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Skagit Opera presents ‘Pagliacci’ Page 3

Skagit Valley Herald Thursday September 20, 2012

Tuning up

Reviews

Roger Ebert

Joan Osborne plays the Pacific Showroom at the Skagit Valley Casino

Music: Kreayshawn, G.O.O.D. Video Games: “NHL 13”

‘End of Watch” one of the best police movies in recent years

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Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E2 - Thursday, September 20, 2012

NEW ON DVD THIS WEEK “The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel”: Seven British seniors travel to India to move into a retirement facility. Maggie Smith and Judi Dench star. Director John Madden blends the multiple plot threads so perfectly that he creates a cinematic tapestry that celebrates life and the wide assortment of those who have lived it. In addition, Madden shows that Hollywood’s obsession with youth is a smoke screen: It doesn’t matter what the age of the cast is as long as the material is first-rate and you have some of the best actors in the business to breathe life into it. “The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel” will attract older film fans because of the age of the cast. Don’t let age discrimination keep you from seeing this magnificent film that deals with the issues — love, life and learning — that all ages connect with. “Get a Life: The Complete Series”: Chris Elliott plays a 30-year-old who makes a living delivering newspapers and lives in an apartment above his parents’ (Elinor Donahue, Bob Elliott) garage. This wild sitcom aired on Fox for a year and a half before its untimely ending. What makes the show so unique — and the reason it could never draw a big audience — is that the story lines often took flights of fancy. There are no rules — especially when it comes to Elliott’s character, who dies a dozen times during the 35 episodes. If you like absurd humor, this is a must-see-and-own DVD. “Katy Perry: Part of Me the Movie”: Concert films are normally superficial excuses to promote an artist’s records. Directors Dan Cutforth and Jane Lipsitz do spotlight Perry’s energetic California Dreams Tour, but they never shy away from the dark emotional realities going on behind the scenes. It would have been easy to strip this movie down to its bubble-gum roots and leave out all of the highs and lows of Perry’s failed marriage to actor Russell Brand. The fact that the directors didn’t try to sanitize the production gives this concert movie some unexpected depth. “Steve Martin: Television Stuff”: A wild and crazy collection of Steve Martin’s various TV appearances. “Indiana Jones: The Complete Adventures”: The four films are available on one Blu-ray set. “Doctor Who: Planet of Giants”:

YOUR ARTS, ENTERTAINMENT AND RECREATION GUIDE TO WHAT’S GOING ON IN SKAGIT COUNTY AND THE SURROUNDING AREAS

Upcoming movie releases

Following is a partial schedule of coming movies on DVD. Release dates are subject to change: SEPT. 25 “Damsels in Distress” - Sony

This Weekend / Page 5

OCT. 2 “Dark Shadows” - Warner “People Like Us” - Disney OCT. 9 “The Raven” - Fox OCT. 16 “Moonrise Kingdom” - Universal “That’s My Boy” - Sony OCT. 23 “Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter” Fox “Savages: Unrated Edition” - Universal NOV. 6 “Javier Bardem 3-Film Collection” Lionsgate NOV. 13 “Brave” - Disney

The Doctor (William Hartnell) and his traveling partners are shrunk. “Supernatural: The Complete Seventh Season”: The two brothers continue to fight demons. “Hysteria”: Romantic comedy set in the 19th century. Hugh Dancy stars. “Joseph Campbell: Mythos — The Complete Collection”: Susan Sarandon hosts. “Suburgatory: The Complete First Season”: Jeremy Sisto stars in this father-daughter comedy. “D.L. Hughley: Reset!”: Uncut comedy special. “Salvation Boulevard”: A man is framed for murder by his pastor. “Thomas & Friends: Blue Mountain Mystery The Movie”: Thomas helps his Narrow Gauge engine friends. “Beverly Hills Chihuahua 3: Viva La Fiesta!”: George Lopez is a voice in this dog tale. “Silenced”: One man battles for justice. “Modern Family: The Complete Third Season”: ABC comedy about a very funny family. “Rawhide: The Complete Fifth Season”: Clint Eastwood stars in the western TV series. “The Magic of Belle Isle”: Morgan Freeman plays a man who loses his passion for writing. n Rick Bentley, McClatchy Newspapers

“To Kill a Mockingbird” at the Anacortes Public Library

Inside

SUBMISSIONS Email features@skagitpublishing.com vrichardson@skagitpublishing. com (recreation items) Phone 360-416-2135 Hand-deliver 1215 Anderson Road Mount Vernon, WA 98274

Travel............................................6-7 Get Involved.................................8-9 On Stage........................................ 10 Tuning Up..................................... 11 Music, Game Reviews............. 12, 14 Roger Ebert.................................... 16 At the Lincoln Theatre.................. 17 Movie Listings............................... 17 Movie Mini-Reviews..................... 17 Out & About.............................18-19

Mailing address P.O. Box 578 Mount Vernon, WA 98273 Online events calendar To list your event on our website, visit goskagit.com and look for the Events Calendar on the home page HAVE A STORY IDEA? w For arts and entertainment, contact Features Editor Craig Parrish at 360-416-2135 or features@skagitpublishing.com w For recreation, contact staff writer Vince Richardson at 360-416-2181 or vrichardson@ skagitpublishing.com TO ADVERTISE 360-424-3251


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, September 20, 2012 - E3

ON STAGE

S

By CRAIG PARRISH Entertainment/Lifestyles editor

The tragic tale of ‘Pagliacci’ comes to McIntyre Hall

kagit Opera, an organization that thrives on setting the bar high, takes on a potentially daunting, challenging production this week with “Pagliacci,” the legendary story of tragic backstage drama. Christina Kowalski, Gino Lucchetti, Adam Kim and Yuseok Oh play the lead characters in the tale of a traveling comedia dell arte troupe (“Pagliacci” is Italian for “clowns”). A clown has been betrayed by his wife, and yet he has to make the audience laugh, even as he continues to be tormented. The history of “Pagliacci” is lengthy, as it was written in 1892 and has been produced numerous times since then. Enrico Caruso’s performance of “Vesti La Guibba” has been an industry standard for opera since it was recorded. Stage Director Erich Parce said Skagit Opera likes to choose its productions based on a number of factors, not the least of which is a production’s familiarity. “We’re trying to hit most of the major operas first,” Parce said. “That way, people will have a chance to be exposed to famous operas. There’s a reason they work; ‘Pagliacci’ has a big audience appeal, and a big musical appeal.” Parce, who been directing for Skagit Opera since its formation eight years ago, lives “in the suburbs” near Renton and Issaquah. His initial opera experiences were on the stage; he sang with the Seattle Opera for 20 seasons and performed with the Metropolitan Opera in New York. He then returned to school at the University of Washington, earned his degree in directing, and directed Skagit Opera productions since its beginnings. The cast of “Pagliacci” performs at McIntyre Hall. Conducting “Pagliacci” is Dean Williamson. Parce lauded the cast and crew: “They would rival any company in the country,” Parce said. “I guarantee the operatic experience will be equal.” Parce made a point to emphasize the quality of McIntyre Hall, and said it’s one of his favorite venues. “The acoustics are perfect for operatic voices,” Parce said. “Audiences can really experience the subtlety of the singing and the intimacy of the acting.” n Craig Parrish can be reached at 360416-2135 or cparrish@skagitpublishing. com.

Craig Parrish / Skagit Valley Herald

Submitted photo

The chorus of “Pagliacci” performs.

‘Pagliacci’

When: 7:30 p.m. Sept. 21, 28; 2 p.m. Sept. 23, 30 Where: McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. Tickets: $15-$59. Pre-performance gala dinner on Friday, Sept. 21: $75. Information: 360416-7727, ext. 2, http://skagitopera. org/performances or www.mcintyrehall.org Note: Performed in Italian with English subtitles.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E4 - Thursday, September 20, 2012

MUSIC

POP CULTURE Q&A

Green Day, country, hip-hop highlight fall pop-music releases By DAN DELUCA The Philadelphia Inquirer

Just because people don’t buy music anymore doesn’t keep artists from releasing it. On Tuesday, Pink, honky-tonk singer Dwight Yoakam, indie harmonizers Band of Horses, and adult-alternative heroine Aimee Mann released albums, and the deluge continues from there. Besides the albums highlighted below, releases of note include two from the 93-year-old folk legend Pete Seeger (Sept. 25); British ambient folkie Beth Orton’s “Sugaring Season” (Oct. 2); and Beck’s “Song Reader,” a 20-song album that will include no actual recorded sound, just sheet music with lyrics. That stocking stuffer comes out Dec. 7. G.O.O.D. Music, “Cruel Summer.” (Released Tuesday.) Last year, Kanye West announced that the album by his posse on his G.O.O.D. Music label, Cruel Summer, would be out by spring. By now, the effort — with Big Sean, Pusha T, and 2Chainz, among others, as well as West — is so long overdue it’ll barely make the season it’s named for. Green Day, “Uno!,” “Dos!,” “Tres!” (On sale Sept. 25, Nov. 13, Jan. 13, respectively.) After two rock operas in a row — 2004’s “American Idiot” and 2009’s less memorable “21st Century Breakdown” — the California punk-pop trio’s new songs like “Oh Love” and “Kill the DJ” signal a return to the bratty bash-andpop approach of their ’90s recordings. Then again, Green Day is set to release so much music there’s no telling where Billie Joe Armstrong’s ambitions will take them. Bettye LaVette, “Thankful N’ Thoughtful” (On sale Sept. 25.) Soul woman Bettye LaVette toiled in obscurity after recording her single “My Man — He’s a Loving Man,” in 1962, when she was 16. Since she released the 2003 album “A Woman Like Me,” however, she’s been on a roll. LaVette has a new album, “Thankful N’ Thoughtful,”

Adamses weren’t related; colorized movies not on DVD By RICH HELDENFELS Akron Beacon Journal

and an autobiography (“A Woman Like Me”) coming out two days later. Mumford & Sons, “Babel.” (On sale Sept. 25.) The 2009 “Sigh No More” by London folkie foursome Mumford & Sons was one of the biggest out-of-the-blue blockbusters in recent memory, thanks to hit “Little Lion Man.” Can the band again take its hootenanny to the top of the charts? No Doubt, “Push and Shove” (On sale Sept. 25.) California ska-pop band No Doubt hasn’t released an album in 11 years. “Push and Shove” is said to pull from the Gwen Stefanifronted band’s influences of Jamaican rhythms and British synth-pop. Jamey Johnson, “Livin’ For a Song” (On sale Oct. 16.) Nashville’s leading country rebel’s new one is a tribute to the great honky-tonk songwriter Hank Cochran. Cochran’s songs — including “I Fall to Pieces” and “Make the World Go Away” — are sung by Johnson and a wish list of partners, including Merle Haggard, Alison Krauss, George Strait, Willie Nelson and Elvis Costello. Taylor Swift, “Red” (On sale Oct. 22.) The video for the lead single on “Red,” Taylor Swift’s fourth album, finds the pride of Wyomissing, Pa., telling a Jake Gyllenhaal look-alike that “We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together.” The song sold 623,000 digital units in its first week, breaking Ke$ha’s record for the most down-

loads in a week from a female artist. The album has a duet on “Everything Has Changed” with British songwriter Ed Sheeran, and seems poised to move Swift farther than ever from calico-dress country. The Coup, “Sorry to Bother You” (On sale Oct. 30.) It’s been six years since Oakland hip-hop outfit the Coup released its last album, “Pick a Bigger Weapon.” On the funk- and punk-flavored “Sorry to Bother You,” agit-rapper Boots Riley serves up a reminder that he’s the rare MC who can drive a political agenda while making you dance — and laugh. Big Boi, “Vicious Lies and Dangerous Rumors” (On sale Nov. 13.) The name of the album by the Atlanta rapper who’s one-half of OutKast was inspired by his grandmother, who told him it would make an apt title for a movie about her life. Big Boi (real name: Antwan Patton) is following 2010’s funky “Sir Lucious Leftfoot” with an album that features guest appearances by indie-pop band Phantogram, Swedish electronica outfit Little Dragon, and rappers A$AP Rocky and Kid Cudi. Alicia Keys, “Girl on Fire” (On sale Nov. 27.) The Grammy-grabbing pianist and songwriter’s fifth studio album is her first since she gave birth to her daughter, Egypt, and features collaborations with Bruno Mars and, intriguingly, producer Jamie xx of the xx.

