Issuu on Google+

What the heck? Organizers strike a different tune with new Anacortes musical festival PAGE 4

A festival celebrating all things Scottish PAGE 3

Skagit Valley Herald Thursday July 12, 2012

Reviews

On Stage

Roger Ebert

Music: Hank Williams, Jr., Ian Tyson Video Games: “Theatrhythm ...”

Comedian Jim Breuer plays the Skagit Valley Casino on July 20-21

Only the real little ones will find joy in fourth installment of “Ice Age”

PAGES 6-7

PAGE 10

PAGE 16


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E2 - Thursday, July 12, 2012

NEW ON DVD THIS WEEK “American Reunion”: The “American Pie” gang gets back together for their high school reunion. The concept is fine. It’s nice to catch up with Jim (Jason Biggs), Michelle (Alyson Hannigan), Stifler (Seann William Scott), Oz (Chris Klein) and the rest of the gang. There are some sweet moments with Kevin (Thomas Ian Nicholas) and Vicky (Tara Reid) and some funny moments with the worldly Finch (Eddie Kaye Thomas). But the few funny scenes get torpedoed by scenes of the guys hitting on teenage girls and fighting with teenage boys. There is slight nostalgic fun to seeing the ups and downs of the lives of these friends since growing up and moving away. But screenwriters Adam Herz, Jon Hurwitz and Hayden Schlossberg keep trying to force these characters into the same mold from 13 years ago. “Doctor Who: The Krotons”: Those of you who may have become fans of the “Doctor Who” franchise in recent years can catch up with some of the original Doctors through DVD releases. This adventure features Patrick Troughton, the second of the 11 actors to play the time-traveling adventurer. The Doctor, Jamie (Frazer Hines) and Zoe (Wendy Padbury) find themselves on the planet of the Gonds, a world ruled and enslaved by the Krotons. The good Doctor and his traveling companions decide to put a stop to their rule. Early episodes don’t have the large budgets of recent “Doctor Who” stories, but they are still cleverly written. “Doctor Who: Death to the Daleks,” featuring the Third Doctor (Jon Pertwee), also is being released. “Warehouse 13: Season 3”: Eddie McClintock stars in this series about the weird items locked in a secret location. “Earthworm Jim: The Complete Series”: Animated series that you will dig. “The Flowers of War”: A band of outcasts emerge as unlikely heroes. Christian Bale stars. “The Note III: Notes from the Heart Healer”: Genie Francis stars in this tale of family, faith and forgiveness. “Mysteria”: Screenwriter finds himself at the center of a murder investigation. “Quill: The Life of a Guide Dog”: True story of a dog trained to lead the blind. “iCarly: The Complete 4th Season”: This season of the series starring

YOUR ARTS, ENTERTAINMENT AND RECREATION GUIDE TO WHAT’S GOING ON IN SKAGIT COUNTY AND THE SURROUNDING AREAS

Upcoming movie releases Following is a partial schedule of coming movies on DVD. Release dates are subject to change: JULY 17 Casa de mi Padre - Lionsgate Friends With Kids - Lionsgate Here - Strand Intruders - Millennium Lockout - Sony Salmon Fishing in the Yemen - Sony The Three Stooges - Fox The Turin Horse - Cinema Guild

This Weekend / Page 5

JULY 24 The Deep Blue Sea - Music Box Footnote - Sony Meeting Evil - Sony My Way - Well Go USA AUG. 7 Blue Like Jazz - Lionsgate Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax - Universal AUG. 14 Stallone 3-Film Collector’s Set Lionsgate Breathless - Anchor Bay The Raid: Redemption - Sony AUG. 21 Chimpanzee - Disney A Separation - Sony

Local filmmakers present their latest movie at the Lincoln

Inside

AUG. 28 The Five-Year Engagement - Universal The Pirates! Band of Misfits - Sony Think Like a Man - Sony

Phone 360-416-2135

n McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Miranda Cosgrove includes a visit by First Lady Michelle Obama. “Fightville”: A look at mixed martial arts. “You’re Nobody Till Somebody Kills You”: The hunt is on for a serial killer. James McDaniel stars. “Sesame Street: Elmo’s Magic Numbers”: Elmo, Big Bird, Zoe and Rosita learn the importance of counting. “Black Limousine”: A Hollywood composer tries to put his life back together. “The Best of Caillou”: Caillou goes on another series of adventures. “Frontline: Money, Power and Wall Street”: Four-hour investigation into the financial meltdown. “Margaret”: A teen’s life is altered after witnessing a terrible accident. “Barney: All About Opposites”: Everyone helps Baby Bop understand concepts such as up and down. n Rick Bentley, McClatchy Newspapers

