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Reviews Music: Trey Songz, Tamia, Corb Lund Video Games: “Madden NFL 13” PAGES 6-7

Tuning Up The Swingnuts play the Rockfish Grill in Anacortes on Friday PAGE 11

Roger Ebert Excess violence overshadows well-made “Lawless” PAGE 16

Skagit Valley Herald Thursday August 30, 2012

Catch GROOVE FOR THOUGHT and much more at Oak Harbor Music & Jazz Festival PAGE 3


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E2 - Thursday, August 30, 2012

NEW ON DVD THIS WEEK “Think Like a Man”: A relationship expert has trouble with his own love life. Anyone thinking about making a romantic comedy should take a look at director Tim Story’s “Think Like a Man” before shooting the first frame of film. It’s not often you see a movie that touches your heart and funny bone so perfectly. It proves romantic comedies can work if you start with the right mixture of love and laughs, toss in a cast that’s so endearing you want the best for them and tie it all together with a smart comical thread. “The Pirates! Band of Misfits”: A pirate looks to Charles Darwin for help to win a top pirate contest in this animated tale. The gang at Aardman Animations, producers of the whimsical and wonderful “Wallace & Gromit” films, have made this story of a pirate and his motley crew the company’s most entertaining venture — without a Brit and his best buddy dog — yet. “The Lucky One”: A soldier (Zac Efron) searches for the person in a photograph who saved his life. The film’s not a total loss. Efron is believable as the confused ex-Marine, and there are some emotional moments. Those just aren’t enough to make up for a film that, with any bit of logical thinking, would end before the first teardrop fell. “Battleship”: The Navy must stop an alien invasion. Watching “Battleship” is like getting ready to play the board game on which the film is based but then having to sit through an hour of vacation photos before you can start. If you can make it through the first dragging hour, the rest is kind of fun. “Homeland: The Complete First Season”: Showtime series starring Claire Danes. “Once Upon a Time: The Complete First Season”: TV series about a place where reality and fairy tales come together. “The Walking Dead: The Complete Second Season”: Survivors look for safety from mobs of zombies. “Boardwalk Empire: The Complete Second Season”: Steve Buscemi stars. “Injustice”: A tale of murder, conspiracy, secrets and guilt. “Spongebob Squarepants: Ghouls Fools”: Gang hunts treasure. “The Viral Factor”: An agent is double-crossed during a secret mission. “The Heineken Kidnapping”: A beer baron is kidnapped. Rutger Hauer stars. “Green Lantern the Animated Series: Season One, Part One”: Green Lantern

YOUR ARTS, ENTERTAINMENT AND RECREATION GUIDE TO WHAT’S GOING ON IN SKAGIT COUNTY AND THE SURROUNDING AREAS

Upcoming movie releases Following is a partial schedule of coming

movies on DVD. Release dates are subject to change: SEPT. 4 Piranha 3DD -- Anchor Bay Safe -- Lionsgate

This Weekend / Page 5

SEPT. 11 Girl In Progress -- Lionsgate What to Expect When You’re Expecting -- Lionsgate Snow White and the Huntsman -- Universal SEPT. 18 The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel -- Fox The Cabin in the Woods -- Lionsgate Strings -- House Lights Hysteria -- Sony Katy Perry: Part of Me -- Paramount SEPT. 25 Damsels in Distress -- Sony OCT. 2 Dark Shadows -- Warner

Catch the ‘Biggest Little Circus in the World’ this weekend in Bow

OCT. 9 The Raven -- Fox

Inside

OCT. 16 Moonrise Kingdom -- Universal That’s My Boy -- Sony n McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Corps faces a new intergalactic mission. “Life Happens”: An unexpected pregnancy changes the lives of three friends. “Poirot: Series 6”: David Suchet plays the mystery solver. “Blood Money”: A Shaolin warrior turns to crime after his parents are killed. “Monsieur Lazhar”: A substitute teacher brings stability to a school shaken by a suicide. “Looney Tunes: The Chuck Jones Collection Mouse Chronicles”: Features 19 remastered theatrical shorts. “Bob the Builder: The Ultimate Can-Do Crew Collection”: Includes 10 episodes. “Big Time Movie and Rags: Double Movie”: Double feature of Nickelodeon films. “Jim Gaffigan: Mr. Universe”: Standup special starring Gaffigan. “Headhunters”: Based on Jo Nesbo’s best-selling novel. “’50s TV Classics”: Includes Bob Hope, Ed Sullivan. “10 Things You Don’t Know About”: Series deals with little known facts. n Rick Bentley, McClatchy Newspapers

SUBMISSIONS Email features@skagitpublishing.com vrichardson@skagitpublishing. com (recreation items) Phone 360-416-2135 Hand-deliver 1215 Anderson Road Mount Vernon, WA 98274 Mailing address P.O. Box 578 Mount Vernon, WA 98273

Music, Game Reviews..................6-7 Get Involved.................................8-9 On Stage........................................ 10 Tuning Up..................................... 11 Travel........................................12-13 Hot Tickets.................................... 14 Roger Ebert.................................... 16 At the Lincoln Theatre.................. 17 Movie Mini-Reviews..................... 17 Out & About.............................18-19

Online events calendar To list your event on our website, visit goskagit.com and look for the Events Calendar on the home page HAVE A STORY IDEA? w For arts and entertainment, contact Features Editor Craig Parrish at 360-416-2135 or features@skagitpublishing.com w For recreation, contact staff writer Vince Richardson at 360-416-2181 or vrichardson@ skagitpublishing.com TO ADVERTISE 360-424-3251


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, August 30, 2012 - E3

MUSIC

Festival offers something for every music lover

CHERYL JEWELL AND THE SALTWATER OCTET

CHRIS EGER

STEVE TREMBLY Skagit Valley Herald staff

Musical acts of many stripes come together this weekend to perform at the Oak Harbor Music & Jazz Festival, running Friday through Sunday in downtown Oak Harbor. Jazz, rock, gospel, rhythm-and-blues, folk music and more will be represented on two stages on Pioneer Way. Entertainment begins at 5:45 p.m. Friday, and the weekend’s final bands wrap up at 6 p.m. Sunday. Among the headliners are the Chris Eger Band, Steve Trembley, Cheryl Jewell and the

Saltwater Octet, Pearl Django, Groove for Thought (which performed on NBC’s “The Sing-Off” in 2010) and Tenyce Mobley. According to festival organizers, proceeds will go partly to help the Blue Fox Drive-In make the transition to digital projection. In addition, a scholarship fund is being established to honor Ed Bridges, the former music director at Oak Harbor High School. Numerous food booths and commercial vendors will be on hand at the festival. Admission is free.

Oak Harbor Music & Jazz Festival When: Friday-Sunday, Aug. 31-Sept. 2 Where: Pioneer Way, downtown Oak Harbor Price: Free Information: www.oakharbormusicfestival.com

The lineup HARBOR VIEW, STAGE 1 Friday, Aug. 31 w 5:45-6:45 p.m.: Tambourine Sky w 7-8:30 p.m.: Pearl Django w 8:30-9 p.m.: Carly Calbero w 9-10:30 p.m.: Groove For Thought Saturday, Sept. 1 w 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.: Spoonshine w 12:45-2 p.m.: The Still Bill Band & Motown Cruisers w 2:15-3:15 p.m.: Carly Calbero w 3:45-5 p.m.: The Halyards w 5:30-6 p.m.: Nada Cantata w 6:40-8 p.m.: Cheryl Jewell and the Saltwater Octet w 8:30-10 p.m.: Steve Trembley

NADA CANTATA

Sunday, Sept. 2 w Noon-1 p.m.: Broken Banjo w 1:30-2:30 p.m.: Boma Cho w 3-4 p.m.: Spellbound w 4:30-6 p.m.: Chris Eger Band

PEARL DJANGO

DOCK SIDE, STAGE 2 Saturday, Sept. 1 w Noon-12:45 p.m.: Rocco and Friends w 1:15-2 p.m.: David Marshall w 2:30-3:30 p.m.: Eric Christensen and Friends w 4-5 p.m.: DB Jazz w 5:30-6:30 p.m.: Weak Sheep w 7-8 p.m.: Tenyce Mobley

STILL BILL BAND

Sunday, Sept. 2 w 12:30-1:30 p.m.: Ryan Rogers and Jamar Jenkins w 2-3 p.m.: Jacobs Road w 3:30-4:30 p.m.: Boys Makin Noise w 5-6 p.m.: Word of Everlasting Life and Faith Church


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E4 - Thursday, August 30, 2012

MOVIES By BEN FRITZ, JOHN HORN and DAVID PIERSON Los Angeles Times

China is rolling up the red carpet for Hollywood. Just six months after Chinese and American leaders reached a new agreement allowing more foreign movies into the world’s most populous nation, officials there are trying to torpedo the box office returns of some of Hollywood’s biggest summer films. American studios carefully schedule their pictures’ launch dates — often declaring them a year or more in advance — to avoid colliding with similar movies going after similar audiences. But the state-owned China Film Group, which oversees the release of imported movies, has been scheduling U.S. films from the same genres on the same dates, aiming to limit their total grosses and boost the percentage of box office generated by Chinese-made pictures. On Tuesday, the superhero movies “The Dark Knight Rises” and “The Amazing Spider-Man,” the Nos. 2 and 4 films of the year at the global box office, were to open simultaneously in China. A similar case of “double dating” occurred July 27 with the release of the animated movies “Ice Age: Continental Drift” and “The Lorax” in China. Next month, the thrillers “The Bourne Legacy” and “Total Recall” are tentatively set to open opposite each other as well, according to knowledgeable people not authorized to discuss the matter publicly.

Blackouts China, now the world’s second-largest movie market, also insists upon monthlong “blackout periods,” during which only

Mixed reaction

in China

locally produced movies can premiere. This summer, the blackouts have lasted longer, according to American movie executives familiar with the China market. A China Film spokesman previously told the Los Angeles Times that the overlapping dates were a result of a crowded calendar. But in a subsequent interview in local media, officials gave a different explanation. “We hope those protective measures will be able to create a space for domestic movies to survive and grow,” Zhang Hongsen, deputy head of the film bureau controlled by the State Administration of Radio Film and Television, said to the state-owned People’s Daily newspaper.

China Film representatives did not respond to requests for further comment. It appears Hollywood is being punished for doing too well, the result of relaxed limits on foreign movies and Chinese consumers’ surging appetite for Hollywood blockbusters. In late February, China agreed to increase from 20 to 34 the number of foreign movies allowed in under a revenue sharing program. Thanks to the robust performances of movies such as “Titanic 3D” and “The Avengers,” imported films accounted for 65 percent of China’s $1.3 billion of box office receipts through the end of June — a possible embarrassment to the Chi-

nese government. “China can’t be seen as being dominated by Hollywood — that’s not the message they want,” said Dan Mintz, chief executive of Chinese/American media company DMG Entertainment. “And you have to assume this is going to continue.” China’s new restrictions are having the desired effects. All of the top five movies in China from January through June were American. But in the week ended Aug. 19, only one was. The double-dating is killing some movies. “The Lorax” has grossed more than $120 million at the foreign box office but only $2.2 million in China — compared with $67 million for “Ice Age.”

