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The Civil War’s unseen roots PAGE 3

Skagit Valley Herald Thursday March 6, 2014

At the Lincoln

Reviews

Movies

Art gallery exhibit features powerful women in Skagit Valley

Music: Lea Michele, Pharrell Video Games: “Thief”

“300” sequel is a more visually stunning but less thrilling epic

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Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E2 - Thursday, March 6, 2014

NEW ON DVD THIS WEEK “12 Years a Slave”: In 1977, the miniseries “Roots” awakened the national conscience about the inhumanity of slavery that remains one of the most appalling periods in American history. The Oscar-nominated “12 Years a Slave” adds an exclamation point to that production through the true life story of Solomon Northup (Chiwetel Ejiofor), the New York State citizen — a free man — who was kidnapped and made to work on a plantation in New Orleans in the 1800s. Through an Oscar-worthy performance by Ejiofor and Oscar-winning newcomer Lupita Nyong’o, director Steve McQueen has fashioned a film that will haunt and enslave your heart and mind. These images come through the life Northup lives under the control of heartless masters and the constant threat from those who consider slaves to be less important than livestock. McQueen built the movie as a constant battle between one man’s efforts to maintain his humanity and the efforts of others to strip it away. “12 Years a Slave” is set against the horrors of slavery, but it’s not just about slaves. It works so magnificently because it looks at how far a person can be pushed and still hold on to the last strands of dignity and basic human rights. It’s a message that cuts across all demographics. The Hunger Games: Catching Fire”: Katniss (Jennifer Lawrence) must fight again during the 75th Hunger Games. The second film in what will be a fourpart series features the same elements as the first. The problem is that it also features a structure that is such a duplication of the first movie that it feels more like a rerun than a chance to move ahead. Director Francis Lawrence has matched the visual splendor of the first movie from the landscapes to the costuming. He also shows a competence with the battle sequences, from a terrifying confrontation with mutated monkeys to a spinning cornucopia. But despite being presented with a more diverse group of Hunger Games competitors, he does little to play up their individuality. “Catching Fire” is a good-enough representation of the second book that it won’t upset fans. Those who don’t know the book will find a film that is a mildly altered version of the first movie in the series. That makes it easy enough

YOUR ARTS, ENTERTAINMENT AND RECREATION GUIDE TO WHAT’S GOING ON IN SKAGIT COUNTY AND THE SURROUNDING AREAS

Upcoming movie releases Following is a partial schedule of coming movies on DVD. Release dates are subject to change: MARCH 11 The Book Thief - Fox The Broken Circle Breakdown - New Video Group Homefront - Universal Inside Llewyn Davis - Sony Out of the Furnace - Fox The Outsider - Image American Hustle - Sony MARCH 18 Frozen - Disney Here Comes the Devil - Magnolia Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom - Anchor Bay Saving Mr. Banks - Disney n McClatchy-Tribune News Service

to skip and wait for the final two movies. “Super Bowl XLVIII Champions Seattle Seahawks”: Recap and interviews. “Doctor Who: The Time of the Doctor”: Threat to the universe brings multiple Doctors together. “Breaking Amish: Season 1”: Amish experience the outside world. “A Cross to Bear”: Woman looks for help after tragic moment. “Oldboy”: Man seeks revenge after being held captive for 20 years. “Elmo’s World: All About Animals”: Children pretend to be different animals. “The Last Days on Mars”: Liev Schreiber stars in this tale of what explorers to the red planet find. “Comet Encounter”: Documentary on comet that hurtled toward the sun in 2013. “Cold Comes the Night”: Crime drama starring Brian Cranston. “Noah and the Great Ark”: Three documentaries examine the legend. “NOVA: Alien Planets Revealed”: A look at more than 750 planets. “The Visitor”: In this 1979 film, intergalactic warrior joins a cosmic Christ figure in a battle against a demonic 8-year-old girl. “Rawhide: The Seventh Season, Volume One and Volume Two”: Both volumes feature 15 hours of digitally remastered episodes. “The Venture Bros. Season Five”: Animated series starring the Venture family. n Rick Bentley, The Fresno Bee

This Weekend

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Boise State University professor of piano brings his love of Gershwin to Trinity Lutheran Church in Mount Vernon on Sunday

Inside

SUBMISSIONS Email features@skagitpublishing.com, vrichardson@skagitpublishing. com (recreation items) Deadline: 5 p.m. Friday for the following Thursday edition Phone 360-416-2135 Hand-deliver 1215 Anderson Road Mount Vernon, WA 98274 Mailing address P.O. Box 578 Mount Vernon, WA 98273 Online events calendar To list your event on our website, visit goskagit.com and look for the Events Calendar on the home page

Get Involved........................................ 6 Music, Video Game Reviews...........8-9 On Stage, Tuning Up....................10-11 Travel............................................12-13 Movie Listings, Reviews..............16-17 Out & About.................................18-19

HAVE A STORY IDEA? w For arts and entertainment, contact Features Editor Craig Parrish at 360-416-2135 or features@skagitpublishing.com w For recreation, contact staff writer Vince Richardson at 360-416-2181 or vrichardson@ skagitpublishing.com TO ADVERTISE 360-424-3251


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Thursday, March 6, 2014 - E3

COMMUNITY

THE UNSEEN ROOTS OF THE CIVIL WAR Re-enactment set for today at Burlington Public Library

David Imburgia (left) portrays Captain J.D. Brock, the leader of Company G, 15th Alabama Infantry. Matt Cleman plays Sergeant Rufus Lawless. Submitted photo

and children. Today’s program is a presentation of the Washington Civil War Association re“Making Connections through ROOTS enactors will portray the events that led Project,” a collaboration between the up to the outbreak of the Civil War in the library and the Skagit Valley Genealogical living history drama, “The Civil War: Defin- Society. ing Our Nation,” from 7 to 9 p.m. today at David Imburgia and Matt Clemans, the Burlington Public Library Community dressed in authentic period costumes, will Meeting Room, 820 E. Washington Ave., bring to life the bitter struggles between Burlington. the states. Several women and children The association, which has nearly 900 will join the performance and contribute members, portrays all military sides and historical background as to war’s impact on branches in the Civil War. Dozens of families in the North and South. re-enactors participate in numerous Admission is free. More information: events each year, including civilians, women 360-755-0760 or karenp@burlingtonwa.gov. Skagit Valley Herald staff


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Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

MOVIES

Next year’s Oscars: Too early to call it for ‘Unbroken’? By GLENN WHIPP Los Angeles Times

Angelina Jolie showed up at the Academy Awards on Sunday night on the arm of partner Brad Pitt, who ended up winning an Oscar as one of the producers of “12 Years a Slave.” Don’t be surprised if you see Jolie at the Dolby again next year, this time with Pitt applauding from the audience as Jolie wins the Oscar for directing “Unbroken,” a survival tale depicting the life of World War II hero and former Olympic distance runner Louis Zamperini. Too soon? Definitely. But after spending the past six months writing about “12 Years a Slave” and “Gravity,” can you blame us for wanting to take just a peek at the movies that will likely by vying for next year’s awards? Here’s how the lineup may shake out: “Unbroken” (Dec. 25): Jolie has already been on the trail, talking to Tom Brokaw on the “Today” show about adapting Laura Hillenbrand’s best-seller. “I imagine that for the last 10-something years, (Zamperini has) been sitting there having a coffee in the morning and wondering who’s going to make this movie,” Jolie told Brokaw. “And I’ve been sitting in my room thinking, ‘What am I supposed to be doing with my life? I wanna do something important … I need some help. I need some guidance. Where is it?’ And it was right outside my window,” noting the Zamperini lives in her Los Angeles neighborhood. Zamperini, now 97, ran in the 1936 Olympics, wowed (and met) Hitler, flew a B-24 bomber during World War II, survived 47 days in shark-infested Pacific Ocean waters after a crash landing and then endured brutal treatment as a prisoner of war. So, yeah, just a little drama. Get to recognize Jack O’Connell. Playing Zamperini, the young British actor will be the season’s new-

needs to do is remind voters, come autumn, that this wonderful movie deserves some recognition. No Anderson movie has been nominated for best picture. This would be a fine place to start. “Inherent Vice” (Dec. 12): While we’re on the subject of filmmakers long overdue for an Oscar, Paul Thomas Anderson’s latest is an adaptation of Thomas Pynchon’s comic detective novel. Set in Los Angeles as the ’60s bleed into the ’70s, the film stars Joaquin Phoenix as a pothead private eye investigating the disappearance of his ex-girlfriend. Phoenix, so good (and so different) in Anderson’s “The Master” and Spike Jonze’s “Her,” might be the most interesting actor working today. And we shouldn’t have to sell you on PTA. “The Giver” (Aug. 15): No list of best picture contenders would be complete without at least one entry from the Weinstein Co. Based on Lois Lowry’s critically acclaimed young-adult novel, “The Giver” concerns a utopian society that has eliminated pain and strife at the expense of love and exhilaration. The cast includes Jordan Strauss / Invision via AP Meryl Streep and Jeff Bridges, with Phillip Noyce directing. It’s Presenter Angelina Jolie poses in the press room with Alfonso Cuaron, as he holds his award not the kind of movie the acadfor best director for “Gravity” during the Oscars at the Dolby Theatre on Sunday in Los Angeles. emy normally falls in line behind, Don’t be surprised if you see Jolie at the Dolby again next year, this time as Jolie wins the Oscar but Weinstein has a track record for directing “Unbroken,” a survival tale depicting the life of World War II hero and former Olympic of salesmanship. distance runner Louis Zamperini. “Jersey Boys” (June 20): Clint Eastwood brings the Tony comer to know. Case of Benjamin Button,” “The American Film Institute’s AFI Award-winning musical biography “Interstellar” (Nov. 7): Can Social Network” and “The Girl Fest in November last year but, of Frankie Vallie and the Four Christopher Nolan’s latest sci-fi With the Dragon Tattoo” — have at the last moment, was pushed Seasons to the screen. Really. This brain-bender find the wormhole all been in the best picture conver- to this year. We were told at the is either going to be the feel-good, into voters’ hearts? Details about sation, though this one feels a bit time that perfectionistic Miller populist movie of the year or the the time travel epic are scarce, but more like the one preceding those, just needed a bit more time to film version of Eastwood talking given the filmmaker and the cast “Zodiac.” And that’s OK, because, massage the final cut. Particularly to an empty chair. Either way, oh, — Matthew McConaughey, Anne for our money, that’s the best of for Steve Carell, who plays Du what a night! Hathaway, Jessica Chastain, Matt the lot. Pont, this has the potential to be a “Exodus” (Dec. 12): Christian Damon and Casey Affleck — “Foxcatcher” (unscheduled career-changer. Bale is Moses. Need we say more? expectations are understandably 2014): Bennett Miller follows his “The Grand Budapest Hotel” OK. Ridley Scott directs. More? sky-high. Oscar-nominated “Moneyball” (March 7): We’ve already seen Aaron Paul is playing Joshua. “Gone Girl” (Oct. 3): Gillian with an altogether different true Wes Anderson’s latest, a manBlow that horn, yo! Flynn’s popular mystery-thriller story — the relationship between nered and manic caper movie “The Lego Movie” (currently has Ben Affleck playing a husparanoid chemical fortune heir about an elegant hotel concierge in theaters): Because everything band suspected of killing his wife John du Pont and an Olympic (Ralph Fiennes), and can hapis awesome!!! And with Pixar not (Rosamund Pike) after she goes gold-medal wrestler who was his pily report that it can take its releasing a movie this year, it easmissing. Director David Fincher’s longtime friend. place among the filmmaker’s best ily moves to the front of the list last three movies — “The Curious The film was slated to open the works. Now all Fox Searchlight for at least animated feature.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, March 6, 2014 - E5

THIS WEEKENDin the area SPRING STUDIO TOUR

‘My Favorite Gershwin’ Dr. Del Parkinson (left), professor of piano at Boise State University, will present “My Favorite Gershwin” at 3 p.m. Sunday, March 9, at Trinity Lutheran Church, 301 S. 18th St., Mount Vernon. The audio-visual recital/lecture on the music of George Gershwin will feature some of the composer’s best known works, including song transcriptions, piano preludes and excerpts from “Porgy and Bess” and “Rhapsody in Blue.” $5 suggested donation at the door. skagitmusicteachers.

