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Skagit Valley Herald Thursday August 29, 2013

Reviews

Tuning Up

At the Movies

Music: Bob Dylan, Jimmy Buffett Video Games: “Saints Row IV”

Amy Hindman plays Washington Sips on Saturday evening in La Conner

Psychological thriller “Closed Circuit” comes up a bit short

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Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E2 - Thursday, August 29, 2013

NEW ON DVD THIS WEEK “The Great Gatsby”: Leonardo DiCaprio stars in the latest version of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel that cast a harsh light on the 1920s, showing that no matter how opulent the facade what lies behind is a decaying dream. The same can be said of Baz Luhrmann’s big-screen adaptation. The director gets so obsessed with visual fancy that he fails to reach the heart of the story. Because the adaptation of Fitzgerald’s work by Luhrmann and Craig Pearce concentrates on the love story, it loses the social commentary that makes the book such a classic. Instead of seeing the dark side of the life that Gatsby has to live to feel on the same economic level as his true love, Daisy (Carey Mulligan), it is treated as an annoying means to an end. “Pain & Gain”: The film is based on the true story of Miami bodybuilders who committed a long list of crimes, including torture and murder, in the mid-’90s. Director Michael Bay and screenwriters Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely are proud of how they took this true story and turned it into a dark comedy. At least they can see the humor. Had it been a fictional story, it would have been a lot easier to accept the absurdity of the crimes and actions. It would have been easier to laugh at how the trio’s first victim, Victor Kershaw (Tony Shalhoub), could not be killed despite being in a crashed car, set on fire and then run over by a van. The reality of their actions keep creeping back, making this dark humor play like a soulless recounting of a tragedy. “At Any Price”: A son rejects the family business to race cars. Dennis Quaid stars. “Tales of the City: 20th Anniversary Collection”: Peabody Awardwinning mini-series starring Olympia Dukakis, Laura Linney, Billy Campbell, Thomas Gibson. “Online”: A man discovers changing a person’s life with the click of a button can have consequences. “Elementary — The First Season”: CBS detective series starring Jonny Lee Miller and Lucy Liu. “Seattle Superstorm”: Strange object crashes and creates a massive storm. “Stranded”: Crew of a U.S. military moon base is cut off from Earth. Christian Slater stars.

YOUR ARTS, ENTERTAINMENT AND RECREATION GUIDE TO WHAT’S GOING ON IN SKAGIT COUNTY AND THE SURROUNDING AREAS

Upcoming movie releases Following is a partial schedule of coming movies on DVD. Release dates are subject to change: SEPT. 3 Evocateur: The Morton Downey Jr. Movie - Magnolia Now You See Me - Lionsgate/Summit Stories We Tell - Lionsgate

The Weekend / Page 5

SEPT. 10 Love Is All You Need - Sony Star Trek Into Darkness - Paramount Peeples - Lionsgate SEPT. 17 The Bling Ring - Lionsgate SEPT. 24 24. Redemption - Lionsgate OCT. 1 The Croods - Fox/DreamWorks This Is the End - Sony OCT. 8 After Earth - Sony The Hangover Part III - Warner Much Ado About Nothing - Lionsgate

Check out the World of Outlaws Fan Fest on Saturday at Skagit Speedway

Inside

n McClatchy-Tribune News Service

“Q — The Winged Serpent”: Michael Moriarty film now available on Blu-ray. “Sapphire and Steel: The Complete Series”: Includes 34 episodes of the British sci-fi series starring Joanna Lumley and David McCallum. “Billy the Kid”: The future criminal and a bounty hunter work together to get revenge. Cody McCarver stars. “Monsuno: Combat Chaos”: Five episodes of the Nicktoons animated series. “The Idolmaker”: Taylor Hackford film about a music promoter driven by his desire to discover the next big act. “Among Friends”: A murder mystery night goes bad when someone decides to use the evening for revenge. “Sons of Anarchy — Season Five”: Cable series starring Ron Perlman. “NYC Underground”: Friends end up on the run after making a deal with a gangster. “Prime Suspect: The Complete Collection”: The police drama starring Helen Mirren is now on Blu-ray. “Missions That Changed The War: German’s Last Ace”: Gary Sinise narrates the documentary that explores the downfall of Nazi Germany. n Rick Bentley, The Fresno Bee

SUBMISSIONS Email features@skagitpublishing.com, vrichardson@skagitpublishing. com (recreation items) Deadline: 5 p.m. Friday for the following Thursday edition Phone 360-416-2135 Hand-deliver 1215 Anderson Road Mount Vernon, WA 98274 Mailing address P.O. Box 578 Mount Vernon, WA 98273

Music, Game Reviews..................6-7 Get Involved.................................... 8 Little Words..................................... 9 On Stage, Tuning Up..................... 10 Travel........................................12-13 Hot Tickets.................................... 14 Movie Review “Closed Circuit”.... 16 Movie Reviews, Listings............... 17 At the Lincoln................................ 17 Out & About.............................18-19

Online events calendar To list your event on our website, visit goskagit.com and look for the Events Calendar on the home page HAVE A STORY IDEA? w For arts and entertainment, contact Features Editor Craig Parrish at 360-416-2135 or features@skagitpublishing.com w For recreation, contact staff writer Vince Richardson at 360-416-2181 or vrichardson@ skagitpublishing.com TO ADVERTISE 360-424-3251


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, August 29, 2013 - E3

COMMUNITY

Youth circus returns to Skagit County Skagit Valley Herald staff

The Wenatchee Youth Circus returns to town this weekend with performances at Thousand Trails Campground, 5409 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. Performances will be held at 2 and 5 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 31, and 2 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 1. Performers ages 3 to 18 will do everything adult performers do, including the flying trapeze, high wire, swinging ladders, trampoline, juggling, performing as clowns and more. Tickets are $5-$10. For more information, call 360-724-4811.

Skagit Valley Herald file photos


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E4 - Thursday, August 29, 2013

ADVENTURES IN BARRYWOOD

A

fter a bloody battle at the box office, Ashton Kutcher has retained his title of “World’s Biggest Star For No Apparent Reason.” Kutcher, who has somehow parlayed a silly ’70s sitcom, a “Candid Camera” rip-off and a marriage to Demi Moore into a bustling show business empire, went down for the count with his Steve Jobs biopic. “Jobs” was deleted at the box office after millions of Apple customers and Kutcher’s millions of Twitter followers refused to show up to fill movie theaters. Apparently, movie-goers weren’t interested in watching a bad actor play a bad person (Hey, all I know about Jobs is what I learned in this movie). Rumors of Kutcher’s inclusion in this year’s Oscar race were premature, but all is not lost for the man who not only replaced Charlie Sheen on “Two and a Half Men,” but does a horrible job of it and gets paid $2 million a week. As a consolation, he won a coveted spot on our annual list of the summer movie season’s biggest losers. It’s been an interesting summer for some pretty big names, and by “interesting,” we mean “disheartening” and “disastrous” and “disappointing” and “disconcerting” and other words that begin with the letter “d.” Before I start, I want to acknowledge that every person appearing on this list is richer, more successful and better looking than me, so please don’t write to tell me that I’m jealous. I may be jealous of them, but at least I’m not on this list of losers. My only regret is that Adam Sandler does not appear on this list for his sequel “Grown Ups 2.” In no particular order: 1. Vince Vaughn and Owen Wilson — Both these

Summer movie season had more than fair share of missteps By BARRY KOLTNOW / The Orange County Register

DENZEL WASHINGTON AND MARK WAHLBERG, “2 GUNS” Universal Pictures via AP

JOHNNY DEPP AND ARMIE HAMMER, “THE LONE RANGER” Disney Enterprises, Inc. and Jerry Bruckheimer Inc. via AP

ASHTON KUTCHER, “JOBS” Open Road Films via AP

guys will survive “The Internship,” but if they truly want to apologize for this well-publicized return of the guys from “Wedding Crashers,” they’ll send personal checks to reimburse the cost of movie tickets, parking, babysitters and popcorn. 2. Will Smith — We don’t get to use the words “Will Smith” and “summer loser”

in the same sentence very often, but “After Earth” was a dismal failure. Still, the Fresh Prince will endure. 3. Johnny Depp — One of my wonderful readers took me to task for mocking Johnny for his role of Tonto in “The Lone Ranger.” It is her contention that people of my ilk are blaming him for the failure of

the filmmakers to make an entertaining movie. I do blame the filmmakers, but I also think Johnny needs to receive recognition for his part in this silliness. 4. Ryan Reynolds — I have pontificated upon this actor’s deficiencies in a previous column so I won’t belabor the point. Suffice to say that his film “R.I.P.D”

did not do well. The initials must stand for: “Rest in Peace, Dude.” 5. Channing Tatum — “White House Down” is certainly not his fault. But he was the face and biceps up there on the posters so his reputation took a bit of a hit for a film that gave movie-goers a sense of déjà vu. Several months earlier,

a very similar movie called “Olympus Has Fallen” opened in theaters, and it had Morgan Freeman in it. 6. Guillermo del Toro — The director of the brilliant “Pan’s Labyrinth” was off his game in “Pacific Rim,” an homage to the Godzilla movies he loved so much while growing up in Mexico. He spent a fortune on this movie, but he should have spent more on recognizable stars and a screenwriter. 7. Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms and Zach Galifianakis — Who among us could have resisted the money thrown at these guys for “The Hangover Part III?” At some point, however, people have to look at themselves in the mirror and wonder how they’re going to give us back two hours of our lives. With great salaries comes great responsibility. 8. Denzel Washington — Why does every comedian want to play Hamlet and every dramatic actor want to be funny in “2 Guns?” Denzel has a perfectly good dramatic career going, so why would he want to mess with his reputation by appearing in something so silly? Take your Oscars and laugh all the way to the bank, Mr. Washington. 9. Bruce Willis — Let’s be honest; Bruce doesn’t care about being on this list. He doesn’t care much about anything. He’ll show up just about anywhere, even if it’s an AARP action sequel called “Red 2.” And speaking of aging action stars, it has been reported that Willis rejected an offer to be in the third “Expendables” movie because they wouldn’t pay him $4 million for three days work. 10. Ashton Kutcher — As I was watching his movie “Jobs,” I kept expecting Ashton to jump out from behind the screen to tell me I was being punk’d.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, August 29, 2013 - E5

THIS WEEKEND in the area SUMMER CONCERT SERIES The Dead

Edsels are next up on the sixth annual Cap Sante Summer Concert Series lineup, at 7 p.m. Friday. Aug. 30, at Seafarers’ Memorial Park in Anacortes. Bring a blanket or lawn chair for seating. Free. 425-303-1848 or snohomishartistguild.org.

FIREFIGHTERS FAMILY FAIR The Con-

way Muse will host the event Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 31-Sept. 1, at 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. Enjoy free overnight camping on Saturday, and a full lineup of activities both days: w Saturday’s activities will include a free family river float from noon to 5 p.m.; a barbecue dinner at 5 p.m. for $12; and live music by the Modern Relics and Drummer Boy from 7:30 to 11:30 p.m. for $12. w Sunday will start off with brunch from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. for $10; free trout fishing and swimming from noon to 5 p.m. at Lake Sixteen; and live music by the Mark Dufresne Blues Band from 6 to 9:30 p.m. for $10. A portion of proceeds will benefit the Seattle Firefighters Benevolent Fund. 360-445-3000.

World of Outlaws Fan Fest Race fans are invited to the Monster Meltdown World of Outlaws Fan Fest Party from 3 to 5 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 31, at Skagit Speedway, 4796 Old Highway 99 N, Alger. Get autographs from the drivers, enjoy classic rock music from The Unknown, meet the Monster Energy girls and more. Free parking and admission. 360-724-3567 or skagitspeedway.com.

