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Tommy Castro to headline Skagit Blues Festival PAGE 3

Skagit Valley Herald Thursday August 16, 2012

Jordin Sparks

Reviews

Roger Ebert

“American Idol” winner sets her sights on another passion

Music: Tom Jones, Israel & New Breed Video Games: “Sleeping Dogs”

“The Odd Life of Timothy Green” is a treat for the family

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Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E2 - Thursday, August 16, 2012

NEW ON DVD THIS WEEK “The Raid: Redemption”: This ultraviolent story of a special tactical team’s ill-fated raid on a high-rise run by a crime boss is the best battle in a building since Bruce Willis blasted his way through “Die Hard.” Compare the violence in the two movies and “Die Hard” comes across like an evening in a luxury suite. This isn’t the kind of movie where you expect anything more than a superficial story line and stereotypical characters. Rama (Iko Uwais) is a rookie cop who is about to become a father. He’s assigned to a team invading a tenement and has to deal with a personal mission along the way. His mission is the secondleast-interesting part of the film behind the bland title. Plot and character development are beaten out of existence because it’s all about the action. There’s never a dull moment. “Dexter: The Sixth Season”: The cable series starring Michael C. Hall gets better with each season because of brilliant writing and the convincing performance by Hall as a serial killer who works in a Miami police department. The cliffhanger at the end will make you want to subscribe to Showtime just to see what happens in the next season. As always, Dexter’s killing rivals, played by Colin Hanks and Edward James Olmos, are solid and that makes for an engaging game of cat-and-killer mouse. “Community: The Complete Third Season”: Bonus material includes “A Glee-ful Community Christmas” feature. “Breathless”: Texas Gothic tale starring Gina Gershon and Kelli Giddish. “Jaws”: The Steven Spielberg film is now on Blu-ray. “Dance Moms: Season One”: Lifetime series looks at the pursuit of the ultimate National Dance title. “Elmo’s Alphabet Challenge”: Includes seven video game spoofs. “Titanic: 100 Years in 3D”: Combines 3-D imagery of the wreck with stories of passengers and crew. “Suddenly Single”: A contemporary love story starring Garcelle Beauvais. “Assassin’s Bullet”: Former FBI field agent (Christian Slater) investigates killings of high-priority terrorists. “Happy Endings: The Complete First & Second Seasons”: Elisha Cuthbert stars in this ABC comedy. “American Pickers: Volume Four”: Two antique hunters dig through homes and barns. “Pawn Stars: Season Five”: Rick

YOUR ARTS, ENTERTAINMENT AND RECREATION GUIDE TO WHAT’S GOING ON IN SKAGIT COUNTY AND THE SURROUNDING AREAS

Upcoming movie releases Following is a partial schedule of coming

movies on DVD. Release dates are subject to change: AUG. 21 The Dictator - Paramount Chimpanzee - Disney A Separation - Sony

This Weekend / Page 5

AUG. 28 Battleship - Universal Darling Companion - Sony The Five-Year Engagement - Universal The Pirates! Band of Misfits - Sony Think Like a Man - Sony SEPT. 4 Piranha 3DD - Anchor Bay Safe - Lionsgate SEPT. 11 Girl In Progress -- Lionsgate What to Expect When You’re Expecting - Lionsgate Snow White and the Huntsman - Universal SEPT. 18 The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel - Fox The Cabin in the Woods - Lionsgate Strings - House Lights

Check out the fun at Cascade Days this weekend in Concrete.

Inside

SEPT. 25 Damsels in Distress - Sony n McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Harrison and crew deal with more buyers and sellers. “Glee: The Complete Third Season”: Chris Colfer stars. “August”: A look at love and intimacy in the modern world. “Fresh Beat: The Wizard of Song”: Marina gets swept into the lands of Oz. “Stallone Collection”: Includes “Rambo: First Blood,” “Cop Land” and “Lock Up.” “Vega$: The Third Season Volume 2”: Robert Urich stars. “Marvel Knights Astonishing X-Men: Torn”: Emma Frost’s erratic behavior sends the team into a spiral. “Tonight You’re Mine”: Two feuding rockers get handcuffed together. “Jay & Silent Bob Get Old”: Jay and Silent Bob go to England. “Madness”: A quiet weekend is ruined by a murderer. “Juan of the Dead”: Alexis Diaz de Villegas stars. “Tai Chi — Discover the Ancient Art”: Jian Liu Jun offers help with exercise and meditation. “Traintastic Adventure”: Latest release in the “Chuggington” saga. n Rick Bentley, McClatchy Newspapers

SUBMISSIONS Email features@skagitpublishing.com vrichardson@skagitpublishing. com (recreation items) Phone 360-416-2135 Hand-deliver 1215 Anderson Road Mount Vernon, WA 98274 Mailing address P.O. Box 578 Mount Vernon, WA 98273

Music, Game Reviews..................6-7 Get Involved.................................8-9 On Stage........................................ 10 Tuning Up..................................... 11 Travel........................................12-13 Hot Tickets.................................... 14 Roger Ebert.................................... 16 At the Lincoln Theatre.................. 17 Movie Mini-Reviews..................... 17 Out & About.............................18-19

Online events calendar To list your event on our website, visit goskagit.com and look for the Events Calendar on the home page HAVE A STORY IDEA? w For arts and entertainment, contact Features Editor Craig Parrish at 360-416-2135 or features@skagitpublishing.com w For recreation, contact staff writer Vince Richardson at 360-416-2181 or vrichardson@ skagitpublishing.com TO ADVERTISE 360-424-3251


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, August 16, 2012 - E3

ON STAGE

Veteran bluesman headlines in Conway AL AGIT BLUES FESTIV SECOND ANNUAL SK and The Painkillers,

Castro Featuring: Tommy nd Ba e sn Fre Du k ar M nday, Aug. 19 When: 5 p.m. Su use Starlight Stage, M ay nw Where: Co ain St., Conway ts. 18444 Spruce/Mthe door or www.brownpaper ticke at 5, $2 s: et ck Ti 8 e.com or com/event/26135 www.conwaymus More information: 360-445-3000

Tommy Castro and The Painkillers to play Skagit Blues Festival By CRAIG PARRISH Entertainment/Lifestyles Editor

festival in Ritzville!” Castro’s band includes Randy McDonald (bass), Byron Cage (drums) and James Pace (keyboards). “We’re having a great time,” Castro said. “I’ve got a good bunch of guys; upbeat, and we’re happy to be here. We’re working on new material for some new releases coming out in the fall, stuff like that.” Castro is an award-winning performer, guitarist and composer, with a voice that brings to mind the legendary Delbert McClinton. He sports a stinging guitar style that oozes the same rhythm-and-blues blood as Eric Clapton, Mike Bloomfield and Elvin Bishop. He’s recorded, performed and toured with some of the blues world’s elite: B.B. King, Carlos Santana, Joe Louis Walker and Rick Estrin. Castro’s recording catalog includes “Hard Believer,” a stirring set from 2009, and “Tommy Castro Presents: Legendary Rhythm & Blues Revue — Live!,” in which Castro teams up with Estrin, Walker and Debbie Davies for a roaring 12-song celebration. “We’ve got a few of those Rhythm & Blues shows booked coming up here, so we’ve all got plenty of homework to do,” Castro said. “We’re just doing the music, trying to put on good shows. “We’ve done it about 2,000 times, so you would think that it would be no big deal,” he said of performing. “But I still get nervous, you know, before shows. I still try really hard to make sure that we really do one show at a time, and make sure that that show is as good as it can be. We try to keep it fresh.”

You get the sense that Tommy Castro doesn’t waste a lot of time sitting in one place. The veteran blues guitaristsinger, who will headline the second annual Skagit Blues Festival on Sunday at the Conway Muse, had just been picked up by his family Monday, from an airport near his northern California home. Castro had played the previous two nights in Colorado. The next destination? A three-night camping trip before Castro takes off for three weekend gigs in Oregon prior to playing in Conway. “It’s not so much ‘busy,’ as it’s sort of a family vacation,” he said. The Mark DuFresne Band, led by the veteran singer/harmonica player, will open Sunday’s show. DuFresne has been longtime mainstay in Seattle and on the West Coast, and fronted Roomful of Blues for several years. Although Castro has been touring constantly for going on 30 years, he said he hasn’t had many chances to spend time in the Northwest, but he’s looking forward to coming to town. “Yep, definitely Seattle and other parts of Washington over : d The Painkillers the years,” Castro said Tommy Castro an left), Tommy Castro, about his previous James Pace (fromand Byron Cage. Randy McDonald visits. “We’ve played Submitted photo a couple of festivals in the state, and we always pass through there when we do our Northn Craig Parrish can be reached west tours; Spokane, of course, at 360-416-2135 or cparrish@ Tacoma and Seattle. We did a skagitpublishing.com.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E4 - Thursday, August 16, 2012

MOVIES

W

hen most singers make the leap from recording artist to movie star, it’s usually a well-calculated career maneuver that requires show-business acumen from an army of agents, acting coaches, managers and publicists. However, for bubbly sixth season “American Idol” champion Jordin Sparks, the jump from stage to screen just, well, kinda happened. The way Sparks tells the story of how she became the title character in a remake of the 1976 musical “Sparkle” is that her music career was unexpectedly in flux last year while she was parting ways with her management and her label was undergoing a shake-up. Unable to record a new album and uncertain of her future, Sparks looked to another passion — acting. “I was in this weird limbo and ‘Sparkle’ just fell into my lap,” she says. “My agent sent it to me and said, ‘What do you think? Do you wanna audition?’ I read the script and fell in love with it. “I related a lot to Sparkle. She’s a girl with a dream, and she’s gonna do Story by DERRIK J. LANG AP Entertainment Writer whatever it takes to get to the top. I Photo by MATT SAYLES know something Invision via AP about a girl who that did that as well.” Sparks won the “Idol” crown at the age of 17 and is now 22. She’s grown up in that time, losing her chubby teen frame for a svelte sexy figure, and has a regular boyfriend in fellow singer Jason Derulo. “Sparkle” represents her growth as an actress as well. Sparks refers to herself as a “theater geek”: The Phoenix-born singer says she saw the musical revue “Smokey Joe’s Cafe” on Broadway “like seven or eight times” while growing up in New Jersey during football season (Sparks’ father, Phillippi Sparks, played for the New York Giants). Besides a couple of guest starring stints on tween TV shows and numerous drama club and community theater credits, she also had a 12-week run in the Broadway musical “In the Heights” in 2010. “Music always took precedence though,” Sparks says,

JORDIN SPARKS finds new light in ‘Sparkle’ debut

casually hugging her leg while parked on a chair inside a Beverly Hills hotel suite recently. “Sparkle,” which opens Friday, tells the story of a Detroit singing sibling group attempting to break into the music industry in 1968. Sparks first auditioned for the part last July, scored the role in August and started rehearsing in September. She didn’t have a chance to work with an acting coach, but she nervously memorized the entire script, including the parts of Sparkle’s older sisters, played by Carmen Ejogo (“Love’s Labour’s Lost”) and Tika Sumpter (“One Life to Live”). As if starring in her first feature film wasn’t nerve-racking enough, she learned that Whitney Houston, who had been working for 12 years with producer Debra Martin Chase to remake “Sparkle,” would be playing her strict churchgoing mother, Emma, who turned her life around after battling her own demons. “It was nice to see Jordin, who was new to this; Whitney, who was a veteran and an icon; and in between Carmen and Tika, who were willing to listen and learn from one of the best,” says director Salim Akil. “It was something to watch and something I didn’t want to mess with because it created an emotional bond that plays over into their performances.” Houston died Feb. 11 after accidentally drowning in a hotel room bathtub on the eve of the Grammy Awards; authorities said her death was complicated by cocaine use and heart disease. With Houston gone, “Sparkle” has become more than a potential breakout moment for Sparks. It’s serving as a tribute to the superstar. One of the toughest scenes for Sparks to film involved Houston’s character confronting her daughters after discovering that they have formed a group against her wishes. Sparks remembers that it was filmed late at night, and she was surprised that Houston was so effortlessly able to switch between yelling in character and joking around on set. “That was the scene where she says, ‘Was my life not enough of a cautionary tale for you?’ I remember standing there and her saying that and going, ‘Whoa. That’s crazy.’ Watching the movie now with her not here, it holds even more weight,” Sparks says, pausing to rub some goose bumps that have emerged on her arm. “I just got chills thinking about it.” Sparks learned Houston died just before they were due to walk the red carpet at Clive Davis’ pre-Grammys party. “It was going to be our first round of interviews to talk about ‘Sparkle,’” Sparks says. “Now, all of the things that she was going to do have fallen on my shoulders and the rest of the cast. I can feel it. My shoulders are a little tense, but at the same time, I feel like it’s just a blessing. I’m really lucky. I get to talk about Whitney Houston.” Sparks is already working on her next movie, an independent film called “The Inevitable Defeat of Mister and Pete” directed by George Tillman Jr. She’s also playing “an Afro-Latina from the Bronx” alongside Anthony Mackie and Oscar-winning “Idol” alum Jennifer Hudson. But Sparks, a Grammy nominee whose hits include “No Air,” is not finished with her music career. “I am growing and learning,” Sparks says. “There’s so much more that I want to accomplish and do. I’m gonna do it at whatever pace it happens. I’m not trying to rush anything or slow anything down.”


