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Lincoln film festival celebrates the world of paddlesports PAGE 3

Skagit Valley Herald Thursday June 6, 2013

Recreation

Reviews

At the Movies

It’s the perfect weekend to get in a little fishing – for free

Music: LeAnn Rimes, Laura Mvula Video Games: “Call of Juarez ...”

It’s a more complicated relationship in “Before Midnight”

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Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E2 - Thursday, June 6, 2013

NEW ON DVD THIS WEEK “Warm Bodies”: The zombie love story introduces a new film genre: the zom rom com. It has all the leg shuffling, brain-eating fun of a horror film played out against a modern day “Romeo & Juliet” tale. The combination might sound as compatible as chicken and chocolate, but director Jonathan Levine makes the odd mix work. “Warm Bodies” works because of Nicholas Hoult’s sweet and slightly silly performance. He plays R with the same nervousness, uncertainties and doubts many very alive teens face when they fall in love. His plight happens to be complicated by being dead, but under all that rotting flesh is a typical teenager. The real joy of the film comes through voice-overs by R, where he reveals all the confusion he feels. There are no great revelations, but there are plenty of moments that resonate with anyone who’s had a first love. It’s really amazing how much emotion comes from R despite his being a zombie. “A Good Day to Die Hard”: The plot has more holes than a 25-year-old pair of favorite socks. But just like those tattered toe covers, there is something fun about the latest in this long-running film series to make you glad it’s still around. Bruce Willis dusts off the tough-guy attitude to reprise his most iconic role, detective John McClane — a man who always seems to be in the wrong place at the right time. This time, he travels to Russia in hopes of saving his estranged son, Jack (Jai Courtney), from a lifetime in prison. He ends up in the middle of a political and military mess — the norm for McClane. Did we need another “Die Hard?” No. But as long as the action is this intense and superficially fun, then keep them coming. “Identity Thief”: Jason Bateman plays Sandy Patterson, a hot-shot accountant on the verge of making the biggest move in his career. He needs to advance because Patterson, his wife (Amanda Peet) and their two daughters live on a very tight budget. Patterson’s life goes into the financial toilet when Diana (Melissa McCarthy) steals his identity and goes on a spending spree. The combination of cheap jokes, idiotic script and uninspired situations makes this the worst cross-country road movie since Robert Downey Jr. and Zach Galifianakis teamed up for the 2010 disaster “Due Date.” Compared to “Identity Thief,” that clunker now looks

YOUR ARTS, ENTERTAINMENT AND RECREATION GUIDE TO WHAT’S GOING ON IN SKAGIT COUNTY AND THE SURROUNDING AREAS

Upcoming movie releases Following is a partial schedule of coming movies on DVD. Release dates are subject to change: JUNE 11 Hansel & Gretel: Witch Hunters Paramount Masquerade - Inception/CJ Oz the Great and Powerful - Disney Snitch - Lionsgate/Summit

This Weekend / Page 5 Sky Colony to play 1st Street Cabaret & Speakeasy on Friday

JUNE 18 Jack the Giant Slayer - Warner The Last Exorcism Part II - Sony Stoker - Fox 21 & Over - Fox JUNE 25 The Call - Sony The Incredible Burt Wonderstone Warner JULY 2 Tai Chi Hero -- Well Go USA n McClatchy-Tribune News Service

like it was written by William Shakespeare. “Escape from Planet Earth”: An astronaut (Brendan Fraser) on the planet Baab goes on a daring mission. “Falling Skies”: First season of the cable alien-invasion story. “The Twilight Zone: The Complete Second Season”: Agnes Moorehead, Art Carney, Bill Mumy, Sydney Pollack and William Shatner guest star. “23:59”: Ghost story that takes place on a haunted island after an army recruit is found dead at exactly 23:59. “The First Churchills”: Juliet Stevenson plays a betrayed wife who stands by her man while secretly orchestrating a political power play. “Ring of Fire”: Jewel stars in the story of country music legend June Carter. “The Mad Max Trilogy”: Includes “Mad Max,” “Mad Max Road Warrior” and “Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome.” “Electra Glide in Blue”: The ’70s cult hit from director James William Guercio is now on Blu-ray. “Sadako 3D”: The scary long-haired girl in the white nightgown returns to emerge for all forms of technology. “Perfect Understanding”: Gloria Swanson stars in this 1933 comedy. “Mountain Men: Season 1”: Cable series about those living off the grid. “Journey of the Universe”: A look at the universe starting with the Big Bang. n Rick Bentley, The Fresno Bee

Inside

SUBMISSIONS Email features@skagitpublishing.com vrichardson@skagitpublishing. com (recreation items) Deadline: 5 p.m. Friday for the following Thursday edition Phone 360-416-2135 Hand-deliver 1215 Anderson Road Mount Vernon, WA 98274 Mailing address P.O. Box 578 Mount Vernon, WA 98273

Music, Game Reviews..................6-7 Travel............................................8-9 On Stage........................................ 10 Tuning Up..................................... 11 At the Lincoln Theatre.................. 12 Movie Listings............................... 13 Movie Mini-Reviews..................... 13 Hot Tickets.................................... 14 Get Involved.................................. 16 Out & About.............................18-19

Online events calendar To list your event on our website, visit goskagit.com and look for the Events Calendar on the home page HAVE A STORY IDEA? w For arts and entertainment, contact Features Editor Craig Parrish at 360-416-2135 or features@skagitpublishing.com w For recreation, contact staff writer Vince Richardson at 360-416-2181 or vrichardson@ skagitpublishing.com TO ADVERTISE 360-424-3251


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, June 6, 2013 - E3

RECREATION

The riveting allure of WATERSPORTS in

‘Blazing Paddles’ Skagit Valley Herald staff @360_SVH

‘Blazing Paddles: A Paddling Film Festival’

The passion of paddlesports will be on When: 7-10 p.m. today full display at 7 p.m. today as the Lincoln Where: Lincoln Theatre, Theatre presents “Blazing Paddles: A 712 S. First St., Mount Paddling Film Festival.” Vernon The festival will present a unique Tickets: $12, includes opportunity to view some of the best door prize drawings Information: 360-336watersports films, inspiring people to 8955 or lincolntheatre.org. explore rivers, lakes and oceans, push physical and emotional extremes, embrace the lifestyle and appreciate the heritage of the wild places we paddle, according to a news release. The films will cover action, documentary and environmental categories featuring sea kayaking, whitewater kayaking, surf skiing, canoeing, rafting, stand-up paddle-boarding and other paddling-related footage. A portion of the proceeds will benefit Washington Water Trails, which is dedicated to the recreational use and environmental stewardship of Washington’s waterways. Reel Productions photos


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E4 - Thursday, June 6, 2013

RECREATION By VINCE RICHARDSON @Sports_SVH

The weather has taken a turn for the better, and the state is offering a Free Fishing Weekend. Can it get much better for the outdoor enthusiast? Those who are interested in fishing but don’t have a license can get in on the action for free on Saturday and Sunday. No license will be required to fish or gather shellfish in any waters open to fishing in Washington state. Also, no vehicle access pass or Discover Pass will be required to park at any of the 650 wateraccess sites maintained by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). “Free Fishing Weekend is a great time to revive an old hobby or to introduce friends and family to fishing,” said Craig Burley, WDFW Fish Division manager. “Adults can take kids fishing on a wide variety of waters around the state.” While licenses will not be required, other rules — season closures, size limits and bag limits — must be adhered to. Also, anglers will be required to complete a catch record card for any salmon, steelhead, sturgeon or halibut they catch.

A fishing free-for-all

Wildlife caution

Skagit Valley Herald file photo

chased from contracted, private fish growers. The 10,000 trout are in addition to about 42,000 triploids stocked in more than 100 lakes across the state earlier this year. In addition, hundreds of other lakes have been stocked with Mountains of trout millions of trout over the past June also offers a special opportunity to hook large trout. year, said Donley. Portions of the Skagit and CasWDFW fish hatchery crews will cade rivers are open for hatchery be stocking 10,000 triploid rainbow trout in 20 lakes just before chinook salmon fishing through July 15. Father’s Day weekend (June The Skagit is open to hatch15-16). ery chinook retention from the “This is the second straight Highway 530 bridge at Rockport year we’ve stocked trout before Father’s Day, and this year we’ve to the Cascade River Road. On the Cascade, anglers can fish for doubled the number of fish and salmon from the mouth of the added six more lakes to the river to the Rockport-Cascade list,” said Chris Donley, WDFW Inland Fish Program manager. “A Road bridge. The daily limit on fishing license is a great Father’s the Skagit and Cascade rivers is four hatchery chinook, two of Day gift and catching these big fish will make for some wonder- which may be adults (chinook salmon at least 24 inches in ful memories.” length). Locally, Campbell Lake will Fishing for salmon is also open receive 250 triploid trout, as on portions of the Skykomish will Lake Padden in Whatcom River. County. Crab fisheries are open in The triploid trout, which avermost areas of Puget Sound, age 1.5 pounds each, were pur-

and-release fishing for salmon. Fishing is allowed north of a line from Point Monroe to Meadow Point. Farther north, the Tulalip Bay “bubble” fishery is under way. The fishery is open each week from Friday through noon Monday through Sept. 2. The exception is June 15, when the bubble is closed for the Tulalip Tribes salmon ceremony. Anglers fishing the bubble have a two-salmon daily limit, plus two additional pink salmon, and can use two fishing poles with the purchase of a WDFW two-pole endorsement. The halibut fishery in the region closed May 31, though fishing for lingcod is still a viable option. The lingcod fishery runs through June 15. During the hook-and-line season (through June 15), there’s a one-fish daily limit for lings, with a minimum size of 26 inches and a maximum size of 36 inches.

including the Strait of Juan de Fuca on July 1. Anglers have their pick of several other fishing opportunities in June. Several area rivers and streams are open for trout. Under the statewide rule for trout, there is a two-fish daily limit and a minimum size of 8 inches in rivers and streams. However, some of the region’s streams have a rule requiring trout to be at least 14 inches in length to keep. Lake fishing for bass, bluegill, perch and crappie is steadily improving as water temperatures increase and fish become more active, said Danny Garrett, fisheries biologist for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

the same habitats as largemouth bass, but smallmouth are often more abundant around rocky points, riprap, and offshore rock piles,” said Garrett. “Both species are highly adaptive to specific lake conditions, and habitat use will vary from lake to lake.” For smallmouth and largemouth, Garrett recommends using spinnerbaits, jerkbaits, crankbaits, jigs and plastic baits such as worms, tubes and creature baits. Perch and bluegill can also be caught with an assortment of artificial jigs, spinners, and flies, although many anglers prefer to use live worms under a bobber, he said. Those fishing for perch and bluegill should try fishing around several different pieces of cover in the lake until a group of Know the environment fish is found. When fishing for these species, “Generally, a single, small area focus on areas where there are will produce many individuals, bridge pilings, boat docks, rocks, since both species tend to consubmerged trees and bushes, gregate in large groups,” said grass beds, lily pads and flooded Garrett. vegetation along the shoreline, On Puget Sound, the northern Garrett said. portion of Marine Area 10 (Seat“Smallmouth bass use many of tle/Bremerton) is open to catch-

As spring turns to summer, wildlife sightings naturally increase for species ranging from butterflies to black bears. One reason is that animals become more active, emerging from cocoons and dens to feed and breed; another is that more people are outside to see them. WDFW wildlife managers ask that people observe a few basic rules in their interactions with Washington’s wildlife. n Keep a respectful distance. Using binoculars is a good way to get a close-up view of wildlife species without disturbing them. n Leave baby animals alone. Deer fawns and baby birds may appear to be abandoned when a parent may be nearby. Picking up wildlife of any kind not only can be harmful to the animal, it’s illegal. n Don’t feed wildlife either intentionally or unintentionally; this requires keeping campsites clean by storing food and garbage securely. Many of the problems with wildlife that require WDFW’s involvement stem from human handouts, in one form or another.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, June 6, 2013 - E5

THIS WEEKEND in the area SUMMER ARTWALK The Anacortes Chamber of Commerce Summer Artwalk will take place from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, June 7-8, at several locations in downtown Anacortes. More than 20 merchants will display work by local artists, including paintings, sculptures, jewelry, photography and more. 360-293-3832.