COMEDY SHOW, AUCTION The “Laugh Your Tail Off” Comedy Show and Auction will take place at 5 p.m. Saturday, March 8, at the Tulalip Resort & Casino, Orca Ballroom, 10200 Quil Ceda Blvd., Marysville. Featuring comedians Ivan Decker, Neill McLaughlin, Jen Seaman and Damian Johnson, and emceed by KING 5 News’ Jesse Jones, the event will include the live show, dinner, beverages, a silent auction and more. $95. Proceeds will benefit the NOAH Animal Adoption & Spay/Neuter Center in Stanwood. For tickets or sponsorship information, call 360-629-7055, email donate@thenoahcenter.org or visit thenoahcenter.org.

The Whidbey Working Artists’ Spring Studio Tour will take place from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday through Sunday, March 7-9, at locations around Whidbey Island. Some 25 artists will display their work at 17 working studios and other venues, with many artists offering demonstrations of their creative process and techniques. Find a map for the free self-guided tour at whidbeyworkingartists.com.

PENN COVE MUSSELFEST The 28th annual event, set for March 7-9, will begin with the Mussel Mingle from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Friday at the Coupeville Recreation Hall, 901 NW Alexander St., Coupeville. Enjoy live music, wine, mussels and more. $20. The festivities will continue from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday along the historic Coupeville waterfront. Enjoy chowder tasting, cooking demonstrations, a mussel farm boat tour, musseleating competitions, downtown art walk and more activities for all ages. Free admission. Some activities require an additional fee. 360-678-5434 or thepenncovemusselfestival.com.

SUNDAY JAZZ HOUR Fidalgo Swing will perform from 2 to 3 p.m. Sunday, March 9, at the Anacortes Public Library, 1220 10th St., Anacortes. Free. 360-293-1910, ext. 21, or jazzatthelibrary.com.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E6 - Thursday, March 6, 2014

GET INVOLVED ART CLASSES FAMILY ART DAYS AT MoNA: The Museum of Northwest Art, 121 S. First St., La Conner, offers Family Art Days each month. Sessions are open to ages 5 and older at all skill levels and include guided walk-throughs of MoNA exhibitions. Limited to 15 participants per session. Workshops are free with museum admission. Admission: $8 adults, $5 seniors, $3 students, free for members and ages 11 and younger. For information or to register: 360-466-4446, ext. 106, or jasminev@ museumofnwart.org. Next up: “Color in Painting”: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. or 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday, March 8. Explore color in painting, with inspiration from the work of Henri Matisse and other Fauves. Sketch, learn

FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK

Mar. 7 6-9pm Anne Martin McCool Gallery Gallery KP Burton Jewelers Scott Milo Gallery The Majestic Inn and Spa Apothecary Spa (2nd floor Majestic Inn)

www.anacortesart.com

watercolor techniques, then paint an exotic, vibrant painting. ART CLASSES: Dakota Art Center offers a variety of art classes and workshops at 17873 Highway 536, Mount Vernon. 360416-6556, ext. 5, or dakota artcenter.com. MOSAIC YARD ART: JoAnne Hoehne will offer a four-week class from 10 a.m. to noon Fridays, beginning March 7, at Hobby Lobby, 220 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. Participants can make a gazing bowl/bird bath or a stepping stone. $50. Sign up at Hobby Lobby or call Hoehne at 360-399-1180 or email jchoehne@live.com.

days at the Bayview Civic Hall, 12615 C St., Mount Vernon. Learn to folkdance to a variety of international music. Instruction begins at 7 p.m. followed by review and request dances until 9:30. The first session is free, $3 thereafter. All are welcome. No partners needed. For information, contact Gary or Ginny at 360-766-6866.

ON STAGE

THURSDAY DANCE: Enjoy dancing to the music of the Skippers from 1 to 3:30 p.m. Thursdays at Hillcrest Lodge, 1717 S. 13th St., Mount Vernon. For information, contact Doris at 360-588-8239.

RECREATION

MUSIC

CALL FOR SINGERS AND MUSICIANS: Christ AUDITIONS Episcopal Church invites “YOU CAN’T TAKE IT singers and musicians WITH YOU”: Auditions will interested in participating take place at 2 p.m. Sunday in its Lent Taize Service and 6 p.m. Tuesday, March to attend a rehearsal at 6 9 and 11, at Anacortes p.m. today, March 6, at the Community Theatre, 918 M church, 1216 Seventh St., Ave., Anacortes. Parts are Anacortes. The Taize Seravailable for 10 to 12 men vice is a Christian worship and seven women ages 18 service featuring music, and older. chanting and the lighting The comedy will run of candles that reflects the May 30-June 21. Audition meditative nature of the materials are available at Taize community, an ecuthe ACT office. For informenical Christian monastic mation, contact director order in Taize, Burgundy, Julie Wenzel at 509-341France. 4306, email juliehaakenThe Taize Service son@hotmail.com or visit will take place at 6 p.m. acttheatre.com. Wednesday, March 12, at the church. For informaDANCE tion, contact the Rev. Eric Johnson at 293-5790 or the COMMUNITY DANCE: Rev. Diane Ramerman, Dance to the big band 360-202-7397. sounds of Camano Junction from 7 to 10 p.m. SECOND FRIDAY Saturday, March 15, at DRUM CIRCLE: 7 to 9 p.m. the Camano Center, 606 Arrowhead Road, Camano Friday, March 14, Unity Church, 704 W. Division Island. $12, $10 members; St., Mount Vernon. Shake includes light snacks. 360off the energy of the week 387-0222. through drumming, songs, FOLK DANCING: Skagit- chants. Freewill donation. For information, email Anacortes Folkdancers heatmiser@inbox.com. meet at 7 p.m. most Tues-

ANACORTES OPEN MIC: 9:30 p.m. Thursdays, at the Brown Lantern Ale House, 412 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-2932544. OPEN MIC: Jam Night, 9 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. Thursdays, at the Conway Pub & Eatery, 18611 Main St., Conway. 360-445-4733.

MV PARKS FOCUS GROUPS: The Mount Vernon Parks and Recreation Department invites community members to discuss ways to improve Mount Vernon’s parks. Parks and Rec will host a series of focus-group meetings to address different aspects of the department’s comprehensive plan. Meetings will take place from 6 to 7 p.m. Tuesdays at the Vaux Retreat Center at Bakerview Park, 3011 E. Fir St., Mount Vernon. Next up: March 11: Active recreation. For information, call 360-336-6215 or email mvparks@mountvernonwa. gov.

paved trail is handicapped accessible. Free. SENIOR HIKE: Join Friends of the Forest from 10 a.m. to noon Friday, March 14, for an easy hike at Pine Ridge Loop near Anacortes. Meet at the base of Mount Erie on Ray Auld Drive and enjoy a hike to this unique secret spot off the beaten path. Free. No dogs. 360-2933725 or friendsofacfl.org. FUN RUN/WALK: The Shamrock Shuffle Fun Run/Walk to benefit Bethany Christian Preschool will begin at 10 a.m. Saturday, March 15, at the Port of Skagit Nature Trails, 15000 Crosswind Drive, Burlington. Prizes for top finishers and best costumes. Green attire encouraged. Runners, walkers and strollers welcome. Day-of registration from 9 to 10 a.m.; online registration at runsignup.com/Race/ WA/Burlington/BCP5K. $20, free for ages 10 and younger, accompanied by an adult. 360-424-9399.

THEATER

YOUTH THEATER CLASSES: The Whidbey Playhouse “Would Be TRAIL TALES: Friends of Players” theater program Skagit Beaches will lead a for ages 8 to 18 will offer series of informative walks a workshop from 3:30 to along the Tommy Thomp- 5:30 p.m. Mondays and son Trail in Anacortes. For Tuesdays, March 10-April information, visit skagit29, at the Whidbey Playbeaches.org. house Star Studio, 730 SE Next up: Midway Drive, Oak HarBirding Walk: Join Trail bor. There will be a special Tales docents and Auduthree-hour rehearsal on bon birders from 8:30 to Sunday, April 27, and the 10 a.m. Wednesday, March workshop will culminate 12, at Fidalgo Bay RV with public performances Resort, 701 Fidalgo Bay at 4:30 p.m. April 28-29. Road, Anacortes. Get a Students will learn a last glimpse of the birds variety of theater skills, that winter in Fidalgo Bay including theater actbefore they leave for the ing, vocal training, body breeding season. Bring language, stage presence, binoculars or scopes, if you blocking and more. $75. have them; extras will be Some scholarships are available to share. The flat, available. Register by

today, March 7. For information or to register, contact Stan Thomas at 360675-0574. FREE ADULT ACTING CLASSES: Anacortes Community Theatre offers free acting classes for adults from 10 a.m. to noon the third Saturday each month at 918 M Ave., Anacortes. Classes include scripted scenes and a variety of acting games, with a different topic each month. Each class is independent, so you don’t have to commit to every session. 360840-0089 or acttheatre.com

WORKSHOPS BASKET WORKSHOP: Nancy Loorem and Danielle Bodine will lead Random Weave Basket miniworkshops at 2 and 3 p.m. Sunday, March 9, at the La Conner Quilt & Textile Museum, 703 S. Second St., La Conner. Create a personalized basket embellished with natural materials and your own bits of memory. Learn how to construct a vessel out of flat reed using a random weave basketry technique and explore stamping and other surface design applications. Suitable for second grade on up. No experience necessary. There is no charge, but preregistration is required. 360-466-4288 or laconnerquilts.com. ART OF CRAZY QUILTS: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday, March 12-13, La Conner Quilt & Textile Museum, 703 S. Second St., La Conner. Learn about crazy quilt block construction and a variety of embroidery stitches, with the opportunity to study antique crazy quilts from the museum’s permanent collection. $75$85. 360-466-4288 or lacon nerquilts.com.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, March 6, 2014 - E7

Warrior woman sculpture to launch women’s art display

34th Annual

Garden &

Skagit Valley Herald staff

The Lincoln Theatre art gallery in March, in celebration of International Women’s Day, will showcase powerful women in Skagit Valley, their art and their ability to connect as natural communicators and organizers. The Skagit Human Rights Festival will host an International Women’s Day reception from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Saturday, March 8, at the theater, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon, to honor the collaborative art display. The featured art, a 5-foot-9 warrior woman sculpture titled “Women’s Work,” was created by Sarai Stevens of Bow and numerous other contributors. Stevens is a co-founder of the Bow Little Market and Chuckanut Transition and is a founding member of the Skagit Valley Farmers Market Coalition. Stevens said the sculpture is a multimedia collaborative collage of some 35 women that illustrates the strength, beauty and force of her women’s network and includes writing and images submitted from artists, activists, mothers, radical homemakers, grandmothers, gardeners and crafters. Mouse Bird contributed the headdress and Laura Matthews turned the french rolling pin. “This woman warrior is a celebration of our fiercely creative womanly power and the networks we build,” Stevens said. The Lincoln gallery show will spotlight women of artistic talent and women who have made their life their art. Cherie Donovan-Smith paints vibrant, celebra-

Show

MARCH 21, 22 & 23 • 2014 Friday 11-6, Saturday 10-6, Sunday 11-4 Skagit County Fairgrounds 1410 Virginia Street • Mount Vernon, WA $5/Person or $8/Family Tickets Available at the Gate FREE PARKING!

