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VALENTINE’S DAY Local events, date night ... and ‘The Big Lebowski’ PAGE 3

Skagit Valley Herald Thursday February 13, 2014

Reviews

Movies

Music: Eric Church, Neil Finn Video Games: ‘KillZone: Shadow Fall’

‘RoboCop’ reboot: Same blueprint, modified and updated for sleeker design, but not as intellectually cutting edge

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Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E2 - Thursday, February 13, 2014

YOUR ARTS, ENTERTAINMENT AND RECREATION GUIDE TO WHAT’S GOING ON IN SKAGIT COUNTY AND THE SURROUNDING AREAS

This Weekend / Page 5 Enjoy free admission Friday through Monday at the Whale Museum in Friday Harbor.

Inside

SUBMISSIONS Email features@skagitpublishing.com, vrichardson@skagitpublishing. com (recreation items) Deadline: 5 p.m. Friday for the following Thursday edition Phone 360-416-2135 Hand-deliver 1215 Anderson Road Mount Vernon, WA 98274 Mailing address P.O. Box 578 Mount Vernon, WA 98273

Music, Video Game Reviews...........6-7 Get Involved........................................ 8 On Stage, Tuning Up....................10-11 Travel............................................12-13 Hot Tickets........................................ 14 At the Lincoln.................................... 15 Movies..........................................16-17 Out & About.................................18-19

Online events calendar To list your event on our website, visit goskagit.com and look for the Events Calendar on the home page HAVE A STORY IDEA? w For arts and entertainment, contact Features Editor Craig Parrish at 360-416-2135 or features@skagitpublishing.com w For recreation, contact staff writer Vince Richardson at 360-416-2181 or vrichardson@ skagitpublishing.com TO ADVERTISE 360-424-3251


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, February 13, 2014 - E3

VALENTINE’S DAY

It’s a rather dim picture for date night By GLENN WHIPP Los Angeles Times

Dinner and a movie. Yes, I realize it represents a profound failure of imagination, but this was the date I had proposed to my wife for Valentine’s Day this week. But sometimes life’s obligations (not to mention two kids) limit your options for an evening out, so you flail around, punt and resort to an old standby. It still beats takeout and loading the dishwasher, right? Maybe not. A cursory glance at the theater listings reveals a slate of movies not exactly geared toward anyone whose age or IQ exceeds 30. “That Awkward Moment”? The one about the infantile guys chanting “bros before hos”? Didn’t that phrase go out with low-rise jeans? Pass. “The Lego Movie”? I believe that’s currently playing on our living room floor. “Labor Day”? Did you read the reviews? No reason not to skip ahead, enjoy a slice of peach pie and call it a night. And we’ve already seen “About Last Night” and “Endless Love” back when Lionel Richie and John Waite ruled the charts and Rob Lowe looked … well, exactly as he does now. Maybe that Valentine’s dinner should include kale and a brisk power walk back to the car … that we parked five miles away. My point is: Somewhere, somebody is at this very moment asking: Where have you gone, Garry Marshall? Our nation turns its lonely eyes to you, woo, woo, woo. (Or, eew, eew, eew, depending on how you feel about “Valentine’s Day” and “New Year’s Eve.”) Just when did “date night movie” lose its place on studios’ release schedules? Typically this time of year, there’s still some awards-season leftovers hanging around in theaters, movies aimed at grown-ups and among the biopics and historical epics and serious-minded whatnot, you might occasionally get a whiff of love in the air.

Valentine’s events in the area

VALENTINE’S DAY LUNCHEON: Noon Friday, Feb. VALENTINE’S HEART AND ART DAY CAMP: 14, Mount Vernon 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday, Feb. 14, Burlington Senior Center, Parks and Recreation Center, 900 E. Fairhaven Ave., Burlington. Ages 7 to 12. Make Valentine’s 1401 Cleveland St., Mount Vernon. decorations, visit CreativiTEA Pottery Painting Just in Time Jazz Studio in Bellingham and enjoy cocoa and a Duo will perform. treat. $40. 360-755-9649. $3.50 to $5.50 suggested dona SINGING VALENTINE: Have the An-O-Chords John Pendleton photo John Pendleton photo tion for ages 60 men’s barbershop chorus deliver a singing and older. ReserValentine to your favorite person at his or her home, job, restaurant or other location on Friday, vations: 360-336-5757. Feb. 14. The quartet will deliver two love songs, a long-stemmed rose and mail your Valentine a VALENTINE’S SALSA DANCE: Rumba Northphoto of the fun-filled moment. $35. Mount Ver- west will host a Valentine’s Day Salsa Dance from 8 p.m. to midnight Friday, Feb. 14, at BAAY, non/Burlington/Sedro-Woolley, 360-757-1946; La Conner/Anacortes, 360-293-3483; Oak Har- 1059 N. State St., Bellingham. Dance instructors Antonio Diaz and Heather Haugland will bor/Coupeville, 360-672-4620. lead lessons in salsa, bachata and merengue at VALENTINE’S DANCE, CONCERT: Dance to the 8:30 and 10:30 p.m., with open dancing before music of Ruvara Marimba Ensemble from 7 to 9 and between. Advance tickets: $10 at Café Rumba, 1140 State St., Bellingham; $12 at the p.m. Friday, Feb. 14, at the Phillip Tarro Theatre door. All ages welcome. Beer and wine available on the Skagit Valley College campus, 2405 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. Free admission and for ages 21 and older. Details: 360-595-7369 or rumbanorthwest@gmail.com. refreshments. Information: jmandg@msn.com.

The author’s big plans for Valentine’s Day include watching “The Big Lebowski” with his Special Lady Friend. Last year we watched those two kooky head cases in David O. Russell’s “Silver Linings Playbook” fuss, feud and dance and give each other renewed purpose in life to the strains of Stevie Wonder and the White Stripes. It had us at “Hey!” This year there’s another movie from Russell, “American Hustle,” but the emotional connection between its con artist lovers, played by Christian Bale and Amy Adams, feels like it’s hidden

somewhere beneath the elaborate comb-over that Bale’s character sports. Meanwhile, there’s a lot of sex in “The Wolf of Wall Street,” even some between a husband and wife, but not much in the way of romance unless you broaden the definition to include a candlelit dominatrix. Among the other best picture nominees, Sandra Bullock and George Clooney never have the chance to pair off in “Grav-

VALENTINE’S CONCERT: Eric Tingstad and Nancy Rumbel, 7:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 14, Lincoln Theatre, Rob Prout photo 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $18-$25. Purchase an add-on package with champagne/sparkling cider, two truffles and a chance to win a gift box of chocolates for $5 in advance, $8 at the door. 360336-8955 or lincolntheatre.org. VALENTINE’S DANCE: Dance to the big band sounds of Camano Junction from 7 to 10 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 15, at Camano Center, 606 Arrowhead Road, Camano Island. $12, $10 members. 360-387-0222 or camanocenter.org.

ity,” while, thankfully, nothing of that sort ever happens between 79-year-old Judi Dench and Steve Coogan during their trip to our nation’s capital in “Philomena.” Bruce Dern and June Squibb give us a glimpse of long-standing love in “Nebraska.” It’s not always pretty, but it also proves considerably more affecting than you’d expect from the way the movie begins. Like Tom Hanks’ Capt. Phillips, you might even think that, in his younger days, Dern’s character might write a goodbye note to his wife in the event he was captured by Somali pirates. Then there’s “Her,” the Spike Jonze romance about Theodore (the great Joaquin Phoenix), a lovelorn man with a “tiny little hole” in his heart falling for his computer’s sexy, sentient operating system and as a result, finding himself re-engaged with his life and other flesh-and-blood people. “You always wanted a wife without the challenge of dealing with anything real,” Theodore’s bruised ex tells him. But she’s speaking out of spite. After their breakup, Theodore had isolated

himself and retreated into technology. It was the mechanized world that allowed him to feel again and shed his solitude. Jonze was jokingly asked at the Toronto Film Festival whether “Her” was his way of getting rid of all the real women in the world and replacing them. “The movie, to me, is about our desire to connect or the need to connect,” Jonze answered, “and how quickly technology has changed our lives in this newest incarnation — the Internet and digital technology. But I was also always trying to make a relationship movie and a love story and examine relationships.” It’s arguably the most interesting look at love attempted on film in ages. And as such, my wife and I have already watched “Her.” Twice. In the end, we decided we’ll return on Valentine’s night to a movie possessing all the elements of a great romance — friendship, fun, a little sex and Nina Simone singing Duke Ellington. That’s right. I’ll be watching “The Big Lebowski” with my Special Lady Friend. You’re not dealing with morons here.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E4 - Thursday, February 13, 2014

MOVIES

Oscar-winning writer calls in favors to make ‘Winter’s Tale’ makes your eyes cross.” In “WinOscar-winning screenter’s Tale,” in writer, producer and directurn-of-thetor Akiva Goldsman fell in 20th century love with Mark Helprin’s America, an 1983 novel “Winter’s Tale” immigrant decades ago. And despite baby is set the book’s themes, texture, Goldsman adrift in a density and sheer bulk — model ship it is 740 pages long — he by parents denied entrance could never quite give up to America so that he the idea that it should be a might grow up to have the movie. opportunities denied him. “It’s a fairy tale for “Peter Lake” grows up to grown-ups,” says Goldsbecome a thief, only to fall man, who won an Oscar for Beverly, a spirited but for adapting “A Beautiful sickly, doomed beauty, the Mind,” and counts “The daughter of a newspaper Da Vinci Code,” “Cindereditor. Can he somehow ella Man” and “A Time to save her with his “gift”? Kill” among his screenplay Peter is pursued by a credits. “The most appealgang led by his former ing thing about the book mentor, the murderous is also the most tricky. Pearly. And he is saved, It’s a hybridized genre — time and again, by a magimagical realism. It’s not cal, winged white horse, something Americans have which makes it easier to embraced in books or in accept Peter’s sudden arrivmovies, because it’s neither al 100 years in the future fantasy nor fact — bricks where his fate and his past and mortar reality right actions meet their destiny. alongside high fantasy.” The New York Times Think “Life of Pi” or Book Review was among “Midnight in Paris,” for those publications praisexamples of the rare mov- ing this “large souled” ies in the genre that have book as one of the best been hits. American novels of its “Back when the book era. But that alone wasn’t came out, you’d have enough to keep Goldsman, people who couldn’t toler- one of Hollywood’s most ate the idea of a dramatic, in-demand screenwriters, wrenching scene of death interested. in the same story as a fly“It’s about redefining ing white horse. You either hope and triumph in the think that’s delightful, or it search for meaning after By ROGER MOORE McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Warner Bros. via AP

Colin Farrell and Jessica Brown Findlay star in “Winter’s Tale.” we’ve lost someone,” he says. He took versions of a script to studios six times over the years. “And I was right in the middle of that sixth try when my wife suddenly died.” Rebecca Goldsman had a heart attack in July 2010. She was only 42. Goldsman stayed with his labor-oflove project “as a way of surviving that.” “In a funny way, I made it for people like me, who have gone through that, losing someone who was too young,” Goldsman says. “Finally, everybody becomes like me. We all face the death of loved ones.” Hollywood is full of determined writer-directors pushing scripts they describe as “a labor of love.” Goldsman’s track record meant that he’d be given seriously con-

sideration — with strings attached. “Warner Bros. graciously said ‘Yes.’ We budgeted the movie at $80 (million), and they gave us $40.” ($46 million is the reported budget.) Goldsman could get around that shortfall in ways available to a screenwriter who has an Oscar, a best picture win, a lot of hits under his belt and loyal actor friends he’s made over the course of a 30-year film career. “Akiva calls, of course I’m doing the movie,” says Jennifer Connelly, who won her best supporting actress Oscar for “A Beautiful Mind.” “I’ve been hearing about this project for many years. It’s flattering and I was honored, too, to be asked to be a part of something that’s so close to his heart.”

