group restore local salmon get help from Rachel Anderson and Lily Hirdler of Christianson’s habitat at scheduled planting Nursery. Five one-hour classes parties. Dress for the weather and bring knee boots and gloves. offered. The cost of one wreath Snacks and porta-potties provid- form is included in the class fee. Wear warm clothing and bring ed. To sign up, call 360-336-0172 “LEGALLY BLONDE”: Auditions or email sfeg@skagitfisheries.org. pruners and gardening gloves. $5. Reservations required. Next up: will be held from 2 to 5 p.m. SatIndependent Wreath Making: Saturday, Nov. 17: 10 a.m. to urday and 6 to 8 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 1 p.m., Howard Miller Steelhead 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily, Nov. 25-Dec. 15-16, at Anacortes Community Park, 52804 Rockport Park Road, 24, south greenhouse. Wire rings Theatre, 911 M Ave., Anacortes. Parts are available for 16 women Rockport. Follow signs for park- and greenery are available for purchase, or you may bring your and seven men, young to middle ing at the west end of the park own. Complimentary. Reservaaged. Music and scripts are avail- and sign in at the blue SFEG tions required. able in the ACT office. The play tent. “QUILTERS”: Auditions for the musical will be held at 7 p.m. Sunday and Monday, Dec. 2-3, at the Bellingham Theatre Guild, 1600 H St., Bellingham. Parts are available for seven women ages 15 to 65. Must be able to harmonize and read sheet music. Prepare 16-32 bars of a folk or musical theater song; be prepared for cold reads, improvisation and dance. The play will run Jan. 25-Feb. 10. For information, contact director Mish Kriz or visit www.bellinghamtheatre guild.com.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, November 15, 2012 - E13

Thanksgiving meals in the area Meals to be served before Thanksgiving Day: SKAGIT VALLEY: Area senior centers will serve Thanksgiving lunch today, Nov. 15: 11:30 a.m. at Anacortes, Burlington and Sedro-Woolley; noon at Concrete and Mount Vernon. The menu includes roast turkey with stuffing, mashed potatoes and gravy, and pumpkin pie. $3.50-$5.50 suggested donation for seniors, $2.50 for grandchildren, $6 for nonseniors. Reservations requested: Anacortes, 360-293-7473; Burlington, 360-755-0102; Concrete, 360-853-8400; Mount Vernon, 360-336-5757; SedroWoolley, 360-855-1531. Meals to be served on Thanksgiving Day: ANACORTES: Anacortes Eagles Aerie 249 will serve Thanksgiving dinner from noon to 4 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 22, at Eagles Hall, 901 Seventh St., Anacortes. Meals will also be delivered to Meals on Wheels clients, families in

need and others. Free, but donations accepted. To volunteer or sign up for meal delivery, call 360-293-3012. OAK HARBOR: The traditional Thanksgiving dinner will be served from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 22, at the Oak Harbor Elks Lodge, 155 NE Ernst St. The menu includes roasted, deep-fried and smoked turkey and all of the trimmings. Free, but donations accepted. SEDRO-WOOLLEY: The annual SedroWoolley Community Thanksgiving Dinner will be held from 12:30 to 3 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 22, at Cascade Middle School, 201 N. Township St., SedroWoolley. The dinner is free to all members of the community. Family-style seating. Handicap accessible. Donations accepted. For information, to volunteer or make a donation, contact Stephanie at 360-855-0231 or email slokkebo@ yahoo.com.

POP CULTURE Q&A

No more Miami for ‘CSI’; ‘Top Shot’ host costs in recent seasons.” CBS moved “The Mentalist” into “Miami’s” Sunday slot with Q: Is “CSI: Miami” going the hope that the younger to come back on the air? series could draw and keep A: I have received several an audience. questions about the fate of Fans of “Miami” noted the CBS drama starring that its ratings were about David Caruso. This may tell the same as companion you something about how we show “CSI: NY,” which was view the TV season — wait- renewed, and a top CBS ing until as late as November executive said that when it before we think a network came time to decide which schedule is finally set (and of those CSIs to keep, “it was then bracing for more chang- almost a jump ball.” “NY” es in the new year). got the nod because it fit well But to answer the queswith another Friday show, tion, the series has been the New York-set “Blue canceled, without hope for Bloods,” and CBS had hopes reprieve. The DVD set of for a geographically themed the 10th-season episodes night on Fridays by adding from 2011-12 proclaims it’s “Made in Jersey” to the mix. “the final season.” When But as I noted in a previous the show’s demise was mailbag, “Made in Jersey” announced in May, the proved unsuccessful. Los Angeles Times noted the show “had dealt with Q: Colby Donaldson hosts depressed ratings and “Top Shot” on the History sharply increased production channel. What is his own By RICH HELDENFELS Akron Beacon Journal

experience with guns? A: In the series’ companion book, also called “Top Shot,” Donaldson says this of his shooting experience: “I learned to shoot when I was 6 years old and that experience is one of my best childhood memories. My father taught me on a Winchester single-shot .22 rifle that was the first gun that he bought when he was a kid. I’ve been into guns ever since.” The series has done well for History, and Donaldson tweeted recently that a fifth season has completed production for an air date to be determined. People who do not watch “Top Shot” may remember Donaldson as a contestant on “Survivor,” where he was the runner-up in the second season and returned for the “All Stars and Heroes Vs. Villains” seasons.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E14 - Thursday, November 15, 2012