Local exhibitors and moviegoers are not happy with the situation. Pan Xiaming, the manager of a multiplex in Shengzhou, a city of about 800,000 in eastern Zhejiang province, said the “SpiderMan” and “Dark Knight” sequels should never have gone head to head. “I was so anxious in July and August because there were no interesting big blockbusters and now suddenly we have two very good films together with good reputations,” said Pan, who runs an eight-screen theater next to a shopping center. “I wonder why China Film Group doesn’t just separate them by one week or half a month.” The faceoff between “The Dark Knight” and “SpiderMan” was the No. 2-trending topic Monday on Sina Weibo, China’s wildly popular Twitter alternative, drawing nearly 13 million comments by the early evening. “Spiderman and Batman are exhibited the same day, if I can only choose one, which one should I choose?” wrote one micro-blogger. “The American studios are getting more movies into China … but on the other hand there are these new constraints occurring,” said Steven Saltzman, a Loeb & Loeb partner with extensive experience in China. “One shouldn’t be surprised, however, because this is a market where noncommercial considerations, including political ones, matter greatly.”

Unclear guidelines In Hollywood, China’s decision-making process on whether and when to release an imported movie has long been mystifying. Companies that desire to have their movies distributed in China submit them to SARFT several months before their U.S. launch date

in hopes of getting permission to open there and an optimum release date. “The Dark Knight Rises,” “The Amazing Spider-Man,” “The Lorax” and “Ice Age” were cleared by government censors and given a coveted quota slot relatively quickly. The studios then waited — half a year in the case of “The Lorax” — until officials from the China Film Group, part of SARFT, informed them they would be opening against competitive Hollywood pictures. China Film refused to provide an explanation to the studios for its decision. Hollywood executives with China experience were shocked. None could recall two quota films ever opening against each other, let alone similar ones. There is no official appeals process, and unofficial lobbying efforts by studio representatives in Beijing were unsuccessful. The Motion Picture Assn. of America, Hollywood’s trade organization, has been similarly unable to persuade Chinese authorities to change their policies. The studios’ only recourse would appear to be withholding future releases from China, cutting off a growing revenue stream in an increasingly important foreign movie market. Spokespeople for the MPAA and several Hollywood studios declined to comment. People familiar with the thinking of studio executives said they were fearful that speaking publicly on the matter would antagonize Chinese authorities and lead to further punitive measures. “While there has been change in the way China handles American movies, it has been and will remain incremental for the foreseeable future,” said Saltzman. “To expect otherwise is an unsophisticated approach in this market.”


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, August 30, 2012 - E5

THIS WEEKENDin the area WENATCHEE YOUTH CIRCUS The “Biggest Little Circus in the World” will perform at 2 and 5 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 1, and at 2 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 2, at Thousand Trails Campground, 5409 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. Wenatchee Youth Circus members, ages 3 to 18, will offer displays of juggling, tightwire walking, high-flying aerial acrobatics and other professional circus acts. Tickets, more information: 360-724-4811.

STANWOOD ART WALK

“Your Passport To Art,” Stanwood’s third annual artwalk, will take place from 5 to 8 p.m. Friday, Aug. 31, in downtown Stanwood. Participating restaurants and businesses will showcase the work of local artists during the event. Meet the artists and enjoy music, appetizers, art and prizes. Free. 360-629-0562.

Skagit Valley Herald file photos

GUEMES FALL FESTIVAL

Check out the Guemes Island Fall Festival from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 1, at the Guemes Community Hall, 7549 Guemes Island Road. Enjoy arts and crafts, artist demonstrations, hot dogs, a bake sale and more.

SAIL CAM ISLE

The Cama Beach Celebration of Small Boats will take place from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 1-2, at Cama Beach State Park, 1880 S. West Camano Drive, Camano Island. Enjoy waterfront fun, music, food, games, sailing and more. Bring your own small boat or rent one from Camano Sail or the Center for Wooden Boats. Discover Pass required to park. www.camanosail.com.

“ACROSS THE MOUNTAINS AND BACK” A show of new artwork by Skagit Valley native Lisa Gilley will open with a reception from 5 to 8 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 1, and continue through Sept. 30 at Smith & Vallee Gallery, 5742 Gilkey Ave., Edison. Gilley’s new work explores her familiar Skagit tidelands as well as the warmer palettes of the Palouse, Yakima and Methow valleys. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday. 360-766-6230 or www.smithandvallee.com.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E6 - Thursday, August 30, 2012

REVIEWS MUSIC CDS Compiled from news services

Lionel Loueke

“Heritage” Lionel Loueke’s distinctive blend of African rhythms and modern jazz has already impressed such jazz legends as Herbie Hancock, who has prominently featured the guitarist on his recent recordings and in his touring bands. On “Heritage,” his third release for the Blue Note label, Loueke teams with another innovative, genre-stretching musician, keyboard player Robert Glasper, whose richly textured music combines jazz with hip-hop, R&B and soul. Glasper coproduced and performs on the album and also contributed two compositions. Loueke’s new lineup — with a powerful rhythm section of electric bassist Derrick Hodge (of Glasper’s Experiment band) and drummer Mark Guiliana — has a sound that is more groove-oriented and electric compared with the guitarist’s previous releases. Loueke himself switches from the softer nylon-string acoustic guitar to play steel-string acoustic and electric guitars. On the opening “Ife” (“Love” in Yoruba), Loueke begins with some percussive guitar work, uses clicking sounds to accent his vocals and creates infectious Afrorhythm grooves colored by electronic effects. The bittersweet ballad “Chardon” (“Thistle” in French) is more Europeaninfluenced with Loueke displaying a delicate, lyrical touch on acoustic guitar. Glasper’s “Tribal Dance,” featuring backup vocals by Gretchen Parlato, has repetitive, soaring, trance-inducing melody lines that rise and fall in intensity, while Loueke’s feel-good, high-energy “Freedom Dance” has Loueke playing an electric guitar solo over Hodge’s funky bass lines. Loueke wrote most of the 10 tunes on “Heritage.” It reflects the guitarist’s musical roots and personal odyssey from his native Benin in West Africa to France and then the U.S., where he has established himself as one of the most distinctive new artists on today’s jazz scene. n Charles J. Gans, Associated Press

Trey Songz “Chapter V”

Other than that lustrous tenor voice, the nicest thing about R&B crooner Trey Songz is he gets better with age. He didn’t peak with his 2005 debut or fade into the sunset with fewer hits, as so often happens in the nusoul stakes. Although not flashy, each album since his start shows Songz getting rougher around the edges, a little freakier and more willing to face down top-notch guest rappers. The freak-a-deak side of Songz is satisfied by the panting “Panty Wetter” and the racy, racing club-a-dub “2 Reasons.” An unnecessarily Auto-Tuned Songz finds G-rated humanity between grumbling MC Young Jeezy and the overplayed growl of Lil Wayne on the rudely clickclacking “Hail Mary” (rappers T.I., Rick Ross, Diddy, and Philly’s Meek Mill are littered throughout V, for better or worse). Songz does best when he goes it alone while keeping slow and low down. The beeping, laid-back “Heart Attack” is a handsome showcase for the singer’s sultry vocals, as is “Simply Amazing,” which finds Songz and his paramour lost under the covers with a subtle melody line and a slinky beat to warm them.

mode. He later observes that “(You Ain’t a Cowboy) If You Ain’t Been Bucked Off,” and offers a stark outlaw tale in “Pour ‘Em Kinda Strong.” Like-minded American Hayes Carll joins in for the wry road story “Bible on the Dash,” and on “Cows Around” Lund extols the joys of a constant bovine presence, set to nimble Western swing. But this cowboy also likes to go “90 miles an hour on a German motorcycle” (“Mein Deutches Motorrad”). He also knows the allure of the big city, which deepens the poignancy of his plea to his girlfriend in the ringing country-rocker “September.” And if he does end up having to try to lose “these country-boy blues,” he’s going to do it with “The Gothest Girl I Can.” Through all of this Lund is backed by his three-man band, the Hurtin’ Albertans, and their unfussy, live-in-the-studio approach gives everything an extra kick.

the quirkiness and emotional connection that made Dear’s earlier albums cult hits. n Katherine Silkaitis, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Tamia

“Beautiful Surprise”

Tamia, whose voice is one of music’s most powerful — and underrated — should be among the ranks of divas like Aretha, Chaka, Mariah and Beyonce. But her 17-year career hasn’t translated to charttopping songs and multiplatinum album sales. Despite that, the R&B songstress — best known for the hits “Stranger in My House” and “Into You” with Fabolous n Nick Cristiano, The Philadelphia Inquirer — has released four outstanding albums, including her stellar 1998 self-titled debut, Matthew which featured production work by Quincy Jones and Jermaine Dupri. Tamia’s fifth Dear release, “Beautiful Surprise,” is another “Beams” consistent effort, filled with soulful ballads and midtempo grooves. On his fifth The album’s biggest — and best — surfull-length prise is Tamia’s take on country music. album, popShe nicely remakes Wynonna Judd’s “Is electronic artist It Over Yet,” and “Still” is a beautiful, Matthew Dear twang-inspired version of a song from her has toned down the dark edginess that characterized his earlier releases in favor third album, “More.” Tamia’s bold leap into a new genre of a more accessible but less memorable makes up for some of the album’s shortalbum. n A.D. Amorosi, The Philadelphia Inquirer The 11 tracks of “Beams” feature some comings, including the lukewarm first single and title track, produced by frequent standout tunes — “Headcage,” the only Amy Winehouse collaborator Salaam Corb Lund track from last year’s eponymous EP to Remi. make it to the album, is the weirdest. “Cabin Fever” The 11-track set — her second indeWith a bubbling, underwater qualpendent release — also includes bouncy ity reminiscent of the film “The Abyss” Coming out tunes like “Lose My Mind” and “Believe and distant, robotic vocals that are sexy of western in Love,” both produced by the Runners in their withheld emotion, it’s also the Canada, Corb (Rick Ross, Rihanna, Usher). Fellow singalbum’s most compelling track. There’s Lund is weller Jazmine Sullivan co-writes and sings also the uplifting and tender “Ahead of versed in the background on the power ballad “Still Myself,” a nostalgia-filled song punctucowboy culture. Love You,” which finds Tamia stretching ated with breathless, staccato synth beats, But he also has her voice to new heights. seen life beyond the ranch, and that range a version of which Dear includes on every CHECK OUT THIS TRACK: On the soulalbum. of experience informs this bracing and There are other good tunes, some that stirring gospel tune “Because of You,” sharp-witted set. Tamia wonderfully returns to her church Cabin Fever begins with “Gettin’ Down feature memorable bass lines and others with industrial or even calypso influences. roots. on the Mountain,” with the singer sensBut for all its bright spots, “Beams” lacks n Stacy A. Anderson, Associated Press ing apocalypse and going into survivalist


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, August 30, 2012 - E7

REVIEWS VIDEO GAMES Chris Campbell, Scripps Howard News Service

‘Madden NFL 13’

Platforms: Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, Wii, Vita Genre: Sports Publisher: EA Sports ESRB Rating: E, for Everyone Grade: 3 stars (out of 5) After years of being berated by critics and fans (OK, probably more by critics than by fans, since this is still an 800pound gorilla of a franchise), “Madden NFL 13” injected some new technology — and life — into its creaky old knees. The changes result in an uneven product overall. Yes, gamers will flock to it because they love football and cannot get enough of it from August to February. But beneath the surface of the shiny packaging gamers will find old problems left unresolved. A new physics engine and an overhaul of the visual presentation and accompanying play-by-play commentary highlight the major overhauls to the “Madden” franchise. The new engine allows for a wealth of new tackle animations, but almost every play looks like 20 rag dolls are being chucked around the field, with necks and limbs bending and twisting in physically impossible ways. I kept awaiting the arrival of the “Madden ’92” ambulance to cart off every player on the field, but they somehow kept getting up. Most gamers want reassurance that “Madden 13” delivers the thrilling NFL experience they expect. Rest easy, but prepare yourselves for a shockingly level playing field. The convoluted play-calling system means less creativity, with more teams running the same sets and routes. It’s ridiculous to watch Seattle and New England run the same offense successfully. Players make a difference in the real NFL, but clearly in “Madden” everyone is a Hall of Famer. A big tip of the hat goes to EA for breathing some new life into the series. These “Madden” alterations, while not always hitting the mark, could set the stage for bigger and better things to come next year. Here’s hoping that happens.

