Issuu on Google+

It’s all about planes this weekend in Concrete PAGE 3

Skagit Valley Herald Thursday July 26, 2012

At RiverBelle

Reviews

Roger Ebert

Vaudeville comes to the stage in the new play “Make ’Em Laugh”

Music: Soul Asylum, Chris Smither Video Games: ‘Amazing Spider-Man’

“Ruby Sparks” about a writer and his fictional creation

PAGE 4

PAGES 6-7

PAGE 16


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E2 - Thursday, July 26, 2012

NEW ON DVD THIS WEEK “Treasure Island”: The classic 1883 pirate novel by Robert Louis Stevenson has been made into 30 different movies, spawned more than 20 prequels and sequels, and has been the source for at least one TV series. You can make that 31 films with the Syfy Channel adaptation starring Eddie Izzard, Elijah Wood and Donald Sutherland. The latest version works because of Izzard. He turned to a larger-than-life historical figure, Winston Churchill, for the inspiration he needed to make his John Silver different than all the rest. Izzard used the notion that Churchill was able to bounce between political parties over the years and yet was recently voted by the British people as the greatest Briton ever. Izzard makes Silver a character who can play both sides of an issue and always seem to be right. This is an impressive take on the classic story. Credit Izzard with making this made-for-cable offering a real treasure. “Boss: Season One”: After years of showing great comic skills with “Cheers” and “Frasier,” Kelsey Grammer gets the opportunity to show his dramatic skills with this dark cable series. Grammer plays Tom Kane, ruthless mayor of Chicago. He’s a man who has risen to power on the backs of others and has no problem stepping on a few more people to hang on to his control despite being hampered by health problems. Political stories are only as good as the central players. and Grammer shows the proper way such a role should be played. He can go from being a ruthless leader to confused health patient with ease. The first season will help you get up to speed before the second season starts on Starz on Aug. 17. “Silent House”: A woman is terrorized inside her family’s lakeside home. Elizabeth Olsen stars. “Inspector Lewis: 5th Series”: Kevin Whately plays Detective Inspector Robbie Lewis. “Jock the Hero Dog”: Family adventure about a young man and his best friend. “The Love Guide”: A couple looks to save their relationship. “Footnote”: Father and son compete for a prestigious honor. “The Untouchables: The Complete Series”: Eliot Ness (Robert Stack) and his team fight crime in 1920s Chicago. “Touched By An Angel: The Com-

YOUR ARTS, ENTERTAINMENT AND RECREATION GUIDE TO WHAT’S GOING ON IN SKAGIT COUNTY AND THE SURROUNDING AREAS

Upcoming movie releases Following is a partial schedule of coming movies on DVD. Release dates are subject to change: AUG. 7 Blue Like Jazz - Lionsgate Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax - Universal

This Weekend / Page 5

AUG. 14 Stallone 3-Film Collector’s Set - Lionsgate Breathless - Anchor Bay The Raid: Redemption - Sony AUG. 21 The Dictator - Paramount Chimpanzee - Disney A Separation - Sony AUG. 28 Battleship - Universal The Five-Year Engagement - Universal The Pirates! Band of Misfits - Sony Think Like a Man - Sony SEPT. 4 Piranha 3DD - Anchor Bay Safe - Lionsgate SEPT. 11 Girl In Progress -- Lionsgate What to Expect When You’re Expecting -- Lionsgate

Enjoy the Bite of Skagit on Saturday in downtown Mount Vernon.

Inside

SEPT. 18 The Cabin in the Woods -- Lionsgate n McClatchy-Tribune News Service

plete Fifth Season”: Angels Monica (Roma Downey), Tess (Della Reese) and Andrew (John Dye) continue their good work. “Michael Wood’s Story of England”: The story of the village of Kibworth, Leicestershire, is told throughout the whole English history. “Childrens Hospital: The Complete Third Season”: Rob Corddry stars in the cable comedy series. “Age of the Dragons”: Adaptation of Herman Melville’s “Moby Dick.” “My Way”: Rival marathon runners fight for Japan at the start of World War II. “Young Justice: Dangerous Secrets”: Contains 14 episodes of the animated series. “On the Inside”: A college professor (Nick Stahl) sentenced to a psychiatric hospital for the criminally insane meets an inmate (Olivia Wilde) with a shocking secret. “Star Trek: The Next Generation — The First Season”: The sci-fi series makes its Blu-ray debut. n Rick Bentley, McClatchy Newspapers

SUBMISSIONS Email features@skagitpublishing.com vrichardson@skagitpublishing. com (recreation items) Phone 360-416-2135 Hand-deliver 1215 Anderson Road Mount Vernon, WA 98274 Mailing address P.O. Box 578 Mount Vernon, WA 98273

Music, Game Reviews..................6-7 Travel............................................8-9 On Stage........................................ 10 Tuning Up..................................... 11 Get Involved.................................. 12 At the Lincoln Theatre.................. 13 Hot Tickets.................................... 14 Roger Ebert.................................... 16 Movie Mini-Reviews................16-17 Out & About.............................18-19

Online events calendar To list your event on our website, visit goskagit.com and look for the Events Calendar on the home page HAVE A STORY IDEA? w For arts and entertainment, contact Features Editor Craig Parrish at 360-416-2135 or features@skagitpublishing.com w For recreation, contact staff writer Vince Richardson at 360-416-2181 or vrichardson@ skagitpublishing.com TO ADVERTISE 360-424-3251


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, July 26, 2012 - E3

COMMUNITY

Busy skies above Concrete this weekend North Cascades Vintage Fly-In When: Friday-Sunday, July 27-29 Where: Mears Field, Concrete Information: 360-8537320 or skagitaero. com/calendar/concretenorth-cascades-fly-in

Skagit Valley Herald staff

The skies above Concrete this weekend will be filled with airplanes and the history those planes represent. The North Cascades Vintage Fly-In will take place Friday through Sunday, July 27-29, at Mears Field. Dozens of antique, classic and vintage airplanes are expected, as their owners will display the planes both on the ground and in the air. Food vendors will be set up for the entire weekend, with much of the airplane-related activities scheduled for Saturday. Aircraft judging will take place throughout the day Saturday, according to the Fly-In website.

Skagit Valley Herald file photos


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E4 - Thursday, July 26, 2012

ON STAGE

A new spin on vaudeville By AMELIA DICKSON Staff Writer

TOP: Richard Callaghan (from left), Christopher Touhy, Brandon Taitano and Guy Smith star in “Make ’Em Laugh.” RIGHT: Sarah Mickelson (from left), Michaela Williams, Charlie Lenord are the Automotons in the RiverBelle Dinner Theatre production, which opens Friday. Submitted photos

RiverBelle Theater is offer‘Make ’Em Laugh’ ing a different take on classic Where: RiverBelle Dinner vaudeville with the new play Theatre, 100 E. Montgomery, “Make ’Em Laugh.” Written Mount Vernon by local actor, director and When: 7 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays, July 27-Aug. 25; 2 p.m. Sundays, playwright Mike Wallace, Aug. 12, 19, 26 the play showcases singing, Tickets: $40 dinner/show, $30 dancing and an interesting dessert buffet/show; Sundays storyline. $20, $18 seniors, show only Information: 360-336-3012 or “We’re trying to incorpowww.riverbelledinnertheatre.com rate a lot of the old vaudeville, and then splice in a lot of what’s happening in our world,” RiverBelle owner Wendy Bell said. So, what is vaudeville? The show’s director, Matthew Riggins, said it’s a type of theater that has roots in the Industrial Revolution (1750-1850), serving as entertainment for the newly formed middle class. Traditional vaudeville is made up of a variety of sketch shows, singing and dancing. “If you’ve seen ‘Looney Toons,’ that’s vaudeville,” Riggins said. “But what they can do with cartoons is have someone diving off of a 1,000-foot cliff, going through the ground. But the live performances had the same feel, they evoked the same things.” The storyline of “Make ’Em Laugh” serves as a commentary on the violence in today’s society, primarily bullying, and then examines the phenomenon’s roots in American history. The show opens with three teens, who are part of the “losers club,” breaking into an old movie theater. There, they learn about violence as entertainment. “I think what the show is saying is if we want to take who we are today and change in any capacity, you can’t disconnect from where we came from,” Riggins said. “There’s a reason why vaudeville was so popular.” Bell said she plans on doing more local, original shows in the future, as they are less expensive to produce and give local playwrights a chance to showcase their talents. “Instead of doing these high-end shows like ‘Chicago’ and ‘The Wizard of Oz,’ we’re starting to work on these original shows,” Bell said. “It’s like we’re in the depression again, and we’re bringing back vaudeville because that’s what people can afford.” n Amelia Dickson can be reached at 360-416-2130 or adickson @skagitpublishing.com.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, July 26, 2012 - E5

THIS WEEKENDin the area BITE OF SKAGIT

SUMMER ART FESTIVAL The Lazy Days of Summer Art Festival will take place Friday and Saturday, July 27-28, around La Conner. Check out the Final Friday Art Walk, featuring local art on display in storefront windows around town, art in the parks and more. 360-466-4778 or www.laconnerchamber.com

BARK FEST

The event will take place from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, July 28, at the Mount Vernon Dog Park at Bakerview Park, 3101 E. Fir St., Mount Vernon. Bring your four-legged friends for doggie cake walks, agility demonstrations, contests and more. Free admission. 360-336-6215

SILVANA FAIR

The 65th annual Silvana Community Fair will take place from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, July 28, at the Viking Hall and adjacent grounds, 1331 Pioneer Highway, Silvana. Check out a variety of livestock, arts and crafts demonstrations and displays, vendors, pony rides, kids’ games, food, music and more. Free admission. 360-652-8682 or www.silvanafair.com

CEMENT CITY STREET FAIR

The fifth annual celebration of healthy living and family fun will take place from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, July 28, in downtown Concrete. Enjoy music, movies, arts and crafts, health screens and information, 5K fun run, motorcycle show, kids’ activities, food and more. Sponsored by United General Hospital in collaboration with the Concrete Chamber of Commerce and local businesses. Free admission. 360-853-8784 or www.unitedgeneral.org

SAMISH ISLAND ART FEST North Coast Credit Union will host the fourth annual Bite of Skagit to benefit the Skagit Food Share Alliance (SFSA) from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday, July 28, on First Street in Mount Vernon. Enjoy local restaurants, live music, beer and wine garden, and the Best Bite of 2012 contest. Free admission. Food and beverage tickets are $1 each, with the average bite between two to four tickets each. Nonperishable food donations will be accepted. Information: contact Susan Lanahan at 360-685-4005 or slanahan@northcoastcu.com.

The 16th annual Samish Island Arts Festival will take place from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, July 28, at the Samish Island Community Center, 11292 Blue Heron Road. Enjoy original artworks, barbecued oysters, live music, children’s crafts, door prizes and more. Free admission. 360-757-8771 or www.samishisland.net

LA CONNER FESTIVALS OF MUSIC AND ART

Enjoy music, food, wine and art from 3 to 10 p.m. Sunday, July 29, at Maple Hall, 104 Commercial Ave., La Conner. The Swinomish Blues Revue, featuring Nick Vigarino, Terry Nelson, Chris Leighton and Rob Moitoza, will be the host band. Guest performers include vocalists Duffy Bishop and Suze Sims and guitarist Rich Rorex. Visual artists Dennis Hacker, Phil Chestnut and Willow Stone will display their work. $20, free for ages 14 and younger. 360-387-0374


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E6 - Thursday, July 26, 2012

REVIEWS MUSIC CDS Compiled from news services

Soul Asylum

ing along with hints of world music. The result is tuneful and kind of unexpected. Friedman, who was inspired by the late jazz apostle and pianist Amit Golan, makes very personal jazz with some knockout sidemen. Amos Hoffman deftly works in some along with guitar, while pianist Omri Mor offers sophisticated color. Drummer Amir Bressler almost steals the show with inventive locomotion that borrows from around the globe. Friedman, who plays soprano and tenor, knows his way around a bop tune and clearly draws from the jazz tradition. The funky calypso vibe of “Optimism” is dedicated to Sonny Rollins. Yet he takes the basics to new realms.