Q: Are Nick Adams, the actor from “The Rebel,” and Edie Adams related? Are they still alive? A: As far as I can tell, they are not related. Nick Adams, born Nicholas Adamschock in Nanticoke, Pa., was also known for “Rebel Without a Cause” and received an Oscar nomination for his performance in “Twilight of Honor.” He was 36 when he died in 1968 of a prescriptiondrug overdose. Edie Adams, born Edith Elizabeth Emke in Kingston, Pa., was known for Muriel cigar commercials, singing, acting and her marriage to brilliant comic Ernie Kovacs. She died in 2008 of cancer and pneumonia; she was 81. Q: What has happened to new episodes of “Cops?” Has the series been discontinued? A: Fox has decided, at least for the fall, to concentrate on sports programming in prime time on Saturdays. But it has said “Cops” will return at midseason. Q: I have really enjoyed “Law & Order: UK” on BBC America. Do you know if there will be any new episodes soon? A: BBC America has aired all 39 completed episodes of the series, a British adaptation of the American program. But production will begin on another eight episodes in November, apparently for telecast in 2013, and I would expect those to make their way stateside eventually. Q: Will “Political Animals”

be back for another year? A: The drama starring Sigourney Weaver was announced as a “limited series event,” or miniseries, which would suggest that it aimed to conclude with its final episode. Still, it left quite a few plot threads hanging in its finale, making a sequel possible (and there have been sequels to miniseries). But at this writing, USA has not yet announced another season. Q: Back in the ’90s several Warner Bros. colorized movies (including “Casablanca” and “Yankee Doodle Dandy”) were televised and were available on VHS. They were extremely well done and look like real Technicolor. Any available now on DVD? I have the “Casablanca” on VHS but it’s starting to deteriorate. A: Colorization of blackand-white films has been possible for a long time and is still in use for some productions. But the debate over the process was at its height in the late ’80s when entertainment mogul Ted Turner began colorizing some Warner Bros. classics for telecast on his WTBS station, including “Yankee Doodle Dandy” in 1986 and “Casablanca” two years later. It was believed by Turner and some others that a sizable portion of the TV audience did not like watching movies in black-and-white but would watch them in color. Still, film critics, historians and devotees were horrified — and I thought the color generally looked awful.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, September 20, 2012 - E5

THIS WEEKENDin the area TAILGATE PARTY

The Burlington-Edison Education & Alumni Foundation will hold its annual tailgate party Bar-B-Que before the home football game against Ferndale from 5 to 7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 21, at the entrance to Kirkby Field, 301 N. Burlington Blvd., Burlington. Enjoy freshly grilled hamburgers and hot dogs with chips and soda for just $5. Proceeds will benefit the Foundation’s scholarship fund. For information, contact Patti Chambers at 360-929-8856.

GYPSY JAZZ Djangofest Northwest will feature

a full lineup of music workshops and performances Wednesday through Sunday, Sept. 19-23, at the Whidbey Island Center For The Arts and Langley Middle School, Langley. For information, tickets and a complete schedule of events, call 800-638-7631 or visit www.wicaonline.com/DFNW2012.html.

FALL BIRDING FIELD TRIP

FALL FILM SERIES 7 p.m. Fridays, at the Anacortes Public Library, 1220 10th St., Anacortes. Movie man Nick Alphin, Academy Award nominee and career Hollywood sound man, will introduce and share insights about each selection. Free. 360-293-1910, ext. 21, or library. cityofanacortes.org.

Next up: n Sept. 21: “To Kill a Mockingbird”: Based on Harper Lee’s beloved novel, Gregory Peck stars as a small town Alabama lawyer defending a black man charged with raping a white woman in the 1930s. Winner of three Oscars.

Tour Stanwood and Camano Island birding hotspots from 9 a.m. to noon Sunday, Sept. 23, starting from the Terry’s Corner Park and Ride, 860 N. Sunrise, Camano Island. Pam Pritzl of Skagit Audubon and Habitat Steward Roxie Rochat will lead the tour. Meet at 9 a.m. to form carpools and get directions. Tour will take place rain or shine. Dress in layers appropriate for the weather, wear sturdy shoes and bring binoculars or scopes. No dogs. Discover Pass may be required at some stops on the tour, but carpooling is available. For information, call 360-387-7024 or visit www.camanowildlifehabitat.org.

“RUN TILL YOU WINE”

Half Marathon and 5K/10K Fun Run/Walk: Saturday, Sept. 22, at Challenger Ridge Winery, 43095 Challenger Road, Concrete. Registration opens at 8 a.m.; half marathon begins at 9 a.m., followed by 5K/10K run/walk at 10 a.m. Live music by Scratch Daddy from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Barbecue available from 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Registration: Half marathon: $35, includes a shirt and bottle of wine at the finish line. 5K/10K: $20, includes shirt and glass of wine at finish line. Ages 12 to 20: $10, no shirt, no wine. 425-422-6988 or www.challengerridge.com.


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E6 - Thursday, September 20, 2012

TRAVEL

Winslow Homer’s Maine studio to open to public By CLARKE CANFIELD Associated Press

SCARBOROUGH, Maine — The studio where painter Winslow Homer derived inspiration on Maine’s craggy coast and produced some of his most notable seascapes isn’t heated by wood or illuminated by oil lamps the way it was in Homer’s day. But in most other ways, the studio has now been restored to what it was like when Homer lived there, from 1883 until his death in 1910, following a multiyear, $2.8-million restoration by the Portland Museum of Art. With the renovation complete, the museum will begin offering public tours this month, giving visitors a firsthand look at where Homer became one of America’s foremost 19th-century painters and an esteemed figure in American art. Museum officials unveiled the studio Monday to members of the media and museum supporters. There are only a small number of studios of famous artists — Andrew Wyeth, Jackson Pollock, Claude Monet and Frederic Church among them — that are open to the public and allow people to experience what the artist experienced in his day, Museum Director Mark Bessire said. The Homer studio, located on the Prouts Neck peninsula 12 miles south of Portland, is significant because it’s where Homer’s artwork matured and where he created some of his masterpieces, he said. “When Homer comes to Maine, Maine changes the way he painted,” Bessire said. “You have artist studios where artists worked, but then you have artist studios where the place actually changed the artist.” Homer was born and raised in Boston and moved to New York as a young man. In his mid-40s, he moved to his family’s estate in Maine and lived in a remodeled carriage house with a second-story balcony and an unobstructed view

Photos by Clarke Canfield / AP

Winslow Homer's seaside studio is on display Monday in Scarborough, Maine. The home where Homer lived and worked from 1883 until his death in 1910, is opening to the public following a multiyear, multimillion-dollar renovation by the Portland Museum of Art. Workers restored the exterior to its original colors, replaced the second-floor balcony, stabilized the foundation and replaced windows. The home will be open for public tours on Sept. 25. of the ocean. Homer was already an accomplished artist, but it was here where he created his well-known works focusing on man versus nature, showing the angry tumultuous ocean crashing against shore and weather-beaten fishermen. After Homer died, the studio passed down among family members until it was inherited by Homer’s great-grandnephew, Charles “Chip” Homer Willauer, who for many years lived in the studio in the summer months. Willauer, 74, was concerned about the future of the building,

worried that it would deteriorate over time and be lost to future generations. In 2006, he sold the structure to the Portland Museum of Art for $1.8 million. The museum spent $2.8 million renovating the structure, including stabilizing the foundation, replacing the balcony, restoring a chimney, replacing windows and returning the exterior to its original green with brown trim. In all, the museum has raised $10.6 million in a fundraising campaign to pay for the purchase and renovation, an endowment, educational programs and exhibitions.

A plaque on display Monday in Scarborough, Maine, shows that Winslow Homer’s studio was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1966.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, September 20, 2012 - E7

TRAVEL Willauer said he’s thrilled with the finished work and happy he doesn’t have to worry about the future of a building that was instrumental in Homer’s life. But he’s not so sure his great-greatuncle would have understood all the attention. “I think that Winslow, who liked his privacy, would have been surprised by all the interest,” Willauer said outside the studio. The studio will be open for public tours beginning

Local travel

Sept. 25. To celebrate the opening, the museum is presenting an exhibition, “Weatherbeaten: Winslow Homer and Maine,” featuring 38 of Homer’s oils, watercolors and etchings that he produced in his studio. The exhibition opened on Saturday and runs through Dec. 30. The museum will offer three tours of the studio a day, 10 people per tour, in the spring and the fall. Tickets are $55 per person and

$30 for museum members. Details can be found at www.portlandmuseum.org. Because there’s no public parking on Prouts Neck and the studio is located in a private residential neighborhood, visitors will have to take a shuttle van from the museum. Fewer than 4,000 people are expected to visit each year. “This is a shrine,” Bessire said. “This is really about a pilgrimage, and we always meant it to be that way.”

$2,349. Add $299 for an extension tour to Playa Bonita Beach Resort. Trip includes Bellingham to Seatac bus transfer, DAY TRIPS: Camano Center offers sevroundtrip airfare, all lodging, eight meals, eral upcoming trips for seniors and others, transit taxes and fees, and escort. departing from and returning to Camano n Victoria, B.C.: Dec. 4-6. Get a glimpse Center, 606 Arrowhead Road, Camano of British Columbia during the holiday seaIsland. 360-387-0222 or www.camanocen son. See the Butchart Gardens decorated ter.org. in lights, enjoy a city bus tour and admisn WWU Planetarium, Bellingham: Tues- sion to the Royal B.C. Museum, as well as day, Oct. 16. Enjoy a special showing on free time in the city. $399-$489. Includes Indian star lore, then off to lunch and shop- roundtrip transportation, ferry rides, twoping. $22-$27. Pay by Oct. 1. night hotel lodging, hot springs, two breakn Seattle Luau Cruise: Thursday, Oct. fasts, one dinner, city tour and admissions 18. Wear your best Hawaiian attire and to the Gardens, Museum, Festival of Lights enjoy a luau feast. $52-$57. Pay by Sept. and Festival of Trees. Final payment due 25. Nov. 2. n Dickens Carolers Lunch Cruise: Tuesday, Dec. 11. Enjoy a holiday feast accom“VIETNAM AND LAOS: Making a Difpanied by Christmas carolers. $52-$57. ference as a Volunteer While Traveling”: Pay by Nov. 26. With Analeise Volpe: 7 to 9 p.m. today at the Whatcom Museum Old City Hall, 121 ESCORTED TOURS: The Whatcom Coun- Prospect St., Bellingham. Volpe shares ty Tour Program offers a variety of day trips her impressions about the countries and and longer tours, with most trips departpeople of Vietnam and Laos and how voling from and returning to the Bellingham unteering helped her meet “the locals,” Senior Activity Center, 315 Halleck St., Bell- experience their culture and create lasting ingham. For information or to register: 360- friendships. $3 suggested donation, free 733-4030, press #, ext. 47015, or wccoa. for museum members. 360-778-8930 or org/index.php/Tours. www.whatcommuseum.org. n Britannia Mine & Train Museum: 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 27. PASSPORT APPLICATIONS: The AnaEnjoy living history at the Britannia Mine cortes Public Library accepts U.S. passport Museum. This tour features an underapplications from noon to 6:30 p.m. Tuesground train ride, gold panning pavilion, days and Wednesdays, and 1 to 4 p.m. visit to the historic mill building, lunch at Saturdays at 1220 10th St., Anacortes. the Squamish River, a film featuring climb- Passport forms and information on fees ing history and the Stawamus Chief Moun- and how to apply are available online at tain, and time at the Squamish Adventure http://travel.state.gov or pick up an appliCenter. $95-$100. Passport or enhanced cation and passport guide at the library. driver’s license required. Trip includes transportation, museum admissions, CRUISE SHOW: Learn about a variety of underground train ride, lunch, Chief Mounvacation cruise options from 2 to 7 p.m. tain feature film and escort. Thursday, Oct. 11, at the Best Western n Panama Rainforest and Rail ExploCottontree Inn, 2300 Market St., Mount ration: Nov 8-14. Enjoy the views at the Vernon. AAA Travel experts will be joined Panama Canal, take a ride on the Panama by representatives from top cruise lines to Canal Railway, discover beautiful plants discuss cruising trends, offer tips for travand animals in the tropical rainforest, and elers and reveal exclusive booking deals. discover historic Spanish ruins. $1,949Free. RSVP: 360-848-2090.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E8 - Thursday, September 20, 2012

