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‘Legally Blonde, The Musical’ in Anacortes Skagit Valley Herald Thursday March 28, 2013

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Recreation

Reviews

Roger Ebert

Saturday is free-admission day in state parks

Music: The Strokes, Blake Shelton Video Games: ‘LEGO City Undercover’

A new way for true love to struggle against itself

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Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E2 - Thursday, March 28, 2013

NEW ON DVD THIS WEEK “Les Miserables”: This big-screen version of the musical based on Victor Hugo’s book stars Hugh Jackman. To transform the much-beloved musical from stage to screen, director Tom Hooper had to find a way to maintain — and amplify — the emotional power of the original words and music with the trappings of a big-screen production. His efforts have created a beautiful and moving version of the stage production that’s loyal enough to its origins to appease Broadway musical fans, yet is theatrical enough to stand as a feature film release. “Lincoln”: Steven Spielberg directs Daniel Day-Lewis in this drama about the 16th president’s battle to pass the 13th Amendment to abolish slavery. It’s a little-told story in the Abraham Lincoln oeuvre despite how much this effort defined his legacy. The task of portraying the ordinary man with a strong moral core goes to British actor Daniel Day-Lewis, whose makeup makes him look like he posed for the $5 bill. Day-Lewis plays Lincoln as a man of vision, often given to making his points through rambling stories. “Parental Guidance”: Billy Crystal plays Artie Decker, the veteran voice of the Fresno Grizzlies. After a life-changing moment, Decker and his wife, Diane (Bette Midler), head to Atlanta to babysit their three grandchildren — Harper (Bailee Madison), Turner (Joshua Rush) and Barker (Kyle Harrison Breitkopf) — while their parents (Marisa Tomei, Tom Everett Scott) are away at an awards ceremony for a week. “The Borgias: The Second Season”: Jeremy Irons stars in the cable series. “Continuum: Season One”: Time traveling cable series with Rachel Nichols. “Mystery Science Theater 3000 XXVI”: Includes “The Magic Sword” and “The Mole People.” “Star Trek: Enterprise — the Complete First Season”: The first year of the TV series about the early days of the Enterprise is available on Blu-ray. “House Arrest”: A woman (Stacey Dash) must adjust to a new life after being arrested. “Bangkok Revenge”: Man without emotions trains to be a killing machine. “Men at Work: The Complete First Season”: Four buddies count on each other to get through life. “Veep: The Complete First Season”: Julia Louis-Dreyfus stars in the political comedy.

YOUR ARTS, ENTERTAINMENT AND RECREATION GUIDE TO WHAT’S GOING ON IN SKAGIT COUNTY AND THE SURROUNDING AREAS

Upcoming movie releases Following is a partial schedule of coming movies on DVD. Release dates are subject to change: MARCH 26 The Collection — Lionsgate Killing Them Softly — Anchor Bay Parental Guidance — Fox

Easter events / Page 5

APRIL 9 Hyde Park on Hudson — Universal Planet Ocean — Universal APRIL 16 Django Unchained — Anchor Bay APRIL 23 Broken City — Fox Gangster Squad — Warner A Haunted House — Universal APRIL 26 The Impossible — Lionsgate/ Summit APRIL 30 The Guilt Trip — Paramount Not Fade Away — Paramount MAY 7 Jack Reacher — Paramount Mama — Universal

“Johnny Sokko and His Flying Robot: The Complete Series”: Includes 26 episodes of the series that original aired in 1967. “This is 40”: A couple take a look at their marriage. Paul Rudd and Leslie Mann star. “MADtv: The Complete Second Season”: Includes 22 episodes of the comedy series. “Futureworld”: The 1976 sequel to “Westworld” is on Blu-ray. “The Collection”: A madman collects humans in a booby-trapped house. “Day of the Falcon”: Action film about star-crossed lovers. “Party of Five: The Complete Fourth Season”: Matthew Fox headlines the family TV drama. “Stand Of”: A man’s misguided attempt to protect his family backfires. “The Carol Burnett Show: This Time Together”: A collection of comedy bits from Burnett’s variety series. “Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries”: Phryne Fisher (Essie Davis) is a sly sleuth and thoroughly modern woman of the late 1920s. “Midsomer Murders: Tom Barnaby’s Last Cases”: Features 15 stand-alone mysteries in the series. “Shakespeare Uncovered”: Tells the stories behind the William Shakespeare’s greatest plays.

Check out Easter events in the area.

Inside

SUBMISSIONS Email features@skagitpublishing.com vrichardson@skagitpublishing. com (recreation items) Phone 360-416-2135 Hand-deliver 1215 Anderson Road Mount Vernon, WA 98274

Recreation....................................... 4 Get Involved.................................... 8 On Stage........................................ 10 Tuning Up..................................... 11 Music, Game Reviews..............12-13 Roger Ebert.................................... 16 Movie Listings............................... 17 Movie Mini-Reviews..................... 17 At the Lincoln Theatre.................. 17 Out & About.............................18-19

Mailing address P.O. Box 578 Mount Vernon, WA 98273 Online events calendar To list your event on our website, visit goskagit.com and look for the Events Calendar on the home page HAVE A STORY IDEA? w For arts and entertainment, contact Features Editor Craig Parrish at 360-416-2135 or features@skagitpublishing.com w For recreation, contact staff writer Vince Richardson at 360-416-2181 or vrichardson@ skagitpublishing.com TO ADVERTISE 360-424-3251


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, March 28, 2013 - E3

ON STAGE

Blonde ambition

Anacortes Community Theater stages ‘Legally Blonde, The Musical’ Skagit Valley Herald staff @360_SVH

Elle Woods has a problem; a couple of them, actually. She’s just been dumped by her boyfriend Warner, but she’s not going to go quietly. In an attempt to win him back, she makes the least obvious course: she leaves sunny California and enrolls at Harvard Law School. Along the way, she gets help from her sisters at Delta Nu sorority, uses her newfound law knowledge to help others, and learns a great deal about herself. All of that is set to rollicking songs in Anacortes Community Theater’s production of “Legally Blonde, The Musical,” which opens Friday, March 29, and plays Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays through April 27. The play is based on a novel by Amanda Brown, and Oscar winner Reese Witherspoon starred in the 2001 movie by the same name. The success of the first film led to a sequel, “Legally Blonde 2: Photos by Craig Parrish / Skagit Valley Herald Red, White & Blonde,” which was released in 2003. Included in the musical treatment are songs such Anacortes Community Theater presents “Legally Blonde, The Musical,” opening Friday and running through April 27. as “Whipped into Shape,” “Take It Like a Man” and “Chip on My Shoulder.”

‘Legally Blonde, The Musical’ w When: Runs March 29-April 27; Thursdays at 7:30 p.m; FridaySaturdays at 8 p.m.; Sundays at 2 p.m. w Where: Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. Anacortes Community Theater, w Tickets: $20; 360-293-6829 or www.acttheatre. com.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E4 - Thursday, March 28, 2013

RECREATION

State parks have free admission day Lakes primed with thousands of rainbow trout By VINCE RICHARDSON @Sports_SVH

The price will be right to visit a Washington state park on Saturday, so there’s no excuse not to stop by any number of parks in this neck of the woods. Visit any state park for free in recognition of state parks’ 100th birthday. The Discover Pass will not required to visit state parks on that day. Plan accordingly to visit Rasar, Rockport or Bay View state parks in Skagit County. Maybe Peace Arch, Birch Bay or Larrabee in Whatcom County. How about Deception Pass (the state’s most visited), Camano Island, Cama Beach, South Whidbey, Joseph Whidbey, Fort Ebey or Fort Casey state parks in Island County?In Snohomish County, spend time at Mount Pilchuck or Wallace Falls.

Hooked

With spring break fast approaching, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is stocking dozens of lakes in Western Washington with more than 250,000 rainbow trout ready to bite on a worm or lure. Averaging 10-12 inches in length, those fish will be released into 47 year-round fishing lakes in Grays Harbor, Thurston, Pierce, Mason, Kitsap, Island, King and Snohomish counties throughout the month. Chris Donley, WDFW inland fish program manager, said the trout release is timed to give fishing families an opportunity to

spend time outdoors during spring school holidays — and tune up their gear before the start of the state’s main trout season April 27. “Spring is coming, and a lot of people are eager to go fishing,” Donley said. “Our goal is to give them something to catch on both sides of the Cascades at a time when the weather is warming up and students have a break from school.” All of the lakes stocked in Western Washington are located in or near cities and towns, providing an easy getaway for families and young people. Hundreds of year-round lakes around the state have been — or soon will be — stocked for springtime fishing. Locally, two Island County lakes received plants. Cranberry Lake received 6,530 fish and Lone Lake was planted with 3,000. Lone Lake is a selective fishery. All anglers 15 and older must have a valid fishing license to fish in state waters. Current licenses expire at midnight March 31, so anglers planning to fish beyond that date must purchase a 2013-14 license.

Jamie Francis / The Oregonian via AP

People stroll across the Deception Pass Bridge in this undated photo. Admission will be free to any state park Saturday in recognition of the state park system’s 100th birthday.

several weeks longer in various areas of the Sound, due to policy changes recently adopted by the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission. Under the state’s updated policy, 70 percent of the non-tribal spot shrimp harvest is now allocated to the sport fishery, said Rich Childers, WDFW shellfish manager. In past years, the non-tribal harvest was divided approximately evenly between recreational and commercial fisheries. “Recreational shrimp fishers will see a real difference in the length of this year’s seasons, particularly in the San Juan Islands and the Strait of Juan de Fuca,” said Childers. “Sport fisheries in other areas are also likely to pick up some extra fishing days under Big shrimp the updated policy.” Recreational shrimp fishers will Spot shrimp, also known as get more days to fish and a larger prawns, are the largest shrimp in share of the catch in areas of Puget Sound and may grow to Puget Sound under fishing seasons nine inches in length. In all areas announced by the Washington of Puget Sound, fishers are limited Department of Fish and Wildlife to 80 spot shrimp per day, and (WDFW). a valid 2013-14 fishing license This year’s sport fishery for is required to participate in the spot shrimp, set to begin May 4, is fishery. expected to run from one day to In the San Juan Islands, the

recent change in the state’s spot shrimp policy will increase the sport fishery’s share of the catch from 15 percent to 80 percent. To accommodate that change, WDFW split Marine Area 7-North into two subareas — 7 West and 7 South — each with its own season. Under the higher sport quota, Childers said the new Marine Area 7-West could be open for more than a month this year, up from six days of fishing in those waters last year. The spot shrimp fishery in Marine Areas 7 East and 7 South, also open six days last year, is expected to run 13 days during the 2013 season, he said. The shrimp season in Marine Area 6 in the Strait of Juan de Fuca is also expected to expand by several weeks under the new allocation policy, which increased the sport fishery’s share of the catch in those waters from 15 percent to 22 percent this year. The sport fishery in Hood Canal has received 100 percent of the state shrimp allocation in previous years, so it is not affected by the change in the commission’s policy, Childers said. However, sport

shrimpers will have five days to fish — up from four days last year — because stock trends have been healthy in recent years, he said. Childers said the new policy does increase sport fishing allocations in other areas of central Puget Sound, but WDFW will determine whether that will translate into additional fishing days during the course of the season. “The question is whether the higher catch shares will be enough to add a third day of fishing in those areas,” he said. “We’ll be watching the catch totals during the season and will make that decision on an area-by-area basis.” Local recreational shrimp season opening days are: n Marine Area 7 East and South: Open May 4 at 7 a.m. for a one-day fishery and will reopen May 8-11, May 15-18, May 29 June 1. n Marine Area 7 West: Open May 4 at 7 a.m., open Wednesday through Saturday each week until June 1. After June 1 the area will be open Thursday through Saturday each week until the quota is reached or Sept. 15, whichever comes first.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, March 28, 2013 - E5

COMMUNITY

Easter events in the area this weekend EASTER EGG DASH: The annual egg hunt for kids ages 12 and younger begins at 6 p.m. Friday, March 29, at Storvik Park, 1110 32nd St., Anacortes. Bring your own basket. Free. 360-293-1918.

cessions. Free. 360-293-2219.