SAIL CAM’ISLE The second annual cel-

ebration will take place from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday through Monday, Aug. 31-Sept. 2, at The Center for Wooden Boats at Cama Beach State Park, 1880 SW Camano Drive, Camano Island. On Saturday and Sunday, enjoy toy boat building for the kids, crabbing and fishing demonstrations, sailboat racing, umiak rides, rowing competitions, crab catching races, live music and a potluck barbecue. The Center for Wooden Boats will grill the meat, you bring the sides. Monday is member appreciation day, with free boat rentals for CWB members. All activities are free, but donations are gratefully accepted. Discover Pass required for park admission. 360-3879361 or cwb.org.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E6 - Thursday, August 29, 2013

REVIEWS MUSIC CDS Compiled from news services

Bob Dylan

even back then, Dylan was constantly inspired by it. “Another Self Marcus has another theory to explain Portrait (1969“Self Portrait,” suggesting it was Dylan’s 1971): The Bootleg attempt to step away from people who Series Vol. 10” worshipped him as a musical genius, a voice of his generation. “He was trying to In the latest entry quit, but no one would accept his resignaof his ongoing vaultdiving releases, Bob Dylan revisits one of tion,” he wrote. Fine. So why would anyone want to his least-heralded albums. “Self Portrait,” released in 1970, is remembered less today buy a four-disc resignation statement? Through the years, Dylan’s bootleg series for its music than the classic first line has provided some real thrills, and interof a Rolling Stone magazine review by Greil Marcus that greeted it: “What is this esting new perspectives on his work. This one doesn’t. Only completists will find (expletive)?” It was hard not to see why. The cultural something interesting. icon baffled his fans with a badly pron David Bauder, Associated Press duced collection of minor compositions, some live cuts, covers of traditional folk ‘Alabama and blues songs and even contemporary & Friends’ songs like “The Boxer.” Marcus, who Various artists writes the liner notes for this four-disc box set, wisely doesn’t step back from that Nowadays, long assessment. He shouldn’t. Time doesn’t hair and loud guiimprove the work. tars are common It seems amazing four decades later in country music. That wasn’t always that an artist of Dylan’s caliber would the case. The new album “Alabama & take such a hands-off attitude toward his Friends” pays tribute to a pioneering band art, packing up his basic tracks and sendthat proved decades ago how popular ing them to a Nashville producer who merging country and Southern rock could adds some truly cringe-worthy arrangements. Maybe that was precisely the point. be. Forty years after country rockers AlaTwo of the discs are primarily Dylan’s original recordings with several outtakes, bama formed, the band’s sound no longer most with minimal arrangements. They’re carries the shock of the new. But a gang of contemporary country stars, all of whom almost uniformly better than what was incorporate rock into their music, celeon the original “Self Portrait.” There are brate another country music trait: concise, a handful of interesting curios: a version of “If Not for You” with a haunting violin catchy songs survive the ages. Several 21st century stars put their accompaniment, an unreleased studio session with George Harrison and a full-band stamp on Alabama favorites. Jason Aldean adds arena-guitar crunch to “Tennessee version of “I Threw It All Away.” River,” Luke Bryan finds joyous fun in Disc three is a recording of the 1969 concert at the Isle of Wight festival, which “Love in the First Degree” and Florida Georgia Line brings extra bounce to “I’m interrupted a period of seclusion for Dylan. Hard to go wrong with a recording in a Hurry (and Don’t Know Why).” Even better is the intimacy Kenny of Dylan performing with The Band, but Chesney instills into “Lady Down on the performance has a tentative, almost Love” and the Bob Seger-like soul Toby rushed feel to it. Keith pumps into the underrated “She Although the “Self Portrait” sessions and I.” Best of all, Jamey Johnson’s perseemed strange at the time, Dylan’s formance of “My Home’s in Alabama” fits subsequent work gives it more context. him like an old denim jacket — the rare Still performing regularly at 72, Dylan’s tribute that improves on the original. concerts keep his formidable catalogue After a 10-year break from recording, alive along with an American blues, rock and folk tradition that predates even him. Alabama reunited to cut two new songs, These 1970 recordings make clear that which was at least one too many, as nei-

ther carries the nostalgic weight of their more famous songs. Still, there is plenty here to make these old Southern rock pioneers proud. n Michael McCall, Associated Press

Franz Ferdinand

“Right Thoughts, Right Words, Right Action” It’s been four years since Franz Ferdinand released an album, and a full eight since the Scottish dance-rock foursome, named after the Austrian archduke whose assassination triggered World War I, sounded as vigorous and as entertaining as they do on “RT, RW, RA.” When last heard from, on 2009’s sluggish “Tonight,” torpor was setting in. But this time around, FF are clearly on again, making music for all the correct reasons. The guitars are razor-sharp, and locomoting tunes like “Treason! Animals” sport jagged grooves and lacerating selfcriticism. “I’m in love with a narcissist,” Alex Kapranos sings as he gazes into a mirror of self-awareness. Add a previously undiscovered knack for melody to go with the band’s trademark rhythmic flair, and this album amounts to a stylishly energetic comeback of the first order. n Dan DeLuca, The Philadelphia Inquirer

A$AP Ferg “Trap Lord”

A$AP Rocky is the leader of the weirdly swaggering, Southern-inspired A$AP Mob. He’s the Frank Sinatra of their Rat Pack. But the chairman of the board, the hip-hopping Dean Martin of Mob, is A$AP Ferg, a formidable, salesworthy (especially on tracks such as “Work”) equal whose style balances the Rock’s spite-and-sweat-filled provocations. Ferg, a debonair but diabolical Harlem rapper, is certainly as bugged out, boastful, and darkly frank as Rocky. “Cocaine Castle” is a deliciously evil anthem of

greed, gall and avarice. But on tunes such as “Murda Something” and “Shabba,” there’s a salty, old-school, thug romanticism to what Ferg does (to say nothing of his throaty voice) that’s vaguely reminiscent of Notorious B.I.G. There’s also more variety in soundscape and rhythm, and more lyrical depth, in Ferg’s work than in anything the A$AP camp has done. While A$AP’s Southern soul-hop roots come on strong in “Make a Scene,” Ferg shows he’s a fan of lush melody and cool chorales when he teams with Bone Thugs-N-Harmony for the most epic track on the album, “Lord.” n A.D. Amorosi, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Jimmy Buffett “Songs From St. Somewhere”

On Jimmy Buffett’s first album in four years, the mayor of Margaritaville returns to mixing softly swaying beach tunes with pirate tales of foreign intrigue and social commentary. The problem, however, is Buffett’s voice doesn’t sound nearly as engaged as his imaginative songwriting and a few turns with inspired guests. The 66-year-old veteran sounds bored on the island songs, snapping off each word with a clipped tone and a bland sense of phrasing — an about-face from the performances that made Buffett such an enjoyable performer in the past. He sounds livelier on a series of ambitious songs about the mysterious adventures of a world traveler, but the tunes lack the hooks that made Buffett’s famous songs of long ago so memorable. There are positive exceptions, especially when guests Mark Knopfler (on “Oldest Surfer on the Beach”) and Latin singer Fanny Lu (on a Spanish version of “I Want to Go Back to Cartagena”) stir up the proceedings. Best of all is a duet with country star Toby Keith. “Too Drunk to Karaoke” bobs along with common-man humor and vivid writing and performing. It’s the one song from the new album sure to become a favorite during Buffett’s ever-popular live shows. n Michael McCall, Associated Press


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, August 29, 2013 - E7

REVIEWS VIDEO GAMES Chris Campbell, Scripps Howard News Service

‘Saints Row IV’

overt references to pop culture and you have to wonder if the Zucker brothers Platforms: Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, PC were behind the making of this game. To Genre: Action top it off, every time the game strains and Publisher: Deep Silver nears disaster, something happens to pull ESRB Rating: M, for Mature players back from the edge and everyGrade: 4 stars (out of 5) thing makes sense. In short, this game makes no sense and yet everything about The “Saints it makes total sense. Row” franchise has “Saints Row IV” plays smoothly, even changed dramaticalas players get thrown into about 75 videoly from one edition game scenarios. Third-person shootouts, to the next. I don’t flying sequences, 16-bit side-scrolling think a single gamer fights, just about the entire gaming library would think the first appears — except for maybe a Pokemon and fourth games character. came from the same The action switches styles so often franchise if played side by side. The sheer lunacy of “Saints” can’t quite that if you don’t keep your eyes glued to be quantified. When I first played “Saints the screen you might forget which game you’re playing. Row” about seven years ago, I enjoyed Some gamers may compare the action the violent-yet-slapstick way players rose in this franchise to that of a headless up the ranks to eventually conquer the city of Steelport’s mafia landscape. It was chicken, what with all the random gameGodfather Lite, with a distinctively street- play elements and juvenile setups (coarse language and customizable outfits that level emphasis on lifestyle and violence, even allow nudity). But a worthwhile and it worked well. game exists here, and those who have Subsequent iterations have ratchstuck with the “Saints” franchise might as eted up the crazy, however, to the point well dive into the crazy and play this one, where now, in “IV,” the main character too. becomes president of the United States and acquires superpowers in a digital/fake n Follow Chris Campbell on Twitter @camp version of Steelport (a la “The Matrix”). bler or email him at game_on_games@mac. com. Toss in the constant winks, nods and

New video game releases The following games are among those scheduled for release this week, according to Gamestop.com: n Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn (PC, PlayStation 3; rated T) n Killer Is Dead Limited Edition (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360; rated M) n Lost Planet 3 (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360; rated T) n Sweet Fuse: At Your Side (Sony PSP; rated T) n Madden NFL 25 (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360; rated E) n Painkiller Hell and Damnation (PlayStation 3, Xbox 360; rated M) n Lego Legends of Chima: Laval’s Journey (Nintendo DS; rated E10+) n Lexington Herald-Leader (Lexington, Ky.)

CONTINUE THE CYCLE – PLEASE RECYCLE THIS NEWSPAPER


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E8 - Thursday, August 29, 2013

GET INVOLVED ART CLASSES

Highway 536, Mount Vernon. 360-416-6556, ext. 5, or dakotaartcenter.com.

Recreation Center, 900 E. Fairhaven Ave., Burlington. ACRYLICS FOR BEGINFor ages 7-13. Learn drawNERS: With Jennifer ing basics using line and Bowman, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. CLAY CLASSES: Ceramic form, depth and perspective Saturday and 10 a.m. to 3 artist Sue Roberts offers to draw animal studies and p.m. Sunday, Oct. 12-13, at a variety of classes and people, places or things with the Anacortes Center for workshops at Tower Arts pencil, pen and charcoal. Happiness, 619 Commercial Studio, 5424 S. Shore Drive, $50, plus $20 supply fee Ave., Anacortes. $165, plus Guemes Island. For inforpayable to instructor. Regisoptional $20 fee to borrow mation, call 360-293-8878 or ter by Oct. 2: 360-755-9649. Bowman’s materials. visit towerartsstudio.com. 360-464-2229 or anacortes DANCE centerforhappiness.org. ART CLASSES: Sign up THURSDAY DANCE: for a variety of art classes at ART CLASSES: Choose Enjoy dancing to the music A Guilded Gallery (formerfrom painting, photography, ly Gallery by the Bay), 8700 of the Skippers from 1 to fiber and 3D art workshops 271st St. NW, Stanwood. To 3:30 p.m. Thursdays at Hilltaught by professional artcrest Lodge, 1717 S. 13th St., register, stop by the Stanists at the Pacific NorthWest wood Camano Art Guild’s Mount Vernon. For inforArt School, 15 NW Birch mation, contact Doris at cooperative gallery from St., Coupeville. For informa- 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday 360-588-8239. tion and a complete sched- through Saturday. 360-629ule: 360-678-3396 or pacific 2787 or stanwoodcamano BEGINNER SQUARE northwestartschool.com. DANCE LESSONS: 7 p.m. arts.com. Tuesdays, beginning Sept. ART CLASSES, WORKDRAWING FUNDA10, at the Mount Vernon SHOPS: Dakota Art Center MENTALS: 4:30 to 6 p.m. Senior Center, 1401 Cleveoffers a variety of art classes Wednesdays, Oct. 9-30, land St. Couples and singles Burlington Parks and and workshops at 17873 welcome. First two weeks

Join Us for SPAWNtaneous Fun!