GET INVOLVED ART

ages 11 and younger. Next up: ART SALE: Noon to 4 n Exploring the Circle: p.m. Saturday, Sept. 29, Noowith Barbara Silverman kachamp Hills, 17193 ChiSummers: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. nook Court, Mount Vernon. or 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. Altered Lives Art Studio 20. Discover the possibilities is cleaning house. Mixedmedia works by studio artist of the circular form using Susan Stopinski in sizes 12 x watercolor, collage and 16 to 16 x 20 and canvas col- pastel. n Make a Star Book and lages in 8 x 10. All artwork Ornament: with Mary Quin$15 to $275, checks or cash trall: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. or 2 to only. Proceeds benefit the 4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 17. Use local Children of the Valcollage techniques to create ley program as well as the Damian Carmona Primaria unique papers, then turn Escuela in Mexico. 360-422- them into a one-of-a-kind book, which doubles as a 6015. holiday decoration.

a simple vase or sphere out of clay, then turn it into a colorful mosaic piece using fragments of ceramic tiles, mirror, potter, found objects and trinkets. $190 includes most materials. n Introduction to Mosaics: 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 15-16. Students will make a colorful mosaic item using fragments of ceramic tile, mirror, trinkets and found objects. All materials are provided, but students are encouraged to bring their own special mementos to use in the mosaic. $120. n Parent & Child Clay CALL FOR VINTAGE ART CLASSES: Choose Workshop: 9:30 a.m. to 3 PHOTOS: The city of Sedrofrom painting, photography, p.m. Saturday, Sept. 22. A Woolley needs some help fiber and 3D art workshops child and their special adult from the public to finish taught by professional artists will learn basic hand-builda collection of photos of at the Pacific NorthWest Art ing techniques and surface former mayors to mount School, 15 N.W. Birch St., decoration while working on the walls at City Hall. Good quality photos are still Coupeville. For information together on animal-inspired mugs and plates. Pieces needed for six of the town’s and a complete schedule: 360-678-3396 or www.pacific will be fired and ready for 17 former mayors. Their northwestartschool.com. pickup two weeks after the names and the dates they workshop. For children ages served are: Norris Ormsby, ART CLASSES: Dakota 6 to 12 and adults of all ages. 1898-1899; William Curry, Art offers a variety of art $75 per parent/child pair. 1915; Frank Douglass, 1916classes and workshops at Includes clay, glazes and fir1918; Paul Rhodius, 191917873 Highway 536, Mount ing. john 1920; L. Britchford, 1931Vernon. 360-416-6556, ext. 1932; and Gus Gilbertson, 5, or www.dakotaartcenter. ART CLASSES: Sign up 1939-1944. The photos will for a variety of art classes at be scanned to create prints, com. A Guilded Gallery (formerthen returned to their ownCLAY CLASSES: Ceramic ly Gallery by the Bay), 8700 ers. Contact City Supervisor 271st St. NW, Stanwood. To Eron Berg at 360-855-9922. artist Sue Roberts offers a variety of classes and register, stop by the Stanworkshops at Tower Arts wood Camano Art Guild’s ART CLASSES Studio, 5424 S. Shore Drive, cooperative gallery from FAMILY ART DAYS Guemes Island. For infor10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday AT MoNA: Skagit Artists mation, call 360-770-6140 or through Saturday. 360-629Together and the Museum visit www.towerartsstudio. 2787 or www.stanwood of Northwest Art offer Fam- com. camanoarts.com. ily Art Days each month Next up: n Life Drawing: 11 a.m. at MoNA, 121 S. First St., n Ceramics For Everyto 2 p.m. Mondays. Draw La Conner. Sessions are one: The six-week class will from a live model. Poses open to all ages and skill meet from 6:15 to 8:30 p.m. are mixed, gesture, short levels and include guided Tuesdays, beginning Sept. 4. and long poses. Sessions are walk-throughs of MoNA Class will focus on making facilitated by experienced exhibitions. Limited to 15 functional ware using a vari- professional artists. No participants per session. To ety of hand-building techinstruction provided. $12 register: 360-466-4446, ext. niques. Open to all levels of per drop-in session or $10 a 108, or FAD@museumofn- experience. $190, includes week when you sign up for a wart.org. Information: www. materials. month at a time. museumofnwart.org. Workn Mosaic Garden Forms: n Introductory Glassshops are free with museum The class will meet for six blowing Session: with Mark admission. Admission: $8 weeks from 6:15 to 8:30 p.m. Ellinger: Choose a day adults, $5 seniors, $3 stuMondays, beginning Sept. and time, weekdays from 4 dents, free for members and 10. Learn how to hand-build to 6 p.m. or 6 to 8 p.m., at

Glass Quest Studio near Stanwood. Create your own blown glass float or ornament. $60. n Watercolor For Young People: with Bobbi Samples: 2:45 to 4:45 Fridays, Sept. 14-Oct. 26. Learn to paint landscapes in color. For ages 8 and older. $55 plus $7 supply fee. n Watercolors: with Michele Cooper: 5-week session from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursdays, beginning Sept. 13. Subjects will include the natural landscape, still life, flowers, coastal scenes, water and buildings, with helpful handouts on techniques and design. All levels of experience welcome. $150. n Needle Felting: with Sharon Dodge: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 22. Make your own needle felted purse. $45 plus $25 materials fee. n Abstract Painting: with Dotti Burton: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesdays, Sept. 19-Oct. 10. Develop your own style, while growing your skills with new ideas. $115. n Seasonal Folk Art Painting: with Cindy Ellinger and Pati Pontikis: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 29. This “make & take” class will feature rotating seasonal projects. $30-$50 depending on project selected. Preregistration required. n Silversmithing and Jewelry Designing: with Liane Redpath Worlund: 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 29. Each student will leave with two pairs of unique earrings, one silver, one copper. $55 plus $40 materials fee.

all three. Preregistration required: 360-464-2229 or www.anacortescenterfor happiness.org. Next up: n MAIL ART 101: Sept. 23. Using a variety of papers and embellishments, participants will make whimsical, one-of-a-kind pieces of art that can be sent via snail mail. n INSPIRATIONAL PRAYER FLAGS: Oct. 14. Combine beautiful papers, ribbons and heartfelt words of gratitude to create unique prayer flag garlands to adorn your home. n LITTLE BOOKS: Nov. 18. Create and embellish three different little books: a perfect little photo album, a notebook made with recycled papers and a third one that opens up to form a star. WATERCOLOR FOR KIDS!: 4:30 to 6 p.m. Wednesdays, Oct. 10-24, and Tuesday, Oct. 30, at the Burlington Community Center Craft Room, 1011 Greenleaf Ave., Burlington. Kids ages 7 to 13 will learn brush handling, color mixing and more. $40 plus $20 onetime supply fee payable to instructor. Register by Oct. 3, with Burlington Parks and Recreation: 360-755-9649.

PLEIN AIR PAINTING: With Thomas Wood: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 22-23, at Woodstock Farm, located on Chuckanut Drive, south of Bellingham. Wood will offer demonstrations and individual instruction. The class will cover mediums, underpainting, choosing your palette, color mixing, composition and qualities of brushes and PAPER PLAYSHOPS: Join paints. $115, $100 Whatcom Kari Bishay to get creative Museum members. Register and “play with stuff” at the by Sept. 17 through BellingAnacortes Center for Hap- ham Parks and Recreation, piness, 619 Commercial 3424 Meridian St., or call Ave., Anacortes. Workshops 360-778-7000. are held from 2 to 4 p.m. Sundays. All materials are AUDITIONS provided. $15 each, $40 for CALL FOR SINGERS:

Cantabile of Skagit Valley will hold auditions after its regular rehearsal from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Monday, Sept. 24, at United Methodist Church, 1607 E. Division St., Mount Vernon. The chorus currently has openings for talented singers, especially males. Interested singers are invited to attend the rehearsal and participate in a short audition afterward. Singers will be asked to demonstrate basic sightreading and ear-training skills, do some a cappella singing and show their vocal range and ability. Other audition times may be scheduled if needed. For information, contact Cantabile Artistic Director Lynne Rheinhardt at lynnt2001@ msn.com. CALL FOR YOUNG MUSICIANS: The Mount Vernonbased Fidalgo Youth Symphony offers opportunities for young musicians ages 5 to 21 to study and perform orchestral music. For information, including tuition costs and rehearsal schedules, contact Mrs. Hobson at 360-293-8180 or visit www. fysmusic.org.

DANCE

SCOTTISH DANCING: Bellingham Scottish Country Dancers meet from 7 to 9:30 p.m. Wednesdays at the Fairhaven Library auditorium (upstairs), 1117 12th St., Bellingham. Wear comfortable clothes and leathersoled shoes. For information, call Mary Anderson at 360-933-1779 or visit www. bellinghamscd.org. DANCE & YOGA FOR BOYS AND GIRLS: Mount Vernon Parks and Recreation will offer several classes for kids this summer, including ballet, jazz dance and yoga with instructor Sylvia Trask. For information, including class times and fees, call 360-336-6215.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, September 20, 2012 - E9

GET INVOLVED FALL DANCE CLASSES: Harper & I will offer intermediate and advanced ballet technique, pointe, contemporary and hip-hop dance classes this fall at The Bell Tower Studios, 1430 N. Garden St., Bellingham. For information, call 360-908-1653 or visit www. facebook.com/harperandi. EAST COAST SWING: 7:30 to 9 p.m. Mondays, Sept. 10-Oct. 1, at the Anacortes Center For Happiness, 619 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. Kim Hargrove will lead the four-week course in this versatile dance, also known as the Jitterbug. $38, $70 couple. 360464-2229 or www.anacortes centerforhappiness.org.

follows from 7 to 7:15 p.m. n Intermediate instruction at 7:15 p.m. Previous Tango experience required. Attend the Basics class at no extra charge. Open tango dancing from 8:15 to 10 p.m. every fourth Thursday. Practice your new tango techniques. No cover. 360-708-8076 or email secure@cnw.com. CLOG DANCING FOR BEGINNERS: Free lesson from 10 to 11 a.m., followed by regular clog dancing from 11 a.m. to noon Thursdays, at the Mount Vernon Senior Center, 1401 Cleveland St., Mount Vernon. No fee, no partner needed. First three lessons are free. Wear comfortable shoes. For information, call Rosie at 360-4244608.

ARGENTINE TANGO LESSONS: Thursday evenings at The Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main St., Conway. $12 drop-in fee, $60 for six classes. MUSIC n Basics for beginners at 6 READ & RING: Bells p.m. No experience or partner Angels will present a Read needed. Open dance practice and Ring event for hand bell

ringers from novice to experienced from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 29, at Trinity United Methodist Church, 100 N. Blake Ave., Sequim. The event is geared for ringers to have fun while being introduced to a large amount of new music. Supply your own bells, pads, music stands, gloves, mallets and chimes. Music will be on loan and available for purchase. Bring lunch; fruit and beverages provided. Registration: $20. 360-797-7417 or www. bellsangels.info.

Photo credit: Damian Vines

SEpT 26-30 SEpT 6 ShowS

Tickets as low as

$10!

$10-$45

plus applicable fees

ages are welcome to perform or come to watch and listen. Free. For information, contact Tobie Ann at 425-870-6784.

PERFORMING ARTS CLASSES: The Western Arts Preparatory Academy at Western Washington University will offer classes for youth in dance and violin beginning in September on the WWU SEEKING SINGERS, MUSI- campus in Bellingham. PreCIANS, LISTENERS: The sented by Western’s College Skagit Valley Music Club wel- of Fine and Performing Arts, comes performers, listeners the program helps students and guests at 1:45 p.m. Thurs- develop confidence, awareday, Sept. 27, at Vasa Hall, ness, discipline, communicaBEGINNING NATIVE 1805 Cleveland St., Mount tion and organizational skills. AMERICAN FLUTE: with Vernon. Come and sing, play Enrollment is limited. For Peter Ali: 11 a.m. to 12:30 an instrument or just enjoy information, call 360-650-3308 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 15, at the the music. Free. For informa- or visit www.wwu.edu/wapa. Anacortes Center for Haption, call Marsha Pederson at piness, 619 Commercial Ave., 360-757-4906. RECREATION Anacortes. $35. Preregistra“TALK ABOUT TIME”: tion required: 360-464-2229 or ON STAGE Learn about the Fidalgo & www.anacortescenterfor OPEN MIC: All ages: 7 Friends TimeBank at 7:30 happiness.org. p.m. Thursdays, at The Soup p.m. Thursday, Sept. 20, at the Bowl at Common Ground, Anacortes Center for HapFREE MUSIC JAMS: Come 351 Pease Road, Burlington. piness, 619 Commercial Ave., and play or just watch the Sign-ups begin at 6 p.m. All Anacortes. Jan Woodruff will

MBT REp pRESEnTS

More “Loverly” Than Ever

fun at Cyndy’s Broiler, 27021 102nd Ave. N.W., Stanwood. Free for participants and spectators. Teen Jam: 7 p.m. second and fourth Tuesday each month. Jam Night: 8 p.m. Thursdays. 360-629-4800 or www. cyndysbroiler.com.