Basically, Goldsman says, “The movie’s an accumulation of 20 years of Hollywood favors.” Connelly would play Virginia, a modern-day reporter who becomes entangled in Peter Lake’s story. Russell Crowe, her “Beautiful Mind” costar, took the role of the demonic villain Pearly. In tinkering with, streamlining and trying to make the story “more cohesive, with rules to this universe that everyone could understand,” Goldsman created a boss for Pearly — Lucifer himself. To play him? Another favor called in — Will Smith, who starred in films based on Goldsman’s scripts for “I Am Legend” and “I, Robot.” Colin Farrell plays Peter Lake and Jessica Brown Findlay is Beverly. An old hand at convert-

ing popular books into movies, Goldsman took liberties with this “Tale,” and he wishes fans of the book will let him get away with it. “You hope that you’re consolidating those salient elements that are meaningful to the novel, and that other people will agree those are the main points. We all like things for different reasons, so it’s a real game of roulette, in terms of popular acceptance.” His biggest aim — to not compromise in the most important ways, “make a movie for grown-ups,” to not water down the magical realism, the romance or the tragedy of an acclaimed novel just to make an easier sell. “‘Endless Love’ opens opposite us. A friend of mine joked, this is ‘Ended Love.’”


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, February 13, 2014 - E5

THIS WEEKENDin the area Whale Museum free weekend Enjoy free admission from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday through Monday, Feb. 14-17, at The Whale Museum, 62 First St. N., Friday Harbor. Docents will offer free guided tours at 2 p.m. each day, or pick up a self-guided tour map and explore exhibits on all kinds of whales and the Salish Sea ecosystem on your own. 360-378-4710 or whalemuseum.org.

“ONE BILLION RISING” Dance in the street at 6:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 14, at Studio 1010, 1010 Sixth St., Anacortes. Join a billion women (and men) around the world in a show of unity to end violence against women. 360-293-1860 or studio1010.net.

PARENTS’ NIGHT OUT Enjoy a night out while your kids, ages 3 to 12, play games, make crafts and more from 5:30 to 10 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 15, at the Skagit Valley Family YMCA, 215 E. Fulton St., Mount Vernon. Children ages 6 to 12 have the opportunity to swim. $20-$30. 360-336-9622 or j.kerkvliet@skagitymca.org.

BENEFIT CONCERT The South End String Band will perform at 7 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 15, at the Floyd Norgaard Cultural Center, 27130 102nd Ave. NW, Stanwood. $15 suggested donation. Food will be provided, and beer and wine will be available for purchase. Proceeds will benefit the cultural Center. 360-629-6110 or southendstringband.com.

MARITIME SPEAKER SERIES Shipwright David Hartford will present “A Commitment to the Preservation of Tall Ships” at 4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 15, at the Anacortes Public Library, 1220 10th St., Anacortes. Free. 360-293-1910, ext. 21, or library.cityofanacortes. org.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E6 - Thursday, February 13, 2014

REVIEWS: MUSIC Eric Church

Neil Finn

Eric Church is developing two separate and distinct personalities that seem to wrestle each other in a glorious battle royal on his fourth and best album, “The Outsiders.” There’s that guy Chief, with the hat and sunglasses and the love of rock ‘n’ roll, whiskey, stubborn streaks and fistfights. And then there’s the version of Church who wins (or loses) the girl, stirs moments of universal reverie and tickles the funny bone with program director-wooing hits that appeal to country music’s bedrock fan base. Both these guys are at their best on “The Outsiders,” one-upping each other with songs that embrace the breadth and history of country music while ignoring those conventions to explore far afield. Managing this trick requires a delicate touch, and Church and producer Jay Joyce push the limits while maintaining a balance that leaves a little something for everyone. Don’t like the heavy rock riffs and leather jacket-clad message of the Black Sabbath-leaning title song? Well, there’s the tear-jerker ballad “A Man Who Was Gonna Die Young.” Tired of the paint-by-numbers party songs that flood radio? His answer is “Cold One,” which offers a twist on a tired theme. Need a couples song for you and your new country gal? Try “Talladega,” which somehow turns auto racing into an epic love poem. “Give Me Back My Hometown” is straight up nostalgia. And if that’s not your thing, there’s the rockinformed “Dark Side,” ”That’s Damn Rock & Roll” and “The Joint” to go with your shot and beer back. Tempo-shifting “Roller Coaster Ride” and funky country “Broke Record” use sonic interpretations of Church’s lyrics to rev up things. The organ on “Like a Wrecking Ball” and the trumpet at the end of “The Joint” are delightful moments that show Church is confident that his listeners are his to command. He even tries his hand at spoken-word noir on “Devil, Devil.” The album is full of little flourishes like these that aren’t necessary but show a restless creativity that requires repeated listening. “The Outsiders” is the rare album that invites debate, and asks us to take sides. In this case, pick freely. You can’t lose.

Neil Finn has written effortless pop songs since the 1970s, both in Split Enz and, especially, in Crowded House. He also has a penchant for working with family: with brother Tim in Split Enz and the Finn Brothers; with wife Sharon in the Pajama Club; and, on “Dizzy Heights”, his third solo album, with sons Liam (a successful singer-songwriter in his own right) and Elroy as well as his wife. “Dizzy Heights” steps away from the perfectly crafted guitar pop that has usually been Finn’s specialty. At times, it’s more abstract and experimental (the grandiose, falsetto “Divebomber” and the ominous “White Lies and Alibis,” with its disruptive electronics), and these tracks display the fingerprints of producer Dave Fridmann (Flaming Lips, Mercury Rev). Elsewhere, Finn tries his hand at blueeyed soul (the slinky, string-kissed title track and the Hall & Oates-like “Flying in the Face of Love”). The latter style works better than the former, but Finn too often sounds like he’s working hard to stretch outside of what he does best.

n Chris Talbott, Associated Press

n Dan DeLuca, The Philadelphia Inquirer

“The Outsiders”

“Dizzy Heights”

n Steve Klinge, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Hurray for the Riff Raff “Small Town Heroes”

Roots-music lovers have a new heroine to discover in Alynda Lee Segarra. This Bronx-born folk singer of Puerto Rican descent ran away from home to ride the rails when she was 17 and wound up in New Orleans. Along with a winning name, her collective Hurray for the Riff Raff have in Segarra a commanding front woman who never oversings and writes songs of startling intelligence and empathy that reinvigorate the tried-and-true without ever seeming to try too hard. “The Body Electric,” a song with a title inspired by Walt Whitman that’s a feminist corrective to the romanticized misogyny of murder ballads, is the one that’ll get lots of attention. But this Americana coming-out party is rock-solid from start to finish.

Other notable releases n Dianne Reeves “Beautiful Life” n Band of Horses - “Acoustic at the Ryman” n Cibo Matto - “Hotel Valentine” n The Glitch Mob - “Love Death Immortality” n Noah Gundersen - “Ledges” n Hurray for the Riff Raff - “Small Town Heroes” n Jamestown Revival - “Utah” n Nina Persson - “Animal Heart” n Catherine Russell - “Bring It Back” n Temples - “Sun Structures”

tracks like “About the Boy” and “Little Me.” The latter track is a well-intentioned take on a discussion between a woman and her younger self, urging strength and persistence. If Little Mix is about anything, pop bluster aside, it’s pop perseverance. n Ron Harris, Associated Press

Toni Braxton and Babyface “Love, Marriage & Divorce”

Toni Braxton and Kenneth “Babyface” n PopMatters.com Edmonds have had more hits between them than the testimony in a Philly mob trial. Teary, weary and smooth, Edmonds Thumpers pretty much invented the new-school/old“Galore” school sleek (but not slick) romantic adult R&B genre when he penned “Grown & Barely audible Sexy.” Braxton’s powerfully tender, pleading voice could summon rain on the sunfrom the surging shiniest day. bed of instruments One thing that unites the pair is that arrive the first lyrics on Thumpers debut full-length, “Galore”: each has gone through the pain of public divorce. That’s why, 22 years after their “Stay young.” “Give U My Heart” duet, Braxton and Cast in the grammatical imperative, Babyface return with a bold, soul-soaked this edict sums much of the contents of take on the state of separation. the record. The lyrics, contained in the Hark back to Motown’s Marvin Gaye appropriately titled song “Marvel,” reflect and Tammi Terrell glory days, the duo the joy, the lush beauty and, frankly, the simmer through love’s troubles (“Where insouciance of Thumpers optimism trails through the global pop universe. Sounding Did We Go Wrong”) and steam up the guilt-ridden “Hurt You” as if having a at times like Local Natives, at others like the best Dirty Projectors songs that never conversation over snifters of Drambuie. The wrung-out emotionalism of “Roller were, the band marshals songs of size, Coaster” is matched by the seductive scope and heart-pumping sanguinity. swerve of “Sweat.” These two are masters n Geoff Nelson, PopMatters.com at such romantic rope-a-dope.

Little Mix “Salute”

The sophomore album from British group-in-a-box Little Mix is a pleasing blend of soulful pop. “Salute” picks up for this generation where the Spice Girls, and later the Pussycat Dolls, left off with the allfemale group’s spunky girl-power sound. Little Mix is the concoction of music movers behind the television show, “The X Factor,” and it was the first group to win the U.K. version of the show. But it’s hard to hate on hustle when it comes to pop music, a genre that is long on hustle and bluster. On “Salute” — Little Mix’s follow-up to last year’s “DNA” — the foursome is a solid mix of coy and cool on body-moving

n A.D. Amorosi, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Cymbals

“The Age of Fracture” “The Age of Fracture” is an enjoyable exercise in ’80s-influenced, synth-heavy pop that goes right most of the time. Not to doubt the sincerity of Cleverly’s, er, more refined influences. They’re surely there, probably in Cleverly’s lyrics, rendered with his arch, heavily-accented delivery and, on a couple songs, in French. But “The Age of Fracture” is a good album first and foremost because it’s a good “pop” album. n John Bergstrom, PopMatters.com


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, February 13, 2014 - E7

REVIEWS: VIDEO GAMES ‘Killzone: Shadow Fall’

Video game releases

Platform: Sony PlayStation 4 Rated: M Cost: $59.99 Released: November 2013 Stars: 3 out of 5

Sony prepared some literal big guns for the launch of the PlayStation 4 with “Killzone: Shadow Fall,” the sixth game in PlayStation’s go-to sci-fi shooter franchise. As an early PS4 title — and a console exclusive — you would expect “Shadow Fall” to demonstrate the potential of the new device. The game certainly looks fantastic, but it offers little else new beyond that surface flash. If you’ve never played a “Killzone” game before, the single-player campaign will set you up nicely. In reparation for years of brutal war, the Vektans (usually presented as “good” humans) have given half of their planet to the displaced Helghast (they wear scary masks and have British accents, so they’re coded as the “bad” humans). Both sides hate each other, so the reasons for this ludicrous diplomatic outreach are probably too stupid for the game to detail. The end result is a new escalation of conflict between the two peoples, to no one’s surprise. As a soldier adopted by the Vektan war machine, you are thrown into the battle where you see both halves of the coin. The Vektans aren’t as sympathetic as you thought, and the Helghast perhaps not as evil. The most interesting development is the impersonal robot drone that accompanies you throughout the missions. The

These games are scheduled for release this week, according to Gamestop.com: n Lightning Returns: Final Fantasy XIII (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360; rated T) n One Piece: Romance Dawn (Nintendo 3DS; rated T) n Toukiden: The Age of Demons (PS Vita; rated T) n Far Cry Compilation (PlayStation 3; rated M) n Danganronpa: Trigger Happy Havoc (PS Vita; rated M) n Lexington Herald-Leader (Lexington, Ky.)

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drone can attack enemies, hack computer consoles or just act as a distraction while you sneak around to flank a knot of soldiers. It says something about the plot that the bit you will remember most is essentially a flying machine gun. The story jumps from action-movie bombast to quiet “we need to find a better way” cliches, but it is entertaining enough when viewed as a scenery slideshow for the PlayStation 4’s power. You will explore abandoned spaceships, grimy Helghan slums and fluorescent shopping malls of the privileged Vektans. With multiple difficulty options, any gamer should have a reasonably fun time shooting through the rubber-stamped storyline. A flying-squirrel-suit sequence near the end almost ruins the entire singleplayer experience, but you’ll manage. Of course, it’s the online multiplayer that will keep you coming back to “Shadow Fall.” While it rarely disappoints, it rarely amazes. The bullet points of modern shooters are all hit: plenty of game modes, lots of maps/weapons and a complicated system of challenges and unlocks. Aside from some fun special abilities earned over time, “Shadow Fall” does not do much new. You shoot, you score. n Joe Fourhman, Chicago Tribune

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E8 - Thursday, February 13, 2014

GET INVOLVED ART ARTS GRANTS: The Anacortes Arts Festival is accepting applications through today for its annual “Giving Back” grant program. Festival grants impact the community by advancing art and arts education, increasing participation in arts activities and better linking the arts community to the larger community. In 2013 the festival awarded 11 grants totaling $33,500, with a 10-year total of more than $300,000. Information and applications are available at anacortesartsfestival. com.

offer an introduction to working with sheet metal using simple hand tools and basic fastening techniques. Students will bend, form and cut sheets of metal into shapes, which they will use to construct a small figurative or sculptural object. $75, includes materials. 360466-4446 or monamuseum. org.