NEW MOON DRUM CIRCLE The event will take place from 7:30 to 9 p.m. Friday, June 7, at the Anacortes Center for Happiness, 619 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. Join Rev. Elke Macartney to drum in new ideas for the month and drum out the old. Bring your own hand drums and rattles or borrow hers. $5-$10 suggested donation. 360-464-2229 or anacortescenter forhappiness.org.

SVC CAR SHOW The Skagit Valley College Auto Club

SKY COLONY IN CONCERT Sky Colony will play folk music at 8 p.m. Friday, June 7, at the 1st Street Cabaret & Speakeasy, 612 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $5, 360-336-3012 or riverbelledinnertheatre.com.

will host a car show from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, June 8, on the SVC campus, 2405 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. Check out stock and custom cars and trucks, low-riders, rat rods, street rods, custom bikes and more. Registration: 8 to 10 a.m., with cash prizes and trophies in a variety of categories. Free admission for spectators. 360-416-7661 or email scott.hall@ skagit.edu.

SALISH SEA NATIVE AMERICAN CULTURE CELEBRATION Join with the Samish and Swinomish tribes to discover the cultural history along the Salish Sea from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday, June 8, at Deception Pass State Park, Bowman Bay picnic area, Whidbey Island. Enjoy canoe rides, Native American storytellers and music, demonstrations of weaving, woodcarving and more. Free admission. Traditional food will be available for purchase. June 8 is a State Parks free day in honor of National Get Outdoors Day; the Discover Pass is not required. 360-675-3767.

SUNDAY JAZZ A-Town Big Band will perform from 2 to 3 p.m. Sunday, June 9, at Heart of Anacortes, 1014 Fourth St., Anacortes. Weather permitting. Free. jazzatthelibrary.com.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E6 - Thursday, June 6, 2013

REVIEWS MUSIC CDS Compiled from news services

Laura Marling

groove, while the exposed nerves of the modern rocker “You’ve Ruined Me” burn with the fire of truth. Rimes displays a newfound subtlety in her strong voice on several songs. She effectively uses phrasing and shifts in tone to express complex feelings that sound like they come from real experience. It’s too soon to say Rimes has finally found a direction that can carry her back to the top of the charts. But “Spitfire” does show she’s found her adult voice — as a songwriter as well as a singer.

Laura Mvula

rock songs that draw on guitar-based ’70s rock — as seen through a spider-cracked “Once I Was An Eagle” “Sing to the Moon” windshield. Which is to say, those looking for singLaura Marling With a look as stark along joy and simple conceits have some already sounded like as her sound, the Birwork to do here. Friedberger’s work is an old soul when she mingham, Englandoften heavy with odd phrasings, curious released her haunting born Laura Mvula is a images and jagged lyrics. “Other Boys,” for debut, “Alas, I Cancommanding presence. example, features a line about a spider in not Swim,” in 2008, when she was 18. On She stands apart from the Brit retro-soul a stairwell who “demonstrates acoustics to her fourth album, the 23-year-old British movement, which gave the world Amy ne’er-do-wells.” “Staring at the Sun” opens songwriter sets herself even further apart Winehouse and Adele. Mvula is stranger, with the stage-setting line, “In the back of from her peers with a pretty-much-peerjazzier, with a spacey sound that features the tax / you turned off the TV / and read less collection of folk songs. her throaty vocals, which often (but not me a book on the phone.” These words are “Once I Was an Eagle” is so confidently n Michael McCall, Associated Press always) recall Nina Simone. accompanied by guitar/bass/drum-heavy conceived it seems neither precocious nor Written with producer Steve Brown, haughty. She quotes Bob Dylan’s “It Ain’t Queens of the Mvula’s “Sing to the Moon” is arranged for structures that roam easily through samba, Me Babe” in “Master Hunter,” the cenmaximum chamber-pop effect (lots of harp soft-rock and ’70s canyon rock, combining terpiece of an interconnected seven-song Stone Age and celesta), with odd melodic tangents out to create a record that feels wonderfully askew, making “Personal Record” a chal“. Like Clockwork” suite about love, pain and loss that begins of nowhere on songs such as “Make Me the album. Lovely” and “Is There Anybody Out There.” lenge worth taking. Opening to the On her first three records, she moved Mvula nearly goes off the vocal rails during n Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times sound of breaking from ultra-spare to a fuller band sound. the theatrical tune “She,” but she manages, glass and riddled But working here with producer Ethan via whispered dynamics, to keep her cool. The Idan with lascivious Johns — who also produced Tom Jones’ For all of “Moon’s” fussiness, there’s also Raichel Project impressive new “Spirit in the Room” — intent throughout, Queens of the Stone a welcome, singular fragility to this album, Marlin pares her approach back down. Age’s new album “. Like Clockwork” is “Quarter to Six” plus a deep groove running throughout, as She often relies on just her guitar and the soundtrack to the B movie of your (Cumbancha) in the hand-clapped rhythms behind the voice to put across songs with a mythic dreams. synths and double-tracked, Laurie Anderquality that are at once timeless in their In the six years since the release of the son-like harmonies of “Green Garden.” The idea that one connection to British and American folk band’s critically acclaimed “Era Vulgaris,” Onto all these starry melodies, Mvula grafts could create a cohetraditions, and utterly personal. Queens founder Josh Homme has moon- a potent, naturally dramatic sense of soul — sive album by pulling together unique voiclighted with the Eagles of Death Metal es singing in different languages and from the centerpiece to a perfect debut effort. n Dan DeLuca, The Philadelphia Inquirer and supergroup Them Crooked Vultures. different musical traditions would seem n A.D. Amorosi, The Philadelphia Inquirer Now, the California native sounds enerdaunting. Yet this challenge is what Israeli LeAnn Rimes gized back in his day job. keyboardist and composer Idan Raichel has “Spitfire” The credit list for “. Like Clockwork” embraced and brought to blossom. reads like a who’s who of modern rock, Eleanor Over the last decade, Raichel has led his LeAnn Rimes has with appearances from the band’s freimpressive collective pairing up with musiFriedberger appeared in tabloid quent collaborators Dave Grohl and cians from around the globe to create pieces “Personal Record” headlines more often Mark Lanegan, as well as Homme’s forthat leap through boundaries and create than the record mer bandmate Nick Oliveri, Nine Inch synthesis where one expects disparity. On Best known for her charts the last few Nails’ Trent Reznor, Artic Monkeys front- work as half of the “Quarter to Six,” Raichel has composed 16 years. But don’t fault her music. Her last man Alex Turner and, perhaps surprissongs, collaborating at times with his partthree albums have featured the best work ingly, Sir Elton John — who lends backing sibling duo the Fiery ners, giving the body cohesion. Raichel’s of her career, and the new “Spitfire” tops vocals and piano to “Fairweather Friends.” Furnaces, singer and songwriter Eleanor orchestration is subtle, allowing the differFriedberger has been a rock outlier since them all. Thankfully, “. Like Clockwork” isn’t ent languages and instruments to shine on her band burst out of the same ’00s New The onetime child star always had a overwhelmed by its roster of guest each piece. York scene as the Strokes and Yeah Yeah powerful voice. She often picked good stars, as Homme and his cohorts create There is a unifying spirit in the songs, a Yeahs. Over the following decade they material, too. But it never gelled into a merry hell as Lucifer’s house band. The spirit that conjures senses of longing, melpoured forth ridiculous amounts of music consistent creative direction. 10 tracks range from piano-led laments ancholy and hope. This sentiment can be that melded brother Matthew Friedberger’s “Spitfire” finds Rimes emerging as a about solitude (“The Vampyre of Time felt in two of the album’s strongest works: encyclopedic knowledge of music with mature artist whose songwriting abiland Memory”) to loose-limbed desertThere’s “Sabe Deus (God Knows),” perEleanor’s gentle, wavering voice and way ity is catching up with her vocal talent. funk (“Smooth Sailing”) in a collection formed with Portugal’s Ana Moura, and the with a curious lyric. Ballads like “What Have I Done” and that represents a welcome expansion of haunting “Mon Amour (My Love),” sung by On her second solo album, Friedberger “Borrowed” convey deeply felt, difficult Queens of the Stone Age’s sonic temstrikes further afield of her brother’s impa- Vieux Farka Toure, the Malian guitarist who emotions. She also has developed into plate. tient prog-rock tendencies, offering a dozen is the son of the acclaimed Ali Farka Toure. an effective pop-rocker: On “Gasoline reasonably focused, verse-chorus-verse art- n Michelle Morgante, Associated Press n Matthew Kemp, Associated Press and Matches,” she bites into a raw, bluesy


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

REVIEWS VIDEO GAMES Chris Campbell, Scripps Howard News Service

‘Call of Juarez: Gunslinger’

as you traipse around the dusty town settings and unload lead into a host of bad Platforms: PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, PC guys with gnarly teeth and classic cowboy Genre: Shooter mustaches. Publisher: Ubisoft Choose the rifle and longer six-shooters ESRB Rating: M, for Mature to keep your foes at a distance, or arm Grade: 3 stars (out of 5) yourself with a sawed-off shotgun and more power handguns for in-your-face I must shootouts. Either way, the baddies won’t say: What a stand much of a chance against you, but rebound for the point of the game is your enjoyment the “Call and success, not theirs. It plays more like of Juarez” a carnival shooting gallery, so you can franchise. expect to receive lots of damage before After the dying while a single shot takes out most rather disasopponents. The boss battles are a trying trous “The affair, often more repetitious and boring Cartel,” the than the culmination of your previous show-runhard work, and they detract from an othners made a erwise solid experience. smart deciThe quick-draw element from past sion. They “Call of Juarez” games thankfully shows stripped away any pretense, more or less discarded up, and provides many of the game’s beteverything from the series and went back ter moments. Expertly timing your faceoff to the roots. Away went the modern trap- against another armed foe delivers tenpings of “The Cartel,” which never found sion and high satisfaction when you go all Blondie on some fool before he gets the proper footing and ended up a technical drop on you. and narrative mess. During the regular gaming portions, In its place comes “Gunslinger,” a stringing together combos and fast kills pared-down shooter harkening back to earlier arcade games where the object was earns you score multipliers, which helps you leap up the online leaderboards and to leave your brain on the table and just impress your friends. sit back, relax and have fun putting bulThe guns all have an appropriate heft lets into bad guys. The game doesn’t aim and kick to them, and watching the outfor high-minded excellence. Instead, it laws drop from a slug to the noggin brings achieves notoriety for keeping everything a certain amount of satisfaction when simple yet effective. cleaning up this ramshackle town. Offer powerful guns, a bevy of targets By keeping it simple, “Gunslinger” and some otherwise cheeky or outright stays true to its title and delivers satisfying forgettable dialogue, and chances are arcade shooting action. Making the game gamers will be rewarded by doing the available as a download instead of asking basic things really well rather than trygamers to buy a retail copy also wisely ing to hit a creative home run and failing serves as a way to make amends for “The miserably. Cartel” — and should give those fans a The game takes place back in the Old reason to stick around to see if “Call of West, where “Bound in Blood” found Juarez” can regain its mojo. a good deal of its fan base. The plot in “Gunslinger” never really takes off; sure, n Follow Chris Campbell at @campbler or one exists, but it can largely be forgotten email him at game_on_games@mac.com.

