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Valentine’s Day

IT’S NOT FOR EVERYONE PAGE 3

Skagit Valley Herald Thursday February 14, 2013

Reviews

Tuning Up

Richard Roeper

Music: Veronica Falls, Eels Video Games: “Dead Space 3”

Shameless Hussy plays Cyndy’s Broiler in Stanwood on Saturday

Need your “Twilight” fix? “Beautiful Creatures” will fill the void

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Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E2 - Thursday, February 14, 2013

NEW ON DVD THIS WEEK “Skyfall”: Daniel Craig takes his third turn at playing 007 in “Skyfall” (a James Bond movie title that actually makes sense). It’s not the world that’s in danger this time; the challenge hits closer to home as MI-6 comes under attack. Bond must stop the mysterious Silva (Javier Bardem) before he destroys the British spy agency. Neal Purvis, Robert Wade and John Logan have written one of the most understandable Bond scripts, given that some of the past movies have lost focus. They also created a story with some nice connections to the past. There’s at least one major shocker to make “Skyfall” a beautiful gift to fans for the film franchise’s 50th anniversary. James Bond films usually feature a white-knuckle opening action sequence, a sexy credits montage, a world-threatening event, beautiful locations, cool gadgets, the exotic Bond woman and a superb villain. “Skyfall” has five of the seven. It also has five Oscar nominations, including for cinematography, music (original score) and music (original song). “The Sessions”: A man (John Hawkes) in an iron lung contacts a sex surrogate (Helen Hunt). These are the kind of acting roles the Oscar voters love to honor and Hunt picked up a nod in the supporting actress category. It’s a worthy nomination because Hunt turns in the best performance of her career. She’s playing a woman secure enough of herself to engage in the most personal of acts with a stranger, but not so clinical as to hide the painful realities that haunt her own life. Hawkes is magnificent, despite being stripped of almost all his acting tools. All he has is his very expressive face and the emotion he brings to every word of dialogue to create a performance that will emotionally connect with anyone who sees it. Hawkes and Hunt manage magical transformations for the film. “Loretta Young: 100th Anniversary Edition”: The weekly anthology series, which ran from 1953-1961, was hosted by the actress who appeared in more than 100 movies during her long career. Young, who won an Oscar for Best Actress for “The Farmer’s Daughter,” also starred in the stories that ranged from melodramas to light comedies. The DVD set is a great example of the quality work being done during the early days of television.

YOUR ARTS, ENTERTAINMENT AND RECREATION GUIDE TO WHAT’S GOING ON IN SKAGIT COUNTY AND THE SURROUNDING AREAS

Upcoming movie releases Following is a partial schedule of coming movies on DVD. Release dates are subject to change: FEB. 19 Atlas Shrugged: Part II - Fox Anna Karenina - Universal Fun Size - Paramount Sinister - Lionsgate/ Summit Undefeated - Anchor Bay

This Weekend / Page 5

FEB. 26 Chasing Mavericks - Fox Chicken With Plums - Sony Holy Motors - Indomina How to Survive a Plague - MPI/ IFC The Loneliest Planet - MPI/ IFC The Master - Anchor Bay MARCH 5 The Bay - Lionsgate The Intouchables - Sony/ Weinstein Playing for Keeps - Sony Red Dawn - Fox Wreck-It Ralph - Disney MARCH 12 The First Time - Sony Life of Pi - Fox Smashed - Sony

Cannery Underground performs Saturday at the Skagit County Historical Museum in La Conner

Inside

n McClatchy-Tribune News Service

“The Perks of Being a Wallflower”: Emma Watson stars in this bittersweet coming-of-age drama. “Gossip Girl: The Complete Sixth and Final Season”: Includes 10 episodes, a featurette, audiobook, deleted scenes and a gag reel. “The Man with the Iron Fists”: A blacksmith must defend his village. “Bully”: Documentary that looks at school bullies. “Robot & Frank”: A retired cat burglar gets a new friend. Frank Langella stars. “Bonanza: The Official Fifth Season”: More adventures of the Cartwright family. “Dora the Explorer: Dora’s Butterfly Ball”: Dora, Boots and Mariposa head to the Butterfly Ball. “Matlock: The Eighth Season”: Includes 20 episodes of the legal drama starring Andy Griffith. “Storage Wars: Volume 4”: Reality series about those who buy abandoned storage lockers. “Weeds: Season Eight”: MaryLouise Parker wraps up her work as the pot-selling mom. “The Hardy Boys: Season Three”: Shaun Cassidy and Parker Stevenson play the sleuthing siblings. n The Fresno Bee

SUBMISSIONS Email features@skagitpublishing.com vrichardson@skagitpublishing. com (recreation items) Phone 360-416-2135 Hand-deliver 1215 Anderson Road Mount Vernon, WA 98274 Mailing address P.O. Box 578 Mount Vernon, WA 98273

Music, Game Reviews..................6-7 Travel............................................8-9 On Stage........................................ 10 Tuning Up..................................... 11 Get Involved.................................. 12 Richard Roeper............................. 16 At the Lincoln Theatre.................. 17 Movie Listings, Mini-Reviews...... 17 Out & About.............................18-19

Online events calendar To list your event on our website, visit goskagit.com and look for the Events Calendar on the home page HAVE A STORY IDEA? w For arts and entertainment, contact Features Editor Craig Parrish at 360-416-2135 or features@skagitpublishing.com w For recreation, contact staff writer Vince Richardson at 360-416-2181 or vrichardson@ skagitpublishing.com TO ADVERTISE 360-424-3251


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Thursday, February 14, 2013 - E3

HOLIDAYS

LOTS OF US DON’T LOVE VALENTINE’S DAY By SANDRA PEDICINI Orlando Sentinel

The holiday that celebrates love is met by many with apathy, and others with downright dread. Only about 60 percent of Americans will celebrate Valentine’s Day today, making just about every other holiday except St. Patrick’s Day more popular. And no, not everyone who sits on the Valentine sidelines is forlornly single. For Tracy and Karen Wilson of Apopka, Fla., married 22 years with three children, both time and the economy have taken their toll on the holiday of love. “We’ll still tell each other Happy Valentine’s Day and maybe get a card,” said Tracy Wilson, 42, who works for a paint-sales company. “That’s usually about as far as it goes.” His wife was unemployed for a while, he said, and “we’ve kind of chosen to use the money for other things rather than ourselves.” The slowly recovering economy is still putting a damper on the holiday, with 55 percent of consumers in a PriceGrabber survey saying it has affected how much they spend on their sweeties. The National Retail Federation predicts Americans will shell out an average of $130.97 on Valentine’s Day in 2013, up from $126.03 last year. Total spending will reach $18.6 billion. But for some who forgo the festivities, it can be a matter of principle rather than money. “I think Valentine’s Day has gotten sort of commercialized. The opinion we hear is, it’s sort of a Hallmark holiday,” said Cathy McBreen, whose Millionaire Corner investors’ website found in a survey that 16 percent of married couples don’t celebrate. Valentine’s Day actually started

Valentine’s Day events in the area VALENTINE’S DERBY BOWL: Don’t have a Valentine this year? Come and join the girls (and a few guys) from Skagit Valley Roller Derby for a fun night out, from 7 to 9 p.m. today, Feb. 14, at the Community Bowling Center, 612 Metcalf St., Sedro-Woolley. Part of every dollar spent benefits the new local roller derby team. Games cost $3.50, shoes $2.25. 360-399-6188. CONCERT d’AMOUR: with Jean Mann: 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 16, Anacortes Center for Happiness, 619 Commercial Ave. Enjoy live music, chocolate and more. Advance tickets: $15, $25 couple. $20 at the door. 360-464-2229 or www.anacortes centerforhappiness.org.

hundreds of years ago. Still, count Sheryl Kurland of Longwood, Fla., among those who consider it too contrived. “When you’re in a committed relationship or married, Valentine’s Day should be every day,” Kurland said. The author of a book about couples married half a century, Kurland has been wed 23 years herself. She and her husband, Steven, don’t consider celebrating Valentine’s Day a secret of marital bliss. “I try to stay off the chocolate. It’s bad for you. Flowers die,” said Kurland, 55. “It’s just not something that I need. “He’ll get me a card and write something real sweet on it, and we

kiss each other, and that’s our celebration.” Not everyone, of course, ignores Valentine’s Day by choice. People who aren’t married or dating often feel left out when they see all the celebrations of love surrounding them. “It gets frustrating,” said Veronica Smith, 33, of Orlando, Fla., who has been single for several years. “It’s one of those holidays, if you’re by yourself, you know it for sure.” But some restaurants are trying to court diners such as Smith, a high-school-attendance clerk. Maitland, Fla.-based Tijuana Flats is planning a singles’ night tonight, giving out free beers. The chain wanted to bring in business on what used to

be a slow night, marketing director Ashley Montgomery said, because “it may not be the most romantic setting for a Valentine’s Day.” Lil Indies will host Speed Hating, with drink specials and “appropriately sad tunes.” The bar encourages people on Facebook to “prepare yourself a list of things that you hate and cross your fingers that you can bond over grievances ... with someone of the opposite or same sex.” Smith, who used to watch the romantic movie “Sleepless in Seattle” at home alone each Feb. 14, has had a change of heart about how to spend the holiday. This year, she’s considering taking her nieces out to dinner at Ethos Vegan Kitchen, which will have dinner, drink and dessert specials. “You have to step outside and say, How can I make this day work for me and not feel lonely on it?’”

So, who actually celebrates Valentine’s Day? By AISHA SULTAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Other than schoolchildren, who is most likely to celebrate the Hallmark holiday of love? Unsurprisingly, it’s a moment more for singles still looking to impress their dates, according to a survey by investor website MillionaireCorner. com. And if your date involves a good book or movie, take heart, you’ve got plenty of company. Twenty-one percent of people have no plans to celebrate Valentine’s Day at all, the survey found. It’s worse if you’re married: 35 percent won’t be celebrating compared to 16 percent of unmarried people. The day typically does not involve a big demonstration: n 2 percent say they plan to give the gift of jewelry. n 6 percent are planning a getaway weekend. n 10 percent will buy chocolates. n 15 percent will buy flowers. The most common plans: 41 percent plan to exchange cards and 38 percent are going out to dinner. A Valentine’s Day gift can always come from putting pen to paper, rather than anything from a box.