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, August 16, 2012 - E5

THIS WEEKENDin the area CASCADE DAYS

SKAGIT WOODSTOCK The third annual event is set for 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 18, at 20819 Starbird Road, Mount Vernon. Enjoy performances by local bands, including Daddy’s Gotta Girlfriend, Miles Harris and Blue Youth, Troy Fair and Stone Country, and the Huckahoys. Food vendors and raffle. $10 at the gate, free for ages 12 and younger. Proceeds benefit the Skagit Valley Hospital Foundation Cancer Care Fund. www.skagitwoodstock.org

HOT ROD CAR SHOW Shine up your ride and show your stuff from 1 to 5 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 18, at the Rexville Grocery, 19271 Best Road, Mount Vernon. Enjoy live music, hot dogs and cold beer. 360-466-5522 or www.rexvillegrocery.com MOVIES IN THE PARK As part of its Movies in the Parks series, Mount Vernon Parks & Recreation will present “Big Miracle” at dusk Saturday, Aug. 18, at Edgewater Park, 600 Behrens Millett Road. Free. Festival seating. Limited vendors onsite. No pets. 360-336-6215 or mvparks@ mountvernonwa.gov

OUTDOOR MASS AND PARISH FESTIVAL The

The annual event will get under way at 9 a.m. Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 18-19, in downtown Concrete. On Saturday, enjoy the parade at 11 a.m. down Main Street, then check out the car show, firemen’s muster, loggers’ show, scaffold and duck races and more. Sunday will feature a chili cook-off, pet show,

jam contest, pie- and watermelon-eating contests, and a scavenger hunt for kids. Both days will include chain saw carving, music and entertainment, kids’ activities, food and more. Car show registration: $10. Free admission. 360-853-7867 or www.cascadedays.com.

second annual event will take place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 19, on the grounds north and east of St. Joseph Center, 215 N. 15th St., Mount Vernon. An outdoor mass will take place at 10 a.m., followed by kids’ activities, multicultural food booths, vendors, a silent auction, raffle and more. Proceeds will benefit the New Immaculate Conception Church. 360-336-6622


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E6 - Thursday, August 16, 2012

REVIEWS MUSIC CDS Compiled from news services

Israel & New Breed “Jesus at the Center”

Israel & New Breed, the Grammy-nominated gospel act led by singer Israel Houghton, provide many superb praise and worship songs on their new album, “Jesus at the Center.” Houghton co-wrote the majority of songs on the double-disc album, offering solid, upbeat gospel tunes that are fused with jazz and rock melodies. The 21 tracks — some new, some old — flow easily as the group delivers a series of powerful messages about faith and empowerment. The musicians recorded the high-energy, well-produced album over three nights at Lakewood Church in Houston. Houghton’s voice is strong throughout, particularly on “I Call You Jesus” and “Your Presence Is

Heaven.” The singer collaborates with his wife, Mariah, on the pleasant and slowpaced “To Make You Feel My Love/Name of Love.” Numerous shouts and applause are heard on the energetic “Rez Power,” and “You Have Me/You Hold My World” featuring Michael Gungor is enjoyable. n Jonathan Landrum Jr., Associated Press

‘We Walk the Line: A Celebration of the Music of Johnny Cash’ Various artists

Johnny Cash was a big-tent artist, drawing followers from every corner. “We Walk the Line: A Celebration of the Music of Johnny Cash” is a perfect

example of this. The DVD/CD release chronicles a concert held earlier this year in Austin, Texas, to celebrate what would have been Cash’s 80th birthday. Drawing musicians from not just the world of country music, but also from rock, pop and folk, “We Walk the Line” shows just how wide-ranging an influence the American icon remains. The concert included a few key acts from the outlaw country music world like Willie Nelson and Kris Kristofferson, Cash’s longtime friends and collaborators. And Jamey Johnson and Shooter Jennings take over for Cash and Waylon Jennings in a moving re-imagining of The Highwaymen with Nelson and Kristofferson. The rest of the lineup comes from all over the map and includes Ronnie Dunn, Brandi Carlile, Andy Grammer, Shelby Lynne, Lucinda Williams, Sheryl Crow, Train’s Pat Monahan, Iron & Wine and the Carolina Chocolate Drops, who steal the show. Like all such tributes, some of the songartist pairings are head-scratchers. But there are some great moments: Nelson’s guitar playing, Johnson’s rumbling voice standing in for Cash on “Highwayman,” Grammer’s strangely beautiful shuffling take on “Get Rhythm,” Dunn’s sense of humor and horn section, and a crackerjack band led by Don Was and Buddy Miller. n Chris Talbott, Associated Press

Mexican Institute of Sound “Politico”

“Mexico, Mexico, ra ra ra.” The cheer is familiar to Mexican sports fans as well as to film buffs who’ll know it as the ironic title of a 1970s cult movie that criticized Mexico as a nation decaying from within. On “Politico,” the darkly pointed new album by electronic artist Camilo Lara (aka the Mexican Institute of Sound), the cheer is a lopsided refrain anchoring the breakout single “Mexico,” which sadly declares that the stench of rot remains. Layered over a drunken horn line, Lara chants “Todos somos victimas de un

estado confiscado/ Con un gobierno involucrado en las ganacias del narco/ Es una nacion podrida con la poblacion herida,” meaning, “We’re all victims of a confiscated state/ With a government involved in narco profits/ It’s a nation at rot, with the population wounded.” On “Politico,” Lara departs from his earlier MIS albums that were overtly joyous in celebrating Mexico’s rich musical culture. Lara, who is president of EMI Mexico, uses his extensive knowledge of Latin music to smash up diverse sounds: tuba-driven banda rhythms, 1960s pop harmonics, vocal samplings and folk instruments. Mexicans take pride in an ability to pull together odds and ends, whatever is on hand to form creations that are unique, unexpected and delicious in an entirely new way. That “a la Mexicana” style is Lara’s charm, even as he mourns the corruption tearing apart his homeland. n Michelle Morgante, Associated Press

Tom Jones “Spirit in the Room”

Even when he became a big pop star and the quintessential Las Vegas showman in the ’60s, with hits such as “It’s Not Unusual” and “What’s New Pussycat,” Tom Jones was a more than credible singer of blues and R&B. It’s a talent he revealed again on 2010’s great, gospel-drenched “Praise and Blame,” and more recently on his Jack White-produced cover of Howlin’ Wolf’s “Evil.” On “Spirit in the Room,” the 72-year-old Welshman tackles bluesman Blind Willie Johnson’s “Soul of a Man,” but he also ventures into different territory. Most of the material comes from contemporary songwriters such as Leonard Cohen, Paul Simon, Tom Waits, Richard Thompson and Joe Henry. Jones shows the old sexy strut on “Bad as Me,” but mostly he takes an understated approach that reflects the stripped-down but evocative arrangements. The mood is often autumnal or reflective, but thanks to Jones’ unerring and worldly wise interpretations, the performances still pulse with spirit. n Nick Cristiano, The Philadelphia Inquirer


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, August 16, 2012 - E7

REVIEWS VIDEO GAMES Chris Campbell, Scripps Howard News Service

‘Sleeping Dogs’

‘New Super Mario Bros. 2’

Platforms: Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, PC Genre: Shooter Publisher: Square Enix ESRB Rating: M, for Mature Grade: 4 stars (out of 5)

Platform: 3DS Genre: Platformer Publisher: Nintendo ESRB Rating: E, for Everyone Grade: 3 stars

“Sleeping Dogs” convinced me that if I ever have the pleasure of vacationing in Hong Kong, I best stick to the hotel pool and bar. Between the random fights that break out, the bullets whizzing through the air on nearly every street corner and the fools who have no problem driving cars and trucks up and down the sidewalks, there is no place for a happy-go-lucky tourist to feel safe. What? That mayhem’s not real? Wei Shen is our hero, and you guide him into the netherworld of Hong Kong’s organized-crime syndicate, all to avenge your sister’s murder. A noble cause, yet as all John Woo movies have taught us, revenge is always closely accompanied by violence. He also taught us to stare in awe as doves fly when guns are shot, but that is for another day. The game lacks the true open-world nature of “Grand Theft Auto” or “Saints Row.” Yes, you can mindlessly wreak havoc on John Q. Public, but you must live with yourself for murdering a hapless passer-by simply shopping for a good noodle dish. No, the game is best experienced sticking to the narrative and linear gameplay. The driving sections are arcadelike and fast: the combat borrows heavily from the “Batman” games; the minigames are a mishmash of fun (mahjong) and horrible (karaoke). All of this equates to a game that hits the high notes well while sometimes dragging you into a diversion that will likely disappoint. “Sleeping Dogs” is a pleasant surprise to close out summer, which is typically devoid of quality releases.

I can’t quit you, Mario. No matter how easy you are becoming. No matter that you recycle content, level design and gameplay. I bounce along on your colorful mushroom caps and glide along collecting coins using the raccoon tail, knowing it’s all something I’ve seen and done since I owned the first incarnation of Mario back in the 1980s. Just as I am done looking at one more koopa, something goofy and cheery will happen and I’m sucked back into loving this game again. I know Princess Peach needs better security (maybe reach out to the “Halo” crew or something). I know Bowser is unable to annoy someone else’s kingdom. I get it — I have to do some swimming, some diving down into pipes (Mario is a plumber, after all) and, of course, some traipsing through castles that feature more fire than my wood-burning pizza oven on full blast. Yet there I am, sitting on my couch or on the train giggling and quietly highfiving myself when I clear a level in record time or perfectly time that jump to collect just a few more coins while evading Bobomb just before he explodes. As a critic, I am constantly looking for the new, the trendsetting, the future. I know games should strive for originality and achieve greater heights, but this warm feeling in my heart says I’ll never tire of you. Well played, Mario, well played. n Follow Chris Campbell @campbler or email him at game_on_games@mac.com.

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Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E8 - Thursday, August 16, 2012