FIND EASTER EGGS: Children up to 12 years old can hunt for candy-filled Easter eggs starting at 1 p.m. Saturday, March 30, at Riverfront Park, on River Road, Sedro-Woolley. 360-855-1841.

CHILDREN’S EGG HUNT: Hillcrest Christian Fellowship will host its annual Children’s Easter Egg Hunt from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, March 30, at 1830 S. 13th St., CMV EASTER EGG HUNT: Country Mount Vernon. Activities include egg hunts SPRING SPECTACULAR: Celebrate Meadow Village will host an Easter egg for children ages 12 and younger, children’s with a variety of activities all day Sathunt at 2 p.m. Friday, March 29, at the Vilstories and crafts, a bounce house and pho- urday, March 30, at several locations lage, 1501 Collins Road, Sedro-Woolley. tos with the Easter Bunny. Free. 360-424around Stanwood. Kids of all ages are welcome to join in the 3006 or www.hillcrestcf.org. n Pancake Breakfast: 8 to 11 a.m. at fun. Punch and cookies will be served. 360United Methodist Church, 27128 102nd 856-0404. EASTER STORY & EGG HUNT: Valley Drive NW Donations accepted. Baptist Church will have an Easter Egg n Easter Egg Hunt: 9 a.m. at StanKIWANIS EGG HUNT: 10 a.m. SaturHunt for children ages 12 and younger at 11 wood/Camano Fairgrounds, 6431 Pioday, March 30, at Maiben Park, 1011 E. a.m. Saturday, March 30, at the church, 710 neer Highway. Hosted by the Stanwood Greenleaf Ave., Burlington. Kids ages 8 John Liner Road, Sedro-Woolley. Children Eagles, children ages 12 and younger can and younger can hunt for more than 4,000 can enjoy an Easter story and songs, folhunt for 10,000 eggs. Lucky winners will eggs filled with candy and toys. Rain or lowed by the egg hunt. Free. 360-856-2469. receive one of 300 Easter baskets donatshine. Sponsored by the Burlington-Edison ed by local residents and businesses. Kiwanis Morning Club. Free. ADULT EASTER EGG HUNT: Skagit Valn Lions Hippity Hop Trot 5K Run & ley Gardens will host its 11th annual Adult Cottontail Fun Run: 10 a.m. start in the EASTER EGG HUNT: Family Life Easter Egg Hunt at noon Saturday, March parking lot at the old Thrifty store, 8815 Assembly will hold its annual Easter Egg 30, at 18923 Peter Johnson Road, Mount 272nd St. NW. Prizes for the top female/ Hunt from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Vernon. Ages 21 and older are invited to male finishers. Registration: $15 advance, March 30, at 1617 29th St., Anacortes. hunt for eggs among the blooming display $20 day of race. Fun Run: free for ages 12 Children ages 12 and younger will search gardens, with a prize for every egg, chiland younger. for 6,000 eggs, with prizes for each of four dren’s activities and more. 360-424-6760 or n Parade: 11 a.m. on 271st St. N.W. age groups. Enjoy puppets, music and con- www.skagitvalleygardens.com. Day of event registration and line-up at

10:30 a.m. in the parking lot behind the Police Department. n Lunch and family-friendly activities: 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Viking Village. Enjoy pony and train rides, a bouncy house and more. Hot dogs by donation. n Spring Bonnet contest: noon at Candie’s Kids, 8620 271st St. NW. Show off your one-of-a kind creation and win prizes. Register in advance at Candie’s Kids or day of event at the parade registration table behind the Police Department. n Easter Bunny pictures: noon to 2 p.m. at the grassy knoll at Viking Village. Bring your camera for free photos or purchase 5-by-7s from the Stanwood High School Key Club for $2 or three for $5. For information, visit www.stanwood chamber.org. VFW EASTER EGG HUNT: An Easter egg hunt for ages 11 and younger will be held at 1 p.m. Sunday, March 31, at the Whitehead-Muzzall VFW Post, 3037 N. Goldie Road, Oak Harbor. The hunt features prizes and a visit from the Easter Bunny. Free. 360-675-4048 or www.VFW Post7392.org.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E6 - Thursday, March 28, 2013

TRAVEL By MARK THIESSEN Associated Press

Online

Nome, Alaska: http:// www.visitnomealaska. com/

N

OME, Alaska — If you want to see mushers cross the finish line at the world’s most famous sled dog race in March 2014, better make your reservations soon. There aren’t many hotel rooms available at the end of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race in Nome, leaving mushers and their families battling with fans, tourists and volunteers for a place to sleep. “Call early and get going,” advised Richard Beneville, a Nome tour company operator and chamber of commerce official. The Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race always starts the first Saturday in March in Anchorage with a ceremonial run. The competitive race starts the next day in Willow, about 50 miles north of Anchorage. Both events draw huge numbers of fans since both cities are accessible on Alaska’s limited road system. But getting to the end of the race might be as difficult for a fan as it is to a musher. Mushers will travel with their dog teams a thousand miles (1,600 kilometers) over treacherous Alaska wilderness to reach Nome, a Bering Sea coastal community located on Alaska’s wind-whipped western coast. The winner usually comes in about nine days after the Willow start. For fans traveling to Nome, flights aren’t a problem. What is tricky, however, is finding a place to stay. Nome, with a population of 3,500, has only three hotels. Altogether, there are 134 hotel rooms available. All three hotels have varying policies when it comes to reservations during Iditarod week. The Nugget Inn is located right in front of the burled arch, the famous finish line

Iditarod

Book early for next year’s finish AP file photos

Howard Farley speaks about the history of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race during a presentation at the Carrie M. McLain Memorial Museum in Nome, Alaska. Farley, 80, was a co-founder of the Iditarod race, organizing the Nome portion of the race at the finish.

Musher Michael Williams Jr. nears the finish line of the Iditarod earlier this month in Nome, Alaska.

Iditarod fans greet Kotzebue musher John Baker as he nears the finish line earlier this month in Nome, Alaska.

for the Iditarod on Front Street, a block off the Bering Sea — which in March is still frozen and often serves as a runway for small airplanes. The inn has 46 rooms, but also serves as the home hotel for Iditarod officials and volunteers. Manager Thuy Nguyen said they require a stay of seven nights or longer for reservations made by Jan. 1. Then they will start accepting reservations for shorter stays. The Polaris Hotel has 34 rooms, all of which but a handful have already been booked for next year. Manager Tina Yi says the hotel, 20 steps from the finish line, has a sliding cancellation fee. It ranges from losing 25 percent of your deposit if you cancel more than 90 days out to no refund if the cancellation is within 30 days of the reservation. The city’s largest and newest hotel is the Aurora Inn. They don’t open reservations for Iditarod week until April 1, and always sell out the same day. Reservations for the inn’s 54 rooms are only accepted by email and on a first-come, first-served basis. The emails provide a time-stamp on the order that reservations come in. “People pretty much at the stroke of midnight send their emails,” said assistant manager Sean Knudsen. “There’s a real narrow window.” They do keep a waiting list, but Knudsen says he eventually closes it because it gets so long. Adding to a space crunch is that film crews are in Nome filming the popular cable show, “Bering Sea Gold.”


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, March 28, 2013 - E7

TRAVEL Local travel “BRAZIL: MANAUS TO RIO DE JANEIRO”: 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 3, at the Anacortes Public Library, 1220 10th St., Anacortes. Joan and Keith Magee describe their seven-week exploration of Brazil this winter — the cities, beaches and national parks of the Northeast, a cruise on the Amazon and a final flight south that took them to Rio de Janeiro and the colonial town of Ouro Preto. Free. 360293-1910, ext. 21, or library.cityofanacortes. org.

ers will also learn about China’s history and culture through visits to its modern capital, Beijing, and its ancient capital, Xi’an. For information, including cost, application instructions and photos from past trips, visit www.skagit. edu/chinatrip. College credit is available.

“NEPAL: A GLIMPSE INTO ANOTHER WORLD”: 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 24, at the Anacortes Public Library, 1220 10th St., Anacortes. Hilary Walker maps out her recent five-week journey through the streets and mountains of Nepal. This photo travelogue explores the faces and landscapes that make Nepal one of the most culturally rich countries TRAVEL SEMINAR: “World Tours”: 6 p.m. Wednesday, April 10, AAA Mount Vernon office, in the world. Free. 360-293-1910, ext. 21, or library.cityofanacortes.org. 1600 E. College Way, Suite A. Learn about world travel opportunities with Tauck World ART BUS TOUR: “The Masters” and Nicolai Tours. RSVP: 360-848-2090. Fechin. Sunday, April 28. The Skagit County Historical Museum will lead a bus tour from “EXPERIENCE CHINA”: Skagit Valley Colthe Farmhouse Restaurant in Mount Vernon lege is accepting applications through April to the Seattle Art Museum to see the exhibits 10 for a special trip to China Aug. 22-Sept. “Rembrandt, Van Dyck, Gainsborough: The 8. The primary focus of the tour is to journey Treasures of Kenwood House, London” and to the remote villages of Yunnan province to “European Masters: Their Treasures of Seatwork with a partner organization devoted to helping village communities empower minority tle.” Afterward the bus will take a short ride children through culture, art and music. Travel- to the Frye Museum to view the art of Nicolai

B&Bs are another option, but they also sell out quickly. “After all the hotels are booked and the B&Bs, we go into Plan B, which is overflow housing,” Beneville said. Beginning in February, once the commercial rooms are all taken, the Nome Visitors Center begins a file that will eventually match homeowners to travelers. Townspeople call the center, saying they have space for rent that week and what their requirements are: male or female, smoker or nonsmoker, partier or tea-totaler. When people call in looking for a room, visitors center staff try to match them up. Beneville described this makeshift hostelling as “kind of fun.” Be prepared though. Experiences, the type of room or space offered and prices vary by homeowner. You might be sharing your space with a toddler’s toys, rowdy housemates or lots of pets. If lucky enough to get a room, visitors will be

Nome is a very cool place. Period.”

Fechin. $50 covers bus ride, admission, box lunch and other refreshments. Register by April 21; 360-466-3365.

April 19, departing from and returning to Hillcrest Park, Mount Vernon. Enjoy a docent-led tour of the Bellevue Botanical Garden’s 53 acres of cultivated gardens, restored woodTRAVEL SEMINAR: “River Cruises”: 6 p.m. lands and natural wetlands. After a no-host Thursday, May 2, AAA Mount Vernon office, lunch, check out the seasonal flora and fauna 1600 E. College Way, Suite A. Learn about of the Arboretum’s 230 acres on the shores of the exciting world of river cruising. RSVP: 360- Lake Washington. Both tours include walking 848-2090. up to one mile and uneven surfaces. $61$63. Register by April 12. TRIP OF A LIFETIME: The Oak Harbor Senior Center is organizing a small group twoSTANWOOD SENIOR CENTER TRIPS: week trip to the Galapagos Islands and Machu The Stanwood Senior Center offers occaPicchu October 15-28. The all-inclusive trip will sional trips around the Puget Sound area and depart from Whidbey Island or nearby. Open beyond, departing from and returning to the to all adults. Space is limited, so contact Center, 7430 276th St. NW, Stanwood. For Pat Gardner at 360-279-4582 or pgardner@ information or reservations, contact Sandy oakharbor.org. Kitchens at 360-629-7403. SHORT TRIPS: Mount Vernon Parks and Recreation offers several travel opportunities for participants ages 12 and older, adult supervision required for ages 18 and younger. For information or to register, call 360-3366215. Next up: n Bellevue Botanical Garden and Washington Park Arboretum: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday,

PASSPORT APPLICATIONS: The Anacortes Public Library accepts U.S. passport applications from noon to 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Wednesdays, and 1 to 4 p.m. Saturdays at 1220 10th St., Anacortes. Passport forms and information on fees and how to apply are available online at http://travel.state.gov or pick up an application and passport guide at the library.

