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Catch up with Shrek, Donkey, Fiona and the gang at McIntyre Hall PAGE 3

Skagit Valley Herald Thursday May 8, 2014

Tuning Up

Reviews

Movies

Jimmy Wright performs Friday and Saturday at the Big Lake Bar & Grill

Music: Natalie Merchant, Lily Allen Video Games: “Child of Light”

“Neighbors” a modern-day – but raunchier — “Animal House”

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Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E2 - Thursday, May 8, 2014

NEW ON DVD THIS WEEK “Veronica Mars”: The film picks up nine years after Veronica Mars (Kristen Bell) left Neptune. She’s on the fast track to a job with a prestigious New York law firm. That’s when she is called home to help her old high school friend, Logan Echolls (Jason Dohring), who is the prime suspect in the murder of his pop star girlfriend. Rob Thomas creates a film that will draw in those who never saw the series. For the newbies, he provides the right amount of exposition to explain who all of the characters are — without making the production feel slow to all of the loyal fans. Because he finds that balance, the film is both a loving gift for those who adore the series and a fun and entertaining murder mystery for those who don’t know Veronica Mars from Bruno Mars. “The Rodgers & Hammerstein Bluray Collection.”: The songwriting team of Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II created some of the most iconic musicals of the 20th century. This collection features six of the 15-time Academy Award-winning movie musicals by the team. The set features digital restorations of “The King and I,” “Carousel,” “Oklahoma!,” “State Fair,” “The Sound of Music” and “South Pacific.” Bonus materials include a sing-a-long version of “The King and I” and more than an hour of behind-the-scenes features for “Oklahoma!.” “Blazing Saddles”: The 40th anniversary edition of the comedy is being released on Blu-ray. In any form, this is a must-own for anyone who loves film comedy. The film, starring Gene Wilder and Cleavon Little, from director/ writer Mel Brooks, is considered one of the top film comedies of all time. Included in the special edition release is the featurette “Blaze of Glory: Mel Brooks’ Wild, Wild West” in which Brooks reflects on his own movie-making chutzpah and the film’s cultural impact on audiences of all generations. It also includes 10 art cards with quotes and images from the film plus a cast reunion documentary and “Black Bart,” the 1975 television pilot inspired by the movie. “The Terminal”: The Tom Hanks film on Blu-ray. “I Love Lucy — Ultimate Season One”: New Blu-ray includes the first episodes of the Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz series. “Desert Riders”: The story of human trafficking behind camel racing. “Revenge of the Nerds”: Nerds are back to mark the 30th anniversary of

YOUR ARTS, ENTERTAINMENT AND RECREATION GUIDE TO WHAT’S GOING ON IN SKAGIT COUNTY AND THE SURROUNDING AREAS

Upcoming movie releases Following is a partial schedule of coming movies on DVD. Release dates are subject to change:

This Weekend / Page 5

MAY 13 Her - Warner I, Frankenstein - Lionsgate Stalingrad - Sony That Awkward Moment - Sony MAY 20 About Last Night - Sony Grand Piano - Magnolia In Secret - Lionsgate The Monuments Men - Sony Pompeii - Sony 3 Days to Kill - Fox Vampire Academy - Anchor Bay MAY 27 Endless Love - Universal Gambit - Sony Run & Jump - MPI Home Video Trials of Cate McCall - Vertical 24 Exposures - MPI Home Video n McClatchy-Tribune News Service

the film’s release. “Your Inner Fish”: Three-part series is hosted by paleobiologist Dr. Neil Shubin. “7 Boxes”: Teen offered $100 to deliver seven boxes. “A Celebration of Blues and Soul: The 1989 Presidential Inaugural Concert”: Features performances by Stevie Ray Vaughan, Bo Diddley, Bill Preston and Dr. John. “The Andy Griffith Show”: Includes restored versions of the 32 episodes in the first season. “Little House On The Prairie — Season Two”: Blu-ray includes 22 fully remastered episodes. “The Honeymooners: Classic 39”: Blu-ray collection contains full-length episodes of the classic TV series. “Simon and the Oaks”: Two very different families come together during World War II. “Norma Rae”: Film that earned Sally Field an Oscar is being released to mark the 35th anniversary. “Generation War”: German epic drama spanning over five years beginning in Berlin in 1941. “The Dinosaur Experiment”: Local cattle ranch’s breeding ground for velociraptors. “Separate But Equal”: Sidney Poitier stars in the film about events leading up to the Brown v. Board of Education ruling. n Rick Bentley, The Fresno Bee

Dillinger’s Clambake entertains Saturday night at the Anacortes Public Library Jazz Committee’s fifth annual Swing Dance

Inside

SUBMISSIONS Email features@skagitpublishing.com, vrichardson@skagitpublishing. com (recreation items) Deadline: 5 p.m. Friday for the following Thursday edition Phone 360-416-2135

Travel................................................6-7 Get Involved........................................ 8 On Stage, Tuning Up....................10-11 Music, Video Game Reviews.......12-13 Hot Tickets........................................ 14 Mother’s Day Events......................... 15 At the Lincoln.................................... 15 Movie Listings, Reviews..............16-17 Out & About.................................18-19 ON THE COVER Avindea Hanson (from left), Mary Witt, Waylon Johnson, Shawn Steiner and Duncan Ring star in the Skagit Valley College Drama Department production of “Shrek the Musical,” which opens Saturday at McIntyre Hall in Mount Vernon. Craig Parrish / Skagit Valley Herald

Hand-deliver 1215 Anderson Road Mount Vernon, WA 98274 Mailing address P.O. Box 578 Mount Vernon, WA 98273 Online events calendar To list your event on our website, visit goskagit.com and look for the Events Calendar on the home page HAVE A STORY IDEA? w For arts and entertainment, contact Features Editor Craig Parrish at 360-416-2135 or features@skagitpublishing.com w For recreation, contact staff writer Vince Richardson at 360-416-2181 or vrichardson@ skagitpublishing.com TO ADVERTISE 360-424-3251


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, May 8, 2014 - E3

ON STAGE

Photos by Craig Parrish / Skagit Valley Herald

LEFT: Mary Witt is Fiona and Shawn Steiner plays Shrek in “Shrek the Musical,” presented by the Skagit Valley College Drama Department. ABOVE: Rebecca Pedrosa (from left), Mary Witt and Alyssa Nelson each play Fiona at different ages.

SVC stages the musical side of ‘Shrek’ Duncan Ring and Avindea Hanson

Skagit Valley Herald staff

The Skagit Valley College Drama Department presents “Shrek the Musical,” which kicks off a six-performance run Saturday, May 10 at McIntyre Hall in Mount Vernon. Leading the production are Diane Johnson, director and vocal director, and Donna Carroll, co-director and choreographer. The music is by Jeanine Tesori, with book and lyrics by David Lindsay-Abaine. “Shrek The Musical” is based on the DreamWorks Animation movie and the book by William Steig. Proceeds will help support the music and drama students who will be traveling to Edinburgh, Scotland, this summer to

‘Shrek The Musical’ When: 7:30 p.m. May 10, 16, 17; 2 p.m. May 11, 17, 18 Where: McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon Tickets: $15-$20. 360-416-7727, ext. 2, or mcintyrehall.org. $3 discount for military, seniors, children and non-Skagit Valley College students. SVC students are half-price. Mother’s Day preshow brunch on Sunday, May 11, $25 for brunch only.

perform in the Fringe Festival, according to Johnson. The story of “Shrek” focuses on the title character, a goodhumored, greenish-tinged ogre who only yearns for a quiet home in his swamp. When Lord Farquaard, tyrannical leader of the kingdom, banishes all fairy-tale characters to Shrek’s swamp, Shrek sets off on a journey that will change everything.

On the way, he crosses paths with Donkey; his would-be true love Fiona, a princess who carries a secret of her own; and a colorful, wisecracking band of characters that don’t hesitate to break into song and dance. The first “Shrek” movie, starring Mike Myers, Eddie Murphy, Cameron Diaz and John Lithgow, was a massive financial and critical hit and resulted in three sequels.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E4 - Thursday, May 8, 2014

MOVIES

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EW YORK — As the final season of “Mad Men” winds down, John Slattery has traded 1960s Madison Avenue for late 1970s Philadelphia. In “God’s Pocket,” the actor best known for his performance as the wry, apathetic Roger Sterling on the AMC drama makes his directorial debut.

Slattery: Kind of peripherally. I was always of an opinion about what was happening when I was standing around on set, but it wasn’t my job. By the time you get to most movies and television and theater production, they’re all set up — directors in place, producers are in place. So you act a finite amount of time and then you’re gone. With “Mad Men,” it was apparent early on the quality of the production from top to bottom and that it was going to be around for a little while. So I saw it as an opportunity to watch for months and follow directors around and then officially throw my hat in.

Q&A: JOHN SLATTERY

“Whether I like it or not, I’m beginning a new phase. “Mad Men” is finishing and by the time it finishes, it will have been 10 years of my life. So that is occurring and this movie is coming out. There will be a change. What comes next, I don’t know.” The film, which opens Friday, is an adaptation of Pete Dexter’s novel about the overlapping lives of the working-class people of Philadelphia’s God’s Pocket neighborhood. Slattery directed and co-wrote the screenplay. The film also marks one of the two final screen performances of the late Philip Seymour Hoffman. (The other, Anton Corbijn’s John le Carre adaptation, “A Most Wanted Man,” is due out July 25.) In “God’s Pocket,” Hoffman stars as Mickey, a blue-collar schlub half-heatedly investigating his stepson’s death. John Turturro, Richard Jenkins and “Mad Men” co-star Christina Hendricks make up some of the local characters. In a recent interview,

‘MAD MEN’ END NEAR, JOHN SLATTERY TURNS TO DIRECTING

Story by JAKE COYLE / AP Film Writer Photos by CHRIS PIZZELLO / Invision via AP

Slattery discussed his strong vision for Dexter’s book and his abiding admiration of Hoffman.

working relationship. I think any good working relationship between an actor and a director, you become intimate with each other. It wasn’t because we were the best of friends prior to that. We knew each other and lived near each other.

Slattery: Through the course of the shooting it, I realized that of course it isn’t an accident that he’s as revered as he is. He’s AP: You and Hoffman tireless in asking questions long orbited the same terbut not complicated, highritory as New York actors, falutin, fancy questions. It and both were in 2007’s was just, like: ‘Why? Why “Charlie Wilson’s War.” does this guy stay in this But you seemed to grow community where he’s much closer making “God’s AP: What did you learn constantly reminded that Pocket.” about him as an actor while he’s not one of them?’ Slattery: It was a close making the film? Those questions are the

AP: The lived-in naturalism of “God’s Pocket,” which you shot in Yonkers just outside New York City, is in stark contrast to the polish of “Mad Men.” Slattery: I thought that ‘God’s Pocket’ was just a good story and if I could stay out of my own way and everybody else’s way, I could tell it. That’s how the good the story was — that even I could tell it. I’m not being false-modest. You can get in your own way a lot. I do it in acting. You try to do too much or show too much. kind of questions he would ask. I realized that there aren’t any real smoke and mirrors. It’s someone that had that emotional depth and intelligence that works that hard. It was just being that close to it and seeing all those elements working at the same time — the technical wherewithal in the middle of a deep emotional moment. It was pretty impressive, I have to say. AP: You’ve directed five episodes of “Mad Men.” Had the urge to direct long been percolating in you?