GET INVOLVED ART

able for 12 men and 17 women who can sing and/ COMMUNITY ART or dance for the musical PROJECT: In conjunction Christmas show set to run with the Mayor’s Wellness Nov. 23-Dec. 22. Prepare a ART CLASSES Challenge, area residents minute-long classic Irving FAMILY ART DAYS are invited to help paint Berlin-esque song with one AT MoNA: Skagit Artists plywood ornaments to be verse and one chorus (no Together and the Museum hung on the city’s public songs from the show). CLAY CLASSES: Ceramof Northwest Art offer Christmas tree from 5:30 360-420-9517 or www.act ic artist Sue Roberts offers to 6:30 p.m. Monday, Aug. Family Art Days each theatre.com. a variety of classes and month at MoNA, 121 S. 27, at Fire Station 1, 901 S. workshops at Tower Arts Second St., Mount Vernon. First St., La Conner. “BACK HOME ON THE Studio, 5424 S. Shore Drive, Sessions are open to Free. 360-336-6211 or TUMBLIN’ D”: Auditions Guemes Island. For inforall ages and skill levwww.ci.mount-vernon. for professional actors/ mation, call 360-770-6140 els and include guided wa.us. actresses will be held by or visit www.towerarts walk-throughs of MoNA appointment from 2 to 5 studio.com. exhibitions. Limited to 15 ARTS VENDORS: p.m. Sunday, Aug. 26, and 6 Next up: participants per session. To Immaculate Conception ART CLASSES: Choose to 10 p.m. Monday, Aug. 27. Ceramics For Everyone: Regional School is accept- register: 360-466-4446, ext. from painting, photograParts are available for one The six-week class will ing vendors for its Autumn 108, or FAD@museumof phy, fiber and 3D art work- meet from 6:15 to 8:30 p.m. man age 20-30, one man Arts Festival, set for 9 a.m. nwart.org. Information: shops taught by profesage 45-65 and one woman Tuesdays, beginning Sept. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 20, www.museumofnwart. sional artists at the Pacific 4. The class will focus on age 40-55. Prepare a monoorg. Workshops are free at St. Joseph Center, 215 NorthWest Art School, 15 making functional ware logue and a song. Ability to N. 15th St., Mount Vernon. with museum admission. NW Birch St., Coupeville. using a variety of handplay a musical instrument An 8-foot by 10-foot booth Admission: $8 adults, $5 For information and a helpful. building techniques. Open seniors, $3 students, free rents for $40-$45, with an complete schedule: 360The production will run to all levels of experience. for members and ages 11 additional fee for tables 678-3396 or www.pacific during December at The $190, includes materials. and younger. and electricity. For infornorthwestartschool.com. Baylight Dinner Theatre Mosaic Garden Forms: during the Lights of ChristThe class will meet for SVH_4.949x4.75_ AUGUST mas at Warm Beach Camp, six weeks from 6:15 to 8:30 p.m. Mondays, begin- south of Stanwood. Actors will be paid a stipend. For ning Sept. 10. Learn how information or an audito hand-build a simple Paying Out Up To $7.2 Million vase or sphere out of clay, tion appointment, call Tori then turn it into a colorful Ritchey at 360-652-2233. mosaic piece using fragCALL FOR YOUNG ments of ceramic tiles, mirMUSICIANS: Fidalgo ror, potter, found objects and trinkets. $190 includes Youth Symphony invites young musicians to audimost materials. tion and register for the BINGO SLOT 2012-13 season on ThursCARTOONING FOR HAWAIIAN BLACKOUT KIDS: 4 to 6 p.m. Tuesdays, day, Sept. 6, at Salem HAWAIIAN LEI Lutheran Church, 2529 N. Sept. 4-25, at Burlington CASH DRAWING FRIDAY 7PM HOT SEAT DRAWING LaVenture Road,Mount Parks and Recreation AUGUST 17 SUNDAY - AUGUST 26 Vernon. For information or Center, 900 E. Fairhaven Each guest will receive (1) FREE (10) Winners drawn at 11AM, SATURDAYS Hawaiian blackout. First ball out 3PM & 7PM Sessions. Guests AUGUST 4, 11, 18 & 25 Ave., Burlington. Kids ages an audition appointment, will determine odd/even numbers may obtain entry forms 7-12 will learn basic draw- call 360-969-1681 or visit to be covered, playing on for a August 1st - August 25th (1) Winner drawn at each www.fysmusic.org. ing skills and leave with a blackout. single winner will receive at half time just for playing a bingo session. Each winner will a “Hawaiian Trip” voucher valued at slot machine. Drawing winners will choose a “Hawaiian Lei” portfolio of their favorite $2,000 or $1,500 Cash. Multiple be announced at each session CALL FOR YOUNG to determine prize. cartoon characters. $40. halftime August 26th. winners will split $1,000 Cash. MUSICIANS: The Mount Register by Aug. 28: 360Winners must be present and playing Winners must be present and playing Winners must be present and playing Vernon-based Fidalgo with a valid bingo receipt to claim with a valid bingo receipt Bingo or bingo Slots to win. Guests 755-9649. prize. No Seat Hopping Allowed. to claim prize. may win more than one prize. Youth Symphony offers opportunities for musicians Valid 8/01/12 - 8/31/12 AUDITIONS ages 5 to 21 to study and SVH BNG0812 “A HOLIDAY SHOW” BY perform orchestral music. Bring in this ad and receive $5 IRVING BERLIN: 2 to 5 p.m. For information, including Off any 11AM or 7PM Session Any 11AM or 7PM Session Saturday and Sunday, Aug. tuition costs and rehearsal 1 coupon per guest • Redeem at cashier window - Not valid with any other offer. No cash 18-19, Anacortes Commu- schedules, contact Mrs. value. Winners must be present and playing with a valid Bingo receipt or at Bingo Slots to win. No nity Theatre, 918 M Ave., Hobson at 360-293-8180 or seat hopping allowed. Only original ad will be honored for special offers - no copies. Management reserves the right to cancel or amend promotion at any time. 1-800-631-3313 Anacortes. Parts are avail- visit www.fysmusic.org. mation or an application, call 360-421-0641 or visit www.icrsweb.org.

Next up: Painting With Light: with Amy Griffin, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. or 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 15. Explore different painting techniques, including watercolor, acrylic paint and mixed media. Exploring the Circle: with Barbara Silverman Summers, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. or 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 20. Discover the possibilities of the circular form using watercolor, collage and pastel.

AUGUST AT TULALIP BINGO FREE 1-ON

$3,000

$5 OFF BINGO

$3,000

ART CLASSES: Dakota Art offers a variety of art classes and workshops at 17873 Highway 536, Mount Vernon. 360-416-6556, ext. 5, or www.dakotaartcenter. com.

DANCE DANCE & YOGA FOR BOYS AND GIRLS: Mount Vernon Parks and Recreation is offering several classes for kids this summer, including ballet, jazz dance and yoga with instructor Sylvia Trask. For information, including class times and fees, call 360-336-6215. EAST COAST SWING: 7:30 to 9 p.m. Mondays, Sept. 10-Oct. 1, Anacortes Center For Happiness, 619 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. Kim Hargrove will lead the four-week course in this versatile dance, also known as the Jitterbug. $38, $70 couple. 360-4642229 or www.anacortes centerforhappiness.org. CUBAN SALSA DANCE WORKSHOP: 7:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 14, Anacortes Center For Happiness, 619 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. Join instructor Antonio Diaz for an evening of Salsa Cubana and Rueda de Casino. $10. 360-4642229 or www.anacortes centerfor happiness.org. CONTRA DANCE WORKSHOP: 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 23, Depot Arts Center, 611 R Ave., Anacortes. Learn the fundamentals of contra dance and practice dancing to live music. No partner needed. $8 at the door. 360-7553969 or www.skagitcontra. org. BELLY DANCE LESSONS: 5:30 to 6:30 Mondays, Anacortes Center For Happiness, 619 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. $10 drop-in fee per class or $75 for eight classes. To register, call 360-464-2229 or visit www.anacortes centerforhappiness.org.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, August 16, 2012 - E9

GET INVOLVED MUSIC

several local farms at 1 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 18, GYPSY JAZZ: Djangodeparting from the Skagit fest Northwest will feature Valley Food Co-op parking a full lineup of music worklot, 202 S. First St., Mount shops and performances Vernon. The 8-mile ride Wednesday through Sunon level terrain will stop day, Sept. 19-23, at the by Skagit Flats Farm, J4 Whidbey Island Center Ranch, Ralph’s GreenFor The Arts and Langley house and Living Rain Middle School, Langley. Farm before heading back For information, tickets along Penn Road. Enjoy and a complete schedule of free ice cream back at the events, call 800-638-7631 or Co-op after the ride. Bring visit www.wicaonline.com/ helmets and water. Free. DFNW2012.html. 360-336-5087, ext. 139.

RECREATION RETRO BIKE RIDE: Join members of the Skagit Bicycle Club for a vintage bicycle ride at 11 a.m. Sunday, Aug. 19, departing from the Skagit County Historical Museum, 501 Fourth St., La Conner. Vintage bicycles and period costumes are encouraged. The ride will be followed by a screening of a vintage cycling movie in the museum’s east gallery. 360-4663365 or www.skagitcounty. net/museum. PUTTS AND PINTS: The Putts & Pints Million Dollar Golf Tournament will take place Friday, Aug. 17, at Eaglemont Golf Course in Mount Vernon. Checkin begins at 11 a.m. followed by a shotgun start at 1 p.m. Enjoy 18 holes of golf, driving-range balls, golf cart, lunch and dinner, goodie bags and a variety of prizes, followed by the Putts & Pints Brewfest with live music and beer. For registration information, contact the Mount Vernon Chamber of Commerce, 360-428-8547 or www.mountvernoncham ber.com, or the Burlington Chamber of Commerce, 360-757-0994 or www. burlington-chamber.com. BICYCLE TO FARMS TOUR: Enjoy a familyfriendly bicycle ride to

KARATE OPEN HOUSE: Mount Vernon Soo Bahk Do will hold a Karate Open House from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 18, at 1100 Roosevelt Ave., Mount Vernon. Enjoy karate demonstrations, drawings, food and more. Free. 360-395-5123. “NATIVE CULTURES ALONG FIDALGO BAY”: 2 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 18, on the Tommy Thompson Trail in Anacortes. Meet at the Fidalgo Bay RV Park, in the parking area just past the junction with the Tommy Thompson Trail. Explore native cultures who made their homes along the shores of Fidalgo Bay and the surrounding area. Free. Easy 1-mile round trip walk on paved pathway. Free. www.skagit beaches.org.

Country Club, 16701 Country Club Drive, Burlington. Hors de’ oeuvres, prizes, raffle drawings and a crane drop will begin after the tournament at 5 p.m. $100 members, $125 nonmembers, $500 per team. Proceeds will benefit the Charles G. Dynes Memorial Scholarship Fund in the care of the BurlingtonEdison Education and Alumni Foundation. For information or to register, visit sites.google.com/site/ chuckdynestournament or email chuckdynestourna ment@gmail.com. FAMILY BIKE RIDE: Join the Mount Vernon Downtown Association for a scenic, family-friendly bike ride departing at 10 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 25, from the Mount Vernon Farmers Market. Choose from a 3-mile ride or a 15-mile round trip to Conway. Bring your helmet and water. Bike shop staff will be available at the Farmers Market to make sure your bike is good to ride. Free. 360-336-3801.

GOLF TOURNEY: The North Puget Sound Golf Tour will hold its district championship Sunday, Aug. 26, at Eaglemont Golf Course in Mount Vernon. The two-man better-ball tournament will begin with a shotgun start at 2 p.m. Cost is $95 per golfer. The TRAIL HIKE: As part of the Mayor’s Wellness Chal- winner will receive money lenge, Mount Vernon Trail toward a Skagit Valley Builders will lead a family- youth team of the golfer’s choice, and a two-night friendly hike from 10 to golf trip to Las Vegas. For 11 a.m. Sunday, Aug. 19, information, call Ron at at Little Mountain Park, 300 Little Mountain Road, 360-770-1048. Mount Vernon. Free. 360336-6211 or www.ci.mountvernon.wa.us. MEMORIAL GOLF TOURNEY: The Chuck Dynes Memorial Golf Tournament will begin at 10 a.m. Friday, Aug. 24, at Skagit Golf and

Please recycle this newspaper


E10 Thursday, August 16, 2012

ON STAGE in the Skagit Valley and surrounding area August 16-26

TUNING UP Playing at area venues August 16-23

Thursday.16

LOOKING AHEAD

THEATER

FRIDAY.24

Agatha Christie’s “Murder on the Nile”: 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-293-6829 or www.acttheatre.com.

Agatha Christie’s “Murder on the Nile”: 8 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-2936829 or www.acttheatre.com. “Make ’em Laugh”: musical comedy, 7:30 p.m., RiverBelle Theatre, The Old Town Grainery, 100 E. Montgomery, Mount Vernon. $40 dinner and show; $30 dessert buffet and show. Reservations required: 360-336-3012 or www.riverbelledinnertheatre. com. “Nunsense II: the Second Coming”: Skagit Valley College Department of Music and Theatre: 7:30 p.m., Phillip Tarro Theatre, 2405 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $7-$10. 360416-7655 or diane.johnson@ skagit.edu.

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: Stone Town Theatre Works, 7:30 p.m., The Carrot & Stick Community Farm, 4104 Y Road, Bellingham. $10. 360-201-5922 or www.stone towntheatreworks.com.

Friday.17 THEATER

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: 8:15 p.m., Island Stage Left, 1062 Wold Road, Friday Harbor. Free. Donations appreciated. www.islandstageleft.org. Agatha Christie’s “Murder on the Nile”: 8 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-293-6829 or www.acttheatre.com.

“Make ’em Laugh”: musical comedy, 7:30 p.m., RiverBelle Theatre, The Old Town Grainery, 100 E. Montgomery, Mount Vernon. $40 dinner and show; $30 dessert buffet and show. Reservations required: 360-3363012 or www.riverbelledinnertheatre.com. “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: Stone Town Theatre Works, 7:30 p.m., The Carrot & Stick Community Farm, 4104 Y Road, Bellingham. $10. 360-201-5922 or www.stone towntheatreworks.com.

Saturday.18 THEATER

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: 8:15 p.m., Island Stage Left, 1062 Wold Road, Friday Harbor. Free. Donations appreciated. www.islandstageleft.org. Agatha Christie’s “Murder on the Nile”: 8 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-293-6829 or www.acttheatre.com.

“Make ’em Laugh”: musical comedy, 7:30 p.m., RiverBelle Theatre, The Old Town Grainery, 100 E. Montgomery, Mount Vernon. $40 dinner and show; $30 dessert buffet and show. Reservations required: 360-3363012 or www.riverbelledinnertheatre.com. “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: Stone Town Theatre Works, 7:30 p.m., The Carrot & Stick Community Farm, 4104 Y Road, Bellingham. Bring lawn chairs or blankets for seating. $10. 360-201-5922 or www.stonetown theatreworks.com.

Thursday, August 16, 2012 E11

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

SATURDAY.25

SUNDAY.19 “HARPSICHORD DUOS: OLD AND NEW” Barbara King and Monica Kim, 3 p.m., 4606 Cypress Drive, Anacortes. $15, free for ages 12 and younger. Reservations required: 360-293-4930 or www.anacortesartsfoundation.org.

Sunday.19 MUSIC

“Harpsichord Duos: Old and New”: Barbara King and Monica Kim, 3 p.m., 4606 Cypress Drive, Anacortes. $15, free for ages 12 and younger. Reservations required: 360293-4930 or www.anacortesartsfoundation. org.

THEATER

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: 8:15 p.m., Island Stage Left, 1062 Wold Road, Friday Harbor. Free. Donations appreciated. www.islandstageleft.org. Agatha Christie’s “Murder on the Nile”: 2 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-293-6829 or www.acttheatre.com. “Make ’em Laugh”: musical comedy, 2 p.m., RiverBelle Theatre, The Old Town Grainery, 100 E. Montgomery, Mount Vernon. $20, $18 seniors. Reservations required: 360-336-3012 or www.riverbelledinner theatre.com.