Show Sponsor: Moss AdAMs, LLP

Mount Baker Theatre | 360.734.6080 www.mountbakertheatre.com Adapted from George Bernard Shaw’s play and Gabriel Pascal’s motion picture Pygmalion

Season Sponsor:

explain how the timebank works; members exchange their own skills and services for those of others — one hour given for an hour received. Free. 360-424-2229 or www.anacortescenter forhappiness.org. DISCOVER THE MOUNTAINS AND THE SEA: Enjoy family fun from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 22, at Larrabee State Park, 245 Chuckanut Drive, Bellingham. The event features live music, games, guided trail walks, educational displays and demonstrations, crafts and more. Connect with geocachers from 8:30 to 9 a.m. during a meet and greet in the day-use area. From 4:15 to 6 p.m., experienced geocachers can learn more about geocaching in state parks and protecting natural resources at “Cache In, Trash Out.” Free admission. The Discover Pass is required for vehicle access to the festival. www.parks.wa.gov/events.


E10 Thursday, September 20, 2012

Thursday, September 20, 2012 E11

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

ON STAGE in the Skagit Valley and surrounding area September 21-30

TUNING UP Playing at area venues September 19-27

Friday.21

WEDNESDAY.19-SUNDAY.23

THEATER

Djangofest Northwest (gypsy jazz): Whidbey Island Center For The Arts and Langley Middle School, Langley. Times and prices vary. 800-638-7631 or www. wicaonline.com/DFNW2012.html.

“Legally Blonde: The Musical”: Seattle Musical Theatre: 7:30 p.m., Magnuson Park, 7120 62nd Ave. NE, Seattle. $35-$40. 206-363-2809 or www.seattlemusical theatre.org.

OPERA

“Pagliacci”: Skagit Opera: 7:30 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $15-$59. Pre-performance gala dinner: $75. 360-416-7727, ext. 2, or www. mcintyrehall.org.

THURSDAY.20 Too Slim and the Taildraggers: 8 p.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-755-3956 or www. anacortesH2O.com.

FRIDAY.21 Trish, Hans & Phil: 7 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $10. 360445-3000.

Lane Fernando: 6 to 9 p.m., Seeds Bistro and Bar, 623 Morris St., La Conner. No cover. 360-466-3280.

FRIDAY.21SATURDAY.22 JOAN OSBORNE 8 p.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Pacific Showroom, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. $33-$42. 877275-2448 or www. theskagit.com.

Saturday.22 THEATER

“A Fine & Pleasant Misery: The Humor of Pat McManus”: Performed by Tim Behrens: 7:30 p.m., Darrington High School Auditorium, 1085 Fir St., Darrington. $25. Proceeds benefit the Darrington Community Center. 360-436-0140 or 360-436-1930.

Jammin’ Jeff (country, rock): 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411. Marcia Kester (country, rock, blues, pop): 7:30 to 10:30 p.m., Washington Sips, 608 First St., La Conner. No cover. 360-399-1037. w/art

Dana Lyons: Ninth annual International Day of Peace Celebration: 5 p.m., First Congregational Church, 2401 Cornwall Ave., Bellingham. Free, donations accepted. www.whatcompjc. org. Jucifer, Rookery, Totalizer: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $8. 360-778-1067.

The Slough Dogs: 8 p.m., Conway Jim Basnight Band: 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Varsity Inn, 112 N. Cherry St., Burling- Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. 360-445-3000. ton. No cover. 360-755-0165. Seatown R&B: 9 p.m. to midnight, Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-588-1720.

Coyote and the Henhouse Raiders: 8 p.m., Big Rock Café & Grocery, 14779 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-4247872.

Don Richards Band: 9:30 p.m. to 12:30 Midnight Son: 6:30 p.m., Mount Vera.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., non Elks, 2021 Market St., Mount VerAnacortes. 360-755-3956 or www. non. 360-848-8882. anacortesH2O.com.

“Legally Blonde: The Musical”: Seattle Musical Theatre: 7:30 p.m., Magnuson Park, 7120 62nd Ave. NE, Seattle. $35-$40. 206-363-2809 or www.seattlemusical theatre.org.

CABARET

“Behind Closed Doors”: After Midnight Cabaret Group: 7:30 p.m., RiverBelle Theatre, The Old Town Grainery, 100 E. Montgomery, Mount Vernon. $40 dinner and show; $30 dessert buffet and show, $20 show only. Reservations required: 360-336-3012 or www. riverbelledinnertheatre.com.

FRIDAY.28-SATURDAY.29

Sunday.23

“ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO’S NEST” 8 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-293-6829 or www.acttheatre.com.

THEATER

“Legally Blonde: The Musical”: Seattle Musical Theatre: 2 p.m., Magnuson Park, 7120 62nd Ave. NE, Seattle. $35-$40. 206-363-2809 or www.seattlemusicaltheatre.org.

OPERA

“Pagliacci”: Skagit Opera: 2 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $15-$59. 360-416-7727, ext. 2, or www.mcintyrehall.org.

Monday-Tuesday.24-25 No events submitted

Wednesday.26 THEATER

“The Importance of Being Earnest”: comedy: 7 p.m., Mount Vernon Christian High School, 820 W. Blackburn Road, Mount Vernon. $8-$10, student discount available. 360-424-9157.

SATURDAY.22

Thursday.27

Saturday.29

THEATER

THEATER

“The Importance of Being Earnest”: comedy: 7 p.m., Mount Vernon Christian High School, 820 W. Blackburn Road, Mount Vernon. $8-$10, student discount available. 360-424-9157.

Friday.28 THEATER

“Legally Blonde: The Musical”: Seattle Musical Theatre: 7:30 p.m., Magnuson Park, 7120 62nd Ave. NE, Seattle. $35-$40. 206-363-2809 or www.seattlemusical theatre.org.

OPERA

“Pagliacci”: Skagit Opera: 7:30 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $15-$59. 360-4167727, ext. 2, or www.mcintyrehall.org.

“The Importance of Being Earnest”: comedy: 1 p.m. and 5 p.m., Mount Vernon Christian High School, 820 W. Blackburn Road, Mount Vernon. $8-$10, student discount available. 360-424-9157. “Legally Blonde: The Musical”: Seattle Musical Theatre: 7:30 p.m., Magnuson Park, 7120 62nd Ave. NE, Seattle. $35-$40. 206-363-2809 or www.seattlemusical theatre.org.

CABARET “Behind Closed Doors”: After Midnight Cabaret Group: 7:30 p.m., RiverBelle Theatre, The Old Town Grainery, 100 E. Montgomery, Mount Vernon. $40 dinner and show; $30 dessert buffet and show, $20 show only. Reservations required: 360-336-3012 or www. riverbelledinnertheatre.com.

Sunday.30 THEATER

“Legally Blonde: The Musical”: Seattle Musical Theatre: 2 p.m., Magnuson Park, 7120 62nd Ave. NE, Seattle. $35-$40. 206-363-2809 or www.seattlemusicaltheatre.org.

Tim McGraw (country): 7:30 p.m., Puyallup Fair. $50-$95, includes Fair admission. 888559-3247 or www.thefair.com/ concerts.

Falcon Grady: 9 p.m. to midnight, Packers Lounge at Semiahmoo Resort, 9565 Semiahmoo Parkway, Blaine. www.semiahmoo. com.

Jammin’ Jeff (country, rock): 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

Ringo Deathstarr, The Palisades, The Mother’s Anger, Sanoma: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. 360-778-1067.

Jenny & The TomCats: 7 p.m., Skagit River Brewery, 404 S. Third St., Mount Vernon. 360336-2884. Jon Mutchler (piano): 6 to 9 p.m., Stars Restaurant at Semiahmoo Resort, 9565 Semiahmoo Parkway, Blaine. www.semiah moo.com.

Massy Ferguson: 9 p.m. to midnight, Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-588-1720.

The Ride (classic country, Americana): 9 p.m. to midnight, Cyndy’s Broiler, 27021 102nd Ave N.W., Stanwood. No cover. 360-629-4800 or www.cyndys broiler.com. Ann ‘n’ Dean (country): 7 to 10 p.m., Mount Vernon Elks Lodge, 2120 Market St., Mount Vernon. Open to the public. 360-848-8882.

THURSDAY.27 TOCATO TANGO 8 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. 360-4453000.

South End String Band: 6 to 9 Son of Kong: 9:30 p.m. to 12:30 p.m., South Camano Grange, a.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., 2227 S. Camano Drive, Camano Anacortes. 360-755-3956 or www. Island. $5. www.southendstring anacortesH2O.com. band.com.

SUNDAY.23 Ron Bailey: 5:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-7666266.

Ben Starner (piano): 6:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/ Main, Conway. 360-445-3000.

WEDNESDAY.26 Ben Starner (piano): 6:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/ Main, Conway. 360445-3000.

Leatherhorn, Bell Witch, Inter Arma: 9 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $3. 360778-1067.

WWU Faculty Jazz Collective: 7 p.m., Blue Horse Gallery, 301 W. Holly St., Bellingham. 360671-2305 or www. bluehorsegallery. com.

THURSDAY.27 Fidalgo Swing: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-588-1720.

Amara Grace, Philip Nakano: 8 p.m., Anacortes Center For Happiness, 619 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. By donation. 360-4642229 or www.anacortes centerforhappiness.org.

Cheryl Hodge: 6 to 9 p.m., Seeds Bistro and Bar, 623 Morris St., La Conner. No cover. 360-466-3280.


E10 Thursday, September 20, 2012

Thursday, September 20, 2012 E11

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

ON STAGE in the Skagit Valley and surrounding area September 21-30

TUNING UP Playing at area venues September 19-27

Friday.21

WEDNESDAY.19-SUNDAY.23

THEATER

Djangofest Northwest (gypsy jazz): Whidbey Island Center For The Arts and Langley Middle School, Langley. Times and prices vary. 800-638-7631 or www. wicaonline.com/DFNW2012.html.

“Legally Blonde: The Musical”: Seattle Musical Theatre: 7:30 p.m., Magnuson Park, 7120 62nd Ave. NE, Seattle. $35-$40. 206-363-2809 or www.seattlemusical theatre.org.

OPERA

“Pagliacci”: Skagit Opera: 7:30 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $15-$59. Pre-performance gala dinner: $75. 360-416-7727, ext. 2, or www. mcintyrehall.org.

THURSDAY.20 Too Slim and the Taildraggers: 8 p.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-755-3956 or www. anacortesH2O.com.

FRIDAY.21 Trish, Hans & Phil: 7 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $10. 360445-3000.

Lane Fernando: 6 to 9 p.m., Seeds Bistro and Bar, 623 Morris St., La Conner. No cover. 360-466-3280.

FRIDAY.21SATURDAY.22 JOAN OSBORNE 8 p.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Pacific Showroom, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. $33-$42. 877275-2448 or www. theskagit.com.

Saturday.22 THEATER

“A Fine & Pleasant Misery: The Humor of Pat McManus”: Performed by Tim Behrens: 7:30 p.m., Darrington High School Auditorium, 1085 Fir St., Darrington. $25. Proceeds benefit the Darrington Community Center. 360-436-0140 or 360-436-1930.

Jammin’ Jeff (country, rock): 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411. Marcia Kester (country, rock, blues, pop): 7:30 to 10:30 p.m., Washington Sips, 608 First St., La Conner. No cover. 360-399-1037. w/art

Dana Lyons: Ninth annual International Day of Peace Celebration: 5 p.m., First Congregational Church, 2401 Cornwall Ave., Bellingham. Free, donations accepted. www.whatcompjc. org. Jucifer, Rookery, Totalizer: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $8. 360-778-1067.

The Slough Dogs: 8 p.m., Conway Jim Basnight Band: 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Varsity Inn, 112 N. Cherry St., Burling- Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. 360-445-3000. ton. No cover. 360-755-0165. Seatown R&B: 9 p.m. to midnight, Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-588-1720.

Coyote and the Henhouse Raiders: 8 p.m., Big Rock Café & Grocery, 14779 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-4247872.

Don Richards Band: 9:30 p.m. to 12:30 Midnight Son: 6:30 p.m., Mount Vera.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., non Elks, 2021 Market St., Mount VerAnacortes. 360-755-3956 or www. non. 360-848-8882. anacortesH2O.com.