SUBMISSIONS Email features@skagitpublishing.com vrichardson@skagitpublishing. com (recreation items)

Hand-deliver 1215 Anderson Road Mount Vernon, WA 98274 Mailing address P.O. Box 578 Mount Vernon, WA 98273

Music, Video Game Reviews.......6-7 Get Involved.................................8-9 On Stage........................................ 10 Tuning Up..................................... 11 Travel........................................12-13 Hot Tickets.................................... 14 Roger Ebert.................................... 16 Movie Listings............................... 17 At the Lincoln Theatre.................. 17 Out & About.............................18-19

Online events calendar To list your event on our website, visit goskagit.com and look for the Events Calendar on the home page HAVE A STORY IDEA? w For arts and entertainment, contact Features Editor Craig Parrish at 360-416-2135 or features@skagitpublishing.com w For recreation, contact staff writer Vince Richardson at 360-416-2181 or vrichardson@ skagitpublishing.com TO ADVERTISE 360-424-3251


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, July 12, 2012 - E3

COMMUNITY

Celebrate the Scot in you Skagit Valley Herald staff

That sound you’ll likely hear wafting across the Skagit River this weekend is indeed what you think it is. The 2012 Highland Games & Celtic Festival (and the ubiquitous sound of bagpipes) will be taking over Edgewater Park on Saturday and Sunday, as the festival brings all things Scottish to the banks of the river. That includes bagpipers and drummers playing solo and in ensembles big and small, Scottish country dancing, sheepdog trials, fiddlers, food and a Culture Tent to absorb an educational viewpoint of the activities being exhibited. And the athletics events competition is as unique a event as you’ll ever see. Competitors take their turns at throwing stones and logs (cabers) of various weights and sizes, for height and distance. The Braemar Stone throwing greatly resembles a shot put in modern track and field. In the Sheaf Toss, competitors lift and throw, with a pitchfork, a burlap bag filled with straw over a horizontal bar that gets progressively higher. In addition, about 30 family clans will be represented, most from Washington state but some from as far as Portland, Ore.

2012 Highland Games & Celtic Festival When: Saturday-Sunday, July 14-15 Where: Edgewater Park, Mount Vernon Cost: One-day pass: $13 adults; $10 students, seniors and active military; $30 families or group of four; ages 4 and younger free, Weekend pass: $18 adults, $14 students, seniors and active military; $40 families or group of four; ages 4 and younger free Information: 360-416-4934, 888-416-4934, www.celticarts.org

Skagit Valley Herald file photos


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E4 - Thursday, July 12, 2012

COMMUNITY

LAKE

PHIL ELVERUM

Submitted photos

The event formerly known as What The Heck Fest has evolved into the Anacortes Unknown Music Festival.

New music festival keeps its focus local Anacortes Unknown Music Series FRIDAY, JULY 13 5 to 11:30 p.m.: Bands, movies and historical presentation at The Unknown SATURDAY, JULY 14 Noon to 4 p.m.: Bands at Causland Park, small press book fair at The Unknown 4 p.m. to 12:30 a.m.: Bands, movies, piano recital and authors at The Unknown SUNDAY, JULY 15: Noon to 4 p.m.: Bands at Causland Park, small press book fair at The Unknown 4 to 5:30 p.m.: Historical presentation at the Croatian Club 7 to 9 p.m.: Musical performance at The Unknown n Event sites located around intersection of Seventh Street and N Avenue, Anacortes

What the Heck Fest was totally successful. We ended it in its peak. We just wanted to keep things fresh.” Those interested in having some Unlike What the Heck Fest, the unknown fun can head out to Anacortes Anacortes Unknown Music Series will this weekend for the Unknown Music feature only local bands, including ElverSeries. um’s band, Mount Eerie. The festival will The festival, which will run Friday take place in venues on one city block, through Sunday, July 13-15, is being host- around the intersection of Seventh ed by the same group that brought the Street and N Avenue, that includes Causarea the weekend-long What the Heck land Park, the Croatian Center across Fest from 2001-11. the street and an old Catholic church the “We’ve been doing What the Heck group named “The Unknown.” Fest for the last 10 years, and we wanted The festival’s attractions include a to be done with it,” said Phil Elverum, book fair, dinner show, historical presenevent organizer. “But we didn’t want to tations, documentaries, live music in the be done with music and festivals entirely. park and The Unknown. Elverum said