Monday-Wednesday.20-22 No events submitted

Thursday.23 THEATER

Agatha Christie’s “Murder on the Nile”: 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-293-6829 or www.acttheatre.com. “Nunsense II: the Second Coming”: Skagit Valley College Department of Music and Theatre, 7:30 p.m., Phillip Tarro Theatre, 2405 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $7-$10. 360-416-7655 or diane.johnson@skagit.edu.

Agatha Christie’s “Murder on the Nile”: 8 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-2936829 or www.acttheatre.com. “Make ’em Laugh”: musical comedy, 7:30 p.m., RiverBelle Theatre, The Old Town Grainery, 100 E. Montgomery, Mount Vernon. $40 dinner and show; $30 dessert buffet and show. Reservations required: 360-336-3012 or www.riverbelledinnertheatre. com. “Nunsense II: the Second Coming”: Skagit Valley College Department of Music and Theatre, 7:30 p.m., Phillip Tarro Theatre, 2405 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $7-$10. 360416-7655 or diane.johnson@ skagit.edu. “Memories of You”: Wurlitzer theater organ concert featuring Jeff and Jody Fox, 3 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $10. 360-3368955 or www.lincolntheatre.org. Keola Beamer and Moanalani Beamer (Hawaiian guitar and dance): 8 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $20-$30. 360-336-8955 or www.lincolntheatre.org.

SUNDAY.26

Whatever’s Clever Variety Show: music, comedy, hulahooping, belly dancing and more, 8 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $7. 360-778-1067. “Nunsense II: the Second Coming”: Skagit Valley College Department of Music and Theatre: 2 p.m., Phillip Tarro Theatre, 2405 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $7-$10. 360416-7655 or diane.johnson@ skagit.edu.

FRIDAY.17

THURSDAY.16 Savage Jazz Band: 6 to 9 p.m., Seeds Bistro and Bar, 623 Morris St., La Conner. No cover. 360-466-3280.

At The Brink (folk rock): 7 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. 360-445-3000.

Mark Hummel and the Blues Survivors: 8 to 11 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. $10. 360-588-1720.

Impossible Bird, with Nick Drummond and Tyler Carson: 7 p.m., Blue Horse Gallery, 301 W. Holly St., Bellingham. 360-671-2305 or www.bluehorsegallery.com.

DOGTONES 9 p.m. to midnight, Cyndy’s Broiler, 27021 102nd Ave NW, Stanwood. No cover.

SATURDAY.18

PUGET SOUND 7:30 p.m., Washington Sips, 608 S. First St., La Conner. No cover.

FRIDAY.17 Snake Bite: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411. John Anderson (country): 7 and 9:30 p.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Pacific Showroom, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. $28-$37. 877-275-2448 or www.theskagit.com.

Cloverdayle (modern country): 7 p.m., Seafarers’ Memorial Park, Anacortes. Free. 360-293-3134 or www.portofanacortes.com.

Yogoman, Gallus Brothers, Red Raven Follies: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $7. 360-7781067.

Wolves in the Woods: 10 p.m. to midnight, Redlight, 1017 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. www.redlightwineandcoffee. com.

John Carswell and Blues Union: 9 p.m. to midnight, Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-588-1720.

The Blackberry Bushes String Band: 8 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $7. 360-445-3000. Laura Overstreet, Dan Duggins (swing, country, R&B): 7:30 p.m., Washington Sips, 608 S. First St., La Conner. No cover. 360-399-1037.

The Dogtones (classic rock): 9 p.m. to midnight, Cyndy’s Broiler, 27021 102nd Ave NW, Stanwood. No cover. 360-6294800 or www.cyndysbroiler. com. The Atlantics: 8 p.m., Blue Horse Gallery, 301 W. Holly St., Bellingham. 360-671-2305 or www.bluehorsegallery.com.

Snohomish County Firefighters Pipes & Drums, South End String Band: 6 to 10 p.m. Leatherheads Pub & Eatery, 10209 270th St. NW, Stanwood. $5 cover. 360-629-5555 or www.leather headspub.com.

SATURDAY.18 Snake Bite: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411. Marcia Kester (country, rock, blues, pop): noon to 2 p.m., Cap Sante Boat Haven Central Pier, 1019 Q Ave., Anacortes. 360-757-9687.

Care Package, The MC Type, The Knowgooders, Wizdumb: 9 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. 360-778-1067. Laura Overstreet: 6 to 9 p.m., Carpenter Creek Winery, 20376 E. Hickox Road, Mount Vernon. $7 cover. 360-848-6673 or www.carpentercreek. com.

Cloverdayle (modern country): 7 p.m., Riverfront Park, 1001 River Road, Sedro-Woolley. Free. 425-303-1848 or www.snohomishartist guild.org. Ever So Android: 10 p.m. to midnight, Redlight, 1017 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. www.redlightwine andcoffee.com.

SUNDAY.19 Gary B’s Church of the Blues (blues, classic rock): 6 to 10 p.m., Castle Tavern, 708 Metcalf St., Sedro-Woolley. 360-855-2263.

Skagit Woodstock: Daddy’s Gotta Girlfriend, Miles Harris and Blue Youth, Troy Fair and Stone Country, and the Huckahoys, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m., 20819 Starbird Road, Mount Vernon. $10, free for ages 12 and younger. www. skagitwoodstock.org. The Walrus: 8:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-766-6266.

Guy Johnson Band (rock): 9 p.m. to midnight, Cyndy’s Broiler, 27021 102nd Ave. NW, Stanwood. No cover. 360-6294800 or www.cyndys broiler.com. 907Britt: 9:30 p.m., Brown Lantern Ale House, 412 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-2932544.

Fat Tones: 9:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-7553956 or www.anacortes H2O.com.

Puget Sound (pop, rock): 7:30 p.m., Washington Sips, 608 S. First St., La Conner. No cover. 360-399-1037.

Hot Rod’s Blues Review: 9 p.m. to midnight, Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-588-1720.

Rivertalk (world beat, reggae): 5 to 8 p.m., The Heart of Anacortes, 1014 Fourth St., Anacortes. $10. Proceeds benefit Rick Epting Foundation for the Arts. 360-293-3515.

WEDNESDAY.22 Ron Bailey: 5:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-766-6266.

Skagit Blues Festival: Tommy Castro and the Painkillers, The Mark DuFresne Band, 5 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/ Main, Conway. $25. 360-4453000 or www. conwaymuse. com.

The Dusty 45s: 5 to 8 p.m., The Heart of Anacortes, 1014 Fourth St., Anacortes. $10. 360-293-3515.

Marcia Kester (country, rock, blues, pop): 6 to 8 p.m., Anacortes Eagles Hall, 901 Seventh St., Anacortes. Call 360-7579687 for guest sign-in.

The Still Bill Band (R&B, soul): 8 p.m., Blue Horse Gallery, 301 W. Holly St., Bellingham. 360-6712305 or www.blue horsegallery.com. Chris Stevens’ Surf Monkeys: 9 p.m., Semiahmoo Resort, 9565 Semiahmoo Parkway, Blaine. www.semiahmoo.com.

THURSDAY.23 The Ames, Creech: 9 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $3. 360-778-1067.

Fidalgo Swing: 9 p.m. to midnight, Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-5881720.

WWU Faculty Jazz Collective: 8 p.m., Blue Horse Gallery, 301 W. Holly St., Bellingham. 360-671-2305 or www.blue horsegallery. com.

Tocato Tango: 8 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. 360445-3000.

Joachim Nordensson: 6 to 9 p.m., Seeds Bistro and Bar, 623 Morris St., La Conner. No cover. 360-466-3280.

Thomas Harris: 7 p.m., Blue Horse Gallery, 301 W. Holly St., Bellingham. 360-671-2305 or www.blue horsegallery. com.


E10 Thursday, August 16, 2012

ON STAGE in the Skagit Valley and surrounding area August 16-26

TUNING UP Playing at area venues August 16-23

Thursday.16

LOOKING AHEAD

THEATER

FRIDAY.24

Agatha Christie’s “Murder on the Nile”: 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-293-6829 or www.acttheatre.com.

Agatha Christie’s “Murder on the Nile”: 8 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-2936829 or www.acttheatre.com. “Make ’em Laugh”: musical comedy, 7:30 p.m., RiverBelle Theatre, The Old Town Grainery, 100 E. Montgomery, Mount Vernon. $40 dinner and show; $30 dessert buffet and show. Reservations required: 360-336-3012 or www.riverbelledinnertheatre. com. “Nunsense II: the Second Coming”: Skagit Valley College Department of Music and Theatre: 7:30 p.m., Phillip Tarro Theatre, 2405 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $7-$10. 360416-7655 or diane.johnson@ skagit.edu.

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: Stone Town Theatre Works, 7:30 p.m., The Carrot & Stick Community Farm, 4104 Y Road, Bellingham. $10. 360-201-5922 or www.stone towntheatreworks.com.

Friday.17 THEATER

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: 8:15 p.m., Island Stage Left, 1062 Wold Road, Friday Harbor. Free. Donations appreciated. www.islandstageleft.org. Agatha Christie’s “Murder on the Nile”: 8 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-293-6829 or www.acttheatre.com.

“Make ’em Laugh”: musical comedy, 7:30 p.m., RiverBelle Theatre, The Old Town Grainery, 100 E. Montgomery, Mount Vernon. $40 dinner and show; $30 dessert buffet and show. Reservations required: 360-3363012 or www.riverbelledinnertheatre.com. “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: Stone Town Theatre Works, 7:30 p.m., The Carrot & Stick Community Farm, 4104 Y Road, Bellingham. $10. 360-201-5922 or www.stone towntheatreworks.com.

Saturday.18 THEATER

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: 8:15 p.m., Island Stage Left, 1062 Wold Road, Friday Harbor. Free. Donations appreciated. www.islandstageleft.org. Agatha Christie’s “Murder on the Nile”: 8 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-293-6829 or www.acttheatre.com.

“Make ’em Laugh”: musical comedy, 7:30 p.m., RiverBelle Theatre, The Old Town Grainery, 100 E. Montgomery, Mount Vernon. $40 dinner and show; $30 dessert buffet and show. Reservations required: 360-3363012 or www.riverbelledinnertheatre.com. “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: Stone Town Theatre Works, 7:30 p.m., The Carrot & Stick Community Farm, 4104 Y Road, Bellingham. Bring lawn chairs or blankets for seating. $10. 360-201-5922 or www.stonetown theatreworks.com.

Thursday, August 16, 2012 E11

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

SATURDAY.25

SUNDAY.19 “HARPSICHORD DUOS: OLD AND NEW” Barbara King and Monica Kim, 3 p.m., 4606 Cypress Drive, Anacortes. $15, free for ages 12 and younger. Reservations required: 360-293-4930 or www.anacortesartsfoundation.org.

Sunday.19 MUSIC

“Harpsichord Duos: Old and New”: Barbara King and Monica Kim, 3 p.m., 4606 Cypress Drive, Anacortes. $15, free for ages 12 and younger. Reservations required: 360293-4930 or www.anacortesartsfoundation. org.

THEATER

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: 8:15 p.m., Island Stage Left, 1062 Wold Road, Friday Harbor. Free. Donations appreciated. www.islandstageleft.org. Agatha Christie’s “Murder on the Nile”: 2 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-293-6829 or www.acttheatre.com. “Make ’em Laugh”: musical comedy, 2 p.m., RiverBelle Theatre, The Old Town Grainery, 100 E. Montgomery, Mount Vernon. $20, $18 seniors. Reservations required: 360-336-3012 or www.riverbelledinner theatre.com.

Monday-Wednesday.20-22 No events submitted

Thursday.23 THEATER

Agatha Christie’s “Murder on the Nile”: 7:30 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-293-6829 or www.acttheatre.com. “Nunsense II: the Second Coming”: Skagit Valley College Department of Music and Theatre, 7:30 p.m., Phillip Tarro Theatre, 2405 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $7-$10. 360-416-7655 or diane.johnson@skagit.edu.

Agatha Christie’s “Murder on the Nile”: 8 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-2936829 or www.acttheatre.com. “Make ’em Laugh”: musical comedy, 7:30 p.m., RiverBelle Theatre, The Old Town Grainery, 100 E. Montgomery, Mount Vernon. $40 dinner and show; $30 dessert buffet and show. Reservations required: 360-336-3012 or www.riverbelledinnertheatre. com. “Nunsense II: the Second Coming”: Skagit Valley College Department of Music and Theatre, 7:30 p.m., Phillip Tarro Theatre, 2405 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $7-$10. 360416-7655 or diane.johnson@ skagit.edu. “Memories of You”: Wurlitzer theater organ concert featuring Jeff and Jody Fox, 3 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $10. 360-3368955 or www.lincolntheatre.org. Keola Beamer and Moanalani Beamer (Hawaiian guitar and dance): 8 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $20-$30. 360-336-8955 or www.lincolntheatre.org.