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E4 - Thursday, February 14, 2013

MOVIES

I

t works like this. Girl meets boy, preferably in a quaint seaside town. Happiness. They clash. Sadness. Gradually they realize opposites attract and fall in love. Happiness. But they cannot be together because of leukemia/difficult parents/war/Alzheimer’s/a psychotic ex. Sadness. They get together anyway. Happiness. Somebody dies. Huge sadness. But the survivors lead richer, fuller lives for having known each other. Happiness. Publish, collect millions, turn the story into a film, collect more millions, repeat. Massive happiness. That’s the algorithm that has fueled Nicholas Sparks’ success for the past decade and a half. Sparks, a business finance major who sold pharmaceuticals before trying his hand at fiction, knows the value of a well-defined, reliable brand. Every romance novel he’s written — one a year since his 1996 debut, “The Notebook” — has been a New York Times bestseller. “Safe Haven” currently sits in the top three, and the film version, starring Julianne Hough (“Footloose”) and Josh Duhamel (“Transformers”) opens today. It’s Sparks’ eighth film adaptation, and we’re only halfway through his bookshelf. Meanwhile, he’s developing a trio of TV series for ABC Family, TNT and Lifetime. A 47-year-old “small-town guy,” Sparks lived in Watertown, Minn., as a child, and now lives with his wife and five kids in historic New Bern, N.C., not far from scenic Southport, where “Safe Haven” was filmed last year. Sparks believes that what women want from a love story is “female characters that feel absolutely real. Characters that are flawed, because everyone is, yet self-aware enough to know their flaws and to try to get better.” In “Safe Haven,” there comes a moment when Katie (the heroine, played by Hough) must decide to stay or go, and she decides based on her fear of what will happen to someone else. Combine all that and put

Earth from rampaging robots, his new part dials back Duhamel’s heroic stature considerably. “Safe Haven” features a peril-filled climax in which he does some brave things but doesn’t save the day. That turn of events allows Hough’s Katie, who has been fleeing a violent relationship, to step up and “fight the battle she needs to win,” the actress said. “People need to be secure and strong in their own beings before they can be with anybody else.” The film dealt Hough, whose background is in dance, plenty of acting challenges, including an eyebrow-raising final revelation worthy of “The X-Files.” “That actually came easy for me because I grew up very religious and spiritual. There’s something so beautiful about that moment in the book and the movie. It makes me cry.” What came harder was to play a person who is mysterious and guarded. “It wasn’t easy to have my walls up and yet be accessible and likable and relatable so that we could have a relationship,” Hough said. Sparks, who also produced the film, takes an active, hands-on, Josh Duhamel and even argumentative role, he said. Julianne Hough star He decides who gets cast (he in “Safe Haven.” favors new actresses like Hough, Relativity Media via AP having had good luck with Rachel McAdams) and who will direct (he had a good experience with Hallstrom on their earlier collaboration, “Dear John”). When shooting commences, he backs off. “You don’t tell Josh, Julianne or Lasse how to do their jobs. That’s why you hired them.” Hallstrom followed the same Story by COLIN COVERT / (Minneapolis) Star Tribune philosophy with his performers, Duhamel said. “I never felt so trusted. He would listen to ideas, incorporate suggestions we her in a situation where she can he’s done in the past. You want to Hough’s Katie — “I loved the made. What I love about his movmeet somebody. The kind of male separate yourself with something package. I’m a big fan of Lasse character that when he loves, a little different.” Hallstrom,” who directed the film ies, like “My Life as a Dog,” are these little slices of life that don’t loves deeply, and not just for a It wasn’t until he reconsidered straight off “Salmon Fishing in necessarily move the movie forcouple of hours. it a year later that the story’s the Yemen.” ward but everybody can underDuhamel, who had read the thriller and suspense elements He, Hallstrom and Sparks stand. We found an everyday script the year before, was the convinced him it would stand talked at length about how to first to be cast. He came to the apart. make the character “less perfect,” thing for my character to deal with. The door to his store sticks, project with some misgivings. “I “Even though the character Duhamel said. “He is having a and he never gets around to fixwanted to do a Nicholas Sparks didn’t feel the most dynamic” — hard time raising his kids and movie, but I wanted to do it in a his recently widowed shopkeep- getting over the death of his ing it. It’s not pivotal to the story, different way. They run the risk er, Alex, spends a fair amount wife.” but everybody can relate to who of being compared to the ones of time bashfully pining after After repeatedly saving Planet that guy is.”

Sparks fly this Valentine’s Day with movie adaptation of ‘Safe Haven’


Thursday, February 14, 2013 - E5

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THIS WEEKENDin the area CELEBRATE BRAZIL The NWLA Cultural Center will

IN CONCERT: CANNERY UNDERGROUND Cannery Underground will perform original Northwest folk music with a touch of humor and a nautical twist from 6 to 8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 16, at the Skagit County Historical Museum, 501 S. Fourth St., La Conner. Free with museum admission. $4, $3 seniors and ages 6 to 12, $8 families, free for members and ages 5 and younger. 360-4663365 or www.skagit county.net/museum.

host several events through Saturday, Feb. 13-16, at 5023 Langley Road, Langley: Capoeira workshop, with Mestre Silvio and members of Capoeira Seattle: 7 to 9 p.m. Friday, Feb. 15. Learn about this fluid and rhythmic Afro-Brazilian martial art form. $35. Student discounts available. Preregistraion required. “Medicinal Amazon”: 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 16. Herbalist and ethnobotanist Dr. Steve Morris, N.D., and his son Dr. Aaron Morris, N.D., will share their experiences of working with native healers and collecting medicinal plants in the Amazon rain forest. Participants will learn how to make their own healing salves and preparations with Amazonian botanicals. $35, includes all materials. Preregistration required. Brazilian cooking class: 2 to 5 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 16. Learn how to make authentic Brazilian feijoada, empadinhas, churrasco, pao de queijo and more. Learn how Brazil’s unique mix of cultures and nationalities has marked its cuisine. $35, includes a cookbook featuring the instructors’ recipes. Preregistration required. “Celebrate Brazil”: 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 16. Enjoy an evening of food, dance and music, featuring a feast of traditional Brazilian specialties with entertainment by renowned Brazilian musician Eduardo Mendonca and ShowBrazil $75. Preregistration recommended. Package pricing is available for participation in multiple events. Overnight accommodations are available in the Cultural Center’s guesthouse. For information or reservations, call 360-321-2101 or visit www.nwlanguageacademy.com.

GALAXIES, PLANETS & NEBULAS Explore the night sky

and view distant galaxies, planets and nebulas beginning at dark Friday, Feb. 15, at Fort Nugent Park, 2075 SW Fort Nugent Road, Oak Harbor. No telescope is needed and all ages are welcome. Dress warmly. Canceled if cloudy. Free. For information, call Dan Pullen at 360679-7664 or visit www.icas-wa.webs.com.

“ART ALOFT” The Stanwood Camano Arts Guild’s annual judged show will take place from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 16-17, at A Guilded Gallery, 8700 271st St. NW, Stanwood. The show will feature the best recent artwork by members of the guild, with prize ribbons awarded in five categories. Free admission. 425-493-4422 or www.stanwoodcamanoarts.com BLUEGRASS GOSPEL CONCERT Queens Bluegrass will

perform at 2 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 17, at Sedro-Woolley Community Church, 901 Talcott St., Sedro-Woolley. For information, call Ernest Queen at 360-856-1058.


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E6 - Thursday, February 14, 2013

REVIEWS MUSIC CDS Compiled from news services

Eels

“Wonderful, Glorious” Fans of the Eels will be surprised to know that the band’s frontman, Mark “E” Everett, seems to have been lifted from his melancholy — a sentiment that has inspired the band’s previous material. Even the title of the Eels’ 10th record, “Wonderful, Glorious,” oozes optimism. The album’s opener exudes funk and sex appeal, thanks to E’s unique vocals. The song “Peach Blossom” is melodically interesting, with a pounding, rhythmical drum and angry guitar. “On the Ropes” does hark back to the indie rockers’ original sad sound with lyrics like: “I’m not knocked out, but I’m on the ropes.” It’s reminiscent of moments on the band’s “Electro-Shock Blues” (1998) and “Blinking Lights and Other Revelations” (2005) albums. While “Wonderful, Glorious” is interesting and good, it doesn’t match up to the Eels’ previous work. We prefer E’s tortured soul.

It’s not that Veronica Falls shun responsibility (“They say act your age”) or compromise (“Driving late at night/I let you listen to the music you like”), they just don’t want to settle down (“Bury me alive”). A few tracks take subtly winsome turns: the drizzle of classic British folk in the opener, the elliptical harmony on “Shooting Star” and the chorus on “Falling Out” blossoming into their catchiest moment to date. n Jake O’Connell, Associated Press

My Bloody Valentine “m b v”

Kevin Shields’ name belongs on the short list with such creators as Ralph Ellison, Henry Roth, Jeff Mangum (of Neutral Milk Hotel) and Axl Rose — guys whose towering artistic achievements in their youth loomed so large that for a prolonged period they were either unable to continue producing new work or unable n Sian Watson, Associated Press to stop fiddling with it and let it loose into the world. Veronica In Shields’ case, the vehicle is My Bloody Valentine, the half English-half Falls Irish, half male-half female rock band that “Waiting for invented and perfected the genre that Something to came to be known as “shoegaze” with the Happen” 1991 gloriously messy, assaultive yet intimate 1991 Jackson Pollock drip painting The second of a rock album, “Loveless.” full-length In case you hadn’t heard, on Super album from Bowl eve Shields shocked the indie rock indie pop’s world by finally making good on his longVeronica Falls is a tasteful guitar pop running promise to actually release the set, brighter in tone than their first. The follow-up to “Loveless.” London foursome takes a communal The nine-song “m b v” is available for approach to singing their lovely melodies purchase only through mybloodyvalenand there is nothing remotely discordant tine.net, and when it became available on about the affair. Saturday it, “broke the Internet,” as they The lyrics glorify the moments in say, or at least caused the band’s servers between and aligned with the music play like anthems for the indecisive on “Wait- to crash for a time, so it became quite difing for Something to Happen.” These are ficult to buy the thing. “M b v” starts off sounding an awful songs about tiring of the people you hang out with, last conversations, the shortcom- like “Loveless” — not that that’s a bad thing — with cooing, Cocteau Twins-style ings of connectivity and the intersection whispery vocals by Shields or fabulously of early adulthood.

named second guitarist Bilinda Butcher bleeding into a multilayered wall of guitar sound. In its middle passages, the martial drums and captivating melodies alive in the mix on songs like “If I Am” pull “m b v” in a pretty, almost pop direction. Then the tone gets much more aggressive, as skittering drum ‘n’ bass beats work their way into the air-raid attack on not entirely successful tracks such as “In Another Way” and “Nothing Is.” Those songs suggest Shields is at long last searching for an MBV sound, but he hasn’t quite arrived there yet. Be patient: He just needs a little more time. n Dan DeLuca, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Ben Harper with Charlie Musselwhite “Get Up!”

Ben Harper and Charlie Musselwhite first recorded together with the late blues legend John Lee Hooker. Listening to “Get Up!,” you can understand why the singer-songwriter and the harmonica great wanted to collaborate more. The 69-year-old Musselwhite is no slouch as a songwriter himself, but here he lets his harp do the talking — sweet and clean, storming and dirty, he provides all kinds of emotional shadings for Harper’s songs. And those songs are among the most hard-hitting of the 43-year-old’s career, both lyrically and musically. Harper’s got the blues, for sure, but he and Musselwhite skirt the usual cliches, from the acoustic-texture rumination “You Found Another Love (I Lost Another Friend)” to the Hookeresque strut of “I’m In, I’m Out, and I’m Gone,” the gospeltinted “We Can’t End This Way,” and the heavy blues-rockers “I Don’t Believe a Word You Say” and “Blood Side Out.” n Nick Cristiano, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Pi—ed Jeans “Honeys”

Pi—ed Jeans distill hardcore aggression, working-class frustration and self-

conscious insecurity into a thick, heavy assault. The quartet won’t win over anyone not predisposed to the shouted and growled vocals and unrelenting volume of archetypal hardcore and sludgy, trudging metal. But “Honeys,” their fourth album, is faultless on its own terms, mixing speedy punk rock (“Health Plan”), garage-psych blues stomps (“Loubs”), and scuzzy heavy metal (“Chain Worker”). “You’re just another teenage adult, you’re frozen in time,” Matt Korvette yells, and he could be addressing himself until he adds, “Still you’re past your prime.” From the lacerating address to a smug project manager in “Cafeteria Food” to the screaming chorus of “Bathroom Laughter” to the almost bouncy romp of “Cathouse,” “Honeys” is prime ugly, loud hardcore. n Steve Klinge, The Philadelphia Inquirer