Skagit River Salmon Festival

Saturday, September 7 • 10 am to 6 pm Edgewater Park in Mount Vernon

SALMON FESTIVAL

Great Music • Local Artisans • Kids Crafts • Salmon BBQ Cultural Activities • Free Entry • SkagitRiverFest.org

are free, then $4 per lesson. Sponsored by the Mt. Baker Singles and Skagit Squares. 360-424-4608 or 360-4249675.

The market also offers a small stipend for each performance slot. The market supplies a 10-by-10-foot overhead canopy and two 110V outlets. Contact market manager Leslie Collings SALSA DANCE LESat 360-202-3932 or email SONS: 7 p.m. Thursdays, Sept. 12-Oct. 17, at the Ana- leslie@portsusan.org. cortes Center for Happiness, 619 Commercial Ave., RECREATION Anacortes. Learn the basic TRAIL TALES: Friends of salsa rhythm, Cuban body Skagit Beaches lead a series motion, leading/following of informative walks along techniques, footwork and the Tommy Thompson Trail basic turns. $10 per class, in Anacortes. For informa$50 for all six. 360-464-2229 tion, visit skagitbeaches.org. or anacortescenterforhappi Next up: ness.org. Next up: The Shore’s Dynamic CLOG DANCING FOR Edge: Opportunities and BEGINNERS: Free lesson Challenges Where the from 10 to 11 a.m., followed Two Worlds Meet: 2 to by regular clog dancing 3:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 7. from 11 a.m. to noon ThursMeet at Fidalgo RV Park, days, at the Mount Vernon 4701 Fidalgo Bay Road. Senior Center, 1401 CleveGain a new appreciation land St., Mount Vernon. of the organisms, systems No fee, no partner needed. and strategies that are First three lessons are free. integrated in the shoreline Wear comfortable shoes. edge. The flat, paved trail is For information, call Rosie handicapped accessible. at 360-424-4608.

scenic courses ranging from 22 to 97 miles through Skagit, Whatcom and Island counties. Enjoy full meals, stocked rest sites and afterride activities. For information or to register, call 206284-4254 (press 5) or visit bikemsnorthwest.org.

OUTDOOR SKILLS FOR WOMEN: Women can learn the basics of fishing, hunting and other outdoor skills at a Sept. 13-15 workshop at Camp Waskowitz in North Bend. Coordinated by Washington Outdoor Women, the workshop will be taught by Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife experts and other certified instructors. Workshop participants must be at least 18. A state recreational fishing license is required to participate in the fishing sessions. The workshop fee of $250 includes lodging, meals and use of equipment. A limited number of partial scholarships are available for first-time parSALMON DERBY: The ticipants. 425-455-1986 or MUSIC annual Ray Reep Salmon washingtonoutdoorwomen. Derby will be held Saturday, org. CALL FOR SINGERS: Shelter Bay Chorus is look- Sept. 7, at Edgewater Park, 600 Behrens Millet Road, ing for people of all ages THEATER Mount Vernon. Weigh-in who love to sing. Come to YOUTH THEATER takes place from 3 to 5 p.m. a barbecue after the first CLASSES: The Whidbey Prizes will be awarded to rehearsal of the fall season Playhouse “Would Be Playat 2:45 p.m. Thursday, Sept. the top three weights and ers” theater program for one mystery weight in the 5, at the Shelter Bay Clubages 8 to 18 will offer a humpy category and one house in La Conner. No workshop from 3:30 to 5:30 audition required. Rehears- random drawing for the p.m. Mondays and Tuesdays, silvers category. Entry fee: als are held from 2:45 to Sept. 9-Oct. 29, at the Whid$15. Tickets available at 4:45 p.m. every Thursday. bey Playhouse Star Studio, Mount Vernon Parks and 360-466-3805. Recreation, Holiday Sports, 730 SE Midway Drive, Oak Harbor. A special threeand Master Marine. 360CALL FOR MUSICIANS, hour rehearsal will be held 336-6215 or mountvernon PERFORMERS: Soloists, on Sunday, Oct. 27, and the wa.gov. duets or trios with low workshop will culminate amplification are needed with public performances BIKE MS: The annual to perform between 3 and at 4:30 p.m. Oct. 28-29. Stubicycling fundraiser for 7 p.m. Fridays, through dents will learn a variety multiple sclerosis will take Oct. 18, at the Port Susan Farmers Market, located at place Saturday and Sunday, of theater skills, including theater acting, vocal trainViking Village, at the corner Sept. 7-8, beginning and ending at the Skagit County ing, body language, stage of Highway 532 and 88th presence, blocking and Fairgrounds in Mount Avenue NW, Stanwood. more. $75. For information Performers can sign up for Vernon. Join some 2,000 one-hour slots and may set cyclists to help raise money or to register, contact Stan for research while riding out a tip jar and sell CDs. Thomas at 360-675-0574.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, August 29, 2013 - E9

September 1-30 Share the adventure, enjoy the taste!

Twenty-five of Mount Vernon’s best restaurants have joined together to celebrate the wondrous bounty of Skagit Valley. Throughout September, these restaurants will have special menu items, including beverages, which feature Skagit Valley products and showcase local farms. Eat Local Mount Vernon is a cornerstone event of the 2013 Mount Vernon Mayor’s Wellness Challenge, which is a month-long series of free activities to inspire the community to healthier lifestyles. Don’t forget to vote in the People’s Choice Award Contest and you’ll be entered to win a gift certificate from participating restaurants! Share the adventure and enjoy the taste! Participating restaurants include:

Eat Local Mount Vernon is sponsored by the Mount Vernon Community Marketing Campaign, which includes the City of Mount Vernon, Mount Vernon Chamber of Commerce, Mount Vernon School District, Port of Skagit, Skagit Regional Health, Skagit Valley College. Participating sponsors include Mount Vernon Mayor’s Wellness Challenge, Northwest Agriculture Business Center (NABC), North Sound Food Hub, Mount Vernon Farmers Market and Washington Restaurant Association. Our media partners include Skagit Publishing and KAPS/KBRC Radio.

For more info, call: 360.428.8547

EatLocalMountVernon.com


E10 Thursday, August 29, 2013

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

ON STAGE in the Skagit Valley and surrounding area August 30-September 7 Friday.30

Friday.6

Saturday.7

Sunday.8

MUSIC

THEATER

THEATER

THEATER

Cap Sante Summer Concert Series: The Dead Edsels (1950s revue): 7 p.m., Seafarers’ Memorial Park, Anacortes. Free. Bring a blanket or lawn chair for seating. 425-3031848 or snohomishartist guild.org.

“Too Soon For Daisies”: 7:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor. $16. 360-679-2237 or whidbeyplayhouse.com.

“Too Soon For Daisies”: 7:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor. $16. 360-679-2237 or whidbeyplayhouse.com.

‘Duck Dynasty’ is a canny curation of cultures By MARY McNAMARA Los Angeles Times

“Too Soon For Daisies” (pictured): 2:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor. $16. 360-679-2237 or whidbeyplayhouse.com.

TUNING UP Playing at area venues August 29-September 5 THURSDAY.29 Debbie Miller: 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $5. 360-445-3000.

D.O.A., Human Infest, Muppet Fetish, The Basque Rats: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $12.

1967 (THE BAND)

SATURDAY.31

SATURDAY.31

AMY HINDMAN 7:30 p.m., Washington Sips, 608 S. First St., La Conner. No cover.

10 p.m., Draft Pics, 516 S. First St., Mount Vernon. No cover.

Knut Bell and the Blue Collars: 7:30 to 10 p.m., The Corner Pub, Steve Rudy and Bob Storm (jazz): 7:30 p.m., Jansen Art 14565 Allen West Road, Bow. Center Firehall Cafe, 321 Front No cover. 360-757-6113. St., Lynden. No cover.

SUNDAY.1

1967 (the band): 5 p.m., The Corner Pub, 14565 Allen West Road, Bow. No cover.

FRIDAY.30 Jammin’ Jeff: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

The Pine Hearts: 8 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $7. 360-445-3000.

Skip Hamilton: 6 to 9 p.m., Frida’s Gourmet Mexican Restaurant, 416 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-299-2120.

Jim Cull: 7 p.m., Mount Vernon Elks, 2120 Market St., Mount Vernon. 360-848-8882.

Rich Rorex (jazz, blues, classical, pop): 7:30 p.m., Washington Sips, 608 S. First St., La Conner. No cover. 360-399-1037.

Ann ‘n’ Dean (dance, country, rock): 7:30 to 11:30 p.m., Anacortes Eagles Hall, 901 Seventh St., Anacortes. 360-2933012.

Queen Anne’s Revenge, Slacks, Curse of the Black Tongue: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $3. 360-778-1067.

1967 (the band): 10 p.m., Draft Pics, 516 S. First St., Mount Vernon. No cover. 360-336-3626.

The Modern Relics, Drummer Boy: 7:30 to 11:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/ Main, Conway. $12. 360-445-3000.

Trish, Hans & Phil: 6 to 8 p.m., The Heart of Anacortes, 1014 Fourth St., Anacortes. $7. 360-293-3515.

Amy Hindman (light rock, pop, Americana): 7:30 p.m., Washington Sips, 608 S. First St., La Conner. No cover. 360-399-1037.

Br’er Rabbit: 7 to 9 p.m., Birdsview Brewing Co., 38302 Highway 20, Birdsview. 360-826-3406.

John Dennis (acoustic guitar): 6:30 to 8 p.m., Jansen Art Center Firehall Cafe, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360-354-3600.

SATURDAY.31 Jammin’ Jeff: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

Daddy Treetops: Joe Johnson (blues, 8:30 p.m., Edison Inn, pop, rock): 8 p.m., 1st 5829 Cains Court, Street Cabaret & Speak- Edison. 360-766-6266. easy, 612 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $5 cover. 360-336-3012.

Blues Playground: 7:30 p.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-755-3956.

Ann ‘n’ Dean (dance, country, rock): 7:30 to 11:30 p.m., Anacortes Eagles Hall, 901 Seventh St., Anacortes. 360-2933012.

The Unknown: 3 to 5 p.m., World of Outlaws Fan Fest Party, Skagit Speedway, 4796 Old Highway 99 N, Alger. Free. 360-724-3567.

Fox and the Law, The BGB: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. 360-778-1067.

SUNDAY.1 Mark DuFresne Band (blues): 6 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/ Main, Conway. $10. 360-445-3000.

TUESDAY.3 Caleb Klauder Country Band: 5:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. 360-7666266.

1967 (the band): 5 p.m., The Corner Pub, 14565 Allen West Road, Bow. No cover. 360-757-6113.

Knut Bell & The Blue Collars: 5 to 9 p.m., Conway Pub & Eatery, 18611 Main St., Conway. 360-4454733.

Gary B’s Church of the Blues (blues, classic rock): 6 to 10 p.m., Castle Tavern, 708 Metcalf St., Sedro-Woolley. 360-855-2263.

Thursday, August 29, 2013 E11

C.C. Adams and friends Sunday Jam, featuring $cratch Daddy, Coyote Blues and more: 5 to 9 p.m., Station House, 315 E. Morris St., La Conner.

Royal Thunder, Totalizer: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $7. 360-778-1067.

THURSDAY.5 The Silver City Band: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Jansen Art Center Firehall Cafe, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360-354-3600.