HOT TICKETS KRIS ORLOWSKI, BENJAMIN FRANCIS LEFTWICH: Nov. 15, Tractor Tavern, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.livenation.com. 33RD ANNUAL SEATTLE INTERNATIONAL COMEDY COMPETITION SEMIFINALS: Nov. 16, Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Bow. 877-275-2448 or www.theskagit.com. J. BOOG: Nov. 16, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.show boxonline.com. MINUS THE BEAR: Nov. 17, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-7453000 or www.showboxonline.com. BEN GIBBARD: Nov. 17, Washington Hall, Seattle. www.washington hall.org. TOOTS AND THE MAYTALS: Nov. 17, Edmonds Center for the Arts, Edmonds. 425-275-9595 or www. ec4arts.org. THE INTERNET: Nov. 18, The Crocodile, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com. ASKING ALEXANDRIA: Nov. 20, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-7453000 or www.showboxonline.com. DETHKLOK: Nov. 23, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.show boxonline.com. TRANS-SIBERIAN ORCHESTRA: Nov. 24, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-7453000 or www.livenation.com. GREEN DAY: Nov. 26, Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849, www.livenation.com. WALK OFF THE EARTH: Nov. 26, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showbox online.com. BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN & THE E STREET BAND: Nov. 28, Rose Garden Arena, Portland, Ore. 800-7453000, www.livenation.com. THE IRISH ROVERS: Nov. 29, Edmonds Center for the Arts, Edmonds. 425-275-9595 or www. ec4arts.org. DEATH GRIPS: Nov. 29, The Crocodile, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www. ticketmaster.com. BLUE SCHOLARS: Nov. 30, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-7453000 or www.showboxonline.com. DON MCLEAN: Nov. 30-Dec. 1, Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Bow. $40-$55. 877-275-2448 or www. theskagit.com. “BABY, IT’S COLD OUTSIDE”: Seattle Men’s Chorus, Nov. 30-Dec. 22, Benaroya Hall, Seattle. 206-3881400 or www.seattlemenschorus. org. ADAM CAROLLA, DENNIS PRAGER: Dec. 1, Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or www.live

AT THE LINCOLN THEATRE nation.com. THE KILLERS, M83, METRIC: “Deck the Hall Ball 2012”: Dec. 4, Key Arena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com. JOHN CALE: Dec. 6, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. THE CAVE SINGERS: Dec. 7, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxon line.com. THE TRAGICALLY HIP: Dec. 7, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-7453000 or www.showboxonline.com. “THE NUTCRACKER”: Northwest Ballet Theater: Dec. 14-16, Mount Baker Theatre, Bellingham. 360-7346080 or www.mountbakertheatre. com. THE CLASSIC CRIME: Dec. 15, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxon line.com. LAMB OF GOD: Dec. 16, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxon line.com. JINGLE BALL: featuring Calvin Harris, Afrojack, Ed Sheeran, 3OH!3, Owl City, Alex Clare, Cher Lloyd: Dec. 16, WaMu Theater, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster. com. THE MOUNTAIN GOATS: Dec. 17, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxon line.com. MOSCOW BOYS CHOIR: Dec. 18, Edmonds Center for the Arts, Edmonds. 425-275-9595 or www. ec4arts.org. 2 CHAINZ: Dec. 21, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. ZEDS DEAD: Dec. 26, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. PICKWICK: Dec. 31, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. RESOLUTION 2013: featuring DOCTOR P, MORD FUSTANG, RUSKO, W&W: Dec. 31, WaMu Theater, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com. LADY GAGA: Jan. 14, 2013, Tacoma Dome, Tacoma. 800-745-3000 or www.livenation.com. CIRQUE ZIVA: Jan. 17, Edmonds Center for the Arts, Edmonds. 425275-9595 or www.ec4arts.org. DOWN: Jan. 22, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. PINBACK: Jan. 23, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com.