Visit over 150 Booths!

Kid’s Activities

Ciscoe Morris • 2pm Sunday

Also Featuring:

Photo courtesy of Sarai Stevens

“Women’s Work,” a 5-foot-9 warrior woman sculpture is a multimedia collaborative collage that will be featured in a monthlong art display celebrating International Women’s Day at the Lincoln Theatre in Mount Vernon. An opening reception will take place at 6 p.m. Saturday. tory images of women and creates whimsical felted objects. She is also the cocreator of the newly founded Artisan Craft Cooperative in Sedro-Woolley. Her art will be on display in the Lincoln Art Gallery in May. Matthews, a skilled woodturner, is a co-founder

of the Northwest Corner Woodworkers Association Toys for Tots committee, a cooperative group in Bow that shares shop space to create and donate hundreds of toys every year as Christmas gifts for needy children. Two of her bowls will be on display

Charity Playhouse Competition

5 ANNUAL PLAYHOUSE COMPETITION Proceeds to benefit five local charities TH

Presented by:

Skagit / Island Counties Builders Association Major Sponsor:

& Speakers Presented By:

More information & $2 OFF ENTRY coupons at www.sicbahomeshow.org


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E8 - Thursday, March 6, 2014

REVIEWS: MUSIC Drive-By Truckers

in “Spring Awakening” and other shows, gets it right on the piercing “Burn With You,” where she sings: “I don’t wanna go “English Oceans” to heaven if you’re going to hell/I will burn with you.” She also shines on the slow The often-prolific piano tune “Battlefield,” one of four tracks roots rockers Driveco-written by the exceptional Sia Furler By Truckers took (Rihanna’s “Diamonds,” Beyonce’s “Pretty a four-year break from the studio before Hurts”). Instead of yelling, she works her recording “English Oceans,” and the stock- voice nicely on “Thousand Needles,” buildpile of songs pays off throughout the band’s ing it up when needed, but hitting softer 12th album. notes to provide balance. Stripping away the R&B influences But, all in all, “Louder” is jagged. The and musical explorations of their last few songs don’t play well together, and the colalbums, DBT focuses on guitars and a lection sounds more like a demo, instead garage-band stomp on the new album — of a Golden Globe- and Emmy-nominated which also adds to the collection’s consissinger-actress’ debut album. That may be tency. due partially to the group of producers and The band has always shared songwriting songwriters, which include Stargate, Benny chores between singer-guitarists Patterson Blanco, John Shanks, The Messengers, Anne Hood and Mike Cooley, usually augmented Preven, Christopher Braide and more. by contributions by other band members While they’ve produced hits for others, from (most notably onetime band mate Jason Clarkson to Rihanna, Michele might have Isbell in the early 2000s). This time out, been better off with a tighter and smaller Cooley is an equal partner, and he and group of collaborators. Hood are the only songwriters — another Michele closes the album with the ballad beneficial change. “If You Say So,” which was inspired by one The album’s opening guitar chords recall of the last conversations she had with her an old Replacements riff and would’ve fit “Glee” co-star and boyfriend, Cory Monnicely on the Rolling Stones’ “Exile On teith, who died after overdosing on heroin Main Street.” It’s a strong kickoff to the and alcohol last year. rawest rocking Truckers album since their The track is somewhat chilling and worth early days. But it’s the storytelling that gives a listen, but while the rest of “Louder” feathe band a special dimension. The colortures a big voice, most of the time Michele ful twists of “Till He’s Dead Or Rises” and isn’t saying much. “Primer Coat,” the desperation of “Hanging On” and the poignant “Grand Canyon” n Mesfin Fekadu, Associated Press show that this veteran band can still equal Dianne Reeves the highpoints of its past. n Michael McCall, Associated Press

“Beautiful Life”

On her first studio album in five years, “Louder” four-time Grammy winner Dianne On some of the Reeves comes back songs from her debut strong with a genre-crossing collection of 12 album, Lea Michele is love-themed songs on which she infuses her convincing. On others, impressive jazz stylings with a healthy dose it’s like she is acting. of soul. The “Glee” star, known for her big voice, Reeves gets a major assist from producer provides the pipes on “Louder,” but some Terri Lyne Carrington, who skillfully mixes songs sound empty and don’t show much and matches several dozen musicians — emotion or personality from the 27-year-old including rising stars Esperanza Spalding, talent. Robert Glasper and Gregory Porter — to The dance-flavored title track is typiprovide a distinctive multilayered backdrop cal and forgettable, as is “Don’t Let Go.” with a rich palette of instrumental colors for ”Empty Handed,” co-written by singer each track. Christina Perri, comes off like an unimpresThe singer puts her own stamp on an sive Coldplay cover, while other songs echo eclectic selection of covers. These include Kelly Clarkson, but lack the energy that a sultry version of Marvin Gaye’s “I Want Clarkson’s learned to build on her songs. You,” with Sean Jones adding simmering Michele, who has appeared on Broadway trumpet lines; a neo-soul take on Fleetwood

Lea Michele

Mac’s soft-rock classic “Dreams,” arranged by pianist Glasper; and a shimmering vocal duet with Lalah Hathaway on Bob Marley’s “Waiting in Vain.” The only traditional standard is “Stormy Weather,” which Reeves floats through in an extended 8-minute version, colorfully stretching the lyrics. The new songs by Reeves and her session mates include the joyful “Feels So Good (Lifted),” embellished by a synth solo from Reeves’ cousin George Duke, who died last year; Carrington’s soulful “Satiated (Been Waiting),” with Reeves engaging in a seductive vocal duet with Porter; and the smoothly flowing “Wild Rose,” featuring its composer Spalding on bass and background vocals. Reeves best displays her virtuosity on her wordless, Latin-beat composition “Tango,” with Raul Midon vocally imitating a trumpet, on which she improvises scat vocals, suddenly shifts tempos and makes full use of her impressive multi-octave range.

ethos of the album: love in its purest form, love at the first frisson, love settled on a cloud, love of the flesh. The record’s tempo matches the upbeat “Happy,” and it deploys killer hooks. The sound is eclectic, ranging from dramatic violins in the Daft Punk-assisted “Gust of Wind” to Motown disco beats in “Hunter” and tribal drums in “Lost Queen.” Persistent echoes of Michael Jackson-style sound lurk on the album, from the sultry “Gush” to the deliciously head-bopping “Marilyn Monroe” to the Justin Timberlake-featured “Brand New.” A definite homage to women is the female empowerment ballad “Know Who You Are,” where Pharrell sings with piano queen Alicia Keys. He croons on the mellow reggae tune, “I know who you are and I know what you’re feeling.” No doubt about where he stands on gender equality there.

n Charles J. Gans, Associated Press

Eli Young Band

Pharrell “G I R L”

n Cristina Jaleru, Associated Press

“10,000 Towns”

The Eli Young Band continues to provide a smart, relevant antidote to all the male country acts focusing on clichés about the attractions of backwoods America. On “10,000 Towns,” the four-piece band from Denton, Texas, shines by focusing on insightful songs about how young men and women relate with each other. The album’s first hit, “Drunk Last Night,” continues the band’s string of potent songs that don’t rely on the usual Nashville formulas. While most other country bands celebrate drinking and partying in superficial ways, singer Mike Eli instead elucidates, with restrained drama, how a night of overindulgence can lead to actions that might be regrettable the following day. Similarly, the band’s new hit, “Dust,” depicts the complex emotions involved even when driving away from a relationship that’s taken a bad turn. Not everything on “10,000 Towns” hits such high notes. A few clunkers — including “Just Add Moonlight” and the title cut — rely on standard country tropes. But those potholes only briefly slow down an otherwise solid effort by the band, which includes guitarist James Young, bassist Jon Jones and drummer Chris Thompson. Overall, though, the Eli Young Band’s second major-label album — and fifth overall — gives plenty of reasons for cities across America to embrace them with open arms.

On the heels of two monster hits where he was the co-star — the Daft Punk jaunty funk jam “Get Lucky” and the much vilified yet utterly catchy “Blurred Lines” with Robin Thicke — Pharrell is taking the lead with the relentless “Happy,” which appears on the “Despicable Me 2” soundtrack and was nominated for best original song on Sunday’s Oscars. The cheerful tune is also on his second studio album, “G I R L,” released perhaps coincidentally the day after the Academy Award winners were announced. The 10-track set is an ode to the female form and spirit, peppered with sexy vibes and brash come-ons. A definite change from his raspier, more alternative first album, which wasn’t particularly successful, “G I R L” proves Pharrell — a member of N.E.R.D. and the hit-making Neptunes — is a true, and exceptional, frontman. Cynics will dismiss the album as a shameless attempt to derail the accusations of misogyny leveled at “Blurred Lines.” After all, Pharrell is cheeky and sexy, and his lyrics sometimes blur the lines between playful seduction and outright possession. “Ain’t no sense in you roaming around, if I can’t have you nobody can,” he says in “Hunter,” but maybe that’s his way of saying he can’t help it if the ladies find him attractive and he reciprocates. After all, this is the entire n Michael McCall, Associated Press


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, March 6, 2014 - E9

REVIEWS: VIDEO GAMES

Video games are filled with scenarios where the only solution is to blast your way out. That’s why I have a soft spot for “stealth” games like “Metal Gear Solid,” “Tom Clancy’s Splinter Cell” and 2012’s brilliant “Dishonored.” There’s something more mentally stimulating about finding ways to outwit your enemies without filling them with lead. In 1998, Eidos Interactive’s “Thief: The Dark Project” introduced many of the elements that ancestors like “Dishonored” have built upon — in particular, the idea that light is your enemy and darkness your friend. The Eidos Montreal studio is now trying to reclaim that legacy with “Thief” (Square Enix), a game whose bright spots are sometimes overshadowed by thoughtless design and technical shortcomings. The protagonist, Garrett, is a jaded master thief in a fog-drenched city (called “the City”) that looks like Victorian London. In the prologue, Garrett stumbles across an arcane ritual and gets knocked unconscious. Fast forward a year, and he can’t remember a thing. The City is being destroyed by starvation and a disease known as “the gloom,” and the vile Baron Northcrest has its residents living in terror. Garrett’s ability to sneak into the Baron’s heavily guarded fortresses may be the only thing that can stop the City from descending into anarchy. Garrett begins with a few essential tools: a blackjack for knocking out nosy guards, a claw for climbing walls, a bow and a quiver of arrows. Water and fire arrows let Garrett douse and relight torches, while rope arrows, which can be shot into hanging beams, help him climb onto rooftops. As soon as you raise the cash you should buy a wrench, a razor and wire cutters, which Garrett uses to steal plaques and paintings and disarm traps. The event in the prologue has also

New video game releases These games are scheduled for release this week, according to Gamestop.com: n South Park: The Stick of Truth (PC, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360; rated M) n Zoo Tycoon (Xbox One; rated E) n XCOM: Enemy Unknown -- The Complete Edition (PC; rated M)

FAST just got even FASTER. ON SALE NOW

n Lexington Herald-Leader (Lexington, Ky.

gifted Garrett with “focus” powers, which, when activated, increase his dexterity, speed and perception. Focus is most useful when you’re searching for loot, highlighting all the treasures and traps in a given room. The major story missions are well constructed, and often so suspenseful I found myself holding my breath. They offer a variety of approaches: You can be a “ghost,” completely avoiding detection; an “opportunist,” collecting the most loot; or a “predator,” killing anyone who stands in your way. Two clients, an inventor and a circus master, also provide some intriguing side missions. And then there’s your fence, Basso, who has a list of a few dozen artifacts he wants you to hunt down. Some of those are easy enough to find — you just need to climb through the right window — while others require some tricky navigation of the City’s rooftops and alleys. The main obstacle to your crime spree is the Baron’s Watch, an army of surly thugs who patrol the streets. They aren’t particularly bright, animated by shaky artificial intelligence, but they are everywhere and they will kill you if they see you. The initial challenge of avoiding the guards gets tiresome by the fifth or sixth time you need to cross the City to start your next mission. And neighborhoods are divided by loading screens that kill any sense of immersion — an irritation that’s inexcusable these days, particularly if you’re playing on a high-powered PlayStation 4 or Xbox One. Finally, the overarching story in “Thief” is incoherent. Midway through I gave up trying to make any sense of it and settled in to just enjoy the clever individual missions. Fans of stealth games, who get so few of them, will probably be able to overlook the flaws in “Thief,” while wishing Eidos had polished it more carefully. n Lou Kesten, Associated Press

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E10 Thursday, March 6, 2014

Thursday, March 6, 2014 E11

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

ON STAGE in the Skagit Valley and surrounding area March 7-13

TUNING UP Playing at area venues March 7-13

FRIDAY, SUNDAY.7,9 “DIE FLEDERMAUS” Skagit Opera, McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $25-$59. 360-416-7727, ext. 2, or mcintyrehall.org. Checking listing for time.