Reality TV is experiencing something of a “Mad Men” moment, with bandannas and iced tea in place of fedoras and highballs. Last week, the Season 4 premiere of “Duck Dynasty” drew nearly 12 million viewers, making A&E’s celebration of backwoods Alabama the No. 1 “nonfiction” show on cable and the No. 1 show of the week. Suddenly, people who wouldn’t know a Louisiana cedar if their Prius ran into it were chattering about the Robertsons, an extended clan of duck-call magnates who have been entertaining an increasing percentage of the population with their family-centric, redneck ‘n’ proud high jinks. With the shoulder-length hair and Old Testament beards, the Robertson men catch and eat bullfrogs, race souped-up riding mowers, and take their wives deer hunting. They fight over who blew up the duck blind, pull pranks on their eccentric Uncle Si and do anything to avoid the wrath of their wives. Amid the preening culture of today’s Golden Age of television, “Duck Dynasty” might seem an actual reality check — critics and cable execs can brag all they want about the growing sophistication of the idiot box, but in the end, people want to watch what they’ve always wanted to watch: A bunch of good ol’ boys trying to weasel out of work so they can go fishin’. This is true, and not true. “Duck Dynasty” certainly celebrates those things, but like “Mad Men,” it is also a carefully produced, tightly controlled curation of American mythology, in this case a canny mix of red- and blue-state ethos. The Robertsons occupy a unique but very American cultural sweet spot, in which great wealth coexists with the sort of nationally beloved folksiness last seen on “The Beverly Hillbillies.” Like Jed and all his kin, the family of Phil and “Miss Kay”

current presidential administration. Their heated opinions are reserved for pesky neighbors who challenge them to lawnmower races. “Duck Dynasty” has cast itself, smartly and now successfully, as a classic mischief-maker tale. The Robertson males are modern-day Tom Sawyers and Huck Finns messing around with snakes and fireworks, endlessly launching adventures, while their wives provide a Greek chorus of slim blondes, lovingly shaking their heads. Unlike many situational reality shows, “Duck Dynasty” does not rely on acrimony or shock. Animals may be harmed, on screen and off — pop singer Morrissey refused to be on the same show with the Robertsons, calling them animal serial killers — but people are not. To ensure that the message is clear, Willie provides a John-Boy-like voice-over at the end of each show reminding viewers that the only thing that matters is family. The miracle of the show, and the family, is that they are at once quite sincere about who they are and very much in on their own joke. With their looks, they court assumptions that are valid A&E via AP and then again not — the telltale bulge of Skoal is real, but so is Phil Robertson (from left), Jase Robertson, Si Robertson and Willie Robertson from the A&E series, “Duck Dynasty.” the ability to oversee a successful business or a Martha StewartRobertson — four sons (the woods, but they ain’t poor nor sional fart joke and prefer play goes-woodsy wedding. The coneldest of which just joined the are they ignorant, which allows to work, but they are all smart, trivances of “nonfiction” televishow), three daughters-in-law audiences to revel in their home- articulate and equally deft with a sion — Let’s race lawn mowers! and a passel of grandchildren spun ways without any distractwell-placed one-liner as a deadLet’s give Miss Kay and Phil the — fulfilled the American dream ing worries about dental insurpan pause. wedding they never had! — are by hitting it big. Their duck calls, ance or access to education. Likewise the sins associated, inevitably balanced by moments handcrafted still from Louisiana Patriarch Phil, who invented often with alarming fondness, of surprising honesty. cedar, now fuel an empire called the golden duck call, was a star with hillbilly culture — drinking, While renewing her vows in Duck Commander, and the open- quarterback for Louisiana Tech sloth, prejudice and a propensity this season’s premiere, Miss Kay ing of the show hinges on the who turned down an offer from for violence (see, please “Hatsaid she had loved her husband contrast between the bling and the Washington Redskins because, fields & McCoys”) — are utterly for years, including those in the beards. as he told Sports Illustrated, absent here. The Robertsons are which “you weren’t very nice.” But unlike the Clampetts, the professional football would have prayerful Christians, and any The pain in her voice — loving Robertsons stayed put, in West interfered with duck season. divisive issues that might arise and forgiven pain, but pain noneMonroe, La., where they continThird son Willie, who expand- from that simply don’t. theless — told a truth about lovue to hunt, fish and mingle with ed Duck Commander and now Beyond Phil’s continual celing someone long that is rare on the locals down at the hardware serves as CEO, has a business ebration of women who know television. store. degree; he and his wife, Korie, a how to cook and carry the Bible, Too often these days, we are In sharp contrast to reality’s local who has known Willie since “Duck Dynasty” is resolutely told we must choose between the other beloved rednecks, the Rob- childhood, attended the same nonpolitical. We have no idea simple truths and sophistication. ertsons require neither coupons college. Willie and his brothers how the Robertsons feel about “Duck Dynasty” proves you can nor subtitles. They may be back- Jase and Jep may tell the occagay marriage or civil rights or the have both.


E10 Thursday, August 29, 2013

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

ON STAGE in the Skagit Valley and surrounding area August 30-September 7 Friday.30

Friday.6

Saturday.7

Sunday.8

MUSIC

THEATER

THEATER

THEATER

Cap Sante Summer Concert Series: The Dead Edsels (1950s revue): 7 p.m., Seafarers’ Memorial Park, Anacortes. Free. Bring a blanket or lawn chair for seating. 425-3031848 or snohomishartist guild.org.

“Too Soon For Daisies”: 7:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor. $16. 360-679-2237 or whidbeyplayhouse.com.

“Too Soon For Daisies”: 7:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor. $16. 360-679-2237 or whidbeyplayhouse.com.

‘Duck Dynasty’ is a canny curation of cultures By MARY McNAMARA Los Angeles Times

“Too Soon For Daisies” (pictured): 2:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor. $16. 360-679-2237 or whidbeyplayhouse.com.

TUNING UP Playing at area venues August 29-September 5 THURSDAY.29 Debbie Miller: 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $5. 360-445-3000.

D.O.A., Human Infest, Muppet Fetish, The Basque Rats: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $12.

1967 (THE BAND)

SATURDAY.31

SATURDAY.31

AMY HINDMAN 7:30 p.m., Washington Sips, 608 S. First St., La Conner. No cover.

10 p.m., Draft Pics, 516 S. First St., Mount Vernon. No cover.

Knut Bell and the Blue Collars: 7:30 to 10 p.m., The Corner Pub, Steve Rudy and Bob Storm (jazz): 7:30 p.m., Jansen Art 14565 Allen West Road, Bow. Center Firehall Cafe, 321 Front No cover. 360-757-6113. St., Lynden. No cover.

SUNDAY.1

1967 (the band): 5 p.m., The Corner Pub, 14565 Allen West Road, Bow. No cover.

FRIDAY.30 Jammin’ Jeff: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

The Pine Hearts: 8 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $7. 360-445-3000.

Skip Hamilton: 6 to 9 p.m., Frida’s Gourmet Mexican Restaurant, 416 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-299-2120.

Jim Cull: 7 p.m., Mount Vernon Elks, 2120 Market St., Mount Vernon. 360-848-8882.

Rich Rorex (jazz, blues, classical, pop): 7:30 p.m., Washington Sips, 608 S. First St., La Conner. No cover. 360-399-1037.

Ann ‘n’ Dean (dance, country, rock): 7:30 to 11:30 p.m., Anacortes Eagles Hall, 901 Seventh St., Anacortes. 360-2933012.

Queen Anne’s Revenge, Slacks, Curse of the Black Tongue: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $3. 360-778-1067.

1967 (the band): 10 p.m., Draft Pics, 516 S. First St., Mount Vernon. No cover. 360-336-3626.

The Modern Relics, Drummer Boy: 7:30 to 11:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/ Main, Conway. $12. 360-445-3000.

Trish, Hans & Phil: 6 to 8 p.m., The Heart of Anacortes, 1014 Fourth St., Anacortes. $7. 360-293-3515.

Amy Hindman (light rock, pop, Americana): 7:30 p.m., Washington Sips, 608 S. First St., La Conner. No cover. 360-399-1037.

Br’er Rabbit: 7 to 9 p.m., Birdsview Brewing Co., 38302 Highway 20, Birdsview. 360-826-3406.

John Dennis (acoustic guitar): 6:30 to 8 p.m., Jansen Art Center Firehall Cafe, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360-354-3600.

SATURDAY.31 Jammin’ Jeff: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

Daddy Treetops: Joe Johnson (blues, 8:30 p.m., Edison Inn, pop, rock): 8 p.m., 1st 5829 Cains Court, Street Cabaret & Speak- Edison. 360-766-6266. easy, 612 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $5 cover. 360-336-3012.

Blues Playground: 7:30 p.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-755-3956.

Ann ‘n’ Dean (dance, country, rock): 7:30 to 11:30 p.m., Anacortes Eagles Hall, 901 Seventh St., Anacortes. 360-2933012.

The Unknown: 3 to 5 p.m., World of Outlaws Fan Fest Party, Skagit Speedway, 4796 Old Highway 99 N, Alger. Free. 360-724-3567.

Fox and the Law, The BGB: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. 360-778-1067.

SUNDAY.1 Mark DuFresne Band (blues): 6 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/ Main, Conway. $10. 360-445-3000.

TUESDAY.3 Caleb Klauder Country Band: 5:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. 360-7666266.

1967 (the band): 5 p.m., The Corner Pub, 14565 Allen West Road, Bow. No cover. 360-757-6113.

Knut Bell & The Blue Collars: 5 to 9 p.m., Conway Pub & Eatery, 18611 Main St., Conway. 360-4454733.

Gary B’s Church of the Blues (blues, classic rock): 6 to 10 p.m., Castle Tavern, 708 Metcalf St., Sedro-Woolley. 360-855-2263.

Thursday, August 29, 2013 E11

C.C. Adams and friends Sunday Jam, featuring $cratch Daddy, Coyote Blues and more: 5 to 9 p.m., Station House, 315 E. Morris St., La Conner.

Royal Thunder, Totalizer: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $7. 360-778-1067.

THURSDAY.5 The Silver City Band: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Jansen Art Center Firehall Cafe, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360-354-3600.

Reality TV is experiencing something of a “Mad Men” moment, with bandannas and iced tea in place of fedoras and highballs. Last week, the Season 4 premiere of “Duck Dynasty” drew nearly 12 million viewers, making A&E’s celebration of backwoods Alabama the No. 1 “nonfiction” show on cable and the No. 1 show of the week. Suddenly, people who wouldn’t know a Louisiana cedar if their Prius ran into it were chattering about the Robertsons, an extended clan of duck-call magnates who have been entertaining an increasing percentage of the population with their family-centric, redneck ‘n’ proud high jinks. With the shoulder-length hair and Old Testament beards, the Robertson men catch and eat bullfrogs, race souped-up riding mowers, and take their wives deer hunting. They fight over who blew up the duck blind, pull pranks on their eccentric Uncle Si and do anything to avoid the wrath of their wives. Amid the preening culture of today’s Golden Age of television, “Duck Dynasty” might seem an actual reality check — critics and cable execs can brag all they want about the growing sophistication of the idiot box, but in the end, people want to watch what they’ve always wanted to watch: A bunch of good ol’ boys trying to weasel out of work so they can go fishin’. This is true, and not true. “Duck Dynasty” certainly celebrates those things, but like “Mad Men,” it is also a carefully produced, tightly controlled curation of American mythology, in this case a canny mix of red- and blue-state ethos. The Robertsons occupy a unique but very American cultural sweet spot, in which great wealth coexists with the sort of nationally beloved folksiness last seen on “The Beverly Hillbillies.” Like Jed and all his kin, the family of Phil and “Miss Kay”