SUNDAY.26

Whatever’s Clever Variety Show: music, comedy, hulahooping, belly dancing and more, 8 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $7. 360-778-1067. “Nunsense II: the Second Coming”: Skagit Valley College Department of Music and Theatre: 2 p.m., Phillip Tarro Theatre, 2405 E. College Way, Mount Vernon. $7-$10. 360416-7655 or diane.johnson@ skagit.edu.

FRIDAY.17

THURSDAY.16 Savage Jazz Band: 6 to 9 p.m., Seeds Bistro and Bar, 623 Morris St., La Conner. No cover. 360-466-3280.

At The Brink (folk rock): 7 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. 360-445-3000.

Mark Hummel and the Blues Survivors: 8 to 11 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. $10. 360-588-1720.

Impossible Bird, with Nick Drummond and Tyler Carson: 7 p.m., Blue Horse Gallery, 301 W. Holly St., Bellingham. 360-671-2305 or www.bluehorsegallery.com.

DOGTONES 9 p.m. to midnight, Cyndy’s Broiler, 27021 102nd Ave NW, Stanwood. No cover.

SATURDAY.18

PUGET SOUND 7:30 p.m., Washington Sips, 608 S. First St., La Conner. No cover.

FRIDAY.17 Snake Bite: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411. John Anderson (country): 7 and 9:30 p.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Pacific Showroom, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. $28-$37. 877-275-2448 or www.theskagit.com.

Cloverdayle (modern country): 7 p.m., Seafarers’ Memorial Park, Anacortes. Free. 360-293-3134 or www.portofanacortes.com.

Yogoman, Gallus Brothers, Red Raven Follies: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $7. 360-7781067.

Wolves in the Woods: 10 p.m. to midnight, Redlight, 1017 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. www.redlightwineandcoffee. com.

John Carswell and Blues Union: 9 p.m. to midnight, Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-588-1720.

The Blackberry Bushes String Band: 8 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. $7. 360-445-3000. Laura Overstreet, Dan Duggins (swing, country, R&B): 7:30 p.m., Washington Sips, 608 S. First St., La Conner. No cover. 360-399-1037.

The Dogtones (classic rock): 9 p.m. to midnight, Cyndy’s Broiler, 27021 102nd Ave NW, Stanwood. No cover. 360-6294800 or www.cyndysbroiler. com. The Atlantics: 8 p.m., Blue Horse Gallery, 301 W. Holly St., Bellingham. 360-671-2305 or www.bluehorsegallery.com.

Snohomish County Firefighters Pipes & Drums, South End String Band: 6 to 10 p.m. Leatherheads Pub & Eatery, 10209 270th St. NW, Stanwood. $5 cover. 360-629-5555 or www.leather headspub.com.

SATURDAY.18 Snake Bite: 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411. Marcia Kester (country, rock, blues, pop): noon to 2 p.m., Cap Sante Boat Haven Central Pier, 1019 Q Ave., Anacortes. 360-757-9687.

Care Package, The MC Type, The Knowgooders, Wizdumb: 9 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. 360-778-1067. Laura Overstreet: 6 to 9 p.m., Carpenter Creek Winery, 20376 E. Hickox Road, Mount Vernon. $7 cover. 360-848-6673 or www.carpentercreek. com.

Cloverdayle (modern country): 7 p.m., Riverfront Park, 1001 River Road, Sedro-Woolley. Free. 425-303-1848 or www.snohomishartist guild.org. Ever So Android: 10 p.m. to midnight, Redlight, 1017 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. www.redlightwine andcoffee.com.

SUNDAY.19 Gary B’s Church of the Blues (blues, classic rock): 6 to 10 p.m., Castle Tavern, 708 Metcalf St., Sedro-Woolley. 360-855-2263.

Skagit Woodstock: Daddy’s Gotta Girlfriend, Miles Harris and Blue Youth, Troy Fair and Stone Country, and the Huckahoys, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m., 20819 Starbird Road, Mount Vernon. $10, free for ages 12 and younger. www. skagitwoodstock.org. The Walrus: 8:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-766-6266.

Guy Johnson Band (rock): 9 p.m. to midnight, Cyndy’s Broiler, 27021 102nd Ave. NW, Stanwood. No cover. 360-6294800 or www.cyndys broiler.com. 907Britt: 9:30 p.m., Brown Lantern Ale House, 412 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-2932544.

Fat Tones: 9:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-7553956 or www.anacortes H2O.com.

Puget Sound (pop, rock): 7:30 p.m., Washington Sips, 608 S. First St., La Conner. No cover. 360-399-1037.

Hot Rod’s Blues Review: 9 p.m. to midnight, Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-588-1720.

Rivertalk (world beat, reggae): 5 to 8 p.m., The Heart of Anacortes, 1014 Fourth St., Anacortes. $10. Proceeds benefit Rick Epting Foundation for the Arts. 360-293-3515.

WEDNESDAY.22 Ron Bailey: 5:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-766-6266.

Skagit Blues Festival: Tommy Castro and the Painkillers, The Mark DuFresne Band, 5 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/ Main, Conway. $25. 360-4453000 or www. conwaymuse. com.

The Dusty 45s: 5 to 8 p.m., The Heart of Anacortes, 1014 Fourth St., Anacortes. $10. 360-293-3515.

Marcia Kester (country, rock, blues, pop): 6 to 8 p.m., Anacortes Eagles Hall, 901 Seventh St., Anacortes. Call 360-7579687 for guest sign-in.

The Still Bill Band (R&B, soul): 8 p.m., Blue Horse Gallery, 301 W. Holly St., Bellingham. 360-6712305 or www.blue horsegallery.com. Chris Stevens’ Surf Monkeys: 9 p.m., Semiahmoo Resort, 9565 Semiahmoo Parkway, Blaine. www.semiahmoo.com.

THURSDAY.23 The Ames, Creech: 9 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $3. 360-778-1067.

Fidalgo Swing: 9 p.m. to midnight, Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-5881720.

WWU Faculty Jazz Collective: 8 p.m., Blue Horse Gallery, 301 W. Holly St., Bellingham. 360-671-2305 or www.blue horsegallery. com.

Tocato Tango: 8 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. 360445-3000.

Joachim Nordensson: 6 to 9 p.m., Seeds Bistro and Bar, 623 Morris St., La Conner. No cover. 360-466-3280.

Thomas Harris: 7 p.m., Blue Horse Gallery, 301 W. Holly St., Bellingham. 360-671-2305 or www.blue horsegallery. com.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E12 - Thursday, August 16, 2012

TRAVEL

Photos by Tim Roske / AP

Signatures of delegates, including Alexander Hamilton and John Jay, who ratified the U.S. Constitution, fill pages of a convention journal on display at the Capitol in Albany, N.Y. Historic artifacts that have been kept in storage for years are now on display in the corridors of the Capitol and the adjacent Empire State Plaza.

New York raids its attic and finds U.S. history Commemorative trowels used by Gov. Franklin Roosevelt at groundbreaking ceremonies sit on display at the Capitol in Albany, N.Y.

marble halls that for most of their 130 years had been used simply as routes ALBANY, N.Y. — New between offices have been York’s Capitol has been the early abolitionist decrees, transformed into a museum. workplace of future presiEvery few steps, slices of Gov. Nelson Rockefeller’s dents, Supreme Court jusmassively stretched Lincoln American and state history tices, premier thinkers and Continental from the “Mad give even veterans of these even scoundrels. hallways pause. Men” era, and a curious Now the statehouse is It’s a fitting new role chunk of old iron: a 3-foot telling some of its longfor the cavernous Capitol, link from Gen. George hidden tales by filling its which has hosted many Washington’s defense syshallways with artifacts that tem, which strung a quarter- presidents and other imporare drawing thousands of mile chain across the Hud- tant figures — including visitors. at least one after death. A son River at West Point to The newly displayed stop British ships during the marker shows President pieces of Americana include Revolutionary War. Ulysses S. Grant’s body was a 1762 slave bill of sale, viewed in state after he died In less than a year,

By MICHAEL GORMLEY Associated Press

n On the Web: www.hall ofgovernors.ny.gov/generic/ VisitTheCapitol

in upstate New York. For decades, most of the artifacts were boxed in a warehouse in neighboring Schenectady County or stored in climate-controlled cabinets in the state Archives. But in the last year, New York has raided its attic. The artifacts include an iron dumbbell-like device shot from cannons in the days of tall ships, a 1966 Harley-Davidson motorcycle used by state police, Benedict Arnold’s treason papers and documents


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, August 16, 2012 - E13

TRAVEL related to important programs created by Govs. Theodore and Franklin Roosevelt before they became presidents. There are also items from key moments in the women’s rights and labor movements. The artifacts can be seen in regular tours of the Capitol or, as thousands of visitors are increasingly doing, by wandering through the working statehouse. Detailed signs are augmented by audio explanations that can be heard by cellphone. “It’s really beautiful, from the classic cars to the Assembly hall,” said Deepak Dhungana, 38, of Sydney, Australia, who was visiting family in Albany. “There’s a sense of freedom. You can go anywhere.” He and his family were admiring a 1924 Ford truck, the first model the company offered with an open pickup truck design. Behind them, on the underground concourse of the Empire State Plaza that connects to the Capitol, was a long, blue 1931 Pierce-Arrow limousine. Also lining the halls is a longtime permanent exhibit that art historians have called the greatest collection of modern art outside a museum, all collected by Rockefeller. Dhungana’s sister, Arati Pathak, said the historic artifacts fit right in. “It’s a kind of visual art,” said Pathak, 31, of Dallas. “It’s beautiful. Why not display it?” Gov. Andrew Cuomo ordered the dusting off of these items. He wants New York’s rich history to remind Americans of the Empire State’s critical role in the past and to inspire New Yorkers to cut a similar path for the future. The free exhibit is intended to reveal history,

Local travel

Photos by Tim Roske / AP

Weapons and a canteen from the Revolutionary and French and Indian wars sit on display at the Capitol in Albany, N.Y.

A stretched Lincoln Continental used by Gov. Nelson Rockefeller sits on display on the concourse of the Empire State Plaza in Albany, N.Y. unvarnished and directly. The 1799 act to end slavery in New York, for example, shows the complicated politics surrounding abolition, even in New York. The display shows slavery was ended only gradually, with time for masters to keep slaves for years afterward. In an early example of political spin, slaves born before July 4, 1799, weren’t free but were legally redefined as indentured servants. Other items on display include ceremonial trowels used by Gov. Franklin Roosevelt, who favored the small hand tools that could be used from a sit-

ting position instead of the traditional ceremonial shovels. It was one of many ways Roosevelt and those around him masked his polio. Even the Capitol building kept his secret, from a tiny, private elevator to a secret door built into the ornate Red Room so he could welcome visitors while already seated. “For decades, these treasures from our state’s rich history have been locked away and, at times, tragically forgotten,” said Cuomo, who recently hung the portrait of his father, former Gov. Mario Cuomo, in the revamped Hall of Governors.

WILDLIFE TOURS: The Whale Museum, 62 First St., Friday Harbor, will offer landbased wildlife tours of San Juan Island from 2 to 5 p.m. Fridays, Aug. 24 and 31. A certified naturalist will escort you via shuttle to the west side of the island, where you will have the opportunity to see killer whales, if present, and learn about the biology, social structure, culture, endangered status and threats of the Southern Resident killer whales. You may also see Dall’s and harbor porpoises, seals, sea lions, humpback whales, minke whales, bald eagles and various species of seabirds. The tours are free, but reservations are required: 360-3784710, ext. 23, or stop by the museum. www.whalemuseum.org. WHATCOM MUSEUM HISTORY SUNSET CRUISE: 6 to 8:30 p.m. Thursdays, through Aug. 30, departing from Squalicum Harbor, 2621 S. Harbor Loop Drive, Bellingham. Tour guide Brian Griffin will lead a fun, informative evening onboard the 110-foot tour boat Island Caper. Bring binoculars, warm layers and a picnic dinner. $35, $30 Whatcom Museum members. 360-778-8963 or www.whatcom museum.org.

audience for the TV show. $16-$21. Pay by Sept. 6. WWU Planetarium, Bellingham: Tuesday, Oct. 16. Enjoy a special showing on Indian star lore, then off to lunch and shopping. $22-$27. Pay by Oct. 1. Seattle Luau Cruise: Thursday, Oct. 18. Wear your best Hawaiian attire and enjoy a luau feast. $52-$57. Pay by Sept. 25. Dickens Carolers Lunch Cruise: Tuesday, Dec. 11. Enjoy a holiday feast accompanied by Christmas carolers. $52-$57. Pay by Nov. 26. SHORT TRIPS: Mount Vernon Parks and Recreation offers several travel opportunities. For information or to register, call 360-336-6215. WOMEN’S SAFETY IN HOME AND TRAVEL: 10 a.m. Wednesday, Aug. 29, Camano Center, 606 Arrowhead Road, Camano Island. Island County Sheriff Mark Brown will discuss how to take control of your personal safety at home and away. For information, contact Ginny at Senior Services of Island County, 360-387-6201.