Christian Kowalski (left) and Jenny Knapp-Parce Craig Parrish / Skagit Valley Herald

Friday.7

Saturday.8

Sunday.9

Wednesday.12

OPERA

THEATER

OPERA

THEATER

“Die Fledermaus”: Skagit Opera, 7:30 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $25-$59. 360-416-7727, ext. 2, or mcintyrehall.org.

THEATER

“Always … Patsy Cline” (musical): Ria Peth Vanderpool and Kelly Bohon, Theater Arts Guild, 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $20. Tickets: tagpatsy@gmail.com or theater artsguild.org.

“Always… Patsy Cline” (musical): Ria Peth Vanderpool and Kelly Bohon, Theater Arts Guild, 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $20. Tickets: tagpatsy@gmail.com or theaterartsguild.org. “The Language Archive”: Outcast Productions, 7 p.m., Whidbey Island Fairgrounds, Black Box Theater, 819 Camano Ave., Langley. $18, $14 students and seniors. brownpapertickets.com/ event/561263.

“The Language Archive”: Outcast Productions, 7 p.m., Whidbey Island Fairgrounds, Black Box Theater, 819 Camano Ave., Langley. $18, $14 students and seniors. brownpapertickets.com/ event/561263.

“Die Fledermaus”: Skagit Opera, 3 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $25-$59. 360-416-7727, ext. 2, or mcintyrehall.org.

THEATER

“The Language Archive”: Outcast Productions, 1:30 p.m., Whidbey Island Fairgrounds, Black Box Theater, 819 Camano Ave., Langley. $18, $14 students and seniors. brownpapertickets.com/ event/561263.

Tuesday.11 MUSIC

Travis Brass: Air Force Band of the Golden West, 6:30 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. Free. 360336-8955 or lincolntheatre.org. MVHS Festival Concert: Mount Vernon High School bands and orchestra, 7 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $4-$8. 360-416-7727, ext. 2, or mcintyrehall.org. Dana Lyons (pictured): Crude Awakening Oil Train Tour, 8 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $10. 360-336-8955 or lincolntheatre.org/ node/863.

Disney’s “The Aristocats Kids”: Skagit Family Learning Center, 7 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. Free. 360-336-8955 or lincolntheatre.org.

FRIDAY.7

SATURDAY.8

2 BUCK CHUCK 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Winners Lounge, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow.

TILLER’S FOLLY 7:30 p.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes.

FRIDAY.7 The Sardines: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

Randy Norris and Jeff Nicely (blues): 8 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $7. 360-445-3000.

Thursday.13

2 Buck Chuck (classic rock, pop): 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Winners Lounge, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. No cover. 877-275-2448.

Curley Taylor and Zydeco Trouble: 9 p.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. $5. 360-755-3956.

El Colonel and Mary de la Fuente: 8 to 11 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-5881720.

Rising (tribute to Ronnie James Dio), Lorpan: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $8-$10. 360-778-1067.

THEATER

Disney’s “The Aristocats Kids”: Skagit Family Learning Center, 7 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. Free. 360-336-8955 or lincolntheatre.org. “Duck Hunter Shoots Angel” (comedy): Anacortes High School Theatre Department, 7:30 p.m., Brodniak Hall, Anacortes High School, 1600 20th St., Anacortes. Rated PG-13 (mild language). Admission by donation at the door. 360293-2166. “The Language Archive”: Outcast Productions, 7 p.m., Whidbey Island Fairgrounds, Black Box Theater, 819 Camano Ave., Langley. $18, $14 students and seniors. brownpapertickets.com/ event/561263.

SATURDAY.8 The Sardines: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

Margaret Wilder Band (blues/soul): 8 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. 360-445-3000.

Triple Shot (classic rock dance): 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Winners Lounge, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. No cover. 877-275-2448.

Tiller’s Folly: 7:30 p.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360755-3956.

Snug Harbor: 8:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. 360-7666266.

SUNDAY.9 Gary B’s Church of Blues: Jam Night, 6 to 10 p.m., Conway Pub & Eatery, 18611 Main St., Conway. 360-4454733.

Purple Mage: 9 p.m. to midnight, Longhorn Saloon & Grill, 5754 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-766-6330.

WEDNESDAY.12 Archtops, featuring Mike Faast of the Jangles: 5:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. 360-766-6266.

Desperate Measures (classic rock): 6 to 10 p.m., Castle Tavern, 708 Metcalf St., Sedro-Woolley. No cover. 360-855-2263.

Blues/rock jam with CC Adams and Friends: 5 to 9 p.m., Station House, 315 Morris St., La Conner. 360-466-4488.

Stilly River Band: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

Moistboyz, The Vaticxnts: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $10. 360-778-1067.

THURSDAY.13 Janette West: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.


E10 Thursday, March 6, 2014

Thursday, March 6, 2014 E11

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

ON STAGE in the Skagit Valley and surrounding area March 7-13

TUNING UP Playing at area venues March 7-13

FRIDAY, SUNDAY.7,9 “DIE FLEDERMAUS” Skagit Opera, McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $25-$59. 360-416-7727, ext. 2, or mcintyrehall.org. Checking listing for time.

Christian Kowalski (left) and Jenny Knapp-Parce Craig Parrish / Skagit Valley Herald

Friday.7

Saturday.8

Sunday.9

Wednesday.12

OPERA

THEATER

OPERA

THEATER

“Die Fledermaus”: Skagit Opera, 7:30 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $25-$59. 360-416-7727, ext. 2, or mcintyrehall.org.

THEATER

“Always … Patsy Cline” (musical): Ria Peth Vanderpool and Kelly Bohon, Theater Arts Guild, 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $20. Tickets: tagpatsy@gmail.com or theater artsguild.org.

“Always… Patsy Cline” (musical): Ria Peth Vanderpool and Kelly Bohon, Theater Arts Guild, 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $20. Tickets: tagpatsy@gmail.com or theaterartsguild.org. “The Language Archive”: Outcast Productions, 7 p.m., Whidbey Island Fairgrounds, Black Box Theater, 819 Camano Ave., Langley. $18, $14 students and seniors. brownpapertickets.com/ event/561263.

“The Language Archive”: Outcast Productions, 7 p.m., Whidbey Island Fairgrounds, Black Box Theater, 819 Camano Ave., Langley. $18, $14 students and seniors. brownpapertickets.com/ event/561263.

“Die Fledermaus”: Skagit Opera, 3 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $25-$59. 360-416-7727, ext. 2, or mcintyrehall.org.

THEATER

“The Language Archive”: Outcast Productions, 1:30 p.m., Whidbey Island Fairgrounds, Black Box Theater, 819 Camano Ave., Langley. $18, $14 students and seniors. brownpapertickets.com/ event/561263.

Tuesday.11 MUSIC

Travis Brass: Air Force Band of the Golden West, 6:30 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. Free. 360336-8955 or lincolntheatre.org. MVHS Festival Concert: Mount Vernon High School bands and orchestra, 7 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $4-$8. 360-416-7727, ext. 2, or mcintyrehall.org. Dana Lyons (pictured): Crude Awakening Oil Train Tour, 8 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $10. 360-336-8955 or lincolntheatre.org/ node/863.

Disney’s “The Aristocats Kids”: Skagit Family Learning Center, 7 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. Free. 360-336-8955 or lincolntheatre.org.

FRIDAY.7

SATURDAY.8

2 BUCK CHUCK 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Winners Lounge, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow.

TILLER’S FOLLY 7:30 p.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes.

FRIDAY.7 The Sardines: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

Randy Norris and Jeff Nicely (blues): 8 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $7. 360-445-3000.

Thursday.13

2 Buck Chuck (classic rock, pop): 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Winners Lounge, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. No cover. 877-275-2448.

Curley Taylor and Zydeco Trouble: 9 p.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. $5. 360-755-3956.

El Colonel and Mary de la Fuente: 8 to 11 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-5881720.

Rising (tribute to Ronnie James Dio), Lorpan: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $8-$10. 360-778-1067.

THEATER

Disney’s “The Aristocats Kids”: Skagit Family Learning Center, 7 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. Free. 360-336-8955 or lincolntheatre.org. “Duck Hunter Shoots Angel” (comedy): Anacortes High School Theatre Department, 7:30 p.m., Brodniak Hall, Anacortes High School, 1600 20th St., Anacortes. Rated PG-13 (mild language). Admission by donation at the door. 360293-2166. “The Language Archive”: Outcast Productions, 7 p.m., Whidbey Island Fairgrounds, Black Box Theater, 819 Camano Ave., Langley. $18, $14 students and seniors. brownpapertickets.com/ event/561263.

SATURDAY.8 The Sardines: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

Margaret Wilder Band (blues/soul): 8 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. 360-445-3000.

Triple Shot (classic rock dance): 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Winners Lounge, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. No cover. 877-275-2448.

Tiller’s Folly: 7:30 p.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360755-3956.

Snug Harbor: 8:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. 360-7666266.

SUNDAY.9 Gary B’s Church of Blues: Jam Night, 6 to 10 p.m., Conway Pub & Eatery, 18611 Main St., Conway. 360-4454733.

Purple Mage: 9 p.m. to midnight, Longhorn Saloon & Grill, 5754 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-766-6330.

WEDNESDAY.12 Archtops, featuring Mike Faast of the Jangles: 5:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. 360-766-6266.

Desperate Measures (classic rock): 6 to 10 p.m., Castle Tavern, 708 Metcalf St., Sedro-Woolley. No cover. 360-855-2263.

Blues/rock jam with CC Adams and Friends: 5 to 9 p.m., Station House, 315 Morris St., La Conner. 360-466-4488.

Stilly River Band: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

Moistboyz, The Vaticxnts: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $10. 360-778-1067.

THURSDAY.13 Janette West: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E12 - Thursday, March 6, 2014

TRAVEL

OKLAHOMA PANHANDLE Rural and quirky By KRISTI EATON / Associated Press

Kristi Eaton / AP

An abandoned building and car are shown in Cimarron County in the Oklahoma Panhandle. Before becoming a part of Oklahoma Territory, this strip known as No Man’s Land was a haven for outlaws and land squatters. Later, during the Great Depression, severe drought and blinding dust storms turned the region into the Dust Bowl. KENTON, Okla. — The Oklahoma Panhandle has never been for the faint of heart. Before becoming a part of Oklahoma Territory, this strip known as No Man’s Land was a haven for outlaws and land squatters. Later, during the Great Depression, severe drought and blinding dust storms turned the region into the Dust Bowl. The strong survived, and today the Panhandle of Oklahoma is made up of dedicated ranchers, a growing Hispanic population and awe-inspiring views of rural life at its finest.