The Wayne Shorter Quartet

“Without A Net” The title gives a big clue. Saxophonist/composer Wayne Shorter and his quartet engage in what his bassist John Patitucci calls “spontaneous composition,” pushing improvisation to the tune itself. The results make pianist Danilo Perez and drummer Brian Blade more powerful and the leader less so, although Shorter, 79, an elite jazz composer, seems to revel in the group creation. But the CD should also come with an advanced-degree-of-difficulty warning, like a tough ski slope. The set of 11 originals generates a good amount of quirky chaos along with the sublime spontaneity. Take “S.S. Golden Mean,” where Shorter quotes the populist Cuban-jazz classic “Manteca” before the tune devolves into rigorous swerves for initiates. The 23-minute “Pegasus” is oddly classical, the confluence of winds and orchestration making it sound stiff, albeit with spurts of jazzy froth and a calamitous, creative midsection. It won me over by the end. There are some mishits, but Shorter, to his credit, continues to be daring. n Karl Stark, The Philadelphia Inquirer


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Thursday, February 14, 2013 - E7

REVIEWS VIDEO GAMES

‘Dead Space 3’ a less scary, solid shooter By DIRK LAMMERS Associated Press

Isaac Clarke has grown over the first two “Dead Space” games from a troubled systems engineer into a full-fledged action hero, so it would be naive to think that the series would not morph alongside its protagonist. “Dead Space 3” (Electronic Arts, for the Xbox 360, PlayStation 3 and PC, $59.99) has blossomed into a more polished third-person sci-fi shooter, but it has lost a bit of its scare factor. It’s more tense than frightening, but it’s still a darn good game. A more mentally stable Clarke returns for the game’s third installment, and he’s quickly called into battle to again fight scores of “necromorphs” — reanimated corpses — while investigating the markers, the icons responsible for creation of the monsters. Clarke again spends much of his time meandering through dimly lit spaceship corridors, but he does get to venture out onto the surface of the ice planet Tau Volantis, where maintaining body temperature is as important as cutting off creatures’ limbs. Other opportunities to float in zero gravity and rappel down a rocky cliff provide welcome diversions to cramped hallways. The game’s biggest improvement is the new weapon crafting system, which can be used at any workbench in the game’s 19 chapters. Bring the right parts and you can concoct thousands of customized weapons with different combinations of frames, engines and tips. Your creations can be further enhanced with acid-coated or electrified projectiles as well as circuits, which can improve

Electronic Arts via AP

damage, reload speed, clip size or rate of fire. The goal here is to have a secondary weapon, such as an electric charge to stun or freeze the monsters, and a fast-shooting primary weapon like a pulse rifle to finish them off. Thankfully, “Dead Space 3” didn’t change what has worked. Kinesis often comes in handy, allowing you to pick an object from a distance and toss it toward a necromorph. Who says you have to fight fairly? Color-coded meters for health and stasis, Clarke’s special ability to slow down the necromorphs remain on his backpack, negating the need for the kind of headsup display that too often clutters a game’s screen. Ammo level is displayed just to the right of an aimed weapon. A new co-op play mode adds a second protagonist, John Carver. He’s a great addition, though solo players will miss out on some optional quests that are available only when playing with two. In either mode, the main story follows a linear track that has Clarke dismembering necromorphs as he gathers weapons parts or flight recorders, and solving puzzles to open doors or start up machines. Some of these missions begin to feel repetitive, but the fast-paced action makes up for a less compelling story. Horror movie sequels have a hard time living up to the originals, and perhaps scifi video games face the same challenge. The yanked body trick in the flick “Paranormal Activity” is not going to get the same reaction in “Paranormal Activity 4.” Still, unlike the aforementioned movie, “Dead Space 3” provides an enjoyable ride, even if you know there’ll be a leaper creeping up from behind. Rating: 3.5 stars (out of 4).


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E8 - Thursday, February 14, 2013

TRAVEL

When in London, take a page from a favorite book By MICHELLE LOCKE Associated Press

Seeing the sites

LONDON — Walking toward the George Inn on a drizzly evening, yellow light from its bustling Parliament Bar spilling out on wet cobblestones, it’s easy to imagine the ghostly footsteps of the past. Is that a double-decker bus rumbling down the Borough High Street? Or a four-in-hand carriage sweeping into the inn’s cobbled yard? And those commuters hurrying toward London Bridge — Charles Dickens Musecould one be an anxious um: 48 Doughty St., www. Nancy bravely spiriting dickensmuseum.com. Monday-Sunday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Oliver Twist to safety? Adults, 8 pounds ($12.40 London is the kind of U.S.). place where past and presSt. Paul’s Cathedral: St. ent, fiction and real-life Paul’s Churchyard, www. stpauls.co.uk. Mondayswirl together in an everSaturday, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 changing kaleidoscope. It’s p.m. (last admission, 4 why a fun way to explore p.m.) Adults, 15 pounds the nooks and crannies of ($23.40). George Inn: 77 Borough this sprawling city is to take High St., www.nationaltrust. a novel approach and look org.uk/george-inn. Mondayfor places featured in your Saturday, 11 a.m.-11 p.m., favorite books, or for the Sundays, noon-10:30 p.m. Dr. Johnson’s House: real-life hangouts of writers 17 Gough Square, www. you admire. drjohnsonshouse.org. From Your choices are as varOctober-April, Mondayied as the many authors linked to London, but here are a few suggestions to get son’s House, a small but charming museum set in you started. the 300-year-old townhouse where he lived. Look up a lexicon legA statue of one of Johnend: “If a man is tired son’s cats, Hodge, sits in the of London, he is tired of courtyard in front of the life,” wrote author, critic and lexicographer Samuel house, while inside the colJohnson, whose many pithy lection includes 18th and 19th century prints as well quotes also include “No as paintings, several manuman but a blockhead ever scripts and porcelain from wrote, except for money.” the period. But did you know that If you are in need of Johnson worked as a hack refreshment, stroll around writer to support himself the corner to the Ye Olde before making it big with “A Dictionary of the Eng- Cheshire Cheese Pub on VisitBritain via AP lish Language” in 1755? Fleet Street. Don’t be thrown off by the name, You’ll learn about that and Dr. Johnson’s House is a small museum in the 300-year-old townhouse where Samuel Johnson lived in London. Johnson was an author, critic and lexicographer more — including his fond- which sounds a little like ness for cats — at Dr. John- the kind of place you might who wrote “Dictionary of the English Language,” published in 1755.

AP file

Saturday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. May-September, MondaySaturday, 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Closed Sundays. Adults, 4 pounds, 50 pence ($7). Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese: 145 Fleet St., Monday-Friday, 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Saturday-Sunday, noon-11 p.m. Westminster Abbey: www.westminster-abbey. org/home. Monday-Friday, 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. (last admission 3:30 p.m.) and until 7 p.m. on Wednesdays (last admission 6 p.m.) Saturdays, 9:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. (last admission 1:30 p.m.). Sundays, worship only, no tourists. Adults, 18 pounds ($28).

find in the food court of an American mall. This is the real deal: A tavern has been on the property since 1538, and what’s there now was rebuilt after the previous one burned down in the Great Fire of London in 1666. It’s associated with several literary figures, including Dickens. Dickens of a time: Charles Dickens might be the quintessential London author. He lived here, worked here, campaigned for social justice here and set many famous scenes here.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, February 14, 2013 - E9

TRAVEL A good starting point is 48 Doughty St., the house where Dickens lived and wrote from 1837-39. His first two children were born here and this is where he wrote “Oliver Twist” and “Nicholas Nickleby.” The house, near the Russell Square Underground station, is now home to the Charles Dickens Museum, which recently reopened after a major renovation. There are audio guides, a learning center and cafe and numerous artifacts, including the author’s writing desk and chair. About a 20-minute walk from Doughty Street is St. Paul’s Cathedral, mentioned in several books and the place where David Copperfield took Clara Peggoty to show her the view of London from the top. You can get here by the Tube, taking Russell Square to St. Paul’s, which requires a change from the Piccadilly to Central line at Holborn. From St. Paul’s it’s about a 15-minute stroll to London Bridge, which spans the Thames River. In Dickens’ “Great Expectations,” Pip crossed the bridge in great despair after learning that Estella was to be married to Drummle. In “Oliver Twist,” Nancy met with Mr. Brownlow on the bridge to conspire for Oliver’s safety. Of course, if you want to stand on the actual bridge from the 1830s, you’ll have to go to Lake Havasu City, Ariz., where it was relocated, piece by piece, more than 40 years ago. The current London Bridge dates back to ye olde 1973. Finish up your tour by crossing the bridge to the George Inn, which Dickens visited when it was a coffee house and mentions in “Little Dorrit.” This building, the last remaining galleried coaching inn in London, is a replacement, too, built after a fire destroyed the previous inn. But in this case the “new” building was put up

Local travel

VisitBritain via AP

SHORT TRIPS: Mount Vernon Parks and Recreation offers travel opportunities for participants ages 12 and older (adult supervision required for ages 18 and younger). For information or to register, call 360-336-6215. Next up: Olympia Capitol Tour and Exploration: 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 6, departing from and returning to Hillcrest Park, Mount Vernon. Enjoy a private tour of the Legislature building, no-host lunch and exploration of more local and historical attractions around Olympia. $61-$63. Register by Feb. 27. Bellevue Botanical Garden and Washington Park Arboretum: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, April 19, departing from and returning to Hillcrest Park, Mount Vernon. Enjoy a docent-led tour of the botanical garden’s 53 acres of cultivated gardens, restored woodlands and natural wetlands. After a no-host lunch, check out the seasonal flora and fauna of the arboretum’s 230 acres on the shores of Lake Washington. Both

This photo shows a letter written by Samuel Johnson SVH_4.949x4.75_ FEBRUARY Week2 and a copy of the dictionary he wrote, which was published in 1755, beneath a stained glass plaque at Dr. Johnson’s House, a small museum in the 300-year-old townhouse where he lived in London.

tours include walking up to one mile and uneven surfaces. $61-$63. Register by April 12. TRAVELOGUE: “THRILL OF THE CHASE”: 7 to 9 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 21, Whatcom Museum’s Old City Hall, 121 Prospect St., Bellingham. Travel on a mountain search for hidden treasures through prehistoric ruins in the American Southwest. Learn about the life of 82-year-old Forrest Fenn, who hid his collection of American West artifacts valued at $3 million dollars, then left cryptic instructions on how to find it. The thrill? Whoever finds the 11thcentury chest brimming with treasure can keep it! $3 suggested donation, free for museum members. 360-778-8930 or www.whatcommuseum.org. STANWOOD SENIOR CENTER TRIPS: The Stanwood Senior Center offers occasional trips around the Puget Sound area and beyond, departing from and returning to the center, 7430 276th St. NW, Stanwood. For information or reservations, contact Sandy Kitchens at 360-629-7403.

FEBRUARY AT TULALIP BINGO

memorated at Poets’ Corner including John Milton, Percy See the final chapter: Bysshe Shelley, T.S. Eliot, The Poets’ Corner at WestJane Austen and the Bronte minster Abbey memorializes sisters. many of British literature’s Some writers had a toughgreatest names. It’s a tradier time than others making it tion that started out slowly. into the corner. Shakespeare Geoffrey Chaucer was was buried at Stratfordburied in the abbey when he upon-Avon in 1616, but he died in 1400 because he had didn’t get a monument until been Clerk of Works to the 1740. And the poet Lord palace of Westminster, not Byron, a scandalous figure of because of his “Canterbury his time, died in 1824 but he Tales.” But more than 150 didn’t get a memorial until years later, a bigger monu1969. ment was erected to honor Two of the graves are a fitChaucer, and in 1599, the ting end to your literary tour. poet and author Edmund Johnson, who died in 1784 Spenser was buried nearby. at age 75, is buried here, his Other writers buried here grave marked by a plaque include poets John Dryden, and a bust. And Dickens’ Lord Alfred Tennyson and grave is also here, marked, Robert Browning, and at his instructions, only by a authors Rudyard Kipling simple plaque inscribed with and Thomas Hardy. A num- his name and the dates of his ber of other writers are birth and death, Feb. 7, 1812, buried elsewhere but comand June 9, 1870.

