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Berry Dairy Days kicks off in Burlington Page 3 Skagit Valley Herald Thursday June 19, 2014

Tuning Up

Movie Review

Music Reviews

The Moonshine, Mudflat Walkers play the Conway Muse on Friday

‘Jersey Boys’ entertains, but doesn’t transcend

Willie Nelson, Mary J. Blige, Lana Del Rey

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Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E2 - Thursday, June 19, 2014

NEW ON DVD THIS WEEK “The Lego Movie”: An average Lego construction worker has the power to save the world. Directors/writers Phil Lord and Christopher Miller have taken the colorful children’s toy and put it together with a solid script — one that has the high-speed and quirky humor of “Airplane.” The colorful animation and nonstop action will keep the attention of youngsters, while there’s a smart level of humor aimed at adults. The pacing is just a click below frantic and a click above manic. A mix of stopaction and computer-generated images, the film is an explosion of visual splendor. Each frame is a character, vehicle or building put together with such detail that every moment should be studied to fully appreciate the craftsmanship. If you have doubts, try building an ocean out of Legos and see how complicated it can be. After so many attempts to launch a great movie based on a toy franchise, “The Lego Movie” found an entertaining way to create a funny and fun movie while remaining true to the original product. “The Grand Budapest Hotel”: A popular hotel employee goes on the run. Ralph Fiennes stars. Wes Anderson’s films are always filled with a sense of whimsy, but none has been as whimsical as “The Grand Budapest Hotel.” The director’s latest offering is as if Hans Christian Andersen had written a script for Quentin Tarantino because it blends the charm of a fairy tale with the craziness of a fast-talking action film. The director has a frantic and specific rhythm to the way he presents dialogue, which is probably why he continues to go back to the same performers he’s used before — Bill Murray, Edward Norton, Jeff Goldblum, etc. They understand the cadence needed to match the visual imagery that Anderson splashes across the screen. The film is loaded with tremendous supporting performances, topped by Willem Dafoe as a nonsensical no-nonsense killer. Because Dafoe plays the role with such commitment, the character never lapses into silly levels and maintains the feel of a villain from a melodrama. “Walk of Shame”: Reporter’s dream job is threatened by a one-night stand. “Ernest & Celestine”: Animated tale of mice who live underground in constant fear of the bears that dwell in the city above. “The Monkey’s Paw”: Three wishes

YOUR ARTS, ENTERTAINMENT AND RECREATION GUIDE TO WHAT’S GOING ON IN SKAGIT COUNTY AND THE SURROUNDING AREAS

Upcoming movie releases Following is a partial schedule of coming movies on DVD. Release dates are subject to change: JUNE 24 n Blood Ties n Enemy n Jungle n Repentance n Rob the Mob n Some Velvet Morning n 300: Rise of an Empire n Winter’s Tale n Wolf Creek 2

JULY 1 n Afflicted

This Weekend / Page 5

n McClatchy-Tribune News Service

cause nothing but trouble. “DCI Banks: Season One”: Series based on the books by Peter Robinson. “Four of Hearts”: Couple tries to rekindle their passion. “Transformers Beast Wars: Chain of Command”: Optimus Primal and Maximals must stop Predacons. “Meth Head”: Depicts the consequences of meth in America. “Death in Paradise: Season One”: British detective (Ben Miller) goes to a Caribbean Island to investigate a murder. “The Escape Artist”: David Tennant (“Doctor Who”) stars in the legal cliffhanger. “Alexander’s Lost World”: Traces the footsteps of Alexander the Great. “The Rise of the Nazi Party”: Documentary looks at the rise and fall of the Nazis. “Doc Holiday’s Revenge”: Wounded warrior must be saved from Doc Holiday, his would-be killer. “Scott & Bailey: Season One”: Two detectives work for the Major Incident Team in Manchester. “The Machine”: Computer programmers fall in love as they create the firstever piece of self-aware artificial intelligence. “The Good Witch’s Gift”: Romance between Cassie Nightingale (Catherine Bell) and Police Chief Jake Russell (Chris Potter) blossoms. “Joe”: Ex-con with a hair-trigger temper is trying to stay out of trouble. “The Attorney”: Shady lawyer takes on an important case involving government brutality. “Regular Show: The Complete Third Season”: Includes all 40 episodes starring Mordecai, Rigby and their collection of pals. n Rick Bentley, The Fresno Bee

“Orca Sing” Saturday on San Juan Island

Inside

SUBMISSIONS Email features@skagitpublishing.com, vrichardson@skagitpublishing. com (recreation items) Deadline: 5 p.m. Friday for the following Thursday edition Phone 360-416-2135 Hand-deliver 1215 Anderson Road Mount Vernon, WA 98274 Mailing address P.O. Box 578 Mount Vernon, WA 98273

Get Involved........................................ 6 Hot Tickets.......................................... 7 On Stage.............................................. 8 Tuning Up........................................... 9 Movie Review.................................... 10 Movie Listings, Mini-Reviews.......... 11 At the Lincoln.................................... 13 Out & About.................................14-15

Online events calendar To list your event on our website, visit goskagit.com and look for the Events Calendar on the home page HAVE A STORY IDEA? w For arts and entertainment, contact Features Editor Craig Parrish at 360-416-2135 or features@skagitpublishing.com w For recreation, contact staff writer Vince Richardson at 360-416-2181 or vrichardson@ skagitpublishing.com TO ADVERTISE 360-424-3251


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, June 19, 2014 - E3

COMMUNITY

Berry Dariy Days in Burlington

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surprise awaits spectators and entrants in this week’s Berry Dairy Days Parade, organized by the Burlington Chamber of Commerce. A fly-over of historical warbirds by the Heritage Flight Museum will mark the start of the parade at 11 a.m. Saturday, June 21, above Fairhaven Avenue, weather permitting. The museum will host its monthly fly-day from noon to 4 p.m. at the Skagit Regional Airport, following the parade. The Berry Dairy Days began in 1937, started by the local volunteer firemen as a fundraiser for new equipment. The celebration included a parade, carnival and the World’s Largest Shortcake, which served more than 5,000 people. By 1965 the Burlington Chamber became involved with the festival. Lisa Dynes, events director for the chamber, said this year’s Festival in the Park, sponsored by PeaceHealth United General Medical Center, will take place at Railroad Park, 520 E. Fairhaven Ave., and will include live music, food, free kids’ activities and exhibitors. The Festival will kick off just after the Fred Meyer Grand Parade, Dynes said. Activities include four days of strawberry shortcake, fireworks at Skagit River Park, carnival, Truck Demo Derby, the Kiwanis Salmon BBQ, Skagit Runners Road Run and the Berry Cool Car Show. Here’s the lineup of the 77th annual Berry Dairy Days activities, from June 19-22:

Today

n Strawberry Shortcake at the Visitors Center, 520 E. Fairhaven, 11 a.m.-6 p.m.

Friday

n Shortcake on Fairhaven, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. (and at Skagit River Park, 5-9 p.m.) n Kiwanis Salmon BBQ, live music and Fireworks Show at Skagit River Park, 5 p.m. to dusk

Saturday

n Skagit Runners Road Run, 1/2 marathon at 8:30 a.m., 10K and 2-mile at 9 a.m. Registration ($15-$35, berrydairyruns.com) opens at 6:30 a.m. n Shortcake on Fairhaven, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. n Fly-over by Heritage Flight Muse-

Skagit Valley Herald file photos

ABOVE: The United General Hospital Bedpan Brigade performs a routine during the 2012 Berry Dairy Days parade on Fairhaven Avenue in Burlington. BELOW: Audrey McIlraith, 2, of Sedro Woolley, was treated to a strawberry shortcake in Maiben Park during a previous Berry Dairy Days festival. um, 11 a.m. n Fred Meyer Grand Parade on Fairhaven, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m.: Judging will take place during the parade. Route: east on Fairhaven Avenue, then right on Skagit Street and right on Greenleaf. Awards for first, second and third place will be announced about 1:30 p.m. at the Railroad Park entertainment stage. n PeaceHealth United General Festival in the Park, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.: Kids and adult entertainment, food options, vendors. n Kids Zone: Colored hair extensions, bean bag toss, ring toss, fruit loop necklaces, wooden kit building — all free. n Entertainment lineup: Marcia Kester at noon, Natalie Gelman at 1 p.m., Olson Brothers Band at 2 p.m., Shakespeare Northwest at 3 p.m., Four Day Creep at 4 p.m.

n Kiwanis Salmon BBQ at Maiben Park, 11:30 a.m.-6 p.m. n Truck Demolition Derby at Skagit Speedway, 7 p.m. (gates open at 5:30 p.m.)

Sunday

n Berry Cool Car Show on Fairhaven, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. n Shortcake on Fairhaven, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. (For three more days of strawberries, look for Shortcake at Skagit Speedway, June 26-28.) n Some volunteers are still needed for various aspects of the four-day festival. Details and event times are posted online at Burlington-Chamber.com or stop by the Chamber office, 520 E. Fairhaven Ave., or call 360-757-0994.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E4 - Thursday, June 19, 2014

MOVIES

Q&A with ‘Crash’ and ‘Third Person’ director Paul Haggis

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EW YORK — Paul Haggis has the distinction of having written the screenplays for consecutive Best Picture Oscar winners: 2004’s “Million Dollar Baby” and 2005’s “Crash” (which he also directed). The 61-year-old Canadian native also has had an extensive TV career, and won multiple Emmys for writing and producing the hit series “thirtysomething.” In addition, he’s been in the news lately for his very public break with the Church of Scientology, which he belonged to for more than 30 years. Haggis’ latest film, “Third Person,” opening Friday, features Liam Neeson, Mila Kunis, Adrien Brody, Olivia Wilde, James Franco and Maria Bello in a series of overlapping stories about family, marriage and children. Lewis Beale interviewed the prolific writer-director by phone.

By LEWIS BEALE Newsday

don’t notice us. Q. You worked in TV for years, on shows like “thirtysomething,” “Walker, Texas Ranger” and “The Facts of Life.” What did TV teach you about writing? A. How to write quickly. It tells you how to find your story before you write your script.