AUDITIONS

CALL FOR THEATER VOLUNTEERS: Whidbey Playhouse seeks a team of behind-the-scenes folks for its April 2014 production of the Tony-award winning musical “1776” that celebrates the birth of CALL FOR ARTS/MUSIC our nation. Assistance is needed for set-building and ENTHUSIASTS: The Arts Council of Sedro-Woolley decorating, lighting, prop acquisitions and costuming. will hold a public discusFor information, contact sion from 6 to 8 p.m. the theater at 360- 679-2237 Tuesday, Feb. 25, at the or email director Gaye Sedro-Woolley Council Litka at whidbey995@ chambers, 325 Metcalf comcast.net. St. Residents are invited to share their ideas on BRASS CHOIR: The what art should look like Basically Brass Choir is and where it should be in seeking a French horn Sedro-Woolley. For inforplayer to join a group of mation, contact Elizabeth about 12 musicians, playing at 360-521-6325. a variety of styles. RehearsSEEKING GARAGE SALE als are the first and third Mondays in Burlington, VENDORS: The Skagit with regular performances. County Fairgrounds in Contact David Soiseth at Mount Vernon seeks ven360-757-0351 or dsois@ dors of all kinds for the comcast.net. annual “World’s Largest Garage Sale, Antiques & More” event, set for 9 DANCE a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday and FOLK DANCING: SkagitSaturday, April 11-12. For Anacortes Folkdancers a vendor application form, meet at 7 p.m. most Tuesvisit skagitcounty.net/fairdays at the Bayview Civic grounds. For information, Hall, 12615 C St., Mount call 360-336-9414 or email Vernon. Learn to folkdance fairgrounds@co.skagit. to a variety of international wa.us. music. Instruction begins at 7 p.m. followed by review ART CLASSES and request dances until 9:30. The first session is “SCULPTING WITH free, $3 thereafter. All SHEET METAL”: 10 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 15, Museum are welcome. No partners needed. For information, of Northwest Art, 121 S. contact Gary or Ginny at First St., La Conner. The four-hour workshop will 360-766-6866.

THURSDAY DANCE: Dance to the music of the Skippers from 1 to 3:30 p.m. Thursdays at Hillcrest Lodge, 1717 S. 13th St., Mount Vernon. For information, contact Doris at 360-588-8239.

Street Cabaret & Speakeasy, 612 S. First St., Mount Vernon. Ages 21 and older. No cover. 360-336-3012 or riverbelledinnertheatre. com.

Ages 6 to 10: 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Mondays, Feb. 24-March 17. $40 per four-week session or $12 drop-in rate. Parents are free. Preregistration is requested, but not required: 360-755-9649 or burlingtonwa.gov/recreation.

this winter at 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. All classes are held at 1 p.m. Sundays. Tickets are free but required and available by calling 360-4167727, ext. 2, or by visiting mcintyrehall.org. RECREATION Feb. 23: Global SEWING DAY: The Rhythm: Discover music MUSIC Anacortes Chapter of and basic music concepts SKAGIT VALLEY MUSIC Days for Girls Int’l will SENIOR HIKE: Join with drummer Mary Ellen CLUB: The club welcomes host a monthly “sewing Friends of the Forest from Hodges using drums, shakperformers, listeners and day” from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. 10 a.m. to noon Friday, Feb. ers and other instruments. guests to join the fun at every second Thursday, 14, for an easy hike through 1:45 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 27, beginning today, at the forest and wetland habitats FREE ADULT ACTING at Vasa Hall, 1805 CleveCottage Hobby House on at Heart Lake near AnaCLASSES: Anacortes Comland St., Mount Vernon. the northeast corner of cortes. Meet at the Heart munity Theatre offers free Come and sing, play an 12th Street and M Avenue Lake parking lot. Free. acting classes for adults instrument or just enjoy the in Anacortes. Days for No dogs. 360-293-3725 or from 10 a.m. to noon the music. Free. For informaGirls provides sustainable friendsofacfl.org. third Saturday each month tion, call Marsha Pederson feminine hygiene prodat 918 M Ave., Anacortes. at 360-757-4906. ucts, health education and RUNNING FOR MUSIC: Classes include scripted income-generation oppor- The Skagit Symphony’s scenes and a variety of actCALL FOR LOCAL MUSI- tunities for underprivileged annual Smelt Run/Walk ing games, with a different CIANS & MUSIC ENTHUyoung women around the will take place Saturday, topic each month. Each SIASTS: The Anacortes world. 360-708-7960. Feb. 22, at La Conner class is independent, so you Public Library’s Manieri Middle School, 305 N. Sixth don’t have to commit to Endowment will host a local GRANTS AVAILABLE St., La Conner. Registraevery session. 360-840-0089 music roundtable discusFOR NONPROFITS: The tion begins at 8:30 a.m., folor acttheatre.com. sion at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Skagit Community Founlowed by the Kids Dash for March 5, at the Anacortes ages 18 months to 8 years dation is accepting grant Public Library, 1220 10th WORKSHOPS at 9:30 a.m. The USATFrequests from local nonSt., Anacortes. Anyone profits through April 1. The certified 5K and 10K races BUILD YOUR OWN WEBinvolved in local music is foundation creates endow- and a 2-mile Family Walk SITE: Learn how to design invited to come and discuss ments and a portion of the (dogs on leash are welcome and create your own webways to promote and foster earnings is granted to non- on the walk) start at 10 site in this two-part workthe love, performance and a.m. Hot showers, hot soup, shop with Karla Locke of profits that “demonstrate production of all forms refreshments and a raffle responsible stewardship Alternative Focus. Classes of local music. Free. For will be held after the races. will meet in the Anacortes and the ability to make a information, contact Chris $15-$25 for preregistrapositive contribution in Chamber of Commerce Terrell (Heart of Anacortes Skagit County.” 360-419tion; $5 more on race day. boardroom, upstairs at 819 and How it Works) chris@ T-shirt: $20 (pre-orders 3181 or skagitcf.org. Commercial Ave., Anahowitworks.com, or Annette encouraged). Kids Dash cortes. Woolsey Library Jazz & STORYTIME YOGA FOR entry is free. Proceeds will Part One: 6 to 8 p.m. Swing Endowment chairper CHILDREN: Children ages benefit the Skagit SymTuesday, Feb. 18. The class son) awoolsey99@aol.com. 3 to 10 can enjoy songs, phony. 360-848-9336 or will cover choosing a temfinger plays, stories, move- skagitsymphony.com. plate, choosing a domain ON STAGE ment, breathing principles name, planning and page FLYSWATTER VOLLEYlayout. $35. ANACORTES OPEN MIC: and peacefulness, while BALL: 9 a.m. Thursdays at Part Two: 6 to 8 p.m. 9:30 p.m. Thursdays, Brown they improve listening the Sedro-Woolley Senior skills, learn to handle Wednesday, Feb. 19. Lantern Ale House, 412 Center, 715 Pacific St., stressful situations, chalIncludes advanced designCommercial Ave., AnaSedro-Woolley. All ages lenge motor skills and ing, keywords/meta data, cortes. 360-293-2544. and all levels of ability are linking, media and blogs. develop confidence in a welcome. Free. 360-855non-competitive environ$30. OPEN MIC: Jam Night, 1531. No experience neces9 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. Thurs- ment. Classes meet at the Burlington Parks and sary. No software required. days, Conway Pub & EatTHEATER Recreation Center, 900 E. Attend both sessions for ery, 18611 Main St., ConFairhaven Ave., Burlington. $50. To register, call Karla way. 360-445-4733. YOUTH THEATRE: Ages 3 to 6: 11 a.m. Locke, Alternative Focus, McIntyre Hall is offering to noon Mondays, Feb. OPEN MIC: 9 p.m. to a series of performing arts at 360-588-6968 or email midnight, Wednesdays, 1st 24-March 17. workshops for ages 6 to 12 kklocke1@mac.com.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, February 13, 2014 - E9

NEW ON DVD THIS WEEK “Ender’s Game”: Adults have figured out that youngsters have a better aptitude for the kind of high-tech battles that are going to be waged. The trick is to find the one gamer who has both the skill and the strategy to lead a pre-emptive strike on the buggers. They are said to have weapons of mass destruction, and it’s better if Earth strikes first. The script by director Gavin Hood and Card spends more time on preparation than participation. What should have been the movie’s huge emotional moment ends up flat because of the way the story is built. “Mike Tyson: Undisputed Truth”: When Mike Tyson was pounding opponents into bloody messes in the boxing ring, it was those on the other end of his gloves feeling the pain. In this oneman show directed by Spike

Lee, it’s Tyson who reveals all of the pain in his life. And his truthful recounting is compelling. Tyson pulls no punches as he talks about everything from his broken family upbringing to how family has changed his life. He shows both a funny and tender side recounting the events that made him one of the greatest heavyweight champions and also one of the most notorious figures in sports history. It’s obvious very quickly that Tyson’s not an actor, but the rawness of his performance is well suited for such a soul-searching production and adds to the emotional power of his words. If the truth can hurt then Tyson must be feeling a lot of pain. “G.B.F.”: A Gay Best Friend is the latest high school fad and no school queen bee is completely worthy of being worshipped

little of the black humor that made “Jawbreaker” work so well. Following is a partial schedule of coming movies on “Hetty Wainthropp InvesDVD. Release dates are subject to change: tigates: The Complete FEB. 18 Collection”: BBC detective Battle of the Damned - Starz / Anchor Bay series starring Patricia RoutHellbenders - Lionsgate ledge. “Grace Unplugged”: FEB. 25 Teen’s faith and family ties Blue is the Warmest Color - Criterion Gravity - Warner are put to the test when her Muscle Shoals - Magnolia dreams start to come true. Nebraska - Paramount “The Armstrong Lie”: Thor 2: The Dark World - Disney Documentary on Lance n McClatchy-Tribune News Service Armstrong’s rise and fall from grace. “The Red Skelton Show: until she has one. The only a high school that seems to problem is that in this high be stuck in the 1950s when it The Lost Episodes”: Feaschool no one has come out. comes to understanding gay tures 16 episodes previously unreleased on DVD. That changes when Tanpeople. “Sherlock: Season ner (Michael Willett) is Director Darren Stein Three”: Modern take on the outed. He becomes the focus continues his assault on classic detective series. of three high school girls the high school practice “Festival Express”: Conwho are convinced having of selecting a prom queen. cert film featuring The Band, Tanner as a friend will make His 1999 production, “JawGrateful Dead. them a lock to win the Prom breaker,” is a dark comedy “The King Family Classic Queen title. All he has to about what happens when Television Specials Collecdo is survive the constant the prom queen gets accition Volume 1”: Includes pampering, sexual assaults dentally killed. “G.B.F.” and waves of questions from would have benefited from a “Easter with The King Fam-

Upcoming movie releases

ily” and “Mother’s Day with The King Family.” “Newhart: The Complete Second Season”: New Yorker (Bob Newhart) runs a small B&B in Vermont. “Swamp People: Season 4”: More gator-hunting adventures. “Jewtopia”: Jewish and gentile unite in a search for love. “Diana”: Naomi Watts plays the Princess of Wales. “Wadjda”: Little girl’s determined to challenge traditional women’s roles in Saudi Arabia. “All is Lost”: Man (Robert Redford) faces the deadly sea alone. “How I Live Now”: Explores themes of survival, self-sufficiency and love. “Hindenburg — The Last Flight”: Fictional account of one of the most devastating accidents in aviation history, n Rick Bentley, The Fresno Bee

– 5th Annual –

Great Northwest Glass Quest February 14-23, 2014 The fun is in the QUEST! The treasure is in the experience!

Find the Treasures! A treasure hunt for the whole family! Discover unique shops and explore hidden parks while you QUEST for the clue to your hand-blown glass treasure. Funded in part by Snohomish Co. Tourism Assistance Program.