Continue the cycle — please recycle this newspaper

— RICHARD BENEVILLE, A NOME TOUR COMPANY OPERATOR AND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OFFICIAL

able to witness the end of the rugged Iditarod race. Besides the winner, the race’s other mushers will trickle in for a few days. But the Iditarod isn’t the only draw. Nome is still a frontier type of town, where downtown bars are as popular now as when Old West lawman Wyatt Earp owned the Dexter on Front Street at the turn of the last century. Beneville described the celebratory atmosphere of the Iditarod as “Mardi Gras with dogs.” For those needing a break from dogs or the bar, there’s a huge Alaska Native art and craft fair that goes on during Iditarod week. The town also hosts its annual basketball tournament, drawing 70 teams from Norton Sound communities. This year, Howard Far-

ley, an Iditarod founder who helped establish Nome as the race’s finish, gave daily talks at the city’s library, drawing overflow crowds and repeat listeners. Beneville, a former New York actor, has been known to don a top hat and recite the poetry of Robert Service — often called the “Bard of the Yukon” — to crowds at the Nome Convention Center waiting for the next musher to come in. Tour companies in the past also have arranged visits to Safety, the last Iditarod checkpoint 22 miles from Nome. Other winter tours take tourists outside town to look for musk oxen in the wild. You might even see the northern lights. “Nome is a very cool place. Period,” Beneville said.

2012

2013

Roupen Shakarian, Music Director

NEW DISCOVERIES Concert Saturday, March 30th McIntyre Hall, Mount Vernon

7:30 pm ~ Concert

Courtney Ruckman, Soprano J. C. Bach ~ Sinfonia in D Mozart ~ Exsultate, Jubilate Schubert ~ Overture in E Minor, “Unfinished” Symphony

To Order tickets:

Call McIntyre Hall Box Office Tuesday-Saturday, 12-6 pm (360) 416-7727 ext. 2 (866) 624-6897 $20 - $40

Pre-Concert Lecture Please join Roupen Shakarian for his pre-concert lecture.

6:45 pm Orchestra Seating


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E8 - Thursday, March 28, 2013

GET INVOLVED ART

MINI-COMIC WORKSHOP FOR GIRLS: with Geneviève SKETCHING WORKSHOP: Castrée: 1 to 5 p.m. Satur“Line to Color,” a sketching workshop with urban sketch- day, April 6, at Anchor Art ers and UW instructors Frank Space, 216 Commercial Ave., Ching and Gail Wong, will be Anacortes. Young artists held at 9 a.m. Saturday, April ages 8 to 16 will be encouraged to make a small book 27, at the Front Gallery, 420 featuring their own original Myrtle St. Ching and Wong will lead students through the story, including tips on how to come up with ideas and process of making a sketch to inspire storytelling. Free. on location. $85. Registration deadline is April 8. gail@ www.anchorartspace.org. glwarc.com. ART CLASSES: Dakota Art offers a variety of art CALL FOR SCULPTURES: classes and workshops at San Juan Islands Sculpture 17873 Highway 536, Mount Park is seeking sculptures for Vernon. 360-416-6556, ext. 5, display and sale at its outdoor or www.dakotaartcenter.com. location near Roche Harbor on San Juan Island. Submit SPRING ART CLASSES: photos and contact informaThe Schack Art Center, 2921 tion by April 1. Selections will Hoyt Ave., Everett, offers be made by mid-April for a variety of classes in glassinstallation during May and blowing, jewelry, encaustic, June. Information on the submixed media, painting and mission and jurying process more. 425-259-5050 or www. is available online at www. schack.org. sjisculpturepark.com.

pieces of art, ready to display. Mary Anderson at 360-933n Basic Cartooning: 4 to 6 1779 or visit www.bellingp.m. Tuesdays, June 4-25. $40. hamscd.org. DRAWING FUNDAMENTALS: 4:30 to 6 p.m. Wednesdays, April 3-24, at Burlington Parks and Recreation Center, 900 E. Fairhaven Ave., Burlington. For ages 7-13 years old. Learn drawing basics using line, value and texture. Different themes applied each week with various art materials. $40, plus $20 supply fee payable to instructor. Register by March 29: 360755-9649. EPIC ILLUSTRATIONS AND CREATURE CREATIONS: 4 to 6 p.m. Tuesdays, April 9-30, at Burlington Parks and Recreation Center, 900 E. Fairhaven Ave., Burlington. For ages 7-12 years old. Students will work on a different theme each week: Star Wars, Fantasy Anime, Avengers Assemble and Cartoon Comic Strip. $45, includes supplies. Preregister: 360-755-9649.

Fulton St., Mount Vernon. SPLASH is a program for non-swimmers or those who have not had prior swim lesCONTRA DANCE: 7 to 9:30 sons, designed to teach kids p.m. Saturday, April 6, at the to be safe in or around the Depot Arts Center, 611 R water. Free for members, Ave., Anacortes. Learn the $15 for program members. fundamentals of contra dance 360-336-9622 or email and practice dancing to live j.mcadams@skagitymca.org. music. No partner needed. $8 YOUTH SOCCER: Burlingat the door. 360-755-3969 or ton Parks and Recreation is www.skagitcontra.org. offering Mini Kickers Soccer for ages 3-5 on Friday mornMUSIC ings, March 29 to May 31, at SKAGIT VALLEY MUSIC Skagit River Park in BurlCLUB: The club welcomes ington. Mini Kickers teaches performers, listeners and basic soccer skills while guests at 1:45 p.m. today at developing strength, balance, Vasa Hall, 1805 Cleveland St., coordination, listening skills Mount Vernon. Come and and teamwork. $99, includes sing, play an instrument or jersey, shorts, soccer ball and just enjoy the music. Free. For player evaluation. Register information, call Marsha Pedonline at www.minikickersocerson at 360-757-4906. cer.com.

RECREATION

SPRING BREAK MAGIC CAMP: Kids ages 7 to 12 can learn how magic works from INTRO TO ILLUSTRATION 1 to 4 p.m. Monday through ART CLASSES ART CLASSES: Burlington Friday, April 1-5, at the FAMILY ART DAYS AT Parks and Recreation will YMCA Activity Center, 215 MoNA: The Museum of offer a series of art classes E. Fulton St., Mount Vernon. Northwest Art offers Famfor kids ages 7 to 12. Instruc- AUDITIONS Amaze your friends with ily Art Days each month at tor Max Elam will introduce “THE WOMAN IN BLACK”: your very own magic tricks. MoNA, 121 S. First St., La young artists to a variety of Auditions will take place Conner. Sessions are open styles and art mediums. Each from 3 to 5 p.m. Saturday and Get five days of magic training and a magic kit to take to ages 5 and older at all skill four-session class costs $45. 6 to 8 p.m. Sunday, April 6-7, home. $120 members, $150 levels and include guided Supplies are included. To reg- at Anacortes Community program members. 360-336walk-throughs of MoNA ister, call 360-755-9649. Theatre, 918 M Ave., Ana9622. exhibitions. Limited to 15 n Epic Illustrations and cortes. Parts are available for participants per session. To Creature Creations: 4 to 6 two men and one woman in Y KIDS SPRING BREAK register: 360-466-4446, ext. p.m. Tuesdays, April 9-30. this mystery thriller. Prepare CAMP: For ages kindergarten 108, or FAD@museumofna one-minute dramatic mono- through sixth grade: 6:30 a.m. wart.org. Information: www. Inspired art students will draw and create four master- logue in a standard British to 6 p.m. Monday through museumofnwart.org. WorkFriday, April 1-5, at Lincoln, shops are free with museum works, with a different focus accent. Scripts are available each week: Star Wars/black & at the ACT office. The play Lucille Umbarger and Whitadmission. Admission: $8 will run May 31-June 22. For ney Elementary Schools. Kids adults, $5 seniors, $3 students, white; fantasy anime/mixed information, call 360-941can enjoy crafts, team buildfree for members and ages 11 media; avengers assemble/ 5744 or email eal@innocent. ing activities, group play, field intro to color theory; and and younger. com. cartoon comic strip/intro to trips, swimming and more. Next up: writing and sequential art. $28 per day for members, $32 n Painting From Nature: n Mixed Media: 4 to 6 DANCE per day for program memwith Stephany Vogel: 11 SCOTTISH DANCING: bers. 360-419-9058, ext, 309, a.m. to 1 p.m. or 2 to 4 p.m., p.m. Tuesdays, May 7-28. In this class, students will Bellingham Scottish Counor email t.acker@skagitymca. Saturday, March 30. Using try Dancers meet from 7 to org. traditional paints and brush- experiment with five dif9:30 p.m. Wednesdays at the es as well as unconventional ferent mediums other than pencil. They’ll use exciting Fairhaven Library auditoSPLASH SWIM: For ages techniques for applying paint to canvas, participants color partnered with dynamic rium (upstairs), 1117 12th St., 3 to 12: From 4 to 4:40 p.m. Bellingham. Wear comfortor 4:45 to 5:25 p.m. Monday will make original artworks drawings in markers, chalk, ink, watercolor and colored able clothes and leather-soled through Thursday, April 1-4, inspired by the natural pencil as they complete two shoes. For information, call at the YMCA Pool, 215 E. world.

TULIP RUN: The 28th annual event will get under way at 9:30 a.m. Saturday, April 6, at Skagit Regional Airport, 15400 Airport Drive, Burlington. Choose the 2- or 5-mile course and register in advance or day of race starting at 7:30 a.m. $12, or $22 with shirt. Free for ages 14 and younger and 70 and older. 360-540-1611 or www. tuliprun.com.

THEATER

IMPROV WORKSHOP: Check out a free improv class with Sheila Goldsmith from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Monday, April 22, at Skagit Valley Food Co-op, 202 S. First St., Mount Vernon. Awaken the spontaneity within and develop confidence, flexibility and the ability to listen and respond. Preregister with a co-op cashier or call 360-336-5087, ext. 139. THEATER CLASSES: Anacortes Community Theatre’s Class Act School for the Performing Arts is now enrolling kids from preschool through 12th grade for winter classes on acting and theater arts. Classes are held at ACT, 918

M Ave., Anacortes. 360-2936829 or www.acttheatre.com/ classact. n Creative Characters: for preschool-age children: 10 to 11 a.m. Tuesdays, March 26-May 7 (no class April 2), or 1 to 2 p.m. Fridays, March 29-May 10 (no class April 5). Students will take part in creative dramatic games designed to use their imagination, improve selfconfidence and provide social interaction as they create crazy characters, sing and dance. $50. n Save the Circus!: for kindergarten through second grade: 4 to 5:15 p.m. Fridays, March 29-May 10 (no class April 5). Students get to have fun with a circus character as they play fun theater games and work on their acting skills. Class will culminate in a performance May 10, on ACT’s Second Stage. $50. n How to Perform in a Musical: for third through sixth grade: 4 to 5:30 p.m. Wednesdays, March 27-May 8 (no class April 3). Students will get practical experience in singing and choreography through solo/duet and group work. No need to be a good singer or dancer; just be ready for some fun, culminating in an evening “showcase” performance Friday, May 10, for family and friends, with the option to perform in Class ACT’s annual Music Revue. $50. n Triple Threat: for grades seven through 12: 3 to 4:30 p.m. Thursdays, March 28-May 9 (no class April 4). Each class session, students will get to explore acting, singing and dancing — the “triple threat” — through games, exercises and practical experience. Students will leave the class with a monologue and song to take to their next audition. Class will culminate with an evening performance for family and friends Friday, May 10, and the option to perform in Class ACT’s annual Music Revue. $100.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, March 28, 2013 - E9

