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Skagit Valley Herald Thursday April 17, 2014

Tulip Festival

Movies

Reviews

Skagit County’s premier event offers something for everyone

Strength of “Heaven is for Real” is the movie’s focus on the family

Music: Ray Price, YG Video Games: “Professor Layton ...”

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Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E2 - Thursday, April 17, 2014

NEW ON DVD THIS WEEK “Black Nativity”: “Black Nativity” rises above the standard holiday film because of the strong writing, acting and music. There’s always going to be a certain amount of sentimentality that comes with such emotional redemption tales. That’s cushioned by the smart choices director Kasi Lemmons makes. The standard approach to this kind of story is to have the protagonist already well down the path of sin. Bringing someone back from such a long and winding road often feels manipulative or forced. Because Lemmons quickly shows that the film’s central figure has a good heart and is only facing bad decisions, the transformation that eventually comes feels real and grounded. “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty”: Ben Stiller stars as Mitty, a man who has lived most of his life dreaming of adventure. That’s the nature of Mitty. Despite the film’s endearing qualities, it loses its way when Mitty goes from dreamer to doer. It is a beautifully shot movie. “Nut Job”: “The Nut Job” is filled with colorful woodland creatures that inhabit an idyllic park. Winter’s coming and they are dangerously low on food. A new supply is needed, especially when squirrel loner Surly (voiced by Will Arnett) puts an even bigger damper on the winter menus. The film is strictly fun for kids. Adults may just go nuts waiting for the rather redundant comic humor to end. “The Invisible Woman”: The film shows how Charles Dickens was living a life of great expectations as the perfect father who was also sharing his love with a mistress, Ellen Ternan, better known as Nelly. The film, directed by and starring Ralph Fiennes as the Victorian writer, lovingly turns back the pages on Dickens’ life to show the emotional turmoil that he faced. Fiennes crafts a film that is content to walk around the edges of events so that the focus is more cerebral and less sexual. It’s presented much the same way a novel during the Victorian Era would treat salacious elements, with more innuendo than direct examination. “Philomena”: Judi Dench plays a woman searching for her son. “Better Living Through Chemistry”: Pharmacist starts a drug-and-alcoholfueled affair.

YOUR ARTS, ENTERTAINMENT AND RECREATION GUIDE TO WHAT’S GOING ON IN SKAGIT COUNTY AND THE SURROUNDING AREAS

Upcoming movie releases Following is a partial schedule of coming movies on DVD. Release dates are subject to change: APRIL 22 Barefoot - Lionsgate Big Bad Wolves - Magnolia The Suspect - Image

Tuning Up / Page 9

APRIL 29 Bad Country - Sony Devil’s Due - Fox Gimme Shelter - Lionsgate Labor Day - Paramount The Legend of Hercules - Summit / Lionsgate Locker 13 - Arc The Rocket - Kino MAY 6 The Art of the Steal - Anchor Bay Burn - Passion River Still Mine - Fox Veronica Mars - Warner MAY 13 Her - Warner I, Frankenstein - Lionsgate Stalingrad - Sony That Awkward Moment - Sony n McClatchy-Tribune News Service

“Midsomer Murders: Village Case Files”: The English village mystery gets a contemporary spin in this TV series. “Ride Along”: High school security guard (Kevin Hart) must prove his worth on patrol. “Boys of Abu Ghraib”: American soldier forms bond with a prisoner he’s guarding. “The Practice: The Final Season”: Legal drama that paved the way for “Boston Legal.” “Camp Dread”: Director wants to resurrect summer camp horror genre. “Making of a Lady”: Educated but penniless Emily Fox Seton (Lydia Wilson) struggles with love. “Thomas & Friends: Railway Mischief”: There’s trouble on the tracks. “Saint Seiya: Sanctuary”: Follows five mystical warriors called the “Saints.” “Ripper Street: Season Two”: The job of protecting London’s Whitechapel district has never been harder for Detective Inspector Edmund Reid. “Flowers In The Attic”: Mother hides four siblings in the attic. “The Gabby Douglas Story”: Recounts how Douglas overcame obstacles to win Olympic gold. n Rick Bentley, The Fresno Bee

CC Adams and Friends performs on Sunday at the La Conner Pantry & Pub

Inside

SUBMISSIONS Email features@skagitpublishing.com, vrichardson@skagitpublishing. com (recreation items) Deadline: 5 p.m. Friday for the following Thursday edition Phone 360-416-2135 Hand-deliver 1215 Anderson Road Mount Vernon, WA 98274 Mailing address P.O. Box 578 Mount Vernon, WA 98273 Online events calendar To list your event on our website, visit goskagit.com and look for the Events Calendar on the home page

Tulip Festival Events........................... 4 Earth Day Events................................ 5 Movie Listings, Reviews..................6-7 On Stage, Tuning Up........................8-9 Get Involved...................................... 11 Hot Tickets........................................ 12 At the Lincoln.................................... 13

HAVE A STORY IDEA? w For arts and entertainment, contact Features Editor Craig Parrish at 360-416-2135 or features@skagitpublishing.com w For recreation, contact staff writer Vince Richardson at 360-416-2181 or vrichardson@ skagitpublishing.com TO ADVERTISE 360-424-3251


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, April 17, 2014 - E3

COMMUNITY EASTER BASKET SALE: Island Hospital Auxiliary will have handmade Easter baskets for sale from 9 a.m. to noon today in the 24th Street entrance of Island Hospital, 1211 24th St., Anacortes. Proceeds will benefit programs and services at Island Hospital. 360-293-8393. EASTER EGG COLORING: Decorate Easter eggs from 4 to 7 p.m. today at Alger Community Hall, 18735 Parkview Lane, Alger. Also, enter the coloring contest; winners in three age groups will be announced at the Alger Easter Egg Hunt at 10 a.m. Saturday, April 19. 360-724-0340.

EASTER EVENTS

IN THE AREA

CMV EASTER EGG HUNT: Country Meadow Village will host an Easter egg hunt at 2 p.m. Friday, April 18, at the Village, 1501 Collins Road, Sedro-Woolley. Kids ages 10 and younger are welcome. Punch and cookies will be served. Free. 360-8560404. EASTER EGG DASH: The annual egg hunt for ages 12 and younger begins at 6 p.m. Friday, April 18, at Storvik Park, 1110 32nd St., Anacortes. Bring your own basket. Free. 360-293-1918. KIWANIS EGG HUNT: 10 a.m. Saturday, April 19, Maiben Park, 1011 E. Greenleaf Ave., Burlington. Ages 8 and younger can hunt for more than 4,000 eggs filled with candy and toys. Rain or shine. Free. EASTER EGG HUNT: The La Conner Fire Department’s annual Easter Egg Hunt for ages 11 and younger begins at 10 a.m. Saturday, April 19, in Pioneer Park, La Conner. Free. 360-6614781. CHILDREN’S EGG HUNT: Hillcrest Christian Fellowship will host its annual Children’s Easter Egg Hunt from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Saturday, April 19, at 1830 S. 13th St., Mount Vernon. Activities include egg hunts for ages 12 and younger, crafts, face art, a bounce house and photos with the Easter Bunny. Free.

360-424-3006 or hillcrestcf.org. NEIGHBORHOOD EGG HUNT: Ages 12 and younger can enjoy an egg hunt, games, photos with the Easter Bunny and more at 10 a.m. Saturday, April 19, at Trinity Lutheran Church, 301 S. 18th St., Mount Vernon. This event is co-hosted by Trinity Lutheran Church, Mount Vernon Presbyterian Church, First United Methodist Church and Saint Paul’s Episcopal Church. Free. 360-424-3628. ALGER EGG HUNT: Enjoy a potluck brunch and Easter Egg Hunt at 10 a.m. Saturday, April 19, at Alger Community Hall, 18735 Parkview Lane, Alger. The hunt will be divided into three age groups. Older kids are invited to use metal detectors to find hidden treasure. 360-724-0340. STANWOOD EASTER

PARADE: The Stanwood Easter Parade will begin at 11 a.m. Saturday, April 19, beginning near the train station at the east end of town and proceeding down Main Street. Everyone is welcome to participate — walkers, bicyclists, old cars, even dogs on leashes. Meet at 10:30 a.m. in the parking lot near the Stanwood train station. No entry fee. 360629-4414. OAK HARBOR EGG HUNT: Concordia Lutheran Church will host its annual Easter Egg Hunt at 11 a.m. Saturday, April 19, at 590 N. Oak Harbor Road, Oak Harbor. Kids from toddlers through preteens are welcome. Free. Rain or shine. 360-6752548. ADULT EASTER EGG HUNT: Skagit Valley Gardens will host its 12th annual Adult Easter Egg Hunt at noon Saturday,

April 19, at 18923 Peter Johnson Road, Mount Vernon. Ages 21 and older are invited to hunt for eggs among the blooming display gardens, with a prize for every egg, children’s activities and more. 360-424-6760 or skagit valleygardens.com. FIND EASTER EGGS: Children up to age 12 can hunt for candy-filled Easter eggs starting at 1 p.m. Saturday, April 19, at Riverfront Park, 1001 River Road, Sedro-Woolley. 360-8551841. TEENS FLASHLIGHT EGG HUNT: Burlington teens can search in the dark for eggs starting at 8:30 p.m. Saturday, April 19, at Whitmarsh Fields. The Burlington Healthy Community Coalition will host this H.U.B. Project (Help Unify Burlington) event. Prize donations are needed. 360-757-3311.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E4 - Thursday, April 17, 2014

DISPLAY GARDENS April 17-24: Check out display gardens filled with blooming tulips and more: Tulip Town, 15002 Bradshaw Road, Mount Vernon: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. $5, free for ages 10 and younger. No pets. 360-424-8152. Roozengarde, 15867 Beaver Marsh Road, Mount Vernon: 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily. $5, $4 military with ID, free for ages 10 and younger. No pets. 360424-8531. Azusa Farm and Gardens, 14904 Highway 20, Mount Vernon: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily. Display gardens, plants, flowers, art and more. 360-424-1580. Christianson’s Nursery, 15806 Best Road, Mount Vernon: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily. Gardens, greenhouses, art and more. 360-466-3821. Skagit Valley Gardens, 18923 Peter Johnson Road, Mount Vernon: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily. Gardens, gifts, cafe and more. 360-424-6760. WSU Discovery Garden, 16650 Highway 536, Mount Vernon: Dawn to dusk daily. Gardens showcasing plants that do well in the Pacific Northwest. Docents are on hand to answer gardening questions on the weekends.

KIWANIS SALMON BARBECUE April 17-24: 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily, Hillcrest Lodge, 1717 S. 13th St., Mount Vernon. Alder grilled salmon with baked potato, coleslaw, garlic bread, beverages and dessert. $12 adults, $10 child/senior plate. Visa/MC accepted. Reservations required for groups of 15 or more: 360-202-0926 or kiwanisbbq.com.