AP: With the seventh and final season of “Mad Men” finishing up, do you feel like you’re entering a new phase? Slattery: Whether I like it or not, I’m beginning a new phase. “Mad Men” is finishing and by the time it finishes, it will have been 10 years of my life. So that is occurring and this movie is coming out. There will be a change. What comes next, I don’t know. But I look forward to that. Part of what I like about this business is not knowing what’s coming next.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, May 8, 2014 - E5

THIS WEEKENDin the area PENN COVE WATER FESTIVAL The annual Penn Cove Water Festival will take place from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, May 10, on the Coupeville waterfront. Events include Tribal canoe racing, Native music, singing and dancing, storytelling, children’s activities, food, arts and crafts and more. penncovewater festival.com.

Swing dance

ANTIQUE TRACTORS, FARM MACHINERY The 31st annual GAS-UP will take place from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, May 10, at the Skagit County Fairgrounds, 1410 Virginia St., Mount Vernon. Watch demonstrations of operating early-day gas engines, classic tractors and antique farm machinery presented by the Early Day Gas Engine & Tractor Association, Branch 26. Free. 360-826-3782 or antiquetractor@yahoo.com.

DECOYS AND MORE Washington Brant Foundation will host the 2014 Puget Sound Open Decoy Carving Competition from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, May 10, at Holiday Sports, 895 Nevitt Road, Burlington. Activities include judging of entries from across the U.S., sporting goods vendors, children’s activities, live and silent auctions of winning decoys and outdoor items. Entry fee: $10 per decoy, $40 maximum. Free admission for spectators. 425-231-6497, 360-2020415 or wabrant.org.

JAZZ AT THE LIBRARY Dmitri Matheny will perform from 2 to 3 p.m. Sunday, May 11, at the Anacortes Public Library, 1220 10th St., Anacortes. Free. 360-293-1910, ext. 21, or jazzat thelibrary.com.

The Anacortes Public Library Jazz Committee will hold its fifth annual Swing Dance, with music by Dillinger’s Clambake, from 7 to 9:30 p.m. Saturday, May 10, at Skyline Beach Club, 6041 Sands Way, Anacortes. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Tickets: $20 in advance at Heart of Anacortes, $25 at the door. Snacks and water included; soft drinks, wine and beer available for purchase. Proceeds benefit the library and local jazz students. 360-293-1910, ext. 21, or library.city ofanacortes.org.

DILLINGER’S CLAMBAKE


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E6 - Thursday, May 8, 2014

TRAVEL

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ANAJOHARIE, N.Y. — Winslow Homers in the shadow of a defunct Beech-Nut baby food plant. A Rembrandt, Picasso, Rubens and Renoir up the hill from a paper mill. The founder of Hudson River School vying for attention amid baseball memorabilia and old farm machinery. There are plenty of treasures to be found among the collections of lesser-known, off-the-beaten-path art museums dotting upstate New York. But they’re well worth the trek for anyone looking for great art in unexpected places, whether it’s the rolling, bucolic countryside typical of many areas or the industrial grittiness of riverside mill towns. This June, the Fenimore Art Museum in Cooperstown will open an exhibit of about two dozen rarely seen works by American painter Winslow Homer, including 21 on loan from the Arkell Museum in Canajoharie, on the Mohawk River 45 miles northwest of Albany. The Arkell Museum, started in 1928 by Bartlett Arkell, founder of the Beech-Nut food company, is located next door to the company’s former plant in Canajoharie, population 2,200. The Arkell’s collection also includes works by such prominent American artists as Georgia O’Keeffe, Andrew Wyeth and George Inness. “You don’t expect this type of collection in a small town like this,” said Diane Forsberg, the Arkell’s director and chief curator. The Fenimore’s Homer exhibit, running June 6 to Aug. 24, will be the first time the Arkell’s entire collection of acclaimed the 19th-century painter’s work will be displayed at the same time. Two other Homer works, one from a private collector and the other from the Met-

Upstate New York home to great art in unexpected places Story by CHRIS CAROLA / Photos by MIKE GROLL Associated Press

If you go Arkell Museum: Canajoharie, N.Y., arkellmuseum.org Fenimore Art Museum: Cooperstown, N.Y., fenimoreartmuseum.org The Hyde Collection: Glens Falls, N.Y., hyde collection.org Burchfield-Penney Art Center: Buffalo, N.Y., burchfieldpenney.org Frederick Remington Art Museum: Ogdensburg, N.Y., fredericreming ton.org Rockwell Museum of Western Art: Corning, N.Y., rockwellmuseum.org

for its wide-ranging collection of works by such artists as Vincent van Gogh, Paul Gauguin, Jackson Pollock, Andy Warhol and Jasper Johns. But the nearby Burchfield-Penney Art Center, located on the campus of Buffalo State College, has emerged as a must-see for art lovers. Named for acclaimed watercolorists Charles Burchfield and Buffaloborn lawyer and art collector Charles Rand Penney, the museum is home to the largest collection of BurchClockwise, from upper right: The Arkell Museum in Canajoharie, N.Y.; paintings by artist Winslow Homer field works. His art has been mounted in the Arkell Museum; Meredith Lord (left) and Louise Darragh view paintings of the Mohawk River exhibited in recent years at the Arkell Museum. at the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles as well as the ropolitan Museum of Art in nearby National Baseball Italian palazzo-style Hyde welcoming the blue-collar Whitney Museum in New Manhattan, will also be part Hall of Fame of Museum House, the mansion home of community to its home and York City. of the exhibit. attract larger crowds in Charlotte Pruyn Hyde and its lush grounds for public After Burchfield’s death “If you’re an art lover, Cooperstown, but the Feni- her husband Louis Fiske art and social events. in 1967, President Lyndon Winslow Homer is on every- more gets its share of visiHyde, owners of the Finch, “The Hydes used their B. Johnson eulogized him as body’s top five list of Amer- tors during the busy sumPruyn paper mill just down enormous wealth to buy art, “artist to America.” ican artists of all time,” says mer months. the hill from the museum. but they were really interFor fans of Western art, Paul D’Ambrosio, the FeniIn Glens Falls, a city of The Hydes began colested in sharing it with their two museums at opposite more’s CEO and president. 14,700 on the upper Hudson lecting art during trips to employees and the people ends of the state offer visiFor the Fenimore, it’s River, The Hyde Collection Europe in the early 20th in town,” said Charles Allan tors some of the genre’s best an opportunity to draw has been surprising visitors century, and by the time Guerin, the museum’s direc- collections to be found east attention to the breadth of for years with its stellar ros- Louis Hyde died in 1934, tor. of the Mississippi. Cornits own collection, which ter of works by Rembrandt, they had amassed a sigLike the Arkell and the ing, in the Southern Tier includes works by HudRubens, Van Dyck, Degas, nificant amount of artwork, Fenimore, the Hyde seems near the Pennsylvania line, son River School founder Picasso, Renoir and other including Rembrandt’s to be “rediscovered” every is home to the Rockwell Thomas Cole and American prominent painters from the “Christ with Arms Folded.” few years — and likewise Museum of Western Art, folk artist Grandma Moses, Old Masters to contempoAfter Charlotte Hyde welcomes the renewed while Ogdensburg, on the as well as the Thaw Collec- rary artists. died in 1963, the Hyde man- interest,” Guerin said. Canadian border in northtion of American Indian The museum is split sion was opened as a public In western New York, ern New York, lays claim to Art. The Farmers Museum between a modern wing museum. Well before then, Buffalo’s Albright-Knox the Frederic Remington Art across the street and the and the early 20th century the family was known for Art Gallery is well-known Museum.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, May 8, 2014 - E7

TRAVEL Local travel JAPANESE TEA TASTING, CEREMONY: Learn about Japanese tea and the tea ceremony at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Saturday, May 10, at Gretchens Kitchen, 509 S. First St., Mount Vernon. Tatsuo Tomeoka from Charaku Fine Japanese Tea Company will discuss the history, culture and preparation surrounding the tea ceremony. Attendees will taste several Japanese green teas, ending with a tasting of matcha, the traditional tea used for tea ceremonies, and a Japanese sweet from Chef Tokara’s Japanese bakery in Seattle. $10. 360-3368747 or gretchenskitchen. com. Mike Groll / AP

A tractor-trailer travels along the New York State Thruway from the Arkell Museum in Canajoharie, N.Y. The museum, started in 1928 by Bartlett Arkell, founder of the Beech-Nut food company, is located next door to company’ former plant in Canajoharie, population 2,200. Remington, a native of nearby Canton, is best known for his work depicting cowboys, ranch life, soldiers and American Indians in the last decades of the Old West. A collection of his sculptures, oil paintings, family possessions, personal art collection and studio contents is housed in a 200-yearold house his wife moved into after Remington’s death in 1909. The museum’s current exhibits include displays in two galleries of Remington’s masterwork paintings, illustrations and

bronze sculptures. The Rockwell Museum traces its origins to Robert F. Rockwell, Jr., born in Bradford, Pa., but raised on his family’s cattle ranch in Colorado. Growing up with cowboys led to his collecting Western art while running his family’s businesses, which included a chain of department stores in western New York towns. In a few years he had built a major collection that included works by Remington, George Catlin, Charles M. Russell and Albert Bier-

stadt. Originally exhibited in the Rockwell’s flagship store, the collection eventually found a permanent home in Corning’s Old City Hall in 1983. Current exhibits include displays of more than 100 pieces of Southwest pottery from the Nancy and Alan Cameros Collection, and the Rockwell’s own collection of 19th-century German painter Karl Bodmer’s handcolored engravings based on his original watercolors of images from a trip on the Missouri River in the 1830s.

May 2, 3, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16 & 17 at 7:30 p.m. Mother’s Day, May 11 at 2:00 p.m. The Historic Lincoln Theatre $16 Festival Seating May 9 is Pay What You Can Night! To purchase tickets, visit www.lincolntheatre.org or call (360) 336-8955 Directed by Lindsey Bowen / Produced by special arrangement with THE DRAMATIC PUBLISHING COMPANY of Woodstock, Illinois

SHORT TRIPS: Mount Vernon Parks and Recreation offers travel opportunities for ages 12 and older (adult supervision required for ages 18 and younger). Trips depart from and return to Hillcrest Park, 1717 S. 13th

St., Mount Vernon. For information or to register, call 360-336-6215. Next up: “Wallabies and Waterfalls”: 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Saturday, June 14. Travel to Snoqualmie to view the 286-foot Snoqualmie Falls and adjoining hydroelectric project, followed by time to enjoy a no-host lunch and exploration of the quaint downtown. Next, the group will head over to the Fall City Wallaby Ranch for a private tour, including a chance to pet, feed and learn all about gray and albino Bennett’s wallabies and red kangaroos, with one final stop at Maltby for an afternoon treat at Snoqualmie Gourmet Ice Cream. $62-$64. Register by June 6. “San Juan Island History, Hiking and Whales”: 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Saturday, June 28. Travel by van and ferry to Friday Harbor for hiking and great views at American Camp, then on to Lime Kiln Point State Park,

considered one of the best locations to see migrating orca whales. After a picnic lunch, head back to Friday Harbor for time on your own to explore shops, cafes and maybe even the Whale Museum. Pack a lunch and beverages and wear weather-appropriate clothing and hiking shoes. $72-$80. Register by June 20. GLASS SCHOOL TOUR: The Pilchuck Glass School will host an open house from noon to 5 p.m. Sunday, July 13, at its private campus near Stanwood. Enjoy hot glass demonstrations, docent-led tours of the studios and gallery, live music and more. Hands-on activities, including glass blowing and printmaking, and an “off the beaten path” tour are available for additional fees. General admission: $20, $10 ages 6 to 12, free for ages 5 and younger. For information or reservations, call 206-621-8422, ext. 26, or visit pilchuck.com.