Paying Out Up To $7.1 Million

in 1676.

$2,500

VALENTINE’S CASH

HOT SEAT DRAWING THURSDAY

$3,000

CASH DRAWING SUNDAY

FEBRUARY 14

FEBRUARY 24

Each guest present and playing will receive (1) playing card for that particular session and the lucky winners matching the (2) cards drawn will receive $50 cash each!

(5) - $100 At 11am & 3pm sessions and (10) - $200 at 7pm session. Each guest will automatically be entered into monthly drawing upon initial buy-in starting Feb. 1 - Feb. 23, With drawing to be held Feb. 24.

ALL SESSIONS

Winners must be present and playing with a valid receipt to claim prize. No Seat Hopping Allowed.

$5

Drawing winners must be present and playing with a valid bingo receipt to claim prize.

$1,600

GOOD NEIGHBOR

HOT SEAT DRAWING SATURDAYS

FEBRUARY 2, 9, 16 & 23 (2) Winners of (1) $50 slot play ticket. The guest to the right and left of the winner will receive (1) $40 for $30 slot play coupon. Winners must be actively playing a bingo slot machine to claim prize. No seat hopping allowed.

WINNERS CLUB DISCOUNT OFFER MUST BE WINNERS CLUB CARD HOLDER

Valid 2/12/13 - 2/18/13 SVH BNG0213

Bring in this ad to claim $5 Winners Club discount $5 Off any 11am or 7pm session

One coupon per guest per week • Redeem at cashier window - Not valid with any other offer. No cash value. Only original ad will be honored for special offers - no copies. Management reserves the right to cancel or amend promotion at any time.

1-800-631-3313


E10 Thursday, February 14, 2013

Thursday, February 14, 2013 E11

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

ON STAGE in the Skagit Valley and surrounding area February 14-23

TUNING UP Playing at area venues February 14-21 THURSDAY.14 NOMEANSNO: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $10-$12. 360-778-1067. Leah Natale & Ambience (jazz): 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360588-1720. Mardi Love, Rattletrap Ruckus: 9 p.m., Redlight, 1017 N. State St., Bellingham. Free. 360-927-1949 or www.redlight bellingham.com.

THURSDAY-SATURDAY.14-16

Fat Lips Slim, Shorty and Mama Ben Starner (piano): 8 to 10 p.m., Gumbo, Sky Colony: 7:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, EdiConway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, son. 360-766-6266. Conway. $7 cover. 360-445-3000.

Thursday.14

Saturday.16

Sunday.17

Friday.22

THEATER

MUSIC

OPERA

THEATER

“It Runs in the Family” (comedy): 7:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor. $16. 360-6792237 or www.whidbeyplayhouse.com.

Friday.15 OPERA

“Lucia Di Lammermoor”: Skagit Opera, 7:30 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $15-$59. 360-416-7727, ext. 2, or www.mcintyre hall.org.

THE FAT TONES 9 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-755-3956.

FRIDAY.15

“STEEL MAGNOLIAS” 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-293-6829 or www.acttheatre.com.

“Steel Magnolias” (comedy/drama): 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-293-6829 or www.acttheatre.com.

SATURDAY.16

What The Chelm (Klezmer): 7:30 p.m., Maple Hall, 104 Commercial Ave., La Conner. $15-$17, free for ages 17 and younger. 360-466-2665 or www.laconnerarts.com. “Concert d’Amour” with Jean Mann: 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Center for Happiness, 619 Commercial Ave. Advance tickets: $15, $25 couple. $20 at the door. 360-464-2229 or www.anacortescenterforhappiness.org. Cannery Underground (Northwest folk music): 6 to 8 p.m., Skagit County Historical Museum, 501 S. Fourth St., La Conner. Free with museum admission. $4, $3 seniors and ages 6 to 12, $8 families, free for members and ages 5 and younger. 360-466-3365 or www.skagitcounty.net/museum.

THEATER

THEATER

“Steel Magnolias” (comedy/drama): 8 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-293-6829 or www.acttheatre.com.

“Steel Magnolias” (comedy/drama): 8 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-293-6829 or www.acttheatre.com.

“It Runs in the Family” (comedy): 7:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor. $16. 360-6792237 or www.whidbeyplayhouse.com.

“It Runs in the Family” (comedy): 7:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor. $16. 360-6792237 or www.whidbeyplayhouse.com.

“Lucia Di Lammermoor”: Skagit Opera: 2 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $15-$59. (special closing night repast after opera concludes, $75). 360-416-7727, ext. 2, or www.mcintyrehall.org.

THEATER

“It Runs in the Family” (comedy): 2:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor. $16. 360-6792237 or www.whidbeyplayhouse.com.

Monday-Thursday.18-21 No events submitted

“Late Nite Catechism”: 7:30 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $25. 360-416-7727, ext. 2, or www.mcintyrehall.org.

Saturday.23 THEATER

“Late Nite Catechism”: 7:30 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $25. 360-416-7727, ext. 2, or www.mcintyrehall.org.

Silver City Band: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

Bryan Nelson and Boomer (acoustic rock): 9 p.m., La Conner Pub & Eatery, 702 S. First St., La Conner. No cover. 360-466-9932.

Red Fang, Federation X, Uh-Oh: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $12-$15. 360-778-1067.

SATURDAY.16 Scratch Daddy: 9 p.m., Longhorn Saloon, 5754 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-7666330.

Crow Quill Night Owls, Gallus Brothers: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $8. 360778-1067.

The Walrus: 8:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. 360-7666266.

Andy Brown: 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. 360-445-3000.

Silver City Band: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-4226411.

Wreckless Spenders: 9:30 p.m. to 1:30 a.m., Conway Pub & Eatery, 18611 Main St., Conway. No cover. 360-445-4733.

MONDAY.18

SUNDAY.17 Gary B’s Church of the Blues (blues, classic rock): 6 to 10 p.m., Castle Tavern, 708 Metcalf St., SedroWoolley. 360-855-2263.

Sandy Sanders Band: 8:30 to 11:30 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

Bow Diddlers: 5:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. 360-7666266.

Knut Bell & The Blue Collars: 5 to 9 p.m., Conway Pub & Eatery, 18611 Main St., Conway. 360-445-4733.

Wyatt Parks & The Mute Choir, Dillion Warned and The Dismal Tide, Tim Mechling: 9 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $3. 360-7781067.

Dog Shredder: 10 p.m. to midnight, Redlight, 1017 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. 360-9271949 or www.redlight bellingham.com.

The Fat Tones: 9 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360755-3956.

WEDNESDAY.20 Spoonshine Duo: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

Eagle Teeth: 10 p.m. to midnight, Redlight, 1017 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. 360-927-1949 or www.redlight bellingham.com.

THURSDAY.21 Rattletrap Ruckus: 8 p.m., Redlight, 1017 N. State St., Bellingham. Free. 360-927-1949 or www.redlightbelling ham.com.


E10 Thursday, February 14, 2013

Thursday, February 14, 2013 E11

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

ON STAGE in the Skagit Valley and surrounding area February 14-23

TUNING UP Playing at area venues February 14-21 THURSDAY.14 NOMEANSNO: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $10-$12. 360-778-1067. Leah Natale & Ambience (jazz): 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360588-1720. Mardi Love, Rattletrap Ruckus: 9 p.m., Redlight, 1017 N. State St., Bellingham. Free. 360-927-1949 or www.redlight bellingham.com.

THURSDAY-SATURDAY.14-16

Fat Lips Slim, Shorty and Mama Ben Starner (piano): 8 to 10 p.m., Gumbo, Sky Colony: 7:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, EdiConway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, son. 360-766-6266. Conway. $7 cover. 360-445-3000.

Thursday.14

Saturday.16

Sunday.17

Friday.22

THEATER

MUSIC

OPERA

THEATER

“It Runs in the Family” (comedy): 7:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor. $16. 360-6792237 or www.whidbeyplayhouse.com.

Friday.15 OPERA

“Lucia Di Lammermoor”: Skagit Opera, 7:30 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $15-$59. 360-416-7727, ext. 2, or www.mcintyre hall.org.

THE FAT TONES 9 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-755-3956.

FRIDAY.15

“STEEL MAGNOLIAS” 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-293-6829 or www.acttheatre.com.

“Steel Magnolias” (comedy/drama): 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-293-6829 or www.acttheatre.com.

SATURDAY.16

What The Chelm (Klezmer): 7:30 p.m., Maple Hall, 104 Commercial Ave., La Conner. $15-$17, free for ages 17 and younger. 360-466-2665 or www.laconnerarts.com. “Concert d’Amour” with Jean Mann: 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Center for Happiness, 619 Commercial Ave. Advance tickets: $15, $25 couple. $20 at the door. 360-464-2229 or www.anacortescenterforhappiness.org. Cannery Underground (Northwest folk music): 6 to 8 p.m., Skagit County Historical Museum, 501 S. Fourth St., La Conner. Free with museum admission. $4, $3 seniors and ages 6 to 12, $8 families, free for members and ages 5 and younger. 360-466-3365 or www.skagitcounty.net/museum.

THEATER

THEATER

“Steel Magnolias” (comedy/drama): 8 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-293-6829 or www.acttheatre.com.

“Steel Magnolias” (comedy/drama): 8 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-293-6829 or www.acttheatre.com.

“It Runs in the Family” (comedy): 7:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor. $16. 360-6792237 or www.whidbeyplayhouse.com.

“It Runs in the Family” (comedy): 7:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor. $16. 360-6792237 or www.whidbeyplayhouse.com.

“Lucia Di Lammermoor”: Skagit Opera: 2 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $15-$59. (special closing night repast after opera concludes, $75). 360-416-7727, ext. 2, or www.mcintyrehall.org.

THEATER

“It Runs in the Family” (comedy): 2:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor. $16. 360-6792237 or www.whidbeyplayhouse.com.

Monday-Thursday.18-21 No events submitted

“Late Nite Catechism”: 7:30 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $25. 360-416-7727, ext. 2, or www.mcintyrehall.org.

Saturday.23 THEATER

“Late Nite Catechism”: 7:30 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $25. 360-416-7727, ext. 2, or www.mcintyrehall.org.

Silver City Band: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

Bryan Nelson and Boomer (acoustic rock): 9 p.m., La Conner Pub & Eatery, 702 S. First St., La Conner. No cover. 360-466-9932.

Red Fang, Federation X, Uh-Oh: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $12-$15. 360-778-1067.

SATURDAY.16 Scratch Daddy: 9 p.m., Longhorn Saloon, 5754 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-7666330.

Crow Quill Night Owls, Gallus Brothers: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $8. 360778-1067.

The Walrus: 8:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. 360-7666266.

Andy Brown: 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. 360-445-3000.

Silver City Band: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-4226411.

Wreckless Spenders: 9:30 p.m. to 1:30 a.m., Conway Pub & Eatery, 18611 Main St., Conway. No cover. 360-445-4733.

MONDAY.18

SUNDAY.17 Gary B’s Church of the Blues (blues, classic rock): 6 to 10 p.m., Castle Tavern, 708 Metcalf St., SedroWoolley. 360-855-2263.

Sandy Sanders Band: 8:30 to 11:30 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

Bow Diddlers: 5:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. 360-7666266.