“AMALUNA”: Cirque du Soleil: Jan. 31-Feb. 24, 2013, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 800-450-1480 or www.cirquedusoleil.com. THE SONICS, MUDHONEY: Feb. 2, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxon line.com. ELLIE GOULDING: Feb. 4, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. INTERNATIONAL GUITAR NIGHT: Feb. 6, Edmonds Center for the Arts, Edmonds. 425-275-9595 or www. ec4arts.org. SOUNDGARDEN: Feb. 7-8, The Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877784-4849 or www.livenation.com. SUPER DIAMOND (Tribute to Neil Diamond): Feb. 9, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. PILOBOLUS: Feb. 16, Edmonds Center for the Arts, Edmonds. 425275-9595 or www.ec4arts.org. HARLEM GLOBETROTTERS: Feb. 17, Comcast Arena at Everett. 866332-8499 or www.comcastarena everett.com. MICHAEL KAESHAMMER: Feb. 22, Edmonds Center for the Arts, Edmonds. 425-275-9595 or www. ec4arts.org. COHEED AND CAMBRIA, BETWEEN THE BURED AND ME: Feb. 19, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxon line.com. BLIND BOYS OF ALABAMA: March 9, Edmonds Center for the Arts, Edmonds. 425-275-9595 or www.ec4arts.org. MAROON 5, WITH NEON TREES & OWL CITY: March 11, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.live nation.com. LADYSMITH BLACK MAMBAZO: March 13, Edmonds Center for the Arts, Edmonds. 425-275-9595 or www.ec4arts.org. BRIAN REGAN: March 13, Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877-7844849 or www.livenation.com. SARAH BRIGHTMAN: March 22, 2013, Comcast Area at Everett. 866332-8499 or www.livenation.com. RIHANNA DIAMONDS WORLD TOUR: April 3, 2013, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.livenation. com. NANCI GRIFFITH: April 5, Edmonds Center for the Arts, Edmonds. 425-275-9595 or www. ec4arts.org. ONE DIRECTION: July 28, 2013, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.livenation.com.

712 S. First St., Mount Vernon 360-336-8955 n www.lincolntheatre.org

Chris Eger

‘Producer’s Night 2012’ 6:30-9:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 16

Join the Lincoln Theatre board and staff for “Producer’s Night,” which will include a live and silent auction (including an auction for producing rights to such upcoming events as International Guitar Night, Janis Ian, National Theatre Live, and The Met: Live in HD), hors d’oeuvres, drinks, and a chance to win one of many prizes. Music by the Chris Eger Band; appropriate dress and dancing encouraged but not required. Soul food hors d’oeuvres will include fried chicken and plain white toast, the favorites of Joliet Jake and Elwood Blues, the Blues Brothers. Tickets: $25 advance; $35 at the door. Ages 21 and over.

Curtis Salgado

8 p.m. Saturday, Nov 17 The Rick Epting Foundation for the Arts (REFA) celebrates Epting’s 70th birthday, featuring 2012 Soul Blues Artist of the Year, Curtis Salgado. The opening act will be local favorites Bobby Holland and Breadline. Salgado is a Northwest blues icon who effortlessly mixes soul, funk and R & B, with a delivery that is raw and heartfelt. Born in Everett, the Northwest native moves with ease from ballads to the most full-throated stompers. Reserved seating: $27, $23, $19 and $15.

The Met Live in HD: ‘The Tempest’ 1 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 18

Composer Thomas Adès conducts the Metropolitan Opera premiere of his own work, with baritone Simon Keenlyside starring as Prospero. Director Robert Lepage recreates the interior of 18th-century La Scala in this inventive staging. Includes pre-opera lecture with Stassya Pacheco 30 minutes before the start time. $23 adults; $19 seniors; $16 students and children with $2 off for Lincoln members.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, November 15, 2012 - E15

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Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E16 - Thursday, November 15, 2012

MOVIES

‘Anna Karenina’ too extravagant for its own good

A

nna Karenina and Madame Bovary are two of the most notorious fallen women in literature. Karenina is prepared to lose all the advantages of high society in favor of the man she loves. Bovary abandons the man who loves her in an attempt to social Roger climb. As portrayed by Ebert Leo Tolstoy and Gustave Flaubert, both are devastated by the prices they pay. These are two of the great roles for many actresses, and irresistible challenges for many filmmakers. There have been 25 film versions of Karenina, most famously by Greta Garbo (1927 and 1935) and Vivien Leigh, and nine of Bovary, notably by Isabelle Huppert, Jennifer Jones and Pola Negri; Mia Wasikowska will play her next year. I mention these details to ask myself: What makes the two roles so enticing every good actress must sooner or later read the novels and start to daydream? Both are mothers who essentially choose to abandon their single children. Both are the center of attention and gossip within their own circles. Both use opera houses as a stage for their affairs. Both pay dearly for their adulteries. The big difference is that Karenina is driven by sincere passion, and Bovary by selfishness and greed. Kar-