“Legally Blonde: The Musical”: Seattle Musical Theatre: 7:30 p.m., Magnuson Park, 7120 62nd Ave. NE, Seattle. $35-$40. 206-363-2809 or www.seattlemusical theatre.org.

CABARET

“Behind Closed Doors”: After Midnight Cabaret Group: 7:30 p.m., RiverBelle Theatre, The Old Town Grainery, 100 E. Montgomery, Mount Vernon. $40 dinner and show; $30 dessert buffet and show, $20 show only. Reservations required: 360-336-3012 or www. riverbelledinnertheatre.com.

FRIDAY.28-SATURDAY.29

Sunday.23

“ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO’S NEST” 8 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-293-6829 or www.acttheatre.com.

THEATER

“Legally Blonde: The Musical”: Seattle Musical Theatre: 2 p.m., Magnuson Park, 7120 62nd Ave. NE, Seattle. $35-$40. 206-363-2809 or www.seattlemusicaltheatre.org.

OPERA

“Pagliacci”: Skagit Opera: 2 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $15-$59. 360-416-7727, ext. 2, or www.mcintyrehall.org.

Monday-Tuesday.24-25 No events submitted

Wednesday.26 THEATER

“The Importance of Being Earnest”: comedy: 7 p.m., Mount Vernon Christian High School, 820 W. Blackburn Road, Mount Vernon. $8-$10, student discount available. 360-424-9157.

SATURDAY.22

Thursday.27

Saturday.29

THEATER

THEATER

“The Importance of Being Earnest”: comedy: 7 p.m., Mount Vernon Christian High School, 820 W. Blackburn Road, Mount Vernon. $8-$10, student discount available. 360-424-9157.

Friday.28 THEATER

“Legally Blonde: The Musical”: Seattle Musical Theatre: 7:30 p.m., Magnuson Park, 7120 62nd Ave. NE, Seattle. $35-$40. 206-363-2809 or www.seattlemusical theatre.org.

OPERA

“Pagliacci”: Skagit Opera: 7:30 p.m., McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $15-$59. 360-4167727, ext. 2, or www.mcintyrehall.org.

“The Importance of Being Earnest”: comedy: 1 p.m. and 5 p.m., Mount Vernon Christian High School, 820 W. Blackburn Road, Mount Vernon. $8-$10, student discount available. 360-424-9157. “Legally Blonde: The Musical”: Seattle Musical Theatre: 7:30 p.m., Magnuson Park, 7120 62nd Ave. NE, Seattle. $35-$40. 206-363-2809 or www.seattlemusical theatre.org.

CABARET “Behind Closed Doors”: After Midnight Cabaret Group: 7:30 p.m., RiverBelle Theatre, The Old Town Grainery, 100 E. Montgomery, Mount Vernon. $40 dinner and show; $30 dessert buffet and show, $20 show only. Reservations required: 360-336-3012 or www. riverbelledinnertheatre.com.

Sunday.30 THEATER

“Legally Blonde: The Musical”: Seattle Musical Theatre: 2 p.m., Magnuson Park, 7120 62nd Ave. NE, Seattle. $35-$40. 206-363-2809 or www.seattlemusicaltheatre.org.

Tim McGraw (country): 7:30 p.m., Puyallup Fair. $50-$95, includes Fair admission. 888559-3247 or www.thefair.com/ concerts.

Falcon Grady: 9 p.m. to midnight, Packers Lounge at Semiahmoo Resort, 9565 Semiahmoo Parkway, Blaine. www.semiahmoo. com.

Jammin’ Jeff (country, rock): 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

Ringo Deathstarr, The Palisades, The Mother’s Anger, Sanoma: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. 360-778-1067.

Jenny & The TomCats: 7 p.m., Skagit River Brewery, 404 S. Third St., Mount Vernon. 360336-2884. Jon Mutchler (piano): 6 to 9 p.m., Stars Restaurant at Semiahmoo Resort, 9565 Semiahmoo Parkway, Blaine. www.semiah moo.com.

Massy Ferguson: 9 p.m. to midnight, Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-588-1720.

The Ride (classic country, Americana): 9 p.m. to midnight, Cyndy’s Broiler, 27021 102nd Ave N.W., Stanwood. No cover. 360-629-4800 or www.cyndys broiler.com. Ann ‘n’ Dean (country): 7 to 10 p.m., Mount Vernon Elks Lodge, 2120 Market St., Mount Vernon. Open to the public. 360-848-8882.

THURSDAY.27 TOCATO TANGO 8 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. 360-4453000.

South End String Band: 6 to 9 Son of Kong: 9:30 p.m. to 12:30 p.m., South Camano Grange, a.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., 2227 S. Camano Drive, Camano Anacortes. 360-755-3956 or www. Island. $5. www.southendstring anacortesH2O.com. band.com.

SUNDAY.23 Ron Bailey: 5:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-7666266.

Ben Starner (piano): 6:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/ Main, Conway. 360-445-3000.

WEDNESDAY.26 Ben Starner (piano): 6:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/ Main, Conway. 360445-3000.

Leatherhorn, Bell Witch, Inter Arma: 9 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $3. 360778-1067.

WWU Faculty Jazz Collective: 7 p.m., Blue Horse Gallery, 301 W. Holly St., Bellingham. 360671-2305 or www. bluehorsegallery. com.

THURSDAY.27 Fidalgo Swing: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-588-1720.

Amara Grace, Philip Nakano: 8 p.m., Anacortes Center For Happiness, 619 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. By donation. 360-4642229 or www.anacortes centerforhappiness.org.

Cheryl Hodge: 6 to 9 p.m., Seeds Bistro and Bar, 623 Morris St., La Conner. No cover. 360-466-3280.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E12 - Thursday, September 20, 2012

REVIEWS MUSIC CDS Compiled from news services

Kreayshawn

mixtapes. They’re the buzz-building lifeblood of the rap game. But they’ve got “Somethin ‘Bout an intentionally short shelf-life, forgotten Kreay’” after a few weeks. And despite West’s oversight, “Cruel Summer” is utterly disIt’s unfortunate posable — one-liners and posturing, beat that the beats switches and orchestral flourishes that throughout Kreayare momentarily entertaining but don’t shawn’s debut cohere. album are brilliant, The thing is, West knows how to surbut her lyrics and stories are not. “Somethin ‘Bout Kreay’” features top- round himself with talent: John Legend notch production work from Free School, backed his very first tour. He flirted with a super-group featuring Lupe Fiasco and Diplo, Boys Noize and DJ Two Stacks — and these beats would be another rapper’s Pharrell and famously paired with Jay-Z last year for “Watch The Throne.” dream. But Kreayshawn, the charismatic And there is plenty of potential on 22-year-old newcomer, doesn’t use them display here. Producer Hit-Boy lends his well: While she’s playful throughout the signature martial drums and throbbing album, there is no depth to her rhymes. bass to “Clique,” “Cold” and “Higher,” all “Gucci, Gucci” has a catchy hook, but standouts. Coke rap veteran Pusha T is at the overall song about her disregard for his snarling best trading bars with West on designer brands is annoyingly repetitive. The uneven “Left Ey3,” about a deceitful “New God Flow” and R. Kelly lifts opener “To The World” with exuberant arrogance. boyfriend, references TLC’s Left Eye, who West offers a few fascinating, self-conburned down her boyfriend’s house. She scious peeks inside his bubble — $6,000 also raps on the song: “Heard my man is shoes! Tax worries! Kim K love! — but cheating with another (girl) in my house, none of the introspection that leavened now I’m finna make a scene like I’m Amy the braggadocio in “Watch The Throne.” Winehouse.” Really? Try again. And the rappers around him — including Kreayshawn tries singing on “luV Kid Cudi, 2 Chainz, Big Sean and Cyhi the Haus,” but the drowning track is uneventPrince — simply don’t find much to say. ful. This album will leave you asking: Foxy They circle the tired topic of the IllumiBrown and Missy Elliott, when will your nati in “The Morning,” bask in their own records be released? glory on “The One” and match Chicago CHECK OUT THIS TRACK: “Summerteen Chief Keef’s rude immaturity on “I time,” with its smooth feel, is the best of Don’t Like (Remix).” this bunch. There’s more repetition than you would expect for an album with only a n Mesfin Fekadu, Associated Press dozen songs (including five that had been either released or leaked online during the actual summer). West again quotes a G.O.O.D. Notorious B.I.G. line about three Mikes: “Cruel Summer” Tyson, Jackson, Jordan. Only this time he lumps in Michael Phelps with the above The putting-ongroup, saying he “had to take it to another my-crew album realm. Because everything around me got has long been a me underwhelmed.” Unfortunately for rite of passage hip-hop fans, it’s “Cruel Summer” itself — and stumbling that underwhelms. block — for rap CHECK THIS TRACK OUT: In the addicstars. Kanye West’s G.O.O.D. Music comtive head-nodder “Clique,” Jay-Z pops pilation “Cruel Summer” fails in the same up to join in the boasting and Kanye gets way most do: It’s a disjointed assemblage brutally honest about Kim Kardashian: of rhyme styles and perspectives with no “My girl a superstar all from a home overarching musical direction. In short, a movie.” mixtape. n Ryan Pearson, Associated Press Not that there’s anything wrong with

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Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E14 - Thursday, September 20, 2012

REVIEWS

HOT TICKETS JEFF DUNHAM: Sept. 20, Puyallup Fair. 888559-3247 or www.thefair.com/concerts. ANDY C & DOWNLINK: Sept. 20, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www. showboxonline.com. “THE SUNSHINE BOYS”: Sept. 21-Oct. 7, Everett Theatre, Everett. 425-258-6766 or www.brownpapertickets.com. PITBULL: Sept. 21, Puyallup Fair. 888-5593247 or www.thefair.com/concerts. SERJ TANKIAN: Sept. 21, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. JOAN OSBORNE: Sept. 21-22, Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Pacific Showroom, Bow. 877275-2448 or www.theskagit.com. TIM MCGRAW: Sept. 22, Puyallup Fair.888559-3247 or www.thefair.com/concerts. JASON MRAZ, CHRISTINA PERRI: Sept. 22, The Gorge Amphitheatre. 800-745-3000 or LiveNation.com. KREATOR, ACCEPT: Sept. 22, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline.com. UPROAR FESTIVAL: Sept. 22, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn. 800-745-3000 or LiveNation.com. GEORGE WINSTON: Sept. 23, Northshore Performing Arts Center, Bothell. 425-984-2471 or www.npacf.org. TRAIN: Sept. 23, Puyallup Fair. 888-5593247 or www.thefair.com. FURTHUR, FEATURING PHIL LESH & BOB WEIR: Sept. 25, WaMu Theater, Seattle. 800745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com. HATEBREED: Sept. 25, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or LiveNation.com. KIMBRA: Sept. 26, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline. com. GARBAGE: Sept. 26, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. “MY FAIR LADY”: Sept. 26-30, Mount Baker Theatre, Bellingham. 360-734-6080 or www. mountbakertheatre.com. MiMOSA: Sept. 27, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline. com. LAURA MARLING: Sept. 27, Columbia City Theater, Seattle. 800-838-3006 or www.brownpapertickets.com. BLOC PARTY: Sept. 28, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline. com. CARL CRAIG 69 LIVE: Sept. 28, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www. showboxonline.com. “MY FAIR LADY”: Lyric Light Opera: Sept. 29-Oct. 6, McIntyre Hall, Mount Vernon. 360416-7727. PAIN IN THE GRASS: Sept. 29, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn. 800-745-3000 or LiveNation.com. MATTHEW DEAR: Sept. 29, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. DJ SHADOW: Sept. 29, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. NIGHTWISH: Oct. 1, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com. IL VOLO: Oct. 2, Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or LiveNation.com. IMAGINE DRAGONS: Oct. 2, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.show-

VIDEO GAMES boxonline.com. MADONNA: Oct. 3, KeyArena, Seattle. 800745-3000 or LiveNation.com. CITIZEN COPE: Oct. 3, Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster.com. BEACH HOUSE: Oct. 3-4, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. MICHAEL KIWANUKA: Oct. 5, Showbox at the Market. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. SEETHER: Oct. 5, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. ALANIS MORISSETTE: Oct. 5, Moore Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or LiveNation. com. WWE RAW WORLD TOUR: Oct. 5, Comcast Arena at Everett, Everett. 866-332-8499 or www.comcastarenaeverett.com. CARRIE UNDERWOOD: Oct. 6, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster. com. ED SHEERAN: Oct. 6, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or LiveNation.com. JUSTIN BIEBER: Oct. 9, Tacoma Dome. www. AEGLive.com. GOSSIP: Oct. 9, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline. com. THE SMASHING PUMPKINS: Oct. 10, Comcast Arena at Everett. 866-332-8499 or www. comcastarenaeverett.com. THE PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA: Oct. 12-13, Skagit Valley Casino Resort 877-275-2448 or www.theskagit.com. MACKLEMORE & RYAN LEWIS: Oct. 12, WaMu Theater, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www. ticketmaster.com. RODRIGUEZ: Oct. 12, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. “HOW SWEET THE SOUND”: Seattle Women’s Chorus: Oct. 12-13, 19-20, St. Mark’s Cathedral, Seattle. 206-388-1400 or www. seattlewomenschorus.org. EARSHOT JAZZ FESTIVAL: Oct. 12-Nov. 4, at venues around Seattle. 206-547-6763 or www. earshot.org. BOB DYLAN, MARK KNOPFLER: Oct. 13, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or LiveNation.com. D.R.I.: Oct. 13, El Corazon, Seattle. 800-5143849 or www.CascadeTickets.com. CIRCA SURVIVE: Oct. 13, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. BETH ORTON: Oct. 15, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. STOMP: Oct. 16, Comcast Arena at Everett. 866-332-8499 or www.comcastarenaeverett. com. GHOSTLAND OBSERVATORY: Oct. 19, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www. showboxonline.com. “WITCHES”: Theater Arts Guild: Oct. 19-Nov. 3, Lincoln Theatre, Mount Vernon. 360-3362408. NATALIE MACMASTER: Oct. 20, Mount Baker Theatre, Bellingham. 360-734-6080 or www.mountbakertheatre.com. COLLIE BUDDZ, NEW KINGSTON: Oct. 20, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com.