POSTER SIGNING Tulip Festival poster artist Luke Tornatzky will sign 2014 festival posters and offer other artwork: n Saturday, April 19: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Tulip Town, 15002 Bradshaw Road, Mount Vernon. n Sunday, April 20: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at RoozenGaarde,

31st annual Skagit Valley Tulip Festival APRIL 17-24 w For the full month’s listing of events, maps and directions, visit tulipfestival.org

15867 Beaver Marsh Road, Mount Vernon.

MASTER GARDENER ‘STEP-ON’ GUIDES Have a WSU Skagit County Master Gardener act as your tour guide to the Skagit Valley. For reservations, email toni tulip@comcast.net.

CHILDREN’S MUSEUM April 17-24: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday; noon to 5 p.m. Sunday; 8:30 to 10 a.m. toddler Tuesday; 550 Cascade Mall Drive, Burlington. Activities for ages 10 and younger. $5.25, free for ages younger than 1. 360-757-8888.

HISTORICAL MUSEUM April 17-20, 22-24: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday, Skagit County Historical Museum, 501 S. Fourth St., La Conner. Featuring “100 Years of Fashion” through April 28. $5 adults, $4 seniors and ages 6-12; $10 families.

Free for members and ages 5 and younger. 360-466-3365 or skagitcounty.net/museum.

bers and ages 11 and younger. 360-466-4288 or laconnerquilts. com.

MUSEUM OF NORTHWEST ART

ART BASH

April 17-24: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, noon to 5 p.m. Sunday and Monday, MoNA, 121 S. First St., La Conner. The museum’s collections include contemporary art from Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Alaska and British Columbia. Free admission. 360-466-4446 or mona museum.org.

April 17-24: Art League North’s annual Fine Art MultiMedia Exhibition is open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily in the upstairs gallery at The Farmhouse Restaurant, 13724 La Conner-Whitney Road, Mount Vernon. Free admission. 360466-0382 or artleaguenorth. com.

ART IN A PICKLE BARN

April 17-24: Area artists display their work at various sites. Maps available at La Conner Chamber of Commerce and participating merchants. Free. 360-466-3125.

April 17-24: Azusa Farm & Gardens, 14904 Highway 20, Mount Vernon. The 25th annual Skagit Art Association show features award-winning art in a variety of media. The show continues from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily. Free admission. 360-4241580 or skagitart.org.

ANACORTES QUILT WALK

J & L ART SHOW

LA CONNER SCULPTURE TOUR

April 17-24: See a wide variety of quilts and wearable art garments in downtown Anacortes businesses during regular shop hours. Maps available at participating businesses and the Anacortes Visitors Center. Free. 360-333-9311 or fidalgo islandquilters.com.

DOWNTOWN BURLINGTON ART WALK April 17-24: Check out original artworks along Fairhaven Avenue in downtown Burlington. Tour brochures available at the Visitor Information Center, 520 E. Fairhaven. Free. 360-7559717 or 360-757-0994.

LA CONNER IN BLOOM: TULIP QUILT CHALLENGE April 17-24: Check out tulip-themed quilts and fiber artworks at the La Conner Quilt & Textile Museum, 703 S. Second St., La Conner. Created and donated by area quilters, all quilts are for sale, with proceeds to benefit restoration and repairs to the Gaches Mansion’s picket fence. Museum hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Admission: $7, $5 students and military with ID, free for mem-

April 17-24: Check out the fifth annual art show at Tulip Valley Winery & Orchard, 16163 Highway 536, Mount Vernon. Local artists show work in a variety of media. Show hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily. Free admission and parking. 360-708-3170 or face book.com/JLArtShow.

SPRING ART SHOW April 17-20, 23-24: Clayton James, Maggie Wilder and Marty Rogers are the featured artists in the annual Spring Art Show at the River Gallery, 19313 Landing Road (off of Dodge Valley Road), Mount Vernon. Open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday. The show also includes works by more than two dozen other local artists. 360-466-4524 or rivergallerywa.com.

ART AT THE SCHOOLHOUSE April 17-24: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Members of the Stanwood Camano Arts Guild offer a variety of original artworks and demonstrations at the historic 1888 schoolhouse at Christianson’s Nursery & See FESTIVAL, Page E7


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, April 17, 2014 - E5

ENVIRONMENT By KIMBERLY CAUVEL @Kimberly_SVH

From the peaks of the North Cascades Mountains to the Skagit River Delta where glacial melt meets with Puget Sound, Skagit County has a wealth of natural beauty to celebrate. Many organizations are offering community events for Earth Day, a national tradition that took hold in 1970. From running on prized public trails, planting trees on the banks of the river, or helping pick up litter on the highway leading to the Cascades and the beaches of Whidbey Island, there are many ways to get involved while spending your time outdoors. Indoors, you can also catch an environment-focused film or lecture. Learn about climate change — perhaps the greatest environmental issue of today — at Skagit Valley College’s Mount Vernon or Whidbey Island campuses. The celebration is set to start this weekend and will last through the week with the first Earth Week in Concrete, organized by the Concrete Chamber of Commerce and KSVU radio station. “The upper Skagit Valley is all about natural beauty, and the community is very into conservation and recycling, so we wanted to celebrate that,” chamber office manager Valerie Lee said.

Cement City Trail Run Hit the pavement running for the benefit of the Concrete School District on Saturday, April 19. Begin at Concrete High School, where registration will be open from 8:30 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. Elementary school-aged kids can participate in a half-mile race around the high school track before the adults take off at 10 a.m. on 5K or 10K routes on the Cascade Trail. More information: earthweek2014. weebly.com or call the Chamber of Commerce at 360-853-8784.

Earth Day planting, ivy pull Help the Skagit Fisheries Enhancement Group restore the Skagit River bank in downtown Mount Vernon at Edgewater Park 10 a.m. Saturday, April 19. The group is seeking volunteers to help remove invasive ivy, plant trees and pick up trash. The plantings are an extension of the group’s original restoration effort to create rearing habitat for young salmon, environmental education intern Rebecca Williams said. To RSVP: 360-336-0172.

Earth Day origins

EARTH DAY events in the area

Discovery Day at S-W library Sedro-Woolley Public Library, 802 Ball St., will host its first Discovery Day at noon Saturday, April 19, with an Earth Day theme. The family-friendly event will offer healthy snacks, stories and lessons about nature and the environment.

Climate change discussion A discussion on climate change will take place at noon Tuesday, April 22, in the Knutzen Cardinal Center multipurpose room at Skagit Valley College, 2405 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. Department of Environmental Conservation Chair Claus Svendsen will lead an interactive presentation about the warming climate. Sponsored by Phi Theta Kappa, Environmental Club, Outdoor Club, Chef’s Club and The Sustainability Committee.

Climate change symposium Skagit Valley College and the Climate Reality Project will sponsor a series of climate change presentations by Pacific Northwest experts at 6 p.m. Tuesday, April 22, at the college’s Whidbey Island campus in Oak Harbor. Speakers include University of Washington researcher Ingrid Tohver, graduate student Laura Newcomb, Anacortes Public Works Director Fred Buckenmeyer, Western Washington University geology professor and glacier research Doug Clark, and U.S. Geologic Survey researcher Eric Grossman. Individual discussions will start in Oak Hall, and a general forum will follow in Hayes Hall. For session topics and times, see dl.dropboxusercontent.

com/u/106545284/Climate%20 Change%20Poster.pdf.

Ocean stewardship film Skagit Valley College, 2405 E. College Way, Mount Vernon, will show the film “Ocean Frontiers – The Dawn of a New Era in Ocean Stewardship” at 6 p.m. Tuesday, April 22, in the Knutzen Cardinal Center multipurpose room, in collaboration with Friends of Skagit Beaches and the Skagit County Marine Resources Committee. A question-and-answer session will follow with representatives from local marine stewardship programs. More information: skagitbeaches.org, or contact Friends of Skagit Beaches president Betty Carteret at 360-299-8553 or friends@skagitbeaches.org.

Highway 20 cleanup Volunteers will take on trash cleanup on sections of Highway 20 at 3 p.m. Monday, April 21; 9 a.m. Tuesday, April 22; and 10 a.m. Saturday, April 26. More information: earthweek2014.weebly.com, or call the Concrete Chamber of Commerce at 360-853-8784.

Earth Day at NAS Whidbey Visit the Can-Do Inn at Rocky Point in Oak Harbor at 10 a.m. Tuesday, April 22, for a presentation on responsible environmental stewardship for the next generation with guest speaker Larry Campbell Sr., Swinomish Tribal Historic Preservation officer. The Washington State University Extension, Island County Health, Whidbey Island Conservation District, Forest City’s Resident Energy Conservation Program, Puget Sound

The first Earth Day took place April 22, 1970, when then-U.S. Sen. Gaylord Nelson of Wisconsin wanted to start a “national teach-in on the environment.” He was devastated by the 1969 oil spill in Santa Barbara, Calif., and hoped he could harness the nation’s energy that was then found in the student antiwar movement. That first Earth Day, 20 million people demonstrated for environmental causes in rallies across the U.S. The events ultimately led to the creation of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the passage of the Clean Air, Clean Water, and Endangered Species acts. n Source: earthday.org

Energy, and NAS Whidbey Island’s Environmental and Energy divisions will provide environment-themed educational displays.

National Park Week Celebrate the history, nature, trails, archeology, and wildlife of the North Cascades National Park Service Complex during National Park Week from April 19-27. The park will host a volunteer cleanup of Colonial Creek Campground on Tuesday, April 22. Volunteers interested in carpooling can meet in Sedro-Woolley at 7:45 a.m. or at the National Park Service compound in Marblemount at 8:45 a.m. To reserve a carpool spot from SedroWoolley, call the Park Headquarters Visitor Information Center at 360-854-7304. Volunteers should bring water, lunch and work gloves. For more information about National Park Week at the North Cascades National Park Service Complex and other National Park Service sites, visit nationparkweek.org.