“VIETNAM AND LAOS: MAKING A DIFFERENCE AS A VOLUNTEER WHILE TRAVELING”: 7 to 9 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 20, Whatcom Museum Old City Hall, 121 Prospect St., Bellingham. Analeise DAY TRIPS: Camano Center is offerVolpe will share her impressions about ing several trips for seniors and others, the countries and people of Vietnam departing from and returning to Camano and Laos and how volunteering helped Center, 606 Arrowhead Road, Camano her meet “the locals,” experience their Island. 360-387-0222 or www.camano culture and create lasting friendships. center.org. $3 suggested donation, free for museum Granville Island, British Columbia: Tues- members. 360-778-8930 or www.what day, Aug. 28. Artful shopping. Passport or commuseum.org. enhanced driver’s license required. $30$35. Pay by Aug. 16. PASSPORT APPLICATIONS: The Ana Japanese Botanical Garden at the Uni- cortes Public Library accepts U.S. passversity of Washington: Tuesday, Sept. 11. port applications from noon to 6:30 p.m. Check out the City People’s Garden Store, Tuesdays and Wednesdays, and 1 to 4 near the arboretum, continue on to the p.m. Saturdays at 1220 10th St., AnaJapanese Garden at the UW Arboretum, cortes. Passport forms and information then dine out nearby. Price includes tour. on fees and how to apply are available $21-$26. at http://travel.state.gov, or pick up an “New Day Northwest” and studio tour: application and passport guide at the Monday, Sept. 17. Be part of the studio library.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E14 - Thursday, August 16, 2012

HOT TICKETS includes fair admission. 888-559-3247 or www.thefair.com/concerts. MARTINA MCBRIDE: Sept. 12, Puyallup Fair. 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com. TOBYMAC: Sept. 13, Puyallup Fair. $25-$50, includes Fair admission. 888-559-3247 or www.thefair.com/concerts. JEFF FOXWORTHY: Sept. 14, Puyallup Fair. $25-$65, includes fair admission. 888-559-3247 or www.thefair.com/concerts. CROSBY, STILLS & NASH: Sept. 14, Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com. TAINTED LOVE: Sept. 14, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.livenation. com. CHICAGO: Sept. 15, Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or www.ticket master.com. ATMOSPHERE: Sept. 15, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showbox online.com. HUEY LEWIS AND THE NEWS: Sept. 16, Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com. ENRIQUE IGLESIAS: Sept. 16, Puyallup Fair. 888-559-3247 or www.thefair.com/concerts. BIG TIME RUSH: Sept. 17, Puyallup Fair. $30$60, includes fair admission. 888-559-3247 or www.thefair.com/concerts. BOB MOULD PLAYS COPPER BLUE AND SILVER AGE: Sept. 18, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. DOOBIE BROTHERS: Sept. 19, Puyallup Fair. 888-559-3247 or www.thefair.com/concerts. B’z: Sept. 19, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-7453000 or www.showboxonline.com. ANTHRAX: Sept. 19, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline. com. JEFF DUNHAM: Sept. 20, Puyallup Fair. 888-5593247 or www.thefair.com/concerts. ANDY C & DOWNLINK: Sept. 20, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.show boxonline.com. PITBULL: Sept. 21, Puyallup Fair. 888-5593247 or www.thefair.com/concerts. SERJ TANKIAN: Sept. 21, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showbox online.com. TIM MCGRAW: Sept. 22, Puyallup Fair.888-5593247 or www.thefair.com/concerts. JASON MRAZ, CHRISTINA PERRI: Sept. 22, The Gorge Amphitheatre. 800-745-3000 or livenation.com. KREATOR, ACCEPT: Sept. 22, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showbox online.com. UPROAR FESTIVAL: Sept. 22, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn. 800-745-3000 or www.livenation.com. TRAIN: Sept. 23, Puyallup Fair. 888-559-3247 or www.thefair.com. FURTHUR, FEATURING PHIL LESH & BOB WEIR: Sept. 25, WaMu Theater, Seattle. 800-7453000 or www.ticketmaster.com. HATEBREED: Sept. 25, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.livenation.com. KIMBRA: Sept. 26, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline. com. GARBAGE: Sept. 26, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. BLOC PARTY: Sept. 28, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. “MY FAIR LADY”: Lyric Light Opera: Sept. 29-Oct. 6, McIntyre Hall, Mount Vernon. 360-4167727.

THE

AY ONW

C

MUSE

Thurs. 8/16 at 7pm - no cover

Fri. 8/17 at 8pm - $7 cover

REAL FOLK

Folk-rock trio celebrating their new release “At the Brink” - A social commentary! (We are closed Sat. 8/18) ND

THE 2 ANNUAL SKAGIT BLUES FESTIvAL

Sun. 8/19

ALL NEW SUMMER MENU! NOW OPEN FOR LUNCH

Featuring 24 Handles • Craft Cocktails Live Music • Full Menu

SAT 8/18 - Fat Tone s 314 Commercial • 360-755-3956

CONWAY PUB & EATERY

BURGERS • STEAK SEAFOOD • SALADS I-5 Exit 221 360-445-4733

Open 9 AM daily Breakfast Daily Pulltabs Galore VISIT OUR 2ND LOCATION IN STANWOOD! CONWAY BOXCAR

KARAOKE Fri/Sat HAVE YOUR PARTIES HERE!!

Family-Friendly Restaurant and Cabaret

BLACKBERRY BUSHES STRINGBAND

Impressive bluegrass, folk & Americana trio - guitar, banjo, fiddle & lots of harmony from Jess, Kendl and Jakob Sun. 8/19 at 5pm - $25 cover

TOMMY CASTRO & THE PAINKILLERS The MARK DuFRESNE BAND

www.BrownPaperTickets.com/event/261358

A Perfect Dining Experience.

FULL BAR TAKE OUT GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE

COSTCO

JAPANESE STEAKHOUSE & SUSHI BAR

Exit 229

I-5

ARCO S. Burlington Blvd.

HEART: Aug. 16, Northwest Washington Fair, Lynden. 360-354-7777 or www.nwwafair.com. JOHN ANDERSON: Aug. 17, Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Pacific Showroom, Bow. 877-275-2448 or www.theskagit.com. BILLY CURRINGTON: Aug. 17, Northwest Washington Fair, Lynden. 360-354-7777 or www.nwwafair.com. KISS, MOTLEY CRUE: Aug. 18, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn. 800-745-3000 or www.livenation.com. NORAH JONES: Aug. 18, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com. BILLY IDOL AID 4: Aug. 18, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showbox online.com. SKAGIT BLUES FESTIVAL: Aug. 19, The Conway Muse, Conway. 360-445-3000 or www.conway muse.com. CANNIBAL CORPSE: Aug. 22, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline. com. RINGLING BROS. AND BARNUM & BAILEY’S BARNUM BASH: Aug. 23-26, Comcast Arena at Everett. 866-332-8499 or www.comcastarena everett.com. SUPER DIAMOND: Aug. 24, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showbox online.com. DESAPARECIDOS: Aug. 25, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.ticket master.com. EL TRI: Aug. 25, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. SLOW FOOD ROOTS MUSIC FESTIVAL: Aug. 25-26, Stanwood Community Fairgrounds, Stanwood. www.slowrootsfestival.com. REFUSED: Aug. 28, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. DAVE MATTHEWS BAND: Aug. 31-Sept. 2, The Gorge Amphitheatre, George. 800-745-3000 or www.livenation.com. AMON TOBIN: Sept. 1, WaMu Theater. 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com. HANK 3: Sept. 1, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. DIANA KRALL, DENZAL SINCLAIRE: Sept. 1, Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com. OLD 97’S: Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. UNITY TOUR 2012: Sept. 5, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster. com. LINKIN PARK, INCUBUS: Sept. 5, Tacoma Dome, Tacoma. 800-745-3000 or www.ticket master.com. MELVINS LITE: Sept. 6, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. www.livenation.com. POWERMAN 5000: Sept. 7, El Corazon, Seattle. 800-514-3849 or www.cascadetickets.com. BLONDIE & DEVO: Sept. 7, Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com. PUYALLUP PRO RODEO, JUSTIN BOOTS PLAYOFF: Sept. 7, Puyallup Fair. 888-559-3247 or www.thefair.com/concerts. WILLIE NELSON: Sept. 7, Puyallup Fair. 888-559-3247 or www.thefair.com/concerts. THE HIVES: Sept. 7, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. LIGHTNING BOLT: Sept. 8, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.ticket master.com. BONNIE RAITT, MAVIS STAPLES: Sept. 8-9, Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com. HEART: Sept. 10, Puyallup Fair. $25-$65,

E George Hopper Rd Lighting Universe Japanese Steakhouse Hampton Inn

Sushi & Hibachi - Lunch Happy Hour Every Day Until 3pm

1830 South Burlington Blvd.

(360) 588.4281

www.sakuraburlington.com


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, August 16, 2012 - E15

VOTED BEST OF ANACORTES 12 YEARS RUNNING

THURSDAY 8/16

Summer Specials still available Book your Fall Banquets

FRIDAY 8/17

HOT SEAT DRAWINGS 10 am - 5 pm

John Carswell and Blues Union

Rewards Club Players will be chosen each hour to play our Cash Cup Game Board!

SATURDAY 8/18

Hot Rod’s Blues Review

Local Food, Local Beer, Made Here

360.466.4411

320 Commercial Ave • 360.588.1720

www.anacortesrockfish.com

30 FOR 20 $

$

ROCKFISH GRILL

Full Service Catering LaConner Whitney Rd. & Hwy. 20

FRIDAYS! 7”

Mark Hummel and the Blues Survivors with Special Guest Steve Freud

GET

Present your Rewards Club Card 9 am - 6 pm at either cashier cage for $10 in FREE gaming 1 1/4” when you buy-in for $20.* 1 1/2”

Follow the Fish

1/2”

3/4”

1”

ALL YOU CAN EAT!

Rockfish Grill : http://www.facebook.com/pages/Rockfish-Grill-Anacortes-Brewery/1645506695

Great Food! Great Fun!

NEW HOURS & NEW MENU

Tues - Sat • Noon - 9pm Now Serving Beer!

Spectacular BBQ Ribs Brisket Sandwiches Salads KIDS MENU 855-0117 • 208 Ferry st Sedro-Woolley www.tonysbbqhouse.com

Bellingham

Burlington

360.714.1065

360.755.9010

Mount Vernon

La Conner

360.424.5514

THURS NIGHTS:

ALL YOU CAN EAT PRAWNS

FRI 8/17 & SAT 8/18 Snake Bite

4 – 10 pm

No time for lunch?

Ask about our Express Lunch Monday-Friday!

$5.99

Why Pay

More?

FRIDAY & SATURDAY

with purchase of an adult meal

Fresh, Local & Delicious!

360.466.0267

NEW! DELUXE BURGER W/FRIES ONLY $4.99 11:30-4pm PRIME RIB & PASTA DAILY FAMILY SPECIAL: Kids 12 & Under FREE

FRIDAY NIGHT SEAFOOD

Thurs. 8/16 at 7pm - no cover

REAL FOLK

Folk-rock trio - new CD release “At the Brink,” A social commentary! We are closed Sat. 8/18 Sun. 8/19 THE 2ND ANNUAL

SKAGIT BLUES FESTIVAL

Fri. 8/17 at 8pm - $7 cover

BLACKBERRY BUSHES STRINGBAND

Impressive bluegrass, folk & Americana trio guitar, banjo, fiddle & lots of harmony Sun. 8/19 at 5pm - $25 cover

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with your 50 $ Only 16 Rewards Club Card! $19.41 without Rewards Club Card. Tax and gratuity not included.

On I-5 at Exit 236

TOMMY CASTRO & THE PAINKILLERS The MARK DuFRESNE BAND

877-275-2448 • theskagit.com

www.BrownPaperTickets.com/event/261358

422-6411

18247 State Route 9 Mount Vernon

Owned by Upper Skagit Indian Tribe.