current presidential administration. Their heated opinions are reserved for pesky neighbors who challenge them to lawnmower races. “Duck Dynasty” has cast itself, smartly and now successfully, as a classic mischief-maker tale. The Robertson males are modern-day Tom Sawyers and Huck Finns messing around with snakes and fireworks, endlessly launching adventures, while their wives provide a Greek chorus of slim blondes, lovingly shaking their heads. Unlike many situational reality shows, “Duck Dynasty” does not rely on acrimony or shock. Animals may be harmed, on screen and off — pop singer Morrissey refused to be on the same show with the Robertsons, calling them animal serial killers — but people are not. To ensure that the message is clear, Willie provides a John-Boy-like voice-over at the end of each show reminding viewers that the only thing that matters is family. The miracle of the show, and the family, is that they are at once quite sincere about who they are and very much in on their own joke. With their looks, they court assumptions that are valid A&E via AP and then again not — the telltale bulge of Skoal is real, but so is Phil Robertson (from left), Jase Robertson, Si Robertson and Willie Robertson from the A&E series, “Duck Dynasty.” the ability to oversee a successful business or a Martha StewartRobertson — four sons (the woods, but they ain’t poor nor sional fart joke and prefer play goes-woodsy wedding. The coneldest of which just joined the are they ignorant, which allows to work, but they are all smart, trivances of “nonfiction” televishow), three daughters-in-law audiences to revel in their home- articulate and equally deft with a sion — Let’s race lawn mowers! and a passel of grandchildren spun ways without any distractwell-placed one-liner as a deadLet’s give Miss Kay and Phil the — fulfilled the American dream ing worries about dental insurpan pause. wedding they never had! — are by hitting it big. Their duck calls, ance or access to education. Likewise the sins associated, inevitably balanced by moments handcrafted still from Louisiana Patriarch Phil, who invented often with alarming fondness, of surprising honesty. cedar, now fuel an empire called the golden duck call, was a star with hillbilly culture — drinking, While renewing her vows in Duck Commander, and the open- quarterback for Louisiana Tech sloth, prejudice and a propensity this season’s premiere, Miss Kay ing of the show hinges on the who turned down an offer from for violence (see, please “Hatsaid she had loved her husband contrast between the bling and the Washington Redskins because, fields & McCoys”) — are utterly for years, including those in the beards. as he told Sports Illustrated, absent here. The Robertsons are which “you weren’t very nice.” But unlike the Clampetts, the professional football would have prayerful Christians, and any The pain in her voice — loving Robertsons stayed put, in West interfered with duck season. divisive issues that might arise and forgiven pain, but pain noneMonroe, La., where they continThird son Willie, who expand- from that simply don’t. theless — told a truth about lovue to hunt, fish and mingle with ed Duck Commander and now Beyond Phil’s continual celing someone long that is rare on the locals down at the hardware serves as CEO, has a business ebration of women who know television. store. degree; he and his wife, Korie, a how to cook and carry the Bible, Too often these days, we are In sharp contrast to reality’s local who has known Willie since “Duck Dynasty” is resolutely told we must choose between the other beloved rednecks, the Rob- childhood, attended the same nonpolitical. We have no idea simple truths and sophistication. ertsons require neither coupons college. Willie and his brothers how the Robertsons feel about “Duck Dynasty” proves you can nor subtitles. They may be back- Jase and Jep may tell the occagay marriage or civil rights or the have both.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E12 - Thursday, August 29, 2013

TRAVEL

Jim Mone / AP

Server Taryn Yanez holds an order at The Nook in St. Paul, Minn. The Nook boasts 31 burgers. At the always-bustling joint in residential St. Paul, over-indulgence is the rule and staff proudly promote the “Meat is Murder. Tasty Tasty Murder” motto.

Oozing burgers in St. Paul, Minn. If you go The Nook: 492 Hamline Ave S, St. Paul, Minn. 651-6984347. crnook.com Lynden’s Soda Fountain: 490 Hamline Ave S, St. Paul, Minn. 651-330-7632. lyndens.com Ran-Ham Bowling Center: 490 Hamline Ave S (beneath Lynden’s), St. Paul, Minn. 651698-0252

By BRIAN BAKST Associated Press

ST. PAUL, Minn. — BaskinRobbins has 31 flavors of ice cream. The Nook has 31 types of burgers. They’re ooey-gooey and oh-sogood. At the always-bustling burger joint in residential St. Paul, overindulgence is the rule, and staff proudly wear T-shirts promoting the “Meat is Murder. Tasty…

Tasty… Murder!” motto. Want a burger stuffed with pepper jack and topped with roast beef, bacon and cheddar? No problem. How about a patty coated in a delectable bourbon sauce? Coming right up. Care to heap the sauerkraut, corned beef, Swiss and tell-tale sauce of a Reuben atop your standard burger? Done. Unlike Minneapolis with its

hip downtown vibe, St. Paul is the sleepier of the Twin Cities. But its neighborhoods offer dining gems, some of which, like The Nook, are more hole-in-the-wall than chic gastropub. Situated beyond the outfield fence of the high school baseball diamond where eventual American League MVP Joe Mauer and Hall of Famer Paul Molitor cut their teeth, the restaurant’s brick facade has placards marking the spots where big hitters have landed balls over the years.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, August 29, 2013 - E13

TRAVEL Local travel YOGA ADVENTURE SERIES: Join Dawn Jex for day trips and yoga. Each adventure includes fun activities at an area attraction combined with a yoga class. For information or to register, call Jex at 360-631-0587 or visit yoga-gypsies.com. SHORT TRIPS: Mount Vernon Parks and Recreation offers travel opportunities for ages 12 and older (adult supervision required for ages 18 and younger). 360-336-6215.

TOP: Server Taryn Yanez takes an order at The Nook in St. Paul, Minn. BOTTOM: A cheeseburger order rests on a table. Inside, the walls are plastered with memorabilia, photos of famous diners and award brags. Local icons have sandwiches named for them. There’s a spirited St. Paul rivalry in the “Juicy Lucy” business. That’s the term for a burger with slices of cheese being enveloped in a beef patty prior to cooking, making for a molten middle. A couple of miles away from The Nook, the Blue Door Pub serves “Blucys” — burgers with an oozing core of blue cheese and garlic or coconut milk-soaked mozzarella. The Nook opened in 1938, and is now run by a pair of fresh-faced high school buddies who bought it in 2000. Ted Casper and Mike Runyon built it into a big draw. Guy Fieri brought his

water, they cook up with a crispy outside but keep a chewy middle. Be sure to ask to have them tossed in “crack” — a garlicky pepper blend that you’ll want to lick off your fingers. Wash it all down with one of many imports or local brews on tap. If there’s somehow still room in your stomach, pop next door to Lynden’s Soda Fountain, an old-fashioned ice cream parlor, for a scoop or a sundae. Then head downstairs to popular Food Network show erously portioned beer-bat- the eight-lane bowling alley “Diner’s, Drive-ins and tered walleye sandwich and where rickety pin-setting Dives” here twice — the half-pound BLT won’t dismachines routinely turn second time after owners appoint either. Need some awful throws into magical rebuilt following a fire that veggies? Go for an appetizer strikes. gutted the place in 2010. of Leprechaun Legs (deepThe Nook’s full menu is Barbra Streisand raved to fried green beans with a available there, too, after a Minnesota concert crowd zippy dipping sauce). its owners bought the Ranabout The Nook burger she Fries share a basket with Ham Bowling Center a few had. the burgers but that doesn’t years ago. After all, there’s It’s almost sacrilegious to mean they’re secondary. nothing like hoisting an alley bypass the beef, but the gen- Soaked overnight in vinegar ball with greasy fingers.

ESCORTED TOURS: The Whatcom County Tour Program offers a variety of day trips and longer tours, with most trips departing from and returning to the Bellingham Senior Activity Center, 315 Halleck St., Bellingham. For information or to register: 360-733-4030, press #, ext. 47015, or wccoa.org/ index.php/Tours. Next up: Seattle Mariners vs. Oakland Athletics: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 29. $73-$83. Includes round-trip transportation, covered parking, group seating in Section 323 and escort. Fall Foliage Mississippi River Steamboat Cruise: Oct. 4-12. $3,199-$3,999. Includes Bellinghamto-Seatac transfer, air fare, first-night hotel stay, seven-day cruise, all meals on cruise, shore activity at all ports, daily lecture by onboard naturalist, nightly entertainment, taxes, gratuities and escort. New York City and Upstate New York Fall Colors Tour: Oct. 4-13. $2,999-$3,799, includes roundtrip airfare, deluxe motorcoach transportation, hotel accommodations, 14 meals, NYC guided tour, optional Broadway show, attractions, two day-cruises and escort. $300 deposit due at sign-up. Final payment due in August. EXTENDED TRIPS: The Oak Harbor Senior Center is organizing two small-group trips for 2014: Mississippi River Cruise: America’s Heartland, Nashville to New Orleans, March 19–30; and Scotland, June. Trips will depart from Oak Harbor/Mount Vernon. Contact Pat Gardner at pgardner@oakharbor. org. STANWOOD SENIOR CENTER TRIPS: The Stanwood Senior Center offers occasional trips around the Puget Sound area and beyond, departing from and returning to the center, 7430 276th St. NW, Stanwood. For information or reservations, contact Sandy Kitchens at 360-629-7403. PASSPORT APPLICATIONS: The Anacortes Public Library accepts passport applications from noon to 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Wednesdays, and 1 to 4 p.m. Saturdays at 1220 10th St., Anacortes. Passport forms and information on fees and how to apply are available at travel.state.gov, or pick up an application and passport guide at the library. The Oak Harbor Senior Center accepts passport applications, by appointment, from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday through Friday at 51 SE Jerome St., Oak Harbor. 360-279-4580.

Please recycle this newspaper


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E14 - Thursday, August 29, 2013

HOT TICKETS RUSSELL BRAND: Aug. 30, Neptune Theatre, Seattle. 877-7844849 or livenation.com. DAVE MATTHEWS BAND: Aug. 30-Sept. 1, Gorge Amphitheatre, George. 800-745-3000 or live nation.com. ONEREPUBLIC, SARA BAREILLES, CHURCHILL: Sept. 2, Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster.com. THE EAGLES: Sept. 4, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or live nation.com. GODSPEED YOU! BLACK EMPEROR: Sept. 5, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showbox online.com. THE PSYCHEDELIC FURS: Sept. 6, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline. com. CHVRCHES: Sept. 6, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. CRAIG MORGAN: Sept. 6, Washington State Fair in Puyallup. 888559-3247 or thefair.com. KISW PAIN IN THE GRASS: Alice in Chains, Avenged Sevenfold, Jane’s Addiction and more: Sept. 6-7, Gorge Amphitheatre, George. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. TRACE ADKINS: Sept. 7, Washington State Fair in Puyallup. 888559-3247 or thefair.com. ADAM ANT: Sept. 7, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. LITTLE BIG TOWN: Sept. 9, Washington State Fair in Puyallup. 888-559-3247 or thefair.com. THE WEEKND: Sept. 10, Paramount Theater, Seattle. 800-7453000 or livenation.com. THE CELTIC TENORS: with The Tacoma Symphony: Sept. 10, Washington State Fair in Puyallup. 888559-3247 or thefair.com. KID CUDI: WaMu Theater, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster. com. CHEAP TRICK: Sept. 11, Washington State Fair in Puyallup. 888559-3247 or thefair.com. MARIA BAMFORD: Sept. 12, Neptune Theatre, Seattle. 877-7844849 or livenation.com. CEELO GREEN: Sept. 12, Washington State Fair in Puyallup. 888559-3247 or thefair.com. BIG GIGANTIC: Sept. 13, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. CARRIE UNDERWOOD: Sept. 13, Washington State Fair in Puyallup. 888-559-3247 or thefair.com. LED ZEPAGAIN (Tribute to Led Zeppelin): Sept. 14, Showbox at

the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. ZAC BROWN BAND: Sept. 14, Gorge Amphitheatre, George. 800745-3000 or livenation.com. TILTED THUNDER RAIL BIRDS: Banked Track Roller Derby: Sept. 14, Comcast Arena at Everett. 866-3328499 or comcastarenaeverett.com. THE MISSION UK: Sept. 15, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-7453000 or showboxonline.com. ALABAMA: Sept. 16, Washington State Fair in Puyallup. 888-5593247 or thefair.com. BLONDIE: Sept. 17, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888-929-7849 or marymoorconcerts.com. JEREMY CAMP, TENTH AVENUE NORTH, KUTLESS, JARS OF CLAY: Sept. 17, Washington State Fair in Puyallup. 888-559-3247 or thefair. com. SHINEDOWN: Sept. 18, Washington State Fair in Puyallup. 888-5593247 or thefair.com. DJANGOFEST NORTHWEST: Sept. 18-22, Whidbey Island Center for the Arts, Langley. 800-6387631 or wicaonline.com. LARRY THE CABLE GUY: Sept. 19, Washington State Fair in Puyallup. 888-559-3247 or thefair.com. BRIAN REGAN: Sept. 20, Pantages Theatre, Tacoma. 253-591-5894 or broadwaycenter.org. CARLY RAE JEPSEN: Sept. 20, Washington State Fair in Puyallup. 888-559-3247 or thefair.com. MARTY STUART & HIS FABULOUS SUPERLATIVES: Sept. 20-21, Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Bow. 877-275-2448 or theskagit.com. THE LUMINEERS: Sept. 20-21, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888-9297849 or marymoorconcerts.com. AUSTIN MAHONE & BRIDGIT MENDLER: Sept. 21, Washington State Fair in Puyallup. 888-5593247 or thefair.com. MATT NATHANSON: Sept. 21, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-7453000 or showboxonline.com. HALESTORM: Sept. 22, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-7453000 or showboxonline.com. KID ROCK: Sept. 22, Washington State Fair in Puyallup. 888-5593247 or thefair.com. FURTHUR: Phil Lesh and Bob Weir, Sept. 24, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 888-929-7849 or marymoor concerts.com. DANE COOK: Sept. 25, Paramount Theater, Seattle. 800-7453000 or livenation.com. WAX TAILOR: Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. JAKE BUGG: Sept. 26, Neptune,