Earth Day film fest Concrete Theater, 45920 Main St., Concrete, will show two environmentthemed films at 6 p.m. Thursday, April 24: “Who Bombed Judi Bari,” a film about Earth First! activists blamed for a California bombing attack, and “Back to the Garden,” a documentary about back-to-the-land living. The filmmaker of “Back to the Garden” will be available for an audience Q&A. Doors open at 5:30, admission is $10. earthweek2014. weebly.com.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E6 - Thursday, April 17, 2014

MOVIES

Connor Corum (left) and Greg Kinnear star in “Heaven Is For Real.” Sony Pictures via AP

‘Heaven’s’ depiction of family is for real By RICK BENTLEY The Fresno Bee

“Heaven is for Real” is based on the true story of a 4-year-old Nebraska boy who after major surgery tells his father — a local minister — that he’s been to Heaven. Although there are immediate doubts, people begin to accept the story when the youngster reveals information he only could have been given by those who died before he was born. His tale is inspirational for some and draws the wrath of others, who call it all a fabrication. That becomes a major source of tension in the film. This story is fodder for countless debates. What should not be

‘HEAVEN IS FOR REAL’

HHH Cast: Greg Kinnear, Kelly Reilly, Connor Corum, Thomas Haden Church Rating: PG, for intense medical situation Running time: 1 hour, 49 minutes

overlooked is the strong story of how a family must — along with this big event — deal with the normal hardships of life. Director Randall Wallace shows — as he did on “Secretariat” and “We Were Soldiers” — that the strength of a movie comes from a focus on family. Even when “Heaven is for Real”

slips into theological mode, Wallace quickly pulls the attention back to how the family members deal with all that’s being thrown at them. Too often in movies, a man of the cloth is either portrayed as being all-knowing or having fallen from grace. Greg Kinnear’s portrayal of Pastor Todd Burpo — the father of the young boy and the leader of the local church — is more human that most church leaders in film. He spends as much time worrying about the mortgage as he does preaching the Gospel. It helps that Wallace gets an equally strong performance from Kelly Reilly as Sonja, the minister’s wife. Wallace doesn’t

sacrifice the paternal and maternal parts of the couple’s lives in the name of their deep spiritual beliefs. Their financial struggles are very reflective of what’s going on across the country and that makes the movie more accessible to those who don’t care as much about the spiritual aspects. Wallace also manages to get a surprisingly good performance from 6-year-old Connor Corum. There’s a very natural feel to the way the youngster acts in scenes — especially when working with Kinnear — that helps fortify the family story. The film is not without flaws. The biggest mistake in the script by Wallace and Chris Parker is the decision to actually show on

film what the youngsters says he saw in Heaven. No matter how reverent the approach, the depiction of angels comes across as a cheesy special effect. And the appearance by Jesus looks like the worst moments from a church Easter production. More clarification would have helped, especially when it comes to how the boy’s announcement shakes the foundation of those who should have a rock-solid faith. All of this chips away at the solid family foundation on which Wallace had built his movie. These aren’t mortal sins. Wallace has created a movie that has a message that goes beyond preaching to the choir. That’s when the work is at its best.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, April 17, 2014 - E7

MOVIES MINI-REVIEWS Compiled from news services. Ratings are one to four stars. “Bad Words” — I loved the misanthrope played by Jason Bateman in his directorial debut, and you might, too, if your sense of humor is just sick enough. A loophole has allowed this big bowl of hate to compete against fourthgraders in a spelling bee, where he spews insults with a deadpan style that leaves his victims speechless. A pitchblack dark comedy. Comedy, R, 89 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “Captain America: The Winter Soldier” — The more screen time Chris Evans accrues as Captain America, the more engaging the performance. He’s terrific in this adventure, more complex and more compelling than in his 2011 debut. Amid well-choreographed action sequences and a couple of nifty twists and turns, we get another rock-solid chapter in the bigscreen story of Marvel. Scarlett Johansson, Samuel L. Jackson and Robert Redford co-star. Sci-fi action, PG-13, 136 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “Draft Day” — The general manager of the hapless Cleveland Browns (Kevin Costner) tries to coax some star power during the NFL draft in this sentimental, predictable and thoroughly entertaining movie. I would have liked to see less soap-opera subplot (a pregnant girlfriend, an egotistical team owner) and more inside football machinations. Jennifer Garner, Denis Leary, Frank Langella and Chadwick Boseman co-star. Sports drama, PG-13, 110 minutes). HHH “Ender’s Game” — A firstrate cast of wily veterans (Harrison Ford, Ben Kingsley) and fresh-faced youngsters (Asa Butterfield of “Hugo”) deliver a rousing, challenging adventure that should satisfy most young fans of the beloved sci-fi novel while keeping the adults engrossed as well. The simulated battles against scary aliens are beautifully shot and expertly choreographed. Sci-fi adventure, PG-13, 114 minutes. HHH “Frozen” — When a queen with icy powers (voice of Idina Menzel) accidentally freezes her kingdom, she runs away

and her intrepid sister (Kristen Bell) goes to find her. Sure to delight kids and captivate adults, Disney’s musical “Frozen” is the instant favorite for the animated feature Oscar. Animated musical, PG, 102 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “Hateship Loveship” — Kristen Wiig’s performance as a caretaker duped into believing she’s being courted is so beautifully muted it takes a while to appreciate the loveliness of the notes she’s hitting. She’s playing someone a bit, well, crazy, but her quiet resolve is kind of heroic. She’s pretty awesome. With Guy Pearce, Hailee Steinfeld, Nick Nolte. Drama, R, 101 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “Mr. Peabody & Sherman” — The old TV cartoon about a genius dog, his adopted son and their time-traveling adventures becomes a whipsmart, consistently funny and good-natured film with terrific voice performances led by Ty Burrell as Peabody. Lots of sight gags and goofy puns, with some clever one-liners intended for the parents in the audience. Animated adventure, PG, 90 minutes. HHH “Nebraska” — What a joy it is to watch Bruce Dern playing such a miserable SOB in the best role of his long career. Woody Grant is a crabby, boozy, sometimes delusional old guy on a road trip with his son (Will Forte) to collect a sweepstakes prize. Alexander Payne’s latest film is a modern American classic about the dynamic between a father from the generation that didn’t speak about its feelings and a grown son who’s still trying to get his father to explain himself. Stark, beautiful and memorable. Drama, R, 115 minutes. HHHH “Noah” — One of the most dazzling and unforgettable biblical epics ever put on film. Director Darren Aronofsky has delivered an emotionally involving and sometimes loony interpretation of the tale of a God-loving man (Russell Crowe, ferocious and razor-sharp) and his ark. Jennifer Connelly, Ray Winstone, Emma Watson and Anthony Hopkins round out a stellar cast. Biblical epic, PG-13, 131 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “Oculus” — Here is a horror movie that will reach out and

AT AREA THEATERS ANACORTES CINEMAS April 18-24 The Mountain Runners (NR): Friday, 7 p.m. (director and producer Q&A) Shatner’s World (NR): Thursday: 7:30 p.m. Transcendence (PG-13): Friday-Saturday: 1:00, 3:30, 6:20, 8:50; Sunday-Thursday: 1:00, 3:30, 6:20 Rio 2 (G): Friday: 1:05, 3:20, 9:00; Saturday: 1:05, 3:20, 6:40, 9:00; SundayWednesday: 1:05, 3:20, 6:40; Thursday: 1:05, 3:20 Captain America: The Winter Soldier (PG13): Friday-Saturday: 12:55, 3:40, 6:30, 9:15; Sunday-Thursday: 12:55, 3:40, 6:30 360-293-6620 BLUE FOX DRIVE-IN Oak Harbor 360-675-5667 CONCRETE THEATRE April 18-20 Noah (PG-13): Friday: 7:30 p.m.; Saturday: 5 and 7:30 p.m.; Sunday: 4 and 6:30 p.m. 360-941-0403 CASCADE MALL THEATRES Burlington For listings: 888-AMC-4FUN (888-2624386). grab that spot on your spine that produces all the chills. Thanks to the wonderfully twisted style of director Mike Flanagan and four terrific young actors playing brother and sister as children and adults, “Oculus” is one of the more elegant scary movies in recent memory. Horror, R, 105 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “Sabotage” — After stealing $10 million from a drug cartel, elite DEA agents become targets in a brutal, bloody, dark and at times gruesomely funny thriller. The team is played by a strong cast headed by Arnold Schwarzenegger, being typically Arnold, Sam Worthington, Olivia Williams and Terrence Howard. Action thriller, R, 109 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “RoboCop” — The 2014 version of “RoboCop” takes advantage of the superior technology available now, but doesn’t match up to the original when it comes to story and cast. As Alex Murphy, the wounded officer converted into RoboCop, Joel Kinnaman comes across as a wooden human being AND a wooden robot. Sci-fi action, PG-13, 118 minutes. HH

OAK HARBOR CINEMAS April 18-24 Transcendence (PG-13): Friday: 1:00, 3:30, 6:40, 9:10; Saturday: 10:15 AM, 1:00, 3:30, 6:40, 9:10; Sunday: 10:15, 1:00, 3:30, 6:40; Monday-Thursday: 1:00, 3:30, 6:40 Rio 2 (G): Friday: 1:10, 3:50, 6:50, 9:00; Saturday: 10:25, 1:10, 3:50, 6:50, 9:00; Sunday: 10:25, 1:10, 3:50, 6:50; MondayThursday: 1:10, 3:50, 6:50 Captain America: The Winter Soldier (PG-13): Friday: 12:50, 3:40, 6:30, 9:15; Saturday: 10:05, 12:50, 3:40, 6:30, 9:15; Sunday: 10:05, 12:50, 3:40, 6:30; Monday-Thursday: 12:50, 3:40, 6:30 360-279-2226 STANWOOD CINEMAS April 18-24 Shatner’s World (NR): Thursday: 7:30 p.m. Transcendence (PG-13): 1:25, 3:55, 6:30, 9:00 Heaven Is for Real (PG): 1:35, 4:10, 6:35, 9:15 Draft Day (PG-13): Friday-Wednesday: 1:40, 4:00, 6:45, 9:05; Thursday: 1:40, 4:00, 9:05 Rio 2 (G): Friday-Wednesday: 1:30, 3:50, 6:40, 8:55; Thursday: 1:30, 3:50, 6:40 Captain America: The Winter Soldier (PG13): 1:20, 3:40, 6:25, 8:45 360-629-0514

“Son of God” — The first feature in recent memory telling us a life-spanning story of Jesus Christ recounts the events with great reverence but, alas, is not a good movie. The special effects are just OK, and in the title role, Portuguese-born heartthrob Diogo Morgado hits a lot of wrong notes. Historical drama, PG-13, 138 minutes. H1⁄2 “That Awkward Moment” — Strives to straddle the line between breezy, bromantic comedy and “Hangover”esque guy humor – and fails

miserably on both counts. Talented, charismatic actors including Zac Efron and Michael B. Jordan star in a not particularly offensive but utterly unmemorable film. Comedy, R, 94 minutes. H1⁄2 “The Bag Man” — One can’t help but wonder what Robert De Niro and John Cusack saw in the script for “The Bag Man” that made two of our most interesting actors sign up for this irritating mess of a movie. It’s warmed-over Tarantino mixed with a third-rate tribute to the Coen brothers with a dose

of David Lynch-ian madness. Thriller, R, 108 minutes. H “3 Days to Kill” — The term “guilty pleasure” was invented for this kind of movie. Nearly every other scene is so audaciously terrible, you don’t know whether to cringe or chortle. But the star power of Kevin Costner as an aging CIA hit man turns schlock into pure entertainment. Action, PG-13, 117 minutes. HHH “The Railway Man” — Based on the true story of a British Army officer (Colin Firth) in World War II and the Japanese Imperial Army officer who tortured him. This is another prestige film that sometimes feels more like a history assignment than entertainment. Sometimes it’s hard to watch. It’s also hard to imagine anyone watching it and not being deeply moved. Drama, R, 108 minutes. HHH “Under the Skin” — An alien on Earth (Scarlett Johannson) cruises Scotland in a van, hitting on young lads, in a stark mood piece that drills into your psyche and will stay there forever. It’s weird, polarizing work, but I found it the most memorable movie of the first few months of 2014. Sci-fi drama, R, 108 minutes. HHHH “Veronica Mars” — This big-screen update of the Kristen Bell TV series, the result of a Kickstarter campaign, looks and feels like a glorified TV movie, with mostly unexceptional performances and ridiculous plot developments no more innovative than you’d see on a dozen network TV detective shows. Crime comedy, PG-13, 108 minutes. HH


E8 Thursday, April 17, 2014

Thursday, April 17, 2014 E9

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

ON STAGE in the Skagit Valley and surrounding area April 17-24

TUNING UP Playing at area venues April 17-24 SUNDAY.20

THURSDAY.17 Skip Hamilton: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., Big Rock Café, 14779 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. All ages. No cover. 360-4247872.