*Must be a Rewards Club Member – Membership is FREE! Must play Full Redeemed Value of buy-in offer. Limit one per person per day. Visit Rewards Club Center for details. Management reserves all rights. Casino opens at 9 am daily. Must be 21 or older with valid ID.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E16 - Thursday, August 16, 2012

MOVIES

Cameron “CJ” Adams and Odeya Rush star in “The Odd Life Of Timothy Green.” Disney via AP

‘Timothy Green’ a rarity among films today – one for the family

‘T

he Odd Life of Timothy Green” is a warm and lovely fantasy, the kind of fullbodied family film that is being pushed aside in favor of franchises and slam-bang confusion. On a picturepostcard farm in the middle of endlessly rolling hills where it is always Indian summer, a lovable boy comes into the life of a childless couple and brings along great joy and wisdom. Timothy isn’t born and he isn’t adopted. He seems to have grown in the garden. The movie very wisely makes no attempt to explain how this happened. His new parents have tried everything to conceive a child of their own, and one desperate night they open a bottle of red wine and start making a list of the things their perfect child should have. This they

put in a box and bury in their garden, and after a torrential downpour and a lightning storm — Roger why, there’s Ebert Timothy (CJ Adams), covered with wet earth and with leaves growing from his legs. Makes perfect sense to me. How about you? “You can call us Cindy and Jim,” say the bewildered Greens (Jennifer Garner and Joel Edgerton). Timothy says he’ll just call them Mom and Dad. Awww. This cleareyed, beautiful little boy has a knack for saying tactful things, but a tendency to lack information you might think he’d know — for example,

the difference between the two goals in a soccer game. The Greens hardly even attempt to explain his appearance in their house. During an untimely family reunion the very next day, Timothy is so direct and friendly people sort of accept him. Not so much his grandfather (David Morse, who was a demanding parent for Jim), but certainly his lovable Uncle Bub and Aunt Mel (M. Emmet Walsh and Lois Smith). The supporting cast is rich with not only those actors, but a welcome selection of other familiar faces: Dianne Wiest as the mean-spirited supervisor of the local Pencil Museum, Shohreh Aghdashloo as an official of the state adoption agency, Ron Livingston and James Rebhorn as the son and father who own the pencil factory, and Common as

the soccer coach. About those pencils. The movie is set in Stanleyville, “the Pencil Capital of the World.” Times are hard. Computers are making it tough on pencils, and the factory is threatened with closure. Timothy saves the day with an inspiration from his closest friend, a teenage girl named Joni Jerome, played by the transcendent Odeya Rush. She rides around with her bicycle basket filled with brightly colored leaves, and although her origin is not mystical as Timothy’s is, she’s an open-hearted nature girl who completely agrees that if you have leaves growing from your calves, you must sometimes spread your arms and lift your face to the sun. “The Odd Life of Timothy Green” is accessible for all but the youngest children, and I suspect their parents

‘THE ODD LIFE OF TIMOTHY GREEN’

HHH1⁄ 2 Cindy Green........................................ Jennifer Garner Jim Green............................................. Joel Edgerton Timothy Green.............................................CJ Adams Franklin Crudstaff................................. Ron Livingston Bernice Crudstaff...................................Dianne Wiest Joni Jerome............................................. Odeya Rush Brenda Best................................... Rosemarie DeWitt Reggie..........................................Lin-Manuel Miranda Uncle Bub.........................................M. Emmet Walsh Aunt Mel....................................................Lois Smith James Green Sr....................................... David Morse Coach Cal.................................................... Common Evette Onat................................. Shohreh Aghdashloo Joseph Crudstaff.................................James Rebhorn n Running time: 104 minutes. MPAA rating: PG (for mild thematic elements and brief language).

will enjoy it, too. It respects the integrity of its story by dealing with real emotions of loss and parting. It’s intelligently constructed by writer-director Peter Hedges (who wrote “What’s Eating Gilbert Grape” and “About a Boy”), and instead of being

simpleminded like too many family films, it treats the characters with care and concern. Jennifer Garner and Joel Edgerton are appealing together as far-from-perfect parents, and CJ Adams has that ability of so many child actors to be pitch-perfect.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, August 16, 2012 - E17

MOVIES MINI-REVIEWS Compiled from news services. Ratings are one to four stars. “Hope Springs” — Tommy Lee Jones and Meryl Streep play a couple whose marriage has frozen into a routine. Every day starts with his nose buried in the newspaper and ends with him asleep in front of the Golf Channel. They haven’t slept in the same room for years. She convinces him over his own dead body to attend a couples therapy session at a Maine clinic run by Steve Carell. The movie contains few surprises, but one of them is Jones’ excellent performance -- vulnerable, touchy and shy. Comedy, PG-13, 100 minutes. HHH “Ice Age: Continental Drift” — Will perhaps be a delight for little kids, judging by their friendly reaction at a Saturday morning sneak preview I attended. Real little kids. I doubt their parents will enjoy it much, especially after shelling out the extra charge for the 3-D tickets. In this fourth outing for the franchise, familiar characters are joined by a few new ones as continental drift breaks up families and the 3-D threatens to give them whiplash as they zoom back and forth and up and down. Animated adventure, PG, 87 minutes. HH “Step Up Revolution” — Kathryn McCormick of “So You Think You Can Dance” and newcomer Ryan Guzman costar in the story of a new girl in Miami Beach who gets involved in his professional-grade flash mob just when her evil dad (Peter Gallagher) wants to tear down all their beloved hangouts and erect a huge development. Lots of good dancing and choreography. The plot is moronic. (Dance, PG-13, 97 minutes. HH “Ted” — The funniest movie character so far this year is a stuffed teddy bear. And the best comedy screenplay so far is “Ted,” the saga of the bear’s friendship with a 35-year-old man-child. Mark Wahlberg stars as the teddy’s best friend, Mila Kunis is his long-suffering girlfriend, and director Seth McFarlane (“Family Guy”) does Ted’s pottymouthed Beantown accent. The movie doesn’t run out of steam. McFarlane seems

AT AREA THEATERS ANACORTES CINEMAS Aug. 17-23 The Odd Life of Timothy Green (PG): 12:40, 3:05, 6:10, 8:30 The Bourne Legacy (PG-13): 12:30, 3:15, 6:00, 8:45 The Campaign (R): 12:50, 2:55, 6:20, 8:15 360-293-7000 BLUE FOX DRIVE-IN Oak Harbor Aug. 17-23 ParaNorman (PG), Snow White and the Huntsmen (PG-13): 9 p.m. $6.50 ages 11 and older, $1 children 5-10, free for kids 4 and under. 360-675-5667 CASCADE MALL THEATRES Burlington For listings and times, call 888-AMC4FUN (888-262-4386). CONCRETE THEATRE Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Dog Days (PG): 7:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 17; 5 and 7:30 p.m. unwilling to stop after the first payoff of a scene and keeps embellishing. (Definitely not for kids.) Comedy, R, 106 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “The Amazing Spider-Man” — The Spider-Man franchise is back for a reboot only 10 years after its first picture and five years after the most recent one. This is a more thoughtful and carefully written remake of the 2002 original with more attention to the origin story of Peter Parker/ Spider-Man. Andrew Garfield and Emma Stone have warm chemistry as Spidey and Gwen, and this new-generation Spidey is more impulsive and takes more chances; sometimes he leaps from buildings with no clear plan in mind. Costarring Rhys Ifans as the citydestroying Lizard, Denis Leary as Gwen’s father the police captain, and Sally Field and Martin Sheen as Aunt May and Uncle Ben. Action, PG-13, 136 minutes. HHH1⁄ 2 “The Bourne Legacy” — Jeremy Renner plays another secret super agent like Jason Bourne, who realizes he’s been targeted for elimination. To save himself and the experimental medication that gives him great physical and mental power, he travels from Alaska to Manila, fighting off wolves, drone missiles and assassi-

Saturday, Aug. 18; 4 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 19. Tickets: $6 general admission, $5 adults over 65 and kids under 12; $1 off all tickets on Sunday. 360-941-0403

AT THE LINCOLN THEATRE 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon 360-336-8955 n www.lincolntheatre.org

OAK HARBOR CINEMAS Aug. 17-23 The Expendables 2 (R): 1:00, 3:15, 6:30, 9:15 ParaNorman (PG): 1:15, 3:45, 6:45, 8:45 The Bourne Legacy (PG-13): 12:45, 3:30, 6:15, 9:00 360-279-2226 STANWOOD CINEMAS Aug. 17-23 The Expendables 2 (R): 1:05, 3:20, 6:35, 8:40 ParaNorman (PG): 1:25, 3:50, 6:35, 8:30 The Odd Life of Timothy Green (PG): 1:15, 3:40, 6:45, 9:00 The Bourne Legacy (PG-13): 12:45, 3:30, 6:15, 8:50 The Campaign (R): 12:55, 3:10, 6:55, 9:10 360-629-0514

nation, while hooking up with Dr. Marta Shearing (Rachel Weisz), a biochemist who knows all about the medication. The action scenes are gripping in the moment, but go on too long and don’t add up; the dialogue scenes (with Edward Norton, Stacy Keach and Scott Glenn), are well-acted; the plot is a murky muddle. Action, PG-13, 135 minutes. HH1⁄2 “The Campaign” — Raucous, bawdy comedy starring Will Ferrell and Zach Galifianakis as opponents in a North Carolina GOP congressional primary. Ferrell is the incumbent, and Galifianakis is a doofus bankrolled by billionaire brothers who want to buy the district and resell it to China. The movie uses their campaign as a showcase of political scandals and dirty tricks that have become familiar in both parties. Sad fact: Some of the scandals in the movie would have been hard to believe until recent years, when -well, they’ve happened. Comedy, R, 85 minutes. HHH “The Expendables 2” — Sylvester Stallone, Jason Statham, Jet Li and Terry Crews reunite for more headbanging exploits. This time, Jean-Claude Van Damme and Chuck Norris join the faded 1980s action-star

party, and Arnold Schwarzenegger and Bruce Willis show up for more than just cameos. It’s all good fun and games and recycled catchphrases. Action-adventure, R, 142 minutes. H1⁄2 “The Watch” — After the mysterious murder of a night security guard at a Costco store, its manager (Ben Stiller) enlists three other men (Vince Vaughn, Jonah Hill and Richard Ayoade) in a neighborhood watch organization that discovers an invasion of Earth is being plotted by aliens who are headquartered in the Costco’s basement. Dumb slapstick action, lots of green slime and truly versatile use of potty talk. Comedy, R, 100 minutes. HH “Total Recall” — Colin Farrell stars in a retread of the 1990 sci-fi classic, about a factory worker of the future who has his life pulled out from under him when he discovers none of his memories can be trusted. Well-crafted, high energy, but lacking the emotional tug I felt from Arnold Schwarzenegger’s earlier performance. Co-starring Kate Beckinsale, Jessica Biel, Bryan Cranston, Bokeem Woodbine, Bill Nighy and John Cho. Sci-fi action, PG-13, 121 minutes. HHH

‘Moonrise Kingdom’

7:30 p.m. Thursday-Friday, Aug. 16-17 5:30 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 19 7:30 p.m. Monday, Aug. 20 Set on an island off the coast of New England in the 1960s, the film follows a young boy and girl falling in love. When they are moved to run away together, various factions of the town mobilize to search for them and the town is turned upside down — which might not be such a bad thing. The movies stars Bill Murray, Bruce Willis, Edward Norton, Frances McDormand, Harvey Keitel, Jared Gilman, Jason Schwartzman, Kara Hayward and Tilda Swinton. Rated PG-13. $9 general; $8 seniors, students and active military; $7 members; $6 children 12 and under. Bargain matinee prices (all shows before 6 p.m.); $7 general, $5 members, $4 children 12 and under.

‘The Mountain Runners’ 7 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 18

The Lincoln presents an encore screening of “The Mountain Runners,” a movie by local filmmakers that tells the story of a group of hardy individuals who in 1911-13 braved snowstorms, foul weather and death to compete in the Mount Baker Marathon, which required that they summit Mount Baker and return to Bellingham for a winning purse of $100. The story involves modified automobiles that went 60 mph, a speeding train derailed by a bull, a 28-mile run from the base to the 10,778-foot summit through waist-deep snow, and a 40-foot fall into a glacial crevasse. $9 general; $8 seniors, students and active military; $7 members; $6 children 12 and under.