Dave Alvin’s voice is not missing entirely. The set closes with “Maria Maria,” which is the classic Blasters rave-up “Marie Marie” transformed into a lovely acoustic waltz, and sung in Spanish.

how to showcase his label’s roster without fearing they’ll best the boss. He’s looking to sell records by Maybach signees like Meek “Delayed Mill, the controversial Philadelphia MC Reaction” who, when not busy fighting Drake’s battles with Chris Brown or arguing with preachn Nick Cristiano, The Philadelphia Inquirer Soul Asyers over risqué lyrics, is releasing his MMG lum glides debut in August. Laetitia back into While Ross saves the ego for his forthfocus with coming album, “God Forgives, I Don’t” (on Sadier its first new the rival Def Jam label), he’s got plenty of “Silencio” release in six years, “Delayed Reaction,” boastful brio to go around on “Bury Me a G,” his crackling duet with T.I., and guest sounding more casual than anything. On her bits littered throughout SMV2 like the Why not? There’s little likelihood the second solo crunching “Black Magic,” with Philly’s Mill. Minneapolis band will achieve the kind of full-length Some of the album’s best moments focus success it landed in the 1990s (particularly since her old on singsongy rapper/crooner Omarion and with the Grammy-winning 1993 single band, electroWashington MC Wale. Their sweet-and-sour “Runaway” and the 1992 triple-platinum pop legends n Karl Stark, The Philadelphia Inquirer pairing on “M.I.A.” is a surefire soul-hop hit album “Grave Dancers Union”), so the Stereolab, went on indefinite hiatus, the if ever there was one. Still, Maybach is an probable lack of pressure would seem to French-born vocalist amps up the lusciously exclusive gang, and hip-hop’s mob mentalThe make it easier for it to just do its thing. delivered political rhetoric she’s made her ity is made fluidly funky on the team effort “Delayed Reaction” is the group’s first Blasters trademark. “This Thing of Ours.” new full-length recording since it lost “Fun On The album title and spoken-word closer founding bassist Karl Mueller (who died of Saturday n A.D. Amorosi, The Philadelphia Inquirer “Invitation Au Silence” nods to the power cancer in 2006), and it’s also the band’s first Night” of stillness in a world awash in noise. On release on 429 Records. the endearingly earnest “Auscultation to the Chris Fortunately, Soul Asylum always had a The 1985 Nation,” Sadier scolds unelected, “politicalSmither bit of a ragged, rowdy sound, so founding departure ly illegitimate” financial authorities, while “Hundred members vocalist/guitarist Dave Pirner and of guitarist the Jean Renoir-inspired “The Rule of the Dollar lead guitarist Dan Murphy, plus new bassDave Alvin Game” skewers a fattened bourgeoisie. Valentine” may have left ist Tommy Stinson and drummer Michael Things can get a bit heavy, but old bandthe Blasters without a distinctive songwrit- mate Tim Gane helps on the peppy “Next Bland, didn’t have to take pains to update Nobody ing voice, but they remain one of the great their sound or try on new trends. Time You See Me,” and “Silencio’s” pice philosophizes roots-rock bands (and still one of our allFans will take in “Delayed Reaction” de resistance is the James Elkington- coto the blues like a comfortable, if relatively uneventful, time favorites). penned “Fragment Pour le Future de quite like Chris Smither. On his 12th album, On “Fun on Saturday Night,” the four reunion with an old friend: There may be a l’Homme,” a manic, hip-shaking treatise the singer and guitarist continues to be a musicians — original members Phil Alvin, couple of surprises, but it’s mostly just an (“Our church is on fire, from its crypt up to spellbinding blend of the elemental and the Bill Bateman and John Bazz, joined by easy re-acquaintance — and the net effect its spire”) on the hubris of nations. erudite, with a deft touch and often droll red-hot guitarist Keith Wyatt — again show of “Delayed Reaction” is humble charm. undertone that allows him to go deep withn Brian Howard, The Philadelphia Inquirer their impressive range. They tear through n Chuck Campbell, Scripps Howard News out getting ponderous or pretentious. blues chestnuts by Tiny Bradshaw, Magic Service Smither still grounds himself in acoustic Slim, Sonny Boy Williamson II and GateMaybach blues, this time spicing things up with the mouth Brown, and tackle both Johnny Cash Music likes of cello, fiddle, and female backup Amit and James Brown while also venturing vocals. The title song is a jaunty little numGroup south of the border. Friedman ber about romantic frustration, but mostly The two originals here, one by Phil Alvin “Self Made Sextet Smither likes to delve into the big questions. and one credited to all four Blasters, may Vol. 2” When he does, he has a knack for making “Sunrise not match the extremely high standards set even his wordiest songs flow as fluidly as his by Dave Alvin. But as a singer, his older Rick Ross fingerpicking and insistent rhythms. A product brother remains a marvel. Phil Alvin’s is as audaBut he can also be gut-wrenchingly conof the expandpiercing tenor turns raspy in some spots, cious a busicise, as he is on “What It Might Have Been” ing Israeli but it remains as strong and rangy as ever. nessman as he (“It ain’t what I knew that made me blue/ jazz scene, He belts the blues with authority, duets is a rapper. It’s what I thought I knew”) and on two of reed man and with Exene Cervenka on a scorching verNot only because the Maybach Music composer Amit Friedman has made one of sion of the Cash-June Carter hit “Jackson,” label owner has been giving sacks of cash to his better known older songs reprised here: “I Feel the Same” (covered by Bonnie Raitt the happier recordings of the year. This set and pleads like the Godfather of Soul on exotic dancers in strip clubs across America and others) and “Every Mother’s Son.” of a dozen originals delivers a succession of “Please Please Please.” He even proves a to promote this compilation’s bouncing first winsome melodies with jazz heft and solo- nimble yodeler. n Nick Cristiano, The Philadelphia Inquirer single, “Bag of Money.” Ross understands


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, July 26, 2012 - E7

REVIEWS VIDEO GAMES Chris Campbell, Scripps Howard News Service

‘The Amazing Spider-Man’

pletely captured what I imagine could be a never-ending endorphin high from swinging through the big city. Platforms: Xbox Things are much different now, as “The 360, PlayStation 3, Amazing Spider-Man” delivers this thrilling Wii, PC, 3DS sensation by leaps and bounds over earlier Genre: Action games. Even if you question whether at times Publisher: Activision your web is actually attaching to anything to ESRB Rating: swing from, it’s possible you’ll play this game T, for Teen for hours longer than planned just to whip Grade: 3 stars around Manhattan and look for goodies. (out of 5) Sadly, the exhilaration takes a sharp My opening salvo: decline once you hit terra firma. Combat I haven’t seen the borrows heavily from “Batman Arkham movie yet. Yes, I reside in the fuddy-duddy Asylum,” which sounds awesome except lots camp that says it’s too soon since the last tril- of games do this now and no one is buildogy for me to shell out $12 to see an all-new ing upon that model. The enemy artificial origin story. Despite loving to watch comicintelligence is also so dumb that working to book movies and agreeing that Emma Stone unlock new moves and attacks isn’t necessary could soon assume the mantle of “America’s against such middling foes. Sweetheart,” I’m just not interested. The bones of a winning franchise exist if But wait! You say they rebooted the developers continue to expand beyond just video-game franchise as well? Now that I can releasing a game that ties into a movie. In get on board with. The previous games feathe meantime, throw on the Spidey suit for at turing our favorite web-slinger never comleast a weekend or two. It will be worth it.

Fun!

Carnival livE musiC Food nts arEna EvE Car show by diapEr dEr t moviE nigh Kids zonE magiCian hypnotist als Farm anim and

360-336-9414 www.skagitcounty.net/fair

morE!

Fun for the who family i le the hea n of skagrt Countyit !

‘The Walking Dead: Episode 2 – Starving for Help’

Platforms: Xbox 360, PlayStation 3, PC Genre: Action Publisher: Telltale Games ESRB Rating: M, for Mature Grade: 4 stars (out of 5) If “The Walking Dead” video-game series teaches us anything, it’s that when the undead come a-lookin’ for flesh to feast upon, no decision you are forced to make is ever a good one. Telltale is doing wonders with the franchise, even with only two episodes released. Instead of pumping out one 30-hour game on a disc, gamers are being treated to slowly released chapters that feel distinct while remaining part of a larger narrative. The pace forces you to appreciate the characters and interactions because you’ll see them again (or maybe not, depending on your choices) in a few

months when the next episode comes out. If you haven’t played the first episode, stop now and do that first. Ignoring the initial episode would starve you of some character setup and the ability to immerse yourself in the encampment and surrounding areas. The focus is still on Lee, our freed convict. He’s not quite sure of his role in this new zombie apocalypse, but he’s not exactly thrilled with the cast of characters he’s stuck with. The gameplay is similar to that of the first episode, with plenty of shooting and general survival-themed elements, but the focus is clearly on making decisions. Choosing who gets food when the rations dwindle and whether to kill an enemy while a child watches are not trivial matters, and the game makes you feel the weight of them long after you’ve made your choice. Most downloadable games are oneoff experiences where you play, walk away and never think about them again. Brilliantly staggering the game out into smaller portions allows you to ruminate on what a failing society would be like in a zombie apocalypse, and leaves you eagerly awaiting the arrival of the next chapter.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E8 - Thursday, July 26, 2012

TRAVEL

I

tion also took place there (you can walk by, but can’t use the diving pool, though). Families may be more interested in the indoor water playground next to the Olympic warmup pool. After your swim, you can play tennis or try out archery at other venues around the Olympic Park. For more details about hours and fees, visit these sites: ANZ Stadium: www.anzsta dium.com.au Athletic Centre: www.ath leticcentre.com.au Swimming: www.aquatic centre.com.au Olympic Park: www.syd neyolympicpark.com.au Melbourne hosted the Olympics in 1956, but much of the main venue has been transformed since then. The tour of the Melbourne Cricket Ground offers more about SYDNEY AND MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA cricket than the Olympic Games that took place there. The bulk of the Sydney However, a sports museum Games in 2000 took place has an extensive section on at Sydney Olympic Park, a short train ride from the city’s the Olympics. That’s where you can see the cauldron center. where the Olympic flame The opening and closing ceremonies were held in what burned during the Melbourne is now ANZ Stadium. As part Games. The Cricket Ground also of the tour, you can pose for hosted some preliminary socphotos standing on a medal cer games when the Olympics stand — take your pick of were held in Sydney. gold, silver or bronze. An For details: extended, pricier Gantry Tour Cricket Ground: www.mcg. takes you high above the field org.au along steel mesh walkways Museum: www.nsm.org.au used by crews to access lighting and sound equipment. Track and field events also LAKE PLACID, N.Y. took place there, though the Located about five hours actual track used was rolled north of New York City, Lake up like a carpet and moved to Placid hosted the Winter the warmup area of the near- Olympics in 1932 and 1980. by Athletic Centre. (The main Several of the venues are track at the Athletic Centre still open for tours and recrehad been used for warmup ational use, though some are during the Olympics.) operational only during the The Athletic Centre is open winter season. for recreational use when Die-hard fans may want to there isn’t an event schedride the bobsled. It’s the actuuled, with either the main or al one used in competition, warmup track open on a given though you only get to ride part of it, with a professional day. The Aquatic Centre has an escort. If you are brave, you Olympic-sized pool, naturally, can also ride the head-first skeleton run, though it wasn’t open to the public for lap an Olympic event during swimming. Diving competin Sydney, you can swim in the same pool where Ian Thorpe won five Olympic medals in 2000. In Berlin, you can pose for photos in the stadium where Jesse Owens won four gold medals in 1936. In Lake Placid, N.Y., you can skate on the same rink where Eric Heiden speed skated his way to five golds in 1980. You don’t have to go to London to enjoy the Olympics. Many venues used for past Olympic Games are still standing, some in modified form. A few are open for public sporting use, while many others offer tours for a fee. Many Olympic cities also have sports museums with heavy doses of Olympic memorabilia. Here are some places to consider:

Berlin, Germany Olympiastadion Berlin

Run, swim, pose where Olympic champs reigned

pic athletes in 1980. A separate tour is available for the Olympic ski-jumping complex, and Whiteface Mountain is open for skiing during the winter. Lake Placid also hosts an Olympic museum downtown. Consider an Olympic Sites Passport for discounts if you are visiting several venues. To plan your trip, visit www. whiteface.com.