Q. You had a very public break with Scientology, after they came out in favor of the anti-gay marriage Proposition 8. You also objected to their smearing of ex-members. All this is told in “Going Clear,” the Scientology expose that came out in 2013, and in which you are featured prominently. What’s been the fallout from all that? A. I live in New York now; if I lived in L.A., I would feel it more often. Photo by Jordan Strauss / Invision via AP They can’t go through my trash here; Q. Given this and “Crash,” it seems Paul Haggis at the Los Angeles I’m pretty much left alone. All they you have a thing for intertwining story premiere of “Third Person.” do is attack me online. Wikipedia shut lines with multiple characters. them down, because they were using bia that kept “Brokeback Mountain” false names to make comments on A. This is actually antithetical to from winning. How do you respond “Crash,” because unlike in “Crash,” people who had posted about Sciento that? these folks never meet. I thought it tology. They say things like “he makes A. Some of those critics said things crappy movies,” or “I saw him out would be intriguing so that it would like I did not know if it was a good be impossible for them to meet. The with a goat last week,” and there are a underlying theme is parents trying to movie or not, I just wanted it to be a few websites that attack you, but that social experiment, and the first third protect their children. It also got me is pretty obvious. asking questions about how you love of the movie I just present stereotypes. Then, I twist you around and set somebody, and I thought about what Q. You’ve been involved with an was happening with my own relation- you spinning in another direction, and organization called Artists for Peace people said you’re writing stereotypes. and Justice, which works primarily ship and those of my friends. I think it’s ridiculous to pit one film with poor communities in Haiti. Tell against the next. I couldn’t vote for Q. Without giving away any spoilme a little about that. my own film, so it’s not my fault. ers, it’s safe to say there’s a lot going A. We’ve been down there for eight on in this film, and it’s not always years now, and we saw all this relief Q. You’re one of the many Canadi- that goes there, and a lot helps and clear what it is. A. I loved the films in the ’70s, from ans who’ve come south to work in the a lot is wasted, and a lot goes into movie and TV industries. What do you the wrong pockets. We decided we directors like Buñuel, Antonioni, folks bring to the party, so to speak? where you didn’t quite understand weren’t going to solve Haiti’s probA. We look like you, we sound like lems, the Haitians were. We found everything, but you had an emotional you, but we don’t have your history. reaction. Films today give us all the some good Haitian partners, and answers, and that’s OK, but I wanted So when we stand around and some- decided to build long-term institutions one that challenged you, but you have thing is happening that you take for and fund them. We founded the first granted, you say “it’s nothing,” and we free high school in the history of the to figure it out. say “what was that, I think it’s somenation. We’re there for the long haul. thing?” I think we have an advantage It’s trying to give them a shot, like Q. There are still people out there who insist that “Crash” didn’t deserve in some ways that we’re still outsiders, in “Million Dollar Baby,” it’s giving but we’re accepted, and people just the Oscar, and that it was homophothem a shot.

REVIEW

All-star ‘Third Person’ has many of the virtues and failings of ‘Crash’ By ROGER MOORE McClatchy-Tribune News Service

The Paul Haggis drama “Third Person,” like his Oscar-winning “Crash,” is a series of interlocking stories. Each is fascinating, or at least interesting its own right. Each is cast with more than capable actors. Like “Crash,” the conceit that ties those tales together is a bit obvious. And like “Crash,” it rambles on and on, unable or unwilling to develop an exit strategy. His all-starcast has to get its money’s worth, even at the expense of the audience’s patience. Liam Neeson is Michael, a married writer visiting Paris as a cure for writer’s block, trying to carry on an affair would a would-be novelist, Anna (Olivia Wilde). When he gets the call from the front desk announcing she’s shown up, he puts us on our guard. “Does she appear to be … armed?” Wilde is cast on-thenose as a scary-sexy, insulting and mercurial careerist possibly using this “old man” to further her aims. Anna toys with Michael, turns him on and turns on him and never lets on which Anna he’s going to be dealing with in a given scene. Meanwhile, he is fielding calls from a sad, knowing wife (Oscar winner Kim Basinger) back home. In Rome, Oscar winner Adrien Brody is shady Sean, a fashion espionage

‘THIRD PERSON’

HH1⁄2 Cast: Liam Neeson, Olivia Wilde, Mila Kunis, James Franco, Adrien Brody, Kim Basinger, Moran Atias Running time: 2:17 MPAA Rating: R for language and some sexuality/nudity

agent (he steals designs) and an ugly American — the sort of arrogant jerk who doesn’t fall for Italy’s charms. He expects everybody to speak English and serve cold Budweiser. “‘Bar Americain,’ and you don’t speak English,” he sniffs to a bartender too obsessed with soccer to be bothered with him. “You understand the term, ‘irony?’” By chance, he runs into a beautiful Gypsy (Moran Atias) and becomes tangled up in her melodrama. He’s a hustler who wonders, at every turn, if he’s being hustled by an expert. Mila Kunis is Julia, a broke New Yorker who can only find work as a hotel maid, whose life has been wrecked by an accusation of child neglect/ abuse. Maria Bello is her irritated lawyer, the one whose appointments Julia keeps missing. James Franco, an artist who paints without a brush and who lives with a stunning Frenchwoman (Loan Chabanal), is mixed up in it. See THIRD, Page 11


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Thursday, June 19, 2014 - E5

THIS WEEKEND in the area MOUNT VERNON’S BIRTHDAYCelebrate the city of Mount Ver-

non’s 124th birthday at 1 p.m. Saturday, June 21, at Hillcrest Park Lodge, 1717 S. 13th St., Mount Vernon. Join Mayor Jill Boudreau for birthday cake as the city celebrates another milestone. Free. 360-336-6211.

KIDS’ FILM FESTThe Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount

Vernon, will host a kid’s film festival from 1 to 7 p.m. Saturday, June 21. Two one-hour collections of the best short films from the Seattle Children’s Film Festival will be shown. “See the World: Animated Shorts from around the World” is suitable for all ages and will show at 1 p.m. The second collection, “Cinema Magic: Live action shorts from around the world,” will show at 3 p.m. and is recommended for ages 7 and older. In between films, interactive workshops will be offered in the lobby. Tickets: $8, $5 ages 12 and younger. 360336-8955 or lincolntheatre.org.

STRAWBERRY HARVEST FESTCheck out the annual event from

11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, June 21-22, at Biringer Farm, 21412 59th Ave. NE, Arlington. Enjoy pony rides, giant strawberry ride, kites, animals, face paint, giant strawberry and castle maze inflatables, pennies in the hay, kiddy slides and more. Ride the Jolly Trolley and pluck strawberries right from the vines. Picnic on the old covered wagon next to the old historic barn. Free admission; some activities require additional fees. 425-259-0255 or biringerfarm.com.

‘ORCA SING’

Enjoy an evening of music and more at the 15th annual “Orca Sing,” a celebration of southern resident orca whales, beginning around 6 p.m. Saturday, June 21, at Lime Kiln Point State Park on San Juan Island. The free event will feature performances by Seattle’s City Cantabile Choir and other musical guests. Participants are encouraged to bring a picnic to enjoy the beauty of Lime Kiln Park. Tours of the historic lighthouse will be offered before and after the concert. A Discovery Pass is required for parking. Round-trip shuttle transportation is available for $10, with a 5:30 p.m. pick-up in front of The Whale Museum, 62 First St., Friday Harbor. 360-378-4710, ext. 30, or whalemuseum.org.

ART AUCTION The Museum of Northwest Art will host its

22nd annual Art Auction at 5 p.m. Saturday, June 21, at 121 S. First St., La Conner. Enjoy lively bidding on more than 300 artworks by emerging to master artists, including paintings, prints, glass, photographs, sculpture, ceramics, jewelry, textiles and more. A private preview party for ticket holders, auction artists, volunteers, sponsors and guests will take place from 5 to 8 p.m. Friday, June 20. Auction admission: $100. n Golden Tickets: Auction attendees can enter the Golden Ticket raffle for a chance to win their choice of any live auction item. Only 100 tickets will be sold. $100. n Free Public Preview: Members of the public are invited to take a look at the auction artworks before they’re sold, from noon to 5 p.m. Friday and 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, June 20-21. 360-466-4446 or monamuseum.org.

CLASSIC CARS ON WHIDBEY The fourth annual Classic Auto

Display will take place from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, June 21, at Meerkerk Gardens, 3531 Meerkerk Lane, Greenbank. The Whidbey A’s and Whidbey Cruzers clubs will be joined by vintage auto enthusiasts from Everett and Bellingham to display their classic cars around the gazebo. Admission: $5. 360-678-1912 or meerkerkgardens.org.


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E6 - Thursday, June 19, 2014

GET INVOLVED AUDITIONS

“INTO THE WOODS”: Auditions will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. Monday, June 23, at the Whidbey Island Center for the Arts, 565 Camano Ave., Langley. Callbacks will take place Tuesday, June 24. A wide variety of roles are available for ages 14 and older. Auditioners should prepare a song by Stephen Sondheim (16-24 bars, any show/style, accompanist provided) and a contrasting monologue. The musical will run Oct. 10-25. To schedule an audition, call 360-221-8262. “THE ODD COUPLE” (female version): Auditions will be held at 6:30 p.m. Monday and Tuesday, June 23-24, at the Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor. Callbacks, if needed, will be held Wednesday, June 25. Parts are available for six women and two men, able to play ages from late 20s to early 40s. The audition will involve cold readings from the script. Scripts can be checked out at the theater. 360-679-2237 or whidbeyplayhouse.com. “ANYTHING GOES”: Auditions will be held from 2 to 5 p.m. Saturday and 6 to 9 p.m. Sunday, June 28-29, at Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. A variety of parts are available for men and women from their 20s to 60s. Prepare a twominute musical number from the “golden age” of Broadway, wear appropriate clothing for dance and prepare for cold readings from the script. Scripts are available in the ACT office. The musical will run Sept. 26-Oct. 25. To schedule an audition, call 360-293-6829. SHELTER BAY CHORUS: Practices are held from 2:45 to 4:45 p.m. every

Thursday at the Shelter Bay Clubhouse in La Conner. New members welcome. No need to be a Shelter Bay resident. 360466-3805.