Chris Campbell, Scripps Howard News Service

EA Sports

‘NHL 13’

lay out that defender in your path. There is no telling when the lockout might end, so it’s a good thing “NHL 13” is so realistic. It may be the only kind of hockey that fans get to witness this year.

Congrats, hockey fans. After several years of thrilling regular seasons and exciting playoff action, you are left with “NHL 13” as your only avenue to fresh, new hockey this season. While the lockout keeps the professionals off the ice, their digital likenesses are more than happy to pound you into the boards or whip a slapshot past the goalie until your heart is content. This year’s game includes a new physics engine that makes the skating and gameplay the most realistic it has ever been. Most changes were shelved beyond that, so even if this feels a lot like a retread of “NHL 12,” you won’t be able to turn away from the action once the ref drops the puck. This game boasts a long list of ways to enjoy it, no matter if you’re a quick one-off kind of player or if you like to customize every aspect of your online league or re-enact historic moments on the ice. All modes might not be superb, but with this cornucopia of choices, certainly one will do the trick. The new physics engine creates a fluid on-ice experience where plays develop more organically and realistically, as if you were in the arena watching it happen live. When an attack reaches its zenith, your teammates react and instinctively move to receive your pass, follow up your shot or

‘Double Dragon Neon’

Platforms: PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 Genre: Sports Publisher: EA Sports ESRB Rating: E, for Everyone Grade: 3 stars (out of 5)

Platforms: Xbox Live Arcade, PlayStation Network Genre: Action Publisher: Majesco Games ESRB Rating: T, for Teen Grade: 2.5 stars

“Neon” basically reprises the original Mario-Luigi arcade game released about three decades ago. The requisite visual upgrades give you a sassier presentation while remaining firmly grounded in the game play the original was known for, primarily mashing on the punch and kick buttons until numbness occurs in the hands. Back in the day, the combat was more simplified, a few punches and kick combos accented by the occasional use of a baseball bat to finish the job. Players have a larger arsenal of moves at their disposal in “Neon,” but it doesn’t affect the gameplay since this is still a classic button-masher. The game’s currency allows players to buy upgrades and special moves. The later boss battles are extremely difficult, and without the proper offensive and defensive moves, players will writhe in the gutter pleading for mercy.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, September 20, 2012 - E15

MOVIES

Classic Hollywood recipe: Reinventing an actor By BARRY KOLTNOW The Orange County Register

Who knew that the guy who was nominated for an Academy Award for portraying Oskar Schindler and for a Tony in a Broadway production of “Anna Christie” could utter these words: “What I do have are a very particular set of skills; skills I have acquired over a very long career. Skills that make me a nightmare for people like you. If you let my daughter go now, that’ll be the end of it. I will not look for you. I will not pursue you. But if you don’t, I will look for you, and I will kill you.” That dialogue, of course, was from the 2009 surprise hit “Taken,” a relatively low-budget action thriller in which Liam Neeson played an ex-CIA agent wreaking havoc on the Albanian thugs who kidnapped his daughter. Made for a paltry $25 million, it went on to collect $227 million at the box office, and its sequel (“Taken 2”) opens Oct. 5. This time, it is not his daughter (Maggie Grace) in harm’s way, but the exagent’s wife (Famke Janssen). Nobody ever said that the plots of these movies were complicated. The “particular set of skills” line could be straight out of a Charles Bronson revenge flick, but when delivered by a classically trained Irish actor, the drama was elevated to international sensation. It also has turned a respected 60-year-old thespian into a genuine action hero. Burying himself in work after the tragic death of his beautiful actress wife Natasha Richardson, Neeson became a one-man Hollywood wrecking crew in

Tarantino’s inspired casting plays a role. Some actors was not a fluke, and began have no choice but to reina second career as a screen vent themselves as the pubvillain in a series of films, lic and movie industry grow including “Get Shorty” (one weary of their shtick. Yes, of my favorites), “Swordit is the same shtick that fish,” “Broken Arrow,” thrilled everyone for years, “Face-Off” and “The Taking but this is a fickle town and of Pelham 123.” people get bored easily. Of course, he also put on Money is a factor, of a dress for “Hairspray,” but course. Isn’t money always a you know the old Hollyfactor? I don’t think Travolwood saying: “You can take ta kept doing “Look Who’s Vinnie Barbarino out of the Talking?” movies because musical but you can’t take he thought he had a shot at the musical out of Vinnie an Oscar. Barbarino.” The final reason is parThis trio of A-listers enthood. Dozens of serious certainly doesn’t complete actors have told me that the list. Many actors and they started appearing in Lee Jin-man / AP actresses have made sharp comedies and animated family films because they Actor Liam Neeson waves to the media after a press conference to promote his turns in their career paths new movie “Taken 2” on Monday in Seoul, South Korea. later in life, and the reasons wanted their young children vary, although here are the to see their work. films such as “Unknown,” Corleone who lay in wait “Pulp Fiction.” three most popular: But is that a good enough “The A-Team,” “Clash of in a darkened hallway with SVH_4.949x4.75_ The actor proved that Desperation certainly excuse for “Wild Hogs”? September the Titans,” “Wrath of the an improvised silencer to Titans” and “Battleship.” assassinate the neighborYes, there are some truly hood mob boss in “The awful movies on that list Godfather, Part II?” Paying Out Up To $7.1 MillionPaying Out Up To $7.1 Million — a couple of them are in Six words to consider: Al contention for the worst Capone with a baseball bat. movie of the year — which A reminder of the probably explains why he is early De Niro is necessary returning to the well for one because the actor has spent more drink of the “Taken” his later years mocking his elixir. Well, one more drink iconic screen persona in until the next sequel. a series of silly comedies, Neeson isn’t the first from the “Analyze This and 12PM SPECIAL Hollywood heavyweight to Thats” to the “Meeting of CASH DRAWING MARATHON BINGO reinvent himself late in his the Parents and Fockers.” HOT SEAT DRAWING SUNDAY - September 30 SUNDAY career. Yes, I am disappointed in WEDNESDAYS ALL SESSIONS September 9 “You talkin’ to me?” De Niro’s reinvention, but September 5, 12, 19 & 26 (5) $100 at 11am & 3pm 40 Regular Games Paying: Yes, Robert De Niro, I not so with John Travolta. and $1000 ea. Cost: $40/6-on (1) Winner drawn at each (10) $200 at 7pm am talking to you. Although his early work additional: $20 ea. and session halftime to determine Remember the “Ragwas great (“Saturday Night Guests will receive entry forms at cash prize. The winner will play 8 Blackout Games: buy-in Sept. 1st - Sept. 29th to be ing Bull” from the “Mean Fever,” “Grease” and Plinko for a chance to win up to $2/4-on’s. deposited in drawing bin located $500 CASH! Streets” of “New York New “Urban Cowboy”), he lost Come join us for hours of fun and in front of the Caller’s stand. York” who was feeling a his way for a while with Winners must be present and excitement, please don’t forget to Winners must be present and actively playing slot machine to win. bring your family and friends! little “Heat” because “Once “Look Who’s Talking,” playing with a valid receipt to No Seat Hopping Allowed. B-1 of our Lucky Winners! claim prize. Upon a Time in America” “Look Who’s Talking, Too,” he had gone to a “Taxi “Look Who’s Talking Now” Valid 9/01/12 - 9/30/12 Driver” for a ride to “Cape and “Look Who’s Talking to MG BNG0912 Fear” so that he could place Himself.” (I may have made Bring in this ad and receive $5 a wager at the “Casino” on up one of those titles.) Any 11AM or 7PM Session Off any 11AM or 7PM Session a horse named “The Deer Travolta was in a down1 coupon per guest • Redeem at cashier window - Not valid with any other Hunter?” ward spiral when director offer. No cash value. Only original ad will be honored for special offers - no copies. Need I remind you that Quentin Tarantino brought Management reserves the right to cancel or amend promotion at any time. 1-800-631-3313 this was the young Vito him back from the brink in

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Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E16 - Thursday, September 20, 2012

MOVIES

‘End of Watch’ much deeper than a cop buddy movie

‘E

nd of Watch” is one of the best police movies in recent years, a virtuoso joining of performances and often startling action. It stars Jake Gyllenhaal and Michael Pena as Taylor and Zavala, two Los Angeles street cops who bend a few rules but must be acknowledged as heroes. After too many police movies about officers who essentially use their badges as licenses to run wild, it’s inspiring to realize these men take their mission — to serve and protect Roger — with such seriousness they’re Ebert willing to risk their lives. Taylor and Zavala fit the template of the “cop buddy movie,” but “End of Watch” goes so much deeper than that. They’ve been partners for years, and are so close that Zavala’s wife, Gabby (Natalie Martinez), and Taylor’s girlfriend, Janet (Anna Kendrick), have become like sisters. The two cops are transferred to a tough, largely Mexican-American district, where their persistence leads them across the scent of a Mexican drug cartel operating in L.A. This is really an assignment for a detective, but they don’t avoid risk, and eventually become so dangerous to the cartel that a hit is ordered against them. That sets up the third act of the movie. Earlier acts cover sensational shoot-outs, chases, and the rescue of kids from a burning building when the fire department is slow to arrive. It must be said the two men find themselves in an implausibly high percentage of dangerous and violent situations. If every day were as harrowing and risky as their days in this film, it’s incredible they can keep going in to work. As the movie opens, Taylor is filming a video documentary about his job for a film class he’s taking. “End of Watch” begins with his narration about the

Michael Pena (left) and Jake Gyllenhaal star in “End of Watch.” Open Road Films via AP

some of the things they do if we didn’t believe who they are. The movie is much strengthHHHH ened by strong supporting perBrian Taylor........................................................... Jake Gyllenhaal Mike Zavala............................................................. Michael Pena formances, not only by Natalie Gabby..................................................................Natalie Martinez Martinez and Anna Kendrick but Janet...................................................................... Anna Kendrick by fellow officers Van Hauser Sarge......................................................................... Frank Grillo (David Harbour), Sarge (Frank Orozco..................................................................America Ferrera Grillo) and Orozco (America Van Hauser............................................................. David Harbour Ferrera). n Running time: 109 minutes. MPAA rating: R (for strong violence, The consistent plausibility some disturbing images, pervasive language including sexual referof “End of Watch” must owe a ences, and some drug use). great deal to the writer-director, David Ayer. This is his second nature of his job. All through the plays. Michael Pena gives one of credit as a writer-director, after movie, Jake Gyllenhaal reveals the performances of his career as “Harsh Times” (2005), and he a presence and stability that’s the other cop, and the reality of deserves many more. He knows in contrast to the lighter-weight, their relationship underscores the this territory. He wrote Denzel ingratiating characters he often whole film. We wouldn’t believe Washington’s 2001 Oscar-winning