CONTINUE THE CYCLE – PLEASE RECYCLE THIS NEWSPAPER

Thursday, June 6, 2013 - E7


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E8 - Thursday, June 6, 2013

TRAVEL

Ken Nedimyer (right), president of the Coral Restoration Foundation, works with a volunteer in the foundation’s coral nursery situated in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary off Key Largo, Fla. Photos by Florida Keys News Bureau via AP

Divers volunteer on coral restoration in Florida Keys By SUZETTE LABOY Associated Press

KEY LARGO, Fla. — Ken Nedimyer likes to say that he breathes new life into coral reefs. In fact, he’s been doing it for more than a decade, and recreational divers are

volunteering in the effort. “We are trying to put Humpty Dumpty back together again,” said Nedimyer, whose Coral Restoration Foundation has planted four coral nurseries off the shores of the Florida Keys. The foundation offers workshops and

diving trips for recreational divers who help by cleaning and preparing new coral for planting. “We are trying to get people to realize that it was a lot better and it can be brought back again,” Nedimyer said. Divers helping out with

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the work first get a crash course in everything about corals. They learn that coral reefs are experiencing a rapid decline, particularly in the Caribbean. “It’s not as magical as it once was, and it’s going downhill,” said Nedimyer. The decline has dire implications. Coral reefs, much like a rain forest, support a huge amount of biodiversity; attract tourism and commercial fishing; and act as a natural barrier to coastal erosion during storms. In the Florida Keys, staghorn coral (cylindrical branches) and elkhorn coral (antler-like branches) face local extinction. Both are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act, and the National Oceanic and

of NOAA. “Caribbean coral reefs are already dramatically changed from the way we understand they should look because 50 to 80 percent of the coral has already been lost from most Caribbean reefs.” Nedimyer’s four coral nurseries are thriving. But Ken Nedimyer shows Miller cautioned that while recreational divers how the “nurseries are helping to help clean and prepare us keep pace with this negnew coral for planting. ative decline,” there needs to be a concerted effort to address larger problems Atmospheric Administrasuch as global warming tion has proposed listing and the chemical makeup them as endangered. “Corals are dying rapid- of the ocean “if coral reefs ly, much more rapidly than throughout the world are we believe they have in the going to survive.” In the meantime, recpast, which is a problem for sustaining the populations,” reational divers can join marine scientists in helping said Margaret Miller, an ecologist with the National to buy time through the reef restoration efforts. Marine Fisheries Service


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, June 6, 2013 - E9

TRAVEL “The idea is to come up with a simple process and train people just like you to do it,” Nedimyer told a group of seven volunteer divers at a recent workshop in Key Largo that included a series of educational lectures and hands-on dives to restore corals. Nedimyer explained to the group that disease, severe cold fronts, multiple years of coral bleaching (caused by warmer water and other environmental factors) and frequent hurricanes are among the “stressors” that have contributed to the rapid decline of the coral, along with climate change, overfishing, coastal development and more. Nedimyer and his group have experimented with different ways to grow corals in the nurseries, much as you would with plants. At first, corals were mounted

Local travel

nursery — about the length of an acre (four-tenths of a hectare) and as far as your the size of a knuckle but goggled-eyes can see — to can grow to 12 or 15 inches. clean and prepare corals for The volunteer divers help planting. Nedimyer attach the tiny “This is my way of giving starter coral fragments onto back to the community,” the tree nurseries about 30 said Erin McKinnon of feet below the surface of Orlando, who has taken the the water. When the coral course twice. Ken lengthens and has healthy “This garden is blossomNedimyer multiple branches, Nediing,” said Sharon Boggess and Kayla myer clips it for replanting of North Conway, N.H., Ripple are in the popular diving and holding back tears. “It’s just shown during snorkeling spot Molasses so amazing to replenish the a workshop Reef in the Florida Keys reef.” on restoring National Marine SanctuNedimyer, whose work coral reefs ary. (Boats are tied up has led to the cultivation of in Key Largo, to permanent moorings, some 40,000 corals in total, Fla. marked by buoys, to presaid he hopes his “obsesLow-cost line nurserthe lines. The foundation’s vent dropped anchors from sion” with coral restoration ies were later introduced, latest technique has proven damaging the reef.) can be expanded to local where corals hanging from to be most effective: CorThe divers at the recent dive shops, so they can offer wire or monofilament surals hang on a tree nursery Keys workshop traveled his workshops to visitors to vived at high rates and grew (think a Christmas tree with from across the U.S. for help in the nurseries. rapidly. But wildlife offiornaments) that is tethered what they described as “Now we have more cials were concerned that to the sea floor but can “underwater community corals than we can plant,” dolphins, turtles and other move around in storms. service.” Their visit included he said. “We’ve created a species would get caught in The coral starts out about swimming out to the coral monster.” n On the Web: coralrestora tion.org

on concrete disks using underwater adhesive, with each disk attached to a PVC pipe with a cement base raising the disk off the ocean floor. Live tissue grew over the adhesive as the coral formed new branches.

Pelindaba Lavender Farm, followed by a no-host lunch at Roche Harbor SHORT TRIPS: Mount Vernon and a behind-the-scenes tour of the Parks and Recreation offers travel Westcott Bay Cidery and San Juan opportunities for participants ages Island Distillery, where you’ll taste 12 and older (adult supervision their ciders and spirits. Ages 21 and required for ages 18 and younger). older only. $75-$77. Register by July For information or to register, call 12. 360-336-6215. Abbotsford Airshow: 9 a.m. to 5 Next up: p.m. Friday, Aug. 9, departing from “Riches of Richmond, B.C.”: and returning to Hillcrest Park, 1:30 to 10 p.m. Friday, June 14, 1717 S. 13th St., Mount Vernon. departing from and returning to Check out the 51st annual AbbotsHillcrest Park, 1717 S. 13th St., ford, B.C., International Airshow, Mount Vernon. Check out the featuring aerobatics, flight formaInternational Buddhist Temple, tions, parachute drops and pyroSteveston’s restored waterfront and technic displays. Proof of citizenship the most popular night market in required (passport, DMV enhanced North America, with 80 food booths driver’s license or NEXUS card). and some 200 retail vendors. Proof $68-$70. Register by Aug. 2. of citizenship required (passport, DMV enhanced driver’s license or ESCORTED TOURS: The WhatNEXUS card). $55-$57. Register by com County Tour Program offers a June 7. variety of day trips and longer tours, “San Juan Island: Something for with most trips departing from and Everyone”: 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. returning to the Bellingham Senior Friday, July 19, departing from and Activity Center, 315 Halleck St., returning to Hillcrest Park, 1717 S. Bellingham. For information or to 13th St., Mount Vernon. Journey register: 360-733-4030, press #, ext. to San Juan Island to visit the 12th 47015, or wccoa.org/index.php/ annual SJI Lavender Festival at Tours.

Next up: The Heart of Eastern Canada: June 20-29. Fly to Toronto and see Niagara Falls; enjoy a scenic train ride to Montreal; travel on the historic Chemin du Roy carriage road along the St. Lawrence River to Quebec City; and explore the countryside of the Charlevoix region. $3,969-$4,999. Includes deluxe coach transportation, roundtrip airfare, hotel accommodations, attraction entry fees and gratuities, guided tours and 15 meals. Passport required. Barkerville, B.C., and Scenic Loop Tour: June 22-26. Enjoy a scenic highway cruise up gorge Route 97 to Barkerville, B.C., a historic gold rush town. Travel points include the Gold Rush Trail along the Fraser River, Quesnel, the Western Rockies and Valemount, Clearwater and Wells Grey Provincial Park. $850-$1050. Trip includes round-trip motorcoach transportation, admissions and activities in Barkerville, five meals, all nights lodging, luggage handling and escort. Passport or enhanced driver’s license required.

Fall Foliage Mississippi River Steamboat Cruise: Oct. 4-12. Enjoy the quintessential American journey down the Mississippi River aboard the America Queen Steamboat. $3,199-$3,999. Includes Bellingham to Seatac transfer, airfare, first night hotel stay, seven-day cruise, all meals on cruise, shore activity at all ports, daily lecture by onboard naturalist, nightly entertainment, taxes, gratuities and escort. YOGA ADVENTURE SERIES: Join Dawn Jex for day trips and yoga. Each adventure includes activities at an area attraction combined with a yoga class. For information or to register, call Dawn at 360-631-0587 or visit yoga-gypsies.com. Next up: June 15: Theo Chocolate Factory Tour and Troll Yoga: Meet at 10:15 a.m. at the Theo Chocolate Factory, 3400 Phinney Ave., Seattle. Tour the factory, taste a little chocolate and then head up to the Troll under the Fremont bridge for some “Troll Yoga.” Afterward, explore Fremont for lunch, shopping or sightseeing. $20.

First Friday Gallery Walks

June 7 6 - 9 pm Anne Martin McCool Gallery Burton Jewelers Scott Milo Gallery The Majestic Inn and Spa Apothecary Spa (2nd floor Majestic Inn)

Gallery at the Depot www.anacortesart.com


E10 Thursday, June 6, 2013

Thursday, June 6, 2013 E11

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

ON STAGE in the Skagit Valley and surrounding area June 6-13

TUNING UP Playing at area venues June 6-13

SATURDAY.8 HAYNIE OPRY SOUTHERN GOSPEL MATINEE, FEATURING MATT AUDETTE AND THE CIRCLE OF FRIENDS BAND (pictured) 3 p.m., The Haynie Grange, 3344 Haynie Road, Blaine. $10 at the door. 360-336-3321, 360-336-8066 or thehaynieopry.com.

THURSDAY.6

WEDNESDAY.12

Nathaniel Talbot: 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $10 cover. 360-4453000.

SKELETONWITCH (pictured), WITCHBURN, LEATHERHORN 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $10. 360-778-1067.

Andy Koch (blues, soul): 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Jansen Art Center Piano Lounge, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360-3543600.

SATURDAY.8 BOBBY HOLLAND AND THE BREADLINE 8:30 to 11:30 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes.

FRIDAY.7

Thursday.6 CABARET

“Chicks in Space: a Sci-Fi Cabaret”: featuring The Provocateurs, 9 p.m., The Spark Museum of Electrical Invention, 1312 Bay St., Bellingham. $7 at the door. 360-738-3886.

THEATER

“A Rotten Demise”: interactive comedy murder mystery, 7:30 p.m., 1st Street Cabaret & Speakeasy, 612 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $45, includes dinner. 360336-3012 or riverbelledinnertheatre.com. “The Woman in Black”: ghost thriller, 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-293-6829 or acttheatre.com.

Friday.7 CABARET

“Chicks in Space: a Sci-Fi Cabaret”: featuring The Provocateurs, 9 p.m., The Spark Museum of Electrical Invention, 1312 Bay St., Bellingham. $10 advance, $12 at the door. 360-738-3886.

MUSIC

“The Day The Music Died”: Haynie Opry presents a tribute to the music of Richie Valens, The Big Bopper and Buddy Holly: 7 p.m., The Haynie Grange, 3344 Haynie Road, Blaine. $20 at the door. 360-336-3321, 360-336-8066 or thehaynieopry.com.

THEATER

“The Woman in Black”: ghost thriller, 8 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-293-6829 or acttheatre.com.

VARIETY

Miss Betty Desire: 8 p.m., Firelight Bistro, 10007 270th St. NW, Stanwood. No cover. RSVP recommended: 360-629-7575.

Saturday.8 CABARET

“Chicks in Space: a Sci-Fi Cabaret”: featuring The Provocateurs, 9 p.m., The Spark Museum of Electrical Invention, 1312 Bay St., Bellingham. $10 advance, $12 at the door. 360-738-3886.

MUSIC

“Swing Into Spring”: Stanwood-Camano Chorale, with small ensemble Trouvere, 7 p.m., Stanwood United Methodist Church, 27128 102nd Drive NW, Stanwood. Freewill offering. 360-445-2721. Josephine Howell, Paul Richardson Quartet (jazz, blues): 3 p.m., Sudden Valley Dance Barn, Gate 2, 8 Barnview Court, Bellingham. $20. 360-671-1709 or suddenvalleylibrary.org. Haynie Opry Southern Gospel Matinee, featuring Matt Audette and The Circle of Friends Band: 3 p.m., The Haynie Grange, 3344 Haynie Road, Blaine. $10 at the door. 360-336-3321, 360-336-8066 or thehaynieopry.com.