Seattle. 877-784-4849 or live nation.com. SHABAZZ PALACES, THE HELIO SEQUENCE: Sept. 26, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. MOBY: Sept. 26, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showbox online.com. DRAKE: with special guest Miguel: Sept. 26, Tacoma Dome, Tacoma. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. ZEPPARELLA (all-girl Led Zeppelin tribute): Sept. 27, Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Bow. 877-275-2448 or theskagit.com. MACHINEDRUM, XXYYXX: Sept. 27, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or show boxonline.com. NICOLAS JAAR: featuring Tarik Barri: Sept. 27, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or show boxonline.com. JASON ALDEAN: with Jake Owen and Thomas Rhett: Sept. 27, Tacoma Dome, Tacoma. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. LORDE: Sept. 28, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. THE ORB: Sept. 28, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. FLOSSTRADAMUS: Sept. 28, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-7453000 or showboxonline.com. LAILA BIALI TRIO: Sept. 28, Sudden Valley Dance Barn, Bellingham. 360-671-1709 or suddenvalley library.org. MAROON 5, KELLY CLARKSON: Sept. 28, Gorge Amphitheatre, George. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. ZEDD: Sept. 29, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showbox online.com. TECH N9NE: Sept. 29, Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877-7844849 or livenation.com. WOLFGANG GARTNER, TOMMY TRASH: Oct. 1, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or show boxonline.com. EARSHOT JAZZ FESTIVAL: Oct. 1-Nov. 17, Seattle. 206-547-6763 or earshot.org. PET SHOP BOYS: Oct. 2, Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877-7844849 or livenation.com. BULLET FOR MY VALENTINE: Oct. 2, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-7453000 or showboxonline.com. DARK STAR ORCHESTRA: Oct. 3, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800745-3000 or showboxonline.com. “ANYTHING WE WANT: AN EVENING WITH FIONA APPLE AND BLAKE MILLS”: Oct. 4, Benaroya Hall, Seattle. 866-833-4747 or

livenation.com. JOSH GROBAN: Oct. 4, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or live nation.com. STEREOPHONICS: Oct. 4, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800745-3000 or showboxonline.com. PAPA ROACH: Oct. 5, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-7453000 or showboxonline.com. BON JOVI: Oct. 5, Tacoma Dome, Tacoma. 800-745-3000 or live nation.com. BLUE OCTOBER: Oct. 6, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-7453000 or showboxonline.com. DISCLOSURE: Oct. 9, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. RINGLING BROS. AND BARNUM & BAILEY’S “FULLY CHARGED”: Oct. 10-13, Comcast Arena at Everett. 866-332-8499 or comcast arenaeverett.com. GWAR: Oct. 11, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. ADAM CAROLLA: Live Podcast Taping: Oct. 12, Neptune, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or livenation.com. JACK JOHNSON: Oct. 15, Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877-7844849 or livenation.com. PARAMORE, METRIC, HELLOGOODBYE: Oct. 15, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or live nation.com. GRIZ: Oct. 18, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. TIMEFLIES: Oct. 18, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. MOODY BLUES: Oct. 19, Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877-7844849 or livenation.com. BOYCE AVENUE: Oct. 19, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800745-3000 or showboxonline.com. ZEDS DEAD: Oct. 19, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. PINK: Oct. 20, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. THE NAKED AND FAMOUS: Oct. 21, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800745-3000 or showboxonline.com. WALK THE MOON: Oct. 23, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-7453000 or showboxonline.com. BONOBO: Oct. 24, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME: Oct. 24, El Corazon, Seattle. 800514-3849 or elcorazonseattle.com. OKKERVIL RIVER: Oct. 25, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800745-3000 or showboxonline.com. SARAH BRIGHTMAN: Oct. 26,

Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877784-4849 or livenation.com. J. COLE: Oct. 30, Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 206-224-5481 or aeglive.com. HOODIE ALLEN: Oct. 31, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. HELL’S BELLES (AC/DC Tribute), HALLOQUEEN (The music of Queen): Oct. 31, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. AFI: Nov. 1, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. NADA SURF: Nov. 7, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. MINUS THE BEAR: Nov. 8, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800745-3000 or showboxonline.com. GRETA METASSA, MILES BLACK TRIO, JOVON MILLER: Nov. 9, Sudden Valley Dance Barn, Bellingham. 360671-1709 or suddenvalleylibrary.org. LAMB OF GOD, KILLSWITCH ENGAGE: Nov. 11, ShoWare Center, Kent. 866-973-961 or sho warecenter.com. KREATOR, OVERKILL, WARBRINGER: Nov. 12, El Corazon, Seattle. 800-514-3849 or elcorazonseattle.com. SELENA GOMEZ: Nov. 12, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. TORO Y MOI: Nov. 12, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-7453000 or showboxonline.com. GRAMATIK: Nov. 15, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-7453000 or showboxonline.com. MARGARET CHO: Nov. 16, Moore Theatre, Seattle. 877-7844849 or livenation.com. KMFDM: Nov. 16, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-7453000 or showboxonline.com. JAMES BLAKE: Nov. 20, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-7453000 or showboxonline.com. DIR EN GREY: Nov. 21, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800745-3000 or showboxonline.com. NINE INCH NAILS: Nov. 22, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. POLICA: Nov. 23, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-7453000 or showboxonline.com. LESS THAN JAKE: Nov. 26, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800745-3000 or showboxonline.com. PEARL JAM: Dec. 6, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. MACKLEMORE & RYAN LEWIS: Dec. 10, KeyArena, Seattle. 800745-3000 or livenation.com.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, August 29, 2013 - E15

Smokey pays tribute to Motown’s chief of charm Motown sound” produced in Detroit from the late 1950s to the early 1970s, paid tribute DETROIT — She didn’t to Powell on Monday night sing a note or write a lick of a during an invitation-only lyric, but Smokey Robinson event at the former Hitsville, contends that Maxine Powell U.S.A., studio in Detroit that was as essential to Motown now serves as the Motown Records’ operation as the Historical Museum. legendary label’s songwriters, “She was such an imporproducers and musicians. tant, integral part of what we Powell was in charge of were doing here at Motown,” the artists’ personal develsaid Robinson. “It didn’t opment. And Robinson, matter who you became a bard of the American during the course of your romantic songbook and one career — how many hits you of the chief architects of “the had, how well your name was By JEFF KAROUB Associated Press

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ists should carry themselves, treat people and dress. And the training school was the only one of its kind offered at any record label, according to Powell and Motown founder Berry Gordy Jr., who paid tribute to her via videotape. Gordy joked that he still remembers many of Powell’s aphorisms, including “Do not protrude the buttocks,” and “Do not confuse me with your parents — they’re stuck Motown Museum via AP with you. I’m not.” Smokey Robinson speaks at an event honoring Maxine “You had style,” Gordy said. “You gave them class.” Powell on Monday at the Motown Museum in Detroit.

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Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E16 - Thursday, August 29, 2013

MOVIES

‘Circuit’ has the ingredients, but it’s a poor mix By ROGER MOORE McClatchy-Tribune News Service

A terrorist attack, a murderous cover-up, a highly publicized trial and two lawyers — former lovers — forced to stay apart during the proceedings, “Closed Circuit” has all the makings for an incendiary thriller. But this paranoid, cynical tale of terror and privacy and the ways the intelligence apparatus deals with one by stealing the other never quite catches fire. Blame it on the weak chemistry of the stars, blame it on the way the script refuses to let them develop chemistry and the perfunctory way the story is dispensed with, but the sparks aren’t there. Eric Bana is Martin, an English barrister tasked with defending the lone surviving suspect in a mass murder terror bombing. Britain’s State Secrets act means that he’s not the only lawyer on the case. There will be evidence that cannot be heard in open court, and that, for arcane reasons, Martin will not be allowed to hear. Rebecca Hall plays Claudia, another lawyer tasked as “special advocate,” basically the attorney in charge of the suspect’s case in that closed-door part of the trial. They cannot meet, discuss the case or share what they know with one another. That’s probably for the best, as she’s the reason his marriage broke up. Not that they tell the judge this. The fact that the first attorney on the case killed himself sets off no apparent alarm bells, but within hours, both Claudia and Martin have reason to believe they’re under surveillance, and that the people watching may be

Julia Stiles and Eric Bana star in “Closed Circuit.” Focus Features via AP

to her and seeing what she does with it. Neither tells the other what he or she has HH found out. MPAA Rating: R for language and brief violence Jim Broadbent lets just a Cast: Eric Bana, Rebecca Hall, Jim Broadbent, Julia hint of sinister peek through Stiles as the attorney general who Running time: 1:32 charges them with taking this highly public trial. We interested in doing more Circuit” is built on paraland Martin question his than just observing. lel threads telling the same motives. Ciaran Hinds plays Director John Crowley story. We see Martin dig, a solicitor who plays the once did the lively and make a discovery, fret over role of “fixer,” getting them surprising Irish dramsuspicious cabbies and din- access to evidence — sepaedy “Intermission,” and he ner party guests (Julia Stiles rately — doing background jazzes this up with lots of is a reporter). We see Clau- work, listening in on their split screens — as many as dia interview the suspect’s meetings with the client 15 different surveillance family and worry over the (Denis Moschitto). images capture the prelude spy (Riz Ahmed) charged At 92 minutes, “Closed to the terror attack. “Closed with delivering evidence Circuit” should feel tidier

‘CLOSED CIRCUIT’

and tighter than it is. Screenwriter Steven Knight dispenses with back story by having Bana and Hall’s characters blurt out exposition, sizing people up with a few pithy, memorized bits of background and profile data, sort of the “I know your type” speech. That doesn’t spare the film the inane “Keep looking” shout from the spy chief whose minions have lost track of someone (What else are they going to do?) or “OK, you know the plan” (Then why say so?). There’s no virtue in a lean script that still packs in so many things that

don’t need to be said. It feels as if there’s more story here, more movie that was lopped out. We never have time to size characters up for ourselves or invest in anyone before their lives are put in jeopardy. Bana and Hall play their relationship as deflatingly raw — not a romance that either dares to revisit. But that lowers the stakes as well. For all the split screens that play up Britain as a surveillance state, Crowley never really ratchets up the paranoia, and never allows the juice to flow through this closed circuit.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, August 29, 2013 - E17