‘Transformers: Fall of Cybertron’ Platforms: Xbox 360, PlayStation 3 and PC Genre: Action Publisher: Activision ESRB Rating: T, for Teen Grade: 3 stars

While watching the seemingly 500th cutscene in “Fall of Cybertron,” it became clear that this should have been the movie Michael Bay made instead of the chaotic mess we were handed that happened to have “Transformers” in the title. “Fall of Cybertron” presents a planet on the precipice of destruction. The Autobots struggle to maintain the last vestiges of their home while the Decepticons unleash brute force in a “if we can’t have it, we’ll sure as hell burn it” mentality. The game shifts perspective from iconic hero Optimus Prime to numerous other Autobots, some famous and a few not. This gives players the opportunity to try on many gameplay hats and see which ones fit best without committing to a particular style. When players arrive at the big final battle, this concept gets thrown into hyperdrive. Missions where characters alternate between flights and ground battles stand out from the duller missions. The online cooperative mode provides exciting action and the ability to create and customize a Transformer character. As a sequel to “War for Cybertron,” “Fall” is a worthy and strong successor. But disjointed gameplay may lead players to marvel more at the cinematics than the game itself. n Follow Chris Campbell @campbler or email him at game_on_games@mac.com.

Please recycle this newspaper


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E8 - Thursday, August 30, 2012

GET INVOLVED ART

call 360-766-6419.

CALL TO ARTISTS: United General Hospital’s Fine Art Committee seeks uplifting, healing art by local artists for display in the Sedro-Woolley hospital’s Gallery Hall. Artwork, in any medium, can be for sale, with a portion of the proceeds going toward the purchase of a permanent art collection. Contact Patsy Prutzman by email: patsyprutzman@gmail. com.

FAMILY ART DAYS AT MoNA: Skagit Artists Together and the Museum of Northwest Art offer Family Art Days each month at MoNA, 121 S. First St., La Conner. Sessions are open to all ages and skill levels and include guided walk-throughs of MoNA exhibitions. Limited to 15 participants per session. To register: 360-466-4446, ext. 108, or FAD@museumofnwart. org. Information: www. museumofnwart.org. Workshops are free with museum admission. Admission: $8 adults, $5 seniors, $3 students, free for members and ages 11 and younger. Next up: Painting With Light: with Amy Griffin, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. or 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 15. Explore different painting techniques, including watercolor, acrylic paint and mixed media. Exploring the Circle: with Barbara Silverman Summers, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. or 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 20. Discover the possibilities of the circular form using watercolor, collage and pastel.

ARTS VENDORS: Immaculate Conception Regional School is accepting vendors for its Autumn Arts Festival, slated for 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 20, at St. Joseph Center, 215 N. 15th St., Mount Vernon. An 8-foot by 10-foot booth rents for $40-$45, with an additional fee for tables and electricity. For information or an application, call 360-4210641 or visit www.icrsweb. org.

ART CLASSES ART WORKSHOPS: Jeanne Gardner is offering a series of two-hour workshops for ages 7 to adult at That’s Knot All Artists’ Co-op, 128 S. First St., La Conner. $20 per session, includes materials; 10 percent discount for additional family members. Register at the Artists’ Co-op or

CLAY CLASSES: Ceramic artist Sue Roberts offers a variety of classes and workshops at Tower Arts Studio, 5424 S. Shore Drive, Guemes Island. For information, call 360-770-6140 or visit www.towerartsstudio.com. Next up: Ceramics For Everyone: The six-week class will meet from 6:15 to 8:30 p.m. Tuesdays, beginning Sept. 4. The class will focus on making functional ware using a variety of handbuilding techniques. Open to all levels of experience. $190, includes materials. Mosaic Garden Forms: The class will meet for six weeks from 6:15 to 8:30 p.m. Mondays, beginning Sept. 10. Learn how to hand-build a simple vase or sphere out of clay, then turn it into a colorful mosaic piece using fragments of ceramic tiles, mirror, potter, found objects and trinkets. $190 includes most materials. Introduction to Mosaics: 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 15-16. Students will make a colorful mosaic item using ART CLASSES: Dakota fragments of ceramic tile, mirror, trinkets and found Art offers a variety of art objects. All materials are classes and workshops at 17873 Highway 536, Mount provided, but students are Vernon. 360-416-6556, ext. encouraged to bring their

Stay & Savour the last rays of Summer in September. Stroll the streets of Sidney, shop & save at the variety of boutiques and check out our seaside town’s collection of unique bookshops. Then unwind with an oceanfront dinner in Haro’s Restaurant + Bar.

BOOK NOW FROM:

$

169

* based on Single/Double Valid September 1 - 30, 2012. Subject to availability

*

LESSONS: Thursday evenings at The Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main St., Conway. $12 drop-in fee, AUDITIONS $60 for six classes. “LA BOUTIQUE FANn Basics for beginners TASQUE”: Auditions for at 6 p.m. No experience the holiday ballet will be or partner needed. Open held Saturday, Sept. 1, at dance practice follows Firehouse Performing Arts from 7 to 7:15 p.m. Center, 1314 Harris Ave., n Intermediate instrucBellingham. $5 audition tion at 7:15 p.m. Previous fee. Ages 3 and older. No Tango experience required. experience required for Attend the basics class at ages 11 and younger. For no extra charge. information and audition n Open tango dancing times, call 360-908-1653 or from 8:15 to 10 p.m. every email harperandi@hotmail. fourth Thursday. Practice com. your new tango techniques. No cover. 360-708-8076 or CALL FOR YOUNG email secure@cnw.com. MUSICIANS: Fidalgo Youth Symphony invites MUSIC young musicians to audiFREE MUSIC JAMS: tion and register for the Come and play or just 2012-13 season on Thurswatch the fun at Cyndy’s day, Sept. 6, at Salem Lutheran Church, 2529 N. Broiler, 27021 102nd Ave. NW, Stanwood. Free for LaVenture Road,Mount Vernon. For information or participants and spectators. All-Ages Open Mic: 7 an audition appointment, p.m. second and fourth call 360-969-1681 or visit Tuesday each month. www.fysmusic.org. Jam Night: 8 p.m. Thursdays. DANCE 360-629-4800 or www. BEGINNER SQUARE cyndysbroiler.com. DANCE LESSONS: The Mount Baker Singles ON STAGE Square Dance Club will OPEN MIC: 7 p.m. offer lessons at 7 p.m. TuesThursdays, The Soup Bowl days, starting Sept. 11, at at Common Ground, 351 the Mount Vernon Senior Center, 1401 Cleveland St. Pease Road, Burlington. Families, couples or singles Sign-ups begin at 6 p.m. All ages are welcome to perwelcome. First two weeks are free, then $4 per lesson. form or come to watch and listen. Free. For informa360-424-4608 or 360-424tion, contact Tobie Ann at 9675. 425-870-6784. EAST COAST SWING: RECREATION 7:30 to 9 p.m. Mondays, Sept. 10-Oct. 1, Anacortes HUNTER EDUCATION Center For Happiness, 619 CLASSES: The Central Commercial Ave., AnaWhidbey Sportsman’s cortes. Kim Hargrove will Association will offer a lead the four-week course shooter training/safety in this versatile dance, also education course from 6 to known as the Jitterbug. 9 p.m. Wednesday through $38, $70 couple. 360-464Friday and 9 a.m. to noon 2229 or www.anacortescen- Saturday, Sept. 5-8, and terforhappiness.org. again Sept. 12-15, at the CWSA clubhouse near ARGENTINE TANGO Coupeville.

5, or www.dakotaartcenter. own special mementos to com. use in the mosaic. $120.

Package includes: a discount card from participating Sidney shops, free parking and a $25 Haro’s dining credit.

For information call toll free 1 866 659 9445 9805 Seaport Place, Sidney BC www.sidneypier.com

Attendance all four days is mandatory to receive credit. There is no charge for the classes, but donations are accepted to cover the cost of materials. For more information or to register, call Sam Weatherford at 360-914-0354 or John Boling at 360-9692440. ZOMBIE INVASION: Join in a live zombie adventure/ survival game Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 8-9, at Cornet Bay at Deception Pass State Park. Check-in is set for 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, and the object is to survive for 24 hours in a zombie apocalypse, armed only with Nerf guns and boffer-safe weapons. If a survivor is “killed” by one of the zombies, he or she then puts on zombie makeup and joins the attackers. Bring food, water, bedding and appropriate clothing to survive in the largely outdoor event. Some bunks may be provided. Ages 18 and older. No alcohol or drugs. $25 in advance, $30 at the door. For information or to register, visit www.biomechine. net/lastgames/index.php. TRAIL TALES: The last of this summer’s interpretive walks will be held Sept. 5 and 15. All walks are free and handicapped accessible. For more information, go to the Trail Tales link at skagitbeaches. org. Wednesday, Sept. 5: 10 to 11:30 a.m., Fidalgo Bay RV Park, 4701 Fidalgo Bay Road, Anacortes. Walk along the Tommy Thompson trestle and learn about the history of Weaverling Spit, Fidalgo Bay and March Point from earliest European contact to the 21st century. One-and-ahalf miles round trip on flat, paved path and trestle bridging Fidalgo Bay.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, August 30, 2012 - E9

GET INVOLVED Saturday, Sept. 15: 10 to 11:30 a.m., 34th Street crossing of the Tommy Thompson Trail, Anacortes. Learn about the history and cleanup of the old plywood mill site at the east end of 34th Street. Also learn about Washington Ecology’s current cleanup project to remove toxins and restore a healthy shoreline. About 1 mile of walking in total. Saturday, Sept. 15: 3 to 4:30 p.m., Fidalgo Bay RV Park, 4701 Fidalgo Bay Road, Anacortes. Walk along the Tommy Thompson Trail and identify and discuss about a dozen different plants, including how they fit into the environment and how they were used by humans of different backgrounds. The walk is along a paved, flat trail.

BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS GOLF TOURNEY: The 17th annual Boys & Girls Clubs of Skagit County Golf Tournament will take place Friday, Sept. 7, at Avalon Golf Links in Burlington. Registration: $125, $500 for a foursome, includes green fees, carts, snacks, lunch, dinner and prizes. Dinner only: $25. Sponsorships are available. For information or to register, call 360-4285972 or email info@ccev entplanning.com.

and Island counties. Enjoy full meals, stocked rest sites and after-ride activities, including music and a beer garden. For information or to register, call 800344-4867 (press 2) or visit www.bikemsnorthwest.org.