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E8 - Thursday, May 8, 2014

GET INVOLVED ART CALL FOR INSTRUCTORS: Burlington Parks and Recreation seeks qualified instructors to expand its enrichment classes for youths and adults. To download an instructor’s packet, visit the Parks and Recreation Department webpage at burlingtonwa.gov and click on the “Instructors Needed” tab. 360-755-9649 or recre ation@burlingtonwa.gov.

need to be a Shelter Bay resident. 360-466-3805. WOMEN SING FOURPART HARMONY: Join the women of Harmony Northwest Chorus from 7 to 9:30 p.m. every Monday at the Mount Vernon Senior Center, 1401 Cleveland Ave. All a cappella skill levels welcome.

BRASS CHOIR: The Basically Brass Choir seeks a French horn player to CALL FOR ARTISTS: The join a group of about 12 Mount Vernon Downtown musicians, playing a variety of styles. Rehearsals are the Association is developing first and third Mondays in a roster of artists from all Burlington, with regular media interested in showperformances. Contact: ing their art in downtown David Soiseth, 360-757Mount Vernon galleries 0351 or dsois@comcast.net. and businesses during a variety of 2014 Art Walks. CALL FOR YOUNG MUSIArt will be displayed CIANS: The Mount Verduring open hours at participating businesses, with a non-based Fidalgo Youth gala opening advertised in Symphony offers opporprint and social media. dep. tunities for ages 5 to 21 to study and perform orchesmvda@gmail.com. tral music. For information, including tuition costs and CALL FOR ARTISTS: rehearsal schedules, contact The Anacortes Arts ComSara Fisher, 360-682-6949 mission invites artists to or Anita Tatum, 360-969submit two- and three1681, or visit fysmusic.org. dimensional artworks on the theme “FISH — fish, fishing, fishermen” for a MUSIC June 6-7 show at the Depot SECOND FRIDAY DRUM Arts & Community Center, CIRCLE: 7 to 9 p.m. Friday, 611 R Ave., Anacortes. The May 9, Unity Church, 704 show will be held in conW. Division St., Mount junction with the 25th anni- Vernon. Freewill donation. versary Anacortes Waterheatmiser@inbox.com. front Festival. Space is limited. No applications, first come. The arts commission ON STAGE ANACORTES OPEN MIC: will retain a 20 percent commission on art sales to 9:30 p.m. Thursdays, Brown Lantern Ale House, 412 support a variety of local Commercial Ave., Anaarts programs. Contact: Karla Locke, 360-588-6968 cortes. 360-293-2544. or kklocke1@mac.com. OPEN MIC: Jam Night, 9 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. ThursAUDITIONS days, Conway Pub & EatSHELTER BAY CHORUS: ery, 18611 Main St., ConPractices are held from 2:45 way. 360-445-4733. to 4:45 p.m. every Thursday at the Shelter Bay ClubRECREATION house in La Conner. New members welcome. No BOYS & GIRLS CLUB

SUMMER PROGRAMS: Registration is open for summer programs at Skagit Valley Boys & Girls clubs. Children can participate in educational programs from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, June 23-Aug. 15. Programs that encourage academic success, good character and citizenship, and healthy lifestyles are designed around different themes each week. The cost for Day Camp and regular Club hours is $100 per week plus the monthly membership fee, which starts at $25. A reduced rate is available if your family qualifies for the free or reduced school lunch program. Registration is limited and closes May 30. To learn more or sign up your child, stop by your local club, visit SkagitRaisesGreatKids.org/summer or call the club director listed below: Anacortes: Cory Oppel, 360-588-9045. La Conner: Kendrick Davis-Pittmon, 360-4663672. Mount Vernon: Vesta Anderson, 360-428-6995. Sedro-Woolley: John Garman, 360-856-1830.

variety of mediums to create works of art to display at the Children’s Art Festival on July 19. Includes a tour and art lesson at the Museum of Northwest Art in La Conner. July 21-24: Sports Extravaganza: Spend time outdoors playing group games, including basketball, soccer, Frisbee, capture the flag and more. Finish the week with roller skating at Skagit Skate. July 28-31: Barnyard Palooza: Enjoy animalthemed crafts and games, line dancing and a visit to Sky Harvest Produce at Youngquist Farms to take a tour, help with a chore or two, pick berries and stop for ice cream on the way back.

May 13: Washington Park, Anacortes: Meet in the parking lot by the restroom for an easy walk. The park should be in full bloom.

FORD GOLF CLASSIC: The 26th annual James M. Ford Golf Classic will begin at noon Friday, May 9, at Avalon Golf Links in Burlington. Registration starts at 10 a.m.; $150 per golfer or $575 per foursome, includes use of a golf cart, continental breakfast, lunch, refreshments and dinner. Proceeds benefit Skagit Valley College Foundation scholarships and programs. For information about golfer registration and sponsorships, call 360-416-7821, email anne. clark@skagit.edu or visit TRAIL TALES: Friends of skagit.edu/foundation. Skagit Beaches will lead a series of informative walks SPRING CLASSIC along the Tommy ThompBICYCLE RIDE: The Skagit son Trail in Anacortes. For Bicycle Club’s 24th annual information, visit skagitSkagit Spring Classic beaches.org. Bicycle Ride will take place Next up: Saturday, May 10, beginInterpretive Walk: ning at Bay View Elemen“Cleanup Success – A tary School, 15241 Josh New Chapter in an Old Wilson Road, Burlington. Mill’s Story”: Join Trail The bicycle ride, open at 7 Tales docents at 10 a.m. a.m., includes 25-, 45-, 62today at 34th Street at the and 100-mile road routes Tommy Thompson Trail, through Skagit and WhatSUMMER DAY CAMP: Anacortes. Learn about com counties. Helmets Kids in grades K-6 can the history and cleanup of required. Enjoy an end-ofenjoy a variety of activities the old plywood mill site, ride, all-you-can spaghetti centered on each week’s Ecology’s environmental meal from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. theme from 8 a.m. to 5:30 restoration work and the Registration: $35 advance, p.m. Mondays through new wildlife habitat that $40 day of ride. Proceeds Thursdays at Hillcrest Park, has been created. Anabenefit local nonprofit 1717 S. 13th St., Mount Ver- cortes Parks & Recreation organizations. skagitspring non. Two days: $75. Four Director Gary Robinson classic.org. days: $115. Preregistration will share plans for updatrequired: 360-336-6215 or ing landscaping and park RUN FOR YOUR MUM: mountvernonwa.gov/parks. features. Free. The 5K Fun Run & twoJuly 7-10: Adventures mile Walk will take place Abound: Hike Little SPRING PLANT WALKS: Saturday, May 10, on the Mountain’s trails, climb on The Washington Native Port of Skagit nature trails, the Eagle Rock Challenge Plant Society hosts plant Higgins Airport Way and Course, go on a treasure walks from 10 a.m. to noon Crosswinds Drive, Burlinghunt at Hillcrest Park and Tuesdays at area parks. For ton. Registration starts at 8 learn the basics of geoinformation, call Ann at a.m. followed by the walk caching. 360-293-3044 or Susan at at 9 a.m. and run at 9:30 July 14-17: Art Esca360-659-8792. a.m. Participants can either pades: Learn how to use a Next up: pay an entry fee or gather

pledges to benefit Pregnancy Choices. Free for ages 12 and younger. For information or to register, visit runforyourmum.com.

THEATER FREE ADULT ACTING CLASSES: Anacortes Community Theatre offers free acting classes for adults from 10 a.m. to noon the third Saturday each month at 918 M Ave., Anacortes. Classes include scripted scenes and a variety of acting games, with a different topic each month. Each class is independent, so you don’t have to commit to every session. 360-840-0089 or acttheatre.com.

WORKSHOPS POETRY WORKSHOP & SLAM: Skagit Valley Writers League will host a Poetry Workshop and Poetry Slam with Jim Freeman from 1 to 3 p.m. today at the Mount Vernon Community Center, 1401 Cleveland St., Mount Vernon. The event is free, but a $5 suggested donation is requested from nonmembers. RSVP: svwritersleague@gmail.com or skagitwriters.org. PHOTOGRAPHY: Professional photographer Andy Porter will teach Digital SLR from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 14, at the Burlington Parks and Recreation Center, 900 E. Fairhaven Ave. Learn how to shoot in manual mode, how to set aperture, shutter speed and ISO to get the best possible shots, how to bracket your exposure, the use of polarizers, benefits of capturing images in the RAW format and more in this hands-on workshop. Bring your camera and user manual. $40. To register, call 360-755-9649 or email recreation@burling tonwa.gov.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, May 8, 2014 - E9

These rock stars are oldies but still goodies Newsday

Billy Joel (left) turns 65 on Friday and he’ll celebrate with the next of his monthly Madison Square Garden concerts, one that is sure to have even more starstudded guests than usual. But we hope Billy doesn’t fret too much about turning the big 6-5 (and encourage him to take advantage of all those senior discounts). In fact, Billy, you shouldn’t feel bad at all: At 65, you’re just a kid compared to many of your fellow rock-and-rollers. 86: Fats Domino 81: Little Richard 80: Frankie Valli 78: Jerry Lee Lewis 74: Dion, Grace Slick 73: Ringo Starr, Dr. John, Bob Dylan (May 24) 72: Paul McCartney (June 18), Paul Simon, Art Garfunkel 70: Mick Jagger, Keith Richards 69: Rod Stewart, Pete Townshend (May 19), John Fogerty (May 28) 68: Neil Young AP file

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E10 Thursday, May 8, 2014

ON STAGE in the Skagit Valley and surrounding area May 8-15

TUNING UP Playing at area venues May 8-15 FRIDAY-SATURDAY.9-10

SWEET DOMINIQUES 9 p.m. to midnight, Longhorn Saloon & Grill, 5754 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-766-6330.

Jim Carroll photo

FRIDAY-SATURDAY.9-10 JIMMY WRIGHT 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

THURSDAY-SUNDAY.8-11 THURSDAY.15 “THE OUTSIDERS” META Performing Arts, Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. 360336-8955 or lincolntheatre.org. Check individual listings for times and prices.

Friday.9

Saturday.10

Sunday.11

THEATER

THEATER

THEATER

THEATER

“All Shook Up!” (musical based on Shakespeare’s “Twelfth Night,” featuring the songs of Elvis Presley): SedroWoolley High School Drama Dept., 7 p.m., Sedro-Woolley High School auditorium, 1235 Third St., Sedro-Woolley. $10, $5 students/seniors. 360-855-3510.

SATURDAY.10

“GOOD PEOPLE” Outcast Productions, 7:30 p.m., Black Box Theater, 819 Camano Ave., Langley. $14-$18. brownpapertickets.com or outcastproductions.net. Pictured (from left): Marta Mulholland, Patricia Duff, Maureen Masterson and Lars Larson

Thursday.8 “The Outsiders”: META Performing Arts, 7:30 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. Pay-what-youcan (tickets available two hours before show time). 360-336-8955 or lincoln theatre.org.