E10 Thursday, February 13, 2014

ON STAGE in the Skagit Valley and surrounding area February 13-20 Thursday.13

Saturday.15

DANCE

COMEDY

“Positive”: Kuntz and Company, 7:30 p.m., Firehouse Performing Arts Center, 1314 Harris Ave., Bellingham. $12-$15. 360-671-2626 or kuntzandco.org.

THEATER

“Gramercy Ghost” (comedy/drama): 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-293-6829 or acttheatre.com. “Love Letters”: 7:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor. $14. 360-679-2237 or whidbey playhouse.com. “Fuddy Meers” (comedy): Western Washington University Department of Theatre and Dance, 7:30 p.m., WWU Performing Arts Center Mainstage, Bellingham. $8-$12. 360-650-6146 or tickets.wwu.edu.

Friday.14 DANCE

“Positive”: Kuntz and Company, 7:30 p.m., Firehouse Performing Arts Center, 1314 Harris Ave., Bellingham. $12-$15. 360-671-2626 or kuntzandco.org.

MUSIC

Eric Tingstad and Nancy Rumbel: 7:30 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $18-$25. 360-336-8955 or lincolntheatre.org. “Man of La Mancha!” (musical): 7 p.m., Alger Community Church, 1475 Silver Run Lane, Bellingham. $12-14. 360-424-5144 or altatheatre.com.

THEATER

“Always… Patsy Cline” (musical): Ria Peth Vanderpool and Kelly Bohon, 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $20. 360-445-3000 or conwaymuse. com.

TUNING UP Playing at area venues February 13-20

THURSDAY.13

MUSIC

Just in Time Jazz Duo: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

THEATER

Katie Gray: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Jansen Art Center Piano Lounge, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360-3543600.

DANCE

“Positive”: Kuntz and Company, 7:30 p.m., Firehouse Performing Arts Center, 1314 Harris Ave., Bellingham. $12-$15. 360-671-2626 or kuntzandco.org. South End String Band Benefit Concert: 7 p.m., Floyd Norgaard Cultural Center, 27130 102nd Ave. NW, Stanwood. $15 suggested donation, includes food; beer and wine available for purchase. Proceeds benefit the Floyd Norgaard Cultural Center. 360-629-6110.

“Gramercy Ghost” (comedy/drama): 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-293-6829 or acttheatre.com. “Love Letters”: 7:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor. $14. 360-679-2237 or whidbey playhouse.com. “Fuddy Meers” (comedy): Western Washington University Department of Theatre and Dance, 7:30 p.m., WWU Performing Arts Center Mainstage, Bellingham. $8-$12. 360-650-6146 or tickets.wwu. edu. “Man of La Mancha!” (musical): 7 p.m., Alger Community Church, 1475 Silver Run Lane, Bellingham. $12-14. 360-424-5144 or altatheatre.com.

JIM BASNIGHT BAND 7 p.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-755-3956.

VOYAGER 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Winners Lounge, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow.

“Comedy Night”: Andrew Rivers and Adam Norwest, 8 p.m., Max Dale’s Martini Lounge, 2030 Riverside Drive, Mount Vernon. $10. 360-424-7171 or maxdales. com.

“Always… Patsy Cline” (musical): with Ria Peth Vanderpool and Kelly Bohon, 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/ Main, Conway. $20. 360-445-3000 or conwaymuse.com.

FRIDAY.14

FRIDAY. 14

Steven Baughn photo

FRIDAY-SATURDAY.14-15 “ALWAYS… PATSY CLINE” Ria Peth Vanderpool and Kelly Bohon, 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $20. 360-445-3000 or conwaymuse.com.

Sunday.16

Thursday.20

DANCE

MUSIC

“Positive”: Kuntz and Company, 7:30 p.m., Firehouse Performing Arts Center, 1314 Harris Ave., Bellingham. $12-$15. 360-671-2626 or kuntzandco.org.

Jansen Jazz Band: 7:30 p.m., Jansen Art Center Chamber Hall, 321 Front St., Lynden. $10. 360-354-3600 or jansenartcenter. org.

MUSIC

THEATER

THEATER

“Love Letters”: 7:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor. $14. 360-679-2237 or whidbey playhouse.com.

“Why Do Fools Fall In Love?: A musical search of that eternal question”: Skagit Community Band, 3 p.m., Brodniak Hall, 1600 20th St., Anacortes. $15 adults, $10 seniors, $30 family, free for ages 12 and younger accompanied by an adult. skagit communityband.org.

“Gramercy Ghost” (comedy/drama): 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-293-6829 or acttheatre.com.

“Love Letters”: 2:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor. $14. 360-679-2237 or whidbey playhouse.com.

“Love Letters”: 7:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor. $14. 360-679-2237 or whidbey playhouse.com.

“Fuddy Meers” (comedy): Western Washington University Department of Theatre and Dance, 2 p.m., WWU Performing Arts Center Mainstage, Bellingham. $8-$12. 360-650-6146 or tickets.wwu.edu.

“Fuddy Meers” (comedy): Western Washington University Department of Theatre and Dance, 7:30 p.m., WWU Performing Arts Center Mainstage, Bellingham. $8-$12. 360-650-6146 or tickets.wwu.edu.

Thursday, February 13, 2014 E11

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

“Man of La Mancha!” (musical): 2:30 p.m., Alger Community Church, 1475 Silver Run Lane, Bellingham. $12-14. 360-424-5144 or altatheatre.com.

“Northwest Passages”: Living Voices, 7 p.m., Burlington Public Library, 820 E. Washington Ave., Burlington. Free. 360-755-0760.

Knut Bell: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., Big Rock Cafe, 14779 Washington 9, Mount Vernon. No cover. 360-4247872 or bigrock cafe.com.

Ernie Sapiro photo

FRIDAY.14 “Always … Patsy Cline”: with Ria Peth Vanderpool and Kelly Bohon, 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $20. 360445-3000.

The Sardines: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

Eric Miller: 8 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. 360-445-3000.

Wayne Hayton: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

Solo Piano Night: 8:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. 360-7666266.

Jukebox Duo: 7 to 10 p.m., Mount Vernon Elks, 2120 Market St., Mount Vernon. Open to the public. 360-848-8882.

Art Breaker, Topless, Tre Stylez: 9 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. No cover. 360-778-1067.

Lloyd Hooper and the Cascade Ramblers (country dance): 8 p.m., American Legion hall, 701 Murdock St., SedroWoolley. $3. 360-8550520.

The Sardines: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

Mia Vermillion, Jason Edwards (blues, jazz, folk): 8:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/ Main, Conway. $12. 360-445-3000.

Jim Basnight Band: 7 p.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-7553956.

CC Adams Band, featuring Mary Ellen Lykins: 9 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Longhorn Saloon & Grill, 5754 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-766-6330.

Ron Bailey & The Tangents: 8:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. 360-766-6266.

Michael Gonzalez: 6:30 to 8 p.m., Jansen Art Center Piano Lounge, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360-354-3600.

Lloyd Hooper and the Cascade Ramblers (country dance): 8 p.m., American Legion hall, 701 Murdock St., SedroWoolley. $3. 360-8550520.

SATURDAY.15 Voyager (hard rock, ’80s metal): 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Winners Lounge, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. No cover. 877275-2448.

SUNDAY.16 Gary B’s Church of Blues: Jam Night, 6 to 10 p.m., Conway Pub & Eatery, 18611 Main St., Conway. 360-445-4733.

WEDNESDAY.19 Ron W. Bailey & The Tangents: Science Duo: 6 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. 5:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. 360-766-6266. $5. 360-445-3000.

Little Joe Argo: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

THURSDAY.20 Hannah Klos: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Jansen Art Center Piano Lounge, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360-354-3600.


E10 Thursday, February 13, 2014

ON STAGE in the Skagit Valley and surrounding area February 13-20 Thursday.13

Saturday.15

DANCE

COMEDY

“Positive”: Kuntz and Company, 7:30 p.m., Firehouse Performing Arts Center, 1314 Harris Ave., Bellingham. $12-$15. 360-671-2626 or kuntzandco.org.

THEATER

“Gramercy Ghost” (comedy/drama): 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-293-6829 or acttheatre.com. “Love Letters”: 7:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor. $14. 360-679-2237 or whidbey playhouse.com. “Fuddy Meers” (comedy): Western Washington University Department of Theatre and Dance, 7:30 p.m., WWU Performing Arts Center Mainstage, Bellingham. $8-$12. 360-650-6146 or tickets.wwu.edu.

Friday.14 DANCE

“Positive”: Kuntz and Company, 7:30 p.m., Firehouse Performing Arts Center, 1314 Harris Ave., Bellingham. $12-$15. 360-671-2626 or kuntzandco.org.

MUSIC

Eric Tingstad and Nancy Rumbel: 7:30 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $18-$25. 360-336-8955 or lincolntheatre.org. “Man of La Mancha!” (musical): 7 p.m., Alger Community Church, 1475 Silver Run Lane, Bellingham. $12-14. 360-424-5144 or altatheatre.com.

THEATER

“Always… Patsy Cline” (musical): Ria Peth Vanderpool and Kelly Bohon, 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $20. 360-445-3000 or conwaymuse. com.

TUNING UP Playing at area venues February 13-20

THURSDAY.13

MUSIC

Just in Time Jazz Duo: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

THEATER

Katie Gray: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Jansen Art Center Piano Lounge, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360-3543600.

DANCE

“Positive”: Kuntz and Company, 7:30 p.m., Firehouse Performing Arts Center, 1314 Harris Ave., Bellingham. $12-$15. 360-671-2626 or kuntzandco.org. South End String Band Benefit Concert: 7 p.m., Floyd Norgaard Cultural Center, 27130 102nd Ave. NW, Stanwood. $15 suggested donation, includes food; beer and wine available for purchase. Proceeds benefit the Floyd Norgaard Cultural Center. 360-629-6110.

“Gramercy Ghost” (comedy/drama): 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-293-6829 or acttheatre.com. “Love Letters”: 7:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor. $14. 360-679-2237 or whidbey playhouse.com. “Fuddy Meers” (comedy): Western Washington University Department of Theatre and Dance, 7:30 p.m., WWU Performing Arts Center Mainstage, Bellingham. $8-$12. 360-650-6146 or tickets.wwu. edu. “Man of La Mancha!” (musical): 7 p.m., Alger Community Church, 1475 Silver Run Lane, Bellingham. $12-14. 360-424-5144 or altatheatre.com.

JIM BASNIGHT BAND 7 p.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-755-3956.

VOYAGER 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Winners Lounge, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow.

“Comedy Night”: Andrew Rivers and Adam Norwest, 8 p.m., Max Dale’s Martini Lounge, 2030 Riverside Drive, Mount Vernon. $10. 360-424-7171 or maxdales. com.

“Always… Patsy Cline” (musical): with Ria Peth Vanderpool and Kelly Bohon, 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/ Main, Conway. $20. 360-445-3000 or conwaymuse.com.

FRIDAY.14

FRIDAY. 14

Steven Baughn photo

FRIDAY-SATURDAY.14-15 “ALWAYS… PATSY CLINE” Ria Peth Vanderpool and Kelly Bohon, 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $20. 360-445-3000 or conwaymuse.com.

Sunday.16

Thursday.20

DANCE

MUSIC

“Positive”: Kuntz and Company, 7:30 p.m., Firehouse Performing Arts Center, 1314 Harris Ave., Bellingham. $12-$15. 360-671-2626 or kuntzandco.org.

Jansen Jazz Band: 7:30 p.m., Jansen Art Center Chamber Hall, 321 Front St., Lynden. $10. 360-354-3600 or jansenartcenter. org.

MUSIC

THEATER

THEATER

“Love Letters”: 7:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor. $14. 360-679-2237 or whidbey playhouse.com.

“Why Do Fools Fall In Love?: A musical search of that eternal question”: Skagit Community Band, 3 p.m., Brodniak Hall, 1600 20th St., Anacortes. $15 adults, $10 seniors, $30 family, free for ages 12 and younger accompanied by an adult. skagit communityband.org.

“Gramercy Ghost” (comedy/drama): 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-293-6829 or acttheatre.com.

“Love Letters”: 2:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor. $14. 360-679-2237 or whidbey playhouse.com.

“Love Letters”: 7:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor. $14. 360-679-2237 or whidbey playhouse.com.