enina inspires pity; Bovary gets what she deserves. In Joe Wright’s daringly stylized new version of “Anna Karenina,” he returns for the third time to use Keira Knightley as his heroine. She is almost distractingly beautiful here, and elegantly gowned to an improbable degree. One practical reason for that: As much as half of Wright’s film is staged within an actual theater, and uses not only the stage but the boxes and even the main floor — with seats removed — to present the action. We see the actors in the wings, the stage machinery, the trickery with backdrops, horses galloping across in a steeplechase. All the world’s a stage, and we but players on it. Yes, and particularly in Karenina’s case because she fails to realize how true that is. She makes choices that are unacceptable in the high society of St. Petersburg and Moscow, and behaves as if they were invisible. She doesn’t seem to realize the audience is right there and paying close attention. She believes she can flaunt the rules and get away with it. When we meet her she is the pretty young wife of the important government minister Karenin (Jude Law). He is affectionate, but dry and remote. The love she lacks for him she lavishes on their 8-year-old son. At the train station to meet Dolly, the wife of her brother, Count Oblonsky (Matthew Macfadyen), she sees the dashing young officer Vronsky (Aaron Taylor-Johnson).

MINI-REVIEWS Compiled from news services. Ratings are one to four stars.

Jude Law and Keira Knightley star in “Anna Karenina.” Focus Features via AP

Anna’s husband is not blind, and soon knows about her affair. He is very firm. HH1⁄2 If they continue (affairs Anna Karenina.....................................Keira Knightley are not unknown in their Karenin.......................................................Jude Law circle), she must be discreet Vronsky...................................... Aaron Taylor-Johnson and secretive. Anna’s heart Dolly................................................ Kelly Macdonald is too aflame to conceal Oblonsky..................................... Matthew Macfadyen Levin..............................................Domhnall Gleeson her love with Vronsky, and Princess Betsy Tverskoy...........................Ruth Wilson pays the price of separation Kitty....................................................Alicia Vikander from her husband and her Countess Vronsky................................ Olivia Williams beloved son. Society is satisCountess Lydia Ivanova..........................Emily Watson fied. She has sinned, and n Running time: 129 minutes. MPAA rating: R (for she has been punished. Her some sexuality and violence). punishment is far from over, and the lesson she dearly learns is that passion may For both of them it’s love for Tolstoy was the third at first sight. He seems very major character and certain- be temporary, but scandal is young, and perhaps not ly the most attractive. Levin permanent. This is a sumptuous film, schooled in society’s rules. represents Tolstoy’s ideas in She should know better. the novel: He is for abolish- extravagantly staged and photographed, perhaps too All society appears in ing serfdom and liberating much so for its own good. public at the opera and his own serfs and has a grand balls (both staged by near-mystical bond with the There are times when it is Wright in the theater), and land and its cultivation. He not quite clear if we are after Anna and Vronsky hopes to marry Kitty (Alicia looking at characters in a meet at a ball, the die is cast. Vikander), who has a crush story or players on a stage. Productions can sometimes In this film Wright and his on Vronsky, but at the ball upstage a story, but when screenwriter, Tom Stoppard, Vronsky has eyes only for the story is as considerable make adequate room for Anna, and the outcome as “Anna Karenina,” that a landowner named Levin is happiness for Kitty and can be a miscalculation. (Domhnall Gleeson), who Levin.

‘ANNA KARENINA’

“Argo” — Ben Affleck directs and stars in the incredible true story of how, at the height of the Iranian hostage crisis, a CIA agent and a couple of Hollywood professionals dreamed up a cockamamie scheme to free six Americans who were not being held in the American Embassy but had found refuge with the Canadian Embassy. Kept top secret for 18 years, the operation created a fake sci-fi production named “Argo,” convinced the Iranians it was real and used it to spirit the Americans out of the country. With lots of tension and also some humor from John Goodman and Alan Arkin as the Hollywood pros involved. Drama, R, 120 minutes. HHHH “Flight” — After opening with one of the most terrifying flying scenes I’ve witnessed, in which an airplane is saved by being flown upside-down, Robert Zemeckis’ “Flight” segues into a brave and tortured performance by Denzel Washington -- one of his very best. Not often does a movie character make such a harrowing personal journey that keeps us in deep sympathy all of the way. Washington plays a veteran commercial pilot who has built up a tolerance for quantities of alcohol and cocaine that would be lethal for most people. Drama, R, 138 minutes. HHHH

“Lincoln” — Steven Spielberg’s new film focuses on only a few months of Lincoln’s life, including the passage of the 13th Amendment ending slavery, the surrender of the Confederacy and his assassination. Rarely has a film attended more carefully to the details of politics. Daniel Day-Lewis creates a Lincoln who is calmly self-confident, patient and willing to play politics in a realistic way. Not about an icon of history, but about a president who was scorned by some of his opponents as a hayseed from the backwoods. He understood them better than they did him. Sure to win many Academy Award nominations. Drama, PG-13, 149 minutes. HHHH