FRIDAY-SATURDAY.18-19 RICK SPRINGFIELD 8 p.m., Pacific Showroom, Skagit Valley Casino Resort, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. $60-$65. 877-275-2448 or theskagit.com.

CC ADAMS AND FRIENDS 4 to 9 p.m., La Conner Pantry & Pub, 315 Morris St., La Conner. 360-466-4488.

SATURDAY.19 RANDY OXFORD BAND 8 p.m., Conway Muse, Renaissance Room, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $12. 360-445-3000.

Paul Klein: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Jansen Art Center Piano Lounge, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360-354-3600.

FRIDAY.18 The Mike & Guy Show: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-4226411.

Rivertalk, Sky Colony: 7 p.m., Conway Muse, Renaissance Room, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $12. Proceeds benefit YMCA Oasis Teen Shelter. 360-445-3000.

Cahalen Morrison and Country Hammer: 8 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $8. 360-445-3000.

We Are Awesome: 8 to 11 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

2 Buck Chuck (acoustic classic rock, pop): 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Winners Lounge, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. No cover. 877-275-2448.

Artifakts, MTBTZ, Willdabeast: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $5-$7. 360-778-1067.

Marcia Kester: 7 to 10 p.m., Mount Vernon Elks, 2120 Market St., Mount Vernon. 360-848-8882.

Chris Eger Band: 8 p.m., Big Rock Café, 14779 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. All ages. No cover. 360-424-7872.

SATURDAY.19

Thursday.17

Friday.18

Saturday.19

Wednesday.23

THEATER

COMEDY

MUSIC

MUSIC

THEATER

Thursday.24

“Les Miserables” (musical drama): 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $20. 360-293-6829 or acttheatre.com. “1776” (musical): 7:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Drive, Oak Harbor. $18. 360-679-2237 or whidbey playhouse.com.

Comedy Nite: Emmett Montgomery, Cameron Mazzuca and host Randall Ragsdale, 8 p.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. $10. 360-755-3956 or anacortesH2O.com.

MUSIC

Rick Springfield: 8 p.m., Pacific Showroom, Skagit Valley Casino Resort, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. $60-$65. 877-2752448 or theskagit.com.

THEATER

“Les Miserables” (musical-drama): 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $20. 360-293-6829 or acttheatre.com. “1776” (musical): 7:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Drive, Oak Harbor. $18. 360-679-2237 or whidbey playhouse.com.

Rick Springfield: 8 p.m., Pacific Showroom, Skagit Valley Casino Resort, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. $60-$65. 877-2752448 or theskagit.com. “Les Miserables” (musical drama): 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $20. 360-293-6829 or acttheatre.com. “1776” (musical): 7:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Drive, Oak Harbor. $18. 360-679-2237 or whidbey playhouse.com.

Sunday.20 THEATER

“1776” (musical): 2:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Drive, Oak Harbor. $18. 360-679-2237 or whidbey playhouse.com.

Jansen Jazz Band: 7:30 p.m., Jansen Art Center Chamber Hall, 321 Front St., Lynden. $10. 360-354-3600.

Spoonshine: 6 to 9 p.m., Carpenter Creek Winery, 20376 E. Hickox Road, Mount Vernon. $7 cover. 360848-6673.

The Mike & Guy Show: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360422-6411.

THEATER

“Les Miserables” (musical-drama): 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $20. 360-293-6829 or acttheatre.com. “1776” (musical): 7:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Drive, Oak Harbor. $18. 360-679-2237 or whidbey playhouse.com. “Leading Ladies” (comedy): 7 p.m., Nooksack Valley High School Performing Arts Center, 3326 E. Badger Road, Everson. $8. 360-988-4754 or susan. postma@nv.k12.wa.us.

Ken Pickard and Zydeco Explosion: 7:30 to 10:30 p.m., Big Rock Café, 14779 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. All ages. No cover. 360424-7872.

Jill Newman (blues): 8 p.m., Conway Muse, Parlor, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $10. 360-445-3000.

Randy Oxford Band (blues): 8 p.m., Conway Muse, Renaissance Room, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $12. 360-445-3000.

Voyager (’80s metal tribute): 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Winners Lounge, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. No cover. 877-275-2448.

Polly O’Keary and the Rhythm Method: 7:30 p.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360755-3956.

Mattney Cook: 8:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. 360-766-6266.

SUNDAY.20 Gary B’s Church of Blues: Jam Night, 6 to 10 p.m., Conway Pub & Eatery, 18611 Main St., Conway. 360-445-4733.

Lane Fernando: 9 p.m. to midnight, Longhorn Saloon & Grill, 5754 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360766-6330.

Curse of the Black Tongue, Gypsters, Cat Bomb: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. 360778-1067.

WEDNESDAY.23 Daisy: 6 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/ Main, Conway. $5. 360-445-3000.

Ron W. Bailey: 5:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. 360-766-6266.

Desperate Measures (classic rock): 6 to 10 p.m., Castle Tavern, 708 Metcalf St., SedroWoolley. No cover. 360-855-2263.

Blues/rock jam with CC Adams and Friends: 4 to 9 p.m., La Conner Pantry & Pub, 315 Morris St., La Conner. 360-4664488.

Fischkopf Sinfoniker, Dead Air Fresheners, Derek M. Johnson, PRND: 7 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. 360-778-1067.

Fidalgo Swing: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

Margaret Wilder Band: 10 p.m., The Green Frog, 1015 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. acoustic tavern.com.

Bobby Lee McMurray: 6:30 to 8 p.m., Jansen Art Center Piano Lounge, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360354-3600.

THURSDAY.24 Knut Bell: 6:30 to 8 p.m., Big Rock Café, 14779 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. All ages. No cover. 360-424-7872.

Cheryl Hodge: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Jansen Art Center Piano Lounge, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360-354-3600.


E8 Thursday, April 17, 2014

Thursday, April 17, 2014 E9

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

ON STAGE in the Skagit Valley and surrounding area April 17-24

TUNING UP Playing at area venues April 17-24 SUNDAY.20

THURSDAY.17 Skip Hamilton: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., Big Rock Café, 14779 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. All ages. No cover. 360-4247872.

FRIDAY-SATURDAY.18-19 RICK SPRINGFIELD 8 p.m., Pacific Showroom, Skagit Valley Casino Resort, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. $60-$65. 877-275-2448 or theskagit.com.

CC ADAMS AND FRIENDS 4 to 9 p.m., La Conner Pantry & Pub, 315 Morris St., La Conner. 360-466-4488.

SATURDAY.19 RANDY OXFORD BAND 8 p.m., Conway Muse, Renaissance Room, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $12. 360-445-3000.

Paul Klein: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Jansen Art Center Piano Lounge, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360-354-3600.

FRIDAY.18 The Mike & Guy Show: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-4226411.

Rivertalk, Sky Colony: 7 p.m., Conway Muse, Renaissance Room, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $12. Proceeds benefit YMCA Oasis Teen Shelter. 360-445-3000.

Cahalen Morrison and Country Hammer: 8 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $8. 360-445-3000.

We Are Awesome: 8 to 11 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

2 Buck Chuck (acoustic classic rock, pop): 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Winners Lounge, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. No cover. 877-275-2448.

Artifakts, MTBTZ, Willdabeast: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $5-$7. 360-778-1067.

Marcia Kester: 7 to 10 p.m., Mount Vernon Elks, 2120 Market St., Mount Vernon. 360-848-8882.

Chris Eger Band: 8 p.m., Big Rock Café, 14779 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. All ages. No cover. 360-424-7872.

SATURDAY.19

Thursday.17

Friday.18

Saturday.19

Wednesday.23

THEATER

COMEDY

MUSIC

MUSIC

THEATER

Thursday.24

“Les Miserables” (musical drama): 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $20. 360-293-6829 or acttheatre.com. “1776” (musical): 7:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Drive, Oak Harbor. $18. 360-679-2237 or whidbey playhouse.com.

Comedy Nite: Emmett Montgomery, Cameron Mazzuca and host Randall Ragsdale, 8 p.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. $10. 360-755-3956 or anacortesH2O.com.

MUSIC

Rick Springfield: 8 p.m., Pacific Showroom, Skagit Valley Casino Resort, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. $60-$65. 877-2752448 or theskagit.com.

THEATER

“Les Miserables” (musical-drama): 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $20. 360-293-6829 or acttheatre.com. “1776” (musical): 7:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Drive, Oak Harbor. $18. 360-679-2237 or whidbey playhouse.com.

Rick Springfield: 8 p.m., Pacific Showroom, Skagit Valley Casino Resort, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. $60-$65. 877-2752448 or theskagit.com. “Les Miserables” (musical drama): 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $20. 360-293-6829 or acttheatre.com. “1776” (musical): 7:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Drive, Oak Harbor. $18. 360-679-2237 or whidbey playhouse.com.

Sunday.20 THEATER

“1776” (musical): 2:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Drive, Oak Harbor. $18. 360-679-2237 or whidbey playhouse.com.

Jansen Jazz Band: 7:30 p.m., Jansen Art Center Chamber Hall, 321 Front St., Lynden. $10. 360-354-3600.

Spoonshine: 6 to 9 p.m., Carpenter Creek Winery, 20376 E. Hickox Road, Mount Vernon. $7 cover. 360848-6673.

The Mike & Guy Show: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360422-6411.

THEATER

“Les Miserables” (musical-drama): 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $20. 360-293-6829 or acttheatre.com. “1776” (musical): 7:30 p.m., Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Drive, Oak Harbor. $18. 360-679-2237 or whidbey playhouse.com. “Leading Ladies” (comedy): 7 p.m., Nooksack Valley High School Performing Arts Center, 3326 E. Badger Road, Everson. $8. 360-988-4754 or susan. postma@nv.k12.wa.us.

Ken Pickard and Zydeco Explosion: 7:30 to 10:30 p.m., Big Rock Café, 14779 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. All ages. No cover. 360424-7872.

Jill Newman (blues): 8 p.m., Conway Muse, Parlor, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $10. 360-445-3000.

Randy Oxford Band (blues): 8 p.m., Conway Muse, Renaissance Room, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $12. 360-445-3000.

Voyager (’80s metal tribute): 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Winners Lounge, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. No cover. 877-275-2448.

Polly O’Keary and the Rhythm Method: 7:30 p.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360755-3956.

Mattney Cook: 8:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. 360-766-6266.

SUNDAY.20 Gary B’s Church of Blues: Jam Night, 6 to 10 p.m., Conway Pub & Eatery, 18611 Main St., Conway. 360-445-4733.