Monday through Thursday, June 23-26, at Potluck Kitchen Studio, 910 11th St., Anacortes. Students in grades 7-9 will create four menus from scratch in four days: Mexican, Italian, Asian-Fusion and AmeriON STAGE ANACORTES OPEN MIC: can. Each class will incor9:30 p.m. Thursdays, at the porate different cooking Brown Lantern Ale House, methods, food preparation 412 Commercial Ave., Ana- techniques, nutrition and sanitation. $150, includes a cortes. 360-293-2544. gift. RSVP: potluckkitchenstudio.com/calendar or OPEN MIC: Jam Night: 9 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. Thurs- 360-393-2844. days, at the Conway Pub KIDQUEST CAMPS: & Eatery, 18611 Main St., Burlington Parks and Conway. 360-445-4733. Recreation will host several summer camps for RECREATION kids ages 6-14. Camps SUMMER DANCE: meet from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Skagit Valley Academy of Monday through ThursDance will offer Summer day, beginning and ending Dance Classes for all ages each day at the Burlington beginning June 24 at 1522 Parks and Recreation Jay Way, Mount Vernon. Center, 900 E. Fairhaven Students can learn tap, Ave. For information or to ballet, jazz, hip hop, acro, register, call 755-9649 or lyrical and more on Tuesemail recreation@burlingdays and Thursdays. Times tonwa.us. range from 10 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Cost depends on class SUMMER ART CAMPS: choices. Register at the stu- Mount Vernon Parks dio or online at skagitvaland Recreation will host leyacademyofdance.com or several art camps with call 360-424-6677. instructor Julene Brogran at the Vaux Retreat Center at Bakerview Park, 3011 ADVENTURE CAMP: E. Fir St., Mount Vernon. The Skagit County HisNo experience required. torical Museum will host All supplies are included. Skagit Treasures AdvenLimited enrollment. For ture Camp, a day camp information or to register, for children ages 5-12 for four weeks, beginning June call 360-336-6215, email mvparks@mountvernonwa. 23, at the museum, 501 gov or stop by the Parks S. Fourth St., La Conner. and Rec office at Hillcrest Weekly themes include Park, 1717 S. 13th St. Adventures of the Skagit Settlers; Cedar, Salmon, SUMMER DAY CAMP: Celebrations; Fish, Forest Fauna; and Geology, Flora Kids entering grades K-6 can enjoy a variety & Fauna. Led by experiof activities centered on enced educators, camps each week’s theme from will include field trips, 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monhands-on projects and days through Thursdays at amazing stories. To regisHillcrest Park, 1717 S. 13th ter, call 360-466-3365 or email museum@co.skagit. St., Mount Vernon. Two days: $75. Four days: $115. wa.us. Preregistration required: TEEN CULINARY CAMP: 360-336-6215 or mountver9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. nonwa.gov/parks.

n July 7-10: Adventures Abound: Hike Little Mountain’s trails, climb on the Eagle Rock Challenge Course, go on a treasure hunt at Hillcrest Park and learn the basics of geocaching. n July 14-17: Art Escapades: Learn how to use a variety of mediums to create works of art to display at the Children’s Art Festival on July 19. Includes a tour and art lesson at the Museum of Northwest Art in La Conner. GEOCOIN CHALLENGE: Mount Vernon Parks and Recreation will host the Summer Solstice Geocoin Challenge at 7:30 a.m. Saturday, June 21, at Hillcrest Park, 1717 S. 13th St., Mount Vernon. Use a GPS device to track coordinates and search for treasure. Mount Vernon’s 124th Birthday Celebration will follow, with cake served from 1-2 p.m. in the park lodge. 360-336-6215 or mountvernonwa.gov. AMAZING RACE: Mount Vernon Boys & Girls Club is accepting team registrations for Skagit’s Amazing Race to Raise Great Kids, set for 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, June 28. The event includes a combination of challenges based on the Priority Outcomes of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Skagit County’s Formula for Impact: Academic Success, Good Character & Citizenship and Healthy Lifestyles. Loosely following the format of the CBS reality television game show “The Amazing Race,” participants can expect to encounter physical skill elements, such as running and climbing, combined with creative and/or mental skills, such as singing, dancing, puzzle solving, fact finding or eating strange foods. Registration is limited to 50 two-person teams.

You can participate in this event by competing on a team, sponsoring a challenge or volunteering. Contact Mount Vernon Club Director Vesta Anderson at 360-428-6995, email vanderson@bgcskagit.org or visit SkagitRaisesGreatKids.org/Amazing-Race. TRAIL WORK: The Skagit, Whatcom, Island Trail Maintaining Organization (SWITMO) seeks volunteers for upcoming trail work from April through October. The next work party will be held June 21. 360-424-0407 or jdmelcher@comcast.net.

Family Fun Run will take place Saturday, June 21, at Camano Center, 606 Arrowhead Road, Camano Island. Registration begins at 7:30 a.m. followed by the race at 9 a.m. Medals will be awarded to the top three male and female runners, with ribbons for the top three finishers in 13 age groups, as well as a prize for the best team costume. Registration: $25 with shirt, $15 run only, $40 family (no shirts). Free for ages 8 and younger. 360-387-0222 or camanocenter.org.

MARCH POINT RUN: The 20th Annual Tesoro March Point Run will get FRIENDS OF THE FORunderway at 9 a.m. SaturEST HIKES: Join the day June 28, at the Tesoro Friends of the Forest for Anacortes Refinery. Day of scenic hikes in the forest race registration begins at lands around Anacortes. 7:30 a.m., followed by the Free. For information, kids’ ½-mile, a certified 5K call 360-293-3725 or visit and a certified 10K walk/ friendsoftheacfl.org. run at 9 a.m. Registration: Next up: $10 through June 23, $15 n Heart Lake Old day of race. Kids’ ½-mile is Growth Loop Hike: for free. Picnic lunch is includadults: 10 a.m. to noon Fri- ed. T-shirt: $12 in advance, day, June 20. Meet at the $15 day of race while quanbase of Mount Erie on Ray tities last. Entry fees will Auld Drive. Orange trum- benefit the United Way pet honeysuckle and ocean and American Cancer Socispray will be blooming as ety Relay For Life. Regisyou explore the old growth ter online at databarevents. forest on the south shore of com/marchpointrun. Heart Lake. DEEP FOREST EXPERIALL-COMERS TRACK ENCE: Enjoy a presentaMEETS: Athletes of all tion and forest tour with ages can compete at 5 p.m. renowned University of Wednesdays, through July Washington forester Dr. 2, at the Burlington-Edison Jerry Franklin and PulitHigh School track, 301 N. zer Prize-winning author Burlington Blvd., Burling- William Dietrich from 10 ton. Registration opens at a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, 5 p.m., followed by field June 28, at Rockport State events at 5:30 p.m. and Park, 51095 Highway 20, running events at 6 p.m. $5 Rockport. Get a unique per meet or get a season glimpse into the nature and pass and free T-shirt for composition of a 700-acre $25. For information, contemperate rain forest envitact Burlington Parks and ronment, one of only a few Recreation at 360-755-9649 forest stands in Washingor visit burlingtonwa.gov/ ton where logging has not recreation. occurred in modern times. Discover Pass required. CRAB DASH: The Cama- 360-902-8844 or parks. no Crab Dash 5K/10K wa.gov.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, June 19, 2014 - E7

HOT TICKETS DIGITOUR: June 20, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. STEVE EARLE & THE DUKES: June 20-21, Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Bow. 877-2752448 or theskagit.com. SARAH McLACHLAN: June 20-21, Chateau Ste. Michelle, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster.com. RODRIGO AMARANTE: June 21, The Barboza, Seattle. 206-709-9442 or thebarboza.com. MERLE HAGGARD, EMMYLOU HARRIS: June 22, Chateau Ste. Michelle, Woodinville. 800745-3000 or ticketmaster.com. GAVIN DEGRAW AND MATT NATHANSON: with Mary Lambert: June 24, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888-929-7849 or AXS.com. YNGWIE MALMSTEEN: June 26, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline. com. ROBYN + RÖYKSOPP: Do It Again Tour: June 26, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888-929-7849 or AXS.com. EARSHOT JAZZ CONCERTS: June 26-28, Seattle Art Museum, Seattle. 800-838-3006 or brownpapertickets.com. FITZ & THE TANTRUMS: June 27, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. MINUS THE BEAR: June 27, Columbia City Theater, Seattle. 800-838-3006 or columbiacitytheater.com. THE SOULSHINE TOUR: featuring Michael Franti & Spearhead, with SOJA, Brett Dennen and Trevor Hall: June 27, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888-929-7849 or AXS.com. AN EVENING WITH JOHN LEGEND: June 27, Mount Baker Theatre, Bellingham. 360-7346080 or mountbakertheatre.com. PARADISO FESTIVAL: with Bassnectar, Above & Beyond, Zedd, Krewella and more: June 27-28, Gorge Amphitheatre, George. 800-7453000 or LiveNation.com. CHER: June 28, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-7453000 or LiveNation.com. JOHN LEGEND: June 28, Chateau Ste. Michelle, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster.com. PETER MURPHY: June 28, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. STEVE WINWOOD: June 29, Chateau Ste. Michelle, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster.com. KISS, DEF LEPPARD: June 29, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn. 800-745-3000 or LiveNation.com. KRAFTWERK 3-D: July 1, Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or tickets.com. NICK CAVE & THE BAD SEEDS: July 2, Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or tickets.com. MARK LANEGAN: July 3, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. CHEVELLE: July 5, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. STEELY DAN: July 5-6, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888-929-7849 or AXS.com. NEW ORDER: July 6, Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or LiveNation.com. ROCKSTAR ENERGY DRINK MAYHEM FESTIVAL: with Avenged Sevenfold, Korn, Asking Alexandria, Trivium, Cannibal Corpse, Body Count featuring Ice T, Suicide Silence, Emmure, Miss May I, Mushroomhead and more: July 8, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn. 800-745-3000 or LiveNation.com. JURASSIC 5: July 9, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com.

TEDESCHI TRUCKS BAND: with The Wood Brothers: July 17, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888-929-7849 or AXS.com. SLIGHTLY STOOPID: with Stephen “Ragga” Marley: July 10, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888929-7849 or AXS.com. BLIND BOYS OF ALABAMA: July 11, Lincoln Theatre, Mount Vernon. 360-336-8955 or lincolntheatre.org. RINGO STARR & HIS ALL-STARR BAND: July 16, Chateau Ste. Michelle, Woodinville. 800745-3000 or ticketmaster.com. THE GO-GOs, PATTY SMYTH & SCANDAL, MARTHA DAVIS & THE MOTELS, CUTTING CREW, NAKED EYES featuring PETE BYRNE: July 17, Chateau Ste. Michelle, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster.com. TEDESCHI TRUCKS BAND: with The Wood Brothers: July 17, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888-929-7849 or AXS.com. THE AQUABATS: July 17, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. LYLE LOVETT & HIS LARGE BAND: July 18, Chateau Ste. Michelle, Woodinville. 800-7453000 or ticketmaster.com. THE JOHN CONLEE SHOW: July 18-19, Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Bow. 877-275-2448 or theskagit.com. ANACORTES UNKNOWN MUSIC SERIES, Vol. IV: July 18-20, Anacortes Unknown. anacortesunknown.com. WINTHROP RHYTHM & BLUES FESTIVAL: July 18-20, Blues Ranch, Winthrop. 800-4223048 or WinthropTickets.com. GOO GOO DOLLS & DAUGHTRY: July 19, Chateau Ste. Michelle, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster.com. JOURNEY, STEVE MILLER BAND: July 19, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn. 800-7453000 or LiveNation.com. CHEECH & CHONG, WAR: “Up in Smoke 2014”: July 19, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888929-7849 or AXS.com. JOAN BAEZ: July 20, Mount Baker Theatre, Bellingham. 360-734-6080 or mountbakertheatre.com. CHATEAU STE. MICHELLE FESTIVAL OF JAZZ: with The Manhattan Transfer, Spyro Gyra, Lee Ritenour & Dave Gruisin, Jessy J: July 26, Chateau Ste. Michelle, Woodinville. 800-7453000 or ticketmaster.com. MÖTLEY CRÜE: July 27, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn. 800-745-3000 or LiveNation. com. CHRIS ISAAK: July 27, Chateau Ste. Michelle, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster.com. BEYONCÉ, JAY Z: “On The Run Tour”: July 30, Safeco Field, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or LiveNation.com. FOREIGNER, STYX: Aug. 1, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888-929-7849 or AXS.com.