Though I’ve lived in Oklahoma 20 of my 28 years, I’d never trekked out to the Panhandle until recently. The eastern point of the Panhandle is a threeto four-hour drive from Tulsa or Oklahoma City, and it takes another three to four hours to drive across the 170-mile swath of land. Here’s what to know and see in Oklahoma’s Panhandle.

FESTIVALS

The Panhandle hosts some unusual festivals with rural themes. Beaver, a town of 1,500 in the eastern Panhandle, is best-known

for a spring event, the Cimarron Territory Celebration, which honors the families who settled the area 100 years ago. The event includes an old-fashioned church service, chuck wagon dinner, horseshoe throwing contest, carnival and parade, along with the Cow Chip Throwing Competition. Some call it an ode to nature; others just call it smelly. Either way, the event has been a big draw for the area since it started in 1970. The Cow Chip contest will be held the week of April 12-19. On the other western

side of the Panhandle, Boise City hosts the Santa Fe Trail Daze featuring the World Championship Posthole Digging Contest on the first Saturday in June. That’s right; competitors vie to see who can dig the deepest hole in a set amount of time. Competition is divided by men, women and children. Chamber of Commerce President Kim Mizer says it’s not as easy as it looks. City slickers, she says, oftentimes get a lot of smashed fingers.

NOT JUST ANY CALF

Founded in 1934, the No

Man’s Land Museum in Goodwell features exhibits about the history, economy and ecology of the Oklahoma Panhandle. Guns dating back to the 1800s line one wall, while an archive of newspaper articles detail the plight of local residents during the Dust Bowl and their sometimes bitter feelings toward John Steinbeck and his acclaimed novel “The Grapes of Wrath” that popularized the term “Okie.” The word was seen by many as derogatory but in later years became a term of endearment for people living in the state. Another collection tells

the history of barbed wire. Homesteaders initially didn’t accept the inexpensive wire they called “Devil’s Rope” because they thought it would injure the livestock or fail to confine them. But the most noteworthy piece at this Panhandle museum was born more than 80 years ago and had two heads. The two-headed calf that stands upright in a glass viewing box was born in 1932 on a farm 12 miles north of Goodwell. It died a few weeks after birth, and college students preserved the body for display at the museum.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, March 6, 2014 - E13

TRAVEL Local travel

AP file / April 15, 1935

A little ranch in Boise City, Okla., where the top soil was being dried and blown away, is about to be engulfed in a gigantic dust cloud in 1935 in the Oklahoma Panhandle. GHOST TOWNS

phone’s GPS only worked a fraction of the time. There’s something to No Man’s Land be said about not being Museum: Goodwell, wired to technology while Okla., nmlhs.org. exploring new surroundings, Beaver County Chamber of Commerce: though. I actually enjoyed beaverchamber.com pulling over to the side of Guymon, Okla.: the road to pull out my guymonok.org paper map so I could figure out where to go next. ers can follow a trail to the And make sure you have top where they will be greet- enough gas in your car to get ed by breathtaking views of to your next destination. It can be miles between filling Oklahoma, Colorado and stations and hours before New Mexico. Fewer than 20 people live another car passes you by. As for accommodations, in the tiny community of Guymon — the largest comKenton near Black Mesa, munity in the Panhandle but the town still sustains a museum and a post office. A with a population of about convenience store along the 12,000 — is the only place town’s main street closed in where visitors will find chain A RACE TO THE TOP hotels and motels including recent years. At 4,973 feet , Black Mesa While the rest of Oklaho- Holiday Inn, Comfort Inn is Oklahoma’s highest point. ma observes Central Time, and Best Western. It’s located in the far west of the residents of Kenton are Elsewhere, mom and pop the Panhandle — about as a part of the Mountain Time motels are available for travfar west as you can go while Zone. elers. The prices are fairly still being in the state — and cheap. For $70, I stayed in a extends into Colorado and motel in the town of Beaver TRAVEL, ACCOMMODATIONS New Mexico. that pleasantly surprised me Don’t plan on relying on with a flat-screen TV, hardThe Black Mesa Nature your iPhone or other GPS Preserve and Black Mesa wood floors, free wireless State Park are filled with 23 technology in No Man’s Internet, clean linens and Land. Cellphone coverage plant species and eight difcolorful posters decorating ferent types of animals. Hik- is spotty at best, and my the walls. Countless abandoned, dilapidated structures and aging cars dot the landscape in the Panhandle, a sign that people have packed up and left for greener pastures. In some cases, entire communities have become ghost towns, leaving behind relics from other times — uninhabited homes, schools and even stores that may still harbor clothes, furniture and toys. It’s tempting to explore but be careful about trespassing. Some structures are off-limits, tucked away on private property. Others are closer to roads and allow for a closer inspection.

On the Web

23-Sept. 9. The tour is open to students, faculty, staff SHORT TRIPS: Mount Ver- and community members ages 16 or older. College non Parks and Recreation credit is available. The cost offers travel opportunities is $3,200 including internafor participants ages 12 and older (adult supervision tional airfare. Applications and a $300 deposit are due required for ages 18 and by April 1. For information, younger). Trips depart from and return to Hillcrest Park, contact Ted Maloney at 360416-7774 or ted.maloney@ 1717 S. 13th St., Mount Vernon. For information or to skagit.edu. register, call 360-336-6215. TROPICAL TRAVEL GO Next up: Northwest Women’s Show SHOW: Learn about exotic and Historic Downtown Sno- and tropical vacation options at 6 p.m. Wednesday, March homish: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 12, at AAA Travel, 1600 E. Friday, March 21. Enjoy the 26th annual show with some College Way, Suite A, Mount Vernon. Members and non400 exhibits, three entertainment stages, seminars, members welcome. RSVP: 360-848-2090. shopping, fashion shows, food and wine sampling, MADAGASCAR: 7 p.m. beauty and spa services, Wednesday, March 12, giveaways and more. Then Anacortes Public Library, visit trendy “new” historic Snohomish, with boutiques, 1220 10th St., Anacortes. antique stores, bakeries and Biologist Julie Barber will more. $65-$67. Register by describe her adventures in Madagascar and the wildlife March 14. she sighted there. Free. 360-293-1910, ext. 21, or CHINA TOUR: Skagit Vallibrary.cityofanacortes.org. ley College is accepting applications for its Experience China Tour on Aug. NEW ENGLAND TRIP: The

Oak Harbor Senior Center is organizing a trip to New England from Sept. 26-Oct. 3. Details: contact Pat Gardner at 360-279-4582 or pgardner@oakharbor.org. WWU FACULTY-LED TRAVEL PROGRAMS: Western Washington University will offer several educational travel programs this summer in Italy and Africa. Global Discovery trips are not for university credit or restricted to Western students. Trips include: Tuscany, Italy: Aug. 31-Sept. 14. (Information sessions will be held at 5:30 and 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 12, in the Northwest Room of the Bellingham Public Library’s Fairhaven Branch, 1117 12th St., Bellingham.) Mount Kilimanjaro Climb and Serengeti Safari Extension: July 5-19. Serengeti Safari and Kilimanjaro Culture Tour Extension: July 14-26. Details: 360- 650-6409, globaldiscovery@wwu.edu or wwu.edu/GlobalDiscovery.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E14 - Thursday, March 6, 2014

HOT TICKETS G-EAZY: March 7, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. COMMON KINGS: March 8, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. “LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS” (musical): March 8-June 15, ACT, A Contemporary Theatre, Seattle. 206-292-7676 or acttheatre.org. THE ATARIS: March 12, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. GALACTIC: March 13, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. HERMAN’S HERMITS: starring Peter Noone: March 14-15, Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Bow. 877275-2448 or theskagit.com. COLLIN RAYE: March 16, Brodniak Hall, Anacortes. 360-4285972 or collinrayebenefitconcert. brownpapertickets.com. BRIAN REGAN: March 16, Mount Baker Theatre, Bellingham. 360-734-6080 or mountbakertheatre.com. THE SOUNDS: March 19, Neumos, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. MOISTURE FESTIVAL: March 20-April 13, at venues around Seattle. 206-297-1405 or moisturefestival.org. MONETA: March 22, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. BRING ME THE HORIZON: March 24, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline. com. LORDE: March 24, WaMu Theater, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster.com. WIDESPREAD PANIC: March 25, Moore Theatre, Seattle. 877-7844849 or livenation.com. THE SING-OFF LIVE TOUR: March 25, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline. com. INVSN: March 25, The Crocodile, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. ROBIN THICKE: March 26, WaMu Theater, Seattle. 800-7453000 or ticketmaster.com. GUNGOR: March 26, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. BROAD CITY LIVE: March 26, Neumos, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. EMANCIPATOR ENSEMBLE: March 27, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline. com. BIG HEAD TODD & THE MON-

THE 1975: April 24, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. FRANZ FERDINAND: April 24, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-7453000 or showboxonline.com. ARLO GUTHRIE: April 25, Mount Baker Theatre, Bellingham. 360734-6080 or mountbakertheatre. com. THE WANTED, MIDNIGHT RED: April 26, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline. com. ONE MORE TIME: A Tribute to Daft Punk: April 26, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or show boxonline.com. HIGGINS WATERPROOF BLACK STERS: March 28, The Showbox, 12-13, Lincoln Theatre, Mount Ver- MAGIC BAND: April 26, Columbia Seattle. 800-745-3000 or show non. 360-336-8955 or lincoln City Theater, Seattle. 800-838boxonline.com. theatre.org. 3006 or columbiacitytheater.com. KINGS OF LEON: March 28, VOLBEAT: Apil 14, Paramount SUDDEN VALLEY JAZZ SERIES: KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or April 26/Nov. 15, Sudden Valley or livenation.com. tickets.com. Dance Barn, Bellingham. 360-671THE DECIBEL MAGAZINE TOUR: SCHOOLBOY Q: April 14, The 1709 or suddenvalleylibrary.org. featuring CARCASS: March 29, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 MASTODON: April 28, Showbox Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or or showboxonline.com. PINK MARTINI: April 15, Mount showboxonline.com. SHARON JONES & THE DAP Baker Theatre, Bellingham. 360THE GLITCH MOB: May 3, The KINGS: April 2-3, The Showbox, 734-6080 or mountbakertheatre. Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 Seattle. 800-745-3000 or show com. or showboxonline.com. boxonline.com. THE AFGHAN WHIGS: April 15, IRA GLASS: May 3, Mount Baker G. LOVE & SPECIAL SAUCE: The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745Theatre, Bellingham. 360-734April 4, The Showbox, Seattle. 800- 3000 or showboxonline.com. 6080 or mountbakertheatre.com. 745-3000 or showboxonline.com. DIANA KRALL: April 16, ParaTHE GLITCH MOB: May 4, The YOUNG THE GIANT: April 4-5, mount Theatre, Seattle. 877-784Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 The Showbox, Seattle. 800-7454849 or livenation.com. or showboxonline.com. 3000 or showboxonline.com. CHROMEO: April 16, The ShowSTEPHEN “RAGGA” MARLEY: BETTY WHO: April 5, The Barbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or May 6, The Showbox, Seattle. 206boza, Seattle. 206-709-9442 or showboxonline.com. 224-5481 or aeglive.com. thebarboza.com. BLACK LABEL SOCIETY: April STEVE MARTIN & THE STEEP BEATS ANTIQUE: April 5, Show- 16, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800CANYON RANGERS: Featuring box SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 745-3000 or showboxonline.com. Edie Brickell: May 10, Mount or showboxonline.com. SWITCHFOOT: April 18, The Baker Theatre, Bellingham. 360CHUCK RAGAN & THE CAMAShowbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 734-6080 or mountbakertheatre. RADERIE, THE WHITE BUFFALO: or showboxonline.com. com. April 7, The Showbox, Seattle. 800RICK SPRINGFIELD: April 18-19, DANNY BROWN: May 10, The 745-3000 or showboxonline.com. Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Bow. Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 BASTILLE: April 8, Showbox 877-275-2448 or theskagit.com. or showboxonline.com. SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or SNOOP DOGG & WIZ KHALIFA: OLD 97s: May 12, The Showbox, showboxonline.com. April 19, WaMu Theater, Seattle. Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showVNV NATION: April 8, The Show- 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster. boxonline.com. box, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or com. KARLA BONOFF & JIMMY showboxonline.com. MASSIVE MONKEYS: April 19, WEBB: May 15, Mount Baker TheIL DIVO: April 9, Benaroya Hall, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745atre, Bellingham. 360-734-6080 or Seattle. 866-833-4747 or live 3000 or showboxonline.com. mountbakertheatre.com. nation.com. DARK STAR ORCHESTRA: April NICKEL CREEK: May 17, Moore YONDER MOUNTAIN STRING 20, The Showbox, Seattle. 800Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or BAND: April 10, The Showbox, 745-3000 or showboxonline.com. livenation.com. Seattle. 800-745-3000 or show ELLIE GOULDING: April 23, ParaLINDSEY STIRLING: May 21, boxonline.com. mount Theatre, Seattle. 877-784Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745INFECTED MUSHROOM: April 4849 or livenation.com. 3000 or showboxonline.com. 11, The Showbox, Seattle. 800DRIVE-BY TRUCKERS: April 23, TECH N9NE: May 23-24, Show745-3000 or showboxonline.com. Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745- box SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 KRIS ORLOWSKI: April 12, The 3000 or showboxonline.com. or showboxonline.com. Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 WHITE LIES: April 23, The ShowSASQUATCH! MUSIC FESTIVAL: or showboxonline.com. box, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or May 23-25 and July 4-6, Gorge THE WAILIN’ JENNYS: April showboxonline.com. Amphitheatre, George. sasquatch