“The Day The Music Died”: Haynie Opry presents a tribute to the music of Richie Valens, The Big Bopper and Buddy Holly, 7 p.m., The Haynie Grange, 3344 Haynie Road, Blaine. $20 at the door. 360336-3321, 360-336-8066 or thehaynieopry. com.

THEATER

“The Woman in Black”: ghost thriller, 8 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-293-6829 or acttheatre.com.

Sunday.9 MUSIC

A-Town Big Band: 2 to 3 p.m., Heart of Anacortes, 1014 Fourth St., Anacortes. Weather permitting. Free. jazzatthelibrary.com.

THEATER

“A Rotten Demise”: interactive comedy murder mystery, 6:30 p.m., 1st Street Cabaret & Speakeasy, 612 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $45, includes dinner. 360336-3012 or riverbelledinnertheatre.com. “The Woman in Black”: ghost thriller, 2 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-293-6829 or acttheatre.com.

Monday.10

The Modern Relics: 8 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/ Main, Conway. $7 cover. 360-445-3000.

MUSIC

“Setting Standards”: Mount Vernon High School’s Synergy Ensemble accompanied by the Ev Stern Trio, 7 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $8. 360-336-8955 or lincoln theatre.org.

Tuesday.11 VARIETY

Lincoln Elementary School Talent Show: 7 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. Free. 360-3368955 or lincolntheatre.org.

Brian Hillman Band: 8:30 to 11:30 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-5881720.

5 Dollar Fine (country, rock): 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Winners Lounge, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. No cover. 877-275-2448.

The Fender Benders: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

Ann ‘N Dean: 7 p.m., Mount Vernon Elks, 2120 Market St., Mount Vernon. 360848-8882.

Equal Opportunity: 9 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Varsity Inn, 112 N. Cherry St., Burlington. No cover. 360-755-0165.

Skip Hamilton: 6 to 9 p.m., Frida’s Gourmet Mexican Restaurant, 416 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-299-2120.

Enema, Flannel: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. 360-778-1067.

SATURDAY.8 Hardwire: 10 p.m., Draft Pics, 516 S. Mia Vermillion & Kevin Sutton First St., Mount Vernon. No cover. (blues, jazz, folk): 8 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. 360-336-3626. $12 cover. 360-445-3000. The Fender Benders: 8:30 p.m. to Divas & The Dudes: 8:30 p.m., Edi12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, son Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-766-6266. 360-422-6411.

$cratch Daddy: 9 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Longhorn Saloon, 5754 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-7666330. Bobby Holland and the Breadline: 8:30 to 11:30 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

Thursday.13

Joyride: 9 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-755-3956. 5 Dollar Fine: 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Winners Lounge, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. No cover. 877-275-2448. John Dennis (acoustic guitar): 6:30 to 8 p.m., Jansen Art Center Piano Lounge, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360-354-3600.

The Tony Zapnow Benefit Experience: with My Dad Bruce, Haunted Authors, Mike Champoux, Jesus Chris Willis, Jenni Potts, Cliques and Whistles, IG88, Plague Doctor, Care Package, Mostafa, Mark Shirtz, Dinofour & Brie Boogie, Thad Wenatchee, 3rdegree, Bloodshot, White Licorice, A-Hale, Kyle Vest and Honesty, 6 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $3-$5 suggested donation. 360-778-1067.

MUSIC

Geoffrey Castle: “The After School Special!”: 7 p.m., Concrete Theatre, 45920 Main St., Concrete. $15-$25. 360941-0403 or concrete-theatre.com.

THEATER

“A Rotten Demise”: interactive comedy murder mystery: 7:30 p.m., 1st Street Cabaret & Speakeasy, 612 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $45, includes dinner. 360336-3012 or riverbelledinnertheatre.com. “The Woman in Black”: ghost thriller, 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-293-6829 or acttheatre.com.

SUNDAY.9 Bow Diddlers: 5:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. 360-7666266.

WEDNESDAY.12 Knut Bell & The Blue Collars: 5 to 9 p.m., Conway Pub & Eatery, 18611 Main St., Conway. 360-445-4733.

Early Evening Jam: with CC Adams and $cratch Daddy, 4 to 8 p.m., The Station House Bar & Grill, 315 E. Morris St., La Conner. 360-466-4488.

Gary B’s Church of the Blues (blues, classic rock): 6 to 10 p.m., Castle Tavern, 708 Metcalf St., Sedro-Woolley. 360-855-2263.

Ghost Tribe Fires, Furniture Girls: 9 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. 360-778-1067.

Stilly River Band: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

THURSDAY.13 Skeletonwitch, Witchburn, Leatherhorn: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $10. 360-778-1067.

Nick Moyer (one-man band): 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. 360-445-3000.

Trish Hatley: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

The Rudy Trio (jazz): 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Jansen Art Center Piano Lounge, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360-3543600.


E10 Thursday, June 6, 2013

Thursday, June 6, 2013 E11

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

ON STAGE in the Skagit Valley and surrounding area June 6-13

TUNING UP Playing at area venues June 6-13

SATURDAY.8 HAYNIE OPRY SOUTHERN GOSPEL MATINEE, FEATURING MATT AUDETTE AND THE CIRCLE OF FRIENDS BAND (pictured) 3 p.m., The Haynie Grange, 3344 Haynie Road, Blaine. $10 at the door. 360-336-3321, 360-336-8066 or thehaynieopry.com.

THURSDAY.6

WEDNESDAY.12

Nathaniel Talbot: 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $10 cover. 360-4453000.

SKELETONWITCH (pictured), WITCHBURN, LEATHERHORN 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $10. 360-778-1067.

Andy Koch (blues, soul): 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Jansen Art Center Piano Lounge, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360-3543600.

SATURDAY.8 BOBBY HOLLAND AND THE BREADLINE 8:30 to 11:30 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes.

FRIDAY.7

Thursday.6 CABARET

“Chicks in Space: a Sci-Fi Cabaret”: featuring The Provocateurs, 9 p.m., The Spark Museum of Electrical Invention, 1312 Bay St., Bellingham. $7 at the door. 360-738-3886.

THEATER

“A Rotten Demise”: interactive comedy murder mystery, 7:30 p.m., 1st Street Cabaret & Speakeasy, 612 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $45, includes dinner. 360336-3012 or riverbelledinnertheatre.com. “The Woman in Black”: ghost thriller, 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-293-6829 or acttheatre.com.

Friday.7 CABARET

“Chicks in Space: a Sci-Fi Cabaret”: featuring The Provocateurs, 9 p.m., The Spark Museum of Electrical Invention, 1312 Bay St., Bellingham. $10 advance, $12 at the door. 360-738-3886.

MUSIC

“The Day The Music Died”: Haynie Opry presents a tribute to the music of Richie Valens, The Big Bopper and Buddy Holly: 7 p.m., The Haynie Grange, 3344 Haynie Road, Blaine. $20 at the door. 360-336-3321, 360-336-8066 or thehaynieopry.com.

THEATER

“The Woman in Black”: ghost thriller, 8 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-293-6829 or acttheatre.com.

VARIETY

Miss Betty Desire: 8 p.m., Firelight Bistro, 10007 270th St. NW, Stanwood. No cover. RSVP recommended: 360-629-7575.

Saturday.8 CABARET

“Chicks in Space: a Sci-Fi Cabaret”: featuring The Provocateurs, 9 p.m., The Spark Museum of Electrical Invention, 1312 Bay St., Bellingham. $10 advance, $12 at the door. 360-738-3886.

MUSIC

“Swing Into Spring”: Stanwood-Camano Chorale, with small ensemble Trouvere, 7 p.m., Stanwood United Methodist Church, 27128 102nd Drive NW, Stanwood. Freewill offering. 360-445-2721. Josephine Howell, Paul Richardson Quartet (jazz, blues): 3 p.m., Sudden Valley Dance Barn, Gate 2, 8 Barnview Court, Bellingham. $20. 360-671-1709 or suddenvalleylibrary.org. Haynie Opry Southern Gospel Matinee, featuring Matt Audette and The Circle of Friends Band: 3 p.m., The Haynie Grange, 3344 Haynie Road, Blaine. $10 at the door. 360-336-3321, 360-336-8066 or thehaynieopry.com.

“The Day The Music Died”: Haynie Opry presents a tribute to the music of Richie Valens, The Big Bopper and Buddy Holly, 7 p.m., The Haynie Grange, 3344 Haynie Road, Blaine. $20 at the door. 360336-3321, 360-336-8066 or thehaynieopry. com.

THEATER

“The Woman in Black”: ghost thriller, 8 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-293-6829 or acttheatre.com.

Sunday.9 MUSIC

A-Town Big Band: 2 to 3 p.m., Heart of Anacortes, 1014 Fourth St., Anacortes. Weather permitting. Free. jazzatthelibrary.com.

THEATER

“A Rotten Demise”: interactive comedy murder mystery, 6:30 p.m., 1st Street Cabaret & Speakeasy, 612 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $45, includes dinner. 360336-3012 or riverbelledinnertheatre.com. “The Woman in Black”: ghost thriller, 2 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-293-6829 or acttheatre.com.

Monday.10

The Modern Relics: 8 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/ Main, Conway. $7 cover. 360-445-3000.

MUSIC

“Setting Standards”: Mount Vernon High School’s Synergy Ensemble accompanied by the Ev Stern Trio, 7 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $8. 360-336-8955 or lincoln theatre.org.

Tuesday.11 VARIETY

Lincoln Elementary School Talent Show: 7 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. Free. 360-3368955 or lincolntheatre.org.

Brian Hillman Band: 8:30 to 11:30 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-5881720.

5 Dollar Fine (country, rock): 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Winners Lounge, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. No cover. 877-275-2448.

The Fender Benders: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

Ann ‘N Dean: 7 p.m., Mount Vernon Elks, 2120 Market St., Mount Vernon. 360848-8882.

Equal Opportunity: 9 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Varsity Inn, 112 N. Cherry St., Burlington. No cover. 360-755-0165.

Skip Hamilton: 6 to 9 p.m., Frida’s Gourmet Mexican Restaurant, 416 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-299-2120.

Enema, Flannel: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. 360-778-1067.

SATURDAY.8 Hardwire: 10 p.m., Draft Pics, 516 S. Mia Vermillion & Kevin Sutton First St., Mount Vernon. No cover. (blues, jazz, folk): 8 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. 360-336-3626. $12 cover. 360-445-3000. The Fender Benders: 8:30 p.m. to Divas & The Dudes: 8:30 p.m., Edi12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, son Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-766-6266. 360-422-6411.

$cratch Daddy: 9 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Longhorn Saloon, 5754 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-7666330. Bobby Holland and the Breadline: 8:30 to 11:30 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

Thursday.13

Joyride: 9 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-755-3956. 5 Dollar Fine: 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Winners Lounge, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. No cover. 877-275-2448. John Dennis (acoustic guitar): 6:30 to 8 p.m., Jansen Art Center Piano Lounge, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360-354-3600.

The Tony Zapnow Benefit Experience: with My Dad Bruce, Haunted Authors, Mike Champoux, Jesus Chris Willis, Jenni Potts, Cliques and Whistles, IG88, Plague Doctor, Care Package, Mostafa, Mark Shirtz, Dinofour & Brie Boogie, Thad Wenatchee, 3rdegree, Bloodshot, White Licorice, A-Hale, Kyle Vest and Honesty, 6 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $3-$5 suggested donation. 360-778-1067.

MUSIC

Geoffrey Castle: “The After School Special!”: 7 p.m., Concrete Theatre, 45920 Main St., Concrete. $15-$25. 360941-0403 or concrete-theatre.com.