BERLIN AND MUNICH, GERMANY

Germany hosted two notorious games: The 1936 Berlin Olympics, which Adolf Hitler tried to turn into a showcase of Aryan supremacy, and the 1972 Munich Olympics, married by a hostage crisis that left 11 Israelis dead. You see the majestic Olympic Gate — two towers holding up the Olympic rings — as By ANICK JESDANUN / Associated Press you approach Olympiastadion Berlin. Next to the stadium is the tower and parade grounds used by the Nazis for military and political ceremonies. A tour takes you to the stands overlooking the track area where Owens and other athletes competed. You can see the unlit cauldron at one end of the stadium. You can also see the balcony from Sydney, Australia which Hitler had watched the Track used for warmups during 2000 Olympics games, though it had been shortened after World War II as part of de-Nazification Lake Placid, N.Y. efforts. Bobsled course Sign up for the Berlin Marathon in September, and you may also get to run on the track the morning before the race. It’s not the original track surface, though. Many of Munich’s events took place at Olympiapark. The main stadium was used for the opening and closing AP file photos ceremonies, track and field and soccer. With a tour, you get to walk on the track. as the Miracle on Ice. You either of the Lake Placid The tour also takes you to a can skate in one of its Games. VIP lounge filled with Olymindoor rinks. The outdoor While there, you can pic artifacts such as torches tour the Olympic Center, speedskating oval is open from past games and shoes where the U.S. ice hockey during the winter months worn by some of the athletes, team defeated the Soviets and is the same one used in what has become known by Heiden and other Olym- including Kenya’s Kipchoge

Keino, who won gold in the 3,000-meter steeplechase in 1972. A wall display of key moments includes a newspaper headline on the massacre. The athletes’ village where the terrorism acts took place is still around, used mostly for offices and housing these days. Visits are discouraged. Instead, check out a memorial at the Olympic park. For details about tours and fees, see: Berlin: www.olympiastadion -berlin.de/en.html Munich: www.olympiapark. de/en/home

ELSEWHERE

Beijing’s iconic “Bird’s Nest” and “Water Cube” facilities are now open to visitors. The National Stadium was the site of the opening and closing ceremonies, track and field events and soccer and is notable for its architecture — steel “twigs” on the outside form a massive, curving nest. See www.n-s.cn/en. The National Aquatics Center, where Michael Phelps won eight golds in 2008, is dubbed the Water Cube for its blue, bubble-like exterior. It’s a water park these days. Details are at www.watercube.com, though you might need an online translating service to read the Chineselanguage site. Barcelona, Spain, which hosted the 1992 Summer Olympics, offers free entrance to the stadium, but a museum next door charges an admission fee. The museum has a brief discussion on the Ancient Olympics in Greece, but focuses on modern times and has an extensive collection from the Barcelona Games. You can also sign up for the Athens Classic Marathon in November and run roughly the same route of the 1896 and 2004 Olympics in Athens. The route somewhat traces the journey that Pheidippides, according to legend, ran in 490 B.C. to deliver news of a battle victory.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, July 26, 2012 - E9

Local travel

Pike Place Market: Thursday, Aug. 16. Enjoy late-summer produce, flowers and WILDLIFE TOURS: Join The Whale everything else Seattle’s famous market Museum for land-based wildlife tours of has to offer. $15-$20. Pay by Aug. 3. San Juan Island. The tours run from 2 to 5 Granville Island, British Columbia: Tuesp.m. Fridays, July 27 and Aug. 10, 24 and day, Aug. 28. Artful shopping. Passport or 31, beginning at The Whale Museum, 62 enhanced driver’s license required. $30First St., Friday Harbor. The tours are free, $35. Pay by Aug. 16. but reservations are required. Call 360 Japanese Botanical Garden at the Uni378-4710, ext. 23, or stop by the museum. versity of Washington: Tuesday, Sept. 11. www.whalemuseum.org. Check out the City People’s Garden Store, near the Arboretum, continue on to the WHATCOM MUSEUM HISTORY SUNSET Japanese Garden at the UW Arboretum, CRUISE: 6 to 8:30 p.m. Thursdays, through then dine out nearby. Price includes tour. Aug. 30, departing from Squalicum Harbor, $21-$26. 2621 S. Harbor Loop Drive, Bellingham. “New Day Northwest” and studio tour: Tour guide Brian Griffin will lead a fun, infor- Monday, Sept. 17. Be part of the studio mative evening on board the 110-foot tour audience for this popular TV show. $16-$21. boat Island Caper. Bring binoculars, warm Pay by Sept. 6. layers and a picnic dinner. $35, $30 muse WWU Planetarium, Bellingham: Tuesday, um members. 360-778-8963 or Oct. 16. Enjoy a special showing on Indian www.whatcommuseum.org. star lore, then off to lunch and shopping. TALL SHIP EXPEDITION VOYAGES: The tall $22-$27. Pay by Oct. 1. ship Hawaiian Chieftain will offer its annual Expedition Voyages Family and Youth Camps SHORT TRIPS: Mount Vernon Parks and Recreation offers several travel opportuniin the San Juan Islands on July 30-Aug. 3, ties. For information or to register, call 360departing from and returning to Anacortes. 336-6215. Participants will learn to set sail, stand watch and take the helm of a replica 18th PASSPORT APPLICATIONS: The Anacortes century tall ship. Trained naturalists will Public Library accepts U.S. passport applilead island explorations. The voyage is not cations from noon to 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays recommended for children younger than 5. 800-200-5239 or www.historicalseaport.org. and Wednesdays, and 1 to 4 p.m. Saturdays at 1220 10th St., Anacortes. Passport DAY TRIPS: Camano Center is offering sevforms and information on fees and how to eral trips for seniors and others, departing apply are available online at http://travel. from and returning to Camano Center, 606 Arrowhead Road, Camano Island. 360-387- state.gov or pick up an application and 0222 or www.camanocenter.org. passport guide at the library. SVH_4.949x4.75_ JULY

JULY AT TULALIP BINGO Paying Out Up To $7.2 Million $2,500 STAR

$2,000 CASH DRAWING

MADE IN THE SHADE

HOT SEAT DRAWING

SUNDAY - JULY 29

TUESDAYS 7PM

(2) Winners drawn each session and each winner will choose a “Star” to determine prize.

(5) $100 Winners at 11AM and 3PM session and (10) $100 Winners at 7PM session. Guests will receive entry forms July 1 - July 28 to be deposited in drawing bin located in front of the callers stand.

(2) Winners drawn at each session halftime. Each winner will choose a pair of “Sunglasses” to determine prize.

Winners must be present and playing with a valid bingo receipt to claim prize. No Seat Hopping Allowed.

Winners must be present and playing with a valid bingo receipt to claim prize. No Seat Hopping Allowed.

Winners must be present and playing with a valid bingo receipt to claim prize. No Seat Hopping Allowed.

JULY 3, 10, 17, 24 & 31

$2 OFF BINGO Any 11AM or 3PM Session

HOT SEAT DRAWING

WEDNESDAYS JULY 4, 11, 18 & 25

Bring in this ad and receive $2 Off any 11AM or 3PM Session

1 coupon per guest • Redeem at cashier window - Not valid with any other offer. No cash value. Winners must be present and playing with a valid Bingo receipt or at Bingo Slots to win. No seat hopping allowed. Only original ad will be honored for special offers - no copies. Management reserves the right to cancel or amend promotion at any time.

Valid 7/01/12 - 7/31/12 SVH BNG0712

1-800-631-3313


E10 Thursday, July 26, 2012

ON STAGE in the Skagit Valley and surrounding area July 26-August 5

TUNING UP Playing at area venues July 26-August 2

Thursday.26

Saturday.4

THEATER

THEATER

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: Island Stage Left, 8:30 p.m., Roche Harbor Outdoor Stage, San Juan Island. Free. Donations appreciated. Bring a blanket and dress warmly. www.islandstageleft. org.

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: 8:15 p.m., Island Stage Left, 1062 Wold Road, Friday Harbor. Free; donations appreciated. Bring a blanket and dress warmly. www.islandstageleft.org.

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: Shakespeare Northwest, 6:30 p.m., Rexville-Blackrock Amphitheater, 19299 Rexville Grange Road, Mount Vernon. $12. Bring lawn chairs. www.shakesnw. org.

Friday.27 MUSIC

An-O-Chords 57th annual Summer Show: Barbershop harmonies featuring The Humdingers (aka the Dapper Dans at Walt Disney World in Orlando), The Jaybirds and the An-O-Chords, 7:30 p.m., Brodniak Hall, Anacortes High School, 1600 20th St., Anacortes. $16-$25. Senior discount available. 360-679-7473 or www.anochords.org.

THEATER

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: Island Stage Left, 8:30 p.m., Roche Harbor Outdoor Stage, San Juan Island. Free. Donations appreciated. Bring a blanket and dress warmly. www.islandstageleft. org. “Julius Caesar”: Shakespeare Northwest, 6:30 p.m., Rexville-Blackrock Amphitheater, 19299 Rexville Grange Road, Mount Vernon. $12. Bring lawn chairs. www.shakesnw.org. “Make ’em Laugh”: musical comedy, 7 p.m., RiverBelle Theatre, The Old Town Grainery, 100 E. Montgomery, Mount Vernon. $40 dinner and show; $30 dessert buffet and show. Reservations required: 360-336-3012 or www.riverbelledinner theatre.com.

Thursday, July 26, 2012 E11

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Shakespeare Northwest IRONMAN performance: “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” Touring Show and “Julius Caesar,” 1 p.m., Rexville-Blackrock Amphitheater, 19299 Rexville Grange Road, Mount Vernon. $30. Bring lawn chairs. www.shakesnw.org.

FRIDAY-SATURDAY.27-28 AN-O-CHORDS 57TH ANNUAL SUMMER SHOW 7:30 p.m., Brodniak Hall, Anacortes High School, 1600 20th St., Anacortes. $16-$25. Senior discount available. 360-679-7473 or www.anochords.org.

Saturday.28 MUSIC

An-O-Chords 57th annual Summer Show: Barbershop harmonies featuring The Humdingers (aka the Dapper Dans at Walt Disney World in Orlando), The Jaybirds and the An-O-Chords, 7:30 p.m., Brodniak Hall, Anacortes High School, 1600 20th St., Anacortes. $16-$25. 360-679-7473 or www.anochords.org.

THEATER

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: Shakespeare Northwest, 6:30 p.m., Rexville-Blackrock Amphitheater, 19299 Rexville Grange Road, Mount Vernon. $12. Bring lawn chairs. www.shakesnw.org.

Monday-Wednesday.30-1 No events submitted

Thursday.2 THEATER

“Julius Caesar”: Shakespeare Northwest, 6:30 p.m., Rexville-Blackrock Amphitheater, 19299 Rexville Grange Road, Mount Vernon. $12. Bring lawn chairs. www.shakesnw.org.

Friday.3 THEATER

Agatha Christie’s “Murder on the Nile”: 8 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-293-6829 or www.acttheatre.com. “Make ’em Laugh”: musical comedy: 7 p.m., RiverBelle Theatre, The Old Town Grainery, 100 E. Montgomery, Mount Vernon. $40 dinner and show; $30 dessert buffet and show. Reservations required: 360-336-3012 or www.riverbelledinner theatre.com.

THEATER

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: Shakespeare Northwest, 2 p.m., RexvilleBlackrock Amphitheater, 19299 Rexville Grange Road, Mount Vernon. $12. Bring lawn chairs. www.shakesnw.org.

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: Shakespeare Northwest, 6:30 p.m., Rexville-Blackrock Amphitheater, 19299 Rexville Grange Road, Mount Vernon. $12. Bring lawn chairs. www.shakesnw.org.

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: 8:15 p.m., Island Stage Left, 1062 Wold Road, Friday Harbor. Free; donations appreciated. Bring a blanket and dress warmly. www.islandstageleft.org.

“Make ’em Laugh”: musical comedy, 7 p.m., RiverBelle Theatre, The Old Town Grainery, 100 E. Montgomery, Mount Vernon. $40 dinner and show; $30 dessert buffet and show. Reservations required: 360-3363012 or www.riverbelledinnertheatre.com.

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: 8:15 p.m., Island Stage Left, 1062 Wold Road, Friday Harbor. Free; donations appreciated. Bring a blanket and dress warmly. www.islandstageleft.org.

Agatha Christie’s “Murder on the Nile”: 2 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-293-6829 or www.acttheatre.com.

Sunday.29 THEATER

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: Island Stage Left, 8:30 p.m., Roche Harbor Outdoor Stage, San Juan Island. Free. Donations appreciated. Bring a blanket and dress warmly. www.islandstageleft.org. “Julius Caesar”: Shakespeare Northwest, 2 p.m., Rexville-Blackrock Amphitheater, 19299 Rexville Grange Road, Mount Vernon. $12. Bring lawn chairs. www.shakesnw.org.

“Make ’em Laugh”: musical comedy, 7 p.m., RiverBelle Theatre, The Old Town Grainery, 100 E. Montgomery, Mount Vernon. $40 dinner and show; $30 dessert buffet and show. Reservations required: 360-336-3012 or www.riverbelledinner theatre.com.

SATURDAY.28

FRIDAY.27

Nathaniel Talbot: 6 to 9 p.m., Seeds Bistro and Bar, 623 Morris St., La Conner. 360-466-3280.