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, November 15, 2012 - E17

MOVIES “Silver Linings Playbook” — Pat (Bradley Cooper) is confident and upbeat for a man just released from a mental hospital and under a restraining order from his wife. He’s determined to surprise everyone by moving ever onward and upward. What stage of bipolar disorder would you guess he’s in? His parents (Robert De Niro and Jacki Weaver) are wellmeaning but dubious. A prickly neighborhood widow (Jennifer Lawrence) wants to sleep with him and is offended that he’s interested only because she’s in touch with his ex-wife. This all somehow comes down to intersecting bets about a football game and a ballroom dance contest. Comedy-drama, R, 122 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “Sinister” — A story made of darkness, mysterious loud bangs in the attic, distant moans from the dead, vulnerable children, an egomaniacal crime writer and his longsuffering wife, who is plenty fed up -- even before she discovers he has moved his family into the same house where horrifying murders took place. Ethan Hawke stars as the best-selling true crime writer, Juliet Rylance is his

increasingly alarmed wife and their children experience night terrors and sleepwalking. Few films have ever been bathed in so much darkness. Thriller, R, 109 minutes. HHH “Skyfall” — “Skyfall” triumphantly reinvents 007 in one of the best Bonds ever made. This is a full-blooded, joyous, intelligent celebration of a beloved cultural icon, with Daniel Craig taking full possession of a role he earlier played unconvincingly. The film at last provides a role worthy of Judi Dench, returning as M, who is one of the best actors of her generation. She is all but the co-star, with a lot of screen time, poignant dialogue, and a character who is far more complex and sympathetic than we expect. In this 50th year of the James Bond series, with the dismal “Quantum of Solace” (2008) still in our minds, I don’t know what I expected in Bond No. 23, but certainly not an experience this invigorating. If you haven’t seen a 007 for years, this is the time to jump back in. Action, PG-13, 143 minutes. HHHH “This Must Be the Place” — Centers on another uncompromising character invention

by Sean Penn, who plays an aging rock star who comes across as an arthritic bag lady and reveals without the slightest effort that there is a good heart and a quiet sense of humor inside. Famous in the 1980s, now mostly forgotten, Cheyenne still clings to his grotesque makeup although he lacks the legs and breath to perform. Living in Ireland with his longtime wife, Jane (Frances McDormand), he visits America to see his dying father, and getting into motion again budges him into transformation. Drama, R, 118 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “Wreck-It Ralph” — The new Disney animated feature for families takes place inside several arcade-style video games, providing an excuse for the backgrounds, ground rules and characters to constantly reinvent themselves. Its hero is one of those clumsy, misunderstood big guys who dream only of being loved. Ralph (voice by John C. Reilly) spends every day knocking down an apartment building, which is constantly repaired by Fix-It Felix Jr. (Jack McBrayer). Animated comedy, PG, 101 minutes. HHH

AT AREA THEATERS ANACORTES CINEMAS Nov. 16-22 The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 2 (PG-13): Friday-Saturday: 1:20, 3:50, 6:50, 9:20; Sunday-Tuesday: 1:20, 3:50, 6:50; Wednesday-Thursday: 1:20, 3:50, 6:50, 9:20 Skyfall (PG-13): FridaySaturday: 12:45, 3:40, 6:40, 9:35; Sunday-Tuesday: 12:45, 3:40, 6:40; Wednesday-Thursday: 12:45, 3:40, 6:40, 9:35 Wreck-It Ralph (PG): FridaySaturday: 1:00, 3:30, 6:30, 8:50; Sunday-Tuesday: 1:00, 3:30, 6:30; WednesdayThursday: 1:00, 3:30, 6:30, 8:50 360-293-7000

day, Nov. 15 (free admission) Wreck It Ralph (PG): 7:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 16; 5 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 17; 4 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 18 Tickets: $7 general admission, $9 balcony, $6 adults over 65 and kids under 12; $1 off all tickets on Sunday. 360-941-0403

Saturday: 1:05, 3:35, 6:20, 8:50; Sunday-Tuesday: 1:05, 3:35, 6:20; WednesdayThursday: 1:05, 3:35, 6:20, 8:50 360-279-2226