UNLIMITED reasons to play

HOT TICKETS DIRTYPHONICS: March 28, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www. showboxonline.com. BOB SEGER & THE SILVER BULLET BAND: March 29, Tacoma Dome, Tacoma. 800-745-3000 or LiveNation.com. CLUTCH: March 29, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. COMMON KINGS: March 29, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. PHOENIX: March 29, Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or LiveNation.com. LOTUS: March 30, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. ZEKE, FANG: March 230, El Corazon, Seattle. www.elcorazonseattle.com. KMFDM, LEGION WITHIN, NIGHTMARE FORTRESS: March 30, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. PEARL DJANGO, ANNE GRIFFITH: March 30, Sudden Valley Dance Barn, Bellingham. 360-671-1709 or www.suddenvalleylibrary. org. ANTHRAX, EXODUS, HIGH ON FIRE, MUNICIPAL WASTE, HOLY GRAIL: March 31, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. SUPER WHY LIVE: April 2, The Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or www. stgpresents.org. RIHANNA: with A$AP Rocky: April 3, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or LiveNation.com. SOILWORK, JEFF LOOMIS: April 3, El Corazon, Seattle. www.elcorazonseattle. com. NANCI GRIFFITH: April 5, Edmonds Center for the Arts, Edmonds. 425-275-9595 or www.ec4arts.org. LORD OF THE DANCE: April 5, Mount Baker Theatre, Bellingham. 360-734-6080 or www.mountbakertheatre.com. OMD: April 6, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showbox online.com. TECH N9NE: April 6-7, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showbox online.com. KATHLEEN EDWARDS, JOHN RODERICK, DAVID BAZAN: April 7, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www. showboxonline.com. JANIS IAN: April 7, Lincoln Theatre, Mount Vernon. 360-336-8955 or www.lincoln theatre.org. STEPHEN LYNCH: April 7, Neptune Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or LiveNation. com. NICK CAVE AND THE BAD SEEDS: April 7, The Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877784-4849 or LiveNation.com. THE AIRBORNE TOXIC EVENT: April 8, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-7453000 or www.showboxonline.com. FITZ & THE TANTRUMS: April 8, Columbia City Theater, Seattle. 800-838-3006 or www.columbiacitytheater.com. A DAY TO REMEMBER: April 12, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www. showboxonline.com. FUTURE: April 12, Showbox at the Mar-

ket, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.show boxonline.com. MASSIVE MONKEES DAY: April 13, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. PAT TRAVERS BAND: April 14, El Corazon, Seattle. www.elcorazonseattle.com. BAD RELIGION, AGAINST ME!, POLAR BEAR CLUB: April 15, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showbox online.com. BOOKA SHADE: April 17, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www. showboxonline.com. THE SKATALITES: April 18, El Corazon, Seattle. www.elcorazonseattle.com. PRINCE, 3RDEYEGIRL: Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www. showboxonline.com. E-40: April 19, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showbox online.com. WORTHY FEST: April 19-20, in Whatcom County. $40-$60. www.worthyfest.com. CHRIS TOMLIN, LOUIE GIGLIO, KARI JOBE: April 20, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-7453000 or www.ticketmaster.com. DARK STAR ORCHESTRA (Tribute to Grateful Dead): April 20, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www. showboxonline.com. SUNIDHI CHAUHAN & ALI ZAFAR (Indian and Pakistani pop sensations): April 21, Comcast Arena at Everett. 866-332-8499 or www.comcastarenaeverett.com. LOCAL NATIVES: April 26, Neptune Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or LiveNation. com. DR. DOG AND DAWES: April 26, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. COWBOY JUNKIES: April 27, Neptune Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or Live Nation.com. TILTED THUNDER RAIL BIRDS: Banked Track Roller Derby: April 28, Comcast Arena at Everett. 866-332-8499 or www. comcastarenaeverett.com. ALEX CLARE: April 29, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www. showboxonline.com. MINDLESS SELF INDULGENCE: April 30, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-7453000 or www.showboxonline.com. SOJA: April 30, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. BONOBO: May 1, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showbox online.com. MARINA & THE DIAMONDS: May 2, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. THE CAVE SINGERS: May 4, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www. showboxonline.com. BROOKE & JUBAL’S ONE NIGHT STAND: with Ne-Yo, Flo Rida, Carly Rae Jepsen, Icona Pop, DJ Scene: May 8, ShoWare Center, Kent. 866-973-961 or ShoWareCenter.com. BLACKSTREET: May 10, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showbox online.com. FLIGHT TO MARS: May 10, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www. showboxonline.com.

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E10 Thursday, March 28, 2013

ON STAGE in the Skagit Valley and surrounding area March 28-April 4 Thursday.28

Saturday.30

THEATER

THEATER

“SEEDS OF CHANGE: Superhero Boy Band”: musical comedy: 8 p.m., Bellingham Circus Guild, 1401 Sixth St., Bellingham. Come in a superhero costume for post-show dance party. $15-$20, free for babies. www.superheroboyband.com.

Friday.29 THEATER

“SEEDS OF CHANGE: Superhero Boy Band”: musical comedy: 8 p.m., Bellingham Circus Guild, 1401 Sixth St., Bellingham. Come in a superhero costume for post-show dance party. $15-$20, free for babies. www.superheroboyband.com. “Legally Blonde, the Musical”: 8 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $20. 360-293-6829 or www.acttheatre.com.

MUSIC

Karina Mitchell: First Street Cabaret & Speakeasy, 612 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $5 cover. 360-336-3012 or www. riverbelledinnertheatre.com.

Thursday, March 28, 2013 E11

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

TUNING UP Playing at area venues March 28-April 4 FRIDAY.29

“SEEDS OF CHANGE: Superhero Boy Band”: musical comedy: 8 p.m., Bellingham Circus Guild, 1401 Sixth St., Bellingham. Come in a superhero costume for post-show dance party. $15-$20, free for babies. www.superheroboyband.com.

THE BATTLEFIELD BAND (ANCIENT AND MODERN SCOTTISH TRADITIONAL MUSIC) 8 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $29 cover. 360-445-3000.

“Legally Blonde, the Musical”: 8 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $20. 360-293-6829 or www.acttheatre.com.

MUSIC

Spring Concert: Fidalgo Youth Symphony and Mount Baker Youth Symphony: 1 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $15, $10 seniors ages 62 and older, $1 students and children. 360-416-7727, ext. 2, or www. mcintyrehall.org. New Discoveries Concert: Skagit Symphony: with soloist Courtney Ruckman, soprano: 7:30 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $20$40, discounts available for seniors, military, children ages 6 to 15. 360-416-7727, ext. 2, or www.mcintyrehall.org. Heather Mahaffe (folk, pop, rock vocals): 9 p.m. to midnight, First Street Cabaret & Speakeasy, 612 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $5 cover. 360-336-3012 or www.riverbelledinnertheatre.com. Pearl Django, with Anne Griffith (jazz): 3 p.m., Sudden Valley Dance Barn, Gate 2, 8 Barnview Court, Bellingham. $20. 360-671-1709 or www.suddenvalley library.org.

THURSDAY.28 Today is The Day, Black Tusk, KEN Mode, Fight Amp: 8 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $10-$12. 360778-1067.

THURSDAY.28 DANA LYONS 7 p.m., Concrete Theatre, 45920 Main St., Concrete. $10. 360941-0403 or www. concrete-theatre.com.

THURSDAY.4 LEAH MANSFIELD 7 p.m., Concrete Theatre, 45920 Main St., Concrete. $15. 360-941-0403 or www. concrete-theatre.com.

Tuesday.2

Thursday.4

VARIETY

THEATER

Betty Desire: 9 p.m. to midnight, First Street Cabaret & Speakeasy, 612 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $3 cover. 360-3363012 or www.riverbelledinnertheatre. com.

“Legally Blonde, the Musical”: 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $20. 360-293-6829 or www.acttheatre.com.

Paul Klein: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Jansen Art Center Piano Lounge, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360354-3600. Dana Lyons: Great Coal Train Tour: 7 p.m., Concrete Theatre, 45920 Main St., Concrete. $10. 360-9410403 or www.concretetheatre.com.

FRIDAY.29

SATURDAY.30

SUNDAY.31

Jammin’ Jeff: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-4226411.

Ann ‘n’ Dean (country): 7 to 10 p.m., Mount Vernon Elks Lodge, 2120 Market St., Mount Vernon. 360848-8882.

Jammin’ Jeff: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-4226411.

Steve Meyer, Ben Starner (piano): 8 to 10 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. 360-766-6266. $cratch Daddy: 9 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Varsity Inn, 112 N. Cherry St., Burlington. No cover. 360-755-0165.

Silver City Band: 9 p.m., Longhorn Saloon, 5754 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-766-6330.

T Town Aces: 8:30 to 11:30 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

Austin Jenckes, James Redfern: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $8-$10. 360-778-1067.

Gary B’s Church of the Blues (blues, classic rock): 6-10 p.m., Castle Tavern, 708 Metcalf. St., Sedro-Woolley. 360855-2263.

Kimball & The Fugitives, featuring Stickshift Annie: 5:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. 360766-6266.

Knut Bell & The Blue Collars: 5 to 9 p.m., Conway Pub & Eatery, 18611 Main St., Conway. 360-4454733.

WEDNESDAY.3

Savage Jazz: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720. The Clouds: 8:30 p.m., Edi- Seatown R&B: 9 p.m. to son Inn, 5829 Cains Court, 12:30 a.m., H2O, 314 ComEdison. 360-766-6266. mercial Ave., Anacortes. THURSDAY.4 360-755-3956. Johnny Bulldog: 8 p.m., Marvin J and Friends (piano): 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Jansen Art Center Conway Muse, 18444 Ship to Ship, Falling Up Piano Lounge, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360-354-3600. Spruce/Main, Conway. $10 Stairs, Pan Pan, Part Wolf: cover. 360-445-3000. 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $3. 360-778-1067.


E10 Thursday, March 28, 2013

ON STAGE in the Skagit Valley and surrounding area March 28-April 4 Thursday.28

Saturday.30

THEATER

THEATER

“SEEDS OF CHANGE: Superhero Boy Band”: musical comedy: 8 p.m., Bellingham Circus Guild, 1401 Sixth St., Bellingham. Come in a superhero costume for post-show dance party. $15-$20, free for babies. www.superheroboyband.com.

Friday.29 THEATER

“SEEDS OF CHANGE: Superhero Boy Band”: musical comedy: 8 p.m., Bellingham Circus Guild, 1401 Sixth St., Bellingham. Come in a superhero costume for post-show dance party. $15-$20, free for babies. www.superheroboyband.com. “Legally Blonde, the Musical”: 8 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $20. 360-293-6829 or www.acttheatre.com.

MUSIC

Karina Mitchell: First Street Cabaret & Speakeasy, 612 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $5 cover. 360-336-3012 or www. riverbelledinnertheatre.com.

Thursday, March 28, 2013 E11

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

TUNING UP Playing at area venues March 28-April 4 FRIDAY.29

“SEEDS OF CHANGE: Superhero Boy Band”: musical comedy: 8 p.m., Bellingham Circus Guild, 1401 Sixth St., Bellingham. Come in a superhero costume for post-show dance party. $15-$20, free for babies. www.superheroboyband.com.

THE BATTLEFIELD BAND (ANCIENT AND MODERN SCOTTISH TRADITIONAL MUSIC) 8 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $29 cover. 360-445-3000.

“Legally Blonde, the Musical”: 8 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $20. 360-293-6829 or www.acttheatre.com.

MUSIC

Spring Concert: Fidalgo Youth Symphony and Mount Baker Youth Symphony: 1 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $15, $10 seniors ages 62 and older, $1 students and children. 360-416-7727, ext. 2, or www. mcintyrehall.org. New Discoveries Concert: Skagit Symphony: with soloist Courtney Ruckman, soprano: 7:30 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $20$40, discounts available for seniors, military, children ages 6 to 15. 360-416-7727, ext. 2, or www.mcintyrehall.org. Heather Mahaffe (folk, pop, rock vocals): 9 p.m. to midnight, First Street Cabaret & Speakeasy, 612 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $5 cover. 360-336-3012 or www.riverbelledinnertheatre.com. Pearl Django, with Anne Griffith (jazz): 3 p.m., Sudden Valley Dance Barn, Gate 2, 8 Barnview Court, Bellingham. $20. 360-671-1709 or www.suddenvalley library.org.