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E8 Thursday, June 19, 2014

Thursday, June 19, 2014 E9

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

ON STAGE in the Skagit Valley and surrounding area June 19-28

TUNING UP Playing at area venues June 19-26

Thursday.19

THURSDAY.19

THEATER

Minor Plains, Ibex, Maszynaz: 9 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $3. 360-778-1067.

“Enchanted April”: 7:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor. $16. 360-679-2237 or whidbeyplayhouse.com. “Border Songs”: Bellingham Theatreworks: 7:30 p.m., Firehouse Performing Arts Center, 1314 Harris Ave., Bellingham. $15. 360-296-1753 or bellinghamtheatreworks.org.

FRIDAY.20 Steve Earle & The Dukes (classic country): 8 p.m., Pacific Showroom, Skagit Valley Casino Resort, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. $50-$55. 877-2752448 or theskagit.com. The Fenderbenders: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

COMEDY

The Moonshine, Mudflat Walkers Wayne Hayton: 9 p.m. Rockfish Grill, (bluegrass): 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 36018444 Spruce/Main, Conway. 360-445- 588-1720. 3000. Lloyd Hooper Cascade Ramblers The Chris Eger Band (R&B, rock, (classic country): 7:30 to 11:30 p.m., blues): 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Skagit Valley American Legion Hall, 701 Murdock Casino Resort, Winners Lounge, 5984 St., Sedro-Woolley. 360-855-5111. N. Darrk Lane, Bow. No Cover. 877275-2448.

“You Can’t Take It With You”: 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M St., Anacortes. $18. www. actheatre.com or 360-293-6829.

Steve Earle & The Dukes (classic country): 8 p.m., Pacific Showroom, Skagit Valley Casino Resort, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. $50-$55. 877-275-2448 or theskagit.com.

THEATER

“Enchanted April”: 7:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor. $16. 360-679-2237 or whidbeyplayhouse.com.

The Fenderbenders: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

“You Can’t Take It With You”: 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M St., Anacortes. $18. www. actheatre.com or 360-293-6829.

COMEDY

Comedy Nite: with Susan Jones, featuring Fred Bowski and host Randall Ragsdale: 8 p.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. $10. 360-755-3956 or anacortesh2o.com.

Saturday.21 THEATER

“Enchanted April”: 7:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor. $16. 360-679-2237 or whidbeyplayhouse.com.

Gin Creek (blues, roots rock, soul, jazz): 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $8. 360-445-3000.

THURSDAY.19-SATURDAY.21

THEATER

Friday.27

FRIDAY.20-SATURDAY.21 STEVE EARLE & THE DUKES 8 p.m., Pacific Showroom, Skagit Valley Casino Resort, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. $50-$55. 877275-2448 or theskagit.com.

SATURDAY.21

MUSIC

Rivertalk (world music): 7 p.m., Eagle Haven Winery, 8243 Sims Road, Sedro-Woolley. Bring a chair or blanket for seating. $10 cover ($5 for wine club members). Food and drinks available for purchase. 360-856-6248 or eaglehavenwinery.com.

Saturday.28 MUSIC

Austin Jenckes: 7 p.m., The Roller Barn, 98 NE Barron Drive, Oak Harbor. $20. Proceeds benefit the Oak Harbor Music Festival. brownpapertickets.com/event/721814 or oakharborfestival.com.

Maggie’s Fury (Celtic): 6 to 8:30 p.m., The Heart of Anacortes, 1014 Fourth St., Anacortes. $8 cover. 360-293-3515. Junkyard Jane: 7:30 p.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-7553956. King Buzzo, Adam Faucett, Ben Von Wildenhaus: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $13. 360778-1067. Sweet Dominiques (surf/pop): 9 p.m. to midnight, Longhorn Saloon & Grill, 5754 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-766-6330. Lukewarm & The Moderates: 8:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Bow. No cover. 360-766-6266.

SUNDAY.22

“Enchanted April”: 2:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor. $16. 360-679-2237 or whidbeyplayhouse.com.

MUSIC

“You Can’t Take It With You”: 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M St., Anacortes. $18. www. actheatre.com or 360-293-6829.

Lloyd Hooper Cascade Ramblers (classic country): 7:30 to 11:30 p.m., American Legion Hall, 701 Murdock St., Sedro-Woolley. 360-855-5111.

Sunday.22

“Border Songs”: Bellingham Theatreworks: 7:30 p.m., Firehouse Performing Arts Center, 1314 Harris Ave., Bellingham. $15. 360-296-1753 or bellinghamtheatreworks.org.

COMEDY

Buckaroo Blues Band (contemporary, classic and country rock): 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Winners Lounge, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. No Cover. 877-275-2448.

“YOU CAN’T TAKE IT WITH YOU”: 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M St., Anacortes. $18. www.actheatre.com or 360-293-6829.

“Border Songs”: Bellingham Theatreworks: 2 p.m., Firehouse Performing Arts Center, 1314 Harris Ave., Bellingham. $15, includes post-play discussion with playwright Bryan Willis. 360-296-1753 or bellinghamtheatreworks.org.

Trish, Hans & Larry Holloway: 2 to 3:30 p.m., Chandlers Square, 1300 O Ave., Anacortes. 360-293-1300.

Marcia Kester: 7 to 10 p.m., Mount Vernon Elks, 2120 Market St., Mount Vernon. 360-848-8882.

SATURDAY.21

Friday.20

“Border Songs”: Bellingham Theatreworks: 7:30 p.m., Firehouse Performing Arts Center, 1314 Harris Ave., Bellingham. $15. 360-296-1753 or bellinghamtheatreworks.org.

Battle For Athens, Heist, Black Magic Noize, 2Troublesome: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $4. 360-778-1067.

FRIDAY.20 COMEDY NITE: WITH SUSAN JONES, FEATURING FRED BOWSKI AND HOST RANDALL RAGSDALE: 8 p.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. $10. 360-755-3956 or anacortesh2o.com.

SWEET DOMINIQUES 9 p.m. to midnight, Longhorn Saloon & Grill, 5754 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-7666330.

Trish and Hans, with John Anderson (jazz): 5 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $10. 360-4453000.

Desperate Measures (classic rock): 6 to 10 p.m., Castle Tavern, 708 Metcalf St., Sedro-Woolley. No cover. 360-8552263.

Gary B’s Church of Blues: Jam Night: 6 to 10 p.m., Conway Pub & Eatery, 18611 Main St., Conway. 360-445-4733.

Blues/rock jam with CC Adams and Friends: 4-9 p.m., La Conner Pantry & Pub, 315 Morris St., La Conner. 360-4664488. Bow Diddlers: 5:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. 360-766-6266.

WEDNESDAY.25 Fidalgo Swing: 6 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360588-1720.

THURSDAY.26 Purple Rain by Scary Monster and the Super Creeps: 9 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $7. 360778-1067.


E8 Thursday, June 19, 2014

Thursday, June 19, 2014 E9

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

ON STAGE in the Skagit Valley and surrounding area June 19-28

TUNING UP Playing at area venues June 19-26

Thursday.19

THURSDAY.19

THEATER

Minor Plains, Ibex, Maszynaz: 9 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $3. 360-778-1067.

“Enchanted April”: 7:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor. $16. 360-679-2237 or whidbeyplayhouse.com. “Border Songs”: Bellingham Theatreworks: 7:30 p.m., Firehouse Performing Arts Center, 1314 Harris Ave., Bellingham. $15. 360-296-1753 or bellinghamtheatreworks.org.

FRIDAY.20 Steve Earle & The Dukes (classic country): 8 p.m., Pacific Showroom, Skagit Valley Casino Resort, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. $50-$55. 877-2752448 or theskagit.com. The Fenderbenders: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

COMEDY

The Moonshine, Mudflat Walkers Wayne Hayton: 9 p.m. Rockfish Grill, (bluegrass): 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 36018444 Spruce/Main, Conway. 360-445- 588-1720. 3000. Lloyd Hooper Cascade Ramblers The Chris Eger Band (R&B, rock, (classic country): 7:30 to 11:30 p.m., blues): 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Skagit Valley American Legion Hall, 701 Murdock Casino Resort, Winners Lounge, 5984 St., Sedro-Woolley. 360-855-5111. N. Darrk Lane, Bow. No Cover. 877275-2448.

“You Can’t Take It With You”: 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M St., Anacortes. $18. www. actheatre.com or 360-293-6829.

Steve Earle & The Dukes (classic country): 8 p.m., Pacific Showroom, Skagit Valley Casino Resort, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. $50-$55. 877-275-2448 or theskagit.com.

THEATER

“Enchanted April”: 7:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor. $16. 360-679-2237 or whidbeyplayhouse.com.

The Fenderbenders: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

“You Can’t Take It With You”: 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M St., Anacortes. $18. www. actheatre.com or 360-293-6829.

COMEDY

Comedy Nite: with Susan Jones, featuring Fred Bowski and host Randall Ragsdale: 8 p.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. $10. 360-755-3956 or anacortesh2o.com.

Saturday.21 THEATER

“Enchanted April”: 7:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor. $16. 360-679-2237 or whidbeyplayhouse.com.

Gin Creek (blues, roots rock, soul, jazz): 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $8. 360-445-3000.

THURSDAY.19-SATURDAY.21

THEATER

Friday.27

FRIDAY.20-SATURDAY.21 STEVE EARLE & THE DUKES 8 p.m., Pacific Showroom, Skagit Valley Casino Resort, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. $50-$55. 877275-2448 or theskagit.com.

SATURDAY.21

MUSIC

Rivertalk (world music): 7 p.m., Eagle Haven Winery, 8243 Sims Road, Sedro-Woolley. Bring a chair or blanket for seating. $10 cover ($5 for wine club members). Food and drinks available for purchase. 360-856-6248 or eaglehavenwinery.com.

Saturday.28 MUSIC

Austin Jenckes: 7 p.m., The Roller Barn, 98 NE Barron Drive, Oak Harbor. $20. Proceeds benefit the Oak Harbor Music Festival. brownpapertickets.com/event/721814 or oakharborfestival.com.