STANWOOD CINEMAS Nov. 16-22 Life of Pi (PG): WednesdayThursday: 1:10, 3:55, 6:45, CASCADE MALL THEATRES 9:15 Burlington Rise of the Guardians (PG): For listings and times, call Wednesday-Thursday: 12:50, 888-AMC-4FUN (888-2623:35, 6:50, 8:50 4386). The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 2 (PG-13): OAK HARBOR CINEMAS Friday-Thursday: 1:10, 3:45, Nov. 16-22 6:40, 9:10 The Twilight Saga: Break Skyfall (PG-13): Fridaying Dawn - Part 2 (PG-13): Thursday: 12:40, 3:35, 6:30, Friday-Saturday: 1:15, 3:45, 9:20 6:30, 9:00; Sunday-Tuesday: Wreck-It Ralph (PG): FridayBLUE FOX DRIVE-IN 1:15, 3:45, 6:30; WednesThursday: 1:00, 3:15, 6:20, Oak Harbor day-Thursday: 1:15, 3:45, 8:40 Nov. 16-21 6:30, 9:00 Argo (R): Friday-Tuesday: The Twilight Saga: Break Skyfall (PG-13): Friday12:50, 3:25, 6:50, 9:15 ing Dawn Part 2 (PG-13) and Saturday: 12:55, 3:55, Here Comes the Boom Wreck-It Ralph (PG): 9 p.m. 6:40, 9:30; Sunday-Tuesday: (PG): Friday: 1:10, 3:55, 360-675-5667 12:55, 3:55, 6:40; Wednes- 7:00, 9:05; Saturday: 1:10, day-Thursday: 12:55, 3:55, 3:55; Sunday-Tuesday: 1:10, CONCRETE THEATRE 6:40, 9:30 3:55, 7:00, 9:05 Head Games: 7 p.m. Thurs- Wreck-It Ralph (PG): Friday- 360-629-0514

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Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E18 - Thursday, November 15, 2012

OUT & ABOUT ART MIRA KAMADA: OILS: A show of Kamada’s vibrant abstract oil paintings with a botanical flair continues through Dec. 4 at Scott Milo Gallery, 420 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. Also showing are big sky oils by Dederick Ward, watercolors by Cindy Briggs and Theresa Goesling inspired by their travels abroad, and botanical and nonrepresentational acrylics by Richard Nash. Gallery hours are 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. 360-293-6938 or www.scott milo.com. MIXED MEDIA PAINTINGS: A show of paintings by La Conner artist Peter Belknap continues through Nov. 30 at Anne Martin McCool Gallery, 711 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday. After Thanksgiving weekend, the gallery will be open Monday through Saturday. 360-293-3577 or www. mccoolart.com. “FINDING BALANCE”: A show of new work by Joe Menth continues through Dec. 4 at Raven Rocks Gallery, 765 Wonn Road, Greenbank. The exhibition features Menth’s latest photo transfers on wood panels with encaustic. For information, including gallery hours and directions, call 360-222-0102 or visit www.ravenrocksgallery. com. “THIS TOWN”: The Allied Arts Juried Artist Series will feature work from Anita Aparicio, David Ridgway and Donald Simpson, continuing through Dec. 1, at the Allied Arts of Whatcom County Gallery, 1418 Cornwall Ave., Bellingham. Aparicio combines Victorian-era photographs

prints and more. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekends, closed Tuesdays. 360-222-3070 or www. robschoutengallery.com.