Knut Bell & The Blue Collars: 5 to 9 p.m., Conway Pub & Eatery, 18611 Main St., Conway. 360-445-4733.

Wyatt Parks & The Mute Choir, Dillion Warned and The Dismal Tide, Tim Mechling: 9 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $3. 360-7781067.

Dog Shredder: 10 p.m. to midnight, Redlight, 1017 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. 360-9271949 or www.redlight bellingham.com.

The Fat Tones: 9 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360755-3956.

WEDNESDAY.20 Spoonshine Duo: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

Eagle Teeth: 10 p.m. to midnight, Redlight, 1017 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. 360-927-1949 or www.redlight bellingham.com.

THURSDAY.21 Rattletrap Ruckus: 8 p.m., Redlight, 1017 N. State St., Bellingham. Free. 360-927-1949 or www.redlightbelling ham.com.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E12 - Thursday, February 14, 2013

GET INVOLVED ART MoNA VOLUNTEERS: The Museum of Northwest Art, 121 S. First St., La Conner, is looking for volunteers for its MoNA Link Program, which brings students into the museum for hands-on art lessons, student-centered discussion and literacy activities. Volunteer tour leaders are given special training in the Visual Thinking Strategies, a method for encouraging student-led interpretation of selected works of art. The next training will take place from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 21, at the museum. Anyone with a background or interest in youth education and the arts is encouraged to apply. Contact Jasmine at 360-466-4446, ext. 106, or email jasminev@ museumofnwart.org.

adults from 10 a.m. to noon the third Saturday each month, beginning Feb. 16, at 918 M Ave., Anacortes. Classes will include scripted scenes and a variety of acting games, with a different topic each month: Feb. 16: audition technique; March 16: rehearsal; April 20: developing character; May 18: stage presence; June 15: performance. Each class will be independent; you don’t have to commit to every session. Information: 360-2934373 or www.acttheatre.com.

p.m. Thursdays, The Soup Bowl at Common Ground, 351 Pease Road, Burlington. Signups begin at 6 p.m. All ages are welcome to perform or come to watch and listen. Free. For information, contact Tobie Ann at 425-870-6784.

WORKSHOPS

BUILD YOUR OWN WEBSITE: Alternative Focus will offer two classes on designing and creating your own website at the Anacortes Chamber of Commerce Boardroom, upstairs at 819 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No experience necOPEN MIC: 7:30 p.m. essary, no software needed. Friday, Feb. 22, Conway Part One: 6:30 to 8:30 Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 19. Class St., Conway. Come and perform or just enjoy the show. will cover choosing a temNo cover. 360-445-3000 or plate, choosing a domain name, planning a website www.conwaymuse.com. and page layout. $25. Part Two: 6:30 to 8:30 DANCE RECREATION p.m. Wednesday, Feb. PRESIDENTS DAY FUN THIRD FRIDAY DANCE: 20. Topics will include CLUB: For kids in grades Get moving with a rumba advanced designing, keylesson at 7:30 p.m. followed K-6, noon to 5 p.m. Monwords/meta data, linking, by swing, ballroom, country day, Feb. 18, Skagit Family media and blogs. $25. YMCA, 215 E. Fulton St., and Latin dancing from To register, call Karla Mount Vernon. Activities 8:15 to 10:30 p.m. Friday, Locke at 360-588-6968 or Feb. 15, at the Sons of Nor- will include LEGOs, swim- email at kklocke1@mac. ming, art projects, gym way Hall, 9910 270th St. com. WINTER GARDENS games and more. $20 memNW, Stanwood. No partner The 16th annual Smelt 5K/10K Run, 2-Mile Walk PHOTO CONTEST: Amanecessary. Small fee at the bers, $30 program memDIGITAL PHOTO EDITand Kids’ Dash will take place Saturday, Feb. 23, at teurs and professionals may La Conner Middle School in La Conner. See 2013 bers. 360-336-9622 or door, includes predance ING CLASSES: Alternative submit up to two photos www.skagitymca.org. lesson. 360-387-6842 or Focus will offer two classes Smelt Run under Recreation. of previously unpublished adaptabledesigns@cs.com. on digital photo editing images in Christianson’s 2013 SMELT RUN: The with Adobe Lightroom on from each age group — 5-8, dents, free for members and Nursery’s 2013 Winter Gar16th annual 5K/10K Run, Saturday, Feb. 23, at the 9-12 and 13-16 — will be MUSIC ages 11 and younger. dens Photography Contest. 2-Mile Walk and Kids’ Anacortes Chamber of introduced during the April Next up: FREE MUSIC JAMS: Entries are due by 4:30 p.m. Dash will take place Satur- Commerce Boardroom, 6 evening auction, where Line Wash Drawing: Come and play or just Monday, Feb. 25, at the nursday, Feb. 23, at La Conner upstairs at 819 Commercial the top 20 drawings will be with Rose Mary Tate, 11 watch the fun at Cyndy’s ery, 15806 Best Road, Mount Middle School, 305 N. Sixth Ave., Anacortes. Both classfeatured as framed center- a.m. to 1 p.m. or 2 to 4 p.m. Broiler, 27021 102nd Ave. Vernon. The entry form can St., La Conner. Registration es are suitable for novices pieces and auctioned. Send Saturday, Feb. 23. Try this NW, Stanwood. Free for be downloaded at www. to intermediate users. or deliver drawings by fun way to draw with india participants and spectators. starts at 8:30 a.m., with the christiansonsnursery.com. Kids’ Dash at 9:30 a.m., folPart I: Adobe Lightroom March 1 to Ellie, Humane ink and a twig as a drawing Teen Jam: 7 p.m. second Winners will be announced lowed by the 5K/10K runs Library: 10 a.m. to noon. Society, 18841 Kelleher tool, then add color with a and fourth Tuesday each March 2; all entries will be and 2-Mile Walk at 10 a.m. The class will cover importRoad, Burlington, WA watercolor wash. month. exhibited March 2-3 during Dogs on a leash are weling, organizing and ranking 98233, or call 360-757-0445. Jam Night: 8 p.m. Thursthe annual Winter Hellebore come to participate in the images, editing basics, batch INTRO TO ILLUSTRAdays. Festival. 360-466-3821. walk. Registration through edits, exporting images, FAMILY ART DAYS AT TION ART CLASSES: Bur360-629-4800 or www. Feb. 18: 5K/10K, $25; 2K exporting tricks, presets MoNA: The Museum of lington Parks and Recrecyndysbroiler.com. Walk, $15, $30 families; after and collections. ART CLASSES Northwest Art offers Fam- ation is offering a series of Feb. 18, add $5. Day-ofPart II: Lightroom ily Art Days each month BLACK CAT CONTEST: art classes for ages 8 to 14. SKAGIT VALLEY MUSIC race registration available. Develop Module: Digital at MoNA, 121 S. First St., Kids can enter the Black Instructor Max Elam will CLUB: The club welcomes Kids’ Dash, free for ages 18 Darkroom Techniques: 1 to La Conner. Sessions are Cat Drawing Contest by introduce young artists to performers, listeners and months to 8 years, must be 4 p.m. Class will cover local March 1 as part of the 18th open to all ages and skill a variety of styles and art guests at 1:45 p.m. Thursaccompanied by an adult. adjustments, advanced levels and include guided annual Black Cat Aucmediums. Each four-session day, Feb. 28, at Vasa Hall, T-shirts: $20, limited quanti- editing, exploring unique tion in April to benefit the walk-throughs of MoNA class costs $45 (supplies 1805 Cleveland St., Mount ty day of race. Trophies and images with the presets, Humane Society of Skagit exhibitions. Limited to 15 included). To register, call Vernon. Come and sing, other prizes will be awarded develop module workflow participants per session. To 360-755-9649. Valley. Children ages 5 to play an instrument or just to the top male and female and when to use Adobe register: 360-466-4446, ext. 16 can draw an animal or enjoy the music. Free. For 5K/10K runners, with ribPhotoshop. bird the shelter has offered 108, or FAD@museumofninformation, call Marsha bons to the top finishers in Cost: $40 afternoon sesfor adoption, such as dogs, wart.org. Information: www. AUDITIONS Pederson at 360-757-4906. several age divisions. For FREE ADULT ACTING sion only, $65 both sessions. cats, rabbits, potbellied pigs, museumofnwart.org. Workinformation or entry forms, To register, call Karla Locke shops are free with museum CLASS: Anacortes Comhamsters, rats, parakeets, call 360-848-9336 or visit munity Theatre will present ON STAGE at 360-588-6968 or email at cockatiels, chicken hens or admission. Admission: $8 OPEN MIC: All ages: 7 www.skagitsymphony.com. a series of acting classes for kklocke1@mac.com. roosters. A winner selected adults, $5 seniors, $3 stu-


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, February 14, 2013 - E13

HOT TICKETS LEFTOVER SALMON: Feb. 15, Neptune Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or www. livenation.com. SEATTLE ROCK ORCHESTRA: Feb. 16, Neptune Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or www.livenation.com. PILOBOLUS: Feb. 16, Edmonds Center for the Arts, Edmonds. 425-275-9595 or www. ec4arts.org. THE PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA: Feb. 16-17, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.show boxonline.com. HARLEM GLOBETROTTERS: Feb. 17, Comcast Arena at Everett. 866-332-8499 or www.comcastarenaeverett.com. COHEED AND CAMBRIA, BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME: Feb. 19, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showbox online.com. EELS: Feb. 19, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxon line.com. FEED ME, TEETH: Feb. 20-21, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. GALACTIC: FEATURING COREY GLOVER: Feb. 22, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. MICHAEL KAESHAMMER: Feb. 22, Edmonds Center for the Arts, Edmonds. STS9: Feb. 22, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. AARON NEVILLE: Feb. 23, Mount Baker Theatre, Bellingham. 360-734-6080 or www.mountbakertheatre.com. IVAN & ALYOSHA: Feb. 23, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.show boxonline.com. PENNYWISE, LAGWAGON: Feb. 23, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www. showboxonline.com. TILTED THUNDER RAIL BIRDS: Banked Track Roller Derby: Feb. 24, Comcast Arena at Everett. 866-332-8499 or www.comcast arenaeverett.com. HEY MARSEILLES: March 1, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www. showboxonline.com. MARC MARON (comedy): March 1, Neptune Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or www.livenation.com. NEWSBOYS: March 1, Temple Theatre, Tacoma. 855-443-8499 or LMGconcerts. com. YO GABBA GABBA! LIVE!: March 1-2, The Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or www.livenation.com. MARCHFOURTH MARCHING BAND: March 2, Neptune Theatre, Seattle. 877784-4849 or www.livenation.com. MOE: March 2, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxon line.com. ANBERLIN: March 3, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showbox online.com. G. LOVE & SPECIAL SAUCE: March 6, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-7453000 or www.showboxonline.com. FRIGHTENED RABBIT: March 8, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. BLIND BOYS OF ALABAMA: March 9, Edmonds Center for the Arts, Edmonds.