E18 - Thursday, August 16, 2012

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

OUT & ABOUT ART

grand-opening celebration from 4 to 8 p.m. Friday, PAINTINGS ON DISAug. 31, at 8700 271st St. PLAY: Paula Anderson’s NW, Stanwood. The gallery acrylic paintings are feaPAPER COLLAGES: features the work of more tured in a solo exhibition Check out the threethan 40 local artists and through Sept. 30 at North dimensional paper collages artisans, including metal Cove Coffee, 1130 S. Burof Ans Schot, on display and wood sculptures, paintlington Blvd., Burlington. Aug. 5-31 in the Evoluings in a variety of media, Anderson, a lifelong Skagit tion Room Art Gallery at jewelry, art glass and more. Valley resident, captures the Conway Muse, 18444 The gallery also plays host the essence of the valley in Spruce St., Conway. Based to a number of art classes, her unique artwork. 360on a craft started in the late including life drawing, 707-2683 or www.north 17th/early 18th century in painting, silversmithing and covecoffee.com. Venice and France, Schot’s other arts and crafts techcollages offer a different niques. Gallery hours are DIANE AINSWORTH: perspective on the creative 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday OILS: The show continues use of a print. Artworks by through Saturday. 425-629through Sept. 4 at Scott Charlotte Decker are also 2787 or www.stanwood Milo Gallery, 420 Comon display. For information, camanoarts.com. mercial Ave., Anacortes. including gallery hours and Ainsworth’s impressionistic directions, call 360-445“AMERICAN QUILTS: paintings feature land3000 or visit www.conway THE DEMOCRATIC ART scapes, floral and nautical muse.com. 1780-2007”: The show styles. Also showing: oils continues through Oct. 28 by Jeanne Levasseur, color at the Whatcom Museum’s ART STUDIO TOUR: photographs by Lewis Lightcatcher Building, 250 “The Ethereal of Skagit Valley,” a show of new paintings by Jay Bowen (pictued), Whidbey Working Artists Jones, pastels by Sandy Flora St., Bellingham. will present the “Threewill open with a reception from 5 to 9 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 25, at Jay’s Gallery, Byers and oils by James Organized especially for Day Summer Art Studio 105 S. Whatcom St., La Conner. Artworks by Ed Kamuda, Tom Pickett, Roger Moore, as well as jewelry, the museum, and based Tour” from 10 a.m. to Small, Eve McCauley and Dan Soler will also be on display. 360-630-1433 or glass, sculptures and more on Robert Shaw’s 2009 5 p.m. Friday through www.jaybowengallery.com. by other gallery artists. Sunday, Aug. 24-26, at book “American Quilts: Gallery hours are 10:30 18 artists’ studios from The Democratic Art 1780a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday Greenbank to Oak Harbor. 2007,” the exhibition offers formed by these constructs. paintings by Marcia Van buckets, that he found by through Saturday or by The self-guided tour will an array of 30 quilt masterDoren continues through the side of the road while appointment. 360-293-6938 www.anchorartspace.org. include a wide range of art- pieces spanning the entire painting plein air. Gallery Sept. 4 at Raven Rocks or www.scottmilo.com. MIXED MEDIA PAINThours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. works by two dozen artists, history of American quiltGallery, 765 Wonn Road, INGS, SCULPTURES: An many of them demonstrat- making, from its European Greenbank. Rassner-Don- Wednesday through SunANNIVERSARY ART day. 360-766-6230 or www. ing their work. Pick up a exhibition of artworks by ovan’s wraps are created origins to the present day. SHOW: Anne Martin smithandvallee.com. Karin Bolstad and Dan map at visitor centers and in a broad pallet of rich The show includes prime McCool Gallery’s 11th galleries around the island examples from a variety of colors of bamboo, linen, anniversary show will con- Freeman and continues PLEIN AIR PAINTINGS: through Sept. 5 at the Rob silk cotton and wool fibers. or visit www.whidbeywork regional quiltmaking traditinue through Aug. 31 at ingartists.com. Van Doren’s oils on paper A show of artwork by tions, as well as outstanding 711 Commercial Ave., Ana- Schouten Gallery, 765 Samish Island painter Wonn Road, Greenbank. evoke a sense of “havworks by Amish, Hawaicortes. Regular hours are Karn Kenaston continues Bolstad’s lush paintings STANWOOD ARTWALK: ian, African-American and ing been there,” stirring 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday memories of transitional or through Aug. 31 at the Rex- “Your Passport To Art,” Native American quiltmakthrough Saturday. 360-293- are rich in symbolism, created with acrylic paint and cherished times in our lives. ville Grocery, 19271 Best Stanwood’s third annual 3577 or www.mccoolart. ers. Museum hours are embellished with found For information, including Road, Mount Vernon. Most artwalk, will take place com. noon to 5 p.m. Tuesday of Kenaston’s watercolors objects. from 5 to 8 p.m. Friday, hours and directions, call through Sunday. $10, $8 Freeman’s sculptures Aug. 31, in downtown Stan- student/senior/military, “SHELTER”: The exhibit 360-222-0102 or visit www. and oil paintings are done in “plein air,” or on-site. continues through Sept. 16 combine elements found in ravenrocksgallery.com. wood. Participating restau- $4.50 children ages 5 and 360-466-5522 or www. at Anchor Art Space, 216 nature — wood and stone rants and businesses will younger, free for museum rexvillegrocery.com. Commercial Ave., Ana— with the unexpected PAUL HAVAS: “MASHshowcase the work of local members. 360-778-8933 or cortes. The show brings CANS”: The show contextures of glass and steel. artists during the event. www.whatcommuseum.org. PHOTOS ON DISPLAY: together visual artists, Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to tinues through Aug. 26 at Meet the artists and enjoy The photography of architects, designers, vidSmith & Vallee Gallery, 5 p.m. daily. 360-222-3070 music, appetizers, art and LECTURES Damian Vines is featured eographers and photograor www.robschoutengallery. 5742 Gilkey Ave., Edison. prizes. Free. 360-629-0562. AND TALKS through August in the Linphers to address the physi- com. This special exhibition coln Theatre Art Bar, 712 MT. BAKER-SNOQUALMcal, spiritual and emotional features little-known work NEW STANWOOD GALS. First St., Mount Vernon. LERY: A Guilded Gallery, IE SUMMER SPEAKERS: connections to the walls by the late Paul Havas “WRAPPED IN MEMOFree programs about local we build between our(1941-2012) — a collection Vines strives to create the Stanwood Camano RIES”: The show of handimages that capture the history, where to find the selves and the world, and of paintings on smashed Arts Guild’s new coopwoven wraps by India awe-inspiring beauty that best hikes and how to stay the ways identity can be objects, such as cans or erative gallery, will host a Rassner-Donovan and oil surrounds us every day. 360-336-8955 or www. lincolntheatre.org.

‘THE ETHEREAL OF SKAGIT VALLEY’


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, August 16, 2012 - E19

OUT & ABOUT ton. Sign-ups begin at 6 p.m. Free. For information, contact Tobie Ann at 425870-6784.

safe in the outdoors are offered on Saturdays at the Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest’s Gold Basin Campground Amphitheater, located 2 1/2 miles east of Verlot Public Service Center on the Mt. Loop Highway. For information call 360-691-7791 or visit www.fs.usda.gov/mbs. Next up: Aug. 18: About the Mt. Loop Highway Trails: 8 p.m., Edith Farrell, Mt. Loop Tourism Bureau. FILM SCREENING — “THE FAMILY MEAL”: 6:30 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 30, at the Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. Presented in conjunction with the Mayor’s Wellness Challenge, the short documentary film will be followed by guest speaker Marilyn McKenna, who will talk about her personal journey through weight loss and her upcoming book. Free. 360-336-6211 or www.ci.mount-vernon. wa.us.

SUMMER CONCERTS: The Cap Sante Marina Summer Concert Series is offering free concerts at Seafarers’ Memorial Park in Anacortes. 360-293-3134 or www.portofanacortes. com. Next up: Friday: Aug. 17: Circus Cascadia, 11 a.m. Children’s performance and workshop for ages 5 to 12; Cloverdayle: 7 p.m.

NORTHWEST WASHINGTON FAIR MORE FUN The 102nd annual Northwest Washington Fair continues through Saturday, Aug. 18, at 1775 Front St., Lynden. Gates open at 10 a.m. each day. Billy Currington (pictured) will perform at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 17. Fair admission: $10 adults, $8 ages 62 and older, $5 ages 6-12, free for ages 5 and younger. 360-354-7777 or www. nwwafair.com.

FAIRHAVEN OUTDOOR CINEMA: The 13th annual Fairhaven Outdoor Cinema will present live entertainment and big-screen movies on Saturday evenings, through Aug. 25 at the Village Green in Bellingham’s Fairhaven District. Admission is $5. Popcorn and snacks available for purchase. Bring your own blanket or low-backed lawn chair for seating. Rain FESTIVALS or shine. www.Fairhaven FARM TIME ARTS OutdoorCinema.com. by an adult. Tickets availFESTIVAL: The sixth quasi- able at the gate or online at Next up: annual Lo-Fi Arts Festival, www.strangertickets.com. Aug. 18: Music by The “Farm Time 2012,” will take Librarians at 7:30 p.m. folplace from noon Saturday OAK HARBOR MUSIC & lowed by “Moneyball” at to noon Sunday, Aug. 25-26, JAZZ FESTIVAL: Bring the dusk. at Smoke Farm, 12731 Aug. 25: Shadow boxfamily for musical fun from Smokes Road, Arlington. ing performance at 7 p.m. 6:30 to 10:30 p.m. Friday, The 24-hour event will 11 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. Satur- followed by “The Princess bring together more than Bride” at dusk. day, and 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. 75 exhibiting artists and Sunday, Aug. 31-Sept. 2, on performers to present SENIOR DAY IN THE Pioneer Way in downtown everything from life-sized PARK: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Oak Harbor. Enjoy soft bird nests to larger-thantoday, Aug. 16, Maiben rock, jazz, gospel, R&B, life fairy tale sculptures, folk, karaoke, vendors, food Park, 1011 E. Greenleaf aerial dance, underground and more at this combina- Ave., Burlington. This free rituals and more. Overnight tion street fair and music event for seniors includes camping is encouraged. fest. Free admission. www. lunch for the first 550 Bring everything needed to oakharbormusicfestival. seniors, health screenings, float the river, have a cook- com. door prizes, vendor booths out (grills and coals proand live entertainment by vided) and sleep comfortFrank Sinatra tribute artist MUSIC ably under the stars. Light Arthur Alder. 360-755-0102. ALL-AGES OPEN MIC: 7 refreshments will be available for purchase. $40, $20 p.m. Thursdays at The Soup OUTDOOR FAMILY bike ticket, free for ages 11 Bowl at Common Ground, NIGHT: Enjoy an evening and younger accompanied 351 Pease Road, Burlingoutdoors from 5:30 to

7:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 16, at Pomona Grange Park, 5585 Old Highway 99 N., Burlington. Bring the family and take a walk in the woods, explore the wonders of Friday Creek, build a fairy house village, play games, create arts and crafts, make a bagel bird feeder, go on a nature scavenger hunt and meet Blossom the Treeture. Free. Hosted by Friday Creek Habitat Stewards, Skagit Valley Backyard Wildlife Habit Team and the Skagit Conservation District & Partners. Preregistration requested by Aug. 14. Contact Kristi Carpenter at 360-428-4313 or email Kristi@skagitcd.org. FASHION SHOW: Check out an assortment of fashion ensembles made up of gently used clothing from New 2 You Consignment at 6 p.m. today, Aug. 16, at the Concrete Theatre, 45920 Main St., Concrete. Fashions will be modeled by local women, along with music, refreshments and prizes. $10. Proceeds benefit the Concrete Theatre’s digital conversion campaign. 360-941-0403 or www.concrete-theatre.com. FIRE DEPARTMENT OPEN HOUSE: Fire Station 3 will open its doors to the public from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Aug. 17, at 4701 E. Division St., Mount Vernon. Meet your firefighters, participate in some of their tasks and view the department’s antique 1920 American LaFrance fire engine. Free. 360-336-6211 or www. ci.mount-vernon.wa.us. NEW MOON FAMILY DRUM CIRCLE: 7:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 17, Anacortes Center for Happiness, 619 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. The Rev. Elke Macartney will lead the event to drum in new ideas

and drum out the old. Bring your hand drums and rattles or borrow theirs. Donations appreciated. 360-4642229 or www.anacortes centerforhappiness.org. THRESHING BEE: The Belleville Threshers and the Cascade Two Cylinder Club will present their annual Threshing Bee at 10 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 18, at Lagerwood Farms, 19095 Cook Road, Burlington. The 1930s Red River Special Threshing Machine will be threshing wheat. Antique tractors, cars and other farm machinery will also be on display. Free. 360-708-3886.

10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 18, at 45920 Main St., Concrete. Sign the guest book, tell your stories and enjoy free tours of the theater. 360-941-0403 or www. concrete-theatre.com.

EBEY’S LANDING TOURS: Ebey’s Landing National Historical Reserve will offer docentguided tours and a picnic from 5 to 8 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 18, at the Historic Ebey’s Landing Ferry House, 420 Ebey Road, Coupeville. The event will include a catered picnic dinner, music and a raffle. In addition to the Ferry House tour, a limited number of Golden Tickets are CIRCUS CASCADIA: available for an intimate Children’s performance tour from 3 to 5 p.m. of three other National Regand workshop at 11 a.m. ister properties located Saturday, Aug. 18, at Rivin the reserve. Renowned erfront Park, 1001 River Road, Sedro-Woolley. Kids historic barn aficionado ages 5 to 12 can watch and Harrison Goodall will lead the tour, which includes the learn a variety of circus skills. Free. 425-303-1848 or Comstock Barn, circa 1939; www.snohomishartistguild. Engle Water Tower, circa 1911; and Sheepherder’s org. House, circa 1900. Docent tour and dinner, POD NODS: Kids ages $75. Golden ticket, $200. 6 to 10 can enjoy marine 360-678-6084 or www. art projects, science labs, ebeysforeverfund.org. music, games and more during a pajama party WORKBOAT RACE & sleepover starting at 6:30 PIRATE FAIRE: The fourth p.m. Friday, Aug. 17, or annual Anacortes WorkSaturday, Aug. 25, at the boat Race and Pirate Whale Museum in Friday Faire is set for noon to Harbor. The event will include a flashlight tour of 7 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 25, at the Port of Anacortes, the Exhibit Hall, bedtime 100 Commercial Ave. snack and light breakfast. Watch working boats of Pick-up time is 8:30 a.m. $39-$49. Some scholarships all kinds run heats in the Guemes Channel, while available. Preregistration required: 360-378-4710, ext. onshore activities include pirate performers, a clas23, or email cindy@whale sic car show, model boat museum.org. and steam engine demonstrations, sea chantey CONCRETE THEATRE singalongs, vendors, pirate REUNION, TOURS: Anycontests, live music, food, one who used to work grog and more. Proceeds at the Concrete Theatre, meet friends there or have will benefit the Seafarers’ Memorial Fund to aid the special memories to share families of those lost at sea. is invited to stop by dur360-293-3134. ing Cascade Days from


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