MOVIES MINI-REVIEWS Compiled from news services. Ratings are one to four stars. “Blue Jasmine” — Cate Blanchett dives into a showcase role and knocks it out of the park. In Woody Allen’s latest, the upper-crust world of an investment guru’s wife falls apart, and she moves in with her working-class sister. With Alec Baldwin and Sally Hawkins. Drama, PG-13, 98 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “Drinking Buddies” — In one of the best beer movies ever made, Luke (Jake Johnson) and Kate (Olivia Wilde) are craft brewery colleagues meant to be together. Writer-director Joe Swanberg gives us a script that sounds like real people talking, and just when we think we know exactly where things are going, they take another route. Comedy, R, 90 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “Elysium” — It’s amazing how bad Jodie Foster is in this movie, and how little it matters in the grand, rabidly schizoid scheme of things. Matt Damon stars as a criminal on dystopian 2154 Earth trying to get to a utopian space station in one of the most entertaining action films of the year. Action, R, 109 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “Jobs” — In a competently made biopic, Ashton Kutcher, one of the least complex actor/personalities of his generation, is tasked with playing Steve Jobs, one of the most complicated and accomplished visionaries of our time, and he’s in over his head. Drama, PG-13, 122 minutes. HH1⁄2 “Lovelace” — This is a wellmade but grim film about a lost soul, 1970s porn actress Linda Lovelace (Amanda Seyfried) and the sadistic creeps who treated her as if she were a sub-human toy. Unlike a film such as “Boogie Nights,” there’s almost no lightness, no humor, no colorfully twisted comic relief. It’s just sadness and more sadness, and then a little bit of redemption. (Drama, R, 92 minutes. HHH “Pacific Rim” — This ridiculously entertaining (and often just plain ridiculous) monster-robot movie plays like a gigantic version of that Rock’Em, Sock’Em Robots game from the 1960s, com-

AT AREA THEATERS ANACORTES CINEMAS Aug. 30-Sept. 5 The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones (PG-13): Friday-Sunday: 12:55, 3:40, 6:35, 9:15; Monday-Thursday: (12:55), (3:40), 6:35 Lee Daniels’ The Butler (PG-13): FridaySunday: 12:50, 3:35, 6:30, 9:10; MondayThursday: 12:50, 3:35, 6:30 Elysium (R): Friday-Sunday: 1:00, 3:30, 6:40, 9:00; Monday-Thursday: 1:00, 3:30, 6:40 360-293-6620 BLUE FOX DRIVE-IN Oak Harbor 360-675-5667 CONCRETE THEATRE Aug. 30-Sept. 1 Planes (PG): Friday: 7:30 p.m. (3D); Saturday: 5 (2D) and 7:30 (3D) p.m.; Sunday: 4 p.m. (3D) 360-941-0403

bined with the cheesy wonderfulness of black-and-white Japanese monster movies from the 1950s. Director Guillermo del Toro has a weirdly beautiful visual style, and there’s rarely an uninteresting shot in “Pacific Rim.” Sci-fi action, PG-13, 131 minutes. HHH “The Canyons” — After six years of consistently dreadful work, Lindsay Lohan hits rock bottom with a performance that might even be more painful to watch than her work in that campy “Liz & Dick” TV movie. Her performance in director Paul Schrader’s vapid waste of time is a boring train wreck, as is the film itself. Drama, Unrated, 99 minutes. 1⁄2 “The To Do List” — Aubrey Plaza is too mature to play a high school valedictorian suddenly determined to fulfill a bucket list of sexual adventures. Genuinely funny moments are few in a comedy that wastes the talents of TV stars including Connie Britton, Donald Glover and Bill Hader. Comedy, R, 104 minutes. H “This Is the End” — Here’s one of the most tasteless, ridiculous and funniest comedies of the 21st century. In its own sloppy, raunchy, sophomoric, occasionally self-pleased and consistently energetic way, “This Is the

CASCADE MALL THEATRES Burlington For listings: 888-AMC-4FUN (888-2624386). OAK HARBOR CINEMAS Aug. 30-Sept. 5 Getaway (PG-13): Friday-Sunday: 1:00, 3:25, 6:35, 8:35; Monday-Thursday: 1:00, 3:25, 6:35 Lee Daniels’ The Butler (PG-13): FridaySunday: 12:50, 3:35, 6:30, 9:15; MondayThursday: 12:50, 3:35, 6:30 Elysium (R): Friday-Sunday: 12:55, 8:45; Monday-Thursday: 12:55 Planes (PG): Friday-Thursday: 3:15, 6:40 360-279-2226 STANWOOD CINEMAS Aug. 30-Sept. 5 The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones (PG-13): 12:50, 3:35, 6:30, 9:15 Lee Daniels’ The Butler (PG-13): 12:55, 3:40, 6:25, 9:10 Elysium (R): 1:10, 3:30, 6:40, 9:00 Planes (PG): 3:05, 6:35, 8:40 We’re the Millers (R): 1:05, 3:25, 6:45, 9:05 Monsters University (G): 1:00 360-629-0514

End” is just about perfect at executing its mission, which is to poke fun at its stars, exhaust every R-rated possibility to get a laugh, and even sneak in a few insights into Hollywood, the celebrity culture and the nature of faith. (Comedy, R, 107 minutes. HHHH “The Wolverine” — Dramatically ambitious and deliberately paced, “The Wolverine” is one of the better comic-book movies of 2013, thanks in large part to an electric performance by Hugh Jackman as the newly vulnerable mutant. Comic book action, PG-13, 126 minutes. HHH “The World’s End” — In the best film yet from director Edgar Wright and writer-actor Simon Pegg, old friends converge for a 20th-anniversary pub crawl that takes an unexpected turn. “The World’s End” succeeds first as a reunion movie and then as a sci-fi satire with some of the funniest stunts and battle sequences in recent memory. Starring Pegg and the invaluable Nick Frost. Comedy, R, 109 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “2 Guns” — A hot mess that’s cool fun. Funny-as-hell Denzel Washington and Mark Wahlberg are undercover lawmen posing as criminals to each other until they have to team up against common

adversaries. With slick pacing and a sharp if implausible script, “2 Guns” rises above standard action fare. Action, R, 109 minutes. HHH “We’re the Millers” — A movie about a pot dealer and his acquaintances posing as a family to haul a shipment from Mexico, is just good enough to keep you entertained, but not good enough to keep your mind from wandering from time to time. This is an aggressively funny comedy that takes a lot of chances, and connects just often enough. Comedy, R, 110 minutes. HHH “White House Down” — If you see just one terroriststake-over-the-White-House thriller this year, make it “White House Down,” Roland “2012” Emmerich’s preachy, goofy, over-the-top take on “Die Hard” at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. From the earnest but earnestly funny president in jeopardy (Jamie Foxx) who doesn’t like bad guys yanking on his sneakers (“Take your hands OFF my Jordans!”) to the eye-rolling image of a child having a “Les Miz” big-flag-on-the-barricades moment, “White House Down” is a corker, real competition for “Fast & Furious 6” as the dumbest fun you’ll have at the movies this summer. Action-thriller, PG-13, 117 minutes. HH

AT THE LINCOLN THEATRE 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon 360-336-8955 n www.lincolntheatre.org

‘Much Ado About Nothing’

7:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday, Aug. 30-31 5:30 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 1 7:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 2 Shakespeare’s classic comedy is given a contemporary spin by director Joss Whedon. Shot in just 12 days, the story of sparring lovers Beatrice and Benedick offers a dark, sexy and occasionally absurd view of the intricate game that is love. As matchmaking schemes are put into play and disguises are donned, loathing and love soon prove to be close cousins. Directed by Joss Whedon, starring Alexis Denisof, Amy Acker, Clark Gregg, Fran Kranz, Jillian Morgese and Nathan Fillion. Rated PG-13. $10 general; $9 seniors, students and active military; $8 members; $7 ages 12 and under. Bargain matinee prices (all shows before 6 p.m.): $8 general, $6 members, $5 ages 12 and under.

Gomez: Don’t ask what Swift said LOS ANGELES — Did Taylor Swift really utter an expletive to Selena Gomez when One Direction and former love interest Harry Styles took the stage for the MTV Video Music Awards? Don’t ask Selena Gomez. Swift’s seemingly foulmouthed reaction shot lit up social networks. But Gomez reprimanded a reporter who asked what Swift said at the premiere of Gomez’s new film, “Getaway,” on Monday. “Don’t try that with me,”

Gomez told him. The young star later said that she’s protective of her friends. “I think girls need to be more supportive of each other. I definitely agree with that. I’m all about that,” she said. “Taylor has been one of those girls. We have been friends for five years. She is very strong. She doesn’t care what people think and she inspires me.” Gomez won best pop video for “Come & Get It” at the ceremony Sunday. — The Associated Press


E18 - Thursday, August 29, 2013

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

OUT & ABOUT ART “LARRY HEALD: ACRYLICS”: A show of landscapes by La Conner artist Larry Heald continues through Sept. 3 at the Scott Milo Gallery, 420 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. Also showing are photographs by David Lucas, oils by Lorna Libert and Jeanne Levasseur, pastels by Barbara Benedetti Newton and new glasswork by Robin Larson. gallery hours are 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. 360-293-6938 or scottmilo.com. ANNIVERSARY SHOW: The Anne Martin McCool Gallery’s 12th Anniversary Show continues through Aug. 31 at 711 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. The show features paintings and prints by Anne Martin McCool and Cathy Schoenberg, sculptures by Tracy Powell, hand-turned wood by George Way, handwoven baskets by Jane Hyde, jewelry by Carole Cunningham and Debbie Aldrich, Bob Metke glass and work by other gallery artists. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday and noon to 4 p.m. Sunday. 360-293-3577 or mccoolart.com. “DRAWN IN”: The new art exhibit continues through Sept. 15 at Anchor Art Space, 216 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. Whether drawn in cloth, ink, space or light, these artists’ works address gesture and materiality in engaging ways. Artists include Rachel Brumer, Gail Grinnell, Tricia A. Stackle and Ellen Ziegler. Curated by Jasmine Valandani. Gallery hours are noon to 5 p.m. Friday through Sunday or by appointment. anchorart space.org. “COLORS OF WHIDBEY”:

Wonn Road, Greenbank. Oxrieder creates fantasy paintings and mixed media works; Doren creates oilon-paper pieces. For information, including gallery hours and directions, call 360-222-0102 or visit raven rocksgallery.com.

will feature handcrafted wooden furniture, sculptures, musical instruments and more. Free admission. 360-678-1347 or wood palooza.com.