ANNE JACKSON MEMORIAL RUN/WALK: The fourth annual 5K/10K run and 2-mile walk will take place Saturday, Sept. 15, at the Humane Society of Skagit Valley, 18841 Kelleher Road, Burlington. BIKE MS RIDE: The Day-of-race registration: 7 annual bicycling fundraiser to 9 a.m. Walk starts at 9:15 for multiple sclerosis will a.m., followed by the run take place Saturday and at 9:30 a.m. Awards for the top three race winners, plus Sunday, Sept. 8-9, beginning and ending in Mount additional random prizes. Registration: $12, $22 with Vernon. Join some 2,000 cyclists to help raise money T-shirt, in advance; $5 additional, day of event. Free for research while ridfor ages 14 and younger ing scenic courses rangor 70 and older. Shirt only: ing from 22 to 97 miles $10. Walk participants: through Skagit, Whatcom

Polio Plus

A Musical Celebration

A Rotary Encore Performance

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 6 • 7:30 pm THIS PERFORMANCE IS DEVOTED TO FAMILIES AND THE COMMUNITY $10 PER PERSON • FESTIVAL SEATING McIntyre Hall • 2501 E. College Way • Mount Vernon

Pirate Adventures: kinwashingtonoutdoorwomen. org or call Ronni McGlenn dergarten through second at 425-455-1986. grade, 4 to 5:15 Fridays, Sept. 28-Nov. 2. Students will create their own THEATER unique pirate character THEATER CLASSES: and play fun theater games Anacortes Community that will develop their Theatre’s Class Act School OUTDOOR SKILLS FOR acting skills and ability to for the Performing Arts is WOMEN: Women can work with others. Class will learn the basics of fishing, enrolling kids from preculminate in a play, perhunting and other outdoor school through 12th grade formed in ACT’s theater for fall classes on acting skills from Washington on the last day of class. $50. and theater arts. Classes Department of Fish and Wildlife experts and other are held at ACT, 918 M WORKSHOPS Ave., Anacortes. 360-293certified instructors at a QUILTING FOR BEGIN6829 or www.acttheatre. Sept. 14-16 workshop at NERS: Learn how to handcom/classact. Camp River Ranch in quilt from 9 a.m. to 12:30 The Magic Box: preCarnation. Participants p.m. Mondays at the Conmust be at least 18. A state school-age children, 10 crete Center, 45821 Railrecreational fishing license to 11 a.m. Tuesdays, Sept. 25-Oct. 30. Students will road Ave., Concrete. Bring is required. The worktake part in a variety of a flat edge thimble, roundshop fee of $250 includes creative dramatic games needle puller, small scissors lodging, meals and use of equipment. A limited num- designed to use their imag- and No. 9 go-betweens quilting needles. Tips and ber of partial scholarships ination, improve self-conare available for first-time fidence and provide social technique how-tos on the interaction in an organized last Monday each month. participants. For more information, visit www. class setting. $50. 360-853-8400. collect $50 or more in pledges to get free T-shirt and registration; dogs welcome. Proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Skagit County. 360-757-0445 or www.skagithumane.com.

A Family Event Celebrating Our Skagit River

Skagit River Salmon Festival

Saturday, September 15 • 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Edgewater Park in Mount Vernon

Composer Rick Vale at the Piano Skagit Symphony led by Dave Cross PolioPlusCelebration.org

Tickets: www.mcintyrehall.org or call McIntyre Box Office 360.416.7727 ext. 2

SALMON FESTIVAL

100% of proceeds benefit PolioPlus! FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7 • 5:30 PM • ROTARY PERFORMANCE • BLACK TIE OPTIONAL Featuring Past RI President, Ray Klinginsmith • $100 Donation to PolioPlus Per Person

Music • Activities • Arts & Crafts • Beer & Wine Garden Free Admission • SkagitRiverFest.org This event received funding from Skagit County


E10 Thursday, August 30, 2012

Thursday, August 30, 2012 E11

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

ON STAGE in the Skagit Valley and surrounding area August 30-September 16 Thursday-Friday.30-31

TUNING UP Playing at area venues August 30-September 6 SUSAN JONES

No events submitted

Saturday.1 THEATER

“Make ’em Laugh”: musical comedy, 7:30 p.m., RiverBelle Theatre, The Old Town Grainery, 100 E. Montgomery, Mount Vernon. $40 dinner and show; $30 dessert buffet and show. Reservations required: 360-336-3012 or www.riverbelledinnertheatre.com.

FRIDAY.31

THURSDAY.30

TRAINWRECK 9 p.m. to midnight, Cyndy’s Broiler, 27021 102nd Ave. NW, Stanwood. No cover. 360-6294800 or www.cyndysbroiler.com.

Lane Fernando: 6 to 9 p.m., Seeds Bistro and Bar, 623 Morris St., La Conner. No cover. 360-4663280. Matney Cook and the Mudflat Walkers: 7 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/ Main, Conway. 360-445-3000.

Sunday-Wednesday.2-5

FRIDAY.31 SWINGNUTS 9 p.m. to midnight, Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-588-1720.

No events submitted

FRIDAY.31

Thursday.6

Snake Bite: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-4226411.

COMEDY

Comedy Night with Michelle Westford and Susan Jones: 8 p.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. $10. 360-755-3956 or www. anacortesH2O.com.

FRIDAY-SUNDAY.31-2 Bad Religion, Black Flag, Alkaline Trio: 9 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. 360-778-1067.

Swingnuts: 9 p.m. to midnight, Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-5881720.

The Prozac Mountain Boys: 8 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/ Main, Conway. $5-$7. 360-445-3000.

Friday-Sunday.7-9

Trainwreck (country rock): 9 p.m. to midnight, Cyndy’s Broiler, 27021 102nd Ave. NW, Stanwood. No cover. 360-6294800 or www.cyndys broiler.com.

Chico’s Paradise: 8 p.m., Blue Horse Gallery, 301 W. Holly St., Bellingham. 360-671-2305 or www.bluehorse gallery.com.

Ravinwolf (blues): 7:30 p.m., Washington Sips, 608 First St., La Conner. No cover. 360-399-1037.

No events submitted

SATURDAY.1

LOOKING AHEAD FRIDAY.14

Jeff Foxworthy: 7:30 p.m., Puyallup Fair. $25-$65, includes fair admission. 888-5593247 or www.thefair.com/concerts. “Legally Blonde: The Musical”: Seattle Musical Theatre: 7:30 p.m., Magnuson Park, 7120 62nd Ave. NE, Seattle. $35-$40. 206-363-2809 or www.seattlemusicaltheatre.org.

SATURDAY.15

“Legally Blonde: The Musical”: Seattle Musical Theatre: 7:30 p.m., Magnuson Park, 7120 62nd Ave. NE, Seattle. $35-$40. 206-363-2809 or www.seattlemusicaltheatre.org.

SUNDAY.16

“QUE SERA! Celebrating Doris Day”: Kristi King and the Hans Brehmer Quartet, 5:30 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $24-$28. 360-336-8955 or www.lincolntheatre. org. “Legally Blonde: The Musical”: Seattle Musical Theatre, 2 p.m., Magnuson Park, 7120 62nd Ave. NE, Seattle. $35-$40. 206-363-2809 or www.seattlemusicaltheatre.org.

THURSDAY.6 COMEDY NIGHT WITH MICHELLE WESTFORD AND SUSAN JONES 8 p.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. $10. 360-755-3956 or www.anacortesH2O.com.

MICHELLE WESTFORD

Jammin’ Jeff: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411. Jenny & The TomCats: 6 to 9 p.m., Carpenter Creek Winery, 20376 E. Hickox Road, Mount Vernon. $7 cover. 360-848-6673 or www. carpentercreek.com.

Yogoman: 8:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-766-6266. Marcia Kester (country, rock, blues, pop): 7 to 11 p.m., Anacortes Eagles Hall, 901 Seventh St., Anacortes. Call 360-7579687 for guest sign-in.

Scott Pemberton: 9:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-755-3956 or www.anacortesH2O. com.

Con Brio (soul, funk): 8 p.m., Blue Horse Gallery, 301 W. Holly St., Bellingham. 360-6712305 or www.bluehorse gallery.com.

Blues Redemption: 9 p.m. to midnight, Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-588-1720.

Jon Mutchler (piano): 6 to 9 p.m., Semiahmoo Resort, 9565 Semiahmoo Parkway, Blaine. www.semiahmoo.com.

Lee Howard (12-string guitar): 7:30 p.m., Washington Sips, 608 First St., La Conner. No cover. 360-399-1037.

Stilly River Band: 8 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $5-$7. 360-445-3000.

Blues Redemption: 9 p.m. to midnight, Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-588-1720.

Mount Eerie, Hungry Cloud Darkening, Ever Ending Kicks: 5 to 8 p.m., The Heart of Anacortes, 1014 Fourth St., Anacortes. $7. 360-2933515.

SUNDAY.2 Gary B’s Church of the Blues (blues, classic rock): 6 to 10 p.m., Castle Tavern, 708 Metcalf St., Sedro-Woolley. 360-855-2263.

WEDNESDAY.5 New Iberians: 5:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-766-6266.

The Kiss of Jazz/ Trish Hatley Quartet: 5 to 7:30 p.m., The Farmhouse Inn, 13724 La Conner Whitney Road, Mount Vernon. 360-466-4411.

The Spittin’ Cobras, Black Beast Revival: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $6. 360-778-1067.

Ben Starner (piano): 6:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/ Main, Conway. 360-445-3000.

Savage Jazz: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-588-1720.

OAK HARBOR MUSIC AND JAZZ FESTIVAL Groove for Thought, Pearl Django, Cheryl Jewell, Carly Calbero, Nada Cantada, The Halyards, The Chris Eger Band, The Steve Trembley Band and more: 6 to 11 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday, Pioneer Way in downtown Oak Harbor. Free. www. oakharbormusic festival.com.

THURSDAY.6 David Lee Howard (12-string guitar): 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/ Main, Conway. 360445-3000.

Daddy Treetops (blues): 7 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. 360-4453000.


E10 Thursday, August 30, 2012

Thursday, August 30, 2012 E11

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

ON STAGE in the Skagit Valley and surrounding area August 30-September 16 Thursday-Friday.30-31

TUNING UP Playing at area venues August 30-September 6 SUSAN JONES

No events submitted

Saturday.1 THEATER

“Make ’em Laugh”: musical comedy, 7:30 p.m., RiverBelle Theatre, The Old Town Grainery, 100 E. Montgomery, Mount Vernon. $40 dinner and show; $30 dessert buffet and show. Reservations required: 360-336-3012 or www.riverbelledinnertheatre.com.

FRIDAY.31

THURSDAY.30

TRAINWRECK 9 p.m. to midnight, Cyndy’s Broiler, 27021 102nd Ave. NW, Stanwood. No cover. 360-6294800 or www.cyndysbroiler.com.

Lane Fernando: 6 to 9 p.m., Seeds Bistro and Bar, 623 Morris St., La Conner. No cover. 360-4663280. Matney Cook and the Mudflat Walkers: 7 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/ Main, Conway. 360-445-3000.

Sunday-Wednesday.2-5

FRIDAY.31 SWINGNUTS 9 p.m. to midnight, Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-588-1720.

No events submitted

FRIDAY.31

Thursday.6

Snake Bite: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-4226411.

COMEDY

Comedy Night with Michelle Westford and Susan Jones: 8 p.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. $10. 360-755-3956 or www. anacortesH2O.com.

FRIDAY-SUNDAY.31-2 Bad Religion, Black Flag, Alkaline Trio: 9 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. 360-778-1067.

Swingnuts: 9 p.m. to midnight, Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-5881720.

The Prozac Mountain Boys: 8 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/ Main, Conway. $5-$7. 360-445-3000.

Friday-Sunday.7-9

Trainwreck (country rock): 9 p.m. to midnight, Cyndy’s Broiler, 27021 102nd Ave. NW, Stanwood. No cover. 360-6294800 or www.cyndys broiler.com.

Chico’s Paradise: 8 p.m., Blue Horse Gallery, 301 W. Holly St., Bellingham. 360-671-2305 or www.bluehorse gallery.com.

Ravinwolf (blues): 7:30 p.m., Washington Sips, 608 First St., La Conner. No cover. 360-399-1037.