JOE SNEVA & THE SWEET DOMINIQUES 10 p.m., Draft Pics, 516 S. First St., Mount Vernon. 360-336-3626.

MICHAEL POWERS 7 p.m., Seafarers’ Memorial Park, Anacortes. Free. 360-293-3134 or www.portofanacortes.com.

Tocato Tango: 8 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. No cover. 360-4453000.

FRIDAY.27 Jammin’ Jeff (country, rock): 8 p.m. to midnight, Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

Sunday.5

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: Island Stage Left, 8:30 p.m., Roche Harbor Outdoor Stage, San Juan Island. Free. Donations appreciated. Bring a blanket and dress warmly. www.islandstageleft.org.

Agatha Christie’s “Murder on the Nile”: 8 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-2936829 or www.acttheatre.com.

THURSDAY.26

Trainwreck (country rock): 9 p.m. to midnight, Cyndy’s Broiler, 27021 102nd Ave NW, Stanwood. No cover. 360-6294800 or www.cyn dysbroiler.com.

Pierced Arrows, DON’T, Baltic Cousins: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $6. 360-778-1067.

Gertrude’s Hearse: 9 p.m. to midnight, Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-5881720.

The Scott Greene Band: 10 p.m. to midnight, Redlight, 1017 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. www.redlight wineandcoffee. com.

Too Old To Care: 7 p.m., Birdsview Brewing Co., 38302 Highway 20, Concrete. No cover. 360-8263406.

Baby Gramps (vintage and original rags, jazz, blues): 8 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/ Main, Conway. $15. 360-445-3000.

Michael Powers: 7 p.m., Seafarers’ Memorial Park, Anacortes. Free. 360-293-3134 or www.portofana cortes.com.

Amara Grace: 7:30 p.m., Washington Sips, 608 S. First St., La Conner. No cover. 360-399-1037.

SATURDAY.28 Jammin’ Jeff (country, rock): 8 p.m. to midnight, Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411. Troy Fair and Stone Country: 8:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-7666266.

“Make ’em Laugh”: musical comedy, 2 p.m., RiverBelle Theatre, The Old Town Grainery, 100 E. Montgomery, Mount Vernon. $20, $18.

Cookie & the Cutters CD release party (country, blues, rock): 9 p.m. to midnight, Cyndy’s Broiler, 27021 102nd Ave NW, Stanwood. No cover. 360-6294800 or www.cyndys broiler.com. Swingnuts Jazz (vintage swing, original jazz): 7 to 10 p.m., Skagit River Brewery, 404 S. Third St., Mount Vernon. 360-336-2884.

Sonja Lee Band: 9 p.m. to midnight, Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-588-1720. Billy Shears Band: 9:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-755-3956 or www.anacortes H2O.com.

Standing Travis (rock): 9:30 p.m., Brown Lantern Ale House, 412 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-2932544. Kowalski, Crag Dweller, Tacos: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. 360-778-1067.

SUNDAY.29 Gary B’s Church of the Blues (blues, classic rock): 6 to 10 p.m., Castle Tavern, 708 Metcalf St., Sedro-Woolley. 360-855-2263.

Rivertalk (reggae, world music): 8 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/ Main, Conway. $15. 360-445-3000. “Rockin’ The Park”: Rock Candy, CD Woodbury Band, Steal Thunder, 2 to 10:30 p.m., LARC, 21700 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. $20$25. 360-445-6833 or www.larcnudists.com.

TUESDAY.31 Station House Jam with Rich Rorex, Terry Nelson and friends: 4 to 8 p.m., The Station House, 315 Morris St., La Conner. No cover. 360-466-4488.

Bow Diddlers: 5:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-7666266.

Eli Westin Band (rock, blues): 5 p.m., Anchor Inn Tavern, 1920 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-293-9948.

Chris Eger Band (blues, rock): 2 to 7 p.m., Eagle Haven Winery, 8243 Sims Road, Sedro-Woolley. $20-$22. 425345-4888.

The Dirty Dozen Brass Band: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $12. 360-778-1067.

Michael Powers: 7 p.m., Riverfront Park, 1001 River Road, SedroWoolley. Free. 425-303-1848 or www.snohomish artistguild.org.

Joe Sneva & The Sweet Dominiques (reggae, surf, folk): 10 p.m., Draft Pics, 516 S. First St., Mount Vernon. 360-336-3626.

Ann ‘n’ Dean The Social Schema: (country): 7 p.m., Mount Vernon Elks 10 p.m. to midnight, Lodge, 2120 Market Redlight, 1017 N. State St., Bellingham. St., Mount Vernon. $5. www.redlightwine Open to the public. 360-848-8882. andcoffee.com.

Jim Basnight: 3 to 6 p.m., North Sound Brewing, 17406 Highway 536, Mount Vernon. 360-982-2057. El Colonel & Doubleshot (rock, blues, funk): 5 to 7:30 p.m., Heart of Anacortes, 1014 Fourth St., Anacortes. $7. 360-2933515.

WEDNESDAY.1 Bahia (jazz): 6 to 8 p.m., Bayview Cash Store, 5603 Bayview Road, Clinton. No cover. 360-321-4145 or www.goosefoot. org.

THURSDAY.2 Lumpkins, Midtown Dickens, I Love You Avalanche: 9 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $6. 360-778-1067.

Matt Brown: 6 to 9 p.m., Seeds Bistro and Bar, 623 Morris St., La Conner. No cover. 360-4663280.

Spoonshine Duo: 6 to 9 p.m., Seeds Bistro and Bar, 623 Morris St., La Conner. 360-466-3280.


E10 Thursday, July 26, 2012

ON STAGE in the Skagit Valley and surrounding area July 26-August 5

TUNING UP Playing at area venues July 26-August 2

Thursday.26

Saturday.4

THEATER

THEATER

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: Island Stage Left, 8:30 p.m., Roche Harbor Outdoor Stage, San Juan Island. Free. Donations appreciated. Bring a blanket and dress warmly. www.islandstageleft. org.

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: 8:15 p.m., Island Stage Left, 1062 Wold Road, Friday Harbor. Free; donations appreciated. Bring a blanket and dress warmly. www.islandstageleft.org.

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: Shakespeare Northwest, 6:30 p.m., Rexville-Blackrock Amphitheater, 19299 Rexville Grange Road, Mount Vernon. $12. Bring lawn chairs. www.shakesnw. org.

Friday.27 MUSIC

An-O-Chords 57th annual Summer Show: Barbershop harmonies featuring The Humdingers (aka the Dapper Dans at Walt Disney World in Orlando), The Jaybirds and the An-O-Chords, 7:30 p.m., Brodniak Hall, Anacortes High School, 1600 20th St., Anacortes. $16-$25. Senior discount available. 360-679-7473 or www.anochords.org.

THEATER

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: Island Stage Left, 8:30 p.m., Roche Harbor Outdoor Stage, San Juan Island. Free. Donations appreciated. Bring a blanket and dress warmly. www.islandstageleft. org. “Julius Caesar”: Shakespeare Northwest, 6:30 p.m., Rexville-Blackrock Amphitheater, 19299 Rexville Grange Road, Mount Vernon. $12. Bring lawn chairs. www.shakesnw.org. “Make ’em Laugh”: musical comedy, 7 p.m., RiverBelle Theatre, The Old Town Grainery, 100 E. Montgomery, Mount Vernon. $40 dinner and show; $30 dessert buffet and show. Reservations required: 360-336-3012 or www.riverbelledinner theatre.com.

Thursday, July 26, 2012 E11

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Shakespeare Northwest IRONMAN performance: “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” Touring Show and “Julius Caesar,” 1 p.m., Rexville-Blackrock Amphitheater, 19299 Rexville Grange Road, Mount Vernon. $30. Bring lawn chairs. www.shakesnw.org.

FRIDAY-SATURDAY.27-28 AN-O-CHORDS 57TH ANNUAL SUMMER SHOW 7:30 p.m., Brodniak Hall, Anacortes High School, 1600 20th St., Anacortes. $16-$25. Senior discount available. 360-679-7473 or www.anochords.org.

Saturday.28 MUSIC

An-O-Chords 57th annual Summer Show: Barbershop harmonies featuring The Humdingers (aka the Dapper Dans at Walt Disney World in Orlando), The Jaybirds and the An-O-Chords, 7:30 p.m., Brodniak Hall, Anacortes High School, 1600 20th St., Anacortes. $16-$25. 360-679-7473 or www.anochords.org.

THEATER

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: Shakespeare Northwest, 6:30 p.m., Rexville-Blackrock Amphitheater, 19299 Rexville Grange Road, Mount Vernon. $12. Bring lawn chairs. www.shakesnw.org.

Monday-Wednesday.30-1 No events submitted

Thursday.2 THEATER

“Julius Caesar”: Shakespeare Northwest, 6:30 p.m., Rexville-Blackrock Amphitheater, 19299 Rexville Grange Road, Mount Vernon. $12. Bring lawn chairs. www.shakesnw.org.

Friday.3 THEATER

Agatha Christie’s “Murder on the Nile”: 8 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-293-6829 or www.acttheatre.com. “Make ’em Laugh”: musical comedy: 7 p.m., RiverBelle Theatre, The Old Town Grainery, 100 E. Montgomery, Mount Vernon. $40 dinner and show; $30 dessert buffet and show. Reservations required: 360-336-3012 or www.riverbelledinner theatre.com.

THEATER

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: Shakespeare Northwest, 2 p.m., RexvilleBlackrock Amphitheater, 19299 Rexville Grange Road, Mount Vernon. $12. Bring lawn chairs. www.shakesnw.org.

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: Shakespeare Northwest, 6:30 p.m., Rexville-Blackrock Amphitheater, 19299 Rexville Grange Road, Mount Vernon. $12. Bring lawn chairs. www.shakesnw.org.

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: 8:15 p.m., Island Stage Left, 1062 Wold Road, Friday Harbor. Free; donations appreciated. Bring a blanket and dress warmly. www.islandstageleft.org.

“Make ’em Laugh”: musical comedy, 7 p.m., RiverBelle Theatre, The Old Town Grainery, 100 E. Montgomery, Mount Vernon. $40 dinner and show; $30 dessert buffet and show. Reservations required: 360-3363012 or www.riverbelledinnertheatre.com.

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: 8:15 p.m., Island Stage Left, 1062 Wold Road, Friday Harbor. Free; donations appreciated. Bring a blanket and dress warmly. www.islandstageleft.org.

Agatha Christie’s “Murder on the Nile”: 2 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-293-6829 or www.acttheatre.com.

Sunday.29 THEATER

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: Island Stage Left, 8:30 p.m., Roche Harbor Outdoor Stage, San Juan Island. Free. Donations appreciated. Bring a blanket and dress warmly. www.islandstageleft.org. “Julius Caesar”: Shakespeare Northwest, 2 p.m., Rexville-Blackrock Amphitheater, 19299 Rexville Grange Road, Mount Vernon. $12. Bring lawn chairs. www.shakesnw.org.

“Make ’em Laugh”: musical comedy, 7 p.m., RiverBelle Theatre, The Old Town Grainery, 100 E. Montgomery, Mount Vernon. $40 dinner and show; $30 dessert buffet and show. Reservations required: 360-336-3012 or www.riverbelledinner theatre.com.

SATURDAY.28

FRIDAY.27

Nathaniel Talbot: 6 to 9 p.m., Seeds Bistro and Bar, 623 Morris St., La Conner. 360-466-3280.

JOE SNEVA & THE SWEET DOMINIQUES 10 p.m., Draft Pics, 516 S. First St., Mount Vernon. 360-336-3626.

MICHAEL POWERS 7 p.m., Seafarers’ Memorial Park, Anacortes. Free. 360-293-3134 or www.portofanacortes.com.

Tocato Tango: 8 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/Main, Conway. No cover. 360-4453000.

FRIDAY.27 Jammin’ Jeff (country, rock): 8 p.m. to midnight, Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

Sunday.5

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: Island Stage Left, 8:30 p.m., Roche Harbor Outdoor Stage, San Juan Island. Free. Donations appreciated. Bring a blanket and dress warmly. www.islandstageleft.org.

Agatha Christie’s “Murder on the Nile”: 8 p.m., Anacortes Community Theatre, 918 M Ave., Anacortes. $18. 360-2936829 or www.acttheatre.com.

THURSDAY.26

Trainwreck (country rock): 9 p.m. to midnight, Cyndy’s Broiler, 27021 102nd Ave NW, Stanwood. No cover. 360-6294800 or www.cyn dysbroiler.com.