By AMELIA DICKSON Staff Writer

the Anacortes Unknown Music Festival will be similar to What the Heck Fest, but simpler and more casual. He hopes it will develop into something more “curated and refined.” Elverum said one of the documentaries playing at the Anacortes Unknown Music Festival is an homage to the festival’s predecessor. The abstract documentary, which is titled “Heck,” was created by a local artist using footage from What the Heck Fest. It will be shown Friday evening in The Unknown between musical performances. Tickets for the festival and dinner show can be bought at www.anacortes unknown.com.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, July 12, 2012 - E5

THIS WEEKENDin the area ‘RE-ENACTORS’ AT THE LINCOLN

HIGHLAND GAMES KICKOFF CONCERT Clandestine will perform at 7 p.m. Friday, July 13, at Edgewater Park, 600 Behrens Millet Road, Mount Vernon. Free. Bring a nonperishable food donation to benefit the Skagit Food Bank. 360-416-4934 or www.celticarts.org

ANACORTES SHIPWRECK FESTIVAL The annual event will take place from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, July 14, in downtown Anacortes. Check out several blocks of booths filled with antiques, collectibles, arts and crafts, tools, toys and everything else imaginable. Enjoy food, entertainment and more. Free admission. www.shipwreckfest.com

POTLUCK FORUM Community groups Defending Water in the Skagit River Basin, Skagit MoveOn and those following the coal train issue will present updates on their activities at 11:30 a.m. Sunday, July 15, at the Skagit County PUD building, 1415 Freeway Drive, Mount Vernon. Community members are invited, and are asked to bring a potluck dish to share. 360-424-4264

EPTING BENEFIT CONCERT Local filmmakers Zach and Nathan Hamer present their latest movie, the comedy mockumentary “Re-enactors,” at 7:30 p.m. Friday, July 13; 5:30 p.m. Sunday, July 15; and 7:30 p.m. Monday, July 16, at the Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. When Jed is offered his dream job, as a temporary tour guide at the Milltown Pioneer Village, he must set aside his differ-

ences with his old rival, Douglas MarshallPickett, to create the most “authentic” Civil War re-enactor experience possible. But will Jed and Doug’s hardcore re-enacting standards clash with the cushy lifestyle of the Pioneer Village campers? For Jed and Doug the summer has now become 1866; for the campers, it’s become a living nightmare. www.ilovethelincoln.com or 360-366-8955

The Rick Epting Foundation for the Arts summer fundraiser will take place from 2 to 7 p.m. Sunday, July 15, at the Heart of Anacortes, 1014 Fourth St., Anacortes. Performers include Anacortes-based Savage Jazz Band and Whatcom County’s Sabrina y los Reyes, who plays Latin/Afro-Cuban and original music. Local percussionist Oscar De La Rosa will perform with both groups. There will also be a silent auction. $10 suggested donation at the door. Proceeds benefit Skagit Valley artists and arts organizations through the foundation’s grant program. 360-708-1508 or www.rickepting foundation.org


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E6 - Thursday, July 12, 2012