425-275-9595 or www.ec4arts.org. MAROON 5, WITH NEON TREES & OWL CITY: March 11, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-7453000 or www.livenation.com. LADYSMITH BLACK MAMBAZO: March 13, Edmonds Center for the Arts, Edmonds. 425-275-9595 or www.ec4arts.org. BIG HEAD TODD & THE MONSTERS: March 14, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. LUCKY 2013: March 15, WaMu Theater, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster. com. HOODIE ALLEN: March 20, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. NICK OFFERMAN: March 21, Moore Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or www.livenation.com. MOISTURE FESTIVAL: comedy/variety: March 21-April 14, Seattle. www.moisture festival.org. VOLBEAT: March 22, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showbox online.com. BRIAN REGAN: March 23, Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or www.live nation.com. GEORGE CLINTON & PARLIAMENT FUNKADELIC: March 23, Showbox at the Market. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. MAJOR LAZER: March 26, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxon line.com. ANDREW MCMAHON: March 26, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. DEMETRI MARTIN: March 27, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. THE SPECIALS: March 27, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxon line.com. DIRTYPHONICS: March 28, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. BOB SEGER & THE SILVER BULLET BAND: March 29, Tacoma Dome, Tacoma. 800-7453000 or www.livenation.com. CLUTCH: March 29, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showbox online.com. LOTUS: March 30, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showbox online.com. KMFDM, LEGION WITHIN, NIGHTMARE FORTRESS: March 30, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showbox online.com. PEARL DJANGO, ANNE GRIFFITH: March 30, Sudden Valley Dance Barn, Bellingham. 360-671-1709 or www.suddenvalleylibrary.org. ANTHRAX, EXODUS, HIGH ON FIRE, MUNICIPAL WASTE, HOLY GRAIL: March 31, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. RIHANNA: WITH A$AP ROCKY: April 3, 2013, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.livenation.com. STEPHEN LYNCH: April 4, Neptune Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or www.live nation.com. NANCI GRIFFITH: April 5, Edmonds Center for the Arts, Edmonds. 425-275-9595 or www.ec4arts.org.

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Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E14 - Thursday, February 14, 2013

POP CULTURE Q&A

Credits are due; makeup matters Q: I would like to know if the show “Leverage” is coming back for another season. Q: Onscreen credits that A: TNT decided not to use “and” after so many stars continue the series. In fact, its are named seem unfair to future was uncertain enough those mentioned after the that, like many shows, it “and.” On “CSI” (the Las designed a season finale that Vegas one) after everyone could also serve as a closing else is named we see “and” to the show if no more epiPaul Guifoyle. On “Law & sodes were made. Order: SVU” we see “and” Dann Florek. These people Q: I watched a movie the contribute greatly and the other day called “Enemy quality of the show would Mine.” I was very taken certainly suffer without them. aback by the makeup on Don’t you think these folks Louis Gossett Jr. My quesshould be treated equally on tion is how long each day did the credits or is something it take to put it on? else afoot? A: In the 1985 film GosA: Actually, that “and” sett played an alien opposite is treating the actors better Dennis Quaid’s earthling on than regulars whose names a distant planet. Gossett’s are bunched together. The makeup transformation was “and” sets the performers so considerable that the Los apart — not unlike the box Angeles Times said that, you will see around some except for Gossett’s height, performers’ names in ads. “there is absolutely nothing Alec Baldwin, who was recognizable about him.” inarguably the second most- According to the Chicago important player on “30 Tribune: “At the outset it Rock” (after Tina Fey), was was necessary for Gossett listed after other regulars in to spend seven hours in the the opening credits — but makeup chair” although later with that “and.” Powers that was reduced to three Boothe, an Emmy winner hours to get him made up and distinguished actor who (and a couple of more hours plays Rayna’s father on to remove everything). Still, “Nashville,” gets the “and” in said the Tribune, “Gossett’s that show’s credits. face became raw and sore. To be sure, credits can be The double set of contact complicated, as you can tell lenses burned his eyes, causby noting there are stars, ing his vision to blur.” featured players, guest stars, Making the film overall special guest stars and so on proved very complicated; it changed directors after pro— as well as names placed duction began, which led to a strategically onscreen, or shift in shooting locations and in different type sizes. For instance, on “Two and a Half a redesign of Gossett’s makeMen,” the names of stars Jon up — all adding up to months of delays. But Gossett and Cryer and Ashton Kutcher Quaid were paid the entire are onscreen side-by-side; time and, according to a 1985 Cryer is on the left, so your Times story, Gossett “had eye catches his name first, but Kutcher’s is higher up in never made so much money on a project in his life.” the frame. By RICH HELDENFELS Akron Beacon Journal

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Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E16 - Thursday, February 14, 2013

MOVIES

Veteran cast, humor offset goth-youth nonsense By RICHARD ROEPER Chicago Sun-Times

W

ith “Beautiful Creatures,” we continue the seemingly inevitable march toward a cinematic America with a population 50 percent human and 50 percent “other,” including but not limited to superheroes, mutants, vampires, zombies, werewolves, mummies, fairies, angels, witches, ghosts, demons and the undefined undead. Though not specifically conceived to fill the void left by the merciful departure of the $2 billion “Twilight” franchise, comparisons are inevitable, as we’re again presented with a story about a smart, serious, semi-loner high school student with a single parent who falls for a mysterious newcomer with powers far beyond what the mere mortal can conceive. (Not to mention a seriously dysfunctional extended family.) One big difference: This time around it’s the boy who’s the human and the girl who has the ability to make magic, both wondrous and dark. Also, “Beautiful Creatures” has a much better sense of humor about itself than the “Twilight” movies, with most of the grown-up actors delivering performances leaning more toward the devilishly campy than the straightforward and dramatic. Oscar winners Jeremy Irons and Emma Thompson, Oscar nominee Viola Davis and the wickedly lovely Emmy Rossum are all having great fun in this movie. If only that approach extended to the two young leads, who spend so much time brooding and lamenting and trying to figure out the rules of the supernatu-

Warner Bros. Pictures via AP

Alden Ehrenreich and Viola Davis star in “Beautiful Creatures.”

‘BEAUTIFUL CREATURES’ HH 1⁄2

Ethan Wate....................................... Alden Ehrenreich Lena Duchannes..................................... Alice Englert Macon Ravenwood.................................. Jeremy Irons Amma...................................................... Viola Davis Ridley Duchannes................................. Emmy Rossum Link...................................................... Thomas Mann Sarafine.......................................... Emma Thompson n Running time: 124 minutes. MPAA rating: PG-13 (for violence, scary images and some sexual material).

ral game they don’t seem to be enjoying themselves at all. Based on the first of the four “Caster Chronicles” young-adult novels by Kami Garcia and Margaret Stohl, and directed with considerable style by Richard LaGravenese, “Beautiful Creatures” is told mostly from the POV of teenager Ethan Wate (Alden Ehrenreich), who can’t wait to escape a town so backward you’d think they’d never

seen “Footloose.” Immersing himself in seminal 20th-century literature by the likes of Vonnegut and Salinger, eager to shed the prayer-happy ex-girlfriend who refuses to believe they’re really over, Ethan is plagued and intrigued by a recurring dream on a Civil War battlefield not far from his home. When Lena Duchannes (Alice Englert) arrives at school on the wings of a hundred rumors

about her family and their devil-worshipping ways, Ethan is convinced he’s met the girl of his dreams. THE dream. The Bible-thumping townsfolk — and they come “thisclose” to actually thumping their Bibles — believe Lena and her clan are the spawn of Satan or at the very least witches, and you know what? They’re not far off. Turns out Lena is a “Caster,” with her supernatural powers growing stronger every day as she approaches her 16th birthday, upon which she will be subjected to the Claiming, and ... Well, suffice to say there are many stipulations and potentially tragic land mines ahead, and “Beautiful Creatures” stops in its tracks from time to time so Lena or one of her relatives can outline the rules, as if we’re all attending an elab-

orately costumed theme dinner party populated by actors who refuse to break character as they mill about, spinning their tale. It would all be pretty tedious, goth-youth silliness if not for the considerable delights provided by the aforementioned veterans in the supporting cast. Dressed in elaborate finery that does not look like it came off the rack, Macon Ravenwood (Jeremy Irons) lurks about the family mansion like a modern-day Boo Radley. (In case we don’t get the reference, we’re told flatout he’s like a modern-day Boo Radley because, of course, Ethan has read “To Kill a Mockingbird,” even though it’s on the extensive list of the town’s banned books.) All Casters are either Dark or Light (think “Oz” and good witch/bad witch), and Macon is a Dark Caster,

but he tries to keep those impulses in check as he carefully watches over Lena, who will learn her true nature on her 16th birthday. There’s no such impulse control when it comes to the evil Sarafine (Emma Thompson) and the salacious Ridley (Emmy Rossum). They are Dark Casters through and through, and they’re rolling in it. Sarafine can assume the identity of humans and cause all kinds of trouble from within, while Ridley is like a temptress in a Super Bowl commercial, roaring into town in a red BMW convertible and having her way with the boys. “Beautiful Creatures” springs to life whenever Irons, Thompson or Rossum is center stage. (We also see fine work from Viola Davis, though she’s stuck with a cliched role as a perpetually concerned mother figure who knows a lot more about the town’s cursed history than anyone.) The grown-ups get to wear all the coolest costumes and spout all the juiciest lines. Problem is, this isn’t their story. It’s first and foremost a semi-plodding teen romance with supernatural overtones. Ehrenreich is saddled with a character whose primary strength is his irritating persistence. As was the case with Bella and her lip-biting, shoestaring ways, we wonder why anyone in the supernatural community would be so smitten. Alice Englert (daughter of director Jane Campion) is a promising talent, but there’s not a ton of depth to Lena, either. Maybe that’s because she’s 15, and even when you’re a Caster, at 15 your most interesting days are still in front of you.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, February 14, 2013 - E17

MOVIES MINI-REVIEWS Compiled from news services. Ratings are one to four stars. “Argo” — Ben Affleck directs and stars in the incredible true story of how, at the height of the Iranian hostage crisis, a CIA agent and a couple of Hollywood professionals dreamed up a cockamamie scheme to free six Americans who were not being held in the American Embassy but had found refuge with the Canadian Embassy. Kept top secret for 18 years, the operation created a fake sci-fi production named “Argo,” convinced the Iranians it was real and used it to spirit the Americans out of the country. With lots of tension and also some humor from John Goodman and Alan Arkin as the Hollywood pros involved. Drama, R, 120 minutes. HHHH “Identity Thief” — The pairing of Jason Bateman and Melissa McCarthy in a road trip comedy seems inspired. They’re two unique comedic talents who always put an interesting spin on a line or a double take, whether starring in sitcoms or effortlessly swiping scenes in big-screen fare. Unfortunately, “Identity Thief” is a depressingly predictable road-trip buddy comedy that’s far more interested in car chases, lame shootouts, physical shtick and cheap schmaltz than creating anything original. Comedy, R, 112 minutes. HH “Life of Pi” — A miraculous achievement of storytelling and a landmark of visual mastery. Inspired by a worldwide best-seller that seemed unfilmable, it is a triumph over its difficulties. It is also a moving spiritual achievement. The story involves the 227 days that its teenage hero (Suraj Sharma) spends drifting across the Pacific in the same lifeboat as a Bengal tiger. The movie quietly combines various religious traditions to enfold its story in the wonder of life. How remarkable that these two mammals, and the fish beneath them and birds above them, are all here. Fantasy, PG, 125 minutes. HHHH “Lincoln” — Steven Spielberg’s new film focuses on only a few months of Lincoln’s life, including the passage of the 13th Amendment ending slavery, the surrender of the Confederacy and his assassination. Rarely has a film attended more carefully to the details of politics. Daniel DayLewis creates a Lincoln who is calmly self-confident, patient