Pierced Arrows, DON’T, Baltic Cousins: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $6. 360-778-1067.

Gertrude’s Hearse: 9 p.m. to midnight, Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-5881720.

The Scott Greene Band: 10 p.m. to midnight, Redlight, 1017 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. www.redlight wineandcoffee. com.

Too Old To Care: 7 p.m., Birdsview Brewing Co., 38302 Highway 20, Concrete. No cover. 360-8263406.

Baby Gramps (vintage and original rags, jazz, blues): 8 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/ Main, Conway. $15. 360-445-3000.

Michael Powers: 7 p.m., Seafarers’ Memorial Park, Anacortes. Free. 360-293-3134 or www.portofana cortes.com.

Amara Grace: 7:30 p.m., Washington Sips, 608 S. First St., La Conner. No cover. 360-399-1037.

SATURDAY.28 Jammin’ Jeff (country, rock): 8 p.m. to midnight, Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411. Troy Fair and Stone Country: 8:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-7666266.

“Make ’em Laugh”: musical comedy, 2 p.m., RiverBelle Theatre, The Old Town Grainery, 100 E. Montgomery, Mount Vernon. $20, $18.

Cookie & the Cutters CD release party (country, blues, rock): 9 p.m. to midnight, Cyndy’s Broiler, 27021 102nd Ave NW, Stanwood. No cover. 360-6294800 or www.cyndys broiler.com. Swingnuts Jazz (vintage swing, original jazz): 7 to 10 p.m., Skagit River Brewery, 404 S. Third St., Mount Vernon. 360-336-2884.

Sonja Lee Band: 9 p.m. to midnight, Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-588-1720. Billy Shears Band: 9:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-755-3956 or www.anacortes H2O.com.

Standing Travis (rock): 9:30 p.m., Brown Lantern Ale House, 412 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-2932544. Kowalski, Crag Dweller, Tacos: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. 360-778-1067.

SUNDAY.29 Gary B’s Church of the Blues (blues, classic rock): 6 to 10 p.m., Castle Tavern, 708 Metcalf St., Sedro-Woolley. 360-855-2263.

Rivertalk (reggae, world music): 8 p.m., Conway Muse, 18444 Spruce/ Main, Conway. $15. 360-445-3000. “Rockin’ The Park”: Rock Candy, CD Woodbury Band, Steal Thunder, 2 to 10:30 p.m., LARC, 21700 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. $20$25. 360-445-6833 or www.larcnudists.com.

TUESDAY.31 Station House Jam with Rich Rorex, Terry Nelson and friends: 4 to 8 p.m., The Station House, 315 Morris St., La Conner. No cover. 360-466-4488.

Bow Diddlers: 5:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-7666266.

Eli Westin Band (rock, blues): 5 p.m., Anchor Inn Tavern, 1920 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-293-9948.

Chris Eger Band (blues, rock): 2 to 7 p.m., Eagle Haven Winery, 8243 Sims Road, Sedro-Woolley. $20-$22. 425345-4888.

The Dirty Dozen Brass Band: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $12. 360-778-1067.

Michael Powers: 7 p.m., Riverfront Park, 1001 River Road, SedroWoolley. Free. 425-303-1848 or www.snohomish artistguild.org.

Joe Sneva & The Sweet Dominiques (reggae, surf, folk): 10 p.m., Draft Pics, 516 S. First St., Mount Vernon. 360-336-3626.

Ann ‘n’ Dean The Social Schema: (country): 7 p.m., Mount Vernon Elks 10 p.m. to midnight, Lodge, 2120 Market Redlight, 1017 N. State St., Bellingham. St., Mount Vernon. $5. www.redlightwine Open to the public. 360-848-8882. andcoffee.com.

Jim Basnight: 3 to 6 p.m., North Sound Brewing, 17406 Highway 536, Mount Vernon. 360-982-2057. El Colonel & Doubleshot (rock, blues, funk): 5 to 7:30 p.m., Heart of Anacortes, 1014 Fourth St., Anacortes. $7. 360-2933515.

WEDNESDAY.1 Bahia (jazz): 6 to 8 p.m., Bayview Cash Store, 5603 Bayview Road, Clinton. No cover. 360-321-4145 or www.goosefoot. org.

THURSDAY.2 Lumpkins, Midtown Dickens, I Love You Avalanche: 9 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $6. 360-778-1067.

Matt Brown: 6 to 9 p.m., Seeds Bistro and Bar, 623 Morris St., La Conner. No cover. 360-4663280.

Spoonshine Duo: 6 to 9 p.m., Seeds Bistro and Bar, 623 Morris St., La Conner. 360-466-3280.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E12 - Thursday, July 26, 2012

GET INVOLVED ART CALL FOR SCULPTURE: The Anacortes Arts Commission has extended the submission deadline for its 2013 Outdoor Sculpture Exhibition. Artists from Washington, Oregon, Idaho and British Columbia are invited to submit entries by Wednesday, Aug. 1, for the third annual exhibition. Selected sculptures will be displayed through Sept. 1, 2013, in public locations including streets, parks, etc. around Anacortes. The Arts Commission and local merchants will promote the exhibit and sale of the works during the exhibition. No entry fee. For information, call 360-293-1918, email gary@ cityofanacortes.org or visit www. anacortesartscommission. SEEKING VENDORS: The Immaculate Conception Parish invites arts and crafts vendors, businesses and community organizations to sign up by Aug. 5, for the annual Outdoor Mass and Parish Festival, set for 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 19, at 215 N. 15th St., Mount Vernon. The event will feature multicultural food, a silent auction, kids’ activities and more. 12-by-12-foot spaces are available for $25. 360336-3594. CALL FOR PHOTOS: The first “Shoot La Conner” Photo Contest is accepting digital photo entries through Aug. 10. Submit your best photos depicting what makes La Conner special and unique. Prizes will be awarded to the top three entries — an overnight stay at the La Conner Channel Lodge for first place, $100 for second place, and $50 for third. Find complete rulesand submit entries at www.lovela conner.com. SEEKING ARTISTS, CRAFTSPEOPLE, VENDORS: Cascade Days is accepting applications through Aug. 5 for the annual event on Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 18-19, in Concrete. The event will include a parade, logger competition, car show, fireman’s muster, kids’ activities, music, contests and more. For

information or an application, call 360-853-7867 or visit www. cascadedays.com.

urday, Aug. 11, and 5 to 8 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 12, at 918 M Ave., Anacortes. Auditions will consist of cold readings from the script. CALL FOR PHOTOS: Photogra- The show will run Sept. 28-Oct. phers are invited to submit pho- 20. 360-293-6829 or www.act theatre.com. tos of Mount Vernon’s historic downtown by Aug. 11 for the CALL FOR YOUNG MUSIMount Vernon Downtown AssoCIANS: The Mount Vernon-based ciation’s 2012 Art in the Alleys Fidalgo Youth Symphony offers juried photo competition. The show, “Engaging Imagination in opportunities for musicians ages Downtown Mount Vernon,” will 5 to 21 to study and perform be on display Friday and Satorchestral music. For informaurday, Sept. 21-22, at the Front tion, including tuition costs and Gallery, 420 Myrtle St., Mount rehearsal schedules, contact Mrs. Vernon. Hobson at 360-293-8180 or visit www.fysmusic.org.

ART CLASSES

DAKOTA ART CLASSES: Dakota Art offers a variety of art classes and workshops at 17873 Highway 536, Mount Vernon. 360-416-6556, ext. 5, or www.dakotaartcenter.com. ISLAND ART CAMP ADVENTURE: Tower Arts Studio offers summer art camps for kids on Guemes Island. Local professional artists will teach a variety of art techniques to kids ages 8 to 14 during week-long sessions from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday through Friday at Tower Arts Studio, 5424 S. Shore Drive, Guemes Island. Kids can work with clay, watercolors, paper mache, printmaking, cartooning and more. $295 per session, includes all art materials and chaperoned ferry transportation from Anacortes. For information, call 360-2938878 or visit www.towerarts studio.com.

DANCE DINNER AND DANCE: Join the fun at “Let’s Dance,” a clean and sober community dinner and dance with music by Jammin’ Jeff, from 7 to 10 p.m. Friday, Aug. 3, at Christ The King Community Church, 2111 Riverside Drive, Mount Vernon. $10 at the door. 360-848-5116 or www. mvctk.com. CLOG DANCING FOR BEGINNERS: Free lesson from 10 to 11 a.m., followed by regular clog dancing from 11 a.m. to noon Thursdays at the Mount Vernon Senior Center, 1401 Cleveland St., Mount Vernon. No fee, no partner needed. First three lessons are free. Wear comfortable shoes. For information, call Rosie at 360-424-4608.

RECREATION

THEATER

MAYOR’S WELLNESS CHALLENGE: Mount Vernon Mayor Jill Boudreau’s monthlong Wellness Challenge will feature a free wellness event every day during August at locations around Mount Vernon. For a complete schedule of events, including a free gym day at area fitness centers, hikes, bike rides, swimming, yoga and more, visit the City of Mount Vernon website at www.ci.mount-vernon. wa.us, where you can sign up for the Wellness Challenge email list to receive daily wellness tips and “event of the day” information.

IMPROV CLASSES: Free improv classes taught by Sheila Goldsmith of Improv Playworks. Registration required: 360-7560756 or www.improvplayworks .com. Adults and teens: 7 to 9 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 15, Improv Playworks Studio, 302 W. Illinois St., Bellingham. Adults and seniors: 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. Monday, Aug. 20, The Willows Senior Living, 3115 Squalicum Parkway, Bellingham.

PONY CLUB DERBY: The Skagit Valley Pony Club’s sixth annual Event Derby will take place Saturday, July 28, at the Stanwood Equestrian Center, 28119 Old Pacific Highway. Riders of all ages are invited to compete in a dressage test and a jumping course with both stadium and cross-country jumps decorated by members of the Pony Club. Competitors and spectators are encouraged to bring donations of pet/livestock food to be donated to the Humane Society in honor of Skagit County Deputy Anne Jackson, who died in the line of duty in 2008. For information, including derby entry fees, call 360-629-2442 or visit www. skagitvalley.ponyclub.org.

ART DASH: The seventh annual Art Dash half marathon, LINE DANCING: Enjoy classes 10K and 5K run is set for 9 a.m. Saturday, July 28, starting near and open dancing at 7 p.m. the parking lot at the Anacortes Wednesdays at Cyndy’s Broiler, 27021 102nd Ave. NW, Stanwood. City Hall, 904 Sixth St., AnaCARTOONING FOR KIDS: 4 $5. 360-629-4800 or www.cyndys cortes. Registration: $25-$45, free for ages 12 and younger or older to 6 p.m. Tuesdays, Aug. 7-28, broiler.com. than 70. 360-293-1918 or www. Burlington Parks and Recreation cityofanacortes.org. Center, 900 E. Fairhaven Ave., MUSIC Burlington. Kids ages 7-12 will FREE MUSIC JAMS: Come KULSHAN TRAIL CLEANUP: learn basic drawing skills and and play or just watch the fun Join a work party at 10:30 a.m. leave with a portfolio of their at Cyndy’s Broiler, 27021 102nd Sunday, July 29, at the Skagit favorite cartoon characters. $40. Ave. NW, Stanwood. Free for Valley Food Co-op, 202 S. First Register by July 31: 360-755-9649. participants and spectators. St., Mount Vernon. Meet at the All-Ages Open Mic: 7 p.m. Co-op and carpool to the trailAUDITIONS second and fourth Tuesday each head to spend a couple hours month. “ONE FLEW OVER THE or so “cleaning house” on the Jam Night: 8 p.m. Thursdays. CUCKOO’S NEST”: Anacortes Kulshan Trail. Bring gloves, water Community Theatre will hold 360-629-4800 or www.cyndys and sturdy shoes. Free. 360-336auditions from 2 to 5 p.m. Satbroiler.com. 5087.

SUMMER DRAMA CAMP: The Lincoln Theatre Summer Drama Camp for Teens will take place from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, Aug. 13-17, at the Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. Teens can take part in acting, improv, dance, mime, writing and more onstage at the Lincoln. $275, partial scholarships available. 360-4197129, ext. 101, or www.lincoln theatre.org.