Lane Fernando: 9 p.m. to midnight, Longhorn Saloon & Grill, 5754 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360766-6330.

Curse of the Black Tongue, Gypsters, Cat Bomb: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. 360778-1067.

WEDNESDAY.23 Daisy: 6 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/ Main, Conway. $5. 360-445-3000.

Ron W. Bailey: 5:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. 360-766-6266.

Desperate Measures (classic rock): 6 to 10 p.m., Castle Tavern, 708 Metcalf St., SedroWoolley. No cover. 360-855-2263.

Blues/rock jam with CC Adams and Friends: 4 to 9 p.m., La Conner Pantry & Pub, 315 Morris St., La Conner. 360-4664488.

Fischkopf Sinfoniker, Dead Air Fresheners, Derek M. Johnson, PRND: 7 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. 360-778-1067.

Fidalgo Swing: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-588-1720.

Margaret Wilder Band: 10 p.m., The Green Frog, 1015 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. acoustic tavern.com.

Bobby Lee McMurray: 6:30 to 8 p.m., Jansen Art Center Piano Lounge, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360354-3600.

THURSDAY.24 Knut Bell: 6:30 to 8 p.m., Big Rock Café, 14779 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. All ages. No cover. 360-424-7872.

Cheryl Hodge: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Jansen Art Center Piano Lounge, 321 Front St., Lynden. No cover. 360-354-3600.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E10 - Thursday, April 17, 2014

REVIEWS: MUSIC, VIDEO GAMES Jon Langford & Skull Orchard

beries, drugs, parties, punishment, finding tomorrow — is bold and refreshingly plainspoken. Regrets? He’s had a few, as in “Here Be Monsters” “Sorry Momma,” but not enough to qualify his bounce, as in the aggressively catchy “I’m like a god with “Do It to Ya,” or slow his roll, as in “Really a thunderbolt, sitting Be (Smokin N Drinkin).” Guests such as on a big white cloud,” Drake, Schoolboy Q, and Kendrick Lamar prolific Welsh rocker Jon Langford sings on help make the Krazy party more sociable, “Here Be Monsters.” but the CD’s most crucial moments come The founding member of shambling when the rapper brings the fun, or faces his punk experimenters the Mekons and fears, alone. emphatic country-punks the Waco Brothn A.D. Amorosi, The Philadelphia Inquirer ers isn’t boasting of his protean powers. The song is “Drone Operator,” a typically psychologically astute tune about geopoli- Chuck E. Weiss tics and morality that concerns a technician “Red Beans who rains down destruction from the heav- & Weiss” ens and then has beer and watches basketball. The costs and benefits of violence Chuck E. Weiss has are much on Langford’s mind throughout hung with the cool cats “Here Be Monsters.” With guns, blood, all his life. In his youth, and business in his sights, he asks “Ooh, he played drums with Lightnin’ Hopkins what did you do in the war?/ Did you make and other blues legends. In the ’70s, he more money than ever before?” palled around with Tom Waits and Rickie With Skull Orchard, featuring violinLee Jones, who immortalized him in her ist Jean Cook, behind him, Langford is in first hit, “Chuck E.’s in Love.” Waits and a somewhat more folkish, contemplative Johnny Depp are the executive producers mood than usual this time out, although of the new “Red Beans & Weiss,” Weiss’ biting wit is never in short supply. And fourth album. really, even when weaving together various It’s a bluesy rock-and-roll record, with genres, he’s incapable of standing before a Weiss playing the role of a goofy, grizzled microphone and not rocking out. raconteur and with excellent, raw guitar Added bonus: Among other manic mul- work from X’s Tony Gilkyson (Depp titasking skills, the longtime Chicagoan is contributes to several tracks, too). Weiss an abundantly talented visual artist, and sounds a bit like Waits, especially on the the “Here Be Monsters” CD contains mini- unhinged blues shouts of “Dead Man’s reproductions of paintings created to corre- Shoes” and “Oo Poo Pa Do in the Rebop.” spond to each song on the album, including He can be silly on novelty songs like “That a cover of Viv Albertine of the Slit’s “Don’t Knucklehead Stuff,” but his boho-hipster Believe.” So buy a hard copy. attitude makes everything cool. n Dan DeLuca, The Philadelphia Inquirer

YG

“My Krazy Life” From N.W.A. to the first Snoop Dogg/ Dr. Dre pairing, the West Coast has been where gangsta rap and its grooving cousin G-funk rules. No surprise, then, that Compton’s Young Gangsta, best known to mixtape aficionados as YG, is gangsta’s freshest prince. His Def Jam debut has the sort of hard, evil edge that Eazy-E and Co. made into hiphop’s most dangerous vibe, with the sexy, weed-stained swagger of early Snoop. DJ Mustard’s beats and backgrounds both define and defy the genre, as YG leans into his work with confidence and a singsong flow. His narratives aren’t daring, but his evocation of a day in the life — rob-

and other ailments. Live, and on record, Price’s voice had remained a remarkable instrument, yet there are moments on “Beauty Is .” where age, for the first time, appears to limit his breath and range. But Foster arranges these love songs to capitalize on the tonal quality of Price’s voice. Set to string orchestrations accented by country instrumentation, Price sounds like a wise sage with a big heart and a gentle soul on touching songs such as Willie Nelson’s “It Always Will Be,” a romantic duet with Martina McBride on the standard “An Affair To Remember” and a second duet with Gill on the lovely “Until Then.” Graceful to the end, Price takes a final bow with an elegant collection that nicely caps a great musical legacy. n Michael McCall, Associated Press

Afghan Whigs

“Do to the Beast”

Maybe the most impressive thing about the Afghan Whigs’ new album “Do to the Beast,” the band’s first in 16 years, is how it effortlessly manages to bridge old and new. There’s a moment in the stunning “Lost in the Woods,” which starts out pianodriven and more similar to front man Greg Dulli’s more recent work in the Twilight Singers and the Gutter Twins, when John Curley’s bass kicks in and the indie-rock guitars arrive and it’s like spotting an old friend in a crowd. The memories come flooding back instantly. Dulli and Curley are careful not to have too many of those moments on “Do to the Beast.” Neither would be satisfied with n Steve Klinge, The Philadelphia Inquirer some sort of nostalgia trip to bring them back together. This is a decidedly forwardlooking album — from the way a club Ray Price beat drops in at the saddest point of “Can “Beauty Is . ” Rova,” thumping away as Dulli declares, “You don’t need me,” to the industrialThe late Ray Price tinged drums that drive “Matamoros” into titled his final studio Nine Inch Nails territory. recording “Beauty Is .” The journey begins with “Parked Outafter an opening duet side,” a grinding rocker with layers of guiwith Vince Gill that draws on the axiom tars forcing Dulli to sound desperate as he about the eye of the beholder. Music is similarly subjective, but it would be hard to sings of his obsessed love, and closes with the galloping “These Sticks,” which works imagine anyone not recognizing the sublime beauty of the late Ray Price’s singing: through all sorts of dramatics to end up a haunting revenge fantasy. He owned one of the richest voices and Considering everything Dulli has most emotionally expressive styles in counlearned from his other projects, it’s no wontry music history. der “Do to the Beast” makes the Afghan Price died in December, and when he entered the studio earlier in 2013 with pro- Whigs sound masterful as well as raucous. It’s also no wonder it will be one of the best ducer Fred Foster, he realized “Beauty Is. albums of the year. ” quite likely would be his last. At age 87, he had spent a couple years battling cancer n Glenn Gamboa, Newsday

‘Professor Layton and the Azran Legacy’ Platform: Nintendo 3DS Rated: E10+ Price: $39.99 Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

Professor Layton and his able assistants Luke and Emmy tackle another mystery in “Professor Layton and the Azran Legacy,” available exclusively for Nintendo 3DS. Pitched as the final release in the series, “Azran” serves as an excellent capstone to this franchise in which characters and story matter as much as the puzzle design. “Azran” follows up on archaeological leads left dangling in the last two “Layton” games. After encountering ruins left behind by the ancient Azran civilization, Professor Layton finds the most unbelievable relic yet: a “living mummy.” The mummy, actually a young girl named Aurora, inspires Layton to travel the globe on a hunt for lost Azran stones, all while staying a step ahead of the nefarious secret organization known as Targent. Functionally, “Azran” is much the same as ever. You walk through odd locales and pump passers-by for clues. Naturally, almost no one cooperates until you solve a puzzle. After five games, it’s a well-worn pattern, but it’s all so comfortable you are unlikely to mind. The only major change to the formula is that the middle portion of “Azran” lets the player choose the order in which to explore the stones’ locations. In the end, it hardly matters, because you have to do all of them anyway, but it is nice to experience multiple mini-mysteries in wildly different locations. There’s a wide variety of puzzles — logic, number, organizing, even some that seem only possible in a video game — but the in-game hint system does a great job of making sure you can figure them out. Even if you do not want to devote the time and brain power required to de-stump every stumper, the game is so good that it’s worth playing even if you cheat your way through using a strategy guide. “Azran” also makes use of the 3DS’ “StreetPass” feature to create a hiddenobject-style puzzle to share with other players. However, it involves serious amounts of backtracking as you search out specific hidden objects, so it’s probably the least interesting part of the package. Between the storyline, the side puzzles and unlockable content, “Azran” has hundreds of puzzles to chew on. New downloadable puzzles will be provided every day for a year, for free. n Joe Fourhman, Chicago Tribune


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, April 17, 2014 - E11

GET INVOLVED ART CLASSES FAMILY ART DAYS AT MoNA: The Museum of Northwest Art, 121 S. First St., La Conner, offers Family Art Days each month. Sessions are open to ages 5 and older at all skill levels and include guided walk-throughs of MoNA exhibitions. Limited to 15 participants per session. Workshops are free, but registration is required. 360-466-4446 or monamuseum. org. Next up: “Whimsical Animals with Mixed Media”: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. or 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday, May 10. Learn how to draw whimsical animals by using basic shapes as you work with watercolors, pens, pencils, paints and everyday materials from around the house. INTRO TO PAINTING ON SILK: This informal introduction to the Serti (resist) silk-painting method will be held from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Wednesdays, April 30 and May 7, at the Anacortes Center for Happiness, 619 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. Participants will paint a prestretched silk circle in class to take home. The class will also cover how to stretch your own silk, sourcing and more. $45, includes all materials. Register by April 22: 360-464-2229 or anacor tescenterforhappiness.org.

Studio D, The Armory (formerly Center House) at the Seattle Center, and at 1 p.m. Thursday, May 1, in the Mount Baker Theatre encore room, 104 N. Commercial St., Bellingham. Parts are available for several men and women in “Talley’s Folly” by Lanford Wilson, “Last of the Red Hot Lovers” by Neil Simon and “Becky’s New Car” by Steven Dietz. Paid and unpaid roles are available. Casting in more than one show is possible. Prepare two contrasting monologues, one comedic; no more than three minutes total. Auditions may also include cold readings from the scripts. Rehearsals will be held July 5-17; performances are July 15-Aug. 10, with varying days and times. Homestays/housing provided for non-Bellingham actors. For information or to schedule an audition, email alison.terry@mountbaker theatre.com.