‘END OF WATCH’

“Training Day,” and three other superior cop movies, “Dark Blue” (2002), “S.W.A.T.” (2003) and “The Fast and the Furious” (2001). At this point, it seems fair to assume he may want to stay right there in Los Angeles and explore the police experience in one way after another. From a dramatic viewpoint, there are a few professions that grant their members entry into other lives, high among them cops, doctors, clergymen, journalists and prostitutes. Perhaps that explains why they figure in so much television and cinema. Their lives are lived in the midst of human drama.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, September 20, 2012 - E17

MOVIES MINI-REVIEWS Compiled from news services. Ratings are one to four stars. “Hope Springs” — Tommy Lee Jones and Meryl Streep play a couple whose marriage has frozen into a routine. Every day starts with his nose buried in the newspaper and ends with him asleep in front of the Golf Channel. They haven’t slept in the same room for years. She convinces him over his own dead body to attend a couples therapy session at a Maine clinic run by Steve Carell. The movie contains few surprises, but one of them is Jones’ excellent performance — vulnerable, touchy and shy. Comedy, PG-13, 100 minutes. HHH “Lawless” — Based on a real-life, blood-soaked war between moonshiners and the law in Franklin County, Va., in 1931. The three Bondurant brothers (Shia LaBeouf, Tom Hardy and Jason Clarke) fearlessly rule their turf, until a foppish federal agent (Guy Pearce) arrives from Chicago. A wellmade film about ignorant and violent people. It’s not so much that the movie is too long, as that too many people must be killed before it can end. Crime drama, R, 115 minutes. HH1⁄2 “The Expendables 2” — Sylvester Stallone, Jason Statham, Jet Li and Terry Crews reunite for more headbanging exploits. This time, Jean-Claude Van Damme and Chuck Norris join the faded 1980s action-star party, and Arnold Schwarzenegger and Bruce Willis show up for more than just cameos. It’s all good fun and games and recycled catchphrases. Action-adventure, R, 142 minutes. H1⁄2 “Trouble With the Curve” — Clint Eastwood plays Gus, an aging baseball scout who leads a lonely life, driving between small cities, sitting in the stands of minor league clubs, living in budget motels, but he loves it. Failing eyesight threatens his career, and his concerned daughter (Amy Adams) joins him on the road and meets her dad’s onetime discovery (Justin Timberlake). John Goodman plays Gus’ loyal boss at the Atlanta Braves. The story’s payoff is classic movie gold. Drama, PG-13, 111 minutes. HHH “The Bourne Legacy” —

AT AREA THEATERS ANACORTES CINEMAS Sept. 21-27 Lawless (R): Friday: 2:45, 5:05, 7:25; Saturday-Sunday: 12:25, 2:45, 5:05, 7:25; Monday-Thursday: 2:45, 5:00, 7:20 The Words (PG-13): Friday: 5:10, 7:15; Saturday-Sunday: 12:30, 2:50, 5:10, 7:15; Monday-Thursday: 2:50, 5:05, 7:15 Trouble with the Curve (PG-13): Friday: 2:40, 5:00, 7:20; Saturday-Sunday: 12:20, 2:40, 5:0, 7:20; Monday-Thursday: 2:40, 5:00, 7:20 360-293-7000 BLUE FOX DRIVE-IN Oak Harbor Sept. 21-23 Madagascar 3 (PG), Katy Perry: Part of Me (PG): 9 p.m. $6.50 ages 11 and older, $1 children 5-10, free for kids 4 and under. 360-675-5667 CASCADE MALL THEATRES Burlington For listings and times, call 888-AMC-4FUN (888-262-4386). CONCRETE THEATRE Rudy Sparks (R): 7:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 21; 5 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 22; 4 Jeremy Renner plays another secret super agent like Jason Bourne, who realizes he’s been targeted for elimination. To save himself and the experimental medication that gives him great physical and mental power, he travels from Alaska to Manila, fighting off wolves, drone missiles and assassination, while hooking up with Dr. Marta Shearing (Rachel Weisz), a biochemist who knows all about the medication. The action scenes are gripping in the moment, but go on too long and don’t add up; the dialogue scenes (with Edward Norton, Stacy Keach and Scott Glenn), are well-acted; the plot is a murky muddle. Action, PG-13, 135 minutes. HH1⁄2 “The Odd Life of Timothy Green” — A warm and lovely fantasy, the kind of full-bodied family film that’s being pushed aside in favor of franchises and slam-bang confusion. On a picturepostcard farm in the middle of endlessly rolling hills where it is always Indian summer, a lovable boy comes into the life of a childless couple and brings along great joy and wisdom. Jennifer Garner, Joel Edgerton, young CJ Adams and a rich supporting cast.

p.m. Sunday, Sept. 23. Tickets: $7 general admission, $6 adults over 65 and kids under 12; $1 off all tickets on Sunday. 360-941-0403 OAK HARBOR CINEMAS Sept. 21-27 House at the End of the Street (PG-13): Friday-Saturday: 1:25, 3:40, 6:35, 8:30; Sunday-Thursday: 1:25, 3:40, 6:35 Trouble with the Curve (PG-13): FridaySaturday: 1:15, 3:35, 6:30, 8:35; SundayThursday: 1:15, 3:35, 6:30 Resident Evil: Retribution (R): FridaySaturday: 1:35, 3:45, 6:40, 8:40; SundayThursday: 1:35, 3:45, 6:40 360-279-2226 STANWOOD CINEMAS Sept. 21-27 End of Watch (R): Friday-Thursday: 1:25, 3:55, 6:15, 8:35 House at the End of the Street (PG-13): Friday-Thursday: 1:30, 4:00, 6:10, 8:20 Trouble with the Curve (PG-13): Friday-Thursday: 1:20, 3:40, 6:05, 8:30 Resident Evil: Retribution (R): Friday-Thursday: 1:35, 3:45, 6:20, 8:45 The Bourne Legacy (PG-13): Friday-Thursday: 1:15, 6:00 Hope Springs (PG-13): Friday-Thursday: 3:50, 8:40

Written and directed by Peter Hedges (“What’s Eating Gilbert Grape”). Accessible for all but the youngest children, and I suspect their parents will enjoy it, too. Comedy fantasy, PG, 104 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “How to Survive a Plague” — A stunning documentary incorporating a wealth of home video footage taken at the time, tracing the rise of the AIDS epidemic and a response by ACT UP and other activist groups to demand more and swifter government intervention. New drugs are tried and failed, and the two years before the discovery in 1996 of an effective AIDS-fighting drug combination are the darkest and most despairing. The video footage is invaluable; the fight against AIDS is inspiring. Documentary, not rated, 110 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “The Words” — A movie inspired by the famous story of how Ernest Hemingway’s first wife lost a briefcase of his early work on a train. That story is enfolded into another story based on it, written by a contemporary novelist (Dennis Quaid). Bradley Cooper finds the missing briefcase in the Quaid novel and is later

visited by a mysterious Jeremy Irons. The real Hemingway could have told this with infinitely more economy. The plot opens room for three beautiful women (Zoe Saldana, Olivia Wilde and Nora Arnezeder), for which we can be grateful. Drama, PG-13, 96 minutes. HH “The Possession” — The possession of the title is a dark wood box with a carved inscription in Hebrew informing the finder that it entraps a dybbuk, an evil spirit that will cleave to the soul of anyone unlucky enough to release it. This box turns up in a yard sale, and is purchases by young girl named Em (Natasha Calis). Horror, PG-13, 92 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “The Campaign” — Raucous, bawdy comedy starring Will Ferrell and Zach Galifianakis as opponents in a North Carolina GOP congressional primary. Ferrell is the incumbent, and Galifianakis is a doofus bankrolled by billionaire brothers who want to buy the district and resell it to China. The movie uses their campaign as a showcase of political scandals and dirty tricks that have become familiar in both parties. Comedy, R, 85 minutes. HHH

AT THE LINCOLN THEATRE 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon 360-336-8955 n www.lincolntheatre.org

Queen — ‘Hungarian Rhapsody: Live in Budapest ‘86’ 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 20

A chance to watch Queen’s momentous concert movie, “Hungarian Rhapsody: Queen Live In Budapest ’86” on the big screen for the first time. Remastered in high definition and 5.1 surround sound, this cinema event opens with a special 25-minute documentary feature following the legends of rock from just after their show–stealing performance at Live Aid through the year leading up to the concert in Budapest. Staged for 80,000 ecstatic fans, the concert set includes favorite hits like “Bohemian Rhapsody,” “Crazy Little Thing Called Love,” “I Want To Break Free” and “We Are The Champions.” Admission: $12.50.

‘A Lonely Place for Dying’

7:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday, Sept. 21-22 5:30 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 23 7:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 24 “A Lonely Place For Dying” defies conventional wisdom. It’s a Cold War spy thriller that challenges genre expectations by placing character development and wellcrafted dialogue side-by-side with gun battles, fist fights and aerial bombing raids. It’s a high-tech production disguised by it’s devotion to classic 1970s cinema. In 1972, an abandoned Mexican prison sits alone in the dusty Chihuahua desert. KGB mole Nikolai Dzerzhinsky waits for his contact from the Washington Post. Dzerzhinsky holds explosive evidence against the CIA; information he will trade for asylum in the United States. Special Agent Robert Harper must obtain this evidence and kill Dzerzhinsky or risk the end of his CIA career. As the two men hunt each other they discover that the sins from their past destined them for this deadly confrontation. $9 general; $8 seniors, students and active military; $7 members; $6 children 12 and under. Bargain matinee prices (all shows before 6 p.m.): $7 general; $5 members; $4 children 12 and under.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E18 - Thursday, September 20, 2012

OUT & ABOUT ART

LA CONNER QUILT WALK: Check out a variety of hand-crafted quilts from the Washington State Quilters Spokane Chapter on display through Oct. 14, in shops around La Conner. The Quilt Walk is presented in conjunction with the La Conner Quilt & Textile Museum’s annual Quilt Festival, set for Oct. 5-7, at Maple Hall, the La Conner Civic Garden Club and the Museum. 360-466-4288 or www.laconnerquilts.com. NOW SHOWING IN THE ART BAR: Janel Bragg’s abstract artworks are on display through Sept. 30, in the Lincoln Theatre’s Art Bar, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. Inspired by famous artists Robert Henri, Andy Warhol and Vincent Van Gogh, Bragg enjoys experimenting with different mediums, including oils, pastels, charcoal and India ink. 360-336-8955 or www.lincolntheatre.org.

blown, pate de verre, cast and deeply carved glass forms. Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. 360-222-3070 or www. robschoutengallery.com. “DOUBLE BLUFF: SOUTH WHIDBEY’S PLAYGROUND”: A photo essay by Tom Trimbath: The show will continue through Oct. 2, at Raven Rocks Gallery, 765 Wonn Road, Greenbank. The final installment in Trimbath’s five-year photo essay “Twelve Months at Double Bluff,” features the natural Anne Martin McCool Gallery’s “New Paintings Show” environment of Whidbey continues through September, at 711 Commercial Ave., Island. For information, including gallery hours and Anacortes. The show features paintings and prints by directions, call 360-222Anne Martin McCool and Cathy Schoenberg, sculpture 0102 or visit www.raven by Tracy Powell, hand-turned wood by George Way, rocksgallery.com. handwoven baskets by Jane Hyde, jewelry by Carole

NEW PAINTINGS

Cunningham and Debbie Aldrich and other gallery artists. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday and noon to 4 p.m. Sunday. 360-2933577 or www.mccoolart.com.