AT THE LINCOLN THEATRE AT AREA THEATERS ANACORTES CINEMAS Feb. 14-21 One Life (NR): Thursday, Feb. 21: 7 p.m. The Metropolitan Opera: Rigoletto (NR): Saturday: 9:55 a.m. A Good Day to Die Hard (R): Thursday: 1:20, 3:45, 6:50; Friday-Sunday: 1:20, 3:45, 6:50, 9:00; Monday-Wednesday: 1:20, 3:45, 6:50; Thursday: 1:20, 3:45 Safe Haven (PG-13): Thursday: 1:00, 3:35, 6:30; Friday-Sunday: 1:00, 3:35, 6:30, 9:05; Monday-Thursday: 1:00, 3:35, 6:30 Identity Thief (R): Thursday: 1:10, 3:40, 6:40; Friday: 1:10, 3:40, 6:40, 9:10; Saturday: 3:40, 6:40, 9:10; Sunday: 1:10, 3:40, 6:40, 9:10; Monday-Thursday: 1:10, 3:40, 6:40 360-293-7000 BLUE FOX DRIVE-IN Oak Harbor 360-675-5667 CASCADE MALL THEATRES Burlington For listings: 888-AMC-4FUN (888-2624386). CONCRETE THEATRE Feb. 15-17 Beasts of the Wild (PG-13): Friday, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday: 5 and 7:30 p.m.; Sunday: 4 p.m. 360-941-0403

and willing to play politics in a realistic way. Not about an icon of history, but about a president who was scorned by some of his opponents as a hayseed from the backwoods. He understood them better than they did him. Sure to win many Academy Award nominations. Drama, PG-13, 149 minutes. HHHH “Mama” — To the credit of director Andy Muschietti, his co-writing team and a firstrate cast, “Mama” succeeds in scaring the wits out of us and leaving some lingering, deeply creepy images, despite indulging in many horror-film cliches. Movies like “Mama” are thrill rides. We go to be scared and then laugh, scared and then laugh, scared and then shocked. And of course, there’s almost always a little plot left over for a sequel. It’s a ride horror fans would take again. Horror, PG-13, 100 minutes. HHH “Safe Haven” — Directed by the versatile Lasse Hallstrom and starring the attractive duo of Josh Duhamel and Julianne Hough, “Safe Haven” is yet another entry in the Nicholas Sparks book-to-movie factory that has given us “The Notebook,” “Message in a Bottle,” “Dear John,” etc. For 90 per-

OAK HARBOR CINEMAS Feb. 14-21 Silver Linings Playbook (R): Thursday, Feb. 14: 12:55, 3:30, 6:30 Escape from Planet Earth 2D (PG): FridaySunday: 12:55, 3:00, 6:50, 8:50; MondayThursday: 12:55, 3:00, 6:50 Beautiful Creatures (PG-13): Thursday: 12:45, 3:20, 6:30; Friday- Sunday: 12:45, 3:20, 6:30, 9:05; Monday-Thursday: 12:45, 3:20, 6:30 A Good Day to Die Hard (R): FridaySunday: 12:50, 3:10, 6:40, 9:00; MondayThursday: 12:50, 3:10, 6:40; Thursday: 12:50, 3:10, 6:40 360-279-2226 STANWOOD CINEMAS Feb. 14-21 One Life (NR): Thursday, Feb. 21: 7 p.m. The Metropolitan Opera: Rigoletto (NR): Saturday: 9:55 a.m. Beautiful Creatures (PG-13): 1:00, 3:30, 6:30, 9:00 A Good Day to Die Hard (R): 1:20, 3:35, 7:10, 9:20 Safe Haven (PG-13): 1:10, 3:35, 6:40, 9:05 Identity Thief (R): 1:05, 3:15, 6:50, 9:10 Warm Bodies (PG-13): Thursday-Friday: 1:15, 3:20, 7:00, 9:15; Saturday: 3:20, 7:00, 9:15; Sunday-Wednesday: 1:15, 3:20, 7:00, 9:15; Thursday: 1:15, 3:20, 9:15 360-629-0514

cent of the journey, it’s a solid movie for those in the mood for some good old-fashioned, great-looking-couple-getscaught-in-the-rain romance. Then something happens at the very end that’ll make you question the film’s sanity. Romantic thriller, PG-13, 115 minutes H1⁄2 “Side Effects” — Rooney Mara stars as an edgy young woman named Emily whose husband (Channing Tatum) has been released after four years in prison for insider trading. Things don’t go smoothly for Emily and she’s referred to a psychiatrist (Jude Law), who prescribes a new drug named Ablixa. The drug causes some alarming behavior as director Steven Soderbergh draws us into a vortex of whispers that something haunted and possessed is going on. Thriller, R, 105 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “The Impossible” — The tsunami that devastated the Pacific Basin in the winter of 2004 remains one of the worst natural disasters in history. Many around the world sat mesmerized, watching the news on TV -– again and again, that towering wall of water looming from the sea, tossing trucks, buses and its helpless victims aside. In this terrifying triumph

of special effects, Juan Antonio Bayona’s film becomes a powerful story of a family’s cohesive strength. With Naomi Watts, Ewan McGregor and Tom Holland. Drama, PG-13, 114 minutes. HHHH “Warm Bodies” — Here’s a bloody, fresh twist on the most popular horror genre of this century, with none-toosubtle echoes of a certain starcrossed romance that harkens back to a certain Bard who placed a certain young Romeo under a certain balcony. A wellpaced, nicely directed, postapocalyptic love story, it has a terrific sense of humor and the, um, guts to be unabashedly romantic and unapologetically optimistic. A lot of zombie movies have heart, but usually the heart ends up on someone’s plate. Comedy horror, PG-13, 97 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “Zero Dark Thirty” — Two hours of watching a loner CIA strategist who knows she is right — and the payoff that she is. Jessica Chastain stars as Maya, providing the film with a timely heroine. Lots of murky action in the big capture and death, but lacking the split-second timing and relentless action of director Kathryn Bigelow’s “The Hurt Locker.” Thriller, R, 157 minutes. HHH

712 S. First St., Mount Vernon 360-336-8955 n www.lincolntheatre.org

‘Anna Karenina’ 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 14

The “Anna Karenina” story unfolds in its original late 19th-century Russia high-society setting and explores the capacity for love that surges through the human heart, from the passion between adulterers to the bond between a mother and her children. As Anna questions her happiness, change comes to her family, friends and community. Directed by Joe Wright; starring Aaron Johnson, Jude Law, Keira Knightley and Matthew MacFadyen. Rated R. $10 general; $9 seniors, students and active military; $8 members; $7 children 12 and under. Bargain matinee prices (all shows before 6 p.m.): $8 general, $6 members, $5 children 12 and under.

‘The Met: Live in HD – Rigoletto’ 9:55 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 16

Director Michael Mayer places his new production of Verdi’s towering tragedy in 1960s Las Vegas. Inspired by the antics of the Rat Pack, Piotr Beczala is the womanizing Duke of Mantua, Željko Lucic is his tragic sidekick, Rigoletto, and Diana Damrau is Rigoletto’s daughter, Gilda. Enjoy a pre-opera lecture with Stassya Pacheco at 9:25 a.m. Box lunches available by pre-order. $23 adults; $19 seniors; $16 students and children, with $2 off for Lincoln members.

‘Jimi Hendrix: Live at Woodstock’ 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 16

Experience Hendrix’s August 1969 Woodstock concert on the big screen and in surround sound. The performance includes “Voodoo Child,” “Fire,” “Purple Haze,” “Foxey Lady” and his dramatic interpretation of the “Star Spangled Banner.” Directed by Grammy Award-winner Bob Smeaton. $14, with $2 off for Lincoln members.

‘Modern Times’ 3 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 17

Charlie Chaplin’s classic features his last outing as the Little Tramp and his first film to acknowledge the 20th century. Proceeds will benefit the Lincoln’s Digital Futures Campaign. Free, donations to the campaign appreciated.

‘Argo’ 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 21

The Oscar-nominated film is based on the real-life rescue in 1980 of six Americans — including Mark Lijek and Cora Amburn-Lijek of Anacortes — from Iran. The movie follows a CIA and Canadian secret mission to extract the diplomats from the Iranian revolution. Lijek and Amburn-Lijek will talk about their experiences before and after the movie on Saturday, Feb. 23. Rated R. $10 general; $9 seniors, students and active military; $8 members; $7 children 12 and under. Bargain matinee prices (all shows before 6 p.m.): $8 general, $6 members, $5 children 12 and under.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E18 - Thursday, February 14, 2013

OUT & ABOUT ART

art show continues through Feb. 25 at Rob Schouten LORNA LIBERT: OILS: Gallery, 765 Wonn Road, The show of new paintings Greenbank. More than 30 continues through Feb. 25 Whidbey Island artists will at Scott Milo Gallery, 420 participate in the exhibit, Commercial Ave., Anawith a portion of the procortes. Also showing are ceeds going to benefit abstract oils by Carole BarSouth Whidbey’s Hearts rer, watercolors by Jan Geland Hammers, whose latly, photograph encaustics volunteers help Whidbey by Kathy Hastings and residents who are unable watercolors by Keith physically or financially Sorenson. Gallery hours to care for their homes. are 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. Monday through Saturday. to 4 p.m. weekdays and 10 360-293-6938 or www.scott a.m. to 5 p.m. weekends milo.com. (Tuesdays and Wednesdays by appointment). 360-222NEW PAINTINGS: A 3070 or www.robschouten show of new paintings on canvas and paper by Anne gallery.com. Martin McCool continues “ARTISTS IN LOVE: With through Feb. 28 at Anne Life and Each Other”: Martin McCool Gallery, The sixth annual “Love 711 Commercial Ave., AnaMonth” art show continues cortes. The show will also feature works by other gal- through Feb. 28 at Raven lery artists, including paint- Rocks Gallery, 765 Wonn ings and prints, sculptures, Road, Greenbank. The exhibition features Mary Jo glass, ceramics, jewelry, Oxrieder’s latest miniature turned wood, baskets and paintings, handmade art handwoven scarves. Galcards and more; new paintlery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 ings in Windwalker Taibi’s p.m. Wednesday through “Ravens in Love” series; Saturday or by appointand whimsical lizard and ment. 360-293-3577 or fish pen and ink creations www.annemartinmccool. by Tim Potter. For inforcom. mation, including gallery “GHOSTS”: The exhibi- hours and directions, call tion continues through Feb. 360-222-0102 or visit www. ravenrocksgallery.com. 24 at Anchor Art Space, 216 Commercial Ave., AnaMASTERS OF CHIcortes. Participating photographers and video artists NESE ART: Allied Arts of reflect on the human desire Whatcom County and the to record and venerate our Chinese Cultural Festival is hosting “Masters of Chimemories, exploring the nese Art” through Feb. 23 ways memory shapes who we are and who we long to at the Allied Arts Gallery, be. Featured artists include 1418 Cornwall Ave., BellBill Finger, Ford Gilbreath, ingham. The show features three well-known artists Michelle Alexis Newman, Forrest Kahlil Perrine, Jus- from China: Benxing Wang, specializing in seal cutting, tin Colt Beckman and Joe Rudko. Curated by Caitlin currently on exhibit at the United Nations; Lipeng Argyle. Gallery hours Wang, a contemporary Chiare noon to 5 p.m. Friday nese painter with studios in through Sunday. www. China, New York and Cananchorartspace.org. ada; and Zhensheng Liu, a prominent Chinese calART FOR HEARTS & ligrapher. Gallery hours are HAMMERS: The benefit

MoNA EXHIBITIONS: Two new exhibits continue through March 13 at the Museum of Northwest Art, 121 S. First St., La Conner. “Eduardo Calderón: Portraits of 20 Northwest Artists”: Calderón interviewed a cross section of Northwest artists ranging in age, background and mediums each uses to make art, and photographed the artists in their homes. The exhibition includes Calderón’s audio and transcribed interviews with the artists about influences, backgrounds and what brought them to the Northwest (if the artist was not already a native). The show also includes works by each artist. “Black and White Color Study from the Permanent Collection”: Presenting black, a symbol for sophistication and authority, and white, which suggests purity and neutrality, the exhibition offers an atypical look at the Northwest palette. Plus, excerpts from studies that tackle the question, “Are black and white colAfter weeks of interior restoration work, the ors?” as well as the science La Conner Quilt & Textile Museum, 703 Second St., La Conner, will reopen today with a new show, “Color, and history behind black and white. Design, & Inspiration: Kaffe Fassett and Brandon Museum hours are noon Mably.” It continues through March 24. Fassett and to 5 p.m. Sundays and Mably are well-known quilters, fabric designers, Mondays, and 10 a.m. to knitters and authors. The exhibit will feature both 5 p.m. Tuesdays through quilts and knitting. Sponsored by the Camano Island Quilters. Museum hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Saturdays. $8, $5 seniors, $3 $7, $5 students and military, free for members and students, free for members ages 11 and younger. 360-466-4288 or www.laconner and ages 11 and younger. quilts.com. 360-466-4446 or www. museumofnwart.org.