Valley Boys & Girls Clubs. Children can participate in educational programs from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, June 23-Aug. 15. Programs that encourage academic success, good character and citizenship, and healthy lifestyles are designed around different themes each week. The cost for day camp and regular club hours is $100 per week plus the monthly membership fee, which starts at $25. A reduced rate is available if your family qualifies for the free or reduced school lunch program. Registration is limited and closes May 30. To learn more or sign up your child, stop by your local club, visit skagitraisesgreatkids.org/summer or call the club director listed below: Anacortes: Cory Oppel, 360588-9045. La Conner: Kendrick DavisPittmon, 360-466-3672. Mount Vernon: Vesta Anderson, 360-428-6995. Sedro-Woolley: John Garman, 360-856-1830.

SHELTER BAY CHORUS: Practices are held from 2:45 to 4:45 p.m. every Thursday at the Shelter FREE PARK ADMISSION: The Bay Clubhouse in La Conner. New members welcome. No need Washington State Parks and Recto be a Shelter Bay resident. 360- reation Commission will offer free admission to all state parks 466-3805. on Saturday, April 19, and on Earth Day, Tuesday, April 22. The MUSIC Discover Pass will not be required SKAGIT VALLEY MUSIC CLUB: to enter state parks, but is still The club welcomes performrequired to access lands managed ART WORKSHOPS: Artists ers, listeners and guests at 1:45 by the Washington Department of working in a variety of mediums p.m. Thursday, April 24, at Vasa Fish and Wildlife and the Departoffer workshops at Harmony Hall, 1805 Cleveland St., Mount ment of Natural Resources. parks. Fields, 7465 Thomas Road, Bow. Vernon. Come and sing, play wa.gov. For information or to register, call an instrument or just enjoy the 360-941-8196 or visit hfproduce. music. Free. For information, call TRAIL TALES: Friends of Skagit com. Next up: Marsha Pederson at 360-757-4906. Beaches will lead a series of infor“How To Start, And Not Stop, mative walks along the Tommy Making Art”: 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 Thompson Trail in Anacortes. For ON STAGE p.m. Sunday, April 27. Delve into information, visit skagitbeaches. ANACORTES OPEN MIC: 9:30 a treasure trove of art supplies org. Next up: p.m. Thursdays, Brown Lantern (charcoal, watercolor, ink and Ale House, 412 Commercial Ave., more), all while learning how to Interpretive Walk: Early AnaAnacortes. 360-293-2544. navigate through the perils and cortes Maritime Scene: Join Trail into a fluid practice of art makTales docents for a short “JourOPEN MIC: Jam Night: 9 p.m. ing. All skill levels welcome. $145, ney of Discovery” walk at 2 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. Thursdays, Conway lunch and all materials included. Sunday, May 4, by the flagpoles Pub & Eatery, 18611 Main St., at Cap Sante Marina, 11th Street Conway. 360-445-4733. AUDITIONS and R Avenue, Anacortes. Learn about Anacortes’ rich marine hisMBT SUMMER REP: Auditions RECREATION tory and the changes that have for the Mount Baker Theatre’s BOYS & GIRLS CLUB SUMMER taken place along the waterfront Summer Repertory Theatre will PROGRAMS: Registration is open on this one-hour, half-mile walk be held at 3 p.m. Wednesday, on a level paved walkway around April 30, at Theatre Puget Sound, for summer programs at Skagit

the marina to the Rotary Park Gazebo. Free. TULIP PEDAL: The 33rd annual Group Health/Safe Kids Skagit County Tulip Pedal will begin at 7 a.m. Saturday, April 19, at La Conner Middle School, 503 N. Sixth St. The Tulip Pedal includes 20-, 40and 60-mile courses around tulip fields between Mount Vernon and La Conner, near Samish and Padilla bays, and features views of Mount Baker and the Cascade foothills. Entry fee: $30 advance, $35 day of race. Jerseys are available for $15. Children ages 14 and younger ride free. Proceeds will benefit child injury prevention efforts in Skagit County. To register online, visit active.com. For information, call 360-428-3236 or visit safekidsskagit-island.com. PLANTING PARTY: Skagit Fisheries Enhancement Group will host an Earth Day Planting Party and Ivy Pull from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, April 19, at Edgewater Park, 600 Behrens Millett Road, Mount Vernon. Children must be accompanied by a parent/guardian; teens OK with written permission. Knee boots and gloves available. RSVP: 360-336-0172, ext. 304, or education@skagitfisheries.org. TRAIL WORK: The Skagit, Whatcom, Island Trail Maintaining Organization (SWITMO) seeks volunteers for trail work from April through October. The next work party will be held Saturday, April 19. 360-424-0407 or jdmelcher@comcast.net.

place where deep forest, swamp, rocky meadow, lake and bog islands converge.

THEATER “THE BETTER ACTOR”: An acting class for ages 18 and older: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays through April 26, in the Star Studio at the Whidbey Playhouse, 730 SE Midway Blvd., Oak Harbor. This course will offer basic acting instruction as well as more detailed training for the experienced actor, including a brief history of drama, how to use your talents to your advantage, how to audition, what happens during rehearsals and performances and more. There will be a class performance on the last day. $30, $15 playhouse members. For information, contact Stan Thomas at 360-675-0574 or the Whidbey Playhouse, 360-679-2237. FREE ADULT ACTING CLASSES: Anacortes Community Theatre offers free acting classes for adults from 10 a.m. to noon the third Saturday each month at 918 M Ave., Anacortes. Classes include scripted scenes and a variety of acting games, with a different topic each month. Each class is independent, so you don’t have to commit to every session. 360840-0089 or acttheatre.com

WORKSHOPS

PHOTOGRAPHY: Professional photographer Andy Porter will teach two photography courses at the Burlington Parks and Recreation Center, 900 E. Fairhaven FRIENDS OF THE FOREST Ave. $40 per course. Register one HIKES: Join the Friends of the week in advance at 360-755-9649 Forest for scenic hikes in the for- or email recreation@burlingest lands around Anacortes. Free. tonwa.gov. 360-293-3725 or friendsoftheacfl. Point-and-Shoot: 6 to 8:30 p.m. org. Next up: Wednesday, April 23, or 10 a.m. Little Cranberry Lake Hike: All to 12:30 p.m. Saturday, May 17. ages, 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, Learn how to compose an interApril 26. Take Georgia south off esting picture, whether you’re of Oakes and follow to the gravel photographing people, pets or road that leads to the Little Cran- landscapes. Class will cover how berry Lake parking lot. Start the to use lines, reflections and framspring wildflower season with a ing, and use of the various shoothike all the way around Little ing modes — landscape, portrait Cranberry Lake. The trail is rugand sports — to capture the best ged in places. Explore some of the images. Bring your camera and richest habitat in the forest — the user manual.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E12 - Thursday, April 17, 2014

AT THE LINCOLN THEATRE

HOT TICKETS SWITCHFOOT: April 18, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline. com. RICK SPRINGFIELD: April 18-19, Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Bow. 877-275-2448 or theskagit.com. SNOOP DOGG & WIZ KHALIFA: April 19, WaMu Theater, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster.com. MASSIVE MONKEYS: April 19, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. DARK STAR ORCHESTRA: April 20, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. SLEEPER AGENT: April 22, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showbox online.com. ELLIE GOULDING: April 23, Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or live nation.com. DRIVE-BY TRUCKERS: April 23, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. WHITE LIES: April 23, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline. com. THE 1975: April 24, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. FRANZ FERDINAND: April 24, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showbox online.com. ARLO GUTHRIE: April 25, Mount Baker Theatre, Bellingham. 360-734-6080 or mountbakertheatre.com. THE WANTED, MIDNIGHT RED: April 26, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. ONE MORE TIME: A Tribute to Daft Punk: April 26, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-7453000 or showboxonline.com. HIGGINS WATERPROOF BLACK MAGIC BAND: April 26, Columbia City Theater, Seattle. 800-838-3006 or columbiacity theater.com. SUDDEN VALLEY JAZZ SERIES: April 26/Nov. 15, Sudden Valley Dance Barn, Bellingham. 360-671-1709 or sudden valleylibrary.org. MASTODON: April 28, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline. com. PENNYWISE: April 29, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showbox online.com. IRA GLASS: May 3, Mount Baker Theatre, Bellingham. 360-734-6080 or mountbakertheatre.com. STEEL PANTHER: May 3, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or show boxonline.com. IRA GLASS: May 3, Mount Baker Theatre, Bellingham. 360-734-6080 or mountbakertheatre.com. THE GLITCH MOB: May 3-4, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showbox online.com. STEPHEN “RAGGA” MARLEY: May 6, The Showbox, Seattle. 206-224-5481 or aeglive.com.

712 S. First St., Mount Vernon 360-336-8955 n www.lincolntheatre.org

‘The Wind Rises’

7:30 p.m. Friday, April 18 3 p.m. Saturday, April 19 5:30 p.m. Sunday, April 20 7:30 p.m. Monday, April 21

PENNYWISE April 29, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxon line.com. WHO’S BAD: “The Ultimate Michael Jackson Tribute Band”: May 8, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. LED ZEPAGAIN (tribute to Led Zeppelin): May 9, The Showbox, Seattle. 800745-3000 or showboxonline.com. STEVE MARTIN & THE STEEP CANYON RANGERS: Featuring Edie Brickell: May 10, Mount Baker Theatre, Bellingham. 360734-6080 or mountbakertheatre.com. DANNY BROWN: May 10, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline. com. OLD 97s: May 12, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. PRISCILLA AHN: May 13, Columbia City Theater, Seattle. 800-838-3006 or columbiacitytheater.com. RIFF RAFF: May 14, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showbox online.com. MICKEY AVALON: May 15, The Crocodile, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or livenation. com. KARLA BONOFF & JIMMY WEBB: May 15, Mount Baker Theatre, Bellingham. 360734-6080 or mountbakertheatre.com. LIL JON - DJ SET: May 16, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or show boxonline.com. FLIGHT TO MARS: featuring Mike McCready of Pearl Jam: May 16, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. NICKEL CREEK: May 17, Moore Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or livenation.com. KYLE GASS BAND: May 18, The Crocodile, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or livenation. com. KISHI BASHI: May 20, The Showbox, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxon line.com. LINDSEY STIRLING: May 21, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showbox online.com. BACKSTREET BOYS, AVRIL LAVIGNE: May 22, WaMu Theater, Seattle. 800-7453000 or ticketmaster.com.