Maggie’s Fury (Celtic): 6 to 8:30 p.m., The Heart of Anacortes, 1014 Fourth St., Anacortes. $8 cover. 360-293-3515. Junkyard Jane: 7:30 p.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-7553956. King Buzzo, Adam Faucett, Ben Von Wildenhaus: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $13. 360778-1067. Sweet Dominiques (surf/pop): 9 p.m. to midnight, Longhorn Saloon & Grill, 5754 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-766-6330. Lukewarm & The Moderates: 8:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Bow. No cover. 360-766-6266.

SUNDAY.22

“Enchanted April”: 2:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor. $16. 360-679-2237 or whidbeyplayhouse.com.

MUSIC

“You Can’t Take It With You”: 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M St., Anacortes. $18. www. actheatre.com or 360-293-6829.

Lloyd Hooper Cascade Ramblers (classic country): 7:30 to 11:30 p.m., American Legion Hall, 701 Murdock St., Sedro-Woolley. 360-855-5111.

Sunday.22

“Border Songs”: Bellingham Theatreworks: 7:30 p.m., Firehouse Performing Arts Center, 1314 Harris Ave., Bellingham. $15. 360-296-1753 or bellinghamtheatreworks.org.

COMEDY

Buckaroo Blues Band (contemporary, classic and country rock): 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Winners Lounge, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. No Cover. 877-275-2448.

“YOU CAN’T TAKE IT WITH YOU”: 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M St., Anacortes. $18. www.actheatre.com or 360-293-6829.

“Border Songs”: Bellingham Theatreworks: 2 p.m., Firehouse Performing Arts Center, 1314 Harris Ave., Bellingham. $15, includes post-play discussion with playwright Bryan Willis. 360-296-1753 or bellinghamtheatreworks.org.

Trish, Hans & Larry Holloway: 2 to 3:30 p.m., Chandlers Square, 1300 O Ave., Anacortes. 360-293-1300.

Marcia Kester: 7 to 10 p.m., Mount Vernon Elks, 2120 Market St., Mount Vernon. 360-848-8882.

SATURDAY.21

Friday.20

“Border Songs”: Bellingham Theatreworks: 7:30 p.m., Firehouse Performing Arts Center, 1314 Harris Ave., Bellingham. $15. 360-296-1753 or bellinghamtheatreworks.org.

Battle For Athens, Heist, Black Magic Noize, 2Troublesome: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $4. 360-778-1067.

FRIDAY.20 COMEDY NITE: WITH SUSAN JONES, FEATURING FRED BOWSKI AND HOST RANDALL RAGSDALE: 8 p.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. $10. 360-755-3956 or anacortesh2o.com.

SWEET DOMINIQUES 9 p.m. to midnight, Longhorn Saloon & Grill, 5754 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-7666330.

Trish and Hans, with John Anderson (jazz): 5 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $10. 360-4453000.

Desperate Measures (classic rock): 6 to 10 p.m., Castle Tavern, 708 Metcalf St., Sedro-Woolley. No cover. 360-8552263.

Gary B’s Church of Blues: Jam Night: 6 to 10 p.m., Conway Pub & Eatery, 18611 Main St., Conway. 360-445-4733.

Blues/rock jam with CC Adams and Friends: 4-9 p.m., La Conner Pantry & Pub, 315 Morris St., La Conner. 360-4664488. Bow Diddlers: 5:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. 360-766-6266.

WEDNESDAY.25 Fidalgo Swing: 6 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360588-1720.

THURSDAY.26 Purple Rain by Scary Monster and the Super Creeps: 9 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $7. 360778-1067.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E10 - Thursday, June 19, 2014

MOVIES

‘Jersey Boys’ entertains, but doesn’t transcend By PRESTON JONES Fort Worth Star-Telegram

Like the ageless tunes littering its soundtrack, “Jersey Boys” is familiar and satisfying, if somewhat slight. The Tony Award-winning “jukebox musical,” tracing the turbulent rise of seminal pop group the Four Seasons, finally makes the transition from stage to screen almost a decade after its Broadway premiere, bringing with it shifting perspectives and an uncanny recreation of Frankie Valli’s otherworldly vocals (John Lloyd Young, reprising his Tonywinning role). Guided by the unlikely hand of director Clint Eastwood (although, perhaps not as unlikely as it might seem: he did appear in the musical “Paint Your Wagon” all those years ago, after all), “Boys” can’t sustain the fizzy momentum of its first hour, and struggles to balance broad comedy with pungent drama in the film’s latter half. For those who haven’t seen the popular musical, “Jersey Boys” follows Tommy DeVito (played here by “Boardwalk Empire’s” Vincent Piazza), Nick Massi (Michael Lomenda), Bob Gaudio (Erich Bergen) and Frankie Valli (Young) as they struggle to find a singular sound, land a record deal and avoid indebtedness to the local mob, personified by Gyp DeCarlo (Christopher Walken). Countless name changes, an assist from Joe Pesci (of all people) and late nights in small clubs finally leads to a breakthrough, uniting the quartet with savvy producer Bob Crewe (Mike Doyle) for a string of No. 1 singles that sound as good today as they did a half-century ago: “Sherry,” “Walk Like a Man” and “Big Girls Don’t Cry,” to name just a few. The Four Seasons are catapulted to fame, and the usual problems afflicting popular bands — in-fighting; massive egos; financial shenanigans; familial strife — are

John Lloyd Young as Frankie Valli in a scene from “Jersey Boys.” Keith Bernstein / Warner Bros. via AP

Although “Jersey Boys” ends on a (literal) high note, with the HH1⁄2 1990 induction of the original four members of the Four Seasons Cast: John Lloyd Young, into the Rock and Roll Hall of Vincent Piazza, Christopher Walken Fame, each man weathers turbu Rated: R for strong lanlent times, including Valli, whose guage daughter Francine (Freya Tingley) Running time: 134 min. dies of a drug overdose. The actors, led by Young’s soon making life difficult for Valli vocally impressive but dramatiand his bandmates. cally inert performance, each The turning point arrives when get moments to shine, although the mob becomes affixed to one Piazza, a veteran of the tough-guy member of the Four Seasons in milieu, outpaces most of his coparticular, threatening to undo the stars, save only Walken, who often entire enterprise. appears to be making it up as he That moment, played out in a goes. long, tense scene, divides the film Marshall Brickman and Rick — and the musical — between Elice’s screenplay (adapted from its ebullient ascent and its more their Tony-nominated musical somber descent into death, disap- book) doesn’t provide ample pointment and disillusionment. opportunity for its characters to

‘JERSEY BOYS’

give any sense of suffering, however, which greatly hampers some of the more dramatic episodes. Eastwood’s direction is, as always, unfussy and efficient, forsaking visual flash for an almost monochromatic, documentary-like approach. As in the musical, the characters directly address the audience — shades of “Goodfellas” or “House of Cards” — which provides many of the narrative’s comedic moments, and also fosters a false sense of intimacy. Once “Jersey Boys” concludes, you don’t really understand any of the original Four Seasons any better — except, perhaps, the rascally DeVito — and there’s certainly precious little insight into Gaudio or Valli, both of whom are credited as executive producers here.

Imbuing the standard rise-andfall rock ‘n’ roll story with some element of pathos, beyond surface emotions, would have elevated “Jersey Boys” above a straightforward translation from Broadway to Hollywood, but Eastwood and the screenwriters seem patently uninterested in anything beyond stylish recreation. “Everybody remembers it how they need to,” says Tommy DeVito at the climax of “Jersey Boys,” underscoring the subjective nature of the just-concluded tale. A little more insight like that — the wry understanding that history can be a complex, contradictory reality — would have helped “Jersey Boys” transcend its “jukebox musical” origins and become something as profound as it is entertaining.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, June 19, 2014 - E11

MOVIES MINI-REVIEWS Compiled from news services. Ratings are one to four stars. “A Million Ways to Die in the West” — With its endless blue skies and familiar-sounding score, writer-director-star Seth MacFarlane’s Western has the right classic-movie feel, along with an abundance of jokes that range from clever to disgusting to SERIOUSLY disgusting. Charlize Theron, Amanda Seyfried and Liam Neeson co-star in what is basically one long joke about how much it would have sucked to live (and die, at a relatively young age) in the Old West. Comedy, R, 116 minutes. HHH “Blended” — The third comedy pairing Adam Sandler and Drew Barrymore is so much worse than the others, it’s difficult to put into words beyond something along the lines of: This is a cliched, cynical, occasionally offensive, pandering, idiotic film that redefines shameless. Comedy, PG-13, 117 minutes. H “Captain America: The Winter Soldier” — The more screen time Chris Evans accrues as Captain America, the more engaging the performance. He’s terrific in this adventure, more complex and more compelling than in his 2011 debut. Amid well-choreographed action sequences and a couple of nifty twists and turns, we get another rock-solid chapter in the big-screen story of Marvel. Scarlett Johansson, Samuel L. Jackson and Robert Redford co-star. Sci-fi action, PG-13, 136 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “Edge of Tomorrow” — “Groundhog Day” is the most obvious influence as Tom Cruise plays a novice warrior who dies in battle, but keeps waking up to relive the day. That said, this movie has its own merits as an ingenious, wickedsmart and thrilling sci-fi adventure. Sci-fi action, PG-13, 113 minutes. HHHH “Frozen” — When a queen with icy powers (voice of Idina Menzel) acci-

dentally freezes her kingdom, she runs away and her intrepid sister (Kristen Bell) goes to find her. Sure to delight kids and captivate adults, Disney’s musical “Frozen” is the instant favorite for the animated feature Oscar. Animated musical, PG, 102 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “God’s Pocket” — Directed by John Slattery (“Mad Men”), this is a film about third-rate criminal Mickey (Philip Seymour Hoffman), hard-drinking construction workers, casually corrupt business owners and guntoting florists. In the wrong hands it might have come across as condescending, but “God’s Pocket” is unblinking without pandering. Drama, R, 88 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “Godzilla” — While this reboot has its baffling plot developments and the human characters aren’t exactly Shakespearean in depth, there’s some pretty impressive CGI monster destruction here. It’s leaps and bounds ahead of the two main “Godzilla” movies that Americans have seen in the past. Sci-fi action, PG-13, 123 minutes. HHH “Maleficent” — An admittedly great-looking, sometimes creepy, often plodding and utterly unconvincing re-imagining of “Sleeping Beauty” as a female empowerment metaphor. Angelina Jolie looks great, but she delivers a one-note performance as the villain from the 1959 Disney classic. Sometimes it’s best to let Sleeping Beauty lie. Fantasy, PG, 97 minutes. H1⁄2 “Million Dollar Arm” — Nearly everything in “Million Dollar Arm” feels borrowed from other sports movies and ever so slightly reshaped, and almost never for the better. It’s more interested in the redemption of a broken-down sports agent (Jon Hamm) than the amazing adventure of two Indian cricket players he brings to America to pitch baseball. Sports, PG, 124 minutes. HH “The Amazing SpiderMan 2” — It’s difficult to imagine how “The Amazing Spider-Man 2” could have been any worse. Long gone are the elements that made