Thursday, May 8, 2014 E11

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

“The Outsiders”: META Performing Arts, 7:30 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $16. 360-3368955 or lincolntheatre.org. “All Shook Up!” (musical: based on Shakespeare’s “Twelfth Night,” featuring the songs of Elvis Presley): SedroWoolley High School Drama Dept., 7 p.m., Sedro-Woolley High School auditorium, 1235 Third St., Sedro-Woolley. $10, $5 students/seniors. 360-855-3510. “Good People” (drama): Outcast Productions, 7:30 p.m., Black Box Theater, 819 Camano Ave., Langley. $14-$18. brownpapertickets.com or outcast productions.net.

“Shrek The Musical”: Skagit Valley College, 7:30 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $15-$20. 416-7727, ext. 2, or mcintyrehall.org. “The Outsiders”: META Performing Arts, 7:30 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $16. 360-3368955 or lincolntheatre.org. “All Shook Up!” (musical: based on Shakespeare’s “Twelfth Night,” featuring the songs of Elvis Presley): SedroWoolley High School Drama Dept., 7 p.m., Sedro-Woolley High School auditorium, 1235 Third St., Sedro-Woolley. $10, $5 students/seniors. 360-855-3510. “Good People” (drama): Outcast Productions, 7:30 p.m., Black Box Theater, 819 Camano Ave., Langley. $14-$18. brownpapertickets.com or outcast productions.net.

“Shrek The Musical”: Skagit Valley College, 2 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $15-$20. 416-7727, ext. 2, or mcintyrehall.org. “The Outsiders”: META Performing Arts, 2 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $16. 360-336-8955 or lincolntheatre.org.

Thursday.15

THURSDAY.8 Deanne Savage and Friends: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

FRIDAY.9 Andy “Badd Dog” Koch: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Jansen Art Center Piano Lounge, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360-354-3600.

Jimmy Wright: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

The Funaddicts: 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Winners Lounge, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. No cover. 877-275-2448.

Richard Allen and the Louisiana Experience: 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $10. 360-4453000.

Jimmy Wright: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

Kelly Shirey: 8:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $7. 360-445-3000.

Sweet Dominiques Joyride: 9 p.m., H2O, (surf/reggae): 9 p.m. 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-755-3956. to midnight, Longhorn Saloon & Grill, 5754 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-766-6330.

Blaze and Kelly: 8 to 11 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

Jukebox Duo: 7 to 10 p.m., Mount Vernon Elks, 2120 Market St., Mount Vernon. Open to the public. 360-848-8882.

Flannel (’90s tribute), Scary Monster & the Super Creeps: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. 360-778-1067.

One Hat Wonder: 6:30 to 8 p.m., Jansen Art Center Piano Lounge, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360-354-3600.

SATURDAY.10 Nitecrew (top 40 dance): 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Winners Lounge, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. No cover. 877-275-2448.

THEATER

“The Outsiders”: META Performing Arts, 7:30 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $16. 360-3368955 or lincolntheatre.org.

WEDNESDAY.14

SUNDAY.11 JP and the OK Rhythm Boys (swing, hoedown): 6 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $5-$7. 360-4453000.

Gary B’s Church of Blues: Jam Night, 6 to 10 p.m., Conway Pub & Eatery, 18611 Main St., Conway. 360-445-4733.

Desperate Measures (classic rock): 6 to 10 p.m., Castle Tavern, 708 Metcalf St., SedroWoolley. No cover. 360-855-2263.

Orville Johnson: 5:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. 360-766-6266.

Blues/rock jam with CC Adams and Friends: 4 to 9 p.m., La Conner Pantry & Pub, 315 Morris St., La Conner. 360-466-4488.

Stilly River Band: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

THURSDAY.15 Paul Klein (blues, rock): 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Jansen Art Center Piano Lounge, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360-354-3600.


E10 Thursday, May 8, 2014

ON STAGE in the Skagit Valley and surrounding area May 8-15

TUNING UP Playing at area venues May 8-15 FRIDAY-SATURDAY.9-10

SWEET DOMINIQUES 9 p.m. to midnight, Longhorn Saloon & Grill, 5754 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-766-6330.

Jim Carroll photo

FRIDAY-SATURDAY.9-10 JIMMY WRIGHT 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

THURSDAY-SUNDAY.8-11 THURSDAY.15 “THE OUTSIDERS” META Performing Arts, Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. 360336-8955 or lincolntheatre.org. Check individual listings for times and prices.

Friday.9

Saturday.10

Sunday.11

THEATER

THEATER

THEATER

THEATER

“All Shook Up!” (musical based on Shakespeare’s “Twelfth Night,” featuring the songs of Elvis Presley): SedroWoolley High School Drama Dept., 7 p.m., Sedro-Woolley High School auditorium, 1235 Third St., Sedro-Woolley. $10, $5 students/seniors. 360-855-3510.

SATURDAY.10

“GOOD PEOPLE” Outcast Productions, 7:30 p.m., Black Box Theater, 819 Camano Ave., Langley. $14-$18. brownpapertickets.com or outcastproductions.net. Pictured (from left): Marta Mulholland, Patricia Duff, Maureen Masterson and Lars Larson

Thursday.8 “The Outsiders”: META Performing Arts, 7:30 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. Pay-what-youcan (tickets available two hours before show time). 360-336-8955 or lincoln theatre.org.

Thursday, May 8, 2014 E11

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

“The Outsiders”: META Performing Arts, 7:30 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $16. 360-3368955 or lincolntheatre.org. “All Shook Up!” (musical: based on Shakespeare’s “Twelfth Night,” featuring the songs of Elvis Presley): SedroWoolley High School Drama Dept., 7 p.m., Sedro-Woolley High School auditorium, 1235 Third St., Sedro-Woolley. $10, $5 students/seniors. 360-855-3510. “Good People” (drama): Outcast Productions, 7:30 p.m., Black Box Theater, 819 Camano Ave., Langley. $14-$18. brownpapertickets.com or outcast productions.net.

“Shrek The Musical”: Skagit Valley College, 7:30 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $15-$20. 416-7727, ext. 2, or mcintyrehall.org. “The Outsiders”: META Performing Arts, 7:30 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $16. 360-3368955 or lincolntheatre.org. “All Shook Up!” (musical: based on Shakespeare’s “Twelfth Night,” featuring the songs of Elvis Presley): SedroWoolley High School Drama Dept., 7 p.m., Sedro-Woolley High School auditorium, 1235 Third St., Sedro-Woolley. $10, $5 students/seniors. 360-855-3510. “Good People” (drama): Outcast Productions, 7:30 p.m., Black Box Theater, 819 Camano Ave., Langley. $14-$18. brownpapertickets.com or outcast productions.net.

“Shrek The Musical”: Skagit Valley College, 2 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $15-$20. 416-7727, ext. 2, or mcintyrehall.org. “The Outsiders”: META Performing Arts, 2 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $16. 360-336-8955 or lincolntheatre.org.

Thursday.15

THURSDAY.8 Deanne Savage and Friends: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

FRIDAY.9 Andy “Badd Dog” Koch: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Jansen Art Center Piano Lounge, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360-354-3600.

Jimmy Wright: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

The Funaddicts: 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Winners Lounge, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. No cover. 877-275-2448.

Richard Allen and the Louisiana Experience: 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $10. 360-4453000.

Jimmy Wright: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

Kelly Shirey: 8:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $7. 360-445-3000.

Sweet Dominiques Joyride: 9 p.m., H2O, (surf/reggae): 9 p.m. 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-755-3956. to midnight, Longhorn Saloon & Grill, 5754 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-766-6330.

Blaze and Kelly: 8 to 11 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

Jukebox Duo: 7 to 10 p.m., Mount Vernon Elks, 2120 Market St., Mount Vernon. Open to the public. 360-848-8882.

Flannel (’90s tribute), Scary Monster & the Super Creeps: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. 360-778-1067.

One Hat Wonder: 6:30 to 8 p.m., Jansen Art Center Piano Lounge, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360-354-3600.

SATURDAY.10 Nitecrew (top 40 dance): 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Winners Lounge, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. No cover. 877-275-2448.

THEATER

“The Outsiders”: META Performing Arts, 7:30 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $16. 360-3368955 or lincolntheatre.org.

WEDNESDAY.14

SUNDAY.11 JP and the OK Rhythm Boys (swing, hoedown): 6 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $5-$7. 360-4453000.

Gary B’s Church of Blues: Jam Night, 6 to 10 p.m., Conway Pub & Eatery, 18611 Main St., Conway. 360-445-4733.

Desperate Measures (classic rock): 6 to 10 p.m., Castle Tavern, 708 Metcalf St., SedroWoolley. No cover. 360-855-2263.

Orville Johnson: 5:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. 360-766-6266.

Blues/rock jam with CC Adams and Friends: 4 to 9 p.m., La Conner Pantry & Pub, 315 Morris St., La Conner. 360-466-4488.

Stilly River Band: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

THURSDAY.15 Paul Klein (blues, rock): 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Jansen Art Center Piano Lounge, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360-354-3600.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E12 - Thursday, May 8, 2014

REVIEWS: MUSIC Natalie Merchant

“Natalie Merchant” Natalie Merchant has never been one to pull punches. From her start singing deceivingly jovial-sounding tunes about tough topics like child abuse and air pollution with seminal 1980s alternative rock band 10,000 Maniacs through her 21 years as a solo artist, Merchant has made her mark as an unflinchingly honest artist. That fearlessness continues on the self-titled and self-produced “Natalie Merchant,” her first collection of entirely original songs in 13 years. On the haunting “Giving Up Everything,” Merchant sings about mercy killing her craving, giving up her “cursed search for meaning.” Think of it as her version of John Lennon’s “God.” Not everything is a downer. The opening track, “Ladybird,” is a jaunty toetapper. But that’s quickly followed by “Maggie Said,” which begins with the line: “Maggie said dig one more shallow grave before I’m dead.” With her distinctive voice still in strong form as she enters her 50s, together with the lush backing of strings, piano, organ and the occasional woodwinds, Merchant creates a rich musical tapestry that transcends the typical vagary of pop music. n Scott Bauer, Associated Press

Lykke Li

“I Never Learn” Sweden’s Lykke Li delivers a full fusion of deep, soul-searching lyrics on “I Never Learn,” her third studio album and an artistic zenith for this talented singer. “Love Me Like I’m Not Made of Stone” is a minimalist guitar-and-vocalsonly track. Li’s voice strains in all the right places and pleads for love in others, meshing nicely into a raw display of emotion. The title track carries more production sheen, but retains an authentic feel as Li sings about falling too deeply in love. There are no weak songs here, and the best comes on “No Rest for the Wicked.” Ghostly piano stabs echo until an avalanche of percussion falls over it all. It’s a poignant song about fighting to keep a

relationship alive as it tears apart, territory that sounds personal when Li sings it. In the end, it is love that is at stake on “I Never Learn.” Lykke Li adroitly captures the struggle that one must endure to keep love at the risk of losing it forever. n Ron Harris, Associated Press

Ray LaMontagne “Supernova”