LA CONNER QUILT MUSEUM REOPENS

ranging from photo-realism to portraits to landscapes. Museum hours are noon to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday; open until 8 p.m. Thursdays and at 10 a.m. Saturdays. $10, $8 student/ senior/military, $4.50 ages 4 and younger. $5 reduced admission on Thursdays. 360-778-8930 or www.what commuseum.org. “SURFACE”: Artworks by Northwest printmakers Twila Tate, Theo Jonsson and Jean Behnke are on display through March 1 at the Skagit Valley College Art Gallery, located in the Gary Knutzen Cardinal Center on SVC’s Mount Vernon campus. The three Skagit Valley artists investigate surface tension through the use of pattern, texture, rhythm, line and color to create abstract and representational compositions. The gallery is open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. 360416-7812.

BIENNIAL ART SHOW: Western Washington University’s “Departments of Art and Design Biennial” continues through March 9 at the Western Gallery, located on the WWU campus in Bellingham. The show features a variety of work by 18 artists — faculty from Western’s Art and Design departments, including invited temporary and past faculty and staff members. One over“CHICANITAS: SMALL arching theme is collaboartworks by John Goodwin, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday PAINTINGS FROM THE ration, not only in terms through Friday and noon to Macah and Peter Dunthorne from Upper Skagit. CHEECH MARIN COLLEC- of focusing on the artist 5 p.m. Saturday. 360- 676TION”: The show continues team, but also in allowing 8548 or www.alliedarts.org. Gallery hours are noon through March 24 at the the viewer to participate. to 5 p.m. Friday through Whatcom Museum’s Light- The exhibition is free and Sunday. 360-708-4787 or “IN THE SPIRIT OF www.gallerycygnus.com. A catcher Building, 250 Flora open to the public. Gallery OUR GRANDMOTHERS: reception for the artists will St., Bellingham. The show hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Contemporary Art of the N.W. Coast and Ancestral take place from 3 to 5 p.m. features 65 paintings from Monday through Friday, Saturday, Feb. 26. Gallery actor/comedian Cheech except Wednesdays when Tradition”: The exhibit hours are noon to 5 p.m. Marin’s collection by 26 the gallery is open until 8 continues through March Friday through Sunday. Mexican-American artp.m., and noon to 4 p.m. 24 at Gallery Cygnus, 109 360-708-4787 or www.gal ists – averaging 16 inches Saturdays. 360-650-3900 or Commercial St., La Conlerycygnus.com. square and smaller and westerngallery.wwu.edu. ner. The show features


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, February 14, 2013 - E19

OUT & ABOUT AT THE ANACORTES MUSEUM: “Young Man in a Hurry: The Life of Isaac Stevens and the 150th Anniversary of the Civil War” is on display at the Anacortes Museum’s Carnegie Gallery, 1305 Eighth St., Anacortes. As Washington Territory’s first territorial governor and superintendent of Indian Affairs, Stevens pushed through treaties with Indian tribes that set off the region’s Indian Wars and still create controversy today. Museum hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Saturday (closed Wednesday) and 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday. Free admission. 360-293-1915 or museum. cityofanacortes.org.

TRAINS, TRAINS, corn. 360-336-9777 or www. TRAINS: The Whatcomskagitfoodcoop.com. Skagit Model Railroad Club Next up: will host an open house Feb. 20: “Fat, Sick and from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. SatNearly Dead”: 100 pounds urday, Feb. 16, at 1469 Silver overweight, loaded up Run Lane, Alger. The club on steroids and suffering from a debilitating autoim- operates large, permanent “ARGO” GUESTS: AnaHO- and N-scale model cortes residents Mark Lijek mune disease, Joe Cross is railroad layouts. Admission at the end of his rope and and Cora Amburn-Lijek is by donation to help conthe end of his hope. This will speak at the 7:30 p.m. tinue building the layouts. inspiring film chronicles HOLOCAUST SURVIVOR: Saturday, Feb. 23, showwww.whatcomskagitmrc.org. Joe’s personal mission to ing of “Argo” at the LinNoemi Ban will speak at regain his health. Along the coln Theatre, 712 S. First 6 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 19, in DINOSAUR BONES: The way, he meets Phil, a morSt., Mount Vernon. Both Arntzen Hall, Room 100, Mt. Baker Rock & Gem bidly obese man who joins are survivors of the 1979 at Western Washington Club will feature a dinosaur him on his quest for good U.S. Embassy takeover in University, Bellingham. bone “show & tell” at its health. Tehran, the central plot of The Auschwitz-Birkenau next meeting at 7 p.m. MonFeb. 27: “We are Not “Argo.” www.lincolntheatre. death camp survivor will day, Feb. 18, at the Bloedel Ghosts”: Fifty years ago, org. tell how she lost most of Donovan Community CenDetroit was booming with her family in the Nazi death ter Building, 2214 Electric “PUSHING THE LIMITS”: 2 million hardworking camps, and how she shares people living the American Ave., Bellingham. Club her story to inspire current The Sedro-Woolley Public members will also share Dream. When the auto Library is hosting a new and future generations to four-part science discussion industry crashed, so did the other recently acquired rock prevent similar genocides FESTIVALS treasures. The evening will series for adults. Participants Motor City. Most moved from happening. Free, but SNOW GOOSE & BIRDaway; whole neighborhoods include door prizes, refreshwill meet for 75 minutes reservations required: 360ING FESTIVAL: The eighth ments, a silent auction and turned into wastelands. 650-4529 or www.wce.wwu. once a month for a book annual Port Susan Snow discussion, a short related But some didn’t give up on brief business meeting. edu/NWCHE. Goose & Birding Festival video in a fun science café Visitors welcome, with or the city they love. This film will take place from 10 a.m. model, and a group discuswithout rocks. For informatells the tales of Detroiters “THE ROAD NOT to 4 p.m. Saturday and noon sion revolving around the tion, contact Lori at 360remaking their city with TAKEN”: Hilaree O’Neill to 4 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 23-24, monthly theme. Sessions 961-7873, email lorinhardy@ vision and spirit. will offer an inspirational with a variety of activities will be led by scientist Baryahoo.com or visit www. at the Floyd Norgaard Cul- look at the depths of human bara Johnson and library mtbakerrockclub.org. WHALE MUSEUM endurance and teamwork tural Center, 27108 102nd staff. REOPENS: The Whale while sharing her journeys Ave. NW, Stanwood. Events Nature: “When the Kill- Museum will reopen at 10 HUMAN RIGHTS FILM at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. are scheduled both days at ing’s Done” by T.C. Boyle, FESTIVAL: The 13th annual a.m. today, Feb. 14, at 62 19, at the Stanwood High several locations around Feb. 19. Bellingham Human Rights First St. N. Friday Harbor. School Performing Arts Stanwood and Camano Survival: “Arctic Drift” Film Festival will take place After six weeks of closure Center, 7400 272nd St. NW, Island. Enjoy guided and by Clive Cussler, March 19. for renovation, the museum Feb. 21-March 2, with film Stanwood. unguided birding tours, art Connection: “Thunderscreenings at the Fairhaven will feature a variety of In 2012, O’Neill climbed shows, displays and presenstruck” by Erik Larson, new exhibits on whales and College Auditorium at Mount Everest and its tations, kids’ activities and April 16. Western Washington Unithe Salish Sea ecosystem. more. Advance registration neighbor, Lhotse, within Knowledge: “Land of versity, The Pickford Film Museum hours are 10 a.m. 24 hours. In doing so, she required for guided tours. Painted Caves” by Jean to 5 p.m. daily. 360-378-4710 Center and other locajoined an elite group of Some events require a small Auel, May 2. or www.whalemuseum.org. tions around Bellingham. fee. www.snowgoosefest.org. alpinists who possess the Discussions will begin endurance to link two 8,000at 6:30 p.m. on designated meter peaks in a single LECTURES Tuesdays at the library, 802 push and became the sole Ball St. Copies of the books AND TALKS Danceable World Music woman to accomplish this will be available at the feat. Named by Outside “MENTAL ILLNESS AND at Maple Hall in La Conner library’s front desk. RSVP: Magazine as one of the GUN VIOLENCE”: The 7:30pm Saturday Feb. 16th 360-855-1166. Fidalgo Democrats will host most adventurous women The musicians perform lively Yiddish a discussion at 7 p.m. today, in sports, she has skied from tunes, fast-tempo gypsy music and MORE FUN the 8,000-meter Himalayan Feb. 14, at the Anacortes compelling dance rhythms. summit of Cho Oyu in Tibet, Public Library, 1220 10th FREE MOVIES: The Tickets $15 & $17 St., Anacortes. Panelists will throughout the Andes, on Skagit Valley Food Co-op Advanced tickets available at volcanoes in the Kamchatka will screen a series of free include Jonathon Vander Next Chapter Bookstore: 360.466.2665 Schuur, M.S., licensed mar- Peninsula of Russia, and in “films to get you thinking” the tight couloirs of Bafriage and family therapist; at 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays, in Sponsored by: fin Island. $15, $7 students Paul Nielson, deputy prosroom 309, 202 S. First St., ecutor for the Skagit Coun- with ASB. Tickets are Mount Vernon. Free popty Mental Health Court; and a representative from NAMI-Skagit, the National Alliance on Mental Illness. A moderated question and answer period will follow. Refreshments will be available. Bring a nonperishable food donation for the food bank. 360-293-7114.

available at the Stanwood and Camano branches of Coastal Community Bank or at the door. For information, contact Karla Jacks at 425-345-5106.

“What the Chelm”

The opening evening will feature free screenings of “Bidder 70” at 7 and 9 p.m. at the Pickford Film Center, 1318 Bay St., Bellingham. A silent auction will benefit the festival. During the 10-day festival, 20 documentary films will be presented, followed by facilitated discussion, some led by the filmmakers themselves. For information, visit www.bhrff.webs.com. S.P.O.T. AUCTION: Skagit County animal rescue organization Saving Pets One at a Time (S.P.O.T.) will host its annual fundraising auction at 5:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 23, at St. Joseph Center, 215 N. 15th St., Mount Vernon. The auction will feature a variety of items for pets and their owners. Tickets: $25. 360-336-5388 or email teresas@savingpetsoneatatime. org. WOODCHOPPERS’ BALL: The 26th annual Woodchoppers’ Ball will begin at 6 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 23, at the Guemes Island Community Center. Enjoy a potluck dinner at 6 p.m., followed by an open mic from 7 to 8 p.m. and live music by Polecat from 8 to 11 p.m. The evening will also include a raffle, the popular wood-chucking contest and more. $8 adults, $7 seniors, $5 teens. For information, call Mike or Suzie at 360293-5708.


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360 February 14 2013  

Arts, entertainment and recreation for the Skagit Valley

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