the Tobey Maguire/Kirsten Dunst “Spider-Man” series so effective: genuine charm and humor, breathtaking action, and the correct amount of darkness and menace. In its place is a wildly connected cacophony, alternately chaotic and would-be serene, baffling in its lack of originality and its reliance on worn cliches. Andrew Garfield, Emma Stone, Jamie Foxx, Dane DeHaan, Sally Field. Actionadventure, PG-13, 140 minutes. H “X-Men: Days of Future Past” — Thanks to firstclass special effects, a star-packed cast taking the material seriously and director Bryan Singer’s skilled and sometimes electrifying visuals, this time-travel sci-fi thriller is flat-out, big-time, big summer movie fun. Sci-fi thriller, PG-13, 130 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “Jersey Boys” — At times this adaptation captures the electric excitement of the hugely entertaining Broadway musical, but for every soaring moment, there are 10 minutes of bickering or brooding. Though he seems indecisive about the right way to tell the story of Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons, director Clint Eastwood gives us a nice feel for their era. Music biography, R, 134 minutes. HH “Night Moves” — Selfstyled revolutionaries Jesse Eisenberg, Dakota Fanning and Peter Sarsgaard reveal their narcissism as they conspire to blow up a dam in the name of environmentalism. This is a quietly gripping gem from director Kelly Reichardt, who expertly doles out the tension. Thriller, R, 112 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “The Fault in Our Stars” — With lesser source material, an average director and an OK cast, the adaptation of John Green’s novel about the glory and unfairness of life could have lost me. But everyone involved, from director Josh Boone to transcendent star Shailene Woodley and beyond, has talents way beyond the average. This is a lovely work. Drama, PG-13, 125 minutes. HHHH

AT AREA THEATERS ANACORTES CINEMAS June 20-26; July 1 Transformers: Age of Extinction (NR): Thursday: 9:00 Jersey Boys (R): Friday: 1:00, 3:50, 6:30, 9:20; Saturday-Sunnday: 10:30, 1:00, 3:50, 6:30, 9:20; MondayThursday: 1:00, 3:50, 6:30, 9:20 How to Train Your Dragon 2 (PG): Friday: 1:10, 3:35, 6:40, 9:00; Saturday-Sunday: 10:40, 1:10, 3:35, 6:40, 9:00; Monday-Thursday: 1:10, 3:35, 6:40, 9:00 Edge of Tomorrow (PG-13): Friday: 1:20, 3:55, 6:50, 9:25; Saturday-Sunday: 10:50 AM, 1:20, 3:55, 6:50, 9:25; Monday-Wednesday: 1:20, 3:55, 6:50, 9:25; Thursday: 1:20, 3:55, 6:50 Tammy (R): Early Premiere Tuesday, July 1: 8:00 360-293-6620 BLUE FOX DRIVE-IN Oak Harbor June 20-25 How to Train Your Dragon 2 (PG) and Maleficent (PG). First movie starts at approximately 8:45 p.m. 360-675-5667 CONCRETE THEATRE June 21-23 Maleficent (PG): Friday: 7:30 (3D); Saturday: 5:00 (2D); Saturday: 7:30 (3D); Sunday 4:00 (2D); Sunday 6:30 (3D) 360-941-0403 CASCADE MALL THEATRES Burlington For listings: 888-AMC-4FUN (888-262-4386). OAK HARBOR CINEMAS June 20-26; July 1 Transformers: Age of Extinction (NR): Thursday: 9:00 How to Train Your Dragon 2 (PG): Friday: 1:10, 3:40, 6:30, 8:50; Saturday-Sunday: 10:50, 1:10, 3:40, 6:30, 8:50; Monday-Thursday: 1:10, 3:40, 6:30, 8:50 Maleficent (PG): Friday: 1:20, 3:50, 6:50, 9:10: Saturday-Sunday: 10:55, 1:20, 3:50, 6:50, 9:10; MondayWednesday: 1:20, 3:50, 6:50, 9:10; Thursday: 1:20, 3:50, 6:50 A Million Ways to Die in the West (R): Friday: 1:30, 4:00, 6:40, 9:15; Saturday-Sunday: 11:00, 1:30, 4:00, 6:40, 9:15; Monday-Thursday: 1:30, 4:00, 6:40, 9:15 Tammy (R): Early Premiere Tuesday, July 1: 8:00 360-279-2226 STANWOOD CINEMAS June 20-26; July 1 Transformers: Age of Extinction (NR): Thursday: 9:00 Jersey Boys (R): Friday: 1:00, 3:45, 6:30, 9:15; Saturday-Sunday: 10:15, 1:00, 3:45, 6:30, 9:15; MondayThursday: 1:00, 3:45, 6:30, 9:15 22 Jump Street (R): Friday: 1:05, 3:35, 6:25, 8:50; Saturday-Sunday: 10:35, 1:05, 3:35, 6:25, 8:50; MondayThursday: 1:05, 3:35, 6:25, 8:50 How to Train Your Dragon 2 (PG): Friday: 1:10, 3:30, 6:40, 8:55; Saturday-Sunday: 10:45, 1:10, 3:30, 6:40, 8:55; Monday-Thursday: 1:10, 3:30, 6:40, 8:55 Edge of Tomorrow (PG-13): Friday: 1:20, 3:40, 6:45, 9:10; Saturday-Sunday: 10:40, 1:20, 3:40, 6:45, 9:10; Monday-Wednesday: 1:20, 3:40, 6:45, 9:10; Thursday: 1:20, 3:40, 6:45 The Fault in Our Stars (PG-13): Friday: 1:15, 3:55, 6:35, 9:20; Saturday-Sunday: 10:30, 1:15, 3:55, 6:35, 9:20;Monday-Thursday: 1:15, 3:55, 6:35, 9:20 Tammy (R): Early Premiere Tuesday, July 1: 8:00 360-629-0514

w Third Continued from Page 4

The Neeson-Wilde scenes have a playful, dangerous and sexual edge, thanks largely to Wilde’s fearlessness and cocksure comic sensibilities and Neeson’s deadpan reactions to her. Sean, bouncing all over Italy with a woman he seems to both lust after and pity in a succession of different generations of Fiats she apparently steals, is all those things that Brody does best — aloof and cool, a little macho and very sarcastic. I love the way he refuses to meet Italy on its own terms, even when Sean runs into that rare Italian who isn’t a coward, a bigot or criminal. Do Sean a favor and it’s “Spasiba.” He thanks you in Russian, just to irk you. The Kunis / Bello / Franco tale is the most melodramatic and least satisfying, but even it has a nice payoff. Haggis lets us get way ahead of the characters and figure out what the title of this writerly tale — “Third Person” — has to do with the sometimes illogical connections between stories. That’s not a problem. Dragging out the tales after he reaches a logical climax and something close to a resolution with each — that is. A generous whittling down and he might have had something special, from sad story to giddy one with a sad edge, a hustle with pathos and romance intercut with the consequences of infidelity. But “Third Person,” despite its rewards, wears out its welcome long before the third act is through.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E12 - Thursday, June 19, 2014

REVIEWS: MUSIC Mary J. Blige “Think Like A Man Too — Music from and Inspired by the Film”

Sequels rarely outshine the originals they follow, so perhaps that’s why the team behind the “Think Like a Man” soundtrack decided to do something different with the music for the romantic comedy’s second installment. Execs ditched the “various artists” formula — though last time it yielded a Grammy-nominated hit with John Legend’s “Tonight (Best You Ever Had)” — and instead put all their faith in a singular artist: Mary J. Blige. The Queen of Hip-Hop Soul easily proves herself more than capable of exercising a vocal and emotional range to capture all the ups, downs and misfires one might expect from a movie inspired by Steve Harvey’s best-selling relationship guide book. Harvey would certainly approve Blige’s message on the anthemic “Power Back.” “The more you do that BS, the more I keep it real,” she sings of dealing with a wishy-washy lover. “If it’s one thing men respect, it’s when we don’t react.” Self-assured Blige is serious about commitment, and she says as much on the ominous, head nod-inducing “All Fun and Games,” produced by TheDream. But for all Blige’s tough talking, she has a soft side, too. She finds chemistry in the club on the delicious horn and drum-laced “See That Boy Again,” produced by Pharrell. On the growling “I Want You,” she’s all torn up inside when she spots her ex-guy with a new woman. And she’s aching to be loved “like I’m you, like I’m you, babe,” on “Self Love,” a beautifully grand track, which is easily the soundtrack’s most riveting offering. n Melanie J. Sims, Associated Press

Willie Nelson

“Band of Brothers” Willie Nelson has written a song — sometimes two, three or four — for every occasion, mood

Local travel and moment. There’s Wistful Willie. Defiant Willie. Repentant Willie. Randy Willie. Preacher Willie. Populist Willie. Whimsical Willie. Vengeful Willie. Nelson the songwriter returns in all his wonderful guises on the first album of mostly new material he penned himself since 1996’s “Spirit,” the best album of the latter half of his 60-year career. Nelson wrote nine of the 14 songs on “Band of Brothers” with album producer Buddy Cannon, and each song is a perfect projection of its writer’s best qualities. They’re comfortable, familiar, well-worn, but also new and different. Nelson is 81 now, and the new songs make allowances for this. His defiant moments sound a little more worldweary, his regrets a bit more painful. But his sense of humor and philosopher’s personality remain undiminished. “Band of Brothers” opens with Defiant Willie staring down the storm on “Bring It On.” Wistful Willie lets the “Guitar in the Corner” play him, Repentant Willie hits “The Wall” and Randy Willie leads us through a tall tale of all his “Wives and Girlfriends,” ‘’but may they never meet/may they never know each other when they pass on the street.” Populist Willie provides the title track, a beautiful display of the sentiment that has made Nelson incongruously both an outlaw and a figure beloved by all. “We’re a band of brothers and sisters and whatever/On a mission to break all the rules.” Nelson positions that song between a pair of Billy Joe Shaver covers — “The Git Go,” featuring Jamey Johnson, and “It’s Hard to Be an Outlaw” — midway through the album, and this outlaw triptych serves as a powerful reminder of why we’ve loved Nelson all these years.