THURSDAY.28 Today is The Day, Black Tusk, KEN Mode, Fight Amp: 8 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $10-$12. 360778-1067.

THURSDAY.28 DANA LYONS 7 p.m., Concrete Theatre, 45920 Main St., Concrete. $10. 360941-0403 or www. concrete-theatre.com.

THURSDAY.4 LEAH MANSFIELD 7 p.m., Concrete Theatre, 45920 Main St., Concrete. $15. 360-941-0403 or www. concrete-theatre.com.

Tuesday.2

Thursday.4

VARIETY

THEATER

Betty Desire: 9 p.m. to midnight, First Street Cabaret & Speakeasy, 612 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $3 cover. 360-3363012 or www.riverbelledinnertheatre. com.

“Legally Blonde, the Musical”: 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $20. 360-293-6829 or www.acttheatre.com.

Paul Klein: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Jansen Art Center Piano Lounge, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360354-3600. Dana Lyons: Great Coal Train Tour: 7 p.m., Concrete Theatre, 45920 Main St., Concrete. $10. 360-9410403 or www.concretetheatre.com.

FRIDAY.29

SATURDAY.30

SUNDAY.31

Jammin’ Jeff: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-4226411.

Ann ‘n’ Dean (country): 7 to 10 p.m., Mount Vernon Elks Lodge, 2120 Market St., Mount Vernon. 360848-8882.

Jammin’ Jeff: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-4226411.

Steve Meyer, Ben Starner (piano): 8 to 10 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. 360-766-6266. $cratch Daddy: 9 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Varsity Inn, 112 N. Cherry St., Burlington. No cover. 360-755-0165.

Silver City Band: 9 p.m., Longhorn Saloon, 5754 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-766-6330.

T Town Aces: 8:30 to 11:30 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

Austin Jenckes, James Redfern: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $8-$10. 360-778-1067.

Gary B’s Church of the Blues (blues, classic rock): 6-10 p.m., Castle Tavern, 708 Metcalf. St., Sedro-Woolley. 360855-2263.

Kimball & The Fugitives, featuring Stickshift Annie: 5:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. 360766-6266.

Knut Bell & The Blue Collars: 5 to 9 p.m., Conway Pub & Eatery, 18611 Main St., Conway. 360-4454733.

WEDNESDAY.3

Savage Jazz: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720. The Clouds: 8:30 p.m., Edi- Seatown R&B: 9 p.m. to son Inn, 5829 Cains Court, 12:30 a.m., H2O, 314 ComEdison. 360-766-6266. mercial Ave., Anacortes. THURSDAY.4 360-755-3956. Johnny Bulldog: 8 p.m., Marvin J and Friends (piano): 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Jansen Art Center Conway Muse, 18444 Ship to Ship, Falling Up Piano Lounge, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360-354-3600. Spruce/Main, Conway. $10 Stairs, Pan Pan, Part Wolf: cover. 360-445-3000. 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $3. 360-778-1067.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E12 - Thursday, March 28, 2013

REVIEWS MUSIC CDS Compiled from news services

The Strokes

The album opens with a hip-hop treatment of the word “redneck,” traversing “Comedown Shelton’s cross-interests in the rural and Machine” the urban, before blasting into the guitardriven “Boys ‘Round Here,” about backThe Strokes country folk who rock out in the cabs of spent the past their pickups. The tune sets the tone for six years burning Shelton’s focus on boisterous country through all the rock and emotional ballads that show leeway earned off his expressive vocals as the Country with once being declared saviors of rock Music Association entertainer of the year ‘n’ roll. The synth-heavy “Comedown Machine” is hardly a letdown of last-straw rises to his newfound superstar status with a lighthearted but rollicking album that proportions. It also wasn’t made to woo pushes boundaries in all the right places. anyone back. But maybe what The Strokes want is a n Michael McCall, Associated Press clean break. No tour supporting this fifth studio record is on the table. And lyrics Lil Wayne like “Decide my past/Define my life” over “I Am Not a the New Wave bleeps in “Tap Out” feel Human Being II” freighted with a band sick of being forever graded against their 2001 breakout “Is Lil Wayne’s “I This It.” Am Not a Human That might be a fair grievance. But Being II” album also in bounds is the fact that “One Way opens with a Trigger” is a ringer for A-ha. By the time familiar sound — frontman Julian Casablancas is finally rip- someone’s flicking ping through an angry and satisfying cho- a lighter. It’s Weezy’s sonic signature, a rus in the rocker “50/50,” interest in which long-running nod to the weed, women, way this decent but disjointed album lands booze and bravado that has shaped so has already faded. many of his musical releases, including his

He’s a sinister presence over the equally sinister beat of the production duo’s “Trigger Finger,” and seems to laugh about his 2010 eight-month jail stint on “Gunwalk” featuring Gudda Gudda. The songs are reminders of a more focused Wayne — a version of the rapper that seems to be absent from tracks like “Curtains,” where he phones in lines like “I’m getting cake like I’m Jewish/ my (expletive) Drake, he Jewish.” He rages through the heavy metal-influenced “Hello,” but crossing genres doesn’t change the same tired content. And while the hook on “God Bless Amerika” promises a more thoughtful Wayne, his verses don’t measure up — a disappointment considering his still-revered status as the best rapper in the game. Overall, Wayne meets expectations for Wayne these days — not saying much (of substance), but giving listeners plenty to talk about.

foamy sea. Very rock ‘n’ roll. n Steven Wine, Associated Press

Depeche Mode

“Delta Machine”

If you haven’t caught up with Depeche Mode since “Catching up With Depeche Mode” or other collections from the band’s 1980s and early ‘90s heyday of synthesizer-drenched, impossibly addictive pop, it’s time to check in. The British modern rock trio’s 13th studio album, “Delta Machine,” presents a group that’s older, wiser and evolving. There’s not, at least on initial listens, an abundance of hooks. While the ear-candy quotient might be lower than on records n Melanie J. Simms, For The Associated of yore, the result encourages — and often Press rewards — deeper listening. The men who once made many music The fans fear the demise of the guitar have Waterboys become masters of their electronic “An Appointment machines — in part by recognizing when With Mr. Yeats” less is more. The spare, industrial start of latest. n Paul J. Weber, Associated Press “Welcome to My World” gives way to the Now on his 10th album, singles like “No This album strains of choral string sounds in a section Worries” and the Mike WiLL Made Itsounds much betthat sonically and lyrically recalls 1990’s produced “(Expletives) Love Me” suggest ter than the conBlake Shelton “World in My Eyes.” ‘’Broken” opens with that Wayne’s priorities haven’t changed. cept. The Water“Based On disjointed, tinny sounds that retreat to Luckily for fans, he covers familiar terriboys’ Mike Scott has written 14 songs A True Story” the background and provide a discordant tory with fresh, tweet-worthy punchlines. using the poetry of W.B. Yeats, and the twist to an otherwise catchy, straightforBut if you’re looking for storytelling, look collaboration shouldn’t work — not with The more Blake ward chorus. elsewhere. Wayne’s expertise is in lyrical such lyrics as “Man-stealer Niamh leant Shelton rises Other standouts include the more trazingers. and sighed by Oisin on the grass.” in stature, the ditionally modal “Secret to the End,” with He unleashes a dazzling array on the But Scott pulls it off. His rootsy, melod- a theatrical lead vocal by frontman Dave more he parades 2 Chainz-assisted “Rich as (Expletive),” ic Gaelic pop, with nods to Coldplay, Sting Gahan, and the bluesy, snaky “Slow.” his swaggering, which features a standout, swaggering and Mark Knopfler, magnifies the beauty mischievous pern Jeff Karoub, Associated Press beat from producer T-Minus. “AK on my of Yeats’ words and makes them new sonality. His high-profile role as a judge night stand, right next to that Bible/But I again. on NBC’s “The Voice” has provided a Scott, the son of a university lecturer in platform for the entertainingly outspoken swear with these 50 shots, I’ll shoot it out side of this tall, drawling country boy from with 5-0/Pockets gettin’ too fat, no Weight English literature, has been working on these songs for a couple of decades. Oklahoma. Now Shelton is creating music Watchers, no lipo,” Wayne raps. His performance on the song may very His devotion to the project shows as brash as he is, fully integrating his colwell convince on-the-fence fans that the with an impressive variety of musical orful character into his songs. approaches. Before a career resurgence that includ- YMCMB captain still has passion for his craft. He’s entertaining on “Trippy,” one “Mad as the Mist and Snow” becomes ed landing as a coach on “The Voice,” of two tracks produced by Juicy J and an arena-ready bluesy jig, while “The Shelton spent years struggling to estabCrazy Mike. “I got high, and fell asleep Faery’s Last Song” serves as a lilting benelish a consistent presence on the country loaded/I woke up and got high again/OK, diction. And then there’s “News for the music charts, never creating a recognizI’m reloaded,” Wayne raps, making no Delphic Oracle,” which ends with nymphs able style of his own. “Based On A True apologies for his recreational activities. and satyrs in the throes of passion in the Story” reveals how much has changed.

Please recycle this newspaper


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

REVIEWS

COMMUNITY

VIDEO GAMES Chris Campbell, Scripps Howard News Service

‘LEGO City Undercover’

Platform: Wii U Genre: Platformer Publisher: Nintendo ESRB Rating: E, for Everyone Grade: 4 stars (out of 5) I’ve played more LEGOthemed video games than most. (OK, honestly, I think I’ve played them all, so take that, LEGO gaming geek!) And just as I’d thought that candle had burned its last bit of wax, along comes a pleasant surprise in “City Undercover.” Previous LEGO games were kitschy takes on popular movies like “Harry Potter” and “Star Wars,” but in this title you play a wholly original tale, even if there are winks and nods to several classic movies and TV shows. Chase McCain is the lead character, a hammedup former cop who gets pulled back into service to hunt down his archenemy, Rex Fury. But honestly, the story shouldn’t concern you because once you dive into this open world and start exploring, the sheer joy of playing the game will keep you coming back time and again. The quest for LEGO blocks, the game’s currency, is addictive. New puzzles pop up to solve oddball cutscenes, and then you must search for costumes for Chase to wear to solve myriad puzzles scattered through the city. It’s all kind of slapdash and goofy, but the game never loses its way. I dare you to play “City Undercover” and not find yourself constantly smiling. Sure, some load times are slow, and some of the platforming is difficult when the game angle isn’t quite right. But few games are as infused

Thursday, March 28, 2013 - E13

with playfulness like “City Undercover.” This game provides a much-needed boost to the Wii U’s library and should appeal to gamers of any age and skill level.

‘The Walking Dead: Survival Instinct’ Platforms: Xbox 360, PlayStation 3 Genre: Shooter Publisher: Activision ESRB Rating: M, for Mature Grade: 1 star

Just gazing at the box art gave me pause. Merle, one half of the brothers Dixon from the zombie-apocalypse hit show “The Walking Dead,” has both hands! I let out a sigh that even my wife was surprised to hear. She figured I’d be thrilled to play a game as Norman Reedus’ outstanding character, Daryl. I told her the cover meant one of two things: a) the game takes place before the events of the TV show; or b) the developers had no idea what the show was about. It’s a prequel and a shoddily put together one at that, making it a combination of awful that even fans of the show would find hard to get through. “Survival Instinct” features poor design elements and combat that makes season two’s slog at Herschel’s farm feel like “Terminator 2” by comparison. Many games feature fetch quests to break up the action; here, it’s the entire breadth of the story. Merle and Daryl venture from one town to the next, encountering stragglers who will only assist you as long as you bring them back something of import to them. n Follow Chris Campbell @ campbler or email game_on_ games@mac.com.

2013

SKAGIT VALLEY TULIP FESTIVAL The 2013 Skagit Valley Tulip Festival doesn’t officially begin until Monday, April 1, but the gala opening celebration is scheduled for Thursday, March 28. The month-long festival brings visitors from dozens of states and countries, as the unique flavors of Skagit Valley — from flowers to food, from chocolate to beer — are on full, vibrant display.