WORKSHOPS QUILTING FOR BEGINNERS: Learn how to hand quilt from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Mondays at the Concrete Center, 45821 Railroad Ave., Concrete. Bring a flat edge thimble, round-needle puller, small scissors and No. 9 go-betweens quilting needles. Tips and technique how-tos on the last Monday each month. 360-853-8400. WRITERS WORKSHOP: The Skagit Valley Writers League will host a free workshop for writers from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. today at the Mount Vernon Senior Center, 1401 Cleveland St. Author Susan Wingate will present “Plotting, Suspense and Tension.” RSVP to Sharon at 360-391-2042 or www. skagitwriters.org. RABARI EMBROIDERY: 10 to 3 p.m. Saturday, July 28, Harmony Fields, 7465 Thomas Road, Bow. Learn the techniques, motifs and patterns of traditional Rabari embroidery from the nomadic women of the Indian desert. $60. 360-941-8196 or www. hfproduce.com/learn.cfm.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, July 26, 2012 - E13

AT THE LINCOLN THEATRE 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon 360-336-8955 n www.lincolntheatre.org

‘Love Never Dies’

7:30 p.m. today, July 26 The Lincoln presents the first showing of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s “Love Never Dies,” the highly anticipated sequel to “The Phantom of the Opera.” Captured from The Regent Theatre in Melbourne, Australia, this production features a 21-piece orchestra and a cast of 36 including actors Ben Lewis as Phantom and Anna O’Byrne as Christine Daaé. $15 adults; $13 seniors; $11 students and children, with $2 off for Lincoln Theatre members.

‘The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel’ 7:30 p.m. Saturday, July 28 5:30 p.m. Sunday, July 29 7:30 p.m. Monday, July 30

“The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel” follows a group of British retirees who decide to “outsource” their retirement to less expensive and seemingly exotic India. Enticed by ads for the newly restored Marigold Hotel and bolstered with visions of a life of leisure, they arrive to find the palace a shell of its ‘Frankenstein’ former self. Though the new environment is 7:30 p.m. Friday, July 27 less luxurious than imagined, they are forever transformed by their shared experiences, Academy Award-winning director Danny discovering that life and love can begin Boyle (“127 Hours,” “Slumdog Millionagain when you let go of the past. aire”) returns to the theater to direct this $8 seniors, students and active military; $7 new production written by Nick Dear, based members; $6 children 12 and under. Bargain on the novel by Mary Shelley. matinee prices (all shows before 6 p.m.): $15 adults, $13 seniors, $11 students, with $7 general, $5 members, $4 children 12 and $2 off for Lincoln Theatre members. under.

The Grape Escape A community benefit supporting families in all stages of life. Enjoy an evening celebrating community, savoring local cuisine, wine & beer tasting, all to benefit three local charitable organizations making a difference in Skagit County.

Friday, Aug. 3 • 4-9 pm Juntunen Gardens

18091 Burkland Rd., Mount Vernon

Tickets: $50

(Includes admission, food & beverage scrip & a commemorative glass) For tickets & more information, go to

www.skagitgrapeescape.com 360.428.5972

Sponsored by:


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E14 - Thursday, July 26, 2012

HOT TICKETS JAZZ PORT TOWNSEND: July 26-28, McCurdy Pavilion and other venues around Port Townsend. 800-746-1982 or www.centrum.org. NEON TREES: July 27, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showbox online.com. THE ANGRY SAMOANS: July 28, El Corazon, Seattle. 800514-3849 or www.cascadetick ets.com. JOURNEY, PAT BENATAR, NEIL GIRALDO AND LOVERBOY: July 28, Gorge Amphitheatre. 800-745-3000 or www.live nation.com. PORT TOWNSEND ACOUSTIC BLUES FESTIVAL: July 29-Aug. 5, Port Townsend. 800-7461982 or www.centrum.org. IRON MAIDEN: July 30, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn. $30-$75. 800-745-3000 or www.livenation.com. LAMB OF GOD, DETHKLOK: Aug. 1, WaMu Theatre, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.ticket master.com. SLICK IDIOT: Aug. 2, El Corazon, Seattle. 800-514-3849 or www.cascadetickets.com. OZOMATLI: Aug. 2, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-7453000 or www.ticketmaster.com. THE LAST SUMMER ON EARTH TOUR: Featuring Barenaked Ladies, Blues Traveler, Big Head Todd & The Monsters and Cracker: Aug. 3, Marymoor Park, Redmond. $38-$65 plus applicable service charges and fees. 800-745-3000 or www. ticketmaster.com. THE CLASSIC CRIME: Aug. 3, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showbox online.com. 17TH ANNUAL MOUNT BAKER R&B FESTIVAL: Aug. 3-5, Deming Log Show Fairgrounds, 3295 Cedarville Road, Bellingham. Tickets at Avalon Music, Bellingham, 360-6769573; Hugo Helmer Music, Burlington, 360-757-0270; or www.bakerblues.com. Info: 360383-0850. WATERSHED COUNTRY MUSIC FESTIVAL: Featuring Dierks Bentley, Kix Brooks, Sara Evans, Miranda Lambert, Blake Shelton, Dwight Yoakam and more: Aug. 3-5, Gorge Amphitheatre, George. 800-745-3000 or www.livenation.com. WHIDSTOCK 2012: Featuring Carson and Tess Henley, Austin Jenckes, Ben Ecksted, Ayron Jones and The Way, Megan Meconell, Funky 2 Death, Tiffany Wilson and more: Aug. 4, Whidbey Island. 206-718-0720 or www.whidstock.com. VANS WARPED TOUR: Aug. 4, Marymoor Park, Redmond. www. vanswarpedtour.com.

ALISON KRAUSS & UNION STATION: Aug. 4, Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or www.ticket master.com. AEROSMITH, CHEAP TRICK: Aug. 8, Tacoma Dome. 800-7453000 or www.livenation.com. REGINA SPEKTOR, ONLY SON: Aug. 9, Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or www. livenation.com. FRANZ FERDINAND: Aug. 9, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.ticket master.com. KASKADE: Aug. 10, WaMu Theater, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.livenation.com. DEAD CAN DANCE: Aug. 10, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 800745-3000 or www.ticketmaster. com. LEBOWSKI FEST— MOVIE PARTY: Aug. 10, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.livenation.com. PROFESSIONAL BULL RIDERS: Lucas Oil Touring Pro Division: Aug. 10-11, Comcast Arena at Everett. 866-332-8499 or www.comcastarenaeverett. com. NICKI MINAJ: Aug. 11, Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877784-4849 or www.livenation. com. THE ENGLISH BEAT: Aug. 11, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showbox online.com. LOS LOBOS: Aug. 12, McCurdy Pavilion, Port Townsend. 800746-1982 or www.centrum.org. ELECTRIC FRANKENSTEIN: Aug. 14, El Corazon, Seattle. 800-514-3849 or www.cascade tickets.com. JACK WHITE: Aug. 14, WaMu Theatre, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.livenation.com. HEART: Aug. 16, Northwest Washington Fair, Lynden. 360354-7777 or www.nwwafair.com. JOHN ANDERSON: Aug. 17, Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Pacific Showroom, Bow. 877275-2448 or www.theskagit.com. BILLY CURRINGTON: Aug. 17, Northwest Washington Fair, Lynden. 360-354-7777 or www. nwwafair.com. KISS, MOTLEY CRUE: Aug. 18, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn. 800-745-3000 or www. livenation.com. NORAH JONES: Aug. 18, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 800745-3000 or www.ticketmaster. com. BILLY IDOL AID 4: Aug. 18, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showbox online.com. SKAGIT BLUES FESTIVAL: Aug. 19, The Conway Muse, Conway. 360-445-3000 or www. conwaymuse.com.

DINING GUIDE NEW! DELUXE BURGER W/FRIES ONLY $4.99 11:30-4pm FRIDAY & SATURDAY

Great Food! Great Fun!

PRIME RIB & PASTA DAILY FAMILY SPECIAL: Kids 12 & Under FREE

No time for lunch? Ask about our Monday-Friday

with purchase of an adult meal

$5.99 Express Lunch Items!

THURS NIGHTS:

ALL YOU CAN EAT PRAWNS

FRI 7/27 & SAT 7/28 Jammin' Jeff

422-6411

18247 State Route 9 Mount Vernon

HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS IN OUR LOUNGE Bellingham

360.714.1065

Mount Vernon 360.424.5514

La Conner

360.466.0267

Burlington

360.755.9010

ALL NEW SUMMER MENU! NOW OPEN FOR LUNCH

Buy 1 breakfast Get 1 breakfast

FREE!

with purchase of 2 drinks. Offer good 8-10:30am.

HAPPY HOUR 3-6

Featuring 24 Handles • Craft Cocktails

Open for dinner tue-sat until 8pm

Ban d SAT 7/2 8 - Bil ly She ars 314 Commercial • 360-755-3956

Burlington 360.707.0348

Live Music • Full Menu

15426 Airport Dr.

Limit one per table. Expires 7/31/12.

Thurs. 7/26 at 8pm - no cover

TOCATO TANGO

Fri. 7/27 at 8pm - $15 cover

BABY GRAMPS

Sat. 7/28 at 8pm – $15 cover

Unique arrangement of rags, jazz & blues, humor & throat singing Sun. 7/29 at 6:30pm - no cover

Reggae, world-beat & original rock from this 12-piece dance band

Impressions of Gershwin, Joplin & other great American composers

Hot 4-piece Tango Band

RIVERTALK

BEN STARNER at the Piano


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, July 26, 2012 - E15

CONWAY PUB & EATERY

NEW HOURS & NEW MENU

Tues - Sat • Noon - 9pm Spectacular BBQ Ribs Brisket Sandwiches Salads KIDS MENU 855-0117 • 208 Ferry st Sedro-Woolley www.tonysbbqhouse.com

BURGERS • STEAK SEAFOOD • SALADS

New Summer Specials

I-5 Exit 221 360-445-4733

Open 9 AM daily Breakfast Daily Pulltabs Galore

* Fresh roasted Hummus Platter * Northwest Berry Cobbler * Key Lime Pie * Monster Burger * Shrimp Tacos * and many more

VISIT OUR 2ND LOCATION IN STANWOOD! CONWAY BOXCAR

KARAOKE Fri/Sat HAVE YOUR PARTIES HERE!!

360.466.4411

LaConner Whitney Rd. & Hwy. 20

A Perfect Dining Experience.

VOTED BEST OF ANACORTES 12 YEARS RUNNING Friday 7/27

GERTRUDE’S HEARSE

7”

Saturday 7/28

SONJA LEE BAND

320 Commercial Ave 360.588.1720

www.anacortesrockfish.com

FULL BAR TAKE OUT GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE

COSTCO Exit 229

JAPANESE STEAKHOUSE & SUSHI BAR

I-5

ARCO S. Burlington Blvd.

ROCKFISH GRILL Local Food, Local Beer, Made Here

E George Hopper Rd Lighting Universe Japanese Steakhouse Hampton Inn

Sushi & Hibachi - Lunch Happy Hour Every Day Until 3pm

1830 South Burlington Blvd. 1/2”

(360) 588.4281

www.sakuraburlington.com

Follow the Fish

3/4”

1”

1 1/4”

1 1/2”

Rockfish Grill : http://www.facebook.com/pages/Rockfish-Grill-Anacortes-Brewery/164550669515

Great Food! Great Fun! Bellingham

360.714.1065

Mount Vernon 360.424.5514

To Advertise on ForkFly or 360 Deals Please call 416.2180 or email ads@skagitads.com

Burlington

360.755.9010

La Conner

360.466.0267

No time for lunch?

Ask about our Express Lunch Monday-Friday!

$5.99


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E16 - Thursday, July 26, 2012

MOVIES MINI-REVIEWS Compiled from news services. Ratings are one to four stars.

Fox Searchlight Films via AP

Zoe Kazan and Paul Dano star in “Ruby Sparks.”

Crafting his ideal love

T

he magical event that happens in the life of a young novelist named Calvin Weir-Fields is a dream come true for him, but it becomes a nightmare. Calvin (Paul Dano) had the Roger misfortune to write, Ebert in his late teens, a book that was loved and treasured by just about everyone. He’s been blocked ever since. I imagine J.D. Salinger having gone through torture like this. Calvin makes the mistake of seeing a psychiatrist, although anyone who writes for a living would tell him there is only one thing to do when you’re blocked, and that is to start writing again anyway. Calvin never needed to write for a living. A windfall came to him essentially through no effort, and now he expects the Muse to dictate another perfect novel immediately. Turns out the shrink (Elliott Gould) is not needed because the Muse appears in the flesh and gets right to work. This is an ethereal backlit beauty named Ruby (Zoe Kazan), who materializes in Calvin’s life and represents his ideal romantic partner. Surely she’s

too good to be real? Not at all. She is absolutely real, as Calvin’s disbelieving brother, Harry (Chris Messina), discovers after he comes over to see for himself. Calvin discovers that he can control this young woman, however, by the words that he writes. In a sense, that takes all the fun out of it — but there’s no use trying to reason with Zoe Kazan’s original screenplay, which (perhaps wisely) makes no effort to explain how this happens. Instead, Kazan and the co-directors (Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris of “Little Miss Sunshine”) use the existence of Ruby as a device to introduce more characters, who are entertaining as themselves and don’t really need to further the plot. These include Calvin’s mother (Annette Bening), her lover (Antonio Banderas), and Calvin’s long-suffering literary agent (Steve Coogan). They all add color and humor, but the movie’s real activity is between Ruby and Calvin. The wouldbe novelist finds that controlling a woman by writing about her is about as easy as being that guy who keeps all the plates spinning on top of the poles. I imagine most people seeing “Ruby Sparks” will consider it to be about a writer and his fictional creation. There may be another way to approach it.