THEATER

“A Rotten Demise”: interactive comedy murder mystery: 7:30 p.m., 1st Street Cabaret & Speakeasy, 612 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $45, includes dinner. 360336-3012 or riverbelledinnertheatre.com. “The Woman in Black”: ghost thriller, 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-293-6829 or acttheatre.com.

SUNDAY.9 Bow Diddlers: 5:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. 360-7666266.

WEDNESDAY.12 Knut Bell & The Blue Collars: 5 to 9 p.m., Conway Pub & Eatery, 18611 Main St., Conway. 360-445-4733.

Early Evening Jam: with CC Adams and $cratch Daddy, 4 to 8 p.m., The Station House Bar & Grill, 315 E. Morris St., La Conner. 360-466-4488.

Gary B’s Church of the Blues (blues, classic rock): 6 to 10 p.m., Castle Tavern, 708 Metcalf St., Sedro-Woolley. 360-855-2263.

Ghost Tribe Fires, Furniture Girls: 9 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. 360-778-1067.

Stilly River Band: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

THURSDAY.13 Skeletonwitch, Witchburn, Leatherhorn: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $10. 360-778-1067.

Nick Moyer (one-man band): 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. 360-445-3000.

Trish Hatley: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

The Rudy Trio (jazz): 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Jansen Art Center Piano Lounge, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360-3543600.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E12 - Thursday, June 6, 2013

MOVIES Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy star in “Before Midnight.” Sony Pictures Classics via AP

Hawke and Delpy try to break up ‘Before Midnight’

teenager,” she gripes. “Why does any woman waste HHH time trying to change a man?” The debate is salty and sexual. Cast: Julie Delpy, Ethan Hawke, It doesn’t stop just because he’s Seamus Davey-Fitzpatrick taken her top off. Running time: 1:47 MPAA rating: R for sexual conAnd for the most part, it all tent/nudity and language seems too real. The occasional By ROGER MOORE no matter how grave or loud the rick) and put him on a plane back arch moment pops out as the McClatchy-Tribune News Service argument, has got to have a fight- to Chicago, back to the woman argument escalates, more for middle-aged French woman ing chance. Jesse left when he took up with structural reasons than organic losing her hair” and the “geoThey met on a Vienna-bound “Before Midnight” is just as Celine “Before Sunset.” He’s ones. And I would have loved if graphically challenged, footballtrain, and fell in love with each witty, chatty and close-to-thegot three books under his belt, Linklater (“Bernie,” “School of obsessed donut-loving Ameriother over a long night’s talk bone about relationships as the now — and twin daughters from Rock”) had sprinkled some flashcan.” And there’s no ending it, “Before Sunrise.” two earlier Richard Linklater his marriage to Celine. But he’s backs from earlier films, letting us Nine years later, they reconcollaborations with these two missing his son’s formative years not easily anyway. remember what these two maybe She drags up old grievances. He nected in Paris and fell in love all writing actors. Set at the end of a and would love to move back to corrects her English, and her facts. are forgetting — the moist-eyed over again, no matter how much long summer vacation in Greece, the States. “Now I know why Sylvia Plath romance of it all. more complicated their lives had these Parisians live through the Celine has her own career, one But “Before Midnight” is as put her head in the toaster!” turned. romance of that holiday and the that she’s ready to change. If only good a depiction of a couple Oven, dear. It was an oven. And now, nearly a decade quarrels that come once the real she could stop packing for the hitting that 7- to 10-year wall The collaborative script has after that, they’re older, settled, world starts intruding on their kids, tending to Jesse’s needs and as you’d ever want to see. And each actor embellishing lines and with lives more complicated than lives again. Old grievances and scheduling everyone. She’s feelbuttressing his or her arguments Delpy and Hawke are so engagever. Will Celine (Julie Delpy) new ambitions, lingering guilt and ing “oppressed” and resentful. ing as actors in characters that with pointed, on-the-mark zingand Jesse (Ethan Hawke) make fondly held hopes come to the He’s 41, with the same scruffy you can’t help but root for them, ers. Hawke and Delpy are quite it, rekindle their relationship fore as these two hash it out over hair and scraggly goatee. She’s believable as a couple, articulate and that maybe they stick around “Before Midnight”? Any couple a long night away from the kids. pleasingly plump, and OK with for another sequel — “Before the people with a lot of history. that still has this much to say, who Jesse has just kissed his tween- it. But something starts the fight can still make each other laugh age son (Seamus Davey-Fitzpat- between the “fat-(bottomed) “I’m stuck with an American Early Bird Special.”

‘BEFORE MIDNIGHT’


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, June 6, 2013 - E13

MOVIES MINI-REVIEWS Compiled from news services. Ratings are one to four stars. “After Earth” — There was a time when an M. Night Shyamalan-directed film was a real event. From “The Sixth Sense” through “Unbreakable” and even “Signs,” his gifts for suspense and surprise were such that he was earning comparisons to Spielberg and Hitchcock. That was a long time and many films ago. The sci-fi thriller “After Earth,” starring Will Smith and son Jaden, is a film without wit or sparkle. At times the special effects look so cheesy you wonder if they’re going to pull back and show members of the crew rocking the ship or working the strings on puppets. In the meantime, we keep getting heavyhanded metaphors about overcoming fear, and unbearably clunky dialogue. This movie is “Take Your Kid to Work Day” to the extreme. Sci-fi, PG-13, 100 minutes H “Epic” — The latest animated film from Fox’s Blue Sky division, “Epic” depicts good vs. evil forces battling over the fate of the natural realm. Director Chris Wedge (“Ice Age,” “Robots”) gives us lush, often breathtaking visuals of a world within our world -- a forest populated by tiny Leaf Men who ride hummingbirds and do battle with an equally minuscule army of nasty creatures known as Boggans. An all-star cast provides the voice work, which proves to be distracting. Kids won’t mind, but the voices will take adults out of the story. Animated adventure, PG, 100 minutes. HH1⁄2 “Iron Man 3” — Robert Downey Jr. is plain great in this film. Filled with breathtakingly brilliant special effects, bolstered by excellent supporting performances from a half-dozen other top-tier actors, crackling with sharp humor and working as a story that stands alone while often acknowledging the larger Marvel(ous) universe, “Iron Man 3” is one of the best entries in this modern golden age of superhero movies. Working from a smart if sometimes meandering script, director Shane Black takes us on a 3-D thrill ride in which a LOT of stuff is blown up, and the skies are filled with superheroes, supervillains and humans falling to their seemingly certain deaths. Superhero action, PG-13, 130 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “Now You See Me” — Here’s a slick con, all flash and no substance, about The Four Horsemen, illusionists who have been recruited to pull off some of the most audacious stunts in the history of deception. “Now You See Me” seems awfully sure of itself, with self-important, intrusive music, sweeping tracking shots and actors chewing up the scenery. Ultimately, however, there’s no there there. By the time it’s over, we’re left with more questions than answers -- and even more damning, we don’t care all that much about those unanswered questions. Thriller, PG-13, 116 minutes. H 1⁄2

AT THE LINCOLN THEATRE AT AREA THEATERS ANACORTES CINEMAS June 7-13 The Internship (PG-13): FridaySaturday: 1:30, 4:10, 6:50, 9:20; Sunday-Thursday: 1:30, 4:10, 6:50 Epic (PG): Friday-Wednesday: 4:00, 6:40; Thursday: 4:00 Star Trek Into Darkness (PG-13): Friday-Saturday: 1:20, 8:55; SundayThursday: 1:20 Mud (PG-13): Friday-Saturday: 1:10, 3:50, 6:30, 9:10; SundayThursday: 1:10, 3:50, 6:30 360-293-6620 BLUE FOX DRIVE-IN Oak Harbor 360-675-5667 CONCRETE THEATRE June 7-9 Iron Man 3 in 3D (PG-13): Friday: 7:30 p.m.; Saturday: 5 and 7:30 p.m.; Sunday: 4 p.m. 360-941-0403 CASCADE MALL THEATRES Burlington For listings: 888-AMC-4FUN (888262-4386). OAK HARBOR CINEMAS June 7-13 Epic (PG): Friday-Thursday: 3:50, 6:30 Fast & Furious 6 (PG-13): FridaySaturday: 1:20, 3:30, 6:50, 9:05; Sunday-Thursday: 1:20, 3:30, 6:50 The Hangover Part III (R): FridaySaturday: 1:10, 3:40, 6:40, 9:10; Sunday-Thursday: 1:10, 3:40, 6:40 Star Trek Into Darkness (PG-13): Friday-Saturday: 1:00, 9:00; SundayThursday: 1:00 360-279-2226 STANWOOD CINEMAS June 7-13 The Internship (PG-13): 1:00, 4:00, 6:40, 9:10 After Earth (PG-13): 1:30, 4:10, 7:10, 9:20 Now You See Me (PG-13): 1:10, 3:50, 6:50, 9:25 Epic (PG): 3:30 Fast & Furious 6 (PG-13): 1:20, 7:00 The Hangover Part III (R): 9:30 p.m. Star Trek Into Darkness (PG-13): 12:50, 3:40, 6:30, 9:15 360-629-0514

“Fast & Furious 6” — Against all odds, the “Fast & Furious” franchise is actually picking up momentum, with “FF6” clocking in as the fastest, funniest and most outlandish chapter yet. Whether we’re seeing stunt work or special effects or a combo platter, director Justin Lin keeps raising the bar, going for intentional laughs and thrilling moments as cars pull off impossible

maneuvers and humans keep flying in the air and landing with thuds. “Furious 6” couldn’t be any less plausible if it were animated, but that’s sort of the point. Action, PG-13, 130 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “Star Trek Into Darkness” — Director J.J. Abrams is a true talent, and he’s also a pop-culture savant who has great respect for the legacy of this franchise as well as a keen understanding of the mega-importance of box-office figures. There’s no better choice to make the best, the purest AND the most accessible big-budget “Star Trek” movie possible. Yet with all the futuristic splendor and fine performances, “Into Darkness” only occasionally soars, mostly settling for being a solid but unspectacular effort that sets the stage for the next chapter(s). With Chris Pine, Zachary Quinto, Benedict Cumberbatch. Sci-fi adventure, PG-13, 132 minutes. HHH “The Great Gatsby” — Big and bold and brassy, Baz Luhrmann’s “Gatsby” fills every second of its 142-minute running time with images designed to take your breath away, but it is first and foremost F. Scott Fitzgerald’s “Gatsby.” Leonardo DiCaprio stars as Gatsby, in perhaps the most overtly vulnerable version of the character, and Carey Mulligan gives a delicate, intricately crafted performance as Daisy Buchanan. Luhrmann’s dazzling sense of visual style is perfectly suited to the first half of the movie, but when the story becomes more about confrontations, you can almost sense Luhrmann fidgeting as he tries to figure out how to keep the plates spinning. Drama, PG-13, 142 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “The Hangover Part III” — Perhaps responding to criticism of the sequel or perhaps just wanting to challenge himself, director Todd Phillips has delivered a film so different from the first two “Hangovers,” one could even ask if this is supposed to be a comedy. It plays more like a straightforward, real-world thriller with a few laughs than a hard-R slapstick farce. You don’t see too many genre-hopping threequels, so, credit to Phillips and his team of co-writers for trying to do something different with the now familiar characters of Phil (Bradley Cooper), Stu (Ed Helms), Alan (Zach Galifianakis) and the ever-bland Doug (Justin Bartha). But the big fix might have changed things just a little too much. Comedy, R, 100 minutes. HH “The Internship” — You won’t be surprised by a single moment in “The Internship.” Fifteen minutes in, you’ll know exactly where it’s going. Vince Vaughn and Owen Wilson are 40ish salesmen suddenly out of a job who decide to reinvent themselves as trainees at Google. The story’s so sunny even the villain seems like a halfhearted caricature who’s more twit than threat. But the script is funny and cheerfully offbeat, and the cast is uniformly likable. I found myself rooting for the underdogs even as I was aware of the strings being pulled. Comedy, PG-13, 119 minutes. HHH

712 S. First St., Mount Vernon 360-336-8955 n www.lincolntheatre.org

parts of Detroit and tells its story. Firefighters have an up-close view of the best and worst in any city. This is especially true for Detroit. Detroit is a picture of the future of American industrial cities in a postindustrial age: One foot in a prosperous past, with an uncertain next act, struggling to survive in a changing economy. $15 advance, $20 at the door.