No events submitted

SATURDAY.1

LOOKING AHEAD FRIDAY.14

Jeff Foxworthy: 7:30 p.m., Puyallup Fair. $25-$65, includes fair admission. 888-5593247 or www.thefair.com/concerts. “Legally Blonde: The Musical”: Seattle Musical Theatre: 7:30 p.m., Magnuson Park, 7120 62nd Ave. NE, Seattle. $35-$40. 206-363-2809 or www.seattlemusicaltheatre.org.

SATURDAY.15

“Legally Blonde: The Musical”: Seattle Musical Theatre: 7:30 p.m., Magnuson Park, 7120 62nd Ave. NE, Seattle. $35-$40. 206-363-2809 or www.seattlemusicaltheatre.org.

SUNDAY.16

“QUE SERA! Celebrating Doris Day”: Kristi King and the Hans Brehmer Quartet, 5:30 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $24-$28. 360-336-8955 or www.lincolntheatre. org. “Legally Blonde: The Musical”: Seattle Musical Theatre, 2 p.m., Magnuson Park, 7120 62nd Ave. NE, Seattle. $35-$40. 206-363-2809 or www.seattlemusicaltheatre.org.

THURSDAY.6 COMEDY NIGHT WITH MICHELLE WESTFORD AND SUSAN JONES 8 p.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. $10. 360-755-3956 or www.anacortesH2O.com.

MICHELLE WESTFORD

Jammin’ Jeff: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411. Jenny & The TomCats: 6 to 9 p.m., Carpenter Creek Winery, 20376 E. Hickox Road, Mount Vernon. $7 cover. 360-848-6673 or www. carpentercreek.com.

Yogoman: 8:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-766-6266. Marcia Kester (country, rock, blues, pop): 7 to 11 p.m., Anacortes Eagles Hall, 901 Seventh St., Anacortes. Call 360-7579687 for guest sign-in.

Scott Pemberton: 9:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-755-3956 or www.anacortesH2O. com.

Con Brio (soul, funk): 8 p.m., Blue Horse Gallery, 301 W. Holly St., Bellingham. 360-6712305 or www.bluehorse gallery.com.

Blues Redemption: 9 p.m. to midnight, Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-588-1720.

Jon Mutchler (piano): 6 to 9 p.m., Semiahmoo Resort, 9565 Semiahmoo Parkway, Blaine. www.semiahmoo.com.

Lee Howard (12-string guitar): 7:30 p.m., Washington Sips, 608 First St., La Conner. No cover. 360-399-1037.

Stilly River Band: 8 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $5-$7. 360-445-3000.

Blues Redemption: 9 p.m. to midnight, Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-588-1720.

Mount Eerie, Hungry Cloud Darkening, Ever Ending Kicks: 5 to 8 p.m., The Heart of Anacortes, 1014 Fourth St., Anacortes. $7. 360-2933515.

SUNDAY.2 Gary B’s Church of the Blues (blues, classic rock): 6 to 10 p.m., Castle Tavern, 708 Metcalf St., Sedro-Woolley. 360-855-2263.

WEDNESDAY.5 New Iberians: 5:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-766-6266.

The Kiss of Jazz/ Trish Hatley Quartet: 5 to 7:30 p.m., The Farmhouse Inn, 13724 La Conner Whitney Road, Mount Vernon. 360-466-4411.

The Spittin’ Cobras, Black Beast Revival: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $6. 360-778-1067.

Ben Starner (piano): 6:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/ Main, Conway. 360-445-3000.

Savage Jazz: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-588-1720.

OAK HARBOR MUSIC AND JAZZ FESTIVAL Groove for Thought, Pearl Django, Cheryl Jewell, Carly Calbero, Nada Cantada, The Halyards, The Chris Eger Band, The Steve Trembley Band and more: 6 to 11 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday, Pioneer Way in downtown Oak Harbor. Free. www. oakharbormusic festival.com.

THURSDAY.6 David Lee Howard (12-string guitar): 7:30 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/ Main, Conway. 360445-3000.

Daddy Treetops (blues): 7 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. 360-4453000.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E12 - Thursday, August 30, 2012

TRAVEL

REDISCOVERING

Bali’s serenity WORTH THE EFFORT

Firdia Lisnawati / AP

Tourists take a surfing lesson on Kuta beach in Bali, Indonesia. By ANGELA DOLAND For The Associated Press

BALI, Indonesia — The morning sun turned pools of water in the rice paddies into mirrors. A farmer swung a load of coconuts onto his shoulder. Somewhere, a cow was lowing. The scene should have been perfect, but something was off. After four years, I was back in Bali to relive a memory of a walk through the rice fields near the town of Ubud. My disappointment may have started with the bizarre signposts, on a dirt path in the rice paddies, advertising Italian restaurants and French rotisserie chicken. Or maybe it was the villas sprouting up in the green fields, boasting of infinity pools and yoga workout rooms. With Bali developing so fast, my husband and I realized we would

If you go

and Seminyak, try Kedungu beach, a lovely but not famous stretch of Getting real: We spent a day driv- black sand where the only other ing around the Tabanan area, which beachgoers we saw were three boasts endless rice terraces with surfers. We lunched on delicious no luxury villas or tourists in sight. corn-on-the-cob and nasi goreng, or We also came across many trades- fried rice, from a local food stand. men at work. Some were weaving Even more gorgeous is Padang thatched roofs from grass. Still Padang, a surfer’s paradise near others were extracting clay from the the famous Uluwatu temple, where ground and stamping it into bricks cliffs meet blue sky and waves. It and roofing tiles. It was an eyehas avoided mass development opening outing, especially for kids. because it’s tricky to access, but Tranquil beaches: To get away it’s nonetheless getting more from the bikini-clad crowds at Kuta crowded.

have to look harder this time to rediscover the Indonesian island’s serenity and beauty. We regrouped, got advice from locals, and found our travel pleasures in places we hadn’t known to look for — in a simple meal of fried rice and coconut juice at a deserted beach, and in the treasure bins of

an out-of-the-way antiques row. Obviously, nobody heading to Bali expects to find an undiscovered paradise. It’s a longtime favorite of honeymooners, surfers and travelers drawn to its dancing, music and religion. Though Bali is part of the world’s most populous Muslim nation, Indonesia, most res-

The northern coast is quieter, but avoid the dawn dolphin-sighting outings at Lovina, where dozens of speedboats zigzag through the water chasing a few poor animals. Shopping: Ubud is famous for its market and boutiques, though many vendors there sell the same sarongs, baskets and figurines. Laurent Pickaerts, a Frenchman who runs the charming La Maison P&L guest house in Kerobokan, took us antiquing on Tangkuban Perahu Road in the Pengipian neighborhood, where dozens of

idents practice a form of Hinduism known for elaborate ceremonies and rituals. The tiny island offers a touch of adventure and all the creature comforts. You can hike up a volcano, then come back to your hotel for a cappuccino and a massage. Bali, specifically Ubud, is where

shops sell antiques and handicrafts for reasonable prices. Here, you can find small statues, shadow puppets and drums that would fit in a suitcase. For baskets, kites and children’s souvenirs, try Unagi (Marlboro Road No. 383 in Denpasar). It’s a wholesale craft market where Seminyak’s chic boutiques buy their wares to sell at jacked-up prices. What it lacks in charm it makes up for in choice and price. On the Web: www.balitourism board.org

Elizabeth Gilbert put the “love” in “Eat, Pray, Love,” an inspiration for some tourists. But sadly, amid the island’s speedy, haphazard development, sometimes it can be hard to see past the construction cranes, traffic jams and trash on the southern coast.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, August 30, 2012 - E13

TRAVEL Local travel

Photos by Firdia Lisnawati / AP

Balinese men build a bamboo bridge next to a road construction site in Kuta, Bali, Indonesia. Even in landlocked Ubud, the island’s supposedly laid-back cultural hub, my taxi got stuck in gridlock outside a Starbucks. It seemed a fitting symbol for a vacation going wrong. To tackle the infrastructure problems, the island’s dingy, overcrowded airport is getting an upgrade. Work is under way on toll roads to ease the traffic, especially bad around the built-up beach party town of Kuta. But the tourism numbers are growing so quickly, it’s hard to imagine how the island will cope. Last year brought 2.75 million foreign visitors, up more than 10 percent from 2010. Next year, the island will get a publicity boost by hosting two very different international events, the Miss World pageant and the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit. The Jakarta Post reported in July that Bali’s governor expected the number of foreign visitors to nearly double to 5 million by 2015.

day, you’ll happen upon “canang sari,” which are small, exquisite religious offerings made from leaves, flowers, rice and incense sticks. You’ll see Balinese in sarongs and lace blouses kneeling to pray at their family temples by the roadsides. Whizzing down the road in a scooter at dusk, you might hear a snatch of music from a rehearsing gamelan orchestra — percussive, chiming, mesmerYoung tourists release baby turtles on Kuta beach. izing. The chairman of Bali’s Domestic visitors should including Lombok. In July, tourism board, Ida Bagus Ngurah Wijaya, acknowlalso nearly double to hit 10 the French newspaper Le million, he said. Monde published a much- edges the island’s crowdThough bombings by discussed article declaring ing problems but says its culture and temples still Islamic militants in 2002 Bali a has-been under the and 2005 in Bali targeted headline, “Bali, c’est fini?” distinguish it from other beach destinations. “The Westerners at nightclubs Yet I would argue that and beach restaurants, kill- Bali, for all its troubles, still culture is still there, even in a place like Kuta,” the ing a total of 222 people, offers something special, party beach, he told me the violence did not seem if you can forgive its flaws to deter visitors in the long — and if you can get there when I called him after my trip. term. sooner rather than later. That’s true. But we felt Some tourists in search For me, the biggest draw much better about Bali the of cleaner beaches and is the intense moments farther we got from the more authenticity are of beauty that bloom up heading to nearby islands, out of nowhere. Every noise and traffic.

enhanced driver’s license required. Trip includes bus transportation, lodging, lug WILDLIFE TOURS: The gage handling, parks admisWhale Museum will offer sions and six meals. a land-based wildlife tour Boeing Airplane Factory of San Juan Island from 2 & Future of Flight Museum to 5 p.m. Friday, Aug. 31, Tour: 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. beginning at the museum, Wednesday, Sept. 19. $81, 62 First St., Friday Harbor. includes round-trip transA certified naturalist will portation, Future of Flight escort you via shuttle to Center and airplane factory the west side of San Juan Island, where you will have tours, lunch and escort. the opportunity to see killer Britannia Mine & Train Museum: 8 a.m. to 5:30 whales, if present, and p.m. Thursday, Sept. 27. learn about the biology, The tour will feature an social structure, culture, underground train ride, gold endangered status and panning pavilion, visit to the threats of the Southern Resident killer whales. The historic mill building, lunch at the Squamish River, a tour is free, but reservafilm featuring climbing histions are required. Call tory and the Stawamus 360-378-4710, ext. 23, Chief Mountain, and time or stop by the museum. at the Squamish Adventure www.whalemuseum.org. Center. $95-$100. Passport DAY TRIPS: Camano Cen- or enhanced driver’s license ter is offering several trips required. Trip includes transportation, museum for seniors and others, departing from and return- admissions, underground ing to Camano Center, 606 train ride, lunch, Chief Mountain feature film and Arrowhead Road, Camano escort. Island. 360-387-0222 or www.camanocenter.org. Japanese Botanical Gar- SHORT TRIPS: Mount Vernon Parks and Recreation den at the University of Washington: Tuesday, Sept. offers several travel oppor11. Check out the City Peo- tunities. For information or to register, call 360-336ple’s Garden Store, near 6215. the Arboretum, continue on to the Japanese Gar CRUISE SEMINAR: Find den at the UW Arboretum, then dine out nearby. Price out how to save on the cruise of your dreams at 6 includes tour. $21-$26. p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 4, at “New Day Northwest” AAA, 1600 E. College Way, and studio tour: Monday, Suite A, Mount Vernon. Sept. 17. Be part of the Learn about cruise options studio audience for the on Celebrity, Royal CaribTV show. $16-$21. Pay by bean and Azamara cruise Sept. 6. lines. Free admission. Seattle Luau Cruise: RSVP: 360-848-2090. Thursday, Oct. 18. Wear your best Hawaiian attire “VIETNAM AND LAOS: and enjoy a luau feast. $52-$57. Pay by Sept. 25. Making a Difference as a Volunteer While Traveling”: 7 to 9 p.m. Thursday, Sept. ESCORTED TOURS: The 20, Whatcom Museum Old Whatcom County Tour Program is offering a variety of City Hall, 121 Prospect St., day trips and longer tours, Bellingham. Analeise Volpe will share her impressions with most trips departing about the countries and from and returning to the people of Vietnam and Bellingham Senior Activity Laos, and how volunteerCenter, 315 Halleck St., Bellingham. For information ing helped her meet “the locals,” experience their or to register: 360-7334030, press #, ext. 47015, culture and create lasting or wccoa.org/index.php/ friendships. $3 suggested Tours. donation, free for museum Mt. St. Helens and Mount members. 360-778-8930 Rainier: Sept. 11-13. or www.whatcommuseum. $550-$680. Passport or org.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E14 - Thursday, August 30, 2012