“Fuddy Meers” (comedy): Western Washington University Department of Theatre and Dance, 2 p.m., WWU Performing Arts Center Mainstage, Bellingham. $8-$12. 360-650-6146 or tickets.wwu.edu.

“Fuddy Meers” (comedy): Western Washington University Department of Theatre and Dance, 7:30 p.m., WWU Performing Arts Center Mainstage, Bellingham. $8-$12. 360-650-6146 or tickets.wwu.edu.

Thursday, February 13, 2014 E11

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

“Man of La Mancha!” (musical): 2:30 p.m., Alger Community Church, 1475 Silver Run Lane, Bellingham. $12-14. 360-424-5144 or altatheatre.com.

“Northwest Passages”: Living Voices, 7 p.m., Burlington Public Library, 820 E. Washington Ave., Burlington. Free. 360-755-0760.

Knut Bell: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., Big Rock Cafe, 14779 Washington 9, Mount Vernon. No cover. 360-4247872 or bigrock cafe.com.

Ernie Sapiro photo

FRIDAY.14 “Always … Patsy Cline”: with Ria Peth Vanderpool and Kelly Bohon, 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $20. 360445-3000.

The Sardines: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

Eric Miller: 8 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. 360-445-3000.

Wayne Hayton: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

Solo Piano Night: 8:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. 360-7666266.

Jukebox Duo: 7 to 10 p.m., Mount Vernon Elks, 2120 Market St., Mount Vernon. Open to the public. 360-848-8882.

Art Breaker, Topless, Tre Stylez: 9 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. No cover. 360-778-1067.

Lloyd Hooper and the Cascade Ramblers (country dance): 8 p.m., American Legion hall, 701 Murdock St., SedroWoolley. $3. 360-8550520.

The Sardines: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

Mia Vermillion, Jason Edwards (blues, jazz, folk): 8:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/ Main, Conway. $12. 360-445-3000.

Jim Basnight Band: 7 p.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-7553956.

CC Adams Band, featuring Mary Ellen Lykins: 9 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Longhorn Saloon & Grill, 5754 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-766-6330.

Ron Bailey & The Tangents: 8:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. 360-766-6266.

Michael Gonzalez: 6:30 to 8 p.m., Jansen Art Center Piano Lounge, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360-354-3600.

Lloyd Hooper and the Cascade Ramblers (country dance): 8 p.m., American Legion hall, 701 Murdock St., SedroWoolley. $3. 360-8550520.

SATURDAY.15 Voyager (hard rock, ’80s metal): 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Winners Lounge, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. No cover. 877275-2448.

SUNDAY.16 Gary B’s Church of Blues: Jam Night, 6 to 10 p.m., Conway Pub & Eatery, 18611 Main St., Conway. 360-445-4733.

WEDNESDAY.19 Ron W. Bailey & The Tangents: Science Duo: 6 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. 5:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. 360-766-6266. $5. 360-445-3000.

Little Joe Argo: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

THURSDAY.20 Hannah Klos: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Jansen Art Center Piano Lounge, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360-354-3600.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E12 - Thursday, February 13, 2014

TRAVEL

The Texas Capitol, seen through the south gate in Austin, Texas. AP file

Austin beckons with music, bibles and bats By CHRIS TOMLINSON Associated Press

AUSTIN, Texas — The Texas Capital, the Live Music Capital of the World, the Velvet Crown, Bat City or simply River City. Residents of Austin claim many titles and are known for their slogan: “Keep Austin Weird.” Some locals pejoratively call their hometown “festival city,” since there seems to be one every weekend, such as South by Southwest or Austin City Limits Music Festival. But most festival-goers don’t realize Austin is also home to the first photograph, a Gutenberg Bible and the world’s largest urban bat colony. And the best thing for a city that prides itself on environmentalism is that AP file / 2009 all of the sites can be visAn oarsman and sight-seeing boat float the Colorado River as some of the more ited in a single day’s walk, and all of them are free. than 1.5 million bats emerge from the Congress Ave. bridge.

Harry Ransom Center, Thomas McConnell Photography via AP / 2004

A Gutenberg Bible, one of the first and oldest printed books in the world, at The Ransom Center on the University of Texas at Austin campus. THE HARRY RANSOM CENTER

the largest archives in the world. Begin the morning on The HRC holds 42 milthe southwest corner of the lion manuscripts, a million University of Texas at Aus- rare books and 5 million tin campus, home to one of photographs.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, February 13, 2014 - E13

TRAVEL Just inside the front door, visitors can enter a kiosk where a Gutenberg Bible, one of the first printed books, is on display. In a dimly lit alcove nearby, the world’s first photograph resides. The center holds regular multimedia exhibitions from the collection, with the one opening later this month titled, “World at War: 19141918.”

Local travel WWU FACULTY-LED TRAVEL PRO-

TEXAS STATE CAPITOL

From the Ransom Center, walk southeast about nine blocks to the big pink dome. The Texas Capitol opened in 1885, built from pink granite quarried in the Texas Hill Country. The dome is 15 feet taller than the U.S. Capitol building in Washington, and it faces south, to show solidarity with the Confederacy. The interior is filled with famous paintings and statues, and the grounds are home to dozens of statues, the state archives, a visitors center and the governor’s mansion.

DOWNTOWN AUSTIN

The Capitol Complex sits at the north end of Congress Avenue, considered the main street of Texas. Walk south toward the lake, and just off Congress to the east, is the Sixth Street entertainment district, home to dozens of

Austin Parks and Recreation via AP

A coyote is shown at the Austin Nature and Science Center. The center rescues animals that have been injured and could not survive in the wild. bars and restaurants. From Congress head west on Second Street, and find a series of sidewalk cafes, shopping and the Willie Nelson statue.

Science Center is free.

BAT COLONY AT CONGRESS AVE. BRIDGE

With the sun beginning to set, walk east on the south side of the lake, past the Stevie Ray Vaughan statue to ZILKER PARK the Congress Avenue bridge. Lady Bird Lake is the More than 1.5 million Mexiboundary between downcan free-tail bats make their town and South Austin. From the 2ND Street Dis- home in the nooks and crannies on the underside of the trict, walk along the north bridge from March through shore walking trail to the November. Pfluger Pedestrian bridge At dusk, the bats launch and cross over. A half-mile for their nightly search for to the west is the 358-acre insects, creating an hourZilker Park, home to the long spectacle of nature. Austin City Limits Music Festival. The Zilker Botani- Afterward, walk south to cal Garden and the spring- South Congress, where a dozen local restaurants and fed Barton Springs Pool clubs offer a fitting end to charge admission but the nearby Austin Nature and the day.

W inners LO U N G E

GRAMS: Western Washington University will offer three educational travel programs next summer in Italy and Africa. Global Discovery trips are not for university credit or restricted to Western students. People of all ages are invited to travel alongside Western faculty and gain an understanding of other cultures, including their art, ecology, food, history, language and more. Trips include: Mount Kilimanjaro Climb and Serengeti Safari Extension: July 5-19. Serengeti Safari and Kilimanjaro Culture Tour: July 14-26. Tuscany, Italy: Aug. 31-Sept. 14. 360-650-6409, globaldiscovery@wwu. edu or wwu.edu/GlobalDiscovery. An information session for the Italy trip will be held at 7 p.m. today at Village Books, 1200 11th St., Bellingham. WWU Professor of Environmental Studies and Global Discovery leader Gigi Berardi will share her experiences and food background, including growing up in an Italian home and how that inspired her culinary passions, as well as her belief in the importance of minerals, sun and Mediterranean fats in the diet. CRUISE SEMINAR: Learn about upcoming Viking River Cruise options at 6 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 19, at AAA Travel, 1600 E. College Way, Suite A, Mount Vernon. Free. Members and nonmembers welcome. RSVP: 360-848-2090. TRAVEL TALK: “Lesser-Known National Park Properties,” 7 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 26, Anacortes Public Library, 1220 10th St., Anacortes. Roxanne Parish shares sites on her bucket list of 401 National Park Service units, of which just 59 are national parks. Free. 360-293-1910, ext. 21, or library.cityofanacortes.org.

Watch NhL & NBa Games oN the BiG screeNs! saTurday & sunday 2/15, 2/16

NHL, NBA & College Basketball

Wednesday 2/19 I-5 Exit 236 • theskagit.com • 877-275-2448 SVH

Must be 21 or older with valid photo ID.

NBA Games

THINKING ABOUT TAKING AN ALASKAN CRUISE?: Doug Woods will explain everything you want to know about planning a cruise at 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 26, at the Anacortes Public Library, 1220 10th St., Anacortes. Woods also will present landscape and wildlife photos from his various Alaskan cruises. Free. 360-293-1910, ext. 21, or library.cityofanacortes.org. SHORT TRIPS: Mount Vernon Parks and Recreation offers travel opportunities for participants ages 12 and older (adult supervision required for ages 18 and younger). Trips depart from and return to Hillcrest Park, 1717 S. 13th St., Mount Vernon. For information or to register, call 360-336-6215. Next up: Northwest Women’s Show and Historic Downtown Snohomish: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday, March 21. Enjoy the 26th annual NW Women’s Show with more than 400 exhibits, three entertainment stages, seminars, shopping, fashion shows, food and wine sampling, beauty and spa services, giveaways and more. Then visit trendy “new” historic Snohomish, with boutiques, antique stores, bakeries and more. $65-$67. Register by March 14. Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge: 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Saturday, March 29. Grab your camera and binoculars, pack a sack lunch and join birder and raptor specialist Sue Cottrell for a fun, educational trip to the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge, home to more than 300 species of birds, mammals, fish and amphibians. Check out the viewing platforms, climb the observation tower, walk along the trails and explore the visitor center and gift shop. $61-$63. Register by March 21.

EXTENDED TRIPS: The Oak Harbor Senior Center is organizing several smallgroup trips for 2014: Trains of Colorado MADAGASCAR: 7 p.m. Wednesday, in July and Islands of New England in March 12, Anacortes Public Library, 1220 September. Trips will depart from Oak 10th St., Anacortes. Biologist Julie BarHarbor/Mount Vernon. Contact Pat Gardber will describe her adventures in Mada- ner at 360-279-4582 or email pgardner@ gascar and the wildlife she saw there. oakharbor.org.

Game Time Food & Drink Specials • Noon – 6 pm Owned by Upper Skagit Indian Tribe

Free. 360-293-1910, ext. 21, or library. cityofanacortes.org.

Game Time Food & Drink Specials • 5 – 9 pm

eNtertaiNmeNt Thursday 2/13

Open Mic Karaoke

Hosted by Rocky & Kristine 8 pm - midnight

Friday 2/14

DJ Roy Boy

Contemporary & Classic Dance Hits 9 pm – 1 am

saTurday 2/15

Voyager

Tribute to Hard Rock & 80’s Metal 9 pm – 1 am


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E14 - Thursday, February 13, 2014

HOT TICKETS MONTY PYTHON’S SPAMALOT: through March 2, 5th Avenue Theatre, Seattle. 206-625-1900 or 5thavenue. org. MINDI ABAIR: Feb. 14-16, Dimitriou’s Jazz Alley, Seattle. 206-4419729 or jazzalley.com. ERIC TINGSTAD & NANCY RUMBEL: Feb. 14, Lincoln Theatre, Mount Vernon. 360-336-8955 or lincolnthe atre.org. KARMIN: Feb. 14, Neumos, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline. com. USC LOVES YOU: Feb. 14, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. THE PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA: Feb. 15, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline. com. MILEY CYRUS: Feb. 16, Tacoma Dome, Tacoma. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. ALBOROSIE: Feb. 16, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. HARLEM GLOBETROTTERS: Feb. 16, Comcast Arena at Everett. 866332-8499 or comcastarenaeverett. com. BAND OF HORSES: Feb. 16, Moore Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or livenation.com. AMOS LEE: Feb. 17, Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or livenation.com. PAUL SIMON, STING: Feb. 19, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. ODYSSEO by CAVALIA: Feb. 19-March 9, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 866-999-8111 or cavalia. net. PENTATONIX: Feb. 20, Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or livenation.com. THE ENGLISH BEAT: Feb. 21, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800745-3000 or showboxonline.com. DOC SEVERINSEN, THE SAN MIGUEL FIVE: Feb. 21-22, Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Bow. 877-2752448 or theskagit.com. BERTA ROJAS (classical guitar): Feb. 22, Benaroya Hall, Seattle. 206-365-0845 or benaroyahall.org. THE FALL OF TROY: Feb. 22, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. KEB’ MO’: Feb. 22, Mount Baker Theatre, Bellingham. 360-734-6080 or mountbakertheatre.com. NEW POLITICS: Feb. 26, Neumos, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. ANI DIFRANCO: Feb. 26, Mount Baker Theatre, Bellingham. 360734-6080 or mountbakertheatre. com. THE WILD FEATHERS: Feb. 26, The Crocodile, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com.