SKAGIT VALLEY TULIP FESTIVAL CALENDAR

On the Web n For the full month’s listing of events, maps and directions, visit www.tulipfestival.org.

GALA OPENING CELEBRATION

March 28: The 2013 Tulip Festival Gala Opening Celebration, “Our Community Garden,” will take place from 5:30 to 9 p.m. at the Skagit Valley Casino Resort, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. Celebrate the start of the Tulip Festival with live music, delicious dinner, dessert auction, raffles and more. $60. Advance purchase required. 360-428-5959.

daily. $5, free for ages 10 and younger. 360-424-8152. n RoozenGarde, 15867 Beaver Marsh Road, Mount Vernon: 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily. $5, $4 military with ID, free for ages 10 and younger. 360-4248531. n Azusa Farm and Gardens, 14904 Highway 20, Mount Vernon: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily. Display gardens, plants, flowers, art and more. 360424-1580. n Christianson’s Nursery, 15806 Best Road, Mount Vernon: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily. Gardens, greenhouses, art and more. 360-466-3821. n Skagit Valley Gardens, 18923 Peter Johnson Road, Mount Vernon: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily. Gardens, gifts, cafe and more. 360-424-6760. n WSU Discovery Garden, 16650 Highway 536, Mount Vernon: Dawn to dusk daily. Gardens showcasing plants that do well in the Pacific Northwest.

STUDENT ART

MASTER GARDENER ‘STEP-ON’ GUIDES

DOWNTOWN BURLINGTON ART WALK

Have a WSU Skagit County Master Gardener act as your tour guide to the Skagit Valley. For reservations, call 360-848-9053 or email tonitulip@ comcast.net.

CHILDREN’S MUSEUM

March 28-April 4: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday; noon to 5 p.m. Sunday; 8:30 to 10 a.m. toddler Tuesday, at 550 Cascade Mall Drive, Burlington. Activities for children ages 10 and younger. $5.25. Free for ages younger than 1. 360-757-8888.

HISTORICAL MUSEUM

April 1-4: See the top four designs from the 2013 Student Design Outreach program, which showcases Skagit Valley high school artists, at the Museum of Northwest Art, 121 S. First St., La Conner. Museum hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday; noon to 5 p.m. Sunday and Monday. $8, $5 seniors, $3 students, free for members and children ages 11 and younger. 360-466-4446 or www. museumofnwart.org.

ANACORTES QUILT WALK

April 1-4: See a wide variety of quilts and wearable art garments on display in downtown Anacortes businesses during regular shop hours. Maps available at participating businesses and the Anacortes Visitors Center. Sponsored by the Fidalgo Island Quilters. Free. 360-333-9311 or www.fidalgoislandquilters.com.

April 1-4: Check out original artworks on display along Fairhaven Avenue in downtown Burlington. Tour brochures are available at the Visitor Information Center, 520 E. Fairhaven. Continues through April 30. Free. 360-755-9717 or 360-7570994.

LA CONNER IN BLOOM: TULIP QUILT CHALLENGE

April 1-4: Check out tulip-themed quilts and fiber artworks on display during April at the La Conner Quilt & Textile Museum, 703 S. Second St., La Conner. Created and donated by area quilters, all quilts are for sale with proceeds to benefit the installation of the Commemorative Brick Pathway. Museum hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. $7 admission. 360-4664288 or www.laconnerquilts.com.

March 28-31, April 2-4: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday, at Skagit County Historical Museum, Week of March 28-April 4 501 S. Fourth St., La Conner. FeaturMost Tulip Festival events don’t ing “Skagit Sets Sail: A Maritime Hisofficially get under way until Monday, tory of Skagit County.” $5 adults, $4 April 1, but some early blooms (espe- children ages 6-12; $10 families. Free cially daffodils) are already poking for members and children ages 5 and ART BASH up their heads for your enjoyment. younger. 360-466-3365 or www.skagitMarch 30, April 1-4: Art League Beat the crowds for an early look this county.net/museum. North’s annual Fine Art Multi-Media weekend, then come back again when Exhibition is open from 11 a.m. to 7 the tulips are in full bloom. LA CONNER SCULPTURE TOUR p.m. daily in the upstairs gallery at The Farmhouse Restaurant, 13724 March 28-April 4: Area artists La Conner-Whitney Road, Mount display their work at various sites DISPLAY GARDENS Vernon. Meet the artists during an around La Conner throughout the April 1-4: Check out display garopening reception from 6 to 9 p.m. Festival. Maps available at La Condens filled with blooming tulips and Saturday, March 30. Free admission. ner Chamber of Commerce and more: Weekly raffles will benefit scholarparticipating merchants. Free. 360n Tulip Town, 15002 Bradshaw ships for local students. 360-466-0382. Road, Mount Vernon: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 466-3125.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E14 - Thursday, March 28, 2013

BONUS

POP CULTURE Q&A

Old ‘Five-0’ changes By RICH HELDENFELS Akron Beacon Journal

presented.) A story in the Honolulu Star-Bulletin after his death said the actor also annoyed star Jack Lord by falling asleep between takes. “He wasn’t that impressed with Jack,” one journalist said. “Zulu thought he was just as important as anyone else on the show.” Harrington, who had been playing guest-starring roles on the show, was cast as a new detective, Ben Kokua, and remained with the series until 1975; the original version of the show ended in 1980. Harrington, by the way, has also been on the newer version of “Five-O,” which began in 2010, as Mamo Kahike, a family friend of the McGarretts.

Q: Whatever happened to the show “Do No Harm?” It’s about a surgeon who has a split personality. Only a couple of episodes aired, and then it disappeared. A: In a season where some TV shows have had really bad ratings, “Do No Harm” was a standout. As the Hollywood Reporter noted, it had “the distinction of becoming the lowestrated scripted premiere in the history of the Big Four networks” — that is, ABC, CBS, Fox and NBC. And with the young adults prized by advertisers, its secondepisode numbers were even lower than those for the first. So NBC dropped the show Q: I am a big fan of before further ratings dam- “Covert Affairs” with Piper age could occur. Perabo and wondering where it’s been. Her characQ: Recently I was watch- ter had just gotten involved ing the original “Hawaii romantically with best friend Five-O” with Jack Lord and “Auggie” at the Agency, James MacArthur. I noticed when the season ended. that one of the characters But it never returned. What had been replaced — that gives? Kono, played by Zulu, was A: The spy drama will no longer there but someone return this summer, USA was by the name of Ben, Network says. As has been played by Al Harrington. noted here before, some TV Why was there a change in series split up their seasons the cast of the program? to spread them out over a A: From 1968 to 1972, Gil- longer period, and USA bert “Zulu” Kauhi, an enter- does that rather often. But tainer in Hawaii, played for viewers, it then seems as detective Kono Kalakaua. if a show is back, but for a The nickname Zulu report- disconcertingly short period. edly came from rumpled According to TV.com, hair that to his friends Covert began its previous looked African. season in July 2012, but took According to a story in a break in mid-September the Honolulu Advertiser before returning about a after his death of complimonth later; it then wrapped cations from diabetes in the season in November ‘12. 2004, Zulu “was fired after In addition, cable seasons an altercation with the tend to be shorter than those show’s publicist in which he for traditional broadcastacknowledged making loud network shows — “Covert” racist comments.” (He was did 16 episodes for its most apparently unhappy with the recent one — so the gap way his character was being between seasons feels even

longer. Q: Can you tell me who the actress was that played with Billy Bob Thornton in a movie? She was a detective over him and was in “Sucker Punch” as a dance instructor. A: The dance instructor/ doctor in “Sucker Punch” was played by Carla Gugino, who was detective Cicero working with Billy Bob Thornton’s character Cop in the crime thriller “Faster,” which starred Dwayne Johnson. Gugino is a hard-working and admirable performer whose TV credits include a recurring role on “New Girl,” “Political Animals,” “Californication” and “Entourage,” and who numbers “Mr. Popper’s Penguins,” “Watchmen” and the “Spy Kids” films among her other movie roles. She is also an experienced stage actress. Q: There was a good Western on, called “Dead Man’s Gun.” Will that be on again? A: Not that I can determine. The series originally aired on Showtime for two seasons in 1997-99 and followed a cursed gun as it moved from owner to owner. Kris Kristofferson was the narrator of the series, which has been released on DVD. If your local retailer does not have it, I have seen it for sale from online retailers including Amazon.com, Moviesunlimited.com and Deepdiscount. com. n Do you have a question or comment for the mailbag? Write to the Akron Beacon Journal, 44 E. Exchange St., Akron, OH 44309 or rheldenfelsthebeaconjournal. com. Please mark the email or envelope with “mailbag.” Letters may be edited for publication.

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Thursday, March 28, 2013 - E15

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Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E16 - Thursday, March 28, 2013

MOVIES

Max Irons and Saoirse Ronan star in “The Host.” Alan Markfield / Open Road Films via AP

A new way for true love to struggle against itself

S

tephenie Meyer, who created the “Twilight” movies, now presents a new way for true love to struggle against itself. In the “Twilight” world, characters were invited to become vampires in order to more fully share Roger the lives of those Ebert they loved. “The Host” presents a possibility that, if anything, is a deeper commitment. Earth has been invaded by a race of “Souls” that inhabit human bodies, stripping them of their memories and identities. It’s the way the alien

‘THE HOST’

HH 1⁄2 Melanie Stryder.................................... Saoirse Ronan Jared Howe................................................. Max Irons Ian..............................................................Jake Abel Seeker...................................................Diane Kruger Jeb..........................................................William Hurt Maggie................................................ Frances Fisher Jamie..........................................Chandler Canterbury Kyle......................................................Boyd Holbrook Doc.................................................... Scott Lawrence n Running time: 125 minutes. MPAA rating: PG-13 (for some sensuality and violence).

race survives and spreads. We meet Melanie Stryder (Saoirse Ronan), who through some sort of glitch is inhabited by an alien Soul but still retains, there inside her mind, her own identity. This leads to interior conversations between the Soul Melanie and the Earth Melanie.

Soul Melanie (known as Wanderer) falls in love with Earth Melanie, even though in theory this isn’t possible because Wanderer has become Melanie. This intimate form of self-love leads to dialogue that will possibly be found humorous by some people. When Wanderer is about to kiss

the boy she loves, for example, the film uses voice-over to warn her: “No, Melanie! Wrong! No! He’s from another planet!” True, in our own lives we pick up warnings on that frequency: “No! You’ll get pregnant! No! He’s from the other side of town! No! He’s your best friend’s boyfriend!” I imagine this as a version of one of those debates where little angels with harps and devils with pitchforks perch on your shoulders. Much of the film is based on location in New Mexico, where a band of surviving humans hides inside an “almost” extinct volcano. Using sunlight reflected by walls of mirrors they can crank up and down, they raise crops for their agrar-

ian ecosystem. Melanie and her Soul venture forth to find her other Stryder relatives and are united with Jeb Stryder (William Hurt, a bearded patriarch), Maggie Stryder (Frances Fisher) and young Jamie Stryder (Chandler Canterbury). They hide from Soul patrols in search cars and helicopters, allowing “The Host” to get by with a few simple sets, including a tunnel that always looks like the same tunnel. The Souls are determined to track down all evaders, and at the outset I gather they’ve already enlisted more or less all the humans on Earth except for members of the Stryder family. “The Host” was directed by Andrew Niccol, who

co-wrote with Stephenie Meyer. Niccol is attracted to films about humans living (whether they realize it or not) in artificial societies. He wrote “The Truman Show” about a man living inside his own reality show and observed on TV by humankind, and wrote and directed “Gattaca,” about another kind of artificial society. His ground rules limit the depth and variety of possible relationships, and “The Host” is top-heavy with profound, sonorous conversations tending to all sound like farewells. The movie is so consistently pitched at the same note, indeed, that the structure robs it of possibilities for dramatic tension.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, March 28, 2013 - E17