ern woman “lean in” when she can get what’s desired through reclining? Filled with the kind of echoed, distant seduction that has made the young chanteuse-instigator one of the most polarizing pop stars in recent memory, Del Rey’s follow-up to her multi-platinum “Born to Die” is rife with incitements and further defines her philosophy, one that’s as provocative in its way as punk rock but without all that screaming. This belief system on “Ultraviolence” preaches a cutthroat approach to finding and retaining bliss. Put on a red dress on the album’s opener, “Cruel World,” seduce a famous man with “a little bit of bourbon” and tell him you’re crazy. Examine domestic violence on the title track with meaty lines such as “he hurt me but it felt like true love,” but include more questions than answers. Stare unflinchingly at pure, blind desire. Desire is the most potent drug on “Ultraviolence,” an 11-song record featuring Del Rey’s trademark tone, one with the sonic feel of a fading Polaroid and a languorous approach that, depending on your mood and constitution, will sound either lethargic to the point of nodding off or as blissfully relaxing as a massage. Del Rey popped through the clutter of 2011 when she released “Video Games,” a chrome-toned brushoff of a lover that featured an Americanainfused sound as indebted to musical noir as it was to modern pop. With a relaxed vibe that pushed the melodrama of a 1970s soap opera at the expense of sonic aggression, “Video Games” and the other hits from “Born to Die” were as singular in their way as the work of more “forward-thinking” mainstream pop stars such as Kanye West and Beyonce. Since that arrival, Del Rey has n Chris Talbot, Associated Press been dismissed as a poseur, has been belittled as inauthentic (her real Lana name is Elizabeth Grant), and has been the subject of more critical ink Del Rey than virtually any other current pop “Ultraviolence” star. If there’s a She’s been defended by writers central mescalling out the sexism; many critiques sage to “Ultradubbed her a fake while ignoring violence,” the that mask-wearing has been a central highly anticipart of male-dominated pop since pated new album by Lana Del Rey, it Day One. is this: Why mind Facebook executive Sheryl Sandberg’s advice that a mod- n Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times

admission: $20, $10 ages 6 to 12, free for ages 5 LANGUAGE OF FOOD: and younger. Food and bev“China Pearls”: Experience erages will be available for the ancient traditions and purchase. For information contemporary arts of China or reservations, call 206from 5:30 to 9 p.m. Satur- 621-8422, ext. 26, or visit day, June 28, at the North- pilchuck.com. west Language Academy and Cultural Center, 5023 “LESSER-KNOWN Langley Road, Langley. NATIONAL PARKS”: 7 p.m. Enjoy a variety show includ- Wednesday, June 25, at the ing dance, contemporary Anacortes Public Library, classical music, folk song, 1220 10th St., Anacortes. traditional Chinese food, Roxanne Parish describes a cooking class and lively some of her fascinating cross-cultural sharing with visits to less-than-familiar members of the Chinese National Park “units” — and Chinese-American monuments, seashores, community. battlefields and landmarks. The event will feature Free. 360-293-1910, ext. contemporary classical 21, or library.cityofanacomposer Austin Huang cortes.org. with members of the Saratoga Chamber Orchestra, SHORT TRIPS: Mount soloist Chrystal Yu Hai Vernon Parks and RecYang, the Imperial Dance reation offers several Ensemble, the Melody Xie travel opportunities for Dance School, students participants ages 12 and from the Northwest Chiolder, adult supervision nese School, the Seattle required for ages 18 and Chinese Orchestra, Northyounger. Trips depart from west Wushu Martial Arts and return to Hillcrest Park, and more. Prior to the 1717 S. 13th St., Mount show, guests may choose Vernon. For information or cocktails and Dim Sum, to register, call 360-336featuring a variety of Chi6215. nese small-plate offerings Next up: and delicious drinks, beginn “San Juan Island Hisning at 5:30 p.m. Tickets: tory, Hiking and Whales”: $70, dinner and perfor7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. mance; $35, performance Saturday, June 28. Travel only. by van and ferry to Friday n The “China Pearls” Harbor for hiking and great cooking class will be held views at American Camp, from 2 to 5 p.m. Learn to then on to Lime Kiln Point make traditional Chinese State Park, considered one dishes like shaved noodles, of the best locations to hot pot and dumplings see migrating orca whales. from scratch. Participants After a picnic lunch, head will also receive a unique back to Friday Harbor cookbook with recipes from for time on your own to the instructors. $35. Preexplore shops, cafes and registration required. maybe even the Whale For tickets or informaMuseum. Pack a lunch tion, call 360-321-2101, and beverages and wear email info@nwlanweather-appropriate clothguageacademy.com or visit ing and comfortable hiking nwlanguageacademy.com. shoes. And don’t forget your camera and binocuGLASS SCHOOL TOUR: lars. $72-$80. Register by The world-renowned PilJune 20. chuck Glass School will host an open house from EXTENDED TRIPS: The noon to 5 p.m. Sunday, July Oak Harbor Senior Cen13, at its private campus ter is organizing several near Stanwood. Enjoy hot upcoming extended trips: glass demonstrations, New England, Sept. 26-Oct. docent-led tours of the 3, “Southern Charm,” Dec. studios and gallery, live 14-19; Panama, February music and more. Hands-on 2015; “Blue Danube,” April activities, including glass 14-28, 2015; and Portugal, blowing and printmaking, fall 2015. For informaand an “off the beaten tion, contact Pat Gardner path” tour are available for 360-279-4582 or email at additional fees. General pgardner@oakharbor.org.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, June 19, 2014 - E13

AT THE LINCOLN THEATRE 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon 360-336-8955 n lincolntheatre.org

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Friday 6/20 8pm

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6 p.m. Saturday, June 21

Recess Monkey is the nationally acclaimed trio of teachers who make music for kids and families Based on the remarkable that truly rocks. Seambestselling autobiography, lessly meshing their indie“The Railway Man” tells rock roots with their keen the extraordinary and epic awareness of childhood true story of Eric Lomax themes, the band contin(Colin Firth), a British Army ues to make waves coast officer who is tormented to coast. “Deep Sea Diver” as a prisoner of war at a is the band’s ninth album, Japanese labor camp during showcasing the high-enerWorld War II. Decades later, gy, pitch-perfect underLomax and his beautiful love standing of what gets kids interest Patti (Nicole Kidexcited that has launched man) discover that the Japa- them into national awarenese interpreter responsible ness. for much of his treatment $12 adults, $8 students is still alive and set out to and children, with $2 off confront him, and his haunt- for Lincoln Theatre meming past, in this powerful and bers. inspiring tale of heroism, humanity and the redeeming NT Live: ‘A Small power of love. Family Business’ Directed by Jonathan 2 p.m. Sunday, June 22 Teplitzky; starring Colin A riotous exposure of Firth, Nicole Kidman, entrepreneurial greed by Hiroyuki Sanada, Jeremy Irvine and Stellan Skarsgård. Olivier Award-winning playwright Alan AyckRated R. $10 general; $9 bourn (“Bedroom Farce,” seniors, students and active military; $8 members; $7 chil- “A Chorus of Disapproval”). “A Small Family dren 12 and under. Bargain Business” returns to the matinee prices (all shows before 6 p.m.): $8 general, $6 National Theatre for the members, $5 children 12 and first time since its celebrated premiere in 1987, when under. it won the Evening Standard Award for Best Play. Skagit Kid’s $15 general; $13 seniors; Film Festival $11 students with $2 off 1 p.m. Saturday, June 21 for Lincoln Theatre mem(see details on page 5) bers.

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Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E14 - Thursday, June 19, 2014

OUT & ABOUT ART

SOLO ART SHOW: Check out “The Secret Circus of Mike Coslor,” on display through June 30, at the Lincoln Theatre Art Bar, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. Coslor offers up a traveling tent show of imagination featuring his startlingly lifelike full-sized mixed media “Human Facsimiles” along with paintings and cartoons. 360-3368955 or lincolntheatre.org. GALLERY ARTISTS: Check out “The Gallery Artists Show” continuing through June 30, at the McCool Gallery, 711 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. The show features paintings by Anne Martin McCool, Cathy Schoenberg and Peter Belknap, jewelry by Carole Cunningham and Debbie Aldrich, wood by George Way and Art Learmonth, sculpture by Tracy Powell, ceramics by Patsy Chamberlain, Cathy Schoenberg and Barbara Hathaway, handwoven scarves by Martha Tottenham, quilt art by Louise Harris and gourd art by Vicki Hampel. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday or by appointment. 360293-3577 or mccoolart.com.

SUMMER SOLSTICE CELEBRATION

Welcome the arrival of summer at the annual Summer Solstice Celebration from 6 to 8:30 p.m. today on the Skagit Riverwalk next to the Tulip Tower in downtown Mount Vernon. Enjoy food, live music, libations and an auction featuring patio furniture and umbrellas painted by local artists. Auction preview begins at 5:30 p.m. Ages 21 and older. $35. Proceeds will benefit the Mount Vernon Arts Commission. Tickets are available at the Mount Vernon Parks and Recreation office, 1717 S. 13th St., or Gretchens Kitchen, 509 S. First St. For information, call 360-336-6215. Pictured: Umbrella by Norma King.

lery, 420 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. Also showing are photographs by Lewis Jones, acrylics by Jacqui Beck and encaustics and mixed media by “COAL”: The show will Lilli Mathews, as well as a continue through July 6, new selection of jewelry. at Anchor Art Space, 216 During June, the gallery Commercial Ave., Anawill show acrylics by Jencortes. See what your fellow residents — artists, stu- nifer Bowman, with oils by dents, sculptors, neighbors Don de Llamas on display during July. Gallery hours — have to say about the are 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. controversial coal export facility at Cherry Point and Monday through Saturday or by appointment. 360the open coal trains moving through the Northwest. 293-6938 or scottmilo.com. 360-755-3140 or anchorart INVITATIONAL ART space.org. SHOW: “Sky,” a group invitational show, will OIL PAINTINGS: Oils by artist Jeanne Levasseur continue through June 29, at Smith & Vallee Galwill be featured in a new lery, 5742 Gilkey Ave., show continuing through Edison. Focusing on the July 29, at Scott Milo Gal-

300 artworks by emerging to master artists, including paintings, prints, glass, photographs, sculpture, ceramics, jewelry, textiles and more. A private preview party for ticket holders, auction artists, volunteers, sponsors and guests will take place from 5 to 8 p.m. Friday, June 20. Auction admission: $100. n Golden Tickets: Auction attendees can enter the Golden Ticket raffle for a chance to win their choice of any live auction item. Only 100 tickets will be sold. $100. n Free Public Preview: Members of the public are invited to take a look at the auction artworks before they’re sold, from noon to 5 p.m. Friday and 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, June 20-21. 360-466-4446 or monamus eum.org.