Famous for his smooth, smoky voice and softly soulful, earnest craft as a songwriter, Ray LaMontagne has now rearranged his brand of Americana with sensual, reverbing psychedelia and the production help of Black Keys guitarist Dan Auerbach. The result: LaMontagne suddenly sounds as if he’s loose and having weird fun. When he sings about wanting his girl on this album’s title track, he seems, at last, to really want her — and not just to talk while sipping coffee. Auerbach’s production should get much of the credit for the independence and sexual power of this recording. He brings to “Supernova” the same treatment he brought to roots-based artists such as Valerie June. On “Supernova,” we hear a track such as “Drive-In Movies,” with lyrics of youthful motives and desires, plus a jaunty, Brit-pop melody — swathed in dense organ sounds and oozing background voices. “Lavender” conjures more scents and taste sensations than the herb itself. “Pick Up a Gun,” an acoustic cut about an emotional dustup, has more key shifts than a Yes album. “Supernova” is LaMontagne’s most complex statement yet about life, love, and music itself. n A.D. Amorosi, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Doug Paisley

“Strong Feelings”

Other notable releases

n Santana “Corazon” n Atmosphere “Southsiders” n Gregg Allman - “All y Friends: Celebrating the Songs & Voice of Gregg Allman” n Black Stone Cherry - “Magic Mountain” n Chromeo - “White Women” n Brian Eno and Karl Hyde - “Someday World” n Liam Finn - “Nihilist” n Ben & Ellen Harper - “Childhood Home” n Hunter Hayes - “Storyline” n The Horrors - “Luminous” n King Dude - “Fear” n Sarah McLachlan - “Shine On” n People Under the Stairs - “12 Step Program” n Silkworm - “Libertine” n Wesley Wolfe - “Numbskull” n popmatters.com

Paisley’s third album. Paisley sings in a casual baritone, sometimes stretching into his high register. He’s spent time in bluegrass and country bands, but “Strong Feelings” has more in common with classic singer-songwriters such as Gordon Lightfoot or Guy Clark. Most of these are gently rolling acoustic tunes, tastefully appointed with contributions from some stellar guests: Garth Hudson on organ, Colin Stetson on saxophone, Mary Margaret O’Hara on counterpoint vocals. The true stars here, though, are Paisley’s songwriting and singing, and “Strong Feelings” is an understated gem.

tUnE-yArDs “Nikki Nack”

Even though tUnE-yArDs’ rambunctious eclecticism hasn’t mellowed out at all on “Nikki Nack,” Merrill Garbus has, well, found a new way to channel her overactive imagination into song this time around, working with outside producers for the first time and taking voice, percussion and dance training for inspiration. As Garbus has explained it, her attempt to approach things from a different perspective came from feeling artistically stifled after 2011’s “w h o k i l l,” which, ironically enough, was considered by pretty much everyone else as one of the more original creative breakthroughs in recent memory. n Arnold Pan, popmatters.com

Rodrigo y Gabriela

“9 Dead Alive”

Wielding only acoustic guitars, Rodrigo Sanchez and Gabriela Quintero conjure a mix of influences to create a sound that might only have been dreamed up by classical guitar great Andres Segovia, if he’d been born listening to Santana and Metallica. On “9 Dead Alive,” Rodrigo y Gabriela’s first new album in five years, the duo strips down to return to the raw, ferocious energy that won them global acclaim after n Steve Klinge, The Philadelphia Inquirer they were discovered busking in Ireland. Alone with their guitars, the couple indeed create a whole far greater than their two Lily Allen instruments. “Sheezus” Each of the album’s nine instrumentals pays tribute to “enduring touchstones” What “Sheezus” such as writer Fyodor Dostoyevsky and proves is that Lily abolitionist Harriet Tubman, plus one Allen is still growstring-bending thumper, “Torito,” honoring and evolving ing animals and nature. On the opening as a musician, and track, “The Soundmaker,” they bow to even with a few lesser tracks here and there, “Sheezus” is so far her best-yet mix classical guitar godfather Antonio de Torres Jurado with a technically gorgeous of personal stories and overarching culpiece in which Rodrigo furiously soars as tural commentary. Make no mistake: She isn’t the first pop Gabriela powerfully beats her guitar into a percussion piece. “Megalopolis,” their star to point out the foibles of the very haunting homage to Chilean poet Gabriela industry that has helped her become a Mistral, weaves Rodrigo’s fragile melody success, but if “Sheezus” proves anything to us, it’s that she just may be the best at it. through Gabriela’s melancholic rhythm.

Canadian singersongwriter Doug Paisley writes songs that sound lived-in and comfortable from the first listen. They have an aura of simple perfection and ease. That ease is a testament, however, to his skill as a craftsman. It’s not simple to make a record that seems as natural and unforced as “Strong Feelings,” n Evan Sawdey, popmatterscom

n Michelle Morgante, Associated Press


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, May 8, 2014 - E13

REVIEWS: VIDEO GAMES

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‘Child of Light’

Publisher: Ubisoft Platforms: PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, Wii U, PC Price: $14.99 Rating: 3 stars (out of 4) On the Web: childoflight.ubi.com “Child of Light” doesn’t look like any other video game. With its seemingly hand-drawn characters and watercolor backgrounds, it more closely resembles a children’s picture book, the kind your mom would read to you before bedtime. It’s a fitting look, since “Child of Light” is an interactive fairy tale. It’s the story of Aurora, a princess who is transported to a strange world called Lemuria where the sun, moon and stars have vanished. She’s armed with an oversized sword and the ability to use light as a weapon. She can also fly, in slow and smooth motions that add to the game’s dreamlike mood. During her journey, Aurora meets a motley assortment of pilgrims, each of whom has lost something. A jester named Rubella is trying to find her brother; a dwarf named Finn has seen all his friends turned into crows; a prison guard named Oengus is trying to restore his lost honor. Aurora’s most dependable companion, though, is Igniculus, a firefly who floats by her side. The light emitted by Igniculus can unlock doors and treasure chests. It can heal Aurora and her friends. And it can distract enemies long enough for Aurora and company to get in a few licks before being attacked. That last skill comes in handy during the cleverly designed battles, which emphasize strategy over reflexes. Each character, friendly or hostile, is represented by an icon on a timeline; when the icon gets about 80 percent across, time stops and you’re asked to choose an action. Some actions happen almost immediately, but if you want to cast a powerful spell, time slows to a crawl. Move too slowly and an opponent can sneak in and knock you off your game. The turn-based battles will feel familiar to fans of role-playing games, but other elements are more RPG-lite. After almost

Video game releases

Ubisoft via AP

every battle, Aurora or one of her friends levels up, slightly raising both offensive and defensive abilities. Each character gets points to spend on a skill tree, where you can upgrade stats or gain more powerful spells. I found the constant upgrades distracting, given that the differences between levels are too small to make much of a difference. RPG fans who enjoy trying new weapons and armor won’t get that satisfaction here; each character is pretty much stuck with the equipment he or she begins with. And there’s just one kind of loot to collect: gems that, depending on their color, add fire, water or lightning to your attacks or defend against the same elements. There’s a rudimentary crafting tool that lets you turn cheap jewelry into brilliant gems, but it gets old quick. Your appreciation of “Child of Light” will depend on how much you enjoy its story, which leans heavily on fairy-tale cliches like the wicked stepmother. I also lost patience with the writers’ insistence on telling the story in verse, leading to doggerel like “Now be strong, get ready for battle/I will free you from your shackle.” It’s cute at first, but soon becomes cloying. Still, “Child of Light” gets much right, from its charmingly pugnacious heroine to its distinctive images and music. It’s an encouraging experiment from a big publisher like Ubisoft, and Lemuria is a world I’d be delighted to return to.

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Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E14 - Thursday, May 8, 2014

HOT TICKETS LED ZEPAGAIN (tribute to Led Zeppelin): May 9, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or show boxonline.com. STEVE MARTIN & THE STEEP CANYON RANGERS: Featuring Edie Brickell: May 10, Mount Baker Theatre, Bellingham. 360-734-6080 or mountbakertheatre.com. DANNY BROWN: May 10, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. OLD 97s: May 12, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or show boxonline.com. PRISCILLA AHN: May 13, Columbia City Theater, Seattle. 800-838-3006 or columbiacity theater.com. RIFF RAFF: May 14, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. MICKEY AVALON: May 15, The Crocodile, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. KARLA BONOFF & JIMMY WEBB: May 15, Mount Baker Theatre, Bellingham. 360-734-6080 or mountbakertheatre.com. LIL JON - DJ SET: May 16, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. FLIGHT TO MARS: featuring Mike McCready of Pearl Jam: May 16, The Showbox, Seattle. 800745-3000 or showboxonline.com. NICKEL CREEK: May 17, Moore Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or livenation.com. KYLE GASS BAND: May 18, The Crocodile, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. FAILURE: May 18, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or show boxonline.com. KISHI BASHI: May 20, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. LINDSEY STIRLING: May 21, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-7453000 or showboxonline.com. BACKSTREET BOYS, AVRIL LAVIGNE: May 22, WaMu Theater, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or ticket master.com. ASIAN MUSIC FESTIVAL: May 23, The Showbox, Seattle. 800745-3000 or showboxonline.com. TECH N9NE: May 23-24, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. THE NYLONS: May 24, Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Bow. 877-2752448 or theskagit.com. LANA DEL REY: May 27, WaMu Theater, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster.com. BLACK FLAG: May 27, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000

STEVE EARLE & THE DUKES June 20-21, Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Bow. 877-275-2448 or theskagit.com or showboxonline.com. HOODIE ALLEN: May 27, The Crocodile, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. LADY GAGA’S artRAVE: May 28, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. LIONEL RITCHIE: with CeeLo Green: May 30, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. “IN MY LIFE”: A Musical Tribute to the Beatles: June 5, Mount Baker Theatre, Bellingham. 360734-6080 or mountbakertheatre. com. MICHAEL IAN BLACK: June 6, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-7453000 or showboxonline.com. KUBE 93 SUMMER JAM: June 6-7, Gorge Amphitheatre, George. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. GRIEVES: June 7, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or show boxonline.com. BRIT FLOYD: June 9, McCaw Hall, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. THE MOUNTAIN GOATS: June 10, The Showbox, Seattle. 800745-3000 or showboxonline.com. ONEREPUBLIC: June 12, Comcast Arena at Everett. 866-3328499 or comcastarenaeverett.com. ALLEN STONE: June 13, Chateau Ste. Michelle, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster. com. THE FRAY: with Barcelona and Oh Honey: June 17, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888-929-7849 or AXS.com. DIGITOUR: June 20, The Show-

box, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. STEVE EARLE & THE DUKES: June 20-21, Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Bow. 877-275-2448 or theskagit.com. SARAH McLACHLAN: June 20-21, Chateau Ste. Michelle, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster.com. RODRIGO AMARANTE: June 21, The Barboza, Seattle. 206-7099442 or thebarboza.com. MERLE HAGGARD, EMMYLOU HARRIS: June 22, Chateau Ste. Michelle, Woodinville. 800-7453000 or ticketmaster.com. GAVIN DEGRAW AND MATT NATHANSON: with Mary Lambert: June 24, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888-929-7849 or AXS.com. YNGWIE MALMSTEEN: June 26, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-7453000 or showboxonline.com. ROBYN + RÖYKSOPP: Do It Again Tour: June 26, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888-929-7849 or AXS.com. FITZ & THE TANTRUMS: June 27, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800745-3000 or showboxonline.com. MINUS THE BEAR: June 27, Columbia City Theater, Seattle. 800-838-3006 or columbiacity theater.com. THE SOULSHINE TOUR: featuring Michael Franti & Spearhead, with SOJA, Brett Dennen and Trevor Hall: June 27, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888-929-7849 or AXS.com. AN EVENING WITH JOHN LEG-