‘Lincoln’

Synergy’s 7:30 p.m. Friday, June 7 year-end concert 3 p.m. Saturday, June 8 5:30 p.m. Sunday, June 9 7 p.m. Monday, June 10 “Lincoln” is a revealing drama that focuses on the tumultuous final months in office of the 16th president, played by Academy Award winner Daniel Day-Lewis. In a nation divided by war and the strong winds of change, Lincoln pursues a course of action designed to end the war, unite the country and abolish slavery. With the moral courage and fierce determination to succeed, his choices during this critical moment will change the fate of generations to come. Directed by Stephen Spielberg. Starring DayLewis, Sally Field, David Strathairn, Joseph GordonLevitt, Tommy Lee Jones and Hal Holbrook. Rated PG-13. $10 general; $9 seniors, students and active military; $8 members; $7 ages 12 and under. Bargain matinee prices (all shows before 6 p.m.): $8 general, $6 members, $5 ages 12 and under.

Spend an evening listening to jazz with Mount Vernon High School’s awardwinning Synergy, a premier mixed vocal ensemble. They will be singing jazz favorites accompanied by Seattle’s Ev Stern Trio. $8.

Lincoln Elementary Talent Show

7 p.m. Tuesday, June 11 Lincoln Elementary brings its talented students downtown to present their annual talent show. Free admission.

‘The Bath’

7:30 p.m. Wednesday, June 12

The local premiere of an independent short film by Mark Lundsten. Liz has Alzheimer’s and lives with her burned-out caregiver husband Robert. Their adult daughter Anna tries to help out, but she has her hands full with a teenage daughter of her own. As Liz raises all kinds of havoc with both of them, ‘Burn: One Year on the Front Lines of the she still manages to bestow blessing on each of them, Battle to Save Detroit’ aeven though she doesn’t 7:30 p.m. Saturday, June 8 know who they are. This documentary film Not rated; includes some follows one company in language and brief nudity. one of the hardest-hit Free admission.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E14 - Thursday, June 6, 2013

POP CULTURE Q&A

HOT TICKETS ALKALINE TRIO: June 7, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline. com. THREE DOG NIGHT: June 7, Mount Baker Theatre, Bellingham. 360-734-6080 or mount bakertheatre.com. JOSEPHINE HOWELL: June 8, Sudden Valley Dance Barn, Bellingham. 360-671-1709 or suddenvalleylibrary.org. ANTHONY JESELNIK (comedy): June 8, Neptune Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or livenation.com. ONE MORE TIME: A TRIBUTE TO DAFT PUNK: June 8, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-7453000 or showboxonline.com. KUBE 93 SUMMER JAM: featuring T.I., Trey Songz, 2 Chainz, Wale and J. Cole, Macklemore and Ryan Lewis: June 8, Gorge Amphitheatre, George. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. THEY MIGHT BE GIANTS: June 12, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline. com. GIN BLOSSOMS: June 14-15, Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Bow. 877-275-2448 or the skagit.com. GARRISON KEILLOR: “Prairie Home Companion” live broadcast: June 15, Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster.com. VANS WARPED TOUR: June 15, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn. 800-745-3000 or live nation.com. FALL OUT BOY: June 19, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. DAMIAN “JR. GONG” MARLEY, STEPHEN MARLEY: featuring the Ghetto Youths Crew: June 19, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888-929-7849 or mary moorconcerts.com. BAD COMPANY, LYNYRD SKYNYRD: June 20, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. CSS: June 20, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. THE DANDY WARHOLS: June 21, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxon line.com. CAMERA OBSCURA: June 22, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline. com. CODY SIMPSON: June 23, Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or livenation.com. HINDER: June 25, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. HOLLYWOOD UNDEAD: June 26, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showbox online.com. TWISTA: June 28, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. TIESTO, KASKADE & MANY MORE: Paradiso Festival: June 28-29, Gorge Amphitheatre, George. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. CHINO Y NACHO: June 29, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. BARENAKED LADIES, BEN FOLDS FIVE, GUSTER: June 29, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. TILTED THUNDER RAIL BIRDS: Banked Track Roller Derby: June 29, Comcast Arena at Everett. 866-332-8499 or comcastarenaeverett.com. FACE TO FACE: June 30, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxon line.com.

VICTORIA JUSTICE: July 3, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888-929-7849 or marymoorconcerts.com. ROCKSTAR ENERGY DRINK MAYHEM FESTIVAL: Rob Zombie, Five Finger Death Punch, Mastodon, Amon Amarth, Machine Head, Children of Bodom, Behemoth and more: July 3, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn. 800-745-3000 or live nation.com. SAY ANYTHING: July 5, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. SANCTUARY: July 6, El Corazon, Seattle. elcora zonseattle.com. MICHAEL FRANTI & SPEARHEAD, RODRICO Y GABRIELA: with Nicki Bluhm & The Gramblers: July 5, Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster.com. ROBERT PLANT PRESENTS SENSATIONAL SPACE SHIFTERS: with Railroad Earth and Bruce Hornsby & The Noisemakers: July 6, Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster.com. PAT BENATAR & NEIL GIRALDO, BERLIN WITH TERI NUNN: July 7, Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster.com. NEW KIDS ON THE BLOCK, 98 DEGREES, BOYZ II MEN: July 9, Tacoma Dome, Tacoma. 800-7453000 or livenation.com. RANCID: July 11-12, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. MICKEY AVALON: July 12, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline. com. ECLECTIC APPROACH: July 13, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline. com. CHRIS BOTTI: July 13, Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or www.ticket master.com. JIMMY EAT WORLD: July 15, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. PORTUGAL, THE MAN: July 17, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline. com. DAVID BYRNE & ST. VINCENT: July 18, Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster.com. THE POSTAL SERVICE: July 18, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. WINTHROP RHYTHM & BLUES FESTIVAL: with Johnny Winter, Ivan Neville’s Dumpstaphunk, Too Slim & The Taildraggers and more, July 19-21, Winthrop. 800-422-3048 or winthropbluesfestival.org. PAUL McCARTNEY: July 19, Safeco Field, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster.com. PETER MURPHY (of Bauhaus): July 19, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. BLACK FLAG: July 19, El Corazon, Seattle. elcorazonseattle.com. AMERICAN IDOL LIVE 2013: with Amber Holcomb, Angie Miller, Burnell Taylor, Candice Glover, Curtis Finch Jr., Devin Velez, Janelle Arthur, Kree Harrison, Lazaro Arbos, Paul Jolley and Aubrey Cleland: July 19, ShoWare Center, Kent. 866-973-961 or showarecenter.com. JOHN MAYER: July 20, Gorge Amphitheatre, George. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. AMY GRANT, BRANDON HEATH: July 20, Overlake Christian Church, Redmond. 855-443-8499 or lmgconcerts.com. BRUNO MARS: July 21, KeyArena, Seattle. 800745-3000 or livenation.com.

NATALIE MAINES: July 22, Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster.com. COURTNEY LOVE: July 23, Moore Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or livenation.com. WE THE KINGS: July 23, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline. com. PHISH: July 26-27, Gorge Amphitheatre, George. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. CHATEAU STE. MICHELLE FESTIVAL OF JAZZ: with Rick Braun, Kirk Whalum, Norman Brown, Peter White, David Benoit, David Pack, Marion Meadows, Vincent Ingala and Paul Taylor: July 27, Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. 800745-3000 or ticketmaster.com. ONE DIRECTION: July 28, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. GIPSY KINGS: July 28, Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or ticket master.com. THE CULT: July 30, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. GIGANTOUR 2013: with Megadeth, Black Label Society, Device, HELLYEAH, Newsted, Death Division: July 30, Comcast Arena at Everett. 866-3328499 or comcastarenaeverett.com. PEPPER: Aug. 1, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. MOUNT BAKER RHYTHM & BLUES FESTIVAL: Featuring California Transit Authority, Anthony Gomes, Trampled Under Foot and many more. Aug. 2-4, Deming Log Show Grounds, Deming. baker blues.com. LYLE LOVETT & HIS LARGE BAND: Aug. 2, Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. 800-7453000 or ticketmaster.com. TILTED THUNDER RAIL BIRDS: Banked Track Roller Derby: Aug. 3, Comcast Arena at Everett. 866-332-8499 or comcastarenaeverett.com. PINK MARTINI: with China Forbes: Aug. 4, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888-929-7849 or marymoor concerts.com. KURT VILE: Aug. 6, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. SUBLIME WITH ROME: Aug. 6, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888-929-7849 or marymoorconcerts. com. GLADYS KNIGHT & THE O’JAYS: Aug. 8, Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. 800-7453000 or ticketmaster.com. FITZ & THE TANTRUMS: Aug. 9, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline. com. HARRY CONNICK JR.: Aug. 9-10, Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster.com. FIVE IRON FRENZY: Aug. 10, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline. com. 107.7 THE END’S SUMMER CAMP: Aug. 10, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888-929-7849 or marymoorconcerts.com. YEAH YEAH YEAHS: Aug. 12, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888-929-7849 or marymoorconcerts. com. DARYL HALL & JOHN OATES: AUG. 13, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888-929-7849 or marymoor concerts.com. TRAIN, THE SCRIPT, GAVIN DEGRAW: Aug. 14, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn. 800-745-3000 or LiveNation.com.

Goodbye, ‘Emily Owens, M.D.’ By RICH HELDENFELS Akron Beacon Journal

Q: I was wondering if the series “Emily Owens, M.D.,” with Mamie Gummer starring in it, was canceled, or if it will be returning. A: The first season of the drama starring Gummer (who is one of Meryl Streep’s daughters) aired on The CW for 13 episodes, the last of which aired in February. There will not be a second season. Q: Wondering what happened to the Gene Simmons family show, which I believe was called something like “Family Jewels.” I found it very entertaining. A: The series ran for seven seasons on A&E, the last of which aired in 2012. At that time, A&E decided not to continue the show. While Kiss star Simmons could have shopped the show to another network, at the time he decided to let it end because of the band’s tour and “my other business commitments.” Since then, he and producing partners have made a deal with the Spike channel for “Hit Men,” a scripted miniseries about organized crime and the music business. You can keep up with Simmons on his website, genesimmons.com. His wife, Shannon Tweed, also has a website, shannontweed.com, although a lot of it appears to be about Simmons. They are also both on Twitter (gene simmons and shannonleet weed).