MOVIES MINI-REVIEWS Compiled from news services. Ratings are one to four stars. “A Good Day to Die Hard” — The latest installment of the action franchise plays as if we’re watching Bruce Willis in a Bruce Willis movie in which Bruce Willis can survive anything while taking out the villains, video-game style. A quartercentury after the first “Die Hard,” the venerable John McClane has been stripped of any real traces of an actual three-dimensional character. Action, R, 97 minutes. H1⁄2 “Beautiful Creatures” — Though not specifically conceived to fill the void left by the $2 billion “Twilight” franchise, comparisons are inevitable, as we’re again presented with a story about a smart, serious, semi-loner high school student who falls for a mysterious newcomer with supernatural powers. It would all be pretty tedious, goth-youth nonsense if not for the considerable delights provided by a mostly veteran supporting cast of Jeremy Irons, Emma Thompson, Viola Davis and Emmy Rossum, who are all having great fun. Romantic fantasy, PG-13, 124 minutes. HH1⁄2 “Identity Thief” — The pairing of Jason Bateman and Melissa McCarthy in a road trip comedy seems inspired. They’re two unique comedic talents who always put an interesting spin on a line or a double take, whether starring in sitcoms or effortlessly swiping scenes in big-screen fare. Unfortunately, “Identity Thief” is a depressingly predictable road-trip buddy comedy that’s far more interested in car chases, lame shootouts, physical shtick and cheap schmaltz than creating anything original. Comedy, R, 112 minutes. HH “Jack the Giant Slayer” — Director Bryan Singer, a first-rate cast and a stellar team of screenwriters, set designers and specialeffects wizards have dusted off an old and never partic-

AT AREA THEATERS ANACORTES CINEMAS March 29-April 4 The Croods (PG): Friday-Thursday: 1:20, 3:45, 6:40, 8:50; Tuesday: 10:50* *Open captioned The Host (PG-13): Friday-Thursday: 1:00, 3:25, 6:30, 8:55; Tuesday: 10:40* *Open captioned G.I. Joe: Retaliation (PG-13): FridayThursday: 1:10, 3:35, 6:50, 9:10; Tuesday: 10:40* *Open captioned 360-293-7000 BLUE FOX DRIVE-IN Oak Harbor 360-675-5667 CASCADE MALL THEATRES Burlington For listings: 888-AMC-4FUN (888-2624386).

ularly compelling fairy tale and have given us a greatlooking thrill ride. It’s filled with neat touches, from the casting of Ewan McGregor as a knight in shining armor to an epilogue that’s just way cool. Even for those who didn’t think they’d give a fee, fi, fo or fum about this movie, it’s a rousing, original and thoroughly entertaining adventure. Fantasy adventure, PG-13, 115 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “Mama” — “Mama” succeeds in scaring the wits out of us and leaving some lingering, deeply creepy images, despite indulging in many horror-film cliches. Movies like “Mama” are thrill rides. We go to be scared and then laugh, scared and then laugh, scared and then shocked. And of course, there’s almost always a little plot left over for a sequel. It’s a ride horror fans would take again. Horror, PG-13, 100 minutes. HHH “Olympus Has Fallen” — Bystanders and tourists, soldiers, cops and Secret Service agents fall by the score in a movie about the unthinkable — a terrorist ground assault on Washington, D.C. For all the bursts of blood, the gunplay and execution-style head-shots that punctuate scores of deaths, it’s hard to see “Olympus Has Fallen” (that’s Secret Service code) as much more than another movie manifestation of a

CONCRETE THEATRE March 29-31 The Croods (PG): Friday: 7:30 p.m.; Saturday: 5 and 7:30 p.m.; Sunday: 4 p.m. 360-941-0403

AT THE LINCOLN THEATRE 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon 360-336-8955 n www.lincolntheatre.org

OAK HARBOR CINEMAS 360-279-2226 STANWOOD CINEMAS March 29-April 4 The Host (PG-13): Friday-Thursday: 1:10, 3:55, 6:40, 9:15 G.I. Joe: Retaliation (PG-13): Friday-Thursday: 1:30, 4:00, 6:45, 9:05 The Croods (PG): Friday-Thursday: 1:40, 4:05, 6:35, 8:45 Olympus Has Fallen (R): Friday-Thursday: 1:20, 3:50, 6:50, 9:20 Oz The Great and Powerful (PG): FridayThursday: 1:00, 3:40, 6:30, 9:10

first-person shooter video game. Stars Gerard Butler, Aaron Eckhart, Angela Bassett, Melissa Leo, Rick Yune and Morgan Freeman. Action, R, 113 minutes. HH “Oz the Great and Powerful” — Like “The Phantom Menace” trilogy, “Oz the Great and Powerful” precedes a beloved classic on the fictional timeline, but makes full use of modernday technology, which means everything’s grander and more spectacular. Director Sam Raimi and his army of special-effects wizards have created a visually stunning film that makes good use of 3-D, at least in the first hour or so. The film finally breaks free of its beautiful but artificial trappings and becomes a story with heart in the final act. Thing is, we know Oz and its denizens are destined for a far greater adventure a little ways down the Yellow Brick Road. Fantasy adventure, PG, 130 minutes. HH1⁄2 “Quartet” — A sweet, sentimental, predictable story set in a luxurious British retirement home for actors and opera singers. First-time director Dustin Hoffman has his heart in the right place and loves these characters. His screen is filled with legends (Tom Courtenay, Maggie Smith, Michael Gambon, Billy Connolly, Gwyneth Jones). But much is unlikely, including the theory that

a gala on Verdi’s birthday could raise enough cash to save the elegant manor. Comedy drama, PG-13, 99 minutes. HH1⁄2 “The Incredible Burt Wonderstone” — This absurdist, magic-themed buddy movie is a Will Ferrell sports comedy without Will Ferrell and without the sports. In plot and tone, it’s two parts lunatic comedy and one part shameless sentimentality with a dash of romance thrown in. A movie satirizing magicians — even rock ‘n’ roll hipster magicians — is only slightly more cutting edge than a movie mocking mimes. But this is also one dark and wickedly funny comedy, with a great return to form by Jim Carrey opposite Steve Carell in the title role. Comedy, PG-13, 100 minutes. HHH “G.I. Joe: Retaliation” — To say "G.I. Joe: Retaliation" is a video game for the big screen is to insult a number of video games that are far more creative, challenging and better-looking. The first installment of this series, "The Rise of Cobra" (2009), at least had a sense of its own absurdity, but the sequel is a heavyhanded, explosion-riddled, ear-piercing disaster with an insanely stupid plot and an endless stream of mostly generic fight sequences that straddle the PG-13 line. Action, PG-13, 110 minutes H1⁄2

‘Amour’

Skagit Human Rights Festival: ‘Escape Fire’

The couple’s bond of love is severely tested. Starring Emmanuelle Riva, Isabelle Huppert 7 p.m. today and Jean-Louis TrintigSkagit Human Rights nant; directed by Michael Festival presents “Escape Haneke. Winner of this Fire: The Fight to Rescue year’s Oscar for Best ForAmerican Healthcare.” The eign Language Film Rated PG-13. In French film tackles one of the most pressing issues of our time: with English subtitles. $10 general; $9 seniors, how can we save our badly broken healthcare system? students and active military; $8 members; $7 children 12 ‘Escape Fire’ examines and under. Bargain matinee the powerful forces mainprices (all shows before 6 taining the status quo, a p.m.): $8 general, $6 memmedical industry designed bers, $5 children 12 and for quick fixes rather than prevention, for profit-driv- under. en care rather than patientdriven care. This film NT Live: ‘People’ follows dramatic human 2 p.m. Sunday, March 31 stories as well as leadAward-winning writer ers fighting to transform Alan Bennett is reunited healthcare at the highest with director Nicholas levels of medicine, industry, Hytner and Olivier Awardgovernment, and the U.S. winning actress Frances military. de la Tour, with whom he Rated PG-13. Free worked on “The History admission; a panel discusBoys” and “The Habit of sion follows the film. Art.” People spoil things; there are so many of them and ‘Amour’ 7:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday, the last thing one wants is them traipsing through March 29-30 one’s house. But with the 5:30 p.m. Sunday, March 31 park a jungle and a bath on 7:30 p.m. Monday, April 1 the billiard table, what is Georges and Anne are one to do? Dorothy (Franin their eighties. They are ces de la Tour) wonders cultivated, retired music if an attic sale could be a teachers. Their daughter, solution. who is also a musician, lives $15 general; $13 seniors; abroad with her family. One $11 students with $2 off for day, Anne has an attack. Lincoln members.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E18 - Thursday, March 28, 2013

OUT & ABOUT ART

FINE ART PHOTOS: Rob Schouten Gallery will present “Photography, Photography? PHOTOGRAPHY!,”continuing through April 1, at 765 Wonn Road, Greenbank. Featuring the work of Northwest photographers Lorraine Healy, Louie Rochon, Stephen Roxborough, Sandy Rubini and Don Wodjenski, the show explores the boundaries of photographic communication, with images ranging from urban experimental to macro florals, abstracts to reconstructed experiential forms. Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekends, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays by appointment. 360222-3070 or www.robschoutengallery.com. “WAITING ON THE LIGHT”: A show of new work by Becky Fletcher will continue through March 31 at Smith & Vallee Gallery, 5742 Gilkey Ave., Edison. With an extensive background in stained glass, Fletcher approaches painting in a smoothly, graphic manner. An avid hiker, her subject matter focuses on the mountains and forests of the North Cascades. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday. 360766-6230 or www.smithandvallee. com. SPRING ART SHOW: The River Gallery’s annual Spring Art Show will continue through April 28 at 19313 Landing Road, Mount Vernon. This year’s featured artists are Maggi Mason (collage) and Rolf Oversvee (oils), with guest artist Anne Lancaster (sculpture). The show also includes paintings, sculptures, jewelry and glass art by Melissa C. Ballenger, Coizie Bettinger, Jennifer Bowman, Wayne Bradford, Gerald Johnson, Christiane Merkel, Pien Ellis, Joan Enslin, Nancy Fulton, Robert E. Gigliotti, Esther McLatchy, Bob Metke, Carol Merrick, Glen Oberg, Donna N. Radtke, Cynthia Richardson, Randy Emmons, Marty Rogers, Sharon Stapleton, Gail Thein, Christine Troyer, Ellen Dale, Rita Hornbeck and Lance Carleton. Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 5

FINAL FRIDAY ART WALK: Check out artworks in a variety of mediums from 5 to 7 p.m. Friday, March 29, on display in galleries and shops around La Conner. 888642-9284.