HOLIDAY ARTS/GIFT SHOW: The annual Burlington Holiday Fine Arts and Gift Show will be held from noon to 6 p.m. Friday, Nov. 16, and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 17, at “FIRE”: NEW WORK BY the Parks and Recreation PEREGRINE O’GORMLEY: Center, 900 E. Fairhaven The show continues Ave., Burlington. Handthrough Nov. 25 at Smith & made items only. Booths, Vallee Gallery, 5742 Gilkey $40; register by Nov. 9. Ave., Edison. O’Gormley Visit http://recreation. approaches the concept of ci.burlington.wa.us or call fire holistically. In this exhi- 360-755-9649. bition, fire becomes an allegory for the spirit and fade “HONEY, I SHRUNK THE of life — fire gives us life ART”: The 22nd annual and ultimately consumes us show of small artworks as we return to ash. Gallery will open with a potluck hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. and party from 4 to 8:30 Wednesday through Sunp.m. Saturday, Nov. 17, and day. 360-766-6230 or www. continue through Jan. 27 at smithandvallee.com. Matzke Fine Art Gallery & Sculpture Park, 2345 “GLACIAL SPEED”: A Blanche Way, Camano show of recent artwork by Island. The show features Cynthia Camlin continues small-format paintings, through Jan. 13 at the Skagit sculptures, glass and more Valley College Art Gallery by 40 artists. Gallery hours in the Gary Knutzen Cardi- are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Satnal Center on the SVC cam- urday and Sunday, or by pus, 2405 E. College Way, appointment. 360-387-2759 Mount Vernon. The exhibit or www.matzkefineart.com. interprets environmental change through visual metaHOLIDAY ART WALK & Gallery Cygnus reintroduces John Simon’s artwork to the public in a show continuing through Nov. 26 at phors, depicting the phases SOUNDS OF MUSIC: Enjoy 109 Commercial St., La Conner. More than 30 paint- of melting glaciers through art and old-fashioned abstracted forms. Gallery caroling from 5 to 8 p.m. ings from the late artist’s estate will be presented. This work spans the artist’s career and has not been hours are 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday, Nov. 30, in historic Monday through Friday. East Stanwood. Eighteen seen by the public since Simon’s death in 2010. 360-416-7812. businesses will open their A second show of Simon’s art will open with a celebration during La Conner’s Final Friday Artwalk from 5 doors with art displays, to 9 p.m. Friday, Nov. 30, and continue through Dec. HOLIDAY ART AND GIFT goodies, lights and music. 24. Gallery hours are noon to 5 p.m. Friday through SHOW: The Skagit Art Free. 360-629-3710. Sunday. 360-708-4787 or www.gallerycygnus.com. Association’s second annuPictured: “Dancers.” al Holiday Art and Gift “STRANDS: DRAW, Show will take place from CUT, STITCH, WRITE”: An 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sundays exhibition by visual and of people with her own Friday and noon to 5 p.m. through Thursdays, and 10 literary artists continues renditions of local archiSaturday. 360-676-8548 or a.m. to 8 p.m. Fridays and through Nov. 18 at Anchor tecture to create what she www.alliedarts.org. Saturdays, Nov. 14-30, at Art Space, 216 Commercial calls “Bellingham Gothic.” the strip mall, 177 Cascade Ave., Anacortes. The show Ridgway’s paintings focus “HOME FOR THE HOLIMall Drive, Burlington. brings together artists and on the places where man DAYS”: The show continChoose from a wide variety poets to convey a collecand landscape collide. ues through Jan. 1 at Rob of original artworks, includ- tive reflection of living in a Simpson’s creative experi- Schouten Gallery, 765 ing paintings, photos, fused challenging social and enviments in urban and landWonn Road, Greenbank. ronmental era. scape photography utilize Twenty-four of the region’s glass, jewelry, woodworking, fiber arts and more. Exhibiting artists are traditional photography, finest artists have created Enjoy artist demonstraEve Deisher and Ann Reid. panoramic, long exposure a variety of affordable and texture techniques. gifts: handblown glass, silk tions, live music, kids’ crafts Participating poets include Gallery hours are 10 a.m. and more. Free admission. Lana Hechtman Ayers, scarves, jewelry, sculpture, to 5 p.m. Monday through www.skagitart.org. Anita K. Boyle, Matthew ceramics, paintings and

‘WE REMEMBER JOHN SIMON’

Brouwer, Nancy Canyon, Karen Finneyfrock, Kathleen Flenniken (Poet Laureate of Washington), Maria McLeod and Susan Rich. Gallery hours are noon to 5 p.m. Friday through Sunday. www.anchorart space.org. QUILTED ART: Two new quilt shows continue through Dec. 20 at the La Conner Quilt & Textile Museum, 703 Second St., La Conner. “Material Men: Innovation & The Art Of Quiltmaking”: The exhibit showcases the work of 16 male quilters and the many innovations in design, technique and materials these men have brought to the traditionally “women’s work” of quilting. “Best of the Festival”: Check out the quilts that were juried and judged to be the best at the 2012 Quilt Festival. In addition to the Best of Show, the exhibit also includes the top entries in the traditional and nontraditional pieced quilts, wearable arts, eco-green and embellished categories. Museum hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday. Regular admission: $7, $5 students and military, free for members and children ages 11 and younger. 360-466-4288 or www.laconnerquilts.com. MoNA EXHIBITIONS: New exhibits continue through Jan. 1, 2013, at the Museum of Northwest Art, 121 S. First St., La Conner. “CIRCULAR: FROM THE PERMANENT COLLECTION”: Artworks selected from the museum’s collection explore the meaning and influence of the circular form. The show features works by Maria Frank Abrams, Guy Anderson, Marc Boutté, Kenneth


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, November 15, 2012 - E19

OUT & ABOUT Callahan, Doris Chase, Clayton James, Leo Kenney, John-Franklin Koenig, Louise Kikuchi, James Minson, Viola Patterson and Mark Tobey. “Pilchuck: IDEAS”: Celebrating 50 years of studio glass, the show features work from the Pilchuck permanent collection rarely seen off the famous glass school’s campus. These pieces from the early days of the revolution in studio glass were created by some of the most important artists working in the medium, including Dale Chihuly, William Morris, Joey Kirkpatrick, Flora Mace, Ben Moore, Lino Tagliapietra, Italo Scanga and more. The works on display are especially significant because they show these artists in the process of teaching, experimenting and in some cases searching for iconic forms and expressions for which they have become famous. Groupings of early glass are shown next to mature examples of the artists’ work from private collections. Museum hours are noon to 5 p.m. Sundays and Mondays, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. $8, $5 seniors, $3 students, free for members and ages 11 and younger. 360-466-4446 or www. museumofnwart.org.