CAMANO ART SHOW: The annual Roaming Artists Art Show will take ART STUDIO TOUR: place from 10 a.m. to 5 Whidbey Working Artists’ p.m. Saturday, Aug. 31, and annual Summer Studio 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Tour continues from 10 Sept. 1, at the Camano a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday Multipurpose Center, 141 through Monday, Aug. E. Camano Drive, Camano 31-Sept. 2. The free selfIsland. This year’s featured guided tour will include 30 artist is Ann Curtis. The working studios featuring show includes artwork by the work of 31 artists. 27 local artists who work Check out a variety of “plein air” (outside and original artwork, including on-site) at various locaencaustic, fiber, glass, jewtions around Stanwood elry, painting, photography, and Camano Island. Enter print, pottery, sculpture, a raffle to win artwork by wood, multimedia and Gene Cyrus. Free admismore. Pick up a map of par- sion. ticipating studios at island visitor centers, shops and FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY galleries or at whidbey WALK: Check out artwork workingartists.com. in a variety of media from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Sept. “STANWOOD ART 6, at several galleries and The second annual Sail Cam’Isle celebration will take place from 10 a.m. to 6 WALK: YOUR PASSPORT other venues along Comp.m. Saturday through Monday, Aug. 31-Sept. 2, at The Center for Wooden Boats at TO ART”: Check out a vari- mercial Avenue and other Cama Beach State Park, 1880 SW Camano Drive, Camano Island. On Saturday and ety of art on display and locations in downtown Sunday, enjoy toy boat building for the kids, crabbing and fishing demonstrations, meet the artists from 5 to 8 Anacortes. Enjoy pen and sailboat racing, umiak rides, rowing competitions, crab catching races, live music p.m. Friday, Aug. 30, at par- ink drawings, photography, and a potluck barbecue. The Center for Wooden Boats will grill the meat, you bring ticipating businesses along paintings and prints, sculpthe sides. Monday is member appreciation day, with free boat rentals for CWB the 8700 block of 271st St. tures, ceramics, jewelry, art members. All activities are free, but donations are gratefully accepted. Discover NW, in east Stanwood. Fif- glass and more. 360-293Pass required for park admission. 360-387-9361 or cwb.org. teen local businesses will 6938. showcase unique artworks including paintings, potNORTHWEST PASTEL The group show continWoolery. Gallery hours are Distance,” works on paper tery, jewelry and more. Get SOCIETY: SIGNATURE ues through Sept. 3 at the 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. 360- visually inspired by Persian your “passport” stamped MEMBER SHOW: The Rob Schouten Gallery, 765 222-3070 or robschoutenpoems, and “The World in at each location to enter a show will open with a Wonn Road, Greenbank. gallery.com. the Palm of Your Hand,” free prize drawing. 360-629- reception for the artists The exhibition features a series of shell fragments 3710. during the First Friday Galcolorful paintings, pastels, NEW ARTWORK: A show applied with silver leaf and lery Walk from 6 to 9 p.m. sculptures, glass, jewelry, of new work by artists lacquer. Gallery hours are WOODPALOOZA: The Friday, Sept. 6, and continencaustics and fiber arts Lindsay Kohles and Jas11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday Whidbey Island Woodue through Oct. 1 at Scott depicting the brightness mine Valandani continues through Sunday. 360-766workers Guild will present Milo Gallery, 420 Commerof summer on Whidbey through Aug. 31 at Smith & 6230 or smithandvallee. the ninth annual “Art + cial Ave., Anacortes. More Island. Vallee Gallery, 5742 Gilkey com. Wood = Woodpalooza,” than a dozen signature Artists include Annette Ave, Edison. Kohles’ renopening with a reception member artists will exhibit Hanna, Frances Wood, derings meld two organWHIMSY ECLECTICA: from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, pastel landscapes, seaStacey Neumiller, Pete Jor- isms together, resulting in “Whimsy Eclectica: Fanci- Aug. 30, and continuing scapes, florals, animals and dan, Linnane Armstrong, an unnatural creature that, ful art by Mary Jo Oxrieder from noon to 5 p.m. daily abstractions. Gallery hours Anne Belov, Angie Dixon, although never seen before, and Delightful Oils by through Monday, Sept. 2, at are 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Jacob Kohn, Melissa Koch, is strikingly familiar. Valan- Marcia Van Doren” conthe Whidbey Island Center Monday through Saturday. Sandra Whiting, Mark dani presents two distinct tinues through Aug. 30 at for the Arts, 565 Camano 360-293-6938 or scottmilo. Van Wickler and Angèle bodies of work: “Song and Raven Rocks Gallery, 765 Ave., Langley. The show com.

SAIL CAM’ISLE


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, August 29, 2013 - E19

OUT & ABOUT MAGGIE WILDER’S MAGIC MUD SHOW: The show will run from Sept. 6 to Oct. 20 at Gallery Cygnus, 109 Commercial St., La Conner. A special artists reception will take place during the Skagit Art Escape/La Conner Gallery Walk from 5 to 8 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 7. The gallery will give away door prizes to the first 25 people at the reception. Wilder explores relationship to place in her paintings, and a concept she calls “yondering,” a human mental activity somewhere between wondering and wandering. 360708-4787 or gallerycygnus. com. 50 YEARS OF DRAWING: “Michael Stark’s 50 Years of Drawing” will open with a reception during the First Friday Gallery Walk from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Sept. 6, and continue through Sept. 30 at Anne Martin McCool Gallery, 711 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. Stark will exhibit drawings from his trips to a variety of countries including works from his most recent trip to South America. The gallery will celebrate Stark’s 70th birthday during the opening reception. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday and noon to 4 p.m. Sunday. 360-293-3577 or mccoolart.com. NEW PAINTINGS, SCULPTURES: A show of new oil paintings by Kathleen Frugé-Brown and sculptures by Lloyd Whannell will open with a reception from 5 to 8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 6, and continue through Oct. 1 at the Rob Schouten Gallery, 765 Wonn Road, Greenbank. Frugé-Brown’s landscape paintings are all done outdoors from life. Whannell creates sculptures primar-

ily in stone, but he also casts his work in glass and bronze. Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. 360222-3070 or robschouten gallery.com.

at 7 p.m. $10 adults, $7 ages 62 to 89 and 6 to 15, free for ages 90 and older or 5 and younger. Discounted admission on Labor Day. Find a complete schedule of events at evergreenfair. org.

SKAGIT RIVER SALMON FESTIVAL: The second annual family-friendly event will take place from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 7, at Edgewater Park, 600 Behrens Millet Road, Mount Vernon. Enjoy live music, arts and crafts, educational booths and vendors, silent auction, beer and wine garden, great food and salmon barbecue, youth activities and crafts, salmon derby and more. Free admission. skagitriver fest.org.

comments. Bring a nonperishable food item for the food bank. For information, contact Corinne Salcedo at 360-293-7114.

15400 Airport Drive, west of Burlington. Performers in the 90-minute aerobatics show at 1:30 p.m. include the father-and-son team of Bud and Ross Granley, “The Flying Tenor” Will MORE FUN PAINTING IN THE Allen, and female aeroKIRTAN: The monthly PARKS: Members of Plein batic and racing pilot Vicky celebration with chanting Air Washington Artists, an WASHINGTON STATE and dancing will take place Benzing. Check out disoutdoor artist group, will FAIR: Washington state’s plays, vendors, youth activifrom 10:30 a.m. to noon be painting on-site Friday biggest fair will take place Sunday, Sept. 1, at the Ana- ties and more. Free admisand Saturday, Sept. 6-7, in Sept. 6-22 at the Washsion. portofskagit.com. cortes Center for HappiRasar State Park, located ington State Fair Events ness, 619 Commercial Ave., on Highway 20 near ConCenter, 110 Ninth Ave. SW, “SHAPIN’ UP IN WOOLAnacortes. No experience crete. Spectators are invited Puyallup. Advance tickLEY”: Meet Ken and Austin necessary. All ages are welto stop by and chat. parks. ets: $7.50-$10; at the gate: Andrews, contestants on come. By donation. RSVP: wa.gov. $9-$12.50, free for ages 5 360-464-2229 or anacortes NBC’s “Biggest Loser,” at and younger. For informa- LECTURES the Shapin’ Up in Woolley centerforhappiness.org. JOEL BROCK & GREGG tion, including hours and Health and Fitness Fair AND TALKS LAANANEN: A cutting-edge directions, discounts and set for 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. “PIECES OF HISTORY: “THE NOISE EXPLOexhibition by Northwest special attractions, visit QUILTS OF SKAGIT COUN- Saturday, Sept. 7, at the SION: THE SCIENCE, School artists Joel Brock thefair.com. Sedro-Woolley Community POLICY, AND POLITICS OF TY”: The featured exhibit and Gregg Laananen will Center, 703 Pacific St. will continue through Oct. UNDERWATER NOISE”: open with a reception from FESTIVALS The men will share the 6 at the Skagit County Michael Jasny, director of 5 to 8 p.m. Saturday, Sept. story of how together they Historical Museum, 501 S. BUMBERSHOOT: Seatthe Marine Mammal Pro7, and continue through tle’s annual music and arts tection Project and a senior Fourth St., La Conner. The lost more than 400 pounds Sept. 29 at Smith & Vallee and how it has changed festival is set for Saturday policy analyst at the Natu- show includes quilts and Gallery, 5742 Gilkey Ave., their lives. The event will coverlets from the musethrough Monday, Aug. ral Resources Defense Edison. include health and fitness um’s collection, plus heri31-Sept. 2, at the Seattle Council, will speak at 6:30 Brock is best known for activities for all ages, a tage quilts on loan from Center. Enjoy live music, p.m. Friday, Aug. 30, at his paintings that explore variety of informational Skagit families. Museum visual and performing arts, the Whale Museum, 62 landscape, architecture and First St. N., Friday Harbor. hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. booths, healthy food venstill-life, but recently he has dance, films, comedy, arts ues, the “Great American Tuesday through Sunday. been pushing the boundar- and crafts, poetry and liter- Jasny will describe the latSedro-Woolley Weigh-In” $5, $4 seniors and ages 6 to ary arts, children’s activiest developments in noise ies and breaking away into and a 30-day fitness chal12 younger, $10 families, ties, food, beer gardens and research, regulation and compositions that incorlenge. There will also be free for members and ages lots more. Weekend pass: policy and discuss their porate found objects and a performance by the 5 and younger. 360-466$140 advance. Single-day significance for Southern broken glass. Jumpin’ Js, a national DouResident killer whales and 3365 or skagitcounty.net/ Laananen paints en plein tickets: $56-$60 general, ble Dutch jump rope team. museum. $30 ages 65 and older, free other vulnerable wildlife. air to preserve the immediFree. shapinupinwoolley. for ages 10 and younger Free. Light refreshments ate essence of a specific com. NEW MOON CELEBRAwith paying adult. 206-673- will be served. For inforsetting. He scouts out a TION: The event will take 5060 or bumbershoot.org. mation, call 360-378-4710, location, sets up his easel GALA AUCTION: Camaplace at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, ext. 23, or whalemuseum. and paints each scene with no Center will host “Puttin’ Sept. 5, at the Anacortes SOAPBOX SH’BANG: org. an array of colors, patterns on the Ritz,” its annual Center for Happiness, The sixth annual event will and textures. Gallery hours Gala Auction, starting at 619 Commercial Ave., take place from 3 p.m. Fri“SURVEILLANCE: GIVare 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tues5 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 7, Anacortes. Join Rev. Elke day through 8 p.m. Sunday, ING UP LIBERTY FOR day through Sunday. 360Macartney to drum in new at 606 Arrowhead Road, Sept. 6-8, at the Lookout SECURITY?”: Pat Galla766-6230 or smithand Camano Island. Enjoy food Arts Quarry, 246 Old gher, board member of the ideas for the month and vallee.com. and beverages, music, and drum out the old. Bring Highway 99 N. near Alger. American Civil Liberties Enjoy a gravity-powered, Union of Washington, will your own hand drums and lively bidding on a wide FAIRS variety of items in live and off-road vehicle derby, live speak at the Fidalgo Dem- rattles or borrow hers. EVERGREEN STATE $5-$10 suggested donation. silent auctions. Dinner music and dancing, vaude- ocrats meeting at 7 p.m. FAIR: The annual event will ville and circus performers, Tuesday, Sept. 10, at the 360-464-2229 or anacortes choices include prime rib, oven-roasted salmon or continue through Monday, burlesque, workshops, art, Anacortes Public Library, centerforhappiness.org. mushroom lasagna. Formal Sept. 2, at the Evergreen carnival games, kids’ activi- 1220 10th St., Anacortes. attire suggested. $75 per State Fairgrounds, 14405 SKAGIT FLIGHT FEST: ties, vendors and more. Gallagher will talk about 179th Ave. SE, Monroe. Advance weekend pass: drones and National Secu- The air show and fly-in will person, $480 table of six, $640 table of eight. 360Fair hours are 10 a.m. to 10 $35 adults, $10 children. take place from 10 a.m. to rity Agency wiretapping, 387-0222 or camanocenter. p.m. daily, except the final 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 7, at $45 at the gate. shbangfest. followed by a moderated org. day when the fair will close com. 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