“In The Wind Rises,” Jiro dreams of flying and designing beautiful airplanes, inspired by the famous Italian aeronautical designer Caproni. Nearsighted from a young age and unable to be a pilot, Jiro joins a major Japanese engineering company in 1927 and becomes one of the world’s most innovative and accomplished airplane designers. Directed by Hayao Miyazaki; voice cast includes Joseph Gordon-Levitt, John Krasinski, Emily Blunt, Martin Short, Stanley Tucci, Mandy Patinkin, Mae Whitman, Werner Herzog, Jennifer Grey, William H. Macy, Zach Callison, Madeleine Rose Yen, Eva Bella, Edie Mirman, Darren Criss, Elijah Wood, Ronan Farrow and David Cowgill. Rated PG-13. $10 general; $9 seniors, students and active military; $8 members; $7 children 12 and under. Bargain matinee prices (all shows before 6 p.m.): $8 general, $6 members, $5 children 12 and under.

‘Life Cycles’

7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 19 “Life Cycles” tells a spectacular story of the bike, from its creation to its eventual demise. A visually stunning journey, with thought-provoking narration, “Life Cycles” uses 4k Ultra HD to document the many stories surrounding the mountain bike and its culture. Directed by Derek Frankowski and Ryan Gibb. A bonus film, “Follow Me,” takes a look at why we love to ride — the backyard sessions, ripping local trails, bike parks, epic road trips, heli drops.

‘La Boheme’

1 p.m. Sunday, April 20 Puccini’s moving story of young love is the most-performed opera in Met history. Anita Hartig stars as the frail Mimì in Franco Zeffirelli’s classic production, with Vittorio Grigolo as her passionate lover, Rodolfo. $23 adults; $19 seniors; $16 students with $2 off for Lincoln Theatre members; discounted season passes available.

Local travel

SHORT TRIPS: Mount Vernon Parks and Recreation offers travel oppor “FLORA & FAUNA OF THE AMAZON tunities for ages 12 and older (adult JUNGLE”: 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 23, supervision required for ages 18 and Anacortes Public Library, 1220 10th St., younger). Trips depart from and return to Anacortes. Hillcrest Park, 1717 S. 13th St., Mount Bush pilot/adventurer Karl Sune Ander- Vernon. 360-336-6215. sson highlights Colombia’s mostly uninhabited Amazon jungle. Learn about the NEW ENGLAND TRIP: The Oak Harbor unexplored mysteries, the threatened Senior Center is organizing a trip to New indigenous tribes and the biodiversity, England from Sept. 26-Oct. 3. For more with more species of plants and animals information, contact Pat Gardner at 360than any other ecosystem on Earth. 279-4582 or email pgardner@oakharbor. Free. 360-293-1910, ext. 21, or library. org. cityofanacortes.org. WWU FACULTY-LED TRAVEL PROGRAMS: Western Washington University will offer several educational travel programs this summer in Italy and Africa. Global Discovery trips are not for university credit or restricted to Western students. Trips include: Tuscany, Italy: Aug. 31-Sept. 14. Mount Kilimanjaro Climb and Serengeti Safari Extension: July 5-19. Serengeti Safari and Kilimanjaro Culture Tour Extension: July 14-26. Details: 360- 650-6409, globaldiscov ery@wwu.edu, wwu.edu/Global Discovery.

PASSPORT APPLICATIONS: The Anacortes Public Library accepts passport applications from noon to 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Wednesdays, and 1 to 4 p.m. Saturdays at 1220 10th St., Anacortes. Passport forms and information on fees and how to apply are available at travel.state.gov, or pick up an application and passport guide at the library. The Oak Harbor Senior Center accepts passport applications, by appointment, from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday through Friday at 51 SE Jerome St., Oak Harbor. 360-279-4580.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, April 17, 2014 - E13

Donna Tartt wins fiction Pulitzer for ‘Goldfinch’ D o n n a Ta r t t ’s “ Th e Goldfinch,” already among the most popular and celebrated novels of the past year, has won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction. One of the country’s top colonial historians, Alan Taylor, has won his second Pulitzer, for “The Internal Enemy: Slavery and War In Virginia.” Annie Baker’s “The Flick” won the Pulitzer for drama, a play set in a movie theater that was called a “thoughtful drama with well-crafted characters” that created “lives rarely seen on the stage.” The award for general nonfiction went to Dan Fagin’s “Toms River: A

w Festival

Story of Science and Salvation,” a chronicle of industrial destruction in a small New Jersey community that was praised by The New York Times as a “classic of science reporting.” Megan Marshall’s “Margaret Fuller: A New American Life,” about the 19th century intellectual and transcendentalist, won for biography; and Vijay Seshadri’s witty and philosophical “3 Sections” received the poetry prize. The Pulitzer for music was given to John Luther Adams’ “Become Ocean,” which judges cited as “a haunting orchestral work that suggests a relentless tidal surge, evoking thoughts of melting polar ice and rising sea levels.”

School, 503 N. Sixth St. The Tulip Pedal includes 20-, 40- and 60-mile courses Continued from Page E4 around tulip fields between Mount Vernon and La Greenhouse, 15806 Best Road, Mount Vernon. 360- Conner, near Samish and Padilla bays, and features 466-3821 or stanwoodarts. views of Mount Baker and com. the Cascade foothills. Proceeds will benefit TULIP SALE child injury prevention April 17-23: The Mount efforts in Skagit County. Vernon Lions Club sells Entry fee: $30 advance, fresh-cut tulips from 10 $35 day of race. Jerseys are a.m. to 5 p.m. daily at Lions available for $15. Children Park, 501 Freeway Drive, ages 14 and younger ride Mount Vernon. Tulips free. To register: active.com. will also be available for More information: 360delivery. Proceeds benefit 428-3236 or safekidsskagitcommunity residents who island.com. require financial assistance for eye and hearing exams, KIDS’ GIANT eyeglasses and hearing aids. GARAGE SALE 360-424-1888. Saturday, April 19: 9 a.m. to noon, Burlington TULIP PEDAL Parks and Recreation CenSaturday, April 19: The ter, 900 E. Fairhaven Ave. 33rd annual Group Health/ Toys, books, sports gear and Safe Kids Skagit County more, new and gently used. Tulip Pedal will begin at 7 Free admission. 360-755a.m. at La Conner Middle 9649 or burlingtonwa.gov.

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Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E14 - Thursday, April 17, 2014

OUT & ABOUT ART NEW OIL PAINTINGS: Renowned Northwest artist Alfred Currier captures local scenes in “Celebrating the Valley,” an April show of 25 new oils celebrating the tulip fields and migrant farmworkers, through April 25, at La Conner Seaside Gallery, 101 First St., La Conner. Open daily. lacon nerseasidegallery.com. IN THE ART BAR: Julie Bishop’s kaleidoscopes are on display through April 30 in the Lincoln Theatre’s Art Bar, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. Bishop creates her kaleidoscopes from her photographs of local Skagit images, including tulips and other flowers. 360-336-8955 or lincoln theatre.org. SOLO SHOW: Oil paintings by Sharon Eckhardt are on display through April 30 at the Rexville Grocery, 19271 Best Road, Mount Vernon. Eckhardt primarily paints landscapes, capturing farms and fields and small-town views in and around Skagit Valley. 360-466-5522 or rexville grocery.com. PASTELS & MORE: “A Spring Floral Festival,” featuring pastels by Bellingham artist Laurie Potter, continues through April 29 at Scott Milo Gallery, 420 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. Also showing: color photographs by Randy Dana, pastels by Patty Forte Linna and Barbara Durbin Wean, and oils by Anne Belov, as well as a new selection of glass work, custom wood tables, sculptures, jewelry and a selection of quilts by the Fidalgo Island Quilters Guild. Gallery hours are 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. 360-2936938 or scottmilo.com.

NEW WORK: A show of new work by Skagit Valley painter Dedrick Ward continues through April 27 at Smith & Vallee Gallery, 5742 Gilkey Ave., Edison. Comprised of strikingly beautiful Northwest skies and the mists and light it reflects, Ward’s work can be described as tranquil, particularly this current body of work that explores aspects of nocturnes, prompted by the paintings of James McNeil Whistler. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Sunday. 360-766-6230 or smithandvallee.com.

for prizes including a fourhour cruise around Anacortes and the San Juan Islands. Free. 360-755-3140 or anchorartspace.org.

FESTIVALS

HOLLAND HAPPENING: Enjoy arts and crafts, food, live entertainment and more Friday through Sunday, OUTDOOR SCULPTURE April 25-27, in downtown Oak Harbor. A family carEXHIBIT: The La Conner Outdoor Sculpture Exhibit nival will be held all three days. Saturday’s events is on display through include the Eagle 5K run March 1, 2015, at public and 1-mile Kids’ Eagle Dash locations around La Conat 8 a.m. and the Grand ner. The annual juried Parade at 11 a.m. down Bayexhibition features work by some of the Northwest’s shore Drive. The Street Fair most accomplished artists. will be open from 10 a.m. to For information, including 7 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. a map of the sculptures and to 5 p.m. Sunday on Pioneer Way. 360-675-3755 or works available for sale, hollandhappening.org. call 360-466-3125 or visit townoflaconner.org. EXHIBITIONS AT MoNA: RECYCLED ART: Check out a variety of artwork “OUTSIDE IN”: An exhi- Three new exhibits contincreated from recycled bition of artworks by Chris- ue through June 15 at The Museum of Northwest Art, materials from 10 a.m. to 4 topher Gildow, Thomas 121 S. First St., La Conner: p.m. Saturday, April 26, at Christopher Haag and “Lucy Mae Martin: the Concrete Center, 45821 Fred Holcomb continues Railroad Ave., Concrete. through April 20 at Anchor Hands On”: The artworks in the exhibition are All entries include at least Art Space, 216 Commerwrapped and sandblasted The Edison Eye Gallery will feature illustrations by 60 percent reused matericial Ave., Anacortes. The stones representing a new Jessica Bonin opening with a pie party from 5 to 8 als. Vote for your favorites exhibition addresses the p.m. Saturday, April 19, and continuing through May 4 in three categories: youth, intermediate place between side of the Skagit Valley artist’s heavy, creative at 5800 Cains Court, Edison. Check out Bonin’s adult and professional. Free then and now/outside and original illustrations created for “A Commonplace work life. Martin says, “I admission. 360-853-8784. inside and the travelers Book of Pie,” written by Kate Lebo. Attendees are who find themselves there. am inspired to engrave invited to bring a pie to share. 360-766-6276. relief-style because there ANCHOR AT MoNA: Curated by Greg Tate, the are millions of years Meet the people who make show includes landscape tucked behind the surface up Anchor Art Space from scenes from a moving car, FABRIC ART: Quilts by become line and all of it 5:30 to 7 p.m. Saturday, mixed media composed of of every beautiful, unique stone, and the sandblasting is her drawing. Bergner fabric artist Louise HarApril 26, at the Museum old ticket stubs and maps, reveals these layers. I enjoy employs pyrography tech- of Northwest Art, 121 First and collaged works on ris are featured in a show engraving Braille because it niques on sheets of metal that continues through St., La Conner. Anchor is modern forms that allude encourages total interaction mesh causing the visible April 30 at McCool Gala nonprofit art space in to a cultural past. Gallery with my work … I believe lery, 711 Commercial Ave., surfaces to shift, patterns Anacortes that promotes hours are noon to 5 p.m. that everybody should be appearing and disappearing education in the arts by Anacortes. The show also Friday through Sunday. able to enjoy the arts in features paintings by Anne as one’s gaze moves across hosting innovative exhibitheir own individual way.” the forms. Gallery hours Martin McCool, as well tions, workshops, musical SPRING ART SHOW: “Shapes of Abstraction are noon to 5 p.m. Friday as work by other gallery events, performance and Clayton James, Maggie through Sunday. 360-708from the Permanent Colartists. Gallery hours are poetry. Wilder and Marty Rogers 4787 or gallerycygnus.com. lection”: The exhibit offers 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday MoNA supporters are the featured artists in can check out the things the River Gallery’s annual a study of form and color through Sunday. 360-293PHOTOS & PAINTINGS: Anchor is doing, such of new acquisitions with an Spring Art Show, which 3577 or mccoolart.com. Check out the 1010 Art as the upcoming show continues through April 27 ekphrastic poem (descripUpstairs Red Planet show, “COAL,” a nonjuried at 19313 Landing Road (off tion of a visual work of art) “DRAW, STITCH AND open call for work around of Dodge Valley Road), by Kathleen Flenniken. BURN: EVE DEISHER AND by appointment, at Think Studios, 1010 Fifth St., Suite the controversial Cherry between Mount Vernon Curated by exhibitions LANNY BERGNER”: The 320, Anacortes. The show Point coal terminal and and La Conner. The show director Lisa Young. exhibition is on display coal trains. Visitors can also includes works by “John Cole: A Historical through May 18 at Gallery features photos by Thaddeus Hink and Barb Thrall contribute their opinion by more than two dozen other Perspective”: Recognized Cygnus, 109 Commercial, writing on a chalkboard in local artists. The gallery and paintings by Skagit La Conner. Deisher comas one of the Pacific Norththe shape of a giant piece is open from 10 a.m. to 5 Valley artist Bill Ball. bines paper, fabric and west’s leading landscape of coal. MoNA will prop.m. Wednesday through Complementary portraits thread as woven material artists, John Cole (1936Sunday. 360-466-4524 or becomes ethereal structure, for those who come in cos- vide wine and snacks, and 2007) painted in the region Anchor will host a drawing rivergallerywa.com. tumes. 360-770-4528. woven thread and wire for almost four decades.