“WILD EAST MEETS WILD WEST: A show of photographs from Nakhodka, Russia, by news photographer Georgy Pakin continues through Jan. 6, 2013, at the Whatcom Museum Lightcatcher Building, 250 Flora St., Bellingham. Pakin’s photos vividly portray daily life in and around Nakhodka during Soviet and post-Soviet times, including the presence of Americans in Nakhodka, its large fishing operations and other activities. Museum hours are noon to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday. $10; $8 students, military, seniors ages 62 and older, $4.50 ages 5 and younger. 360778-8930 or www.whatcom museum.org.

LECTURES AND TALKS SKAGIT TOPICS: “HARVEST OF SHAME”: 6 to 8 p.m. today, Nov. 15, at the Skagit County Historical Museum, 501 S. Fourth St., La Conner. The event will feature a viewing of the controversial Edward R. Murrow documentary on migrant farm workers, followed by a discussion on the current situations impacting farm workers. Free with museum admission. $4, $3 seniors and children ages 6 to 12, $8 families, free for members

and children ages 5 and younger. 360-466-3365 or www.skagitcounty.net/ museum.

MUSIC

JAZZ AT THE CENTER: Jennifer Scott will perform at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 27, at Camano Center, 606 MARITIME SPEAKER SERIES: Author Joe Upton Arrowhead Road, Camano will discuss his latest book, Island. $20. Cash bar avail“Bering Sea Blues: A Crab- able. 360-387-0222 or www. camanocenter.org. ber’s Tale of FEAR in the Icy North,” at 4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 17, at the Ana- MORE FUN cortes Public Library, 1220 LADIES NIGHT OUT: 10th St., Anacortes. Upton Skagit Valley Gardens will spent 20 years as a comhost Ladies Night Out from mercial fisherman and fish 5 to 8 p.m. today, Nov. 15, at buyer in Alaska. Free. 360- 18923 Peter Johnson Road, 293-1910, ext. 21, or library. Mount Vernon. Enjoy cityofanacortes.org. appetizers, spirits, door prizes, music, shopping and WORLD ISSUES more. $5. Proceeds benefit FORUMS: Western WashThe Forgotten Children’s ington University presents Fund. 360-424-6760. speakers on a variety of global issues. Unless otherSUSAN G. KOMEN wise noted, all events take BENEFIT: Go Further with place from noon to 1:20 Ford Night will be held all p.m. Wednesdays in the evening Nov. 15 at Skagit Fairhaven College audito- Ford, 680 Auto Blvd., Burrium, 516 High St., Belling- lington. Consumers, ages ham. Free. 360-650-2309 or www.wwu.edu/depts/ Fairhaven. Next up: Nov. 28: “Palestinian and Israeli Nonviolent Resistance to the Israeli Occupation”: Canadian author and Quaker-Jewish activist Maxine KaufmanLacusta will highlight nonviolent resistance by both Palestinians and Israelis to the Israeli occupation, along with ways U.S. citizens can support this resistance.

18 and older, can engage in the final “Random Acts of Fusion” adventure and test their judging skills for a chance to win a VIP American Idol experience and see the new Ford Fusion. Skagit Ford Subaru will donate $10 for each person who attends, up to $500, to Susan G. Komen For The Cure, in support of breast cancer research. Preregister at www.RandomActsofFusion.com for a chance to win tickets to a live taping of American Idol. Register at the door for entry in a drawing to win a Ford Fusion. 360757-2000. BROADWAY MOVIE CLIPS: Hollywood sound man and Academy Award nominee Nick Alphin will present clips from some of his favorite Broadway movies at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 28, at the Anacortes

Public Library, 1220 10th St., Anacortes. Free. 360293-1910, ext. 21, or library. cityofanacortes.org. MULTICULTURAL NIGHT: LaVenture Middle School will hold its seventh annual Multicultural Night from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 29, at 1200 N. LaVenture Road, Mount Vernon. Enjoy an evening of food, entertainment and activities from around the world. Performers include the Swinomish Canoe Family, Aztec Dancers, Bards of Keypoynt, Banghera Dancers and more. 360-428-6116. POTTERY EVENT: Mark Eikeland’s annual Pottery Show and Sale will take place from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 2, across from 10024 270th St. NW, Stanwood. Choose from a variety of locally handcrafted ceramics. 360-708-3209.

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360 November 15, 2012