featuring CARCASS: March 29, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800745-3000 or showboxonline.com. SHARON JONES & THE DAP KINGS: April 2-3, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. G. LOVE & SPECIAL SAUCE: April 4, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800745-3000 or showboxonline.com. YOUNG THE GIANT: April 4-5, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800745-3000 or showboxonline.com. BETTY WHO: April 5, The Barboza, Seattle. 206-709-9442 or thebarboza.com. BASTILLE: April 8, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. VNV NATION: April 8, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. IL DIVO: April 9, Benaroya Hall, GALACTIC: March 13, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. Seattle. 866-833-4747 or livenation. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com Zack Smith photo com. YONDER MOUNTAIN STRING BAND: April 10, Showbox at the MarWALK OFF THE EARTH: Feb. 26, Valley Casino Resort, Bow. 877-275ket, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showShowbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-7452448 or theskagit.com. boxonline.com. 3000 or showboxonline.com. BRIAN REGAN: March 16, Mount KRIS ORLOWSKI: April 12, The JIM JEFFERIES: Feb. 27, Moore Baker Theatre, Bellingham. 360Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or 734-6080 or mountbakertheatre. showboxonline.com. livenation.com. com. THE WAILIN’ JENNYS: April 12, RAW “Awakening”: Feb. 27, The MOISTURE FESTIVAL: March Lincoln Theatre, Mount Vernon. 360Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or 20-April 13, at venues around Seat- 336-8955 or lincolntheatre.org. showboxonline.com. tle. 206-297-1405 or moisture VOLBEAT: Apil 14, Paramount MARCHFOURTH MARCHING festival.org. Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or BAND: Feb. 28, Showbox at the Mar- MONETA: March 22, The Showtickets.com. ket, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or show- box, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or SCHOOLBOY Q: April 14, The boxonline.com. showboxonline.com. Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or THE MUSICAL BOX: PerformBRING ME THE HORIZON: March showboxonline.com. ing “Foxtrot” by Genesis: Feb. 28, 24, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. PINK MARTINI: April 15, Mount Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745800-745-3000 or showboxonline. Baker Theatre, Bellingham. 360-7343000 or showboxonline.com. com. 6080 or mountbakertheatre.com. GLASVEGAS: Feb. 28, Columbia LORDE: March 24, WaMu Theater, DIANA KRALL: April 16, Paramount City Theater, Seattle. 800-838-3006 Seattle. 800-745-3000 or ticketmas- Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or or columbiacitytheater.com. ter.com. livenation.com. SKINNY PUPPY: March 1, Showbox WIDESPREAD PANIC: March 25, CHROMEO: April 16, The Showat the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 Moore Theatre, Seattle. 877-784box, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or or showboxonline.com. 4849 or livenation.com. showboxonline.com. DATSIK: March 1, Showbox SoDo, THE SING-OFF LIVE TOUR: March BLACK LABEL SOCIETY: April 16, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showbox 25, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745online.com. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. 3000 or showboxonline.com. DOM KENNEDY: March 2, The ROBIN THICKE: March 26, WaMu SWITCHFOOT: April 18, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or Theater, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. ticketmaster.com. showboxonline.com. “AS THE PALACES BURN”: Lamb GUNGOR: March 26, Showbox at RICK SPRINGFIELD: April 18-19, of God documentary screening: the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Bow. March 6, The Showbox, Seattle. 800- showboxonline.com. 877-275-2448 or theskagit.com. 745-3000 or showboxonline.com. BROAD CITY LIVE: March 26, DARK STAR ORCHESTRA: April 20, G-EAZY: March 7, Showbox at the Neumos, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. 745-3000 or showboxonline.com. showboxonline.com. EMANCIPATOR ENSEMBLE: ELLIE GOULDING: April 23, Para COMMON KINGS: March 8, The March 27, The Showbox, Seattle. mount Theatre, Seattle. 877-784Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or 800-745-3000 or showboxonline. 4849 or livenation.com. showboxonline.com. com. DRIVE-BY TRUCKERS: April 23, THE ATARIS: March 12, Showbox at BIG HEAD TODD & THE MONShowbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or STERS: March 28, Showbox at the 3000 or showboxonline.com. showboxonline.com. Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or WHITE LIES: April 23, The ShowGALACTIC: March 13, Showbox at showboxonline.com. box, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or KINGS OF LEON: March 28, showboxonline.com. showboxonline.com. KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or THE 1975: April 24, Showbox at HERMAN’S HERMITS, starring livenation.com. the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or Peter Noone: March 14-15, Skagit THE DECIBEL MAGAZINE TOUR: showboxonline.com.

FRANZ FERDINAND: April 24, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-7453000 or showboxonline.com. ARLO GUTHRIE: April 25, Mount Baker Theatre, Bellingham. 360-734-6080 or mountbaker theatre.com. THE WANTED: April 26, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. SUDDEN VALLEY JAZZ SERIES: April 26/Nov. 15, Sudden Valley Dance Barn, Bellingham. 360-6711709 or suddenvalleylibrary.org. THE GLITCH MOB: May 3, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. IRA GLASS: May 3, Mount Baker Theatre, Bellingham. 360-734-6080 or mountbakertheatre.com. STEPHEN “RAGGA” MARLEY: May 6, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 206-224-5481 or aeglive.com. STEVE MARTIN & THE STEEP CANYON RANGERS: Featuring Edie Brickell: May 10, Mount Baker Theatre, Bellingham. 360-734-6080 or mountbakertheatre.com. KARLA BONOFF & JIMMY WEBB: May 15, Mount Baker Theatre, Bellingham. 360-734-6080 or mountbakertheatre.com. LINDSEY STIRLING: May 21, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. SASQUATCH! MUSIC FESTIVAL: May 23-25 and July 4-6, Gorge Amphitheatre, George. sasquatchfestival.com. THE NYLONS: May 24, Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Bow. 877-2752448 or theskagit.com. LADY GAGA’S artRAVE — The ARTPOP Ball: May 28, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. BRIT FLOYD: June 9, McCaw Hall, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or live nation.com. ONEREPUBLIC: June 12, Comcast Arena at Everett. 866-332-8499 or comcastarenaeverett.com. DIGITOUR: June 20, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. PARADISO FESTIVAL: June 27-28, Gorge Amphitheatre, George. 800745-3000 or livenation.com. CHER: June 28, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. NICK CAVE & THE BAD SEEDS: July 2, Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or tickets.com. JOURNEY, STEVE MILLER BAND: July 19, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn. 800-745-3000 or livenation. com. MÖTLEY CRÜE: July 27, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn. 800745-3000 or LiveNation.com. ARCADE FIRE: Aug. 8, Gorge Amphitheatre, George. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. BRUNO MARS: Aug. 9, Gorge Amphitheatre, George. 800-7453000 or livenation.com.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, February 13, 2014 - E15

AT THE LINCOLN THEATRE 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon 360-336-8955 n www.lincolntheatre.org

VALENTINE’S SINGE MINGLE FOOD & DRINK SPECIALS DJ TRIPLE CROWN 9PM

VALENTINE'S SPECIAL FRIDAY, FEB 14 • 4pm-9pm

Eric Tingstad and Nancy Rumbel 7:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 14

The Lincoln welcomes Grammy Award winners Eric Tingstad and Nancy Rumbel, who have performed, recorded and toured together for more than 24 years with 19 albums to their credit. Tingstad and Rumbel began their collaboration in 1985. Their debut album, “The Gift,” quickly became a holiday classic. In 1998, “American Acoustic” was honored as Acoustic Instrumental Album of the Year. A Carnegie Hall appearance followed in 2000, and in 2003 they received a Grammy Award for “Acoustic Garden.” Rumbel grew up in San Antonio and continued her musical education at Northwestern University, where she became interested in ethnomusicology, improvisation and dance. She was a member of the Paul Winter Consort for several years prior to her move to the Pacific Northwest. Tingstad grew up in Seattle and attended Western Washington University, where he was trained in the Segovian classic guitar tradition. He is a product of influences like Led Zeppelin, Hawaiian

slack key guitar, Ravi Shankar and Martin Denny. $25, $22, $20 & $18 with $2 off for Lincoln members.

‘Gravity’

7:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 15 5:30 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 16 7:30 p.m. Monday-Tuesday, Feb. 17-18

Alfonso Cuarón’s story features an astronaut (George Clooney) and a medical engineer (Sandra Bullock), who work together to survive after an accident leaves them adrift in space. “Gravity” has been nominated for 10 Academy Awards. Rated PG-13. $10 general; $9 seniors, students and active military; $8 members; $7 children 12 and under. Bargain matinee prices (all shows before 6 p.m.): $8 general, $6 members, $5 children 12 and under.

‘Rusalka’

1 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 16

Renée Fleming returns to one of her signature roles in Dvorák’s soulful fairy-tale opera. Tenor Piotr Beczala co-stars as the Prince, Dolora Zajick is Ježibaba, and Yannick Nézet-Séguin is on the podium. $23 adults; $19 seniors; $16 students with $2 off for Lincoln members.

Innovative Food • Craft Cocktails 24 Draft Handles • Live Music

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Sandra Bullock and George Clooney star in “Gravity.”

Appetizer – Crab Stuffed Mushrooms with Wasabi Aioli & Chives Salad Course – Spring Mix Greens with Burgundy Pears, Bacon, Blue Cheese Crumbles, Candied Walnuts & Champagne Vinaigrette or Classic Caesar Salad Entree – 8oz. Roasted Prime Rib with Shrimp Scampi and Fingerling Potatoes with Herb Butter or Wild Salmon with Citrus Buerre Blanc served with Basil & Parmesan Orzo Accompaniments – Roasted Vegetables, Bread Basket & butter Dessert – Rich Chocolate Cake with vanilla ice cream ball & Raspberry Drizzle Champagne – $3/glass or $16/bottle $22.95 per person – Reservations Encouraged VOTED BEST OF ANACORTES 13 YEARS RUNNING

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Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E16 - Thursday, February 13, 2014

MOVIES

A new, and somewhat improved, ‘RoboCop’ By RICK BENTLEY The Fresno Bee

The reboot of “RoboCop” uses the basic blueprint from the 1987 movie starring Peter Weller. It’s been modified and updated to create a sleeker design, but it is not as intellectually cutting-edge. Big business has become the new go-to villains now that the Russians aren’t as scary, making the film less of a cautionary tale about how machines are taking over our lives and more focused on the evils of corporate America. Just like the original, the new “RoboCop” focuses on Alex Murphy (Joel Kinnaman), a firstrate cop who becomes the target of one of the top criminals in near-future Detroit. An explosive attack leaves Murphy with little more than his brain and right hand worth saving. Fortunately for him, Raymond Sellars (Michael Keaton) has been trying to come up with a way to get the public and politicians to get on board with his new robot peacekeepers. The chief complaint is that robots are too analytical in their thinking. That’s when Sellars comes up with the plan to have his chief robot expert, Dr. Dennett Norton (Gary Oldman), put the few remaining parts of Murphy into a robot body to create the perfect union of a machine’s abilities with a human’s thinking. In the original film, Murphy’s past was a blank, returning in only spits and spurts of images. His emotional struggles came out of trying to recapture the world that helped define his humanity. The new Murphy remembers his family and his struggle is more of how to be a husband and father when most of your body has a limited warranty. Because the new RoboCop has more memory of past life, the per-

‘ROBOCOP’

HHH Cast: Joel Kinnaman, Michael Keaton, Gary Oldman, Abbie Cornish Running time: 1 hour, 50 minutes Rating: PG-13 for disturbing images, language, drug use.

formance by Kinnaman has more emotional impact than Weller’s work. But Weller sold the idea of a manbot far more convincingly because he wasn’t saddled with sentimental situations. Both films offer plenty of action, with the new version having a slight edge just because of the technology that’s available to create massive battle sequences. What the new “RoboCop” loses in its message, it makes up with first-rate fights. The least interesting part of the new “RoboCop” are segments that feature Samuel L. Jackson as the host of a TV news program. The over-the-top rants by Jackson do little to advance the plot or make any serious commentary on the movie’s deeper message. The new “RoboCop” shows we have the technology to build a sleeker, faster and more powerful version of the original film. But it comes at a price — the new movie isn’t as crisp when it comes to its political and social messages. If you are looking for action, the new version is perfect for you. If you want a “RoboCop” with more depth, stick with the original on DVD.