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, June 6, 2013 - E15

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Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E16 - Thursday, June 6, 2013

GET INVOLVED ART CLASSES

group Jezebel Cabaret will hold open auditions for singART LESSONS IN THE ers, dancers, jugglers, comeVINEYARD: Enjoy a glass dians and other variety acts of wine and a painting class from 7 to 9 p.m. Wednesday, from 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday, June 12, at The Conway June 8, at Challenger Ridge Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main Vineyard & Cellars, 43095 St., Conway. Performers can Challenger Road, Concrete. bring music on a CD or MP3 Choose from two different device or musical instrutechniques: watercolor with ments for accompaniment. Don Smith or acrylic with They can offer finished acts Terry MacDonald. $30. Limited spaces: call Candace at or pitch act ideas. Jezebel Cabaret is also looking for 425-422-6988. behind-the-scenes people, CAMANO SUMMER ART including set designers, cosCAMPS: Art Quest for Kids tumers, choreographers, hair and makeup artists, photogSummer Art Camps will be held during July and August raphers, videographers, and at Delzell Studio, 2177 High- graphic and web designers. land Drive, Camano Island. For questions or to confirm Camps meet from 10 a.m. to an audition, email thejeze belrebels@gmail.com. 2:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday and feature a “THE IMPORTANCE OF variety of art projects, beachcombing and swimming. $160 BEING EARNEST”: Auditions will be held from 2 to 4 per child per four-day session. Ages 7-17. 360-387-2251 p.m. Saturday and 5 to 7 p.m. Sunday, June 15-16, at Anaor camanoartcamp.com. cortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. Parts ART CLASSES: Dakota are available for six men Art offers a variety of art and four women. Prepare a classes and workshops at 17873 Highway 536, Mount one-minute monologue in a standard British accent. Vernon. 360-416-6556, ext. Scripts are available at the 5, or www.dakotaartcenter. ACT office. The comedy will com. run Aug. 2-24. 360-420-9517 CLAY CLASSES: Ceramic or acttheatre.com. artist Sue Roberts offers a “TOO SOON FOR DAIvariety of classes and workshops at Tower Arts Studio, SIES”: Auditions for this 5424 S. Shore Drive, Guemes quirky comedy thriller will Island. For information, call be held from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Monday and Tuesday, 360-293-8878 or visit tower June 17-18, at the Whidbey artsstudio.com. Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Drive, Oak Harbor. BASIC CARTOONING: 4 Callbacks, if needed, will to 6 p.m. Tuesdays through take place from 6:30 to 9 June 25, Burlington Parks and Recreation Center, 900 p.m. Wednesday, June 19. Parts are available for four E. Fairhaven Ave., Burlwomen and four men. Britington. Ages 7 to 12. Learn ish or Australian accents basic drawings skills and leave the course with a port- (real or not) are a plus. The play will run Sept. 6-22. 360folio spotlighting favorite cartoon characters. $40. 360- 679-2237 or whidbeyplay house.com. 755-9649.

AUDITIONS

MUSIC

CABARET AUDITIONS: Burlesque and vaudeville

WWU SUMMER CHORAL ARTS SYMPOSIUM: West-

ern Washington University’s College of Fine and Performing Arts, in partnership with the Bellingham Festival of Music, will host a Choral Arts Symposium for music educators, choral directors, voice conductors and students on July 13-21 on the WWU campus in Bellingham. Symposium participants will spend nine days of intense study and performance featuring Verdi’s “Te Deum” with orchestra and “A Summer Night of Love in Old Vienna,” an overview of choral music of Schubert and Brahms with piano. The week will culminate with two performances at the Bellingham Festival of Music on July 19 and 21. Participants can earn three graduate credits or 40 clock hours. Formal admission to Western is not required. Call 360-650-3308, email ExtendedEd@wwu.edu or visit wwu.edu/choralarts.

June 8. Fees will be waived at more than 74 day-use sites on the forest. fs.usda. gov/mbs.

ation will offer “Intro to Geocaching” class from 6 to 8 p.m. Sunday, June 9, at Hillcrest Park, Skylight Room, 1717 S. 13th St. For TRAIL TALES: Friends of all ages; 12 and younger Skagit Beaches lead a series need to be accompanied by of informative walks along a parent. Learn how to get the Tommy Thompson Trail started, equipment needs, in Anacortes. For informadifferent kinds of caches tion, visit skagitbeaches.org. and how to log a find. Head Next up: into the park and use GPS Samish Culture in devices to hunt for hidden Fidalgo Bay – Past, Present caches. Smartphones or GPS & Future: 10 to 11:30 a.m. devices are welcome, but Wednesday, June 12, leaving not necessary. Free. 360-336from the Fidalgo RV Park, 6215. 4701 Fidalgo Bay Road. Learn about traditional ALL COMER TRACK foods, shelter and lifeways MEETS: Athletes of all ages of the Samish community can compete in a variety from Trail Tales docents and of track events at 5 p.m. guest speakers Adam Lorio Wednesdays, through June and Rosie Cayou-James of 26, at the Burlington-Edison the Samish Indian Nation. High School track and KirkThe flat, paved trail is handi- by Field, 301 N. Burlington capped accessible. Blvd., Burlington. Registration opens at 5 p.m., folYOUTH FISHING DERBY: lowed by field events at 5:30 Children ages 15 and young- p.m. and running events at 6 er can try their hand at salt- p.m. Running events for ages water fishing from 10:30 a.m. 13 and older start around to 2 p.m. Saturday, June 8, 6:45 p.m. $5 per meet. $20 SKAGIT VALLEY MUSIC at Cama Beach State Park, season pass includes entry CLUB: The club will not for all four nights plus a meet during June. For infor- 1880 SW Camano Drive, Camano Island. The free T-shirt and faster check-in. mation, call Marsha Pederevent begins with the proFor information, conson at 360-757-4906. gram, “How to fish in salttact Burlington Parks and water,” which teaches fishing Recreation Department RECREATION basics for beginning anglers. at 360-755-9649 or visit FREE PARK ADMISSION: The official derby will run ci.burlington.wa.us. In recognition of National from noon to 2 p.m., with Get Outdoors Day, the prizes for the top finishers in WHIDBEY ISLAND GOLF Washington State Parks and three age brackets. Anglers CLASSIC: The Skagit ValRecreation Commission will must bring their own equip- ley College Foundation is offer free admission to all ment. Rowboat rentals accepting applications for state parks on Saturday and are available. All levels of the 21st annual Whidbey Sunday, June 8-9. During experience are welcome. Island Golf Classic, set for this weekend, the Discover Presented in partnership Friday, June 14, at Whidbey Pass will not be required to with The Center for Wooden Golf and Country Club in enter state parks. The pass is Boats and the Cama Beach Oak Harbor. Registration still required to access lands Foundation. Saturday is a will begin at 11 a.m., folmanaged by the Washington Washington State Parks free lowed by a shotgun start at Department of Fish and day, as well as a Department 1 p.m. $125, includes raffles, Wildlife and the Departof Fish and Wildlife free day, lunch, numerous games and ment of Natural Resources. so the Discover Pass is not refreshments throughout the parks.wa.gov. required for vehicle access course and a buffet dinner in The U.S. Forest Service to the event and no fishing the clubhouse. For informaalso will recognize National license is required. 360-387- tion or to register, contact Get Outdoors Day by waiv- 1550. Julie Krantz at 360-679-3016, ing fees for visitors to the email julie.krantz@skagit. Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie GEOCACHING: Mount edu or visit skagit.edu/foun National Forest on Saturday, Vernon Parks and Recredation.

WORKSHOPS DIGITAL PHOTO CLASSES: Back to Basics Photography, With a Twist: Alternative Focus will offer a series of classes on digital photography at the Anacortes Chamber of Commerce board room, upstairs at 819 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. Each class will include discussion of a basic photo topic in the morning, followed by a photo assignment and afternoon critique session. Each class can be taken independently of the others. Bring your owner’s manual. $50 per session, $125 for all three. To register, call Karla Locke at 360-588-6968 or email at kklocke1@mac.com. Aperture: F-Stop: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, June 8. Learn how the F-stop controls the amount of light your camera “sees,” and how different apertures affect the final image, including the depth of field. Shutter Speed: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, June 22. Learn what longer exposure times create, the importance of making very short exposures and how to determine which shutter speed to use to make a great image. Composition: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, June 29. Learn the basic rules of composition, when and how to break them, and the difference between rules and creativity. FREE ADULT ACTING CLASS: Anacortes Community Theatre will present a series of acting classes for adults from 10 a.m. to noon the third Saturday each month, at 918 M Ave., Anacortes. Classes will include scripted scenes and a variety of acting games, with a different topic each month: June 15: performance. Each class will be independent; you don’t have to commit to every session. 360-293-4373 or acttheatre.com.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E18 - Thursday, June 6, 2013

OUT & ABOUT ART “FROM HERE TO THERE”: The group invitational show featuring work by three dozen artists continues through June 30 at Smith & Vallee Gallery, 5742 Gilkey Ave., Edison. Focused on the subject of movement, transition and traveling, and just in time for summer road trips and adventures, this exhibition captures the journey instead of the destination. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday. 360-766-6230 or smithand vallee.com.

information, including gallery hours and directions, call 360-222-0102 or visit ravenrocksgallery.com.

“ON THE EDGE”: Allied Arts of Whatcom County kicks off the 2013 Juried Artist Series with a show of work by Andy Siebert, Ann Marie Cooper, Chris Shreve, Doug Forrest and Taj Williams, opening with a reception during the Downtown Art Walk from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, June 7, and continuing through June 29 at Allied Arts Gallery, 1418 Cornwall Ave., Bellingham. The exhibit will feature work in a SVC VISUAL ARTS: variety of media that push The annual Associates in the envelope, with bold, Visual Arts exhibit continAnacortes Firefighters IAFF Local 1537 will present “Burn: One Year on the Front loud colors and patterns ues through June 21 at the Lines of the Battle to Save Detroit” at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, June 8, at the Lincoln all working together in a Skagit Valley College Art Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. The documentary film follows one harmonious display. GalGallery, located in the Gary company of the Detroit Fire Department for a year and tells its story as it battles lery hours are 10 a.m. to Knutzen Cardinal Center to save a city many have written off for dead. $15 advance, $20 at the door. A 5 p.m. Monday through on the SVC campus, 2405 E. portion of the proceeds will go to the Leary Firefighters Foundation to purchase Friday and noon to 5 p.m. College Way, Mount Vernon. much-needed gear for Detroit firefighters. 360-336-8955 or lincolntheatre.org. Saturday. 360-676-8548 or The show features work by alliedarts.org. Elizabeth Bird, Berenice Puente, Christy Stewart and PAINTINGS AND BASlection of work by more innovative hand-printing “IN OUR MIDST”: See R. Ben Turpin, and repreKETS: A show featuring than two dozen artists will techniques, the show will Northwest Modernism at sents the culmination of feature work by Linnane its best in a show opening visual arts training in paint- open with a reception dur- paintings and prints by ing the Anacortes Chamber Anne Martin McCool and Armstrong, Anne Belov, with a reception from 5 to ing, drawing, installation handwoven baskets by Peter Durand, Kathleen 7 p.m. Saturday, June 8, and and design in the exhibition of Commerce Summer Jane Hyde will open with a Frugé-Brown, Melissa continuing through July course offered at SVC. Gal- Artwalk from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, June 7, and continue reception during the First Koch, Sandra Whiting 14 at Gallery Cygnus, 109 lery hours are 9 a.m. to 4 Friday Art Walk from 6 to through June 29 at Scott and Kris Wiltse. Gallery Commercial Ave., La Conp.m. Monday through Fri9 p.m. Friday, June 7, and Milo Gallery, 420 Comhours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. ner. The show will feature day. 360-416-7812. continue through June 30 at daily. 360-222-3070 or rob- sculptures and vessels by mercial Ave., Anacortes. Clayton James, landscape “FEATHERED FRIENDS”: The show will feature etch- Anne Martin McCool Gal- schoutengallery.com. ings, monotypes and giclee lery, 711 Commercial Ave., photography by Mary Check out the show of Anacortes. Also on display “WHIDBEY WOODS”: Randlett and drawings by bird-themed art from 6 to 9 prints by Christa Malay, will be work in a variety Anne Belov, Elizabeth A show of new woodwork the late Barbara James. p.m. Friday and 10 a.m. to Ockwell, Tony Turpin, Beki of media by other gallery by Bob Higbee and Roger Randlett and the Jameses 3 p.m. Saturday, June 7-8, artists. Gallery hours are Killoran, Joanne Kollman, White will open with a were members of the soat The Depot, 611 R Ave., 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday Mamie Joy Rayburn and reception from 5 to 8 p.m. called Northwest School Anacortes. Participating artists include Craig Weak- many other regional artists through Saturday. 360-293- Friday, June 7, and continue of artists, which included 3577 or annemartinmccool. through July 3 at Raven Morris Graves and Guy ley, Mark Maulden, Marius represented by Guemes com. Island-based Island InterRocks Gallery, 765 Wonn Anderson. Gallery hours Hibbard, Gwen Berthiez, Road, Greenbank. Higare noon to 5 p.m. Friday Trish Vishnevetsky, Shelley national, which brokers INVITATIONAL HANDbee creates unique turned through Sunday. 360-708Johnson, Vince Streano and their work through galleries MADE PRINT SHOW: wooden vases using found 4787. gallerycygnus.com. Dick Smith, as well as local across the U.S. The gallery The show will open with wood from along the West author Kathleen Kaska. The will also show jewelry by a reception for the artCoast. White carves driftKEVIN PAUL: MASTER show will continue through Cate Grinzell, as well as ists from 5 to 8 p.m. wood feathers, allowing CARVER: An exhibit June at Starbucks, 18th and new glasswork, sculptures Friday, June 7, and conand custom tables. Galthe wood’s natural shape of works by Swinomish Commercial. anacortes lery hours are 10:30 a.m. to tinue through July 1 at to guide the finished form, master carver Kevin Paul artscommission.com. Rob Schouten Gallery, 765 and preserving the original will open Saturday, June 4:30 p.m. Monday through Wonn Road, Greenbank. weathered finish on the ISLAND INTERNATIONAL Saturday. 360-293-6938 or 8, and continue through Celebrating traditional and backside of each piece. For July 7 at the Skagit County scottmilo.com. RETROSPECTIVE: A col-