‘RUBY SPARKS’ HHH

Calvin Weir-Fields............ Paul Dano Ruby Sparks.................. Zoe Kazan Harry........................Chris Messina Gertrude..................Annette Bening Mort.................... Antonio Banderas Langdon Tharp...........Steve Coogan Dr. Rosenthal............... Elliott Gould n Running time: 104 minutes. MPAA rating: R (for language including some sexual references, and for some drug use).

Zoe Kazan, of course, is an actress as well as a writer, and in her career she must have often felt tugged this way and that by the fantasies and requirements of the (mostly) men who wrote and directed her roles. Surely one of the most dreaded things an actress can hear is, “We’ve made a few changes to your character.” But if characters have lives of their own on the page, they also take on a reality in the minds of those who portray them, and the finished character we see in a film may be more of a compromise than anyone’s personal vision. The movie’s intriguing in its fanciful way, and there are times when both Calvin and Ruby seem uncannily like they’re undergoing remodeling at the hands of some uber-writer above them both. If the film has a message, and I’m not sure it does, it may be: As long as you’re alive, you’re always in rewrite.

“Brave” — The new animation from Pixar poaches on traditional Disney territory. Instead of such inventive stories as “Up” and “WALL-E,” we get a spunky princess, her mum the queen, her dad the gruff king, an old witch who lives in the woods and so on. The artistry looks wonderful. Kids will probably love it, but parents will be disappointed if they’re hoping for another Pixar ground-breaker. Animated action, PG, 100 minutes. HHH “Farewell, My Queen” — Opens on Bastille Day, July 14, 1789, and observes the events inside the royal palace of Versailles through the eyes and knowledge of Sidonie Laborde (Lea Seydoux), a poor young woman who is the official reader to Marie Antoinette (Diane Kruger). The servants learn of events in Paris by rumor and gossip, and in a few days see the majesty of the monarchy crumble. What will this mean for the servants? Drama, R, 99 minutes. HHH1⁄ 2 “Ice Age: Continental Drift” — Will perhaps be a delight for little kids, judging by their friendly reaction at a Saturday morning sneak preview I attended. Real little kids. I doubt their parents will enjoy it much, especially after shelling out the extra charge for the 3-D tickets. In this fourth outing for the franchise, familiar characters are joined by a few new ones as continental drift breaks up families and the 3-D threatens to give them whiplash as they zoom back and forth and up and down. Animated adventure, PG, 87 minutes. HH “Magic Mike” — Steven Soderbergh’s film is a crafty mixture of comedy, romance, melodrama and some remarkably well-staged strip routines involving hunky, good-looking guys. I have a feeling women will enjoy it more than men. Channing Tatum stars as the title character, Matthew McConaughey is the no-nonsense impresario, Alex Pettyfer is a kid recruited into the business, and Cody Horn is his protective sister. Starts as a backstage comedy, and

enters darker realms. Comedy drama, R, 110 minutes. HHH1⁄ 2 “Moonrise Kingdom” — Wes Anderson’s enchanted new film takes place on an island that might as well be ruled by Prospero. Sam and Suzy (Jared Gilman and Kara Hayward) are young teens who set out on a trek and pitch camp in a hidden cove. Her parents (Bill Murray and Frances McDormand) and the Scout master (Edward Norton) follow, aided by the police chief (Bruce Willis) and Social Services (Tilda Swinton). Meanwhile, a hurricane approaches. Whimsical magic realism painted on a gorgeous palette. Comedy, PG-13, 94 minutes. HHH1⁄ 2 “Savages” — Oliver Stone’s thriller involves a bloody war between two best buddies in Laguna Beach and the queen of a Mexican drug cartel. A return to form for Stone’s dark side, the movie is a battle between good and evil, except that everyone in it is evil -- but some are less evil than others, and they all have their good sides. Taylor Kitsch and Aaron Johnson are partners in growing primo pot, Blake Lively is the beach bunny they share, Salma Hayek is the queen of the cartel, Benicio Del Toro is her enforcer and John Travolta is a crooked FDA agent. Violent, ingenious, deceptive and funny, but not too funny. Crime thriller, R, 129 minutes. HHH1⁄ 2 “Snow White and the Huntsman” — Reinvents the legendary story in a film of astonishing beauty and imagination. It’s the last thing you would expect from a picture with this title. Starring Kristen Stewart, capable and plucky, as Snow White, and Charlize Theron as the evil Queen, with Chris Hemsworth as the Huntsman and Sam Claflin as the loyal Prince William. Fantasy adventure, PG-13, 127 minutes. HHH1⁄ 2 “Step Up Revolution” — Kathryn McCormick of “So You Think You Can Dance” and newcomer Ryan Guzman co-star in the story of a new girl in Miami Beach who gets involved in his professionalgrade flash mob just when her evil dad (Peter Gallagher) wants to tear down all their beloved hangouts and erect


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, July 26, 2012 - E17

MOVIES a huge development. Lots of good dancing and choreography. The plot is, well, moronic. (Dance, PG-13, 97 minutes. HH “Take This Waltz” — Romantic triangle in a dreamy version of Toronto, involving Michelle Williams as the angelic wife of unpublished cookbook author Seth Rogen, and who is slowly and skillfully seduced by Luke Kirby, an artist and rickshaw puller. A little precious, and how do they afford that neighborhood? Some realism comes in with Sarah Silverman as the husband’s alcoholic sister. Romantic drama, R, 116 minutes. HHH “Ted” — The funniest movie character so far this year is a stuffed teddy bear. And the best comedy screenplay so far is “Ted,” the saga of the bear’s friendship with a 35-year-old man-child. Mark Wahlberg stars as the teddy’s best friend, Mila Kunis is his long-suffering girlfriend, and director Seth McFarlane (“Family Guy”) does Ted’s potty-mouthed Beantown accent. The movie doesn’t run out

Christian Bale stars in “The Dark Knight Rises.” Warner Bros. Pictures via AP

of steam. McFarlane seems unwilling to stop after the first payoff of a scene and keeps embellishing. (Definitely not for kids.) Comedy, R, 106 minutes. HHH1⁄ 2 “The Amazing Spider-Man” — The Spider-Man franchise is back for a reboot only 10 years after its first picture

and five years after the most recent one. This is a more thoughtful and carefully written remake of the 2002 original with more attention to the origin story of Peter Parker/Spider-Man. Andrew Garfield and Emma Stone have warm chemistry as Spidey and Gwen, and this new-

Sat Aug 4th

The Cherry Poppin’ Daddies ests

u With G

Nigel Mustafa and Skablins Seafarers Memorial Park Anacortes, WA 98221 Tix: 425-303-1848 Get tickets at The Business in Anacortes or Online at www.BrownPaperTickets.com

generation Spidey is more impulsive and takes more chances; sometimes he leaps from buildings with no clear plan in mind. Co-starring Rhys Ifans as the city-destroying Lizard, Denis Leary as Gwen’s father the police captain, and Sally Field and Martin Sheen as Aunt May and Uncle Ben. Action, PG-13, 136 minutes. HHH1⁄ 2 “Trishna” — The story of a beautiful woman who is cruelly mistreated by a coldblooded man. Freida Pinto (“Slumdog Millionaire”) plays Trishna, a poor girl from rural India whose beauty attracts the eyes of a rich kid, Jay (Riz Ahmed) -- clueless, emotionally tone-deaf and stupid. Michael Winterbottom bases his film on the novel “Tess of the d’Urbervilles” by Thomas Hardy. The class divisions in his view of India mirror those in Victorian England, and the realism of his film has a pitiless brutality. I felt such sympathy for Trishna. I felt such contempt for Jay. As a melodrama, “Trishna” builds a hypnotic force. Drama, R, 117 minutes. HHH1⁄ 2

AT AREA THEATERS ANACORTES CINEMAS July 27-Aug. 2 The Dark Knight Rises (PG-13): 12:00, 3:05, 6:10, 9:15 Ice Age: Continental Drift (PG): 12:10, 2:55, 6:30, 8:30 Magic Mike (R): 12:20, 2:45, 6:20, 8:45 360-293-7000 BLUE FOX DRIVE-IN Oak Harbor 360-675-5667

over 65 and kids under 12; $1 off all tickets on Sunday. 360-941-0403 OAK HARBOR CINEMAS July 27-Aug. 2 The Watch (R): 12:20, 2:55, 6:45, 9:15 The Dark Knight Rises (PG-13): 11:25, 2:40, 6:30, 9:40 Ice Age: Continental Drift (PG): 12:05, 2:25, 6:50, 8:50 360-279-2226

STANWOOD CINEMAS July 27-Aug. 2 The Watch (R): 12:10, 2:30, 6:30, 8:40 The Dark Knight Rises (PG-13): 12:00, 2:00, 3:00, 5:00, 6:00, 8:15, 9:00 Ice Age: Continental CONCRETE THEATRE People Like Us (PG-13): Drift (PG): 12:20, 2:15, 7:30 p.m. Friday, July 27; 6:15, 8:30 5 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Brave (PG): 2:45 Moonrise Kingdom (PGJuly 28; 4 p.m. Sunday, 13): 12:30, 6:45, 8:50 July 29. Tickets: $6 general admission, $5 adults 360-629-0514 CASCADE MALL THEATRES Burlington For listings and times, call 888-AMC-4FUN (888262-4386).


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E18 - Thursday, July 26, 2012

OUT & ABOUT ART “BIRTHDAY GIRLS”: Small paintings by Anne Martin McCool and jewelry by Debbie Aldrich are featured in a show that continues through July 31 at Anne Martin McCool Gallery, 711 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. McCool’s small paintings have the feeling and tone of the Northwest. Aldrich’s jewelry is made with turquoise, coral and other semi-precious stones and pearls. Work by other gallery artists will also be on display. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday and noon to 4 p.m. Sunday. 360-2933577 or www.mccoolart. com. OILS AND PASTELS: A show of new work by Amanda Houston continues through July 31 at Scott Milo Gallery, 420 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. Houston’s brightly colored landscapes and misty waterscapes will be joined by a collection of summer scenes in oil by Joanne Shellan, oils by Keith Sorenson, oils by Lorna Libert, watercolors by Eric Wiegardt and acrylics by Jennifer Bowman. Gallery hours are 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday or by appointment. 360-293-6938 or www.scott milo.com.

Hoefer, William Ivey, Clayton James, Mary Randlett, Charles Stokes, Mark Tobey and Dederick Ward. Museum hours are noon to 5 p.m. Sundays and Mondays, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. $5, $4 seniors, $2 students, free for members and children ages 11 and younger. 360-466-4446 or www.museumofnwart.org.

STANWOOD ARTWALK: “Your Passport To Art,” Stanwood’s third annual artwalk, will take place from 5 to 8 p.m. Friday, July 27, in downtown Stanwood. Participating restaurants and businesses will showcase the work of local artists during the event. Meet the artists and enjoy music, appetizers, art and prizes. Free. 360-629-0562.

“DEEP LISTENING”: The show of contemplative art will run through Aug. 26 at Gallery Cygnus, 109 Commercial Ave., La Conner. The exhibit reveals an artmaking process that requires a kind of deep listening or meditation. Artists include Heidi Epstein, Jules Faye, Marilyn Frasca, Theodora Jonsson, Natalie Niblack, Elizabeth Tapper and MagThe show “Diane Ainsworth: Oils” will open with a gie Wilder. Gallery hours reception from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Aug. 3, and continue are noon to 5 p.m. Friday through Sept. 4 at Scott Milo Gallery, 420 Commercial through Sunday. 360-708Ave., Anacortes. Ainsworth’s impressionistic paintings 4787 or www.gallery feature landscapes, floral and nautical styles. Also cygnus.com.