LECTURES AND TALKS

SKAGIT HUMAN RIGHTS FESTIVAL: “A Decade in the Valley”: The 10th annual Skagit Human Rights Festival will feature a variety of events during March, including an art exhibit, movie screenings, panel discussions and more. All events are free, donations gladly accepted. For information, visit www.skagithrf. wordpress.com. Next up: n Al Currier art display: Currier’s paintings depicting migrant A show of quilts, photos and paintings will open with a reception workers in the fields will be on during the First Friday Gallery Walk from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, April display during the festival at the 5, and continue through April, at Anne Martin McCool Gallery, 711 Burlington Public Library, 820 E. Commercial Ave., Anacortes. The show features Susan Carlisle’s Washington Ave., Burlington; and unique quilts, Bryce Mann photographs and photographs from the Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First the Lee Mann collection, as well as colorful paintings on canvas St., Mount Vernon. and paper by Anne Martin McCool. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. n “Escape Fire: The Fight to to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday. 360-293-3577 or www. Rescue American Healthcare”: annemartinmccool.com. 7 p.m. today, Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. p.m. Wednesday through Sunday. and crazy quilts dating back to Film screening and panel discus360-466-4524 or www.rivergalthe 1850s, as well as several 20th sion. lerywa.com. century quilts including the “Balloon Bouquet” with more than “PUSHING THE LIMITS”: The ART SHOW: J’s Gallery, at 101 1,000 hand-appliqued balloons Sedro-Woolley Public Library is N. First St., La Conner, features and a Petroglyph Quilt based on hosting a new four-part science pastels and blown-glass baskets by symbols carved into the rock walls discussion series for adults. ParJay Bowen, oil paintings and metal along the Columbia River thouticipants will meet for 75 minutes sculptures by Roger Small, mixed sands of years ago. once a month for a book discusmedia works by Katie Small, new n At Home in High Places: sion, a short related video in a fun mosaics by Katie McNerney, as Longtime Alaska resident Karin science café model, and a group well as artworks by Chuck BanFranzen has created a body of discussion revolving around the kuti, Dan Soler, Tom Pickett and work based on the birds of Alaska monthly theme. Each session will Ed Kamuda. Gallery hours are — not just their visual characterbe led by scientist Barbara John3 to 8 p.m. Wednesday through istics, but also the their individual son and by Library staff. Friday, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday behaviors, habitat preferences and The books and themes are: and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday. www. ecological relationships. n Connection: “Thunderstruck” jaybowenartgallery.com. n Tulip Quilt Challenge: During by Erik Larson, April 16. the Skagit Valley Tulip Festival, n Knowledge: “Land of Painted NEW QUILT SHOWS: The La April 1-30, the museum will also Caves” by Jean Auel, May 2. Conner Quilt & Textile Museum, feature a selection of small tulipDiscusssions will begin at 6:30 703 S. Second St., La Conner, is themed quilts and fiber artworks p.m. on designated Tuesdays at featuring two new quilt shows created and donated by area quilthe library, 802 Ball St. Copies of through June 23. An opening ters. All of the works are for sale, the books will be available at the reception will be held from 1 to 3 and the proceeds will benefit the library’s front desk. RSVP: 360p.m. Saturday, April 6. installation of the museum’s Com855-1166. n Historical Quilts from the memorative Brick Pathway. Latimer: The exhibit includes Museum hours are 10 a.m. to MORE FUN antique and contemporary quilts 5 p.m. daily. $7, $5 students, free TULIP FEST GALA: “Our Comfrom the Latimer Quilt & Textile for members and ages 11 and munity Garden,” the 30th annual Center in Tillamook, Ore. The younger. 360-466-4288 or www. Skagit Valley Tulip Festival gala show includes appliquéd, pieced laconnerquilts.com.

‘SPRINGING FORWARD’

celebration will kick off at 5:30 p.m. today at Skagit Valley Casino Resort, 5984 Darrk Lane, Bow. Enjoy a social hour, with cash bar, from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. followed by dinner, entertainment, dessert auction and raffle with more than $5,000 in prizes. $60. 360-428-5959 or cindy@tulipfestival.org. GIRLS DAY: Challenger Ridge Vineyard presents “Girls Day at the Vineyard” from noon to 6 p.m. Saturday, March 30, at the winery, 43095 Challenger Road, Concrete. Wine tasting, clothing, baked goods, lotions, jewelry and more. Lunch reservations for $12. 425422-6988.

EGG HUNT: Hillcrest Church will host its annual Easter Egg Hunt from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, March 30, at 1830 S. 13th St., Mount Vernon. Bounce house, pictures with the Easter Bunny, crafts, stories and egg hunts. Everything is free. 360-424-3006 or office@ hillcrestcf.org.

APRIL ART

NEW PAINTINGS: New artworks by Ron Farrell are on display through April at Riverclay Studio, 513 S. First St., Mount Vernon. Farrell’s new work combines views of downtown Mount Vernon, the Skagit River and surrounding farmland into colorful, original compositions. Also on display is handcrafted pottery and ceramic art by local artisans. 360420-8559. FIRST FRIDAY ART WALK: Check out sculptures, paintings, photos and other artworks during the First Friday Gallery Walk from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, April 5, at several locations in downtown Anacortes. 360-293-6938. ART FESTIVAL OPEN HOUSE: Take a look at the Anacortes Art Festival’s permanent art collection during an open house from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, April 5, at 505 O Ave., Anacortes. The collection includes a vast array of work created by regional artists and collected over the lifetime of the festival. 360293-6211.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, March 28, 2013 - E19

OUT & ABOUT “FIELDS OF COLOR”: Enjoy artworks depicting all things floral from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, April 5-6, at the Gallery at the Depot, 611 R Ave., Anacortes. The show includes photos, paintings and textiles. “Fields of Color” will continue through April at Starbucks, located at 18th and Commercial. 360-2936938. “ALL ABOUT WINE”: The wine-themed art show will open with a reception during the First Friday Gallery Walk from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, April 5, and continue through April 30, at Scott Milo Gallery, 420 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. Amanda Houston is the featured artist, exhibiting oils and pastels of Italian vineyards from a recent trip to the region. Also showing are acrylics by Jennifer Bowman, oils by Ramona Hammerly, pastels by Patty Forte Linna, color photographs by Lewis Jones and oils by Keith Sorenson. Guest artists include Kathy Hastings with photo encaustics, color photographs by David Lucas and quilts by the Fidalgo Island Quilters Guild. Gallery hours are 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. 360-293-6938 or www.scottmilo.com. NOT JUST NATURE ART: New work by Todd J. Horton and Peregrine O’Gormley opens Friday, April 5, and continues through May 19, at Gallery Cygnus, 109 Commercial Ave., La Conner. A reception for the artists will take place from 3 to 5 p.m. Saturday, April 6. Not just nature artists, Horton and O’Gormley think deeply about their subjects and their human relationship to the rest of the world. Horton practices a kind of “catch and release” form of painting, daring to nearly destroy what he has so perfectly rendered in paint. O’Gormley’s work involves a

study of the life and times of his subject, often delving into deeper issues of well-being that touch our own. Gallery hours are noon to 5 p.m. Friday through Sunday, or by appointment. 360-708-4787 or www.gallerycygnus.com.

7911 or www.anacortes.org.

MUSIC

Anacortes Public Library, 1220 10th St., Anacortes. Actress and storyteller Eva Abram shares American history from an AfricanAmerican perspective. She engages in a conversation about Charles Mitchell, a slave brought to Washington territory, whose break for freedom nearly brought the U.S. and Canada to war. Free. 360-293-1910, ext. 21, or library.cityofanacortes.org.

“immortal” human cells grown in culture are still alive today, though she has been dead for more than 60 years. Skloot will discuss her writing process, the challenges she faced in telling Henrietta Lacks’ story, the importance of science writing and more. $10, $5 students. 360-650-3846 or nssfo@wwu. edu.

SKAGIT JAZZ NIGHT: The third annual event will take place at 6 p.m. Friday, April 12, at Brodniak Hall, Anacortes High School, 1600 20th St., Anacortes. “STUDIO X: Francis X Enjoy performances by the Donovan & Bill Snow”: Anacortes Middle School The show will open with a JazzBots; Anacortes High reception from 5 to 8 p.m. School, Burlington-Edison Saturday, April 6, and conHigh School, Concrete High tinue through “April 28, MORE FUN School, La Conner, Mount at Smith & Vallee Gallery, AUTHOR TALK: Rebecca SPRING FILM SERIES: 7 Vernon High School and 5742 Gilkey Ave., Edison. p.m. Fridays at the Anacortes Sedro-Woolley High School Skloot, author of “The Donovan and Snow share a Immortal Life of Henrietta Public Library, 1220 10th St., Jazz Bands; Skagit Valley studio space by the BellingLacks,” will speak at 7:30 Anacortes. Movie man Nick College Jazz Ensemble and ham wharf and hold similar the debut of the A’Town Big p.m. Wednesday, April 10, in Alphin will introduce the philosophies on art, nature the Performing Arts Concert films and offer his insights Band. $5 at the door. Proand life. Relentless in their ceeds will benefit the public Hall at Western Washington about each one. Free. 360desire to sculpt and build, University in Bellingham. 293-1910, ext. 21, or library. school jazz programs of they leave no rocks unturned Henrietta Lacks was a cityofanacortes.org. Skagit County. isimensen@ in their craft. This exhibiSouthern tobacco farmer Next up: asd103.org. tion features selections in a who worked the same land n Friday, April 5: “Yankee variety of media including as her slave ancestors, and Doodle Dandy”; JAZZ AT THE LIBRARY: painting and carving. Gallery James Cagney stars in this Susan Pascal Quartet: 2 to 3 her cells — taken without hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. her knowledge — became musical portrait of composer/ p.m. Sunday, April 14, AnaWednesday through Sunone of the most important singer/dancer George M. cortes Public Library, 1220 day. 360-766-6230 or www. tools in medicine. The first Cohan, considered the father SVH_4.949x4.75_ MARCH Week4 10th St., Anacortes. The quarsmithandvallee.com. tet features Susan Pascal, vibraphone; Bill Anschell, FESTIVALS piano; Chuck Deardorf, bass; WOODFEST: The showPaying Out Up To $7.3 Million and Jeff Busch, percussion. case of all things wood will Free. 360-293-1910, ext. 30, or take place from 9 a.m. to 4 www.jazzatthelibrary.com. p.m. Saturday, and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, April 6-7, LECTURES AND at Sedro-Woolley High School, 1235 Third St., Sedro- TALKS SEEKING PUBLIC COMWoolley. Chainsaw carving $2,500 MENTS: The Burlington demonstrations and sales, CHARMED professional woodcraft ven- Historic Preservation AdviEASTER EGG HUNT HOT SEAT DRAWING sory Board will host a public dors, student competitions, HOT SEAT DRAWING TUESDAYS silent auction, wood carving meeting on the possible MARCH 5, 12, 19 & 26 SUNDAY raffle. Tasty treats and fun for creation of a Burlington 7PM MARCH 31 Historical Society at 5 p.m. the family. 360-855-1841. (4) winners drawn at (4) winners will be drawn at Tuesday, April 9, at the Burlthe 7PM session prior to each session. Each winner WINE FESTIVAL: The ington Parks and Recreation halftime and each lucky will choose an “egg” to winner will choose a “Lucky annual Anacortes Spring building, 900 E. Fairhaven determine prize. Charm” to determine cash Wine Festival is set for noon Ave. All are invited to attend prize. to 4:30 p.m. Saturday, April and share their views. If you Winners must be present and playing Winners must be present and 13, at the Port of Anacortes cannot attend the meeting, with a valid receipt to claim prize. playing with a valid receipt to claim No Seat Hopping Allowed. Event Center, 100 Commer- direct your suggestions to prize. No Seat Hopping Allowed. cial Ave., Anacortes. Enjoy Loren Cavanaugh, Burlingwine and food tasting and ton Parks and Recreation WINNERS CLUB CARD more. $40 advance, $45 at the Director, at 360-755-9649 or MARCH OFFER door, includes wine and food bparks@ci.burlington.wa.us Present your Winners Club card to cashier and tasting, keepsake glass and by Monday, April 15. receive $5 Off any 11am or 7pm session live entertainment. Designat“SLAVERY IN THE ed driver ticket: $20 advance, NORTHWEST: The Charles One coupon per guest per week • Redeem at cashier window - Not valid with any other offer. No cash value. Only original ad will be honored for special offers - no copies. $25 at the door, includes food Mitchell Story”: 7 p.m. Management reserves the right to cancel or amend promotion at any time. and entertainment. 360-293- Wednesday, April 10, at the

of American musical comedy, who composed more than 300 songs, including “Over There,” “Give My Regards to Broadway,” “The Yankee Doodle Boy” and “You’re a Grand Old Flag.” The film won three Oscars, including Best Actor for Cagney. n Friday, April 12: “Hunt for Red October”: Based on the Tom Clancy novel, this high-tech thriller stars Sean Connery, Alec Baldwin, Scott Glenn, Sam Neill and James Earl Jones. A Soviet Navy captain (Connery) intends to defect with an experimental stealth submarine that is capable of silently entering American waters and launching a surprise attack. CIA operative Jack Ryan (Baldwin) deduces the captain’s intentions and assists him in countering the Soviet fleet as it tries to prevent the captain’s defection and the loss of the strategic technology to the U.S. Winner of one Oscar.

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360 March 28 2013  

Arts, entertainment and recreation for Skagit Valley

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