Joel Kinnaman stars in “RoboCop.” Columbia Pictures-Sony via AP


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, February 13, 2014 - E17

MOVIES MINI-REVIEWS Compiled from news services. Ratings are one to four stars. “About Last Night” — The four leads in this update of the 1986 comedy -- Kevin Hart, Michael Ealy, Regina Hall and Joy Bryant -- are enormously likable and there’s enough sharp, raunchy, sexy humor for me to recommend this version. The movie does a nice job of capturing the rhythms of a relationship. Romantic comedy, R, 100 minutes. HHH “American Hustle” — Christian Bale gives a transcendent performance as a con man who falls hard for hardtime gal Amy Adams. Director David O. Russell and his “Silver Linings Playbook” stars Bradley Cooper and Jennifer Lawrence went right back to work together on this wild tale about con artists helping the FBI on a sting. Comedy, R, 138 minutes. HHHH “Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues” — It’s a marvel the way Will Ferrell flings himself into playing the loathsome idiot for the ages Ron Burgundy, hired in this sequel to anchor on a cable news network in the early 1980s. The gang all returns: Paul Rudd, Steve Carell, David Koechner, Christina Applegate. Funnier than the original, “Anchorman 2” is also, in its own loony way, a sobering look at the television business then — and now. (Comedy, PG-13, 119 minutes). HHH1⁄2 “August: Osage County” — The dialogue is sometimes so sharp we wince, and the acting by an ensemble of world-class actors led by Meryl Streep, Julia Roberts, Ewan McGregor and Chris Cooper is for the most part superb. But this adaptation of Tracy Letts’ play ultimately is sour, loud and draining. Nearly everyone in this story would be the most horrific person at your average dinner party. Drama, R, 119 minutes. HH “Dallas Buyers Club” — Matthew McConaughey plays Ron Woodroof, a grimy, shady, homophobic, substanceabusing horndog in 1985 Texas who learns he’s HIVpositive and procures unapproved means of treatment. McConaughey’s masterful job

ture, PG-13, 114 minutes. HHH “Frozen” — When a queen with icy powers (voice of Idina ANACORTES CINEMAS Menzel) accidentally freezes Feb. 14-20 her kingdom, she runs away Winter’s Tale (PG-13): Friday-Saturday: 1:00, 3:50, and her intrepid sister (Kris6:30, 9:05; Sunday-Thursday: 1:00, 3:50, 6:30 ten Bell) goes to find her. The Lego Movie (PG): Friday-Saturday: 1:20, 3:30, 6:50, Sure to delight kids and cap9:00; Sunday-Wednesday: 1:20, 3:30, 6:50; Thursday: tivate adults, Disney’s musi1:20, 3:30 cal “Frozen” is the instant The Monuments Men (PG-13): Friday-Saturday: 1:10, favorite for the animated fea3:40, 6:40, 9:10; Sunday-Thursday: 1:10, 3:40, 6:40 ture Oscar. Animated musi The Royal Ballet: Swan Lake (NR): Thursday: 7 p.m. cal, PG, 102 minutes. HHH1⁄2 360-293-6620 “Gimme Shelter” — Vanessa Hudgens does strong work BLUE FOX DRIVE-IN as a pregnant teenager runOak Harbor ning away from her abusive Feb. 14 mother. Writer-director Ron The Lego Movie (PG), Winter’s Tale (PG-13): First movie Krauss and a strong cast, starts at 6 p.m. including James Earl Jones, 360-675-5667 Rosario Dawson and Brendan Fraser, elevate some soberCONCRETE THEATRE ing but fairly standard afterFeb. 14-16 school-special material to August: Osage County (R): Friday: 7:30 p.m.; Saturday: the next level. Drama, PG-13, 5 and 7:30 p.m.; Sunday: 4 and 6:30 p.m. 100 minutes. HHH 360-941-0403 “Her” — In writer-director Spike Jonze’s lovely and wonCASCADE MALL THEATRES drous ultra-modern romance, Burlington a fragile fellow in the not For listings: 888-AMC-4FUN (888-262-4386). so-distant future (Joaquin Phoenix) falls in love with the OAK HARBOR CINEMAS voice of an operating system Feb. 14-20 (Scarlett Johansson). One of RoboCop (PG-13): Friday: 1:20, 3:50, 6:35, 9:05; Saturthe more original, hilarious day: 10:40, 1:20, 3:50, 6:35, 9:05; Sunday: 10:40, 1:20, and even heartbreaking sto3:50, 6:35; Monday-Thursday: 1:20, 3:50, 6:35 ries of the year. It works both The Lego Movie (PG): Friday: 1:10, 3:25, 6:40, 8:50; as a love story and as a comSaturdday: 10:50, 1:10, 3:25, 6:40, 8:50; Sunday: mentary on the ways technol10:50, 1:10, 3:25, 6:40; Monday-Thursday: 1:10, 3:25, ogy isolates us from human 6:40 contact. Comedy-romance, R, The Monuments Men (PG-13): Friday: 1:00, 3:30, 6:30, 119 minutes. HHH1⁄2 9:00; Saturday 10:30, 1:00, 3:30, 6:30, 9:00; Sunday: “Inside Llewyn Davis” — 10:30, 1:00, 3:30, 6:30; Monday-Thursday: 1:00, 3:30, With this dry comedy about 6:30 the American folk music 360-279-2226 scene of the early 1960s, Ethan and Joel Coen have STANWOOD CINEMAS crafted another unique period Feb. 14-20 piece. Oscar Isaac gives a Endless Love (PG-13): Friday-Wednesday: 1:20, 3:45, memorable performance as 7:00, 9:20; Thursday: 1:20, 3:45, 7:00 the title character, a thor Winter’s Tale (PG-13): Friday-Wednesday: 12:50, 3:30, oughly unlikable, selfish, 6:50, 9:30; Thursday: 12:50, 3:30, 9:20 socially poisonous miscreant. RoboCop (PG-13): 1:00, 3:40, 6:20, 9:00 The music is terrific. With The Lego Movie (PG): 1:30, 4:00, 6:30, 8:50 Justin Timberlake, Carey Mul The Monuments Men (PG-13): 1:10, 3:50, 6:40, 9:15 ligan and John Goodman. The Royal Ballet: Swan Lake (NR): Thursday: 7 p.m. Comedy, R, 105 minutes. 360-629-0514 HHH1⁄2 “Labor Day” — A depressed single mom of portraying one of the more rate cast of wily veterans (Kate Winslet) falls hard for deeply flawed anti-heroes (Harrison Ford, Ben Kingsley) a wanted man (Josh Brolin) in recent screen history and fresh-faced youngsters in Jason Reitman’s adaptareminds us why he became a (Asa Butterfield of “Hugo”) tion of a Joyce Maynard movie star in the first place. deliver a rousing, challengnovel. Either you go with the We start out loathing this guy ing adventure that should almost dreamlike, sometimes and learn to love him. Jared satisfy most young fans of logic-defying scenario, or Leto disappears into the role the beloved sci-fi novel while you don’t. I was captivated of a transgender drug addict keeping the adults engrossed from the opening sequence. and Jennifer Garner is Ron’s as well. The simulated batRomantic drama, PG-13, 111 empathetic doctor. Drama, R, tles against scary aliens are minutes. HHH1⁄2 117 minutes. HHH1⁄2 beautifully shot and expertly “Lone Survivor” — This “Ender’s Game” — A firstchoreographed. Sci-fi adven- re-creation of a 2005 Navy

AT AREA THEATERS

SEAL mission builds to one of the most realistic, shocking, gruesome and devastating depictions of war ever put on film. Instead of going for the big-picture perspective, director Peter Berg focuses on the unflinching bravery of soldiers executing their mission and looking out for one another. Mark Wahlberg stars, with Taylor Kitsch, Emile Hirsch, Ben Foster and Eric Bana. War drama, R, 121 minutes. HHH “Nebraska” — What a joy it is to watch Bruce Dern playing such a miserable SOB in the best role of his long career. Woody Grant is a crabby, boozy, sometimes delusional old guy on a road trip with his son (Will Forte) to collect a sweepstakes prize. Alexander Payne’s latest film is a modern American classic about the dynamic between a father from the generation that didn’t speak about its feelings and a grown son who’s still trying to get his father to explain himself. Stark, beautiful and memorable. Drama, R, 115 minutes. HHHH “Ride Along” — We’ve seen hundreds of variations on the mismatched buddy-cop movie, and few have been as uninspired and depressingly dreadful as this one. Kevin Hart, who can be fall-down funny at times, at least gets points for infusing boundless energy into his role as a pint-sized video game enthusiast riding around with the snarl-andgrowl cop (Ice Cube) whose sister he wants to marry. Action comedy, PG-13, 100 minutes. H1⁄2 “Saving Mr. Banks” — Emma Thompson is a perfect choice to play prissy P.L. Travers, who wrote the Mary Poppins books and resists the efforts of Walt Disney (Tom Hanks) to give the magical nanny the Hollywood musical treatment. A lovingly rendered, sweet film, set in a stylized and gorgeous rendition of 1961 Los Angeles. Comedy-biography, PG-12, 125 minutes. HHH “That Awkward Moment” — Strives to straddle the line between breezy, bromantic comedy and “Hangover”esque guy humor – and fails miserably on both counts. Talented, charismatic actors including Zac Efron and

Michael B. Jordan star in a not particularly offensive but utterly unmemorable film. Comedy, R, 94 minutes. H1⁄2 “The Book Thief” — A wondrous, richly textured, sometimes heartbreakingly effective movie about good Germans in World War II, including a remarkable little girl and the couple who took her in while sheltering a teenage Jewish boy in their basement. Geoffrey Rush and Emily Watson deserve Oscar consideration for their lovely, layered performances. One of the year’s best movies. Drama, PG-13, 131 minutes. HHHH “The Monuments Men” — One of the most old-fashioned and at times almost breezy World War II films in recent memory is about middle-aged curators recovering art stolen by the Nazis. George Clooney directs himself and his co-stars (including Matt Damon and Bill Murray) as if he had watched “The Dirty Dozen” on a continuous loop for a week. Historical action, PG-13, 118 minutes. HHH “The Wolf of Wall Street” — Martin Scorsese directs the story of an amoral Wall Street hustler (the ever-charismatic Leonardo DiCaprio) -— a user, a taker, a rat and a scoundrel. Though the little bleep sometimes wears out his welcome, we stick around to see if he gets his comeuppance and to marvel at Scorsese’s continuing mastery. Jonah Hill overdoes it as DiCaprio’s right-hand man, and Matthew McConaughey is mesmerizing as his first mentor. Crime-comedy, R, 180 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “12 Years a Slave” — is a film about great bravery, featuring some of the bravest performances you’ll ever have the privilege to witness. Chiwetel Ejiofor stars as a free man in New York state in the 1840s, who is kidnapped and shipped to the South, where he is beaten, given a new name and forced into slavery. Unflinchingly directed by Steve McQueen, “12 Years a Slave” is what we talk about when we talk about greatness in film. With Michael Fassbender, Benedict Cumberbatch and Paul Giamatti. Drama, R, 134 minutes. HHHH


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E18 - Thursday, February 13, 2014