END: June 27, Mount Baker Theatre, Bellingham. 360-734-6080 or mountbakertheatre.com. PARADISO FESTIVAL: June 27-28, Gorge Amphitheatre, George. 800-745-3000 or live nation.com. CHER: June 28, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or live nation.com. JOHN LEGEND: June 28, Chateau Ste. Michelle, Woodinville. 800745-3000 or ticketmaster.com. PETER MURPHY: June 28, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. STEVE WINWOOD: June 29, Chateau Ste. Michelle, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or ticket master.com. KISS, DEF LEPPARD: June 29, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. HEART: July 1, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888-929-7849 or AXS. com. KRAFTWERK 3-D: July 1, Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877-7844849 or tickets.com. NICK CAVE & THE BAD SEEDS: July 2, Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or tickets.com. MARK LANEGAN: July 3, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. STEELY DAN: July 5-6, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888-9297849 or AXS.com. MARK LANEGAN: July 3, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. NEW ORDER: July 6, Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or tickets.com. ROCKSTAR ENERGY DRINK MAYHEM FESTIVAL: Avenged Sevenfold, Korn, Asking Alexandria, Trivium, Cannibal Corpse, Body Count featuring Ice T, Suicide Silence, Emmure, Miss May I, Mushroomhead and more: July 8, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. JURASSIC 5: July 9, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. SLIGHTLY STOOPID: with Stephen “Ragga” Marley: July 10, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888929-7849 or AXS.com. BLIND BOYS OF ALABAMA: July 11, Lincoln Theatre, Mount Vernon. 360-336-8955 or lincoln theatre.org. RINGO STARR & HIS ALLSTARR BAND: July 16, Chateau Ste. Michelle, Woodinville. 800745-3000 or ticketmaster.com. THE GO-GOs, PATTY SMYTH

& SCANDAL, MARTHA DAVIS & THE MOTELS, CUTTING CREW, NAKED EYES featuring PETE BYRNE: July 17, Chateau Ste. Michelle, Woodinville. 800-7453000 or ticketmaster.com. TEDESCHI TRUCKS BAND: with The Wood Brothers: July 17, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888929-7849 or AXS.com. THE AQUABATS: July 17, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. LYLE LOVETT & HIS LARGE BAND: July 18, Chateau Ste. Michelle, Woodinville. 800-7453000 or ticketmaster.com. THE JOHN CONLEE SHOW (classic country): July 18-19, Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Bow. 877275-2448 or theskagit.com. ANACORTES UNKNOWN MUSIC SERIES, Vol. IV: July 18-20, Anacortes Unknown. anacortes unknown.com. WINTHROP RHYTHM & BLUES FESTIVAL: July 18-20, Blues Ranch, Winthrop. 800-422-3048 or winthroptickets.com. GOO GOO DOLLS & DAUGHTRY: July 19, Chateau Ste. Michelle, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster.com. JOURNEY, STEVE MILLER BAND: July 19, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn. 800-745-3000 or live nation.com. CHEECH & CHONG, WAR: “Up in Smoke 2014”: July 19, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888-9297849 or AXS.com. SAY ANYTHING: July 19, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. JOAN BAEZ: July 20, Mount Baker Theatre, Bellingham. 360-734-6080 or mountbakertheatre.com. CHATEAU STE. MICHELLE FESTIVAL OF JAZZ: with The Manhattan Transfer, Spyro Gyra, Lee Ritenour & Dave Grusin, Jessy J: July 26, Chateau Ste. Michelle, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster.com. MÖTLEY CRÜE: July 27, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn. 800745-3000 or livenation.com. CHRIS ISAAK: July 27, Chateau Ste. Michelle, Woodinville. 800745-3000 or ticketmaster.com. BEYONCÉ, JAY Z: July 30, Safeco Field, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. FOREIGNER, STYX: Aug. 1, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888929-7849 or AXS.com. SANTANA: Aug. 1, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn. 800-7453000 or livenation.com.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, May 8, 2014 - E15

AT THE LINCOLN THEATRE

DINING GUIDE

‘La Cenerentola’

9:55 a.m. Saturday, May 10

A pair of Rossini virtuosos joins forces in “La Cenerentola”: mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato, singing her first Met performance, in the Cinderella title role, and tenor Juan Diego Flórez, as her Prince Charming. $23 adults; $19 seniors; $16 students with $2 off for Lincoln members.

Mother’s Day events CAMANO STUDIO TOUR: The 16th annual Camano Island Studio Tour will take place from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday through Sunday, May 9-11, and Saturday and Sunday, May 17-18, at locations around Camano Island and Stanwood. Pick up a self-guided tour map at local merchants or at camanoarts. org. Free. 425-478-0777. TAKE MOM SAILING: The Center for Wooden Boats will offer free boat rides from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, May 10, at Cama Beach State Park, 1880 S. West Camano Drive, Camano Island. Live music, toy boat building and more. Free. Limited parking. Discover Pass required. 360387-9361 or cwb.org. MOTHER’S DAY TEA: Enjoy a 1950s Mother’s Day Tea at 2 p.m. Saturday, May 10, at Skagit Valley Senior Village, 400 Gilkey Road, Burlington. The event will feature a variety of tea samplings and a photo booth with costumes, props, backgrounds and a professional photographer. Open to the community. RSVP: 360-755-5550 or lskiser@artegan.com.

adults, $4 seniors and ages 6 to 12, $10 families. Free for ages 5 and younger and museum members. 360-4663365 or skagitcounty.net/ museum. BRUNCH AND A MUSICAL: Enjoy a Mother’s Day Brunch followed “Shrek The Musical” on Sunday, May 11, at McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. Brunch will be served at 12:30 p.m., followed by “Shrek” at 2 p.m. Brunch: $25. “Shrek”: $15-$20. 4167727, ext. 2; mcintyrehall.org.

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TAKE MOM FOR A HIKE: The state Parks and Recreation Commission will offer free admission to all state parks on Sunday, May 11. The Discover Pass will not be required to enter state parks, but will be required to access lands managed by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Department of Natural Resources.

MOTHER’S DAY CONCERT: Meerkerk Rhododendron Gardens will host its traditional Mother’s Day concert from noon to 4 p.m. Sunday, May 11, at 3531 Meerkerk Lane, Greenbank, Whidbey Island. Enjoy Harper Tasche’s folk harp music on the Gazebo Green. Bring a garden chair MOTHER’S DAY BRUNCH: 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday, or blanket and picnic basket. $10, free for ages 15 May 11, Skagit Valley Senior and younger accompanied Village, 400 Gilkey Road, Burlington. Open to the com- by an adult. Dogs permitted munity. RSVP: 360-755-5550 on leash. 360-678-1912 or meerkerkgardens.org. or lskiser@artegan.com. FREE ADMISSION FOR MOM: Moms get in free on Mother’s Day from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, May 11, at the Skagit County Historical Museum, 501 S. Fourth St., La Conner. Check out the featured exhibit, “Relocation: The Impact of World War II on Skagit County,” along with “Dear Mother,” a special exhibit celebrating the mothers of Skagit County. $5

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Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E16 - Thursday, May 8, 2014

MOVIES

‘Neighbors’ has an ‘Animal House’-sized ‘Hangover’ By ROGER MOORE McClatchy-Tribune News Service

“Neighbors” is an “Animal House” for “The Hangover” era, a frat-boy comedy that pushes the rude and raunchy envelope into daring and dirty new territory. Hilariously coarse, reasonably shrewd and clumsily sentimental, there’s no reason it won’t earn a billion and inspire a whole new generation of party-hearty “bros” to go Greek when they go to college. The hook here is not just the appeal of this band of brothers — drinking, dope-smoking, hardliving loverboys — to their peers. They’re also the sorts of guys Mac and Kelly used to be and wish they still were. But Mac (Seth Rogen) has an office job that is pure drudgery. Kelly (Rose Byrne) is staying at home with Stella, their newborn. They have to lie to convince themselves that the obvious hasn’t come true: “Just because we have a house and a baby doesn’t mean we’re old people.” They strain to keep their old lives — sharing the occasional joint, spontaneous sex (in front of the baby), club hopping. “We can have fun AND a baby! Baby’s first Rave!” The trouble is, they can’t. And having the up-all-night kids of Delta Psi Beta move in next door just rubs their noses in it. The kids, led by Teddy (Zac Efron) and Pete (Dave Franco), may feign neighborliness and high fraternity ideals. But they’re hedonistic beasts, living to make their legends with a frat that claims it invented the toga party, beer pong and the like. Telling them to “keep it down” will never work. And despite the “invite the old people in” flattery, despite Mac’s taste for the magic mushrooms, booze and other substances the Deltas have in mass quantities, this means war. The random laughs are sprinkled throughout this Rogenesque comedy — the shock-value pro-

Zac Efron (left) and Dave Franco star in “Neighbors.” Universal Pictures via AP

behavior when they make “headlines.” HH1⁄2 I love the stuff about the older Cast: Seth Rogen, Rose couple straining to still seem Byrne, Zac Efron, Dave Franco, “cool” to these kids who have no Christopher Mintz-Plasse, Lisa regard for anybody who isn’t at Kudrow their frat house, partying like it’s Running time: 1:36 1979. The fun is supposed to build MPAA rating: R for pervasive language, strong crude and from the elaborate plots the marsexual content, graphic nudity, rieds and the bros engage in to foil and drug use throughout each other. Only, it doesn’t. Whoever the screenwriters, fanity that the parents use in front the Judd Apatow-trained Rogen of the toddler, the college dean makes sure there are a dizzying (Lisa Kudrow) who will only do array of killer one-liners, such as something about the fraternity’s Mac’s reaction to the first time

‘NEIGHBORS’

he sees Teddy shirtless: “He’s like something a gay guy designed in a laboratory!” Byrne, as she proved in “Bridesmaids” and “Get Him to the Greek,” can hang with the bad boys in terms of laying it all out there and cursing like a sailor. But for such a short comedy, “Neighbors” drags. Director Nicholas Stoller creates little momentum between the schemes and counter-schemes. Peripheral characters, while funny, show up and stop the action. Some of the “I love you, man” riffs between

the bros are meant to be funny because they go on forever. The outrageous stunts and boundary-pushing gags are as riotously funny as anything in any “Hangover” movie. And telling this story from both the frat brothers’ and the indignant nearlyadults next door’s point of view broadens the appeal. Yeah, we used to be like that. In our dreams. But in between the belly laughs, “Neighbors” feels like a pulled punch, a mean comedy with a soft streak, a “Hangover” that never delivers the buzz.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, May 8, 2014 - E17