‘PIE’ AT EDISON EYE


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, April 17, 2014 - E15

OUT & ABOUT Favoring abstraction over literal description, Cole’s distinctive, muscular style sublimely expresses the quintessential features of the majestic Northwest landscape — water, mountains and trees. This historical survey includes not just iconic landscapes, but important figurative and still-life works that are less known, and traces the major influences on the artist as reflected in his oils, prints and drawings. Co-curated by Lisa Harris and Sarah Harvey of Lisa Harris Gallery with support from Lucille Cole, the John D. Cole Estate, Patty Stonesifer and Michael Kinsley. The museum is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday and Monday. Free admission. 360-466-4446 or museum ofnwart.org.

Front St., Lynden. Boyle is the author of “What the Alder Told Me” and “Bamboo Equals Loon.” Bertolino is the author of 12 volumes and 15 chapbooks of his poetry and prose. 360-354-3600 or jansen artcenter.org.

artspace.org.

MORE FUN POET LAUREATE: The Skagit River Poetry Foundation will honor Elizabeth Austen, the state’s new Poet Laureate, during a public reception at 7 p.m. today, April 17, at the Museum of Northwest Art, 121 First St., La Conner. There will be wine, appetizers and readings of Austen’s work by both student and adult poets, including the author, whose works include “Every Dress a Decision,” “Where Currents Meet” and “The Girl Who Goes Alone.” Austen is a founding participant in the Skagit River Poetry Foundation’s Poets in the Schools program and is a frequent presenter at the biennial Skagit River Poetry Festival, which will take place May 15-18 in La Conner. Donations will be accepted at the door. skagitriverpoetry.org.

Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. Guest emcee Aleksa Manila Free; donations accepted. 360-416-7727, ext. 2, or mcintyrehall.org.

will benefit community radio station KSVU 90.1 FM. 360-853-8784 or 360853-8533.

STREET FAIR: The 30th annual Tulip Festival Street KIDS GIANT GARAGE Fair will take place from 10 SALE: 9 a.m. to noon Sata.m. to 6 p.m. Friday and urday, April 19, Burlington Saturday and 10 a.m. to 5 Parks and Recreation Cen- p.m. Sunday, April 25-27, CELEBRATE OUR ter, 900 E. Fairhaven Ave., on First Avenue in downOCEANS: View and discuss Burlington. Kids younger town Mount Vernon. Check the film “Ocean Frontiers: than 18 will be selling out hundreds of juried arts The Dawn of a New Era books, video games, bikes, and crafts vendors, live in Ocean Stewardship” at sports equipment, toys and entertainment, children’s 6 p.m. Tuesday, April 22, in more. Free admission. 360- activities, music, food and the Gary Knutzen Cardinal 755-9469. more. Free admission. 360Center multipurpose room, 336-3801 or mountvernon Skagit Valley College, 2405 DISCOVERY DAY: Sedro- downtown.org. E. College Way, Mount VerWoolley Public Library non. Sponsored by Skagit will host its first Discovery FILM SCREENING: Enjoy Valley College Program Day with an Earth Day the movie “What The Bleep Board, Friends of Skagit theme from noon to 3 p.m. Do We Know” at 7 p.m. Beaches and Skagit County Saturday, April 19, at 802 Friday, April 25, at the AnaMarine Resources ComBall St. Sedro-Woolley cortes Center for Happimittee. Following the film, High School’s Varsity in ness, 619 Commercial Ave., attendees can ask quesVolunteerism club memAnacortes. The award-wintions and discuss the film bers will offer children ning film explores the poswith representatives from stories, healthy snacks and sibility of a spiritual conlocal marine stewardship a short, engaging lesson nection between quantum programs. For information, LECTURES about nature and the envi- physics and consciousness contact Betty Carteret AND TALKS ronment. Discovery Days as it follows a photographer at 360-299-8553 or email WESTERN READS will continue on the third who encounters emotional friends@skagitbeaches.org. “RELOCATION: THE SPEAKER SERIES: Author Saturday of each month and existential obstacles IMPACT OF WORLD WAR and professor Naomi through August, featuring in her life and begins to II ON SKAGIT COUNTY”: Oreskes will speak at 4 p.m. MUSIC a different educational consider the idea that The exhibit opens today, VIOLA & CELLO: Enjoy today, April 17, in Western theme. Free. 360-855-1166. individual and group conApril 17, at the Skagit “A Magical Evening of Washington University’s sciousness can influence the Cello and Viola” from 7:30 County Historical Museum, Viking Union multipurECO-FILM FEST: As part material world. Admission 501 Fourth St., La Conto 9 p.m. Saturday, April pose room in Bellingham. of Eastern Skagit Earth by donation. 360-464-2229 26, at the Anacortes Center ner. Learn how World War Week, the Concrete TheOreskes is a professor of or anacortescenterfor II affected the residents for Happiness, 619 Comhistory and science studatre will host screenings of happiness.org. of Skagit County, includmercial Ave., Anacortes. ies at the University of “Who Bombed Judi Bari” ing those who were reloCellist Betsy Tinney will California at San Diego and “Back to the Garden” FIRST RESPONDERS cated to internment camps. at 6 p.m. Thursday, April and also the author of sev- be accompanied by Geli NIGHT: Children’s Museum eral books, her latest being Wuerzner on the viola. $10 Museum hours are 11 a.m. 24, at 45920 Main St., Con- of Skagit County and to 5 p.m. Tuesday through advance, $15 at the door. “Merchants of Doubt: crete. The first documenthe Imagine Children’s 360-464-2229 or anacortes- Sunday. Admission: $5 How a Handful of Scientary details environmental Museum will host a free adults, $4 seniors and centerforhappiness.org. tists Obscured the Truth activist Judi Bari’s lawsuit family night for Oso First children ages 6 to 12, $10 on Issues from Tobacco against the FBI after she Responder families from families, free for members was injured by a car bomb 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Friday, “UNKNOWN MUSIC”: Smoke to Global Warming.” For information, con- Enjoy an evening of experi- and children ages 5 and and accused of bombing April 25, at the Imagine younger. 360-466-3365 or tact Dawn Dietrich at west- mental music including her own car. In “Back to Children’s Museum, 1502 skagitcounty.net/museum. ern.reads@wwu.edu or visit a sound installation by the Garden,” filmmaker Wall St., Everett. All first Mount Eerie and perforwwu.edu/westernreads/. Kevin Tomlinson revisits a responders and volunteers DRAG SHOW: The Rain- group of back-to-the-land mances by Arthur Berwho have participated in bow Alliance, Associated trand and the Earwigs at POETRY EVENT: Cel“hippies” nearly 20 years the Oso mudslide rescue Students of Skagit Valley 8 p.m. Saturday, April 26, ebrate National Poetry after he first filmed them or recovery in any capacCollege and SVC Student Month with poets Anita K. at Anchor Art Space, 216 living off-the-grid, isolated ity and their families are Program Board will presfrom mainstream culture. welcome to attend this free Boyle, James Bertolino and Commercial Ave., Anaent the second annual Drag A question-and-answer cortes. $6. Proceeds will event. The museums ask the Sam Moore from 6:30 to benefit Anchor Art Space. Show at 7:30 p.m. Friday, session with the filmmaker public to please respect that 8 p.m. Friday, April 18, at April 18, at McIntyre will follow. $10. Proceeds this event is solely for first the Jansen Art Center, 321 360-755-3140 or anchor

responders and their families. 425-258 1006 or imag inecm.org. STAR PARTY: Explore the night sky and view distant galaxies, nebulas and planets beginning at dark Friday, April 25, at Fort Nugent Park, 2075 SW Fort Nugent Road, Oak Harbor. Island County Astronomical Society members will provide an assortment of telescopes for viewing. All ages are welcome. Free. The event will be canceled if cloudy. 360-679-7664 or icas-wa.webs.com. FANCY NANCY TEA PARTY: The Tea and Craft Party for ages 5 to 8 will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday, April 26, at the Burlington Public Library, 820 E. Washington Ave., Burlington. Children are encouraged to dress up in glamorous attire. Participants will make regal crowns, lovely purses and dapper boutonnieres to accessorize their wardrobes. Refreshments will be served. Free. Reservations required: 360-755-0760. FLIGHT MUSEUM OPENING: The Heritage Flight Museum’s grand opening celebration is set for noon to 4 p.m. Saturday, April 26, at Skagit Regional Airport, 15053 Crosswind Drive, Burlington. The event will kick off with a ribbon cutting and flyover at noon. The Cascade Warbirds will perform demonstration and formation flights in a variety of historic aircraft, weather permitting. On the ground, visitors can enjoy music by the Skagit Swing Band and check out vintage World War II, Korean and Vietnam era aircraft as well as a wide range of flight memorabilia and artifacts. Suggested admission donation: $8 adults, $5 ages 6 and older. 360-421-5151 or heritageflight.org.


S

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360 April 17 2014 full  

Arts, entertainment and recreation for Skagit Valley

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