OUT & ABOUT ART

fiber art by Martha Tottenham, jewelry by Carole IN THE ART BAR: ArtCunningham and Debbie works by Don Willcuts are Aldrich, sculptures by on display through Feb. 28 Tracy Powell, glass art by in the Lincoln Theatre Art Bob Metke, gourds by Bar, 712 S. First St., Mount Vicki Hampel, ceramics Vernon. Willcuts loves by Patsy Chamberlain and everything that is beautiful Barbara Hathaway, baskets — even things some might by Jane Hyde and paintconsider ugly. According ings by Cathy Schoenberg. to Wilcuts, there are no Gallery hours: 11 a.m. to 5 mistakes; the process is the p.m. Wednesday through perfection. 360-336-8955 or Saturday or by appointlincolntheatre.org. ment. 360-293-3577 or mccoolart.com. GALLERY SHOW: “Of This World and Not,” NW DESIGNER CRAFTSfeaturing artworks by MEN: “6 Celebrate NorthSkagit Valley artists Heidi west Designer Craftsmen Epstein, Eddie Gordon @ 60” continues through and Allen Moe, continues March 9 at Anchor Art through March 16 at GalSpace, 216 Commercial lery Cygnus, 109 ComAve., Anacortes. mercial Ave., La Conner. The exhibition, comGallery hours are noon memorating the 60th to 5 p.m. Friday through anniversary of Northwest Saturday. 360-708-4787 or Designer Craftsmen gallerycygnus.com. (NWDC), will feature the OIL PAINTINGS: A show mixed media work of six local NWDC artists — of large oils on canvas by Lanny Bergner, Danielle Dederick Ward continues Bodine, Lynn DiNino, Lin through March 4 at Scott McJunkin, Don Myhre and Milo Gallery, 420 ComDenise Snyder. mercial Ave., Anacortes. n The gallery will host a Ward’s works often represlideshow/panel discussion sent geological elements. from 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday, Also showing are acrylics Feb. 22. by Cynthia Richardson, n The closing celebrapastels by Sandy Byers, oils tion will take place from 6 by Lorna Libert and mixed to 9 p.m. Friday, March 7. media work by Martha Gallery hours are noon Brouwer. Gallery hours to 5 p.m. Friday through are 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday Sunday. 360-755-3140 or anchorartspace.org. or by appointment. 360293-6938 or scottmilo.com. ART FOR HEARTS & “COLOR OF WINTER”: A HAMMERS: The second show of paintings inspired annual Hearts and Hammers benefit art show by Northwest color and continues through March light will open with a 3 at Rob Schouten Galreception during the First lery, 765 Wonn Road, Friday Gallery Walk from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Feb. 7, at Greenbank. More than 40 Anne Martin McCool Gal- Whidbey Island artists will lery, 711 Commercial Ave., participate in the exhibit, with a portion of the proAnacortes. In addition to new acryl- ceeds going to benefit South Whidbey’s Hearts ic paintings by McCool, and Hammers, whose volthe show will also feature unteers repair the homes wood works by George of Whidbey residents who Way and Art Learmonth,

“ART ALOFT”: The Stanwood Camano Arts Guild’s annual juried Fine Art Show continues from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily through Feb. 23 at A Guilded Gallery, 8700 271st St. NW, Stanwood. The exhibition will feature paintings, drawings, mixed media, sculptures, glass, ceramics, jewelry, wearable art and more. Free admission. 360-629-2787 or stanwoodcamanoarts.com/a-guildedgallery.

‘ARTISTS IN LOVE: WITH LIFE AND EACH OTHER’

The seventh annual “Love Month” show continues through March 3 at Raven Rocks Gallery, 765 Wonn Road, Greenbank. Gallery co-owner Mary Jo Oxrieder will offer her latest miniature mixed media works, framed “Love Grows” series of heart-themed paintings, hand-made heart cards and more. Her partner, Windwalker Taibi, will debut the latest paintings in his “Raven’s in Love” series, new miniature watercolors and a few surprises. The show will also showcase the latest works by other resident gallery artists, including jewelry, hand-turned wooden vases, driftwood feathers, oil paintings and pen and ink creations. For information, including gallery hours and directions, call 360-2220102 or visit ravenrocksgallery.com. are unable physically or financially to do the work. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekends (Tuesdays and Wednesdays by appointment). 360-2223070 or robschouten gallery.com. BIRD FESTIVAL INVITATIONAL: The event

continues through Feb. 23 at Smith & Vallee Gallery, 5742 Gilkey Ave., Edison. The bird-focused exhibition features artwork by more than 30 local and regional artists. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday. 360-766-6230 or smithandvallee.com.

“EXTRA! EXTRA! A HISTORY OF NEWSPAPERS IN SKAGIT COUNTY”: The exhibit continues through April 6 at the Skagit County Historical Museum, 501 Fourth St., La Conner. Learn about the history of the Skagit Valley Herald (130 years old this year), Anacortes American (124 years), The Argus (123 years), Courier-Times (122 years) and other Skagit newspapers that are no longer around. Museum hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday. Admission: $5 adults, $4 seniors and ages 6 to 12, $10 families, free for members and ages 5 and younger. 360-466-3365 or skagitcounty.net/museum. “THE APOCALYPTIC SUBLIME”: In conjunction with the Whatcom Museum’s exhibition “Vanishing Ice,” Western Washington University presents a survey of David Maisel’s major aerial photography projects, “Black Maps: American Landscape and the Apocalyptic Sublime,” which concludes Friday, Feb. 14, in the Western Gallery on the WWU Bellingham campus. In these large-scaled photographs, “Black Maps” leads the viewer on a hallucinatory journey through terrains that have been radically altered by

environmental issues and transformed by human agency. Maisel’s aerial images of environmentally impacted zones frame the issues of contemporary landscape with equal measures of documentation and metaphor, beauty and despair. Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays; 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesdays, and noon to 4 p.m. Saturdays. 360-6503963 or westerngallery. wwu.edu.

FESTIVALS SNOW GOOSE FESTIVAL: The ninth annual Port Susan Snow Goose & Birding Festival will take place Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 22-23, with many activities taking place at the Floyd Norgaard Cultural Center, 27108 102nd Ave. NW, Stanwood. Events will take place both days at several locations in and around Stanwood and Camano Island. Enjoy guided and self-guided tours, speakers and demonstrations, vendors, children’s activities, bird art and more. Free admission. snowgoosefest. org.

LECTURES AND TALKS WORLD ISSUES FORUM: Western Washington University’s Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies holds its annual World Issues Forum from noon to 1:20 p.m. Wednesdays (unless otherwise noted) in the Fairhaven College auditorium on the WWU campus in Bellingham. Presentations are free and open to the public. 360-650-2309 or wwu.edu/ fairhaven/news/worldis suesforum. Next up: Feb. 19: “Red Sky at Morning: Ethics and the Climate Crisis”: with Kathleen Dean Moore,


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, February 13, 2014 - E19

OUT & ABOUT distinguished professor of Philosophy at Oregon State University, and director of the Spring Creek Project for Ideas, Nature and the Written Word. Moore will talk about global warming and the souring of the seas that are threats to all ecosystems and the people who depend on them, and what can be done. Feb. 26: “Tropic of Chaos: Climate Change and the New Geography of Violence”: Drawing on his recent book, the same title as his speech topic, and recent travels in the global South, Christian Parenti, professor at the School for International Training Graduate Institute, will discuss the intersection between war and climate change and what can be done. This lecture will be repeated at 7 p.m. at the Bellingham Public Library.

blowing. (The show will repeat at 8 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 23). speakupspeatout radio.org.

Bellingham. A silent auction will benefit the festival. During the 10-day festival, 20 inspirational and educational films on enviSTORY POLE: “MAIDEN ronmental justice, indigenous resistance, war and OF DECEPTION PASS”: 7 peace, gender and women’s p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 19, Anacortes Public Library, rights will be screened, followed by facilitated dis1220 10th St., Anacortes. cussion led by filmmakers, Carver Tracy Powell and human rights activists and Leslie Eastwood will local experts. For informaexplain how the Samish story pole project came to tion, including a complete be 30 years ago. Free. 360- film schedule and locations, 293-1910, ext. 21, or library. visit bhrff.webs.com. cityofanacortes.org. “PADILLA BAY: A SHOREBIRD ECOLOGY: NATIONAL JEWEL IN OUR OWN BACKYARD: A FINLearn about the ecology GER ON THE PULSE OF and life history of shorebirds at 7 p.m. Wednesday, THE SALISH SEA”: Glen (Alex) Alexander, educaFeb. 19, at the Camano tion coordinator of the Multipurpose Center, 141 E. Camano Drive, Camano Padilla Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, Island. Shorebirds rely on will speak at 7 p.m. Friday, both estuarine and terrestrial habitat as refueling Feb. 21, at the Northwest sites during migration and Education Services District building, 1601 R Ave., for overwintering. Gary RIGHT TO WORK: Lori Slater, founder and execu- Anacortes. Learn about the functions and values of Province, field mobilization tive director of Ecostudthe waters around Fidalgo director of the Washington ies Institute, a nonprofit Island. skagitbeaches.org. State Labor Council, will organization committed discuss “Right to Work to conserving birds and (for less) Laws” at the their habitats, will share MORE FUN next Fidalgo Democrats results from research in BLIND DATE WITH A meeting at 7 p.m. today, the Skagit-Stillaguamish BOOK: Find your (book) Feb. 13, at the Anacortes River Delta, and describe soul mate by going on a Public Library, 1220 Tenth how citizen-scientists can blind date with a book at St., Anacortes. Labor trou- participate in a new Puget the Mount Vernon City badour Gary Kanter will Sound-wide monitoring Library, 315 Snoqualmie perform his song “Right to effort. Free. 360-387-2236 St., Mount Vernon. Check Work is Wrong!” A moder- or camanowildlifehabitat. out a specially wrapped ated period of questions org. book from the library’s and comments will follow. display. Take it home, The meeting is open to the HUMAN RIGHTS FILM unwrap it, read it and give public. Coffee and cookies FESTIVAL: The 14th annual it a chance to win you over. will be available. Bring a Bellingham Human Rights If your date goes well (or nonperishable food dona- Film Festival will take even if it doesn’t, as long as tion for the food bank. place Feb. 20-March 1, you stuck it out to the end) For information, contact with film screenings at fill out the Rate Your Date Corinne at 360-293-7114. the Fairhaven College form. Bring it back when Auditorium at Western you return your book to LOCAL RADIO: “SPEAK Washington University, enter the Blind Book Date UP! SPEAK OUT!”: 5 p.m. the Pickford Film Center raffle. Free. 360-336-6209. Wednesday, Feb. 19, KSVR and other locations around 91.7 FM radio. Dave Bellingham. FULL MOON HAPPIMcConnell will talk with The opening evening NESS DANCE: 7 p.m. SunElizabeth Murray, retired will feature free screenings day, Feb. 16, at the Ananational intelligence offiof “Rooted Lands” at 6:30 cortes Center for Happicer, about intelligence and 9 p.m. at the Pickford ness, 619 Commercial Ave., gathering and whistle Film Center, 1318 Bay St., Anacortes. Celebrate the

arrival of the full moon as you dance your heart out to a variety of worldwide music. By donation. 360464-2229 or anacortes centerforhappiness.org. NORTHWEST PASSAGES: Experience the life of young Swedish immigrant Julie Berg as she and her family struggle to build a new life in Washington state in the early 20th century as part of “Northwest Passages,” a production of Living Voices, from 7 to 9 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 20, at the Burlington Public Library, 820 E. Washington Ave., Burlington. Free admission. Program is suitable for fourth-graders and older. For more information call 360-755-0760, email karenp@burlingtonwa.gov or rootsproject@frontier. com or visit burl

ingtonwa.gov/library. STAR PARTY: Explore the night sky and check out distant galaxies, nebulas and planets beginning at dark Friday, Feb. 21, at Fort Nugent Park, 2075 SW Fort Nugent Road, Oak Harbor. Island County Astronomical Society members will provide an assortment of telescopes for viewing. All ages are welcome. Free. The event will be canceled if cloudy. 360-679-7664 or icas-wa.webs.com.

fish caught that day. Other activities include the Skagit Symphony Smelt Run/ Walk; a pancake breakfast from 8 to 10 a.m. at Maple Hall, 108 Commercial; hot dog lunch; kids’ activities; tours of the Sea Scouts’ historic schooner; raffles and more. laconnerrotary. org.

S.P.O.T. FUNDRAISER: Saving Pets One at a Time (S.P.O.T.) will hold its fifth annual “Spotlight Night” fundraising auction at 5:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 22, at SMELT DERBY: The St. Joseph Center, 215 N. 49th annual La Conner 15th St., Mount Vernon. Rotary Club Smelt Derby Enjoy bidding on a variety will take place from 8 a.m. of donated goods and serto 3 p.m. Saturday, Feb. vices, a dessert dash and 22, on the public docks in more. $25 advance, $30 La Conner. Prizes will be at the door. For tickets, awarded in age categories information or to make a from 1 to 99 for the londonation, call 360-336-5388 gest, smallest, weirdest and or 360-815-2849 or visit many other categories of savingpetsoneatatime.org.

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