MOVIES AT AREA THEATERS ANACORTES CINEMAS May 9-16 The Metropolitan Opera: La Cenerentola (NR): Saturday: 9:55 a.m. The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (PG-13): Friday: 12:55, 3:45, 6:30, 9:15; Saturday: 10:05, 12:55, 3:45, 6:30, 9:15; Sunday: 10:05, 12:55, 3:45, 6:30; Monday-Thursday: 12:55, 3:45, 6:30 The Other Woman (PG-13): Friday: 1:05, 3:35, 6:40, 9:05; Saturday: 10:15, 1:05, 3:35, 6:40, 9:05; Sunday: 10:15, 1:05, 3:35, 6:40; Monday-Thursday: 1:05, 3:35, 6:40 The Grand Budapest Hotel (R): Friday-Saturday: 1:15, 3:25, 6:50, 9:00; Sunday: 10:25, 1:15, 3:25, 6:50; Monday-Thusday: 1:15, 3:25, 6:50 360-293-6620 BLUE FOX DRIVE-IN Oak Harbor May 9-11 The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (PG-13) and Captain America: The American Soldier (PG-13). First movie starts at approximately 8:30 p.m. 360-675-5667 CONCRETE THEATRE May 9-11 The Grand Budapest Hotel (R): Friday: 7:30 p.m.; Saturday: 7:30 p.m.; Sunday: 6:30 p.m. DisneyNature’s Bears (G): Saturday: 5 p.m.; Sunday: 4 p.m. 360-941-0403 CASCADE MALL THEATRES Burlington For listings: 888-AMC-4FUN (888-262-4386). OAK HARBOR CINEMAS May 9-16 The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (PG-13): Friday: 12:50, 3:45, 6:30, 9:15; Saturday: 10:00, 12:50, 3:45, 6:30, 9:15; Sunday: 10:00, 12:50, 3:45, 6:30; Monday-Thursday: 12:50, 3:45, 6:30 The Other Woman (PG-13): Friday-Saturday: 1:00, 9:10; Sunday-Thursday: 1:00 Heaven Is for Real (PG): Friday: 3:25, 6:40; Saturday-Sunday: 10:20, 3:25, 6:40; Monday-Thursday: 3:25, 6:40 The Grand Budapest Hotel (R): Friday: 1:10, 3:35, 6:50, 9:05; Saturday: 10:10, 1:10, 3:35, 6:50, 9:05; Sunday: 10:10, 1:10, 3:35, 6:50; Monday-Thursday: 1:10, 3:35, 6:50 360-279-2226 STANWOOD CINEMAS May 9-16 The Metropolitan Opera: La Cenerentola (NR): Saturday: 9:55 a.m. Legends of Oz: Dorothy’s Return (PG): Friday: 1:20, 3:55, 7:00, 9:00; Saturday: 2:00, 3:55, 7:00, 9:00; Sunday-Thursday: 1:20, 3:55, 7:00, 9:00 Neighbors (R): 12:50, 3:05, 6:40, 8:50 The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (PG-13): 12:40, 3:35, 6:30, 9:25 The Other Woman (PG-13): 1:00, 3:25, 6:20, 9:10 Heaven Is for Real (PG): 1:10, 9:20 The Grand Budapest Hotel (R): 3:45, 6:50 360-629-0514

MINI-REVIEWS Compiled from news services. Ratings are one to four stars. “Bad Words” — I loved the misanthrope played by Jason Bateman in his directorial debut, and you might, too, if your sense of humor is just sick enough. A loophole has allowed this big bowl of hate to compete against fourthgraders in a spelling bee, where he spews insults with a deadpan style that leaves his victims speechless. A pitchblack dark comedy. Comedy, R, 89 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “Captain America: The Winter Soldier” — The more screen time Chris Evans accrues as Captain America, the more engaging the performance. He’s terrific in this adventure, more complex and more compelling than in his 2011 debut. Amid well-choreographed action sequences and a couple of nifty twists and turns, we get another rock-solid chapter in the big-screen story of Marvel. Scarlett Johansson, Samuel L. Jackson and Robert Redford co-star. Sci-fi action, PG-13, 136 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “Devil’s Knot” — Atom Egoyan’s “Devil’s Knot” is a respectful and well-intentioned fictionalization of the West Memphis Three case of three teenagers convicted of killing little boys but eventually let free. Lacking in any real new insight, it recounts twists and turns already better explained in a number of documentaries. Colin Firth and Reese Witherspoon star. Crime drama, not rated, 115 minutes. HH “Draft Day” — The general manager of the hapless Cleveland Browns (Kevin Costner) tries to coax some star power during the NFL draft in this sentimental, predictable and thoroughly entertaining movie. I would have liked to see less soapopera subplot (a pregnant girlfriend, an egotistical team owner) and more inside football machinations. Jennifer Garner, Denis Leary, Frank Langella and Chadwick Boseman co-star. Sports drama, PG-13, 110 minutes). HHH “Fading Gigolo” — Writerdirector John Turturro casts himself as the lead in this offbeat and sometimes just

plain nutso story about a florist who takes money to service beautiful women, including Sharon Stone and Sofia Vergara, and gives a cut to his pimp (Woody Allen). This improbable film is all over the map, veering from pathos to absurdist comedy to romance to weirdness for the sake of weirdness. Comedy, R, 90 minutes. HH “Frozen” — When a queen with icy powers (voice of Idina Menzel) accidentally freezes her kingdom, she runs away and her intrepid sister (Kristen Bell) goes to find her. Sure to delight kids and captivate adults, Disney’s musical “Frozen” is the instant favorite for the animated feature Oscar. Animated musical, PG, 102 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “Hateship Loveship” — Kristen Wiig’s performance as a caretaker duped into believing she’s being courted is so beautifully muted it takes a while to appreciate the loveliness of the notes she’s hitting. She’s playing someone a bit, well, crazy, but her quiet resolve is kind of heroic. She’s pretty awesome. With Guy Pearce, Hailee Steinfeld, Nick Nolte. Drama, R, 101 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “Locke” — In writer-director Steven Knight’s mesmerizing jewel of a film, Tom Hardy is so brilliant we readily watch him drive a car and talk on the hands-free phone for virtually the entirety of the movie. It’s a beautiful film to watch, as the headlights seem animated in the rain-filtered colors of the night while a man drives and drives and makes life-changing phone calls. Drama, R, 85 minutes. HHHH “Mr. Peabody & Sherman” — The old TV cartoon about a genius dog, his adopted son and their time-traveling adventures becomes a whipsmart, consistently funny and good-natured film with terrific voice performances led by Ty Burrell as Peabody. Lots of sight gags and goofy puns, with some clever one-liners intended for the parents in the audience. Animated adventure, PG, 90 minutes. HHH “Noah” — One of the most dazzling and unforgettable biblical epics ever put on film. Director Darren Aronof-

sky has delivered an emotionally involving and sometimes loony interpretation of the tale of a God-loving man (Russell Crowe, ferocious and razor-sharp) and his ark. Jennifer Connelly, Ray Winstone, Emma Watson and Anthony Hopkins round out a stellar cast. Biblical epic, PG-13, 131 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “Oculus” — Here is a horror movie that will reach out and grab that spot on your spine that produces all the chills. Thanks to the wonderfully twisted style of director Mike Flanagan and four terrific young actors playing brother and sister as children and adults, “Oculus” is one of the more elegant scary movies in recent memory. Horror, R, 105 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “RoboCop” — The 2014 version of “RoboCop” takes advantage of the superior technology available now, but doesn’t match up to the original when it comes to story and cast. As Alex Murphy, the wounded officer converted into RoboCop, Joel Kinnaman comes across as a wooden human being AND a wooden robot. Sci-fi action, PG-13, 118 minutes. HH “The Bag Man” — One can’t help but wonder what Robert De Niro and John Cusack saw in the script for “The Bag Man” that made two of our most interesting actors sign up for this irritating mess of a movie. It’s warmed-over Tarantino mixed with a third-rate tribute to the Coen brothers with a dose of David Lynch-ian madness. Thriller, R, 108 minutes. H “The Other Woman” — This would-be comedy is so tone-deaf, so excruciatingly awful, it’s a minor miracle the studio didn’t confiscate the original print and lock it up. None of the stars — Cameron Diaz, Nikolaj CosterWaldau or especially the big and broad Leslie Mann — escapes this mess with a shred of dignity. Comedy, PG-13, 109 minutes. H “The Railway Man” — Based on the true story of a British Army officer (Colin Firth) in World War II and the Japanese Imperial Army officer who tortured him. This is another prestige film that sometimes feels more like a history assignment than entertainment. Sometimes it’s hard to watch. It’s also

hard to imagine anyone watching it and not being deeply moved. Drama, R, 108 minutes. HHH “3 Days to Kill” — The term “guilty pleasure” was invented for this kind of movie. Nearly every other scene is so audaciously terrible, you don’t know whether to cringe or chortle. But the star power of Kevin Costner as an aging CIA hit man turns schlock into pure entertainment. Action, PG-13, 117 minutes. HHH “Transcendence” — In a bold, beautiful, sometimes confounding flight of futuristic speculation, Johnny Depp plays a scientific visionary whose thoughts and personality are uploaded before he dies. He uses his everincreasing intelligence to cure the sick and heal the planet, but fears arise that he will accumulate so much power and intelligence he’ll become the greatest threat to freedom the world has ever known. What a stunning piece of work. Sci-fi thriller, PG-13, 119 minutes. HHHH “Under the Skin” — An alien on Earth (Scarlett Johannson) cruises Scotland in a van, hitting on young lads, in a stark mood piece that drills into your psyche and will stay there forever. It’s weird, polarizing work, but I found it the most memorable movie of the first few months of 2014. Scifi drama, R, 108 minutes. HHHH “Veronica Mars” — This big-screen update of the Kristen Bell TV series, the result of a Kickstarter campaign, looks and feels like a glorified TV movie, with mostly unexceptional performances and ridiculous plot developments no more innovative than you’d see on a dozen network TV detective shows. Crime comedy, PG-13, 108 minutes. HH “Walking With the Enemy” — In a plodding and clunky drama based on an amazing true-life story, a Hungarian Jew wears a stolen Nazi uniform and assumes the identity of the enemy to save lives during World War II. As earnest and heartfelt as a movie can be, “Walking With the Enemy” never misses an opportunity to embrace a cliche. War drama, PG-13, 123 minutes. HH