BONUS

HOT TICKETS DAVE MATTHEWS BAND: Aug. 31-Sept. 2, The Gorge Amphitheatre, George. 800-7453000 or www.livenation.com. AMON TOBIN: Sept. 1, WaMu Theater. 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com. HANK 3: Sept. 1, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showbox online.com. DIANA KRALL, DENZAL SINCLAIRE: Sept. 1, Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com. OLD 97’S: Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. UNITY TOUR 2012: Sept. 5, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster. com. LINKIN PARK, INCUBUS: Sept. 5, Tacoma Dome, Tacoma. 800-745-3000 or www.ticket master.com. MELVINS LITE: Sept. 6, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. www.livenation.com. POWERMAN 5000: Sept. 7, El Corazon, Seattle. 800-514-3849 or www.cascade tickets.com. BLONDIE & DEVO: Sept. 7, Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com. PUYALLUP PRO RODEO, JUSTIN BOOTS PLAYOFF: Sept. 7, Puyallup Fair. 888-559-3247 or www.thefair.com/concerts. WILLIE NELSON: Sept. 7, Puyallup Fair. 888-559-3247 or www.thefair.com/concerts. THE HIVES: Sept. 7, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. LIGHTNING BOLT: Sept. 8, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.ticket master.com. BONNIE RAITT, MAVIS STAPLES: Sept. 8-9, Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or www.ticket master.com. HEART: Sept. 10, Puyallup Fair. $25-$65, includes fair admission. 888-559-3247 or www.thefair.com/concerts. MARTINA MCBRIDE: Sept. 12, Puyallup Fair. 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com. TOBYMAC: Sept. 13, Puyallup Fair. $25-$50, includes Fair admission. 888-559-3247 or www.thefair.com/concerts. JEFF FOXWORTHY: Sept. 14, Puyallup Fair. $25-$65, includes fair admission. 888-5593247 or www.thefair.com/concerts. CROSBY, STILLS & NASH: Sept. 14, Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com. TAINTED LOVE: Sept. 14, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.live nation.com. CHICAGO: Sept. 15, Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com. ATMOSPHERE: Sept. 15, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.show boxonline.com. HUEY LEWIS AND THE NEWS: Sept. 16, Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com. ENRIQUE IGLESIAS: Sept. 16, Puyallup Fair. 888-559-3247 or www.thefair.com/concerts. BIG TIME RUSH: Sept. 17, Puyallup Fair. $30$60, includes fair admission. 888-559-3247 or www.thefair.com/concerts. BOB MOULD PLAYS COPPER BLUE AND SILVER AGE: Sept. 18, Showbox at the Market,

Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline. com. DOOBIE BROTHERS: Sept. 19, Puyallup Fair. 888-559-3247 or www.thefair.com/concerts. B’z: Sept. 19, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. ANTHRAX: Sept. 19, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline. com. JEFF DUNHAM: Sept. 20, Puyallup Fair. 888559-3247 or www.thefair.com/concerts. ANDY C & DOWNLINK: Sept. 20, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. PITBULL: Sept. 21, Puyallup Fair. 888-5593247 or www.thefair.com/concerts. SERJ TANKIAN: Sept. 21, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.show boxonline.com. TIM MCGRAW: Sept. 22, Puyallup Fair. 888-559-3247 or www.thefair.com/concerts. JASON MRAZ, CHRISTINA PERRI: Sept. 22, The Gorge Amphitheatre. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. KREATOR, ACCEPT: Sept. 22, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www. showboxonline.com. UPROAR FESTIVAL: Sept. 22, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn. 800-745-3000 or www.livenation.com. TRAIN: Sept. 23, Puyallup Fair. 888-5593247 or www.thefair.com. FURTHUR, FEATURING PHIL LESH & BOB WEIR: Sept. 25, WaMu Theater, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com. HATEBREED: Sept. 25, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.livenation. com. KIMBRA: Sept. 26, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline. com. GARBAGE: Sept. 26, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. BLOC PARTY: Sept. 28, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline. com. “MY FAIR LADY”: Lyric Light Opera, Sept. 29-Oct. 6, McIntyre Hall, Mount Vernon. 360416-7727. PAIN IN THE GRASS: Sept. 29, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn. 800-745-3000 or www. livenation.com. NIGHTWISH: Oct. 1, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com. IL VOLO: Oct. 2, Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or www.livenation.com. MADONNA: Oct. 3, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.livenation.com. CITIZEN COPE: Oct. 3, Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster. com. BEACH HOUSE: Oct. 3-4, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.show boxonline.com. BEACH HOUSE: Oct. 4, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www. showboxonline.com. MICHAEL KIWANUKA: Oct. 5, Showbox at the Market. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxon line.com. SEETHER: Oct. 5, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. CARRIE UNDERWOOD: Oct. 6, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.ticket

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Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, August 30, 2012 - E15

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Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E16 - Thursday, August 30, 2012

MOVIES

‘Lawless’ is potent, but not 100 proof ‘L

Jason Clarke (from left), Tom Hardy and Shia LaBeouf star in “Lawless.” Courtesy Richard Foreman, Jr. via MCT

awless” is a well-made film about ignorant and violent people. Like “Killer Joe” of four weeks ago, I can only admire the craftsmanship and acting, and regret its failure to rise above them. Its characters live by a barbaric code that honors murder. They live or die in a relentless hail of gunfire. It’s not so much that the movie is too long, as that too many people must be killed before it can end. I don’t require movies to be about good people, and I don’t reject screen violence. The Australian director of “Lawless,” John Hillcoat, made a film named “The Proposition” in 2005 that was also about a band of brothers up against a ruthless lawman, and it was one of the best films of that year. Based loosely on fact, it was written by the musician Roger Nick Cave, and perhaps that’s why both men were hired to Ebert make “Lawless,” based on a war between Virginia moonshiners and lawmen. Whatever inspired “The Proposition” is lacking here, however; the characters seem less driven than propelled by a script, and the most villainous is so far over the top he upstages himself. We meet the three Bondurant brothers in Franklin County, Va., during the Prohibition era. They make excellent moonshine and defend their turf without compromise. Into their backwoods domain ventures Special Agent Charlie Rakes (Guy Pearce), a fed from Chicago. He works with the none-tooenthusiastic local sheriff’s department to do — what? Shut them down? Take them over? Kill them all? This Charlie Rakes, he’s a piece of work. Here in the deep woods he sticks out like a riverboat gambler. He’s meticulously welldressed, parts and slicks back his hair like Valentino, and uses so much cologne he can’t sneak up on anyone. He may be the first man in the history of Franklin County to wear dress gloves in the daytime. It is a detailed, foppish performance, adorning a sadistic personality. Charlie is such a snake he deserves to be shot just on principle. One of the movie’s mysteries is how he survives for so long. The three brothers run a combination shop, restaurant and gas station in the backwoods, where as I recall we never see a customer. It’s their center of moonshine operations. The oldest brother is Forrest Bondurant (Tom Hardy, Bane in “The Dark Knight Rises”).

‘LAWLESS’

HH1⁄2 Jack Bondurant................. Shia LaBeouf Forrest Bondurant................. Tom Hardy Maggie Beauford..........Jessica Chastain Charlie Rakes...................... Guy Pearce Floyd Banner......................Gary Oldman Bertha Minnix.............. Mia Wasikowska Howard Bondurant..............Jason Clarke Cricket Pate..................... Dane DeHaan n Running time: 115 minutes. MPAA rating: R (for strong bloody violence, language and some sexuality/nudity).

Brother Howard (Jason Clarke) is the most feared in the family. Kid brother Jack (Shia LaBeouf) feels he has never really proved himself to the others, but the movie provides him with the opportunity. What kind of a man is Forrest? When his throat is slit open, he holds the edges of the wound together and sets out to walk through the snow to the hospital. Drawn to this remote place is a mysterious woman named Maggie (Jessica Chastain), from Chicago, who was a dancer but wanted to move to a more peaceful place. She becomes a waitress, bookkeeper, business manager and Forrest’s girlfriend. Young Jack spies an angelic beauty named Bertha (Mia Wasikowska) in church. It’s not that he’s a churchgoer; he was looking for her. They become sweethearts. After assorted deaths, a war seems inevitable. What may strike you as surprising is its climactic battle. On a road near town, the two sides essentially line up their cars opposite each other and start shooting. They have that strange illusion of invulnerability born of hate and guns in their hands, and blast away in full view until those required to die do so, and the others survive. By that point I’d seen enough death and bloodshed. I’d also lost interest in the characters: the insane dandy (Special Agent Rakes), the violent brothers, and even both women, who appear in the film because you need some women around, I suppose. The movie takes pains to inform us it’s based on a true story, and indeed the screenplay is based on a book by Matt Bondurant, whose grandfather was Jack. I believe it’s based on facts. I wish it were based on insights. The movie’s publicity tells us: “Brazen and fearless, these young rebel brothers helped build the American Dream.” I don’t even want to think about that.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, August 30, 2012 - E17

MOVIES MINI-REVIEWS Compiled from news services. Ratings are one to four stars. “Hit and Run” — A lot more fun than the title suggests. How many chase comedies have you seen where the hero’s sexy girlfriend has a doctorate in nonviolent conflict resolution? Dax Shepard and Kristen Bell co-star as a loving couple in a bucolic Northern California town, who are plunged into adventure when it’s revealed he’s in the federal witness protection program. He volunteers to drive her to LA, the very place where he needs protection the most. Tom Arnold is very funny as a U.S. marshal whose gun is a danger to himself and everyone in gunshot range. Ever so much better than a film titled “Hit and Run” has any right to be. Action comedy, R, 100 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “Hope Springs” — Tommy Lee Jones and Meryl Streep play a couple whose marriage has frozen into a routine. Every day starts with his nose buried in the newspaper and ends with him asleep in front of the Golf Channel. They haven’t slept in the same room for years. She convinces him over his own dead body to attend a couples therapy session at a Maine clinic run by Steve Carell. The movie contains few surprises, but one of them is Jones’ excellent performance -- vulnerable, touchy and shy. Comedy, PG-13, 100 minutes. HHH “Ice Age: Continental Drift” — Will perhaps be a delight for little kids, judging by their friendly reaction at a Saturday morning sneak preview I attended. Real little kids. I doubt their parents will enjoy it much, especially after shelling out the extra charge for the 3-D tickets. In this fourth outing for the franchise, familiar characters are joined by a few new ones as continental drift breaks up families and the 3-D threatens to give them whiplash as they zoom back and forth and up and down. Animated adventure, PG, 87 minutes. HH “Lawless” — See Roger Ebert’s review on Page E16. “Premium Rush” — A breakneck chase movie about the high-risk daredevils who work as Manhattan bicycle messengers. With a map of the city imprinted in their brains, they hurtle down sidewalks, run red lights, go against traffic, jump obstacles and use bikes without brakes. Joseph-Gordon Levitt stars as a messenger for whom one envelope delivery becomes a matter of life and