“LIVING ON BEAUTY”: The show of new paintings by Maggie Wilder and assemblage temples Each piece in the show rep- by Jules Remedios Faye “CLOSE TO HOME: resents a balance of materi- will continue through Oct. Places I Live and Places I als, subject and expression, 21 at Gallery Cygnus, 109 Love”: The show of new culminating in stunning Commercial, La Conner. oils by Anne Belov will works of art with specific The show’s title comes “ACROSS THE MOUNcontinue through Oct. 2, intent and wild creativity. from a remark made to TAINS AND BACK”: A at Scott Milo Gallery, 420 In addition, Allied Arts Wilder 15 years ago when show of new artwork Commercial Ave., AnaInside the Box Series she pleaded with a propby Lisa Gilley contincortes. Also showing are features work from Mary erty owner to preserve ues through Sept. 30, at mixed media collages by McKinstry. who creates some large cedar trees. The Smith & Vallee Gallery, Barbara Dollahite, oils by wearable jewelry pieces owner replied, “well, you 5742 Gilkey Ave., Edison. Originally from the Skagit Matt Dollahite, color pho- from high quality polymer know Maggie, we cannot tographs on paper by Dick and semi-precious stones. live on beauty.” Maggie Valley, Gilley’s new work Garvey and acrylics by Gallery hours are 10 a.m. and Jules contend that we explores her familiar tideare, indeed, largely living lands as well as the warmer Larry Heald, as well as jew- to 5 p.m. Monday through elry, glass, sculptures and Friday and noon to 5 p.m. on beauty. Gallery hours palettes of the Palouse, more by other gallery artSunday. 360-676-8548 or are noon to 5 p.m. Friday Yakima and Methow Valists. Gallery hours are 10:30 www.alliedarts.org. through Sunday or by leys. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday appointment. 360-708-4787 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday or by PAINTINGS AND GLASS: or www.gallerycygnus.com. through Sunday. 360-766appointment. 360-293-6938 The new show continues 6230 or www.smithand or www.scottmilo.com. through Oct. 3, at Rob ART IN THE ALLEYS: vallee.com. Schouten Gallery, 765 “Engaging Imagination “CAREFUL BALANCE”: Wonn Road, Greenbank. In Downtown Mount VerPHOTOS AND SCULPnon”: The Mount Vernon TURE: Photos by featured The Allied Arts Juried Art- The exhibition includes ist Series continues with new and select paintings Downtown Association’s artist Craig Sullivan and an exhibition of works by by Wendy Wees, whose second juried photography sculptures by guest artist whimsical artworks play exhibit will open from 6 Travis Gerard Kuehn con- Adele Eustis, Emma Jane Levitt, Eileen Reardanz with the idea of birds and to 9 p.m. Friday, Sept. 21, tinues through Sept. 30, at and Faye Hayes on display birdhouses in completely and continue from noon to Whidbey Art Gallery, 220 through Sept. 29, at the original and magical ways. 5 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 22, Second St., Langley. GalAllied Arts of Whatcom The sculptural glass of at the Front Gallery, 420 lery hours are 10 a.m. to 5 Robert Adamson and Janis Myrtle St., Mount Vernon. p.m. daily. 360-221-7675 or County Gallery, 1418 Cornwall Ave., Bellingham. Swalwell includes handBest of Show winner Tairyn www.whidbeyartists.com.

Tennyson will receive a $250 cash prize for her entry “Liberate.” Tennyson is also the winner of the “People” category. Beth Toberer won the “Architecture/Landscape” category. 360-336-3801 or artintheal leysmv@gmail.com. “JUST ENOUGH”: The public is invited to meet participating artists during the opening reception from 2 to 5 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 22, at the River Gallery, 19313 Landing Road, between Conway and La Conner. The show, which continues through Nov. 4, features small format paintings, sculptures and glass by 32 artists, including Alfred Currier, Anne Schreivogl, Robert Gigliotti and others. Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday through Sunday. For information, call 360-466-4524 or visit www.rivergallerywa.com. WINE & GLASS TALK: Enjoy wine tasting and an enjoyable discussion with Northwest glass artist Benjamin Moore from 5 to 8 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 22, at the Museum of Northwest Art,121 S. First St., La Conner. Moore was an early innovator in the studio glass movement and one of the first Educational Coordinators for the Pilchuck Glass School, starting in 1974. $15, $10 members. 360-466-4446 or www. museumofnwart.org. FINAL FRIDAY ARTWALK: Paintings by Roger Small will be featured during the artwalk from 5 to 9 p.m. Friday, Sept. 28, at Jay’s Gallery, 105 S. Whatcom St., La Conner. The show also includes artworks by Ed Kamuda, Tom Pickett, Jay Bowen, Dan Soler and others. 360630-1433. STANWOOD ARTWALK: “Your Passport To Art,”

Stanwood’s third annual artwalk will take place from 5 to 8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 28, in downtown Stanwood. Participating restaurants and businesses will showcase the work of local artists during the event. Meet the artists and enjoy music, appetizers, art and prizes. Free. 360-629-0562. ART, PERFORMANCE & MORE: “The Really, Really Big Show” will open with a costume party, potluck, music and entertainment from 4 to 9 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 29, and continue through Nov. 4, at Matzke Fine Art Gallery & Sculpture Park, 2345 Blanche Way, Camano Island. The theatrical-, burlesque-, puppetry- and circus-themed show features paintings, glass and sculptures by 19 invited artists. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, or by appointment. 360-387-2759 or www.matzkefineart.com. “WILD EAST MEETS WILD WEST: Photographs from Nakhodka, Russia by Georgy Pakin”: Opening Sunday, Sept. 30, continuing through Jan. 6, 2013, at the Whatcom Museum Lightcatcher Building, 250 Flora St., Bellingham. Nakhodka news photographer Georgy Pakin’s photos vividly portray daily life in and around Nakhodka during Soviet and postSoviet times, including the presence of Americans in Nakhodka, its large fishing operations and other activities. Museum hours are noon to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday. $10; $8 students, military, seniors ages 62 and older, $4.50 ages 5 and younger. 360778-8930 or www.whatcom museum.org. n Photojournalist Georgy Pakin will lead a walkthrough of the exhibit at 2 p.m. on opening day. Free with museum admission.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, September 20, 2012 - E19

OUT & ABOUT PAINTINGS ON DISPLAY: Oil paintings by Roger Small are currently on display at Skagit River Brewery, 404 S. Third St., Mount Vernon. The ongoing exhibit features Small’s ‘palette knife-style’ paintings, with a rotating selection shown throughout the year. 360-941-1073 or www.artbyrogersmall.com. PAINTINGS ON DISPLAY: Paula Anderson’s acrylic paintings are featured in a solo exhibition through Sept. 30 at North Cove Coffee, 1130 S. Burlington Blvd., Burlington. Anderson, a lifelong Skagit Valley resident, captures the essence of the valley in her unique artwork. 360-707-2683 or www.north covecoffee.com. PAPER COLLAGES: Check out the three-dimensional paper collages of Ans Schot, on display through Sept. 30 in the Evolution Room Art Gallery at the Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce St., Conway. Based on a craft started in the late 17th/early 18th century in Venice and France, Schot’s collages offer a different perspective on the creative use of a print. Artworks by Charlotte Decker are also on display. For information, including gallery hours and directions, call 360-445-3000 or visit www.conwaymuse. com. “THE ETHEREAL OF SKAGIT VALLEY”: A show of new paintings by Jay Bowen will open with a reception from 5 to 9 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 25, at Jay’s Gallery, 105 S. Whatcom St., La Conner. Artworks by Ed Kamuda, Tom Pickett, Roger Small, Eve McCauley and Dan Soler are also on display. 360630-1433 or www.jaybowen gallery.com. FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK: Check out a variety of art on display during a reception from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Oct. 5, at several gal-

Fund. 360-941-0403 or www. concrete-theatre.com.

WATERCOLORS AND ACRYLICS A show featuring acrylic paintings and watercolors by Eric Wiegardt will open with a reception from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Oct. 5, and continue through Oct. 30, at Scott Milo Gallery, 420 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. In addition to his watercolors, the gallery is showing Wiegardt’s colorful impressionistic acrylics for the first time. Also showing are oils by Ramona Hammerly and Sandy Byers and pastels by Janice Wall, as well as a selection of jewelry, glasswork, sculptures and custom tables by other gallery artists. Gallery hours are 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. 360-293-6938 or www.scottmilo.com. leries and other venues in downtown Anacortes. Featured artworks include paintings and prints, pastels, sculpture, fiber arts, glass, ceramics, wood, photography, jewelry and more. 360-293-6938.

work by other gallery artists. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday or by appointment. 360-293-3577 or www. mccoolart.com.

STEAMROLLER LINOLEUM PRINTS: A show of steamroller linoleum prints will open with a reception during the First Friday Galley Walk from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Oct. 5, and continue through Oct. 31, at the Anne Martin McCool Gallery, 711 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. Made during the Anacortes Arts Festival this past summer, these very large prints include artwork by Brad Bradford, Dona Reed and Nicolette Harrington. The show also features paintings by Anne Martin McCool and

LOCAL AUTHORS NIGHT: Authors of books, blogs, plays and poems will discuss why, how and what they write at 7 p.m. today at the Concrete Theatre, 45920 Main St., Concrete. Hear from Melissa Norris, Grace Popoff, Carol Pando, Jason Miller, Robert Van Wagoner and Nicola Pearson. Plus, Peter Keim will unveil his new novel about the ghosts of Concrete and the annual Concrete Ghost Walk. Admission by donation. Proceeds will benefit the Concrete Theatre’s Digital Conversion

LECTURES & TALKS

Harbor Sno-Isle Library and the League of Women Voters of Whidbey Island, RAINWATER HARVESTwill moderate. Free. Limited ING: 6 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 25, seating. 360-675-5115 or at the Anacortes Senior Cen- www.sno-isle.org/explore/ ter, 1701 22nd St., Anacortes. issuesthatmatter/. Join Transition Fidalgo and Friends for a Seventh FESTIVALS Generation Supper and a GIANT PUMPKIN FESpresentation by author and TIVAL: The Skagit Valley water conservationist Tim Giant Pumpkin Festival will Pope from Friday Harbor. be held from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. An alternative water source Saturday, Sept. 29, at Chrisexpert and licensed water tianson’s Nursery, 15806 Best system designer, Pope has Road, Mount Vernon. In the designed and installed over giant pumpkin weigh-off, 230 rainwater catchment sys- $2,000 cash will go to the bigtems. He also actively trains gest pumpkin! Other attracboth individuals and groups tions: Harvest food from in the proper construction Tweets of Edison, free pony of rainwater catchment rides, family carnival games, systems and is a licensed face painting and harvest water system designer in cooking classes. 360-466-3821 San Juan County. Bring your or www.christiansonsnursery. own place setting. Suggested com. donation: $5 adult, $3 children ages 10 and younger. FAIRS TransitionFidalgo.org. PUYALLUP FAIR: Washington state’s biggest fair will PROTECTING YOURSELF take place through Sept. 23 at FROM FRAUD, SCAMS & FINANCIAL EXPLOITATION: the Puyallup Fair & Events 7 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 26, at Center, 110 Ninth Ave. SW, the Anacortes Public Library, Puyallup. Check out all kinds of livestock and produce, 1220 10th St., Anacortes. Expert advice from “Shining music and entertainment, a Light on Fraud” columnist educational displays, vendors, carnival rides and games, Sandy Perkins. Free. For food and more. Advance information, call 360-293tickets: $7.50-$9; at the gate: 1910, ext. 21, or visit library. $9-$12.50, free for ages 5 and cityofanacortes.org. younger. For information, including hours and direcISSUES THAT MATTER: tions, discounts and special Sno-Isle Libraries will host a panel discussion on Same- attractions, visit www.thefair. com. Sex Marriage Referendum 74 from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 27, at the MORE FUN Oak Harbor Library, MeetMOVIES IN THE PARKS: ing Room HH137, 1000 SE Mount Vernon Parks & Regatta Dr., Oak Harbor. Recreation will present free Panelists will include Joseph movies this summer in parks Backholm, chairman, Prearound Mount Vernon. Movserve Marriage Washington; ies begin at dusk. Festival Dr. Joe Fuiten, pastor, Cedar seating. Limited vendors onPark Church; Joshua Friesite. No pets. For information, des, spokesperson, Equal call 360-336-6215 or email Rights Washington; and Rev. mvparks@mountvernonwa. Rachel Taber-Hamilton, gov. Trinity Episcopal Church. Next up: Dr. Marshall Goldberg, n Saturday, Sept. 22: retired physician and board “Mirror Mirror”: Hillcrest member for both the Oak Park, 1717 S. 13th St.

FALL FILM SERIES: 7 p.m. Fridays, at the Anacortes Public Library, 1220 10th St., Anacortes. Movie man Nick Alphin, Academy Award nominee and career Hollywood sound man, will introduce and share insights about each selection. Free. 360293-1910, ext. 21, or library. cityofanacortes.org. Next up: n Sept. 21: “To Kill a Mockingbird”: Based on Harper Lee’s beloved novel, Gregory Peck stars as a small town Alabama lawyer defending a black man charged with raping a white woman in the 1930s. Winner of three Oscars. n Sept. 28: “An Affair to Remember”: Cary Grant and Deborah Kerr star as a couple who fall in love on a cruise, though engaged to others. Their planned reunion six months later atop the Empire State Building goes awry.

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