WIDESPREAD PANIC March 25, Moore Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or livenation.com.

festival.com. THE NYLONS: May 24, Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Bow. 877275-2448 or theskagit.com. LADY GAGA’S artRAVE: The ARTPOP Ball: May 28, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. LIONEL RITCHIE: with CeeLo Green: May 30, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. GRIEVES: June 7, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. BRIT FLOYD: June 9, McCaw Hall, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. ONEREPUBLIC: June 12, Comcast Arena at Everett. 866-3328499 or comcastarenaeverett.com. DIGITOUR: June 20, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. PARADISO FESTIVAL: June 27-28, Gorge Amphitheatre, George. 800-745-3000 or live nation.com. CHER: June 28, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. NICK CAVE & THE BAD SEEDS: July 2, Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or tickets.com. JOURNEY, STEVE MILLER BAND: July 19, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. MÖTLEY CRÜE: July 27, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn. 800745-3000 or livenation.com. ARCADE FIRE: Aug. 8, Gorge Amphitheatre, George. 800-7453000 or livenation.com. BRUNO MARS: Aug. 9, Gorge Amphitheatre, George. 800-7453000 or livenation.com. JACK JOHNSON: with Amos Lee and Michael Kiwanuka: Aug. 23, Gorge Amphitheatre, George. 800745-3000 or livenation.com. DAVE MATTHEWS BAND: Aug. 29-31, Gorge Amphitheatre, George. 800-745-3000 or live nation.com. “A CHORUS LINE”: Sept. 3-28, The 5th Avenue Theatre, 1308 Fifth Ave., Seattle. 888-584-4849 or 5thavenue.org. CHICAGO/REO SPEEDWAGON: Sept. 9, Washington State Fair, Puyallup. 888-559-3247 or thefair. com. BEST OF JETHRO TULL: performed by Ian Anderson: Sept. 12, McCaw Hall, Seattle. 800-7453000 or livenation.com. KATY PERRY: Sept. 13, Tacoma Dome, Tacoma. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, March 6, 2014 - E15

AT THE LINCOLN THEATRE 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon 360-336-8955 n www.lincolntheatre.org

‘Philomena’

ty didn’t have the highest opinion of — and given away for adoption 7:30 p.m. Thursday, March 6 in the United States. In following “Philomena,” which received church doctrine, she was forced to four Academy Award nominasign a contract that wouldn’t allow tions, including Best Picture and for any sort of inquiry into the Best Actress, is based on the 2009 son’s whereabouts. investigative book by BBC corAfter starting a family years respondent Martin Sixsmith, “The later in England and, for the most Lost Child of Philomena Lee.” part, moving on with her life, Lee It focuses on the efforts of meets Sixsmith, a BBC reporter Philomena Lee, mother to a boy with whom she decides to discover conceived out of wedlock — some- her long-lost son. thing her Irish-Catholic communiRated R. $10 general; $9

‘The Invisible Woman’

‘The Aristocats Kids’

‘Prince Igor’

7 p.m. Wednesday-Thursday March 12-13

Noon Sunday, March 9

7:30 p.m. Friday, March 7 3 p.m. Saturday, March 8 5:30 p.m. Sunday, March 9 7:30 p.m. Monday, March 10

Borodin’s defining Russian epic, famous for its Polovtsian Dances, comes to the Met for the first time in nearly 100 years. “The Invisible Woman” is a Dmitri Tcherniakov’s new produc2013 British biographical drama tion is a psychological journey film directed by Ralph Fiennes through the mind of its conflicted and based on Claire Tomalin’s hero, with the founding of the book “The Invisible Woman: The Story of Nelly Ternan and Charles Russian nation as the backdrop. Ildar Abdrazakov takes on the Dickens.” title role, with Gianandrea Noseda Rated R. $10 general; $9 seniors, students and active miliconducting.

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seniors, students and active military; $8 members; $7 ages 12 and under. Bargain matinee prices (all shows before 6 p.m.): $8 general, $6 members, $5 ages 12 and under.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E16 - Thursday, March 6, 2014

MOVIES

Sullivan Stapleton stars in “300: Rise of an Empire.” Warner Bros. Pictures via AP

‘300’ sequel is prettier but less thrilling By ROGER MOORE McClatchy-Tribune News Service

King Leonidas slipped into legend at the Battle of Thermopylae, martyred with 300 Spartans for the sake of Western Civilization and Spartan glory. “Go, tell the Spartans, stranger passing by That here, obedient to their laws, we lie.” So it was too much to hope that someone with Gerard Butler’s charismatic, bellowing swagger would be around for the sequel, “300: Rise of an Empire.” His Leonidas and his oiled-down eight-pack are sorely missed, as are the quotable quatrains of that famous fight, the Spartan trash talk that sings through the ages. So many Persian arrows will rain on them that they will “blot out the

‘300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE’

HH1⁄2 Cast: Sullivan Stapleton, Eva Green, Lena Headey, Jack O’Connell, Andrew Tiernan, David Wenham Running time: 1:42 MPAA rating: R for strong sustained sequences of stylized bloody violence throughout, a sex scene, nudity and some language

sun”? “Then we shall fight in the shade.” There’s nothing that moving in “Rise of an Empire,” a more visually stunning but less thrilling epic with bloodier slo-motion swordfights, this time at sea. It lacks the heroic proportions and poetry of “300,” mainly thanks to a less

impressive cast and murky, forgettable script. Sullivan Stapleton (“Gangster Squad”) is Themistokles, the Greek general who took the oracle’s prophecy that Greece could only be saved “by a wall of wood” (i.e., ships) to heart and fought the enormous Persian fleet at Artemisium and Salamis. That prophecy, by the way, isn’t shown — a clever and quotably theatrical moment discarded as Queen Gorgo (Lena Headey) relates this oral history. The movie opens at the end of Thermopylae, flashes back to the earlier Battle of Marathon, then flashes forward to the fictive present as Themistokles rallies the city states and prepares for battle at sea as Leonidas marches to his fate at Thermopylae. The Persian fleet is led by the she-devil Artemisia, played by

one-time Bond babe Eva Green, a seductive swordfighter in jet black hair, Egyptian eye makeup and ancient Persian fishnet stockings. She purrs about “the ecstasy of steel” and demands of her admirals, “Is it too much to ask for victory?” It is. The clever Greeks foil her and crush her huge war galleys at every turn. Things get so bad that Artemesia summons Themistokles for a mid-Aegean parlay. And things turn so hot and heavy there that Themistokles has to teach her a little Latin — coitus interruptus. Director Noam Murro did the college professor romance “Smart People,” in no way a recommendation for directing a red-blooded digital epic of an ancient sea battle. Zack Snyder, who directed the original film, had a hand in the

tin-eared script. It’s not graphic novel creator Frank Miller’s fault that Thermopylae, the basis for his “300” book, made for more elegiac history than Salamis. But the design — a sea of greys and whites covered with heaving digital black ships and black sails and Persians clad in black battling Greeks in tiny brown boats — is stunning, an improvement over 2006’s “300.” And the action never disappoints. It’s a pity this colorless cast doesn’t hold a candle to the Butler/Headey/Michael Fassbender/ David Wenham crew of the original, that the writers couldn’t conjure up thrilling speeches to match the original. Go tell the Spartans, stranger passing by, that these pretenders spoiled their franchise, and here their movie lies.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, March 6, 2014 - E17

MOVIES MINI-REVIEWS Compiled from news services. Ratings are one to four stars. “About Last Night” — The four leads in this update of the 1986 comedy -- Kevin Hart, Michael Ealy, Regina Hall and Joy Bryant -- are enormously likable and there’s enough sharp, raunchy, sexy humor for me to recommend this version. The movie does a nice job of capturing the rhythms of a relationship. Romantic comedy, R, 100 minutes. HHH “August: Osage County” — The dialogue is sometimes so sharp we wince, and the acting by an ensemble of world-class actors led by Meryl Streep, Julia Roberts, Ewan McGregor and Chris Cooper is for the most part superb. But this adaptation of Tracy Letts’ play ultimately is sour, loud and draining. Nearly everyone in this story would be the most horrific person at your average dinner party. Drama, R, 119 minutes. HH “Dallas Buyers Club” — Matthew McConaughey plays Ron Woodroof, a grimy, shady, homophobic, substance-abusing horndog in 1985 Texas who learns he’s HIV-positive and procures unapproved means of treatment. McConaughey’s masterful job of portraying one of the more deeply flawed anti-heroes in recent screen history reminds us why he became a movie star in the first place. We start out loathing this guy and learn to love him. Jared Leto disappears into the role of a transgender drug addict and Jennifer Garner is Ron’s empathetic doctor. Drama, R, 117 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “Ender’s Game” — A firstrate cast of wily veterans (Harrison Ford, Ben Kingsley) and fresh-faced youngsters (Asa Butterfield of “Hugo”) deliver a rousing, challenging adventure that should satisfy most young fans of the beloved sci-fi novel while keeping the adults engrossed as well. The simulated battles against scary aliens are beautifully shot and expertly choreographed. Sci-fi adventure, PG-13, 114 minutes. HHH “Frozen” — When a queen with icy powers (voice of