AT AREA THEATERS ANACORTES CINEMAS Aug. 31-Sept. 6 ParaNorman (PG): Friday-Monday: 12:20, 2:40, 5:10, 7:20; TuesdayThursday: 2:40, 5:10, 7:20 The Bourne Legacy (PG-13): Friday-Monday: 12:10, 7:10; Tuesday-Thursday: 7:10 p.m. Hope Springs (PG-13): Friday-Monday: 12:00, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30; Tuesday-Thursday: 2:30, 5:00, 7:30 Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Dog Days (PG); Friday-Thursday: 2:50, 5:05 360-293-7000 BLUE FOX DRIVE-IN Oak Harbor Aug. 31-Sept. 3 Brave (PG), Ice Age 4 (PG), and The Avengers (PG-13): 9 p.m. $6.50 ages 11 and older, $1 children 5-10, free for kids 4 and under. 360-675-5667 CASCADE MALL THEATRES Burlington For listings and times, call 888-AMC4FUN (888-262-4386).

death. Michael Shannon is the rotten cop who wants the envelope, too. Dania Ramirez and Wole Parks co-star as messengers who’d have gold medals if these were the Olympics. An impressive film that credits about a dozen stunt riders and is never less than convincing as it shows messengers threading their way through trucks that could flatten them. Action, PG-13, 91 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “The Bourne Legacy” — Jeremy Renner plays another secret super agent like Jason Bourne, who realizes he’s been targeted for elimination. To save himself and the experimental medication that gives him great physical and mental power, he travels from Alaska to Manila, fighting off wolves, drone missiles and assassination, while hooking up with Dr. Marta Shearing (Rachel Weisz), a biochemist who knows all about the medication. The action scenes are gripping in the moment, but go on too long and don’t add up; the dialogue scenes (with Edward Norton, Stacy Keach and Scott Glenn), are well-acted; the plot is a murky muddle. Action, PG-13, 135 minutes. HH1⁄2 “The Campaign” — Raucous, bawdy comedy starring Will Fer-

CONCRETE THEATRE Safety Not Guaranteed (R): 7:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 31; 5 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 1; 4 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 2. Tickets: $7 general admission, $6 adults over 65 and kids under 12; $1 off all tickets on Sunday. 360-941-0403 OAK HARBOR CINEMAS Aug. 31-Sept. 6 The Expendables 2 (R): Friday-Monday: 1:25, 3:40, 6:30, 8:45; Tuesday-Thursday: 1:25, 3:40, 6:30 The Odd Life of Timothy Green (PG): Friday-Thursday: 4:00, 6:40 The Bourne Legacy (PG-13): Friday-Monday: 1:15, 9:05; Tuesday-Thursday: 1:15 The Campaign (R): Friday-Monday: 1:35, 3:50, 6:50, 8:55; Tuesday-Thursday: 1:35, 3:50, 6:50 360-279-2226 STANWOOD CINEMAS Aug. 31-Sept. 6 Premium Rush (PG-13): 1:30, 3:45, 6:40, 8:55 The Expendables 2 (R): 1:00, 3:05, 6:10, 8:25 The Odd Life of Timothy Green (PG): 1:20, 3:35, 6:30, 8:45 The Bourne Legacy (PG-13): 12:50, 3:25, 6:00, 8:35 Hope Springs (PG-13): 1:10, 3:15, 6:20, 9:05

rell and Zach Galifianakis as opponents in a North Carolina GOP congressional primary. Ferrell is the incumbent, and Galifianakis is a doofus bankrolled by billionaire brothers who want to buy the district and resell it to China. The movie uses their campaign as a showcase of political scandals and dirty tricks that have become familiar in both parties. Comedy, R, 85 minutes. HHH “The Expendables 2” — Sylvester Stallone, Jason Statham, Jet Li and Terry Crews reunite for more head-banging exploits. This time, Jean-Claude Van Damme and Chuck Norris join the faded 1980s action-star party, and Arnold Schwarzenegger and Bruce Willis show up for more than just cameos. It’s all good fun and games and recycled catchphrases. Actionadventure, R, 142 minutes. H1⁄2 “The Odd Life of Timothy Green” — A warm and lovely fantasy, the kind of full-bodied family film that’s being pushed aside in favor of franchises and slam-bang confusion. On a picture-postcard farm in the middle of endlessly rolling hills where it is always Indian summer, a lovable boy comes into the life of a childless couple and brings along great joy and

wisdom. Jennifer Garner, Joel Edgerton, young CJ Adams and a rich supporting cast. Written and directed by Peter Hedges (“What’s Eating Gilbert Grape”). Accessible for all but the youngest children, and I suspect their parents will enjoy it, too. Comedy fantasy, PG, 104 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “The Watch” — After the mysterious murder of a night security guard at a Costco store, its manager (Ben Stiller) enlists three other men (Vince Vaughn, Jonah Hill and Richard Ayoade) in a neighborhood watch organization that discovers an invasion of Earth is being plotted by aliens who are headquartered in the Costco’s basement. Dumb slapstick action, lots of green slime and truly versatile use of potty talk. Comedy, R, 100 minutes. HH “Total Recall” — Colin Farrell stars in a retread of the 1990 sci-fi classic, about a factory worker of the future who has his life pulled out from under him when he discovers none of his memories can be trusted. Well-crafted, high energy, but lacking the emotional tug I felt from Arnold Schwarzenegger’s earlier performance. Sci-fi action, PG-13, 121 minutes. HHH

AT THE LINCOLN THEATRE 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon 360-336-8955 n www.lincolntheatre.org

‘A Cat in Paris’

7:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday, Aug. 31-Sept. 1 5:30 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 2 7:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 3 A thrilling animated mystery that unfurls in the alleys and on the rooftops of Paris, over the course of one adventurous evening. Dino is a pet cat that leads a double life. By day he lives with Zoe, a little mute girl whose mother, Jeanne, is a detective in the Parisian police force. But at night he sneaks out the window to work with Nico — a slinky cat burglar with a big heart, whose fluid movements are poetry in motion — as he evades captors and slips from rooftop to rooftop across the Paris skyline. The cat’s two worlds collide when young Zoe decides to follow Dino on his nocturnal adventures, and falls into the hands of Victor Costa, a blustery gangster planning the theft of a rare statue. Now cat and cat burglar must team up to save Zoe from the bumbling thieves, leading to a thrilling finale on top of Notre Dame. Rated PG. $9 general; $8 seniors, students and active military; $7 members; $6 children 12 and under. Bargain matinee prices (all shows before 6 p.m.); $7 general, $5 members, $4 children 12 and under.

‘The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time’ 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 6

Mark Haddon’s celebrated, multi-award-winning novel is adapted into a stage play for the first time. Part of National Theatre Live – the best of British theatre broadcast live to cinemas worldwide. Christopher, 15 years old, stands beside Mrs Shears’ dead dog, Wellington. It has been speared with a garden fork, it is seven minutes after midnight and Christopher is under suspicion. He records each fact in his book to solve the mystery. He has an extraordinary brain, exceptional at maths but ill-equipped to interpret everyday life. He has never ventured alone beyond the end of his road, he detests being touched and he distrusts strangers. But his detective work, forbidden by his father, takes him on a frightening journey that upturns his world. $15 adults, $13 seniors and $11 students, with $2 off for Lincoln members.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E18 - Thursday, August 30, 2012

OUT & ABOUT ART LA CONNER QUILT WALK: Check out a variety of hand-crafted quilts from the Washington State Quilters Spokane Chapter on display Sept. 1-Oct. 14 in shops around La Conner. The Quilt Walk is presented in conjunction with the La Conner Quilt & Textile Museum’s annual Quilt Festival, set for Oct. 5-7, at Maple Hall, the La Conner Civic Garden Club and the Museum. 360-466-4288 or www.laconnerquilts.com. ROAMING ARTISTS ART SHOW: Sylvia Domoto will be the featured artist at this year’s show, set for 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 1-2, at the Camano Multipurpose Center, 141 E. Camano Drive, Camano Island. Check out original artworks by the 27 Roaming Artists who work “plein air” at various outdoor locations around Stanwood and Camano Island. Raffle, refreshments. Free admission. 360-387-4868. PHOTOS AND SCULPTURE: A show showcasing photos by featured artist Craig Sullivan and sculptures by guest artist Travis Gerard Kuehn will open with a reception from 5 to 7 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 1, and continue through Sept. 30 at Whidbey Art Gallery, 220 Second St., Langley. Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. 360-2217675 or www.whidbey artists.com. FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK: Check out a variety of art as several galleries and other venues host receptions from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Sept. 7, along Commercial Avenue in downtown Anacortes. Featured artwork will include paintings and prints, pastels, sculpture, fiber arts, glass,