CAR SHOWS

CLASSIC CARS ON WHIDBEY: The fourth annual Classic Auto Display will take place from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, June 21, at Meerkerk Gardens, 3531 Meerkerk Lane, Greenbank. The Whidbey A’s and Whidbey Cruzers ever-changing sky of the dani and Dederick Ward. Pacific Northwest, the Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to clubs will be joined by vintage auto enthusiasts from show includes works on 5 p.m. daily. 360-766-6230 Everett and Bellingham canvas, paper, clay and or smithandvallee.com. to display their classic cars more. Participating artaround the gazebo. Admisists include Jean Behnke, “METAMORPHOSIS”: sion: $5. 360-678-1912 or Peter Belknap, Tyree CalRaven Rocks Gallery’s meerkerkgardens.org. lahan, Cynthia Camlin, Lil new show, “MetamorphoCzaran, Margaret Davidsis: Images of Transition,” STANWOOD SHOW ‘N’ son, Eve Deisher, Jessica will continue through June SHINE: The Twin City Gigot, Lisa Gilley, Karen 27, at 765 Wonn Road, Idlers 12th annual ClasHackenberg, Nicolette Greenbank. The exhibit Harrington, Larry Heald, features Tim Potter’s “But- sic, Antique and Custom Bob Holmberg, Todd Hor- terfly” collection as well as Car, Truck and Motorcycle Show will take place from ton, Katy Houseman, Isaac artwork by other gallery 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, Howard, Sharon Kingston, artists. 360-222-0102 or June 29, in downtown StanSteve Jensen, Maren Larravenrocksgallery.com. wood. Check out hundreds son, Lisa McShane, Kris of tricked-out vehicles of Ekstrand Molesworth, ART AUCTION: The Natalie Niblack, Kathleen Museum of Northwest Art all makes and models on display along Main Street. Faulkner, Jess Flegel, Caryn will host its 22nd annual Registration: $15 through Friedlander, Lisa Gilley, Art Auction at 5 p.m. SatJune 15, then $20. Day of Kat Houseman, Teresa urday, June 21, at 121 S. Saia, Keith Sorenson, Lind- First St., La Conner. Enjoy show registration begins at say Kohles, Jasmine Valan- lively bidding on more than 6 a.m. Free admission for

spectators. A controlled cruise through town will take place from 7 to 9 p.m. Saturday, June 28, starting at the former Thrifty Foods parking lot. Trophies will be awarded at the end of the cruise for the best lights/neons. Twincityidlers. org.

PLAYS

FREE SHAKESPEARE: Shakespeare Northwest will offer free performances of “To Be or Not TV2” at locations around the area this summer. Putting a new twist on some time honored classics, the show sets some of our favorite television programs on their Shakespearean ear and puts the Bard’s words into modern situations. shakesnw.org. Next up: n June 21: 3 p.m., Berry Dairy Days, Burlington. n June 28: 1:30 p.m., Gilkey Square, La Conner. n June 29: 1:30 p.m., Fairhaven Village Green, Bellingham. n Aug. 2: 1 p.m., Vaux Retreat Center, Bakerview Park, 3011 E. Fir St., Mount Vernon.

LECTURES AND TALKS

HISTORICAL SOCIETY PRESENTATION: Western Washington University graduate student Laura Taylor will present “A Step Back In Time: Snapshots of the History of Burlington” at the next meeting of the Burlington Historical Society at 7 p.m. Tuesday, June 24, at the Burlington Public Library, 820 E. Washington Ave. Taylor is currently researching the early history of Burlington. A brief meeting to announce upcoming BHS summer events will be held prior to the presentation. Free. For information, email edieed mundson@comcast.net.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, June 19, 2014 - E15

OUT & ABOUT “OIL TRAINS IN SKAGIT”: Protect Skagit will host an information night about the transport of Bakken crude oil by train through Skagit County from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Monday, June 30, at Skagit PUD, Aqua Room, 1415 Freeway Drive, Mount Vernon. Ginny Wolff will present information on new oil train proposals and existing facilities that receive Bakken crude oil, both locally at March Point and throughout our state. Mount Vernon Fire Chief Roy Hari will discuss emergency response planning and practices for possible oil train accidents. Free.

MUSIC

BLUEGRASS & GOSPEL SHOWS: The Skagit Bluegrass & Country Music Association will present its annual Bluegrass Jubilee at 6:30 p.m. Saturday, June 28, at Evergreen Elementary School, 1007 McGarigle Road, Sedro-Woolley. Enjoy lively sets by some of the area’s best bluegrass, country and gospel musicians. $5, $4 seniors and students. n The association’s Gospel Music Show will take place at 1 p.m. Sunday, June 29. Admission by donation. 360-856-1058.

MORE FUN

BARREL RACING: Check out incredible equine athletes and their riders at the bi-weekly Friday Night Lights Open 4D Barrel Races at 5 p.m. Fridays, June 27, July 11 and 25, Aug. 8 and 22, and Sept. 12, at the Sedro-Woolley Riding Club, 24538 Polte Road, Sedro-Woolley. The events start at 5 p.m. with racing at 7:30 p.m. Rider entry: $30 plus $10 office fee; $5 each additional horse. Award series and added money. For information, contact Kristen at 360-770-3383 or visit sed-

of the best short films from the Seattle Children’s Film Festival will be shown. “See the World: Animated Shorts from around the World” is suitable for all ages and will show at 1 p.m. The second collection, “Cinema Magic: Live action shorts from around the world,” will show at 3 p.m. and is recommended for ages 7 and older. In between films, interactive workshops will be offered in the lobby. Tickets: $8, $5 ages 12 and younger. 360-336-8955 or lincolntheatre.org.

DUDESTOCK

Enjoy the fourth annual Dudestock party beginning at 7 p.m. Saturday, June 28, at the Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St. Mount Vernon. Dudes, Walters and Maudes are invited to join “achievers” from far and wide to drink White Russians, listen to Creedence Clearwater Revival and compete in leisure game competitions and Wii bowling on the big screen, followed by a showing of “The Big Lebowski” at 8 p.m. Ages 21 and older. $10 in advance, $12 at the door. 360-3368955 or lincolntheatre.org. Pictured: A scene from “The Big Lebowski.” NATIONAL SUMMER LEARNING DAY: Families are invited to celebrate ANACORTES IN THE GREAT DEPRESSION: “All National Summer Learning Day from noon to 3 in the Same Boat: Anacortes in the Great Depres- p.m. Friday, June 20, at the Upper Skagit Library, sion” is now on display in 45770B Main St., Concrete. the Anacortes Museum’s Activities include story Carnegie Gallery, 1305 time, a scavenger hunt, Eighth St., Anacortes. The year-long exhibit depicts life bike-blended smoothies in Anacortes after the 1929 and raffle prizes. Free. For stock market crash and the information, contact Brie at ensuing Great Depression, 360-856-2549, ext. 211. which dragged on for 12 POTLUCK & SINGyears. See how life went on despite the hard times. Chil- ALONG: Enjoy a Gratitude Potluck and Sing-along at dren played and couples 7 p.m. Friday, June 20, at courted. Festivals, parades, the Anacortes Center for dances, football games, Happiness, 619 Commercial motion pictures — with sound! — as well as all sorts Ave., Anacortes. Bring a dish to share and any donaof clubs and events enlivtion to contribute to the ened daily life. And, with everyone in the same boat, Center. RSVP: 360-464-2229 or anacortescenterforhappipeople worked together ness.org. to get by. The museum is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. FLY DAY: The Heritage Tuesday through Saturday and 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday. Free Flight Museum will host its admission. 360-293-1915 or monthly Fly Day from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday, June museum.cityofanacortes. 21, at the museum’s Skagit org. rowoolleyrodeo.com.

Regional Airport location, 15400 Airport Drive, Burlington. Fly Days allow visitors to see aircraft in action, including vintage warbirds, single-ship fighters, a formation of T-6s and more. Food and drinks available for purchase. No pets. Suggested admission donation: $8 adults, $5 children, free for ages 5 and younger. 360424-5151 or heritageflight. org. MOUNT VERNON’S BIRTHDAY: Celebrate the city of Mount Vernon’s 124th birthday at 1 p.m. Saturday, June 21, at Hillcrest Park Lodge, 1717 S. 13th St., Mount Vernon. Join Mayor Jill Boudreau for birthday cake as the city celebrates another milestone. Free. 360-336-6211. KIDS’ FILM FEST: The Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon, will host a kid’s film festival from 1 to 7 p.m. Saturday, June 21. Two one-hour collections

Arlington. Enjoy pony rides, giant strawberry ride, kites, animals, face paint, giant strawberry and castle maze inflatables, pennies in the hay, kiddy slides and more. Ride the Jolly Trolley and pluck strawberries right from the vines. Picnic on the old covered wagon next to the old historic barn. Free admission. Some activities require additional fees. 425259-0255 or biringerfarm. com.

SEVENTH GENERATION SUPPER: Join Transition Fidalgo & Friends for its HAPPINESS DANCE: monthly community supper Ring in the arrival of sumat 5:45 p.m. Tuesday, June mer with the Summer Sol24, at the Anacortes Senior stice Happiness Dance at Center, 1701 22nd St. Adam 8 p.m. Saturday, June 21, at Lorio, education program the Anacortes Center for manager for the Samish Happiness, 619 Commercial Indian Nation, will discuss Ave., Anacortes. $10. 360how Samish Tribal culture 464-2229 or anacortescenand traditions influence terforhappiness.org. how the tribe works today to preserve our communiORCA SING: Enjoy ties for future generations. an evening of music and Suggested supper donation: more at the 15th annual $5 adults, $3 ages 10 and “Orca Sing,” a celebration younger. Bring your own of southern resident orca place settings. transitionfiwhales, beginning around dalgo.org. 6 p.m. Saturday, June 21, at Lime Kiln Point State Park FUNDRAISING TEA: on San Juan Island. The Enjoy tea service and free event will feature perdelectable desserts at “It’s formances by Seattle’s City a ParTea!” from 2 to 4 p.m. Cantabile Choir and other Thursday, June 26, at the musical guests. Participants Seafarers Memorial Park are encouraged to bring a Building, 501 Seafarers Way, picnic to enjoy the beauty Anacortes. Hats are encourof Lime Kiln Park. Tours of aged, with prizes awarded the historic lighthouse will for funniest, most creative, be offered before and after most artistic, best period, the concert. A Discovery sportiest and most original. Pass is required for parking. Proceeds will benefit the La Round-trip shuttle transConner Regional Library portation is available for Building Project and Help$10, with a 5:30 p.m. picking Hearts and Hands, up in front of The Whale a new nonprofit serving Museum, 62 First St., Friday Skagit Valley with palliative Harbor. 360-378-4710, ext. care resources and educa30, or whalemuseum.org. tion. Advance tickets, $25 or $200 for a table of 8, STRAWBERRY HARVEST are available at La Conner FEST: Check out the annual Library Foundation, 614 event from 11 a.m. to 4 Morris St., La Conner, or p.m. Saturday and Sunday, online at brownpapertickJune 21-22, at Biringer ets.com (search for “It’s a Farm, 21412 59th Ave. NE, ParTea!”).


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