ARTS AT THE PORT: This showcase of regional fine art will open at 6 p.m. Saturday, July 28, and continue from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday, July 30-Aug. 2; 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Aug. 3-4; and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 5, at the Port of Anacortes Transit Shed Event Center. Some 85 artists are featured in the free exhibit. Enjoy nohost wine, dessert nibbles, music and more on opening night. 360-293-6211 or www.anacortesartsfestival. com.

AINSWORTH: OILS

showing: oils by Jeanne Levasseur, color photographs by Lewis Jones, pastels by Sandy Byers and oils by James Moore, as well as jewelry, glass, sculptures and more by other gallery artists. Gallery hours are 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday or by appointment. 360-293-6938 or www.scottmilo.com. Pictured: “Lilly Pad Abstract.”

are open at the Museum of Northwest Art, 121 S. First St., La Conner. “Pilchuck: IDEAS”: Through Jan. 1, 2013. In celebration of 50 years “ALWAYS A SELF-PORof Studio Glass, the show TRAIT”: Paintings, prints will feature work from the and sculptures by Anne Belov and Sharon Spencer Pilchuck permanent colwill continue through Aug. lection rarely seen off the 1 at Rob Schouten Gallery, famous glass school’s campus. These pieces from the 765 Wonn Road, Greenearly days of the revolution bank. Inspired by a poem of the same name, the show in studio glass were created by some of the most features Belov’s vibrant paintings and hand-pulled important artists working prints, and Spencer’s quiet, in the medium, including Dale Chihuly, William Morpowerful sculptures. The gallery is open from 10 a.m. ris, Joey Kirkpatrick, Flora Mace, Ben Moore, Lino to 5 p.m. daily. 360-222Tagliapietra, Italo Scanga 3070 or www.robschouten and more. The works on gallery.com. display are especially sigMoNA: Two new exhibits nificant because they show

these artists in the process of teaching, experimenting and in some cases searching for iconic forms and expressions for which they have become famous. Groupings of early glass are shown next to mature examples of the artists’ work from private collections. “Moments Of Quiet From The Permanent Collection”: Through -Sept. 23. The summer exhibition features artworks and quotes related to the concepts of tranquility, peace of mind and inspiration. It features work by Maria Frank Abrams, Guy Anderson, Kenneth Callahan, Morris Graves, Carl Hall, Paul Havas, Wade

“SUMMER MOMENTS: GLASS, METAL, STONE AND NORTHWEST PAINTINGS”: The exhibit will run through Sept. 9 at Matzke Fine Art Gallery & Sculpture Park, 2345 Blanche Way, Camano Island. The show will feature work by 30 artists working in a variety of techniques. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday or by appointment. 360-3872759 or www.matzkefineart. com.

QUILTS ON THE BEACH: The third annual open-air quilt show will take place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, July 28, at Cama Beach State Park, 1880 S. West Camano Drive, Camano Island. The show will feature approximately 50 of the 165 bed-sized quilts the Cama Beach Quilters have made for the cabins in the park. Enjoy quilt-related activities for all ages, a sale of small quilts made by group members, a garage sale of quilt-related items and cookbooks, a quilt raffle and more. Proceeds will benefit the Cama Beach Foundation’s educational activities. Admission is free, but a Discover parking pass is required. www.cama beachfoundation.org.

“THE PERMANENCE OF PATTERN: WHAT IS ON TOP”: The 20th annual invitational art show continues through Aug. 5 at The Edison Eye Gallery, 5800 Cains Court, Edison. Some 70 local artists explore the conjunction of mathematics and nature. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday or by appointment. ART DEMOS/WORK360-766-6276 or edison SHOPS: Check out a varieye@wavecable.com. ety of free art demonstra-

tions and workshops during the week of July 29-Aug. 4 at artist studios around Whidbey Island. Some 21 demos are scheduled, including mosaics, braiding, felting, kiln-loading, painting, dyeing and more. Pick up a Whidbey Art Trail studio map at Whidbey Island visitor centers, stores and other locations, or download one at www.whidbey arttrail.com.

FESTIVALS SUMMER ART FESTIVAL: The Lazy Days of Summer Art Festival will take place Friday and Saturday, July 27-28, around La Conner. Check out the Final Friday Art Walk, featuring local art on display in storefront windows around town, art in the parks and more. 360-4664778 or www.laconner chamber.com.

LECTURES AND TALKS FILM SCREENING: Skagit MoveOn will present the film “Koch Brothers Exposed” at 7 p.m. Saturday, July 28, at the Burlington Public Library, 820 E. Washington Ave. The documentary looks at tactics used by the Kochs to “sway the political narrative and hijack the political process.” Everyone welcome. Free. 360-424-4264.

MUSIC AMERICAN ROOTS CONCERT SERIES: Discover the roots of American music at a series of free summer concerts at 7 p.m. Saturdays in the West Beach amphitheater at Deception Pass State Park. If it is raining, concerts will be moved to the East Cranberry Lake picnic shelter. Discover Pass required for Park admission. 360-6753767. Next up:


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, July 26, 2012 - E19

OUT & ABOUT Museum, 713 R Ave., Anacortes. Provided by the U.S. Navy’s Office of Commemorations, Naval History and Heritage Command, the exhibit presents the history of the sea services of the United States during the War of 1812, and will remain on display for approximately three months. Museum hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday, Tuesday and Thursday through Saturday, 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday. Closed Wednesdays. Free admission. 360-293-1915 or http:// museum.cityofanacortes. org.

WATER FUN: Splashtacular!, a free kids safety event sponsored by Skagit County Safe Kids Coalition, will be held from noon to 3 p.m. today, July 26, at Washington Park in Anacortes. Local organizations will provide free games, along with fire safety, water safety, poison prevention, healthy eating, helmet safety and other activities. Kids can enjoy a bouncy house, opportunities to win free prizes and face painting, too. For information, contact Patricia Estrada, 360-416-8338 or pestrada@ skagitvalleyhospital.org.

FAIRHAVEN OUTDOOR CINEMA: The 13th annual Fairhaven Outdoor Cinema SINGING AND BARBECUE: The 57th annual An- will present live entertainment and big-screen movO-Chords Summer Show ies on Saturday evenings, is set for 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, July 27-28, at through Aug. 25, at the Village Green in BellingBrodniak Hall, Anacortes High School, 1600 20th St., ham’s Fairhaven District. Admission is $5. Popcorn Anacortes. The show will and snacks available for feature The Humdingers purchase. (aka the Dapper Dans Bring a blanket or lowat Walt Disney World in backed lawn chair for seatOrlando), The Jaybirds and ing. Rain or shine. www. the An-O-Chords. $16-$25. FairhavenOutdoorCinema. Senior discount available Friday only. Proceeds bene- com. Next up: fit local school vocal music July 28: Music by Pretty programs. Little Feet at 8 p.m. folThe An-O-Chords lowed by “The Help” at Famous Salmon Barbecue dusk. and Amateur Barbershop Quartet Contest will take MOVIES IN THE PARKS: place from noon to 4 p.m. Mount Vernon Parks & Sunday, July 29, in WashRecreation will present ington Park, 6300 Sunset free movies this summer Ave., Anacortes. Salmon in parks around Mount dinner: $13. Kids’ hot dog Vernon. Movies begin meal: $7. at dusk. Festival seating. 360-679-7473 or www. Limited vendors on-site. anochords.org. No pets. For information, call 360-336-6215 or email MORE FUN mvparks@mountver WAR OF 1812 EXHIBIT: nonwa.gov. Next up: A traveling exhibit comFriday, July 27: “Bolt”: memorating the bicentenBakerview Park, 3101 E. nial of the War of 1812 is on display at the Anacortes Fir St.

SUMMER FILM SERIES: Enjoy free film screenings at 7 p.m. Fridays at the Anacortes Public Library, 1220 10th St., Anacortes. Movie man Nick Alphin, an Oscar nominee and voting member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences, will introduce each film with facts and anecdotes about the actors, directors, studios and more. 360-293-1910, ext. 21, or library.cityofanacortes.org. Next up: July 27: “Mutiny on the Bounty”: Clark Gable stars as First Mate Fletcher Christian against Charles Laughton as the brutal Captain Bligh aboard the HMS Bounty. Oscar winner for Best Picture.

July 28: A Moment in Time, Seattle AfricanAmerican a capella gospel quartet. Aug. 4: Hank Nelson and Bob and Mike Antone: Music and stories from the Northwest timber communities. SUMMER CONCERTS: The Cap Sante Marina Summer Concert Series will offer free concerts at Seafarers’ Memorial Park in Anacortes. For information, call 360-293-3134 or visit www.portofanacortes. com. Next up: Friday, July 27: Michael Powers: 7 p.m.

STAR PARTY BENEFIT: Check out distant galaxies, planets and nebulas from 7 p.m. to midnight Friday, July 27, at Windjammer Park, 1600 S. Beeksma Drive, Oak Harbor. Island County Astronomical Society members will be on hand to answer questions and collect donations of canned food or money for North Whidbey HELP House. No telescope is

Please recycle this newspaper

needed and all ages are welcome. Canceled if cloudy. For information, contact Dan Pullen at 360679-7664 or visit www.i cas-wa.webs.com. VINTAGE FLY-IN: The North Cascades Vintage Fly-In will take place Friday through Sunday, July 27-29, at Mears Field, Concrete. Check out a variety of vintage, classic and antique airplanes. http:// skagitaero.com/calendar/ concrete-north-cascadesfly-in. MOTORCYCLE POKER RUN: The third annual Yellow Ribbon Troop Support Motorcycle Poker Run is set for 7 a.m. Saturday, July 28, at Coho Liquidation, 408 Metcalf St., SedroWoolley. Breakfast will be served by Hottie Tottie Deli. The End of Day Party will be with Eagles in Flight in Concrete, with food at the Sissy Bar and live music from Pain ‘N Full. $20 for bike and rider, $15 passengers. Includes breakfast, End of Day Party and one poker hand. Additional hands may be purchased on the day of the event for $5. Up to two extra cards may be purchased for each hand for $1 per card. Proceeds will benefit the SedroWoolley Community Troop Support 2012 Christmas Care Package Campaign.

Register at swcommunitytroopsupport.com until noon, Friday, July 27, or the morning of the event. First 50 registrations will receive a Biker Gift Bag. info@ swcommunitytroopsupport. com. PACIFIC NORTHWEST POLO: GOVERNOR’S CUP: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, July 28-29, at George Dill’s Farm, 16278 La Conner-Whitney Road, La Conner. Concessions will be available. Free admission, small fee for parking. 888-642-9284 or www.lovelaconner.com. REDS, WHITES & BLUES: The 39th Legislative District Democrats will present the Reds, Whites and Blues Party from 2 to 7 p.m. Sunday, July 29, at Eagle Haven Winery, 8243 Sims Road, Sedro-Woolley. Meet 1st Congressional District and 39th Legislative District candidates while enjoying a barbecue dinner and wine by donation with blues and rock and roll music by the Chris Eger Band. $20 advance, $22 at the door. www.eagle havenwinery.com or 425345-4888. FOOD SECURITY: Transition Fidalgo & Friends’ Seventh Generation Supper will take place at 6 p.m. Tuesday, July 31, at the Senior Activity Center,

1701 22nd St., Anacortes. Enjoy a catered soup supper and hear a presentation by Sequoia Ferrel, founder of Gaia Rising Farm on Guemes Island, and farm manager Debra Stanberry on their efforts to trial and grow staple food crops. Learn what local folks are doing to ensure our food supply can weather the effects of climate change and rising energy costs and how you can help support this vital effort. Suggested donation: $5 adult, $3 ages 10 and younger. Bring your own place setting. 360-2934048 or www.transition fidalgo.org. SKAGIT COUNTY PIONEER PICNIC: The 108th annual Skagit County Pioneer Association Picnic will take place from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 2, at Pioneer Park, 1200 S. Fourth St., La Conner. The Boyd and Savage families of Birdsview will be honored as the 2012 Pioneer Family of the Year. The Pioneer Spirit Award will be presented to the Rozema Family of Bay View. Music by Hugo’s Accordion Band. Free admission; salmon barbecue luncheon available for $12, includes free admission the day of the picnic to the Historical Museum, 501 S. Fourth St., La Conner. 360-466-4778 or www.laconnerchamber. com.

16th Annual Samish Island Arts Festival! SATURDAY, JULY 28 – 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Samish Island Community Center – 11292 Blue Heron Rd. Come and enjoy original arts, bbq oysters and live music in the relaxed atmosphere of our lovely island, which is at the same latitude as the San Juan Islands, but attached to the mainland~ therefore a ferry is not required to visit us!!

Attendance is free! Photo: Kitty Bluhm

artsfestival@samishisland.net • www.samishisland.net



360: Arts - Entertainment - Recreation