period piece. Oscar Isaac gives a memorable performance as the title character, a thoroughly unlikable, ANACORTES CINEMAS selfish, socially poisonous March 7-13 miscreant. The music is ter 300: Rise of an Empire (R): Friday-Saturday: 1:00, rific. With Justin Timberlake, 3:15, 6:50, 9:05; Sunday-Thursday: 1:00, 3:15, 6:50 Carey Mulligan and John Mr. Peabody & Sherman (PG): Friday-Saturday: 1:10, Goodman. Comedy, R, 105 3:25, 6:40, 8:50; Sunday-Thursday: 1:10, 3:25, 6:40 minutes. HHH1⁄2 3 Days to Kill (PG-13): Friday-Saturday: 3:35, 6:30, “Lone Survivor” — This 9:00; Sunday-Thursday: 3:35, 6:30 re-creation of a 2005 Navy The Lego Movie (PG): 1:20 SEAL mission builds to one 360-293-6620 of the most realistic, shocking, gruesome and devastatBLUE FOX DRIVE-IN ing depictions of war ever Oak Harbor put on film. Instead of going 360-675-5667 for the big-picture perspective, director Peter Berg CONCRETE THEATRE focuses on the unflinching March 6-9 bravery of soldiers executing Walter: Thursday: 7 p.m. their mission and looking out Mr. Peabody & Sherman (PG): Friday: 7:30 p.m.; for one another. Mark WahlSaturday: 5 and 7:30 p.m.; Sunday: 4 and 6:30 p.m. berg stars, with Taylor Kitsch, 360-941-0403 Emile Hirsch, Ben Foster and Eric Bana. War drama, R, CASCADE MALL THEATRES 121 minutes. HHH Burlington “Nebraska” — What a For listings: 888-AMC-4FUN (888-262-4386). joy it is to watch Bruce Dern playing such a miserable OAK HARBOR CINEMAS SOB in the best role of his March 7-13 long career. Woody Grant is 300: Rise of an Empire (R): Friday: 1:10, 3:30, 6:50, a crabby, boozy, sometimes 9:05; Saturday: 10:30, 1:10, 3:30, 6:50, 9:05; Sundelusional old guy on a road day: 10:30, 1:10, 3:30, 6:50; Monday-Thursday: 1:10, trip with his son (Will Forte) 3:30, 6:50 to collect a sweepstakes Mr. Peabody & Sherman (PG): Friday: 1:20, 3:40, prize. Alexander Payne’s 6:30, 8:40; Saturday: 10:40, 1:20, 3:40, 6:30, 8:40; latest film is a modern Sunday: 10:40, 1:20, 3:40, 6:30; Monday-Thursday: American classic about the 1:20, 3:40, 6:30 dynamic between a father Son of God (PG-13): Friday: 1:00, 3:50, 6:40, 9:30; from the generation that Saturday: 10:20, 1:00, 3:50, 6:40, 9:30; Sunday: didn’t speak about its feel10:20, 1:00, 3:50, 6:40; Monday-Thursday: 1:00, 3:50, ings and a grown son who’s 6:40 still trying to get his father 360-279-2226 to explain himself. Stark, beautiful and memorable. STANWOOD CINEMAS Drama, R, 115 minutes. March 7-13 HHHH 300: Rise of an Empire (R): 1:10, 3:25, 6:55, 9:05 “Non-Stop” — I can’t pre Mr. Peabody & Sherman (PG): 1:20, 3:35, 6:25, 8:35 tend the checklist of cliches Non-Stop (PG-13): 1:40, 4:05, 6:45, 9:00 didn’t tickle me in this genre Son of God (PG-13): 1:00, 3:45, 6:35, 9:20 thriller about a mysterious 3 Days to Kill (PG-13): 3:55, 6:40, 9:10 terrorist threatening midflight The Lego Movie (PG): 1:30 murder. As the federal air 360-629-0514 marshal onboard, Liam Neeson continues his late middle-age run as the baddest Idina Menzel) accidentally love with the voice of an action hero on the planet. freezes her kingdom, she operating system (Scarlett (Thriller, PG-13, 107 minutes runs away and her intrepid Johansson). One of the more HHH sister (Kristen Bell) goes original, hilarious and even “Ride Along” — We’ve to find her. Sure to delight heartbreaking stories of the seen hundreds of variations kids and captivate adults, year. It works both as a love on the mismatched buddyDisney’s musical “Frozen” story and as a commentary cop movie, and few have is the instant favorite for on the ways technology been as uninspired and the animated feature Oscar. isolates us from human con- depressingly dreadful as this Animated musical, PG, 102 tact. Comedy-romance, R, one. Kevin Hart, who can minutes. HHH1⁄2 119 minutes. HHH1⁄2 be fall-down funny at times, “Her” — In writer-director “Inside Llewyn Davis” — at least gets points for Spike Jonze’s lovely and With this dry comedy about infusing boundless energy wondrous ultra-modern the American folk music into his role as a pint-sized romance, a fragile fellow scene of the early 1960s, video game enthusiast riding in the not-so-distant future Ethan and Joel Coen have around with the snarl-and(Joaquin Phoenix) falls in crafted another unique growl cop (Ice Cube) whose

AT AREA THEATERS

sister he wants to marry. Action comedy, PG-13, 100 minutes. H1⁄2 “RoboCop” — The 2014 version of “RoboCop” takes advantage of the superior technology available now, but doesn’t match up to the original when it comes to story and cast. As Alex Murphy, the wounded officer converted into RoboCop, Joel Kinnaman comes across as a wooden human being AND a wooden robot. Sci-fi action, PG-13, 118 minutes. HH “Saving Mr. Banks” — Emma Thompson is a perfect choice to play prissy P.L. Travers, who wrote the Mary Poppins books and resists the efforts of Walt Disney (Tom Hanks) to give the magical nanny the Hollywood musical treatment. A lovingly rendered, sweet film, set in a stylized and gorgeous rendition of 1961 Los Angeles. Comedy-biography, PG-12, 125 minutes. HHH “Son of God” — The first feature in recent memory telling us a life-spanning story of Jesus Christ recounts the events with great reverence but, alas, is not a good movie. The special effects are just OK, and in the title role, Portuguese-born heartthrob Diogo Morgado hits a lot of wrong notes. Historical drama, PG-13, 138 minutes. H1⁄2 “That Awkward Moment” — Strives to straddle the line between breezy, bromantic comedy and “Hangover”esque guy humor – and fails miserably on both counts. Talented, charismatic actors including Zac Efron and Michael B. Jordan star in a not particularly offensive but utterly unmemorable film. Comedy, R, 94 minutes. H1⁄2 “The Bag Man” — One can’t help but wonder what Robert De Niro and John Cusack saw in the script for “The Bag Man” that made two of our most interesting actors sign up for this irritating mess of a movie. It’s warmed-over Tarantino mixed with a third-rate tribute to the Coen brothers with a dose of David Lynch-ian madness. Thriller, R, 108 minutes. H “The Monuments Men” — One of the most oldfashioned and at times

almost breezy World War II films in recent memory is about middle-aged curators recovering art stolen by the Nazis. George Clooney directs himself and his costars (including Matt Damon and Bill Murray) as if he had watched “The Dirty Dozen” on a continuous loop for a week. Historical action, PG-13, 118 minutes. HHH “3 Days to Kill” — The term “guilty pleasure” was invented for this kind of movie. Nearly every other scene is so audaciously terrible, you don’t know whether to cringe or chortle. But the star power of Kevin Costner as an aging CIA hit man turns schlock into pure entertainment. Action, PG-13, 117 minutes. HHH “12 Years a Slave” — is a film about great bravery, featuring some of the bravest performances you’ll ever have the privilege to witness. Chiwetel Ejiofor stars as a free man in New York state in the 1840s, who is kidnapped and shipped to the South, where he is beaten, given a new name and forced into slavery. Unflinchingly directed by Steve McQueen, “12 Years a Slave” is what we talk about when we talk about greatness in film. With Michael Fassbender, Benedict Cumberbatch and Paul Giamatti. Drama, R, 134 minutes. HHHH “Tim’s Vermeer” — A documentary voiced by Penn Jillette and directed by his partner-in-magic Teller, “Tim’s Vermeer” chronicles multimillionaire entrepreneur Tim Jenison’s years-long effort to figure out just how Johannes Vermeer was able to produce photo-realistic art in the 17th century. You won’t believe the painting created by this guy who cannot paint. Documentary, PG-13, 80 minutes. HHH “Winter’s Tale” — A good old-fashioned train wreck of a film. Despite the beloved source material, a talented writer-director (Akiva Goldsman) and an A-list cast headed by Colin Farrell and Russell Crowe, there’s no stopping the tide of the overwhelmingly cheesy story of love, romance and our place in the universe. It’s a gooey mess. Romance, PG-13, 118 minutes. H


E18 - Thursday, March 6, 2014

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

OUT & ABOUT ART PAINTINGS & SCULPTURES: Check out palette knife paintings and small metal statues by Roger Small during March at Skagit Running Company, 702 S. First St., Mount Vernon. Store hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday and Saturday. artby rogersmall.com. “ATMOSPHERES”: A show of new paintings by Tyree Callahan, Todd Horton and Sharon Kingston continues through March 30 at Smith & Vallee Gallery, 5742 Gilkey Ave., Edison. The exhibition concentrates on the artists’ expressions of the interplay between atmospheric light and the Northwest landscape. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday. 360-766-6230 or smithand vallee.com. show will feature a collection of photographs from NW ARTISTS: A show of the estate of Dick Garvey work by 25 of the 100 artists (1952-2011), with special featured in the new book, pricing for all work hanging “100 Artists Of The Northin the show. Gallery hours west,” continues through are 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. April 13 at Matzke Fine Monday through Saturday Art Gallery and Sculpture or by appointment. 360-293Park, 2345 Blanche Way, 6938 or scottmilo.com. Camano Island. The book, co-authored by Karla MatzGALLERY WALK: Check ke, features contemporary out a variety of art on disWashington and Oregon play at several galleries and artists working in sculpture, other venues during the First glass, painting, clay, wood Friday Gallery Walk from and other mediums. Gal6 to 9 p.m. Friday, March 7, lery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 along Commercial Avenue p.m. Saturdays and Sundays; and other locations in downweekdays by appointment. town Anacortes. Featured artworks include paintings, 360-387-2759 or matzke drawing and prints, sculpfineart.com. tures, fiber arts, jewelry, glass art, mixed media, pastels, PHOTO EXHIBIT: Dick photos and more. 360-293Garvey — Photography: “A Collector’s Dream” will 6938. open with a reception durNEW PAINTINGS: A show ing the First Friday Gallery of new acrylic paintings on Walk from 6 to 9 p.m. Fricanvas and paper by Anne day, March 7, and continue Martin McCool will open through April 1 at Scott Milo Gallery, 420 Commer- with a reception from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, March 7, and cial Ave., Anacortes. The

‘SPRING CLEARING: IN WITH THE NEW’

lery walls. The gallery is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. 360-416-7812.