FILM SCREENING

Historical Museum, 501 S. Fourth St., La Conner. The museum is open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday. $5 adults, $4 seniors and ages 6 to 12, $10 families, free for members and ages 5 and younger. 360-466-3365 or skagitcounty.net/museum. FATHER’S DAY ART WALK: The Arts Council of Sedro-Woolley will honor dads and art in the Father’s Day Community Art Walk, June 12-26, in downtown Sedro-Woolley. The council seeks submissions of community art to exhibit. The entry fee is $20. Each participant can enter up to four pieces of art. Photos of art with approximate valuations are due by June 12 at Simply Silver & More, 805B Metcalf St. Entry forms are available at that location and at the SedroWoolley Public Library. Call 360-588-4384 for information. FRIDAY HARBOR ART MARKET: Check out artist booths, demonstrations, food and music from 3 to 7 p.m. Fridays, June 21-Aug. 30, at the Brickworks Plaza in Friday Harbor. Free admission. 360-472-0216 or email pigmansartworks@ rockisland.com. PHOTOS ON DISPLAY: The work of photographer John D’Onofrio will be on display through June 29 at the Hotel Bellwether, One Bellwether Way, Bellingham. D’Onofrio’s photography has appeared in numerous magazines and calendars, been utilized by the NBC and ABC television networks, featured in materials for North Cascades National Park and is on permanent display at the U.S. Forest Service headquarters in Everett. 360-676-8548 or alliedarts. org.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, June 6, 2013 - E19

OUT & ABOUT ARTIST SERIES: The Challenger Ridge Summer Artist Series will feature watercolorist Don Smith from 1 to 5 p.m. Saturday, June 22, at Challenger Ridge Vineyard & Cellars, 43095 Challenger Road, Concrete. Smith will work on a piece of art and offer a selection of finished paintings available for purchase. Free admission. 425-4226988 or challengerridge. com. “THE RAVENS OF MAE: Whimsical Ravens Share the Wisdom of Mae West”: The show of new artwork by Windwalker Taibi concludes today, June 6, at Raven Rocks Gallery, 765 Wonn Road, Greenbank. For information, including gallery hours and directions, call 360-222-0102 or visit www.ravenrocksgallery.com. MONA ART AUCTION: The Museum of Northwest Art will hold its 21st annual fundraising auction at 5 p.m. Saturday, June 15, at MoNA, 121 S. First St., La Conner. More than 300 works by emerging-through-master painters, printmakers, sculptors, glass artists, ceramic artists, jewelers, textile artists and photographers will be offered for sale in silent and live auctions. A private preview party for artists, ticketholders and volunteers will take place from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, June 14. Tickets: $100, or reserve tables while available, at museumofnwart.org or call 360-4664446, ext. 109. Free public previews will take place from noon to 5 p.m. Friday and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, June 14-15. Absentee bidding is available with ticket purchase. “THE HARMONY OF SILENCE”: The art exhibit continues through June 16 at Anchor Art Space, 216 Commercial Ave., Ana-

cortes. Alma Chaney, Aaron Haba, Trish Maharam and Timea Tihanyi mine the expressive potential of quiet restraint with works in a variety of media including textile, porcelain, oil and wax. Gallery hours are noon to 5 p.m. Friday through Sunday. anchorartspace.org.

CAR SHOWS TWIN CITY CAR SHOW: The 11th annual Twin City Idlers Car Show will take place from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, June 30, in downtown Stanwood. Check out hundreds of classic, antique and custom cars, trucks and motorcycles on display. Vehicle registration: $15 until June 15, $20 day of show. Free admission for spectators. twincityidlers. org. A preshow controlled cruise will take place from 7 to 9 p.m. Saturday, June 29, beginning at the Thrifty Foods parking lot, 272nd St. NW and 90th Ave. NW. Trophies will be awarded for the best lights/neon.

LECTURES AND TALKS WARM BEACH OPEN HOUSE: Learn about the health, history, culture and marine life of Port Susan at an open house from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Thursday, June 13, at the Warm Beach Senior Community, 20420 Marine Drive, Stanwood. Local biologist and marine specialist Franchesca Perez will talk about the marine resources of Port Susan. Penny Buse, educator and author of “Stuck in the Mud,” will share the history of pioneers who settled the area. Walkins welcome or register at portsusantwo.eventbrite. com. There will be refreshments and information on the health of Port Susan and what residents can do to help protect it.

MUSIC

rides, games, music and hot dogs from noon to 2 p.m. “ANACORTES ROCKS!”: Sunday, June 9, at the Alger Enjoy a concert featuring Community Church, 1475 Heart by Heart, Karl Blau Silver Run Lane, Alger. and Sleepy Lagoon at 2 p.m. Free. 360-724-5211. Saturday, June 15, at the Transit Shed Event CenSUMMER FILM SERIES: ter, One Commercial Ave., Enjoy free screenings of Anacortes. Advance tickets classic films at 7 p.m. Friavailable at brownpaperdays at the Anacortes Public tickets.com/event/371348: Library, 1220 10th St., Ana$25 adults, $15 students. At cortes. 360-293-1910, ext. 21, the door: $30 adults, $20 stu- or library.cityofanacortes. dents. Proceeds will benefit org. the Anacortes Stadium Next up: Project. anacortesstadium June 14: ”Dr. Zhivago”: project.org. Based on the Nobel Prize-

MORE FUN MINI-TECHNOLOGY EXHIBIT: “The History of What’s Inside Your Smart Phone”: Check out the history of communications technology at the Anacortes Museum, 1305 Eighth St., Anacortes. Centered around a modern smart phone, the exhibit includes an array of antique phones, record players, typewriters, cameras and other machines that demonstrate the march of history toward the iPhone. Try out an old dial telephone, listen to a 45-rpm record or type a letter on a manual typewriter. Museum hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday and 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday. Free admission. 360-293-1915 or museum. cityofanacortes.org. LOOK TO THE STARS: Explore the night sky and check out distant galaxies, planets and nebulas beginning at dark Saturday, June 8, at Fort Nugent Park, 2075 SW Fort Nugent Road, Oak Harbor. No telescope is needed and all ages are welcome. Dress warmly. Canceled if cloudy. For information, contact Dan Pullen at 360-679-7664, email icaspub@juno.com or visit icas-wa.webs.com. FAMILY FUN FAIR: Bring the family and enjoy train

winning novel by Boris Pasternak, this Russian epic follows poet/physician Yuri Zhivago (Omar Sharif) during the upheaval of the Bolshevik Revolution. Yuri is caught between two loves; married to the devoted Tonya (Geraldine Chaplin), he falls in love with the enigmatic Lara (Julie Christie). All suffer terrible hardships during the chaos of the revolution. Winner of five Oscars. June 21: “The Searchers”: This classic Western stars John Wayne as Civil War veteran Ethan Edwards, who returns to Texas during the Texas-Indian wars. Ethan embarks on a quest to find his abducted niece (Natalie Wood), now assimilated into the tribe that kidnapped her. As the quest progresses, Ethan’s hatred for the Indians muddles his motives. Directed by John Ford. CAMP CASEY OPEN HOUSE: Seattle Pacific University’s Camp Casey Conference Center on Whidbey Island will host an open house from noon to 4 p.m. Friday, June 14. Visitors will get a rare chance to tour the Colonel’s House, reserved exclusively for the SPU president and vice presidents. Tours will be available in various barracks and the newly renovated mess

hall, where free snacks will be served. Guests also can visit the Sea Lab, a marine biology teaching facility, play games in the center’s gymnasium and enjoy free admission to the outdoor pool. For information, call 866-661-6604 or 360-6785050 or visit spu.edu/casey.

door prizes, refreshments, a silent auction and brief business meeting. Visitors welcome, with or without rocks. For information, contact Lori at 360-961-7873, email lorinhardy@yahoo.com or visit mtbakerrockclub.org.

SUMMER SOLSTICE CELEBRATION: Welcome SWING DANCE: Dance the arrival of summer at to the sounds of the Saltthe third annual Summer water Octet from 7 to 9:30 Solstice Celebration from 6 p.m. Saturday, June 15, at to 8:30 p.m. Thursday, June the Skyline Beach Club, 20, on the Skagit Riverwalk 6041 Sands Way, Anacortes. next to the Tulip Tower in Enjoy music, dancing, downtown Mount Vernon. snacks and a no-host bar. Enjoy food, live music and Tickets: $20 in advance at an auction featuring patio the library, 1220 10th St., umbrellas and Adirondack Anacortes; $25 at the door. chairs painted by local artPresented by the Anacortes ists. Auction preview begins Public Library Jazz Comat 5:30 p.m. Ages 21 and mittee, the Manieri Endow- older. $30. Proceeds will ment and the Library Foun- benefit the Mount Vernon dation. Proceeds will benefit Arts Commission. Tickets the library and scholarships are available at the Mount for local jazz students. 360Vernon Parks and Recre293-1910. ation office, 1717 S. 13th St.; Gretchens, 509 S. First St.; ROCKS & GEMS SWAP/ or from Mount Vernon Arts SALE: The Mt. Baker Rock Commission members. For & Gem Club’s annual Rock- information, contact Mount hounds Recycling RendezVernon Parks and Recrevous will be held from 10 ation at 360-336-6215. a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, June 15, at Birch Bay Square in FAIRHAVEN OUTDOOR Blaine. Take exit 270 off of CINEMA: The 14th annual I-5. Buy, sell and swap rocks, Fairhaven Outdoor Cinema minerals, gems and related will present live entertainitems from participants’ ment and big-screen movtables, tailgates or tents. ies on Saturday evenings, Spaces are available startthrough Aug. 24, at the Viling at 9 a.m. on a first-come/ lage Green in Bellingham’s first-choice basis from $15. Fairhaven District. AdmisFree admission for buyers. sion is $5, free for ages 5 Proceeds will benefit the and younger. Pizza and popclub’s Western Washington corn available for purchase. University scholarship pro- Bring your own blanket gram. For information, con- or low-backed lawn chair tact Candi at 360-384-3187. for seating. Rain or shine. FairhavenOutdoorCinema. ROCKS & GEMS: The Mt. com. Baker Rock & Gem Club Next up: will feature a “show & tell” June 22: Music by Jasof Jadeite and Nephrite at mine Greene at 8:30 p.m., its next meeting at 7 p.m. followed by “Ferris BuelMonday, June 17, at the ler’s Day Off” at dusk. Bloedel Donovan CommuJune 29: Circus acts by nity Center Building, 2214 One Fine Fool at 8:30 p.m., Electric Ave., Bellingham. followed by “Rise of the The evening will include Guardians” at dusk.


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360 June 6 2013 full  

Arts, entertainment and recreation for Skagit Valley

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