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E18 - Thursday, May 8, 2014

OUT & ABOUT ART

Wosk Family Trust”: This exhibit highlights a collection of crazy quilts and embroidered suzanis that were collected by California artist Miriam “DRAW, STITCH AND BURN: EVE DEISHER AND Wosk over her lifetime (1947-2010), and served LANNY BERGNER”: The as inspirational pieces for exhibition is on display through May 18 at Gallery her elaborate collage and painted works. The museCygnus, 109 Commercial, um will also have images La Conner. Deisher comof select works from Wosk bines paper, fabric and as examples of how textiles thread as woven material becomes ethereal structure, influenced her art. “Color in the Great woven thread and wire Depression”: The exhibit become line and all of it features selected quilts is her drawing. Bergner Anacortes, as part of the Spring Film Series hosted employs pyrography tech- from the Josie Teeter by movie man Nick Alphin. The 1947 film stars Gene “MEMOIRS OF A BIRD”: Schlotterback CollecFABRIC ART: A show niques on sheets of metal Tierney, Rex Harrison, George Sanders and a young Check out Northwest tion, including a hexagon of quilts by fabric artist mesh causing the visible Natalie Wood. In 1900, a young widow finds her artist Anne Schreivogl’s Grandmother’s Flower Louise Harris continues surfaces to shift, patterns seaside cottage is haunted, and forms a unique new exhibition, showing through May 31 at McCool relationship with the resident ghost. Free. 360-293appearing and disappearing Garden quilt, a Lily quilt through May 30 at La Con- Gallery, 711 Commercial as one’s gaze moves across and Circle Star quilt along 1910, ext. 21, or library.cityofanacortes.org. ner Seaside Gallery, 101 with some recently comAve., Anacortes. The show the forms. Gallery hours First St., La Conner. The pleted quilt tops on display will also feature paintings are noon to 5 p.m. Friday show features Schreivogl’s by Anne Martin McCool, 6230 or smithandvallee. States — numbering some through Sunday. 360-708for the first time. upbeat, colorful paintings, 562 tribes when her project 4787 or gallerycygnus.com. Museum hours are 11 jewelry by Carole Cunning- com. delighting in the reader’s began in 2012. Project 562 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday ham and Debbie Aldrich, and writer’s world, with CAMANO STUDIO is one of the few contemwood by George Way and OUTDOOR SCULPTURE through Sunday. $7, $5 stuimages of typewriters, porary photographic proj- EXHIBIT: The La Conner dents and military with ID, Art Learmonth, sculptures TOUR: The 16th annual books, and letter-writing. Camano Island Studio Tour ects of this magnitude to be Outdoor Sculpture Exhibit free for members and chilby Tracy Powell, ceramics The gallery is open from dren ages 11 and younger. by Patsy Chamberlain and will take place on Mother’s completed exclusively by a is on display through 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. 360- Barbara Hathaway, handDay weekend from 10 a.m. Native photographer, and 360-466-4288 or laconner March 1, 2015, at public 202-2956 or laconnersea the only large-scale effort to 5 p.m. Friday through quilts.org. woven scarves by Martha locations around La Considegallery.com. to capture the vibrancy Sunday, May 9-11 and Tottenham and gourd art ner. The annual juried of contemporary Native May 17-18, at numerous by Vicki Hampel. Gallery EXHIBITIONS AT MoNA: exhibition features work PAINTINGS AND PASculture through interviews by some of the Northwest’s Three new exhibits continhours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. locations around Camano TELS: “Amanda Houston: and the collection of stoIsland and Stanwood. Tuesday through Sunday. most accomplished artists. ue through June 15 at The Oils and Pastels” continues 360-293-3577 or mccoolart. Check out artwork in a ries. Museum hours are 10 For information, including Museum of Northwest Art, through June 3 at Scott variety of media offered by a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday com. a map of the sculptures and 121 S. First St., La Conner: Milo Gallery, 420 Commerthrough Sunday. $10 adults, works available for sale, 41 juried artists and three “Lucy Mae Martin: cial Ave., Anacortes. The $8 students, military and galleries. Pick up a selfPAINTINGS & CERAMHands On”: The artworks call 360-466-3125 or visit show includes Houston’s seniors, $25 family, free for townoflaconner.org. ICS: An exhibition of new guided tour map at local in the exhibition are brilliantly colored oils as members and ages 5 and paintings by Becky Fletch- merchants or at camanowrapped and sandblasted well as a selection of softer er and ceramics by Jeffrey arts.org. Free. 425-478-0777. younger. 253-272-4258 or stones representing a new QUILTS & TEXTILES: pastel landscapes. Also tacomaartmuseum.org. Hanks continues through side of the Skagit Valley New exhibits continue showing: oils by Seattle June 1 at Smith & Vallee “PHOTOGRAPHIC PRESartist’s heavy, creative through June 29 at the La artist Brooke BorcherdSAN JUAN ART TOUR: Gallery, 5742 Gilkey Ave., ENCE AND CONTEMPOwork life. Martin says, “I Conner Quilt & Textile ing, black and white phoThe 23rd anniversary San Edison. Fletcher’s new RARY INDIANS: MATIKA Museum, 703 S. Second St., am inspired to engrave tography by David Lucas, body of work, “ReiteraWILBUR’S PROJECT 562”: Juan Island Artists’ Studio La Conner. relief-style because there pastels by Pat Meras, Tour will take place from tions,” explores the repeat- The exhibition opens Satare millions of years “Made by Hand: Marioils by Donna Trent and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday ed lines and shapes offered urday, May 17, and contucked behind the surface anne Burr”: Burr handmixed media by Renate and Sunday, May 31-June visually by nature. Hanks’ tinues through Oct. 5 at of every beautiful, unique paints her designs on silk Trapkowski. Gallery hours ceramics are fired in either the Tacoma Art Museum, 1, at 15 artists’ studios. and then creates a complex stone, and the sandblastare 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. a wood-burning kiln or 1701 Pacific Ave., Tacoma. Check out a variety of ing reveals these layers. design with hand stitching Monday through Saturday. in clay containers known original artworks by more Photographer Matika I enjoy engraving Braille and applique, creating a 360-293-6938 or scottmilo. as saggers, which infuses than 40 artists on display Wilbur, a member of the because it encourages total rich surface that catches com. the surface with random Swinomish and Tulalip and offered for sale from the light and seems to glow interaction with my work flashes from the flame tribes, has taken on the task the source, with a chance … I believe that everybody from within. “LANDSCAPE/MINDstrike. Gallery hours are 11 of photographing every to enter a drawing for art should be able to enjoy the “Suzanis and Crazy SCAPE”: A show featuring a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday federally recognized indig- at each location. Maps and Quilts: Recent Acquisiarts in their own individual artists Mike Adams, Susan- through Sunday. 360-766enous nation in the United brochures for the free self- tions from the Miriam way.” na Bluhm, Jennifer Campbell and Jennifer Zwick IN THE ART BAR: Artcontinues through June 1 work by Cherie Donovan- at Anchor Art Space, 216 Smith is on display through Commercial Ave., AnaMay 31 in the Lincoln cortes. Using landscape as a Theatre’s Art Bar, 712 S. metaphor for a place within First St., Mount Vernon. the mind, regional artists Donovan-Smith, co-creator use sculpture, installation, of the newly founded video and mixed media Artisan Craft Cooperative works to create landscapes in Sedro-Woolley, paints that suggest memory, vibrant, celebratory images humor and fear. Curated of women and creates by Ann Chadwick Reid. whimsical felted objects Gallery hours are noon to and “characters” for her 5 p.m. Friday through Sunown line of cards. 360-336- day. 360-755-3140 or anchor “The Ghost & Mrs. Muir” will be shown at 7 p.m. Friday at the Anacortes Public Library, 1220 10th St., 8955 or lincolntheatre.org. artspace.org.

FILM SERIES

guided tour are available at Friday Harbor businesses or at sanjuanislandartists. com.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, May 8, 2014 - E19

OUT & ABOUT “Shapes of Abstraction from the Permanent Collection”: The exhibit offers a study of form and color of new acquisitions with an ekphrastic poem (description of a visual work of art) by Kathleen Flenniken. Curated by exhibitions director Lisa Young. “John Cole: A Historical Perspective”: Recognized as one of the Pacific Northwest’s leading landscape artists, John Cole (19362007) painted in the region for almost four decades. Favoring abstraction over literal description, Cole’s distinctive, muscular style sublimely expresses the quintessential features of the majestic Northwest landscape — water, mountains and trees. The museum is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday and Monday. Free admission. 360-466-4446 or museum ofnwart.org.

CAR SHOWS ALL AMERICAN CAR SHOW: The Humane Society of Skagit Valley will host the All American Car Show from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, May 31, at the HSSV Adoption Center, 18841 Kelleher Road, Burlington. Any Americanmake car from any year can be entered. Trophies will be awarded in 12 categories. $10 entry fee. Free for spectators. Proceeds will benefit the Humane Society of Skagit Valley. For information, contact Kandi at 360-853-3373 or skagithumane.com.

sors and Western Police Chief Darin Rasmussen to discuss social networking and cyber harassment at 7 p.m. Wednesday, May 14, in Academic West Room 204. Free. For information, contact WWU Professor of Psychology David N. Sattler at 360-650-3525 or email David.Sattler@wwu. edu. CLIMATE CHANGE: Bill McKibben, one of America’s best-known environCraig Parrish mentalists, will present Skagit Valley Herald “350: The Most Important Number in the World” at 3 p.m. Saturday, May 17, at the Western Washington University Performing Arts Center Mainstage in Bellingham.

‘DEAR MOTHER’ A special exhibit celebrating the mothers of Skagit County continues through June 1 at the Skagit County Historical Museum, 501 S. Fourth St., La Conner. The exhibit features photos, flowers and china. The museum is open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday. $5 adults, $4 seniors and children ages 6 to 12, $10 families, free for members and ages 5 and younger. 360466-3365 or skagitcounty .net/museum.

Democrats meeting at 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 13, at the Anacortes Public Library, 1220 10th St., Anacortes. A moderated period of questions and comments will follow the speaker. The meeting is open to the public. Bring a nonperishable food donation for the food LECTURES bank. For information, AND TALKS contact Corinne at 360“HUMAN TRAFFICKING: 293-7114. IT’S HAPPENING HERE”: CYBER BULLYING: WestAndrea Doll, co-chair of ern Washington University Skagit County Coalition in Bellingham will host Against Trafficking, will speak at the next Fidalgo an expert panel of profes-

ALSO ... MODEL TRAINS: The Whatcom-Skagit Model Railroad Club will host an open house from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, May 10, at 1469 Silver Run Lane, Alger. The club operates large, permanent HO- and N-scale model railroad layouts. This will be the last open house until fall. Admission is by donation to help maintain and expand the layouts. whatcomskagitmrc.org. TRAWLER FEST: The annual event for powerboat cruising enthusiasts will take place Tuesday through Saturday, May 13-17, at Cap Sante Marina, 1019 Q Ave., Anacortes. Check out an extensive in-water selection of new and preowned powerboats, daily seminars and activities, and dozens of exhibitors offering a variety of boating products, services and accessories. $15 daily. Seminars, evening programs and pre-Fest “Trawler University” classes require additional fees. Trawlerfest.com.

THE MIGHTY SKAGIT: A WONDROUS WATERSHED EXHIBIT: Come to an “adults only” event from 5 to 7 p.m. Thursday, May 15, at the Children’s Museum of Skagit County, 550 Cascade Mall Drive, Burlington. Learn about the major overhaul Skagit Fisheries Enhancement Group and the Children’s Museum are giving the museum’s River Exhibit, which will become a Skagit River Watershed 3-D “Mountains to Sound” display. The interactive exhibit will educate children, parents and others on how they can help preserve and improve the watershed as a source of clean water for fish habitat, recreation and a renewable source of power. RSVP: cate@ skagitcm.org. POETRY FEST: The Skagit River Poetry Fes-

tival will be held May 15-18 at various locations throughout La Conner, featuring some of the most provocative voices in contemporary poetry, including former U.S. Poet Laureate Robert Hass, National Book Award winner Mark Doty and Pacific Northwest authors Tom Robbins and Sherman Alexie, among many others. Performances, panel discussions, interviews and workshops. Tickets available at brownpaper tickets.com/event/520248. skagitriverpoetry.org.

methane digester, lunch at Washington Bulb Co., then to Sakata Seed Co. $20$30, through PayPal (no account needed). skagit onians.org or 360-3363974.

“RELOCATION: THE IMPACT OF WORLD WAR II ON SKAGIT COUNTY”: The exhibit continues through June 29 at the Skagit County Historical Museum, 501 Fourth St., La Conner. Learn how World War II affected the residents of Skagit County, including those who were relocated to internment SPRING FARM TOUR: camps. Museum hours are Skagitonians to Preserve 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday Farmland will host its through Sunday. AdmisSpring Farm Tour from 8 sion: $5 adults, $4 seniors a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday, May and children ages 6 to 16, starting at Dike Dis12, $10 families, free for trict 3 headquarters, 20800 members and children ages Dike Road, Conway, then 5 and younger. 360-466to Mesman Dairy, Farm 3365 or skagitcounty.net/ Power NW to see the museum.

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360 May 8, 2014  

Arts, entertainment and recreation for Skagit Valley

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