MoNA WINTER EXHIBITS: Two exhibits continue through March 12 at The Museum of Northwest Art, 121 S. First St., La Conner. “North American”: Film installation by Robinson Devor and Charles Mudede. Working outside the traditional narrative structure, the film installation follows a mentally exhausted airline pilot wandering through a massive public park. Visitors will experience the pilot’s journey on multiple screens. The project was filmed entirely in Seattle’s Eddie Gordon and Allen six local NWDC artists — Olmstead-designed park sysLanny Bergner, Danielle Moe, continues through tem. Devor and Mudede will Bodine, Lynn DiNino, Lin March 16 at Gallery Cygintroduce their film instalMcJunkin, Don Myhre and nus, 109 Commercial Ave., lation before the opening Denise Snyder. La Conner. Gallery hours reception at 1 p.m. Saturday, n The closing celebration Jan. 11. are noon to 5 p.m. Friday will take place from 6 to 9 through Saturday. 360-708“Shoreline from the Perp.m. Friday, March 7. 4787 or gallerycygnus.com. continue through March manent Collection”: The Gallery hours are noon to exhibit will offer a kaleidoat the McCool Gallery, 711 5 p.m. Friday through SunSPRING ART EXHIBIT: Commercial Ave., Anacortes. scope experience of color, Check out the Spring Com- day. 360-755-3140 or anchor media and composition, The show also will feature work by other gallery artists munity Exhibit at the Jansen artspace.org. including artwork by Guy Art Center, 321 Front St., including sculptures, glass Anderson, Bill Brennen, INTERACTIVE ART Lynden. The juried show and ceramics, baskets and Kenneth Callahan, INSTALLATION: #pictureincludes work by several fiber art, jewelry, paintings Richard Gilkey, Paul Havas, and more. Gallery hours are regional artists and features methere, a fully interactive Charles Miller, Allen Moe, installation by Jessica Bonin Mary Randlett, Jack Stangle, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday special showings by Kathand James Reisen, is on through Sunday. mccoolart. erine Payge and Vernon Mark Tobey and Hiroshi display through March 21 Leibrant, plus a retrospeccom. Yamano. Curated by Lisa in the Skagit Valley Coltive collection of work by Young. Michael Davenport. Gallery lege Art Gallery, located in PHOTOS ON DISPLAY: the Gary Knutzen Cardinal Think Studios will be show- hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. FIBER ARTS ON DISMonday through Wednesday Center, 2405 E. College ing images from photograPLAY: Three exhibits continWay, Mount Vernon. Using pher Barb Thrall during the and 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Thursue through March 23 at the hand-painted backdrops day through Saturday. 360First Friday Artwalk from La Conner Quilt & Textile and handmade objects, #pic- Museum, 703 S. Second St., 354-3600 or jansenart 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, March 7, turemethere creates a play- La Conner: at 1010 Fifth St., Suite 320, center.org. ground for the imagination Anacortes. The collection, “Creating Texture”: Self“Places,” presents contemNW DESIGNER CRAFTS- where viewers can become taught stitcher, quilter and an active participant in the plations while stopping MEN: “6 Celebrate Northartist Sue Spargo is influartwork. Visitors can pick along the path between here west Designer Craftsmen enced by the beautiful, colup the props, take a photo and there. The studio will @ 60” continues through orful work of primitive craft with their smartphone and be open by appointment March 9 at Anchor Art artists around the world. render their own version of Spargo’s folk art style is rich following the artwalk. Space, 216 Commercial the story. By uniting all of 360-770-4528. Ave., Anacortes. The exhiwith embroidery. the work with a common bition, commemorating “Out of the Blue”: The hashtag, #picturemethere GALLERY SHOW: “Of the 60th anniversary of one-of-a-kind artworks Northwest Designer Crafts- participants collectively cre- created by members of This World and Not,” feaate a body of photographs men (NWDC), will feature turing artworks by Skagit Whidbey Island’s Surface that exists outside the galValley artists Heidi Epstein, the mixed media work of Design Association blend

Check out new art for the new season opening with a reception from 5 to 8 p.m. Friday, March 7, and continuing through March 31 at Raven Rocks Gallery, 765 Wonn Road, Greenbank. Windwalker Taibi will introduce a new series of paintings based upon spiritual and philosophical perspectives along with tapestries woven from hand-dyed and natural colored wool yarns. Mary Jo Oxrieder will unveil an array of mixed media and fiber artworks, including Scrumble dolls, Lucky Fish and spring flowers in watercolor, as well as hand-knitted and crocheted hats, scarves, treasure and fairy bowls and woolen mug nest coasters. Information, including gallery hours and directions: 360-2220102 or ravenrocksgallery.com.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, March 6, 2014 - E19

OUT & ABOUT many techniques — collage, weaving, felting, beading, basketry, hand-dyed fabric and contemporary quilting. Each artist was challenged to literally or figuratively create artwork with “Out of the Blue” as its theme. “Timeless Treasures: Crazy Quilts”: Each January, the museum features a selection of crazy quilts, a craze that became popular in America around the 1880s. While some Crazies might include fans or other recognizable patterns, the style often features random-sized patches sewn onto a foundation fabric with embroidery stitches around the patch edges. Patches also often include paintings, ink work or embroidery. Museum hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday. Admission: $7, $5 students and military, free for members and children ages 11 and younger. 360-466-4288 or laconner quilts.org.

LECTURES AND TALKS SISTER CITIES PRESENTATION: Bill and Ann Testerman will be the featured speakers at the Anacortes Sister Cities Association (ASCA) meeting at 7 p.m. today at the Anacortes Public Library, 1220 10th St., Anacortes. The Testermans will present a slide show about their 33-day, 500-mile pilgrimage on foot from the French Pyrenees at St. Jean Pied de Port, across the top of Spain to Santiago de Compostela, near the Atlantic Coast. Free. anacortes sistercities.com. FILM & DISCUSSION: The film “Pleasure Unwoven” will be presented at 6:30 p.m. Monday, March 10, at Central United Methodist Church, Safe Haven Room, 1013 Polte Road, SedroWoolley. Hosted by PFLAG Skagit/Stanwood, the film

reviews the latest neuroMUSIC scientific research about BENEFIT CONCERT: addiction and addresses the Noted country music artist question: “Is it really a disCollin Raye will perform at ease?” Free. 360-856-4676 or 6 p.m. Sunday, March 16, at pflagskagit.org. Brodniak Hall, 1600 20th St., Anacortes. Tickets: $30-$50. GETTING ELECTED: A preconcert meet and greet Anthony Young and Janet will take place at 4 p.m. at McKinney will offer a the Majestic Hotel. Cost: presentation on “Getting $120, includes reserved conElected” at the Fidalgo Democrats meeting at 7 p.m. cert seating. Proceeds will benefit the Skagit Adult Day Thursday, March 13, at the Program, serving individuals Anacortes Public Library, suffering from Alzheimer’s 1220 10th St., Anacortes. and dementia. 360-428-5972 Young was a field director or collinrayebenefitconcert. in a presidential and two gubernatorial campaigns in brownpapertickets.com. North Carolina, and camMUSICAL BENEFIT: The paigned locally for Reps. Rick Epting Foundation For Rick Larsen and Suzan The Arts will present Lydia DelBene, State Rep. Kris Pense & Cold Blood and Lytton, Sheriff Will ReichThe Margaret Wilder Band ardt and Mayor Laurie at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, March Gere. McKinney is a labor 29, at the Lincoln Theatre, organizer and member of 712 S. First St., Mount Verthe Skagit County Demonon. The concert pairs the crats Getting Elected Action late ’60s/early ’70s funk/ Team. A moderated period soul/R&B sound of Cold of questions and comments Blood with local R&B vocal will follow. Bring a nonsensation Margaret Wilder. perishable food donation for $15-$35. Proceeds will benthe food bank. For informaefit the Epting Foundation’s tion, contact Corinne at 360efforts to keep the arts alive 293-7114. in Skagit Valley. 360-3368955. FRIENDS OF SKAGIT BEACHES LECTURE: Dr. MORE FUN M. Brady Olson, marine “EXTRA! EXTRA! A HISscientist at Western WashTORY OF NEWSPAPERS ington University’s ShanIN SKAGIT COUNTY”: The non Point Marine Center, exhibit continues through will present “Salish Sea April 6 at the Skagit Oceanography and Marine County Historical Museum, Ecosystem Stressors: Part501 Fourth St., La Conner. ners in a Changing Marine Landscape” at 7 p.m. Friday, Learn about the history of the Skagit Valley Herald March 14, at the NWESD building, 1601 R Ave., Ana- (130 years old this year), Anacortes American (124 cortes. Free. skagitbeaches. years), The Argus (123 org. years), Courier-Times (122 years) and other Skagit MEGAQUAKE: Seattle newspapers that are no lonTimes science reporter and author Sandi Doughton will ger around. Museum hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdiscuss the possibility of a mega earthquake at 10 a.m. day through Sunday. Admission: $5 adults, $4 seniors Saturday, March 15, at the and ages 6 to 12, $10 famiBurlington Public Library, lies, free for members and 820 E. Washington Ave., ages 5 and younger. 360Burlington. Free. 360-755466-3365 or skagitcounty 0760 or burlingtonwa.gov/ .net/museum. library.

MOUNTAIN MEN SHOW: The Cascade Mountain Men will present its annual Muzzle Loading Arms and Pioneer Craft Show from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, March 8-9, at the Evergreen State Fairgrounds, 14405 179th Ave. SE, Monroe. The event will include more than 300 traders and exhibitors in period dress, muzzle loading firearms, supplies and accessories, trade goods, leather and fur, period clothing, Native American crafts, beading and more. $5, free for ages 12 and younger. Ages 15 and younger must be accompanied by an adult. 425-392-1972 or cascade mountainmen.com. FASHION SHOW/AUCTION: The En Vogue Runway Show & Benefit Auction will be held at 6 p.m. Thursday, March 13, in the McIntyre Hall grand lobby, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. A reception will begin at 6 p.m. followed by runway modeling at 6:30. Local fashion designers will unveil their creations that have been “re-purposed” from secondhand clothing and materials. The outfits will be auctioned off to benefit the Friendship House homeless shelter. $25 general admission. $50 VIP ticket includes reserved seating and one beverage. 360-4167727, ext. 2, or mcintyrehall. org.

“OUR WILD QUILT GARDEN!”: The Quilters Anonymous Quilt Guild’s 33rd annual show will take place from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, March 14-16, at the Evergreen State Fairgrounds, 14405 179th Ave. SE, Building 604, Monroe. Featuring some 500 quilts ranging from traditional pieced to innovative art quilts, the event will include 25 vendors offering quilting supplies and notions. Admission: $8, good for all three days. quiltersanonymous. com.

ety of gift certificates and other items. $20, $35 couple. 360-629- 3074 or sahs-fncc. org. FIDALGO FLING: Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day at the Fidalgo DanceWorks’ third annual gala benefit from 7 to 10:30 p.m. Saturday, March 15, at the Swinomish Casino and Lodge, 12885 Casino Drive, Anacortes. Enjoy music by The Weatherheads, dancing and more. $75, $125 couple. Tickets are available at Fidalgo DanceWorks, 901 Third St., Anacortes, or by calling 360-299-8447.

MoNA STYLE: The 30th anniversary showcase of wearable art and home fashions handmade by Northwest artists will take place from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and noon to 6 p.m. Sunday, March 15-16, at The Museum of Northwest Art, 121 S. First St., La Conner. Enjoy a full weekend of art and fashion and the opportunity to purchase a variety of items directly from the BIG BAND SWING artists, with a portion of the DANCE: The Stanwood proceeds to benefit MoNA. Area Historical Society Family art activities will be will host a big band dance offered beginning at 2 p.m. featuring The Moonlight Sunday in the Art Studio. Swing Orchestra from 6 to Free admission. 9 p.m. Saturday, March 15, A ticketed evening fashat the Floyd Norgaard Cul- ion show from 7 to 9 p.m. tural Center, 27130 102nd. Saturday will include hors Ave. NW, Stanwood. Hors d’oeuvres, wine, a fashion d’oeuvres, beer, wine and show and silent auction. $30. soft drinks will available 360-466-4446 or museumof along with a raffle for a vari- nwart.org. S-W FILM SCREENING: The premier film showing of “Tugboats on the Skagit River” is set for noon Saturday, March 15, at the Sedro-Woolley Museum, 725 Murdock St., Sedro-Woolley. Elmer Engen and film narrator Dan Vandenburg will be on hand to answer questions. $5, limited seating. Reservations: 360-855-2390.

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