assemblage temples by Jules Remedios Faye will open with a reception from 3 to 5 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 15, and continue through Oct. 21 at Gallery Cygnus, 109 Commercial, La Conner. The show’s title comes from a remark made to Wilder 15 years ago when she pleaded with a property owner to preserve some large cedar trees. The owner replied, “Well, you know Maggie, we cannot live on beauty.” Wilder and Faye contend that we are, indeed, largely living on beauty. Gallery hours FEATURED ARTIST: are noon to 5 p.m. Friday Friends of the Anacortes through Sunday or by Community Forest Lands will unveil artwork by Joel appointment. 360-708-4787 Brock at a reception during or www.gallerycygnus.com. the First Friday Art Walk WINE & GLASS TALK: from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Sept. 7, at Watermark Book Enjoy wine tasting and Company, 612 Commercial a discussion with Northwest glass artist Benjamin Ave., Anacortes. Brock’s artwork will be featured on Moore from 5 to 8 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 22, at the the poster for the Friends’ annual benefit event set for Museum of Northwest Oct. 20 at the Transit Shed Art,121 S. First St., La ConEvent Center. 360-293-3725 ner. Moore was an early innovator in the studio or www.friendsoftheacfl. glass movement and one of org. An exhibition of artwork by Karin Bolstad and Dan the first educational coorFreeman continues through Sept. 5 at Rob Schouten PAINTINGS AND GLASS: dinators for the Pilchuck Gallery, 765 Wonn Road, Greenbank. Bolstad’s lush Glass School, starting in The new show will open paintings are rich in symbolism, created with acrylic 1974. $15, $10 members. with a reception from 5 to paint and embellished with found objects. Freeman’s 8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 7, and 360-466-4446 or www. sculptures combine elements found in nature — continue through Oct. 3 at museumofnwart.org. wood and stone — with the unexpected textures of Rob Schouten Gallery, 765 glass and steel. Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wonn Road, Greenbank. PAINTINGS ON DISdaily. 360-222-3070 or www.robschoutengallery.com. The exhibition includes PLAY: Oil paintings by Pictured: “Harvest” by Dan Freeman Roger Small are on display new and select paintings at Skagit River Brewery, by Wendy Wees, whose 404 S. Third St., Mount Verwhimsical artworks play ceramics, wood, photogra- photographs on paper by non. The ongoing exhibit with the idea of birds and phy, jewelry and more. 360- Dick Garvey and acrylics features Small’s “palette birdhouses in completely 293-6938. by Larry Heald, as well as original and magical ways. knife-style” paintings, with jewelry, glass, sculptures a rotating selection shown The sculptural glass of “CLOSE TO HOME: and more by other gallery Robert Adamson and Janis throughout the year. 360PLACES I LIVE AND PLAC- artists. Gallery hours are 941-1073 or www.artby ES I LOVE”: The show of 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Mon- Swalwell includes handrogersmall.com. new oils by Anne Belov will day through Saturday or by blown, pate de verre, cast open with a reception from appointment. 360-293-6938 and deeply carved glass forms. Gallery hours are PAINTINGS ON DISPLAY: 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Sept. or www.scottmilo.com. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Paula Anderson’s acrylic 7, and continue through Oct. 2 at Scott Milo Galpaintings are featured in NEW PAINTINGS: Anne 360-222-3070 or www. robschoutengallery.com. lery, 420 Commercial Ave., Martin McCool Gallery’s a solo exhibition through Anacortes. Also showing Sept. 30 at North Cove Cof“New Paintings Show” will are mixed media collages “LIVING ON BEAUTY”: fee, 1130 S. Burlington Blvd., open with a reception from by Barbara Dollahite, oils The show of new paintBurlington. Anderson, a life6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Sept. 7, by Matt Dollahite, color and continue through Sep- ings by Maggie Wilder and long Skagit Valley resident, tember at 711 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. The show will feature paintings and prints by Anne Martin McCool and Cathy Schoenberg, sculptures by Tracy Powell, hand-turned wood by George Way, handwoven baskets by Jane Hyde, jewelry by Carole Cunningham and Debbie Aldrich, and other gallery artists. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday and noon to 4 p.m. Sunday. 360-293-3577 or www.mccoolart.com.

MIXED MEDIA PAINTINGS AND SCULPTURES

captures the essence of the valley in her unique artwork. 360-707-2683 or www.north covecoffee.com. “WILL ROBINSON, SHAPE, TEXTURE, TOUCH”: The show continues through Aug. 31 at Foster/White Gallery, 220 Third Ave. S., Suite 100, Seattle. Robinson revisits earlier styles and techniques in basalt and granite, while venturing forward into wood, metal and glass. For information, including gallery hours, call 206-622-2833 or visit www.fosterwhite. com. DIANE AINSWORTH: OILS: The show continues through Sept. 4 at Scott Milo Gallery, 420 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. Ainsworth’s impressionistic paintings feature landscapes, floral and nautical styles. Also showing: oils by Jeanne Levasseur, color photographs by Lewis Jones, pastels by Sandy Byers and oils by James Moore, as well as jewelry, glass, sculptures and more by other gallery artists. Gallery hours are 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday or by appointment. 360-293-6938 or www.scott milo.com. “WRAPPED IN MEMORIES”: The show of handwoven wraps by India Rassner-Donovan and oil paintings by Marcia Van Doren continues through Sept. 4 at Raven Rocks Gallery, 765 Wonn Road, Greenbank. Rassner-Donovan’s wraps are created in a broad pallet of rich colors of bamboo, linen, silk cotton and wool fibers. Van Doren’s oils on paper evoke a sense of “having been there,” stirring memories of transitional or cherished times in our lives. For information, including hours and directions, call 360-222-0102 or visit www.ravenrocks gallery.com.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, August 30, 2012 - E19

OUT & ABOUT PLEIN AIR PAINTINGS: A show of artwork by Samish Island painter Karn Kenaston continues through Aug. 31 at the Rexville Grocery, 19271 Best Road, Mount Vernon. Most of Kenaston’s watercolors and oil paintings are done in “plein air,” or on-site. 360-466-5522 or www.rex villegrocery.com.

Free. 360-336-6211 or www. fee. Dash plaques for the ci.mount-vernon.wa.us. first 350 cars. Free admission for spectators. 360-8551841. MUSIC

FAIRS

PHOTOS ON DISPLAY: The photography of Damian Vines is featured through August in the Lincoln Theatre Art Bar, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. Vines strives to create images that capture the awe-inspiring beauty that surrounds us every day. 360-336-8955 or Alfred Currier and Anne Schreivogl will present a onewww.lincolntheatre.org.

‘PAINTING THE WESTERN STATES’

day exhibition of new paintings from noon to 7 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 8, at their studios, Screechingbird Fine PAPER COLLAGES: Art, 1814 M Ave., Anacortes. The show will feature Check out the three50 new oil paintings completed during an eight-week, dimensional paper collages 7,000-mile “Plein Air” painting trip they took this spring of Ans Schot, on display through Idaho, Colorado, the Grand Canyon, Yosemite through Aug. 31 in the Evo- and California. www.alfredcurrier.com. lution Room Art Gallery at the Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce St., Conway. Based on a craft started in the late 17th/early 18th century in Venice and France, Schot’s collages offer a different perspective on the creative use of a print. Artworks by Charlotte Decker are also on display. For information, including gallery hours and directions, call 360-445-3000 or visit www.conwaymuse. com.

place from 5 to 8 p.m. Friday, Aug. 31, in downtown Stanwood. Participating restaurants and businesses will showcase the work of local artists during the event. Meet the artists and enjoy music, appetizers, art and prizes. Free. 360-629-0562.

Tuesday through Saturday. 425-629-2787 or www.stan woodcamanoarts.com.

WOODPALOOZA: The Whidbey Island Woodworkers Guild’s annual show will open with a reception from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Aug. 31, and continue through Monday, Sept. 3, at the Whidbey NEW STANWOOD GALIsland Center for the Arts, LERY: A Guilded Gallery, the Stanwood Camano Arts 565 Camano Ave., Langley. The show will feature artiGuild’s new cooperative san-crafted wood furniture, gallery, will host a grand“THE ETHEREAL OF cabinetry, sculpture and opening celebration from SKAGIT VALLEY”: A show more. Show hours are noon 4 to 8 p.m. Friday, Aug. 31, of new paintings by Jay at 8700 271st St. NW, Stan- to 5 p.m. Saturday through Bowen continues at Jay’s Monday. 360-221-8268 or Gallery, 105 S. Whatcom St., wood. The gallery features www.woodpalooza.com. the work of more than 40 La Conner. Artworks by local artists and artisans, Ed Kamuda, Tom Pickett, CAR SHOWS including metal and wood Roger Small, Eve McCauley and Dan Soler will also sculptures, paintings in a OPEN CAR SHOW: In be on display. 360-630-1433 variety of media, jewelry, art conjunction with the Sedroglass and more. The gallery Woolley Founders’ Day celor www.jaybowengallery. also plays host to a number ebration, JJ’s Cruisers will com. of art classes, including life host an open car show from drawing, painting, silverSTANWOOD ARTWALK: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, smithing and other arts and Sept. 9, at Riverfront Park, “YOUR PASSPORT TO crafts techniques. Gallery 2212 River Road, SedroART”: Stanwood’s third hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Woolley. $10 registration annual artwalk, will take

PUYALLUP FAIR: Washington state’s biggest fair will take place Sept. 7-23 at the Puyallup Fair & Events Center, 110 Ninth Ave. SW, Puyallup. Check out all kinds of livestock and produce, music and entertainment, educational displays, vendors, carnival rides and games, food and more. Advance tickets: $7.50-$9; at the gate: $9-$12.50, free for ages 5 and younger. For information, including hours and directions, discounts and special attractions, visit www.thefair.com.

ALL-AGES OPEN MIC: 7 p.m. Thursdays at The Soup Bowl at Common Ground, 351 Pease Road, Burlington. Sign-ups begin at 6 p.m. Free. For information, contact Tobie Ann at 425870-6784.

Island. Dress up, enjoy a fabulous meal, and bid on a variety of auction items and packages. $75, $480 table for six, $640 table for eight. Proceeds will benefit Camano Center programs. 360-387-0222 or www. camanocenter.org.

FOUNDERS’ DAY: The annual Sedro-Woolley Founders’ Day celebration is set for Saturday and MORE FUN Sunday, Sept. 8-9, around MOVIES IN THE PARKS: Sedro-Woolley. Activities will begin at 8 a.m. Saturday Mount Vernon Parks & with the Founders’ Day Recreation will present breakfast at the Senior free movies this summer Center, 715 Pacific St., folin parks around Mount lowed by a video about the Vernon. Movies begin 1914 Bank Robbery from at dusk. Festival seating. 10 to 11 a.m. at the SedroLimited vendors on-site. Woolley Museum, 725 MurNo pets. For information, call 360-336-6215 or email dock St. A reenactment of mvparks@mountvernonwa. the bank robbery will take FESTIVALS gov. place in front of the museNext up: um at noon. Events will BUMBERSHOOT: SeatFriday, Sept. 7: “Johnny continue on Sunday with tle’s annual music and arts English Reborn”: Kiwanis a car show from 9 a.m. to festival is set for Saturday Park, 500 S. 18th St. 4 p.m., a community picnic through Monday, Sept. from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., chil1-3, at the Seattle Center. ANTIQUE TECHNOLdren’s activities and more, Enjoy live music, visual at Riverfront Park, 2212 and performing arts, dance, OGY: The 17th annual Anacortes Antique Engine River Road. For more inforfilms, comedy, arts and & Machinery Show will mation, call 360-855-2390 or crafts, poetry and literary take place from 9 a.m. to visit www.sedrowoolley arts, children’s activities, museum.org. food, beer gardens and lots 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 8, behind the historic W.T. more. Weekend pass: $125 FREE ADMISSION TO advance. Single-day tickets: Preston steam-powered sternwheeler at Market CHILDREN’S MUSEUM: $45-$55 general, $25 ages Street and Sixth Avenue, in Enjoy free admission to 65 and older, free for ages 10 and younger with paying Anacortes. Enjoy rail rides, the Children’s Museum of Skagit County on Tuesday, adult. 206-673-5060 or www. an assortment of chugging old engines, kids’ activities, Sept. 11, located inside bumbershoot.org. vendors and more. A fire Cascade Mall, 550 Cascade truck parade at 11 a.m. will Mall Drive, Burlington. LECTURES feature the 1899 fire engine Designed for ages 12 and AND TALKS from the movie “Hello younger, museum exhibits FILM SCREENING — Dolly” and the Anacortes include a music room, art “THE FAMILY MEAL”: 6:30 Fire Department’s newly studio, working crane, boat to 8 p.m. today, Aug. 30, at restored 1924 American and semitruck and more. the Lincoln Theatre, 712 LaFrance fire truck. Tommy Special activities for todS. First St., Mount Vernon. Thompson’s Anacortes dlers will be held from Presented in conjunction Railway engine will also be 8:30 to 10 a.m. Tuesdays. with the Mayor’s Wellon display. Free admission. Museum hours are 10 a.m. ness Challenge, the short 360-293-1915. to 5 p.m. Monday through documentary film will be Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. followed by guest speaker GALA AUCTION: Camano Sunday. Regular admission Marilyn McKenna, who Center will host “An Eveis $5.25, free for children will talk about her personal ning in the Garden” at 5 younger than 1. 360-757journey through weight loss p.m. Saturday, Sept. 8, at 606 8888 or www.skagitchild and her upcoming book. Arrowhead Road, Camano rensmuseum.net.


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360: Arts - Entertainment - Recreation