REVIEWS MUSIC CDS Compiled from news services

Marina and the Diamonds

ter,” 1970s singer-songwriter musings on “Lance’s Song,” and Caribbean-influences on “Jump Right In,” which has more in common with Paul Simon than Kenny Chesney. “Electra Heart” Altogether, “Uncaged” is a powerful artistic declaration rather than an album Marina and carefully plotted to achieve maximum the Diamonds radio exposure. It succeeds, too, suggesting certainly don’t Brown and his fellow instrumentalists and lack ambition. songwriters plan on gaining a reputation On “Electra Heart,” the British band for musical diversity rather than safely tries to outpace everything from its sucrepeating an established formula. cessful 2010 debut “The Family Jewels” CHECK OUT THIS TRACK: “Over— bigger dance beats, broader lyrical connight,” the boldest cut on “Uncaged,” cepts and way more drama from Marina shifts into contemporary rhythm-andDiamandis’ acrobatic vocals. That means blues, overtly describing a couple’s seducattempting jaded, step-by-step relationtive evening, set to a quiet-storm track ship guides that also get fists pumping that crosses Usher with Marvin Gaye. (“How to Be a Heartbreaker”) or dance floor anthems that combine feminist theo- n Michael McCall, for The Associated Press ry with swooping vocals (“Sex Yeah”). Unfortunately, the group can’t quite Hank pull most of it off, coming off heavy-handed (“Homewrecker”) or histrionic (“Star- Williams Jr. “Old School, ring Role”). Marina may strive to be the next Kate Bush, but too often here, she’s a New Rules” second-rate Katy Perry. Hank Wiln Glenn Gamboa, Newsday liams Jr. kicks off his album Zac Brown “Old School, New Rules” by addressing ESPN’s deciBand sion to drop his song as the opening “Uncaged” theme for “Monday Night Football,” a role he held for more than 20 years. In The Zac a robust voice, Williams bellows: “I’ll go Brown Band find a network that will treat me right” delivers a mesto start “Takin’ Back The Country,” a sage with the song set to a rocking arrangement of his title of its new legendary father’s song “Mind Your Own album, “Uncaged” — and the songs back Business.” up that statement. Although still likely to The lyrics of “Takin’ Back The Counbe described as a country band, the Geor- try” refer to his notorious 2011 interview gia group purposely, and admirably, avoids on the TV program “Fox & Friends” in current Nashville conventions on their which he made an allegory that some new collection. construed as comparing President Barack Ten years in, the ZBB instead focus on Obama to Adolf Hitler. Williams makes the tight interplay the ensemble has devel- it clear that he considers the incident an oped through heavy touring, dwelling on example of political correctness run amok. instrumental chops as much as on vocals Singing with fire in his belly, and offerand hooks. They also cast a broad view ing up ferociously rocking tunes fueled toward material: There’s country music, by a bluesy slide guitar, Williams tackles for sure, in the harmony-driven “Goodbye political themes throughout “Old School, In Her Eyes” and hoedown picking in the New Rules.” He wrote every song, save exhilarating “The Wind.” But, keeping a cover of his father’s “You Win Again,” to its theme, “Uncaged” takes on fierce which he turns into a southern-rock stomsouthern rock on the title cut, gospelper, and a duet with Merle Haggard on tinged mountain soul on “Natural Disasthe latter’s classic hit, “I Think I’ll Just

Stay Here And Drink,” in which the two aging country stars have a ball trading lines with ribald delight. Williams’ conservative viewpoint will rankle some and rally others. At age 63, though, the old lion of country music continues to roar — and to say exactly what is on his mind. CHECK OUT THIS TRACK: On “I’m Gonna Get Drunk And Sing Hank Williams,” the family torch-bearer joins with Brad Paisley in a rollicking honky-tonk tune that suggests Hank Jr. deals with his troubles by raising a ruckus.

Kitty Pryde

n Ron Harris, Associated Press

n Nick Cristiano, The Philadelphia Inquirer

“Haha I’m Sorry”

The first words on Kitty Beckwith’s second EP are “Get out of my room!”; on the next track she proclaims herself the “rap game Taylor Swift” before guest weirdo Riff Raff drops in to rhyme “rhinoceros” with “immaculate.” The most laconic voice-of-her-generan Michael McCall, for The Associated Press tion candidate ever condenses a few years of New York Times-recognized microRebecca & genres (chillwave/ witch house/ swag rap) Fiona into a happy, sluggish universe that culmi“I Love You, nates in turning 2012’s biggest breakout Man” hit, “Call Me Maybe,” into the hypnotichorns giggle “Give Me Scabies.” Swedish DJ The Floridian, a Claire’s employee and duo Rebecca unlikely rap star, spends “Haha’s” other & Fiona is out 10 minutes prizing 3 a.m. drunk dials, takand about with ing Adderall to stay thin, and bragging “I Love You, Man,” a light and airy dance that she’s ruining hip-hop. She’s smarter album that feels gilded in gold. This album than indie-rockers five years her senior, is more about filling the need for fun sum- not least because she won’t tell us how old mer sounds and less about ground-break- she actually is. ing arrangements, because there are none. n Dan Weiss, The Philadelphia Inquirer Rebecca Svheja and Fiona Fitzpatrick are, at their inner artistic core, the Ian Tyson Bananarama of electronic dance music. Their presentation is breezy and not “Raven Singer” too aggressive on the ears. In an age of crushing dubstep assaults on the senses, “Get the feel “I Love You, Man” is a welcome, if brief, of it, down to respite. the real of it,” “Jane Doe” gets things out of the gate Ian Tyson sings nicely. “Someone has taken your heart to on “Blueberry far from home,” go the lyrics delivered in Susan,” a salute spoken-not-sung tones. The melody lends to the first guitarist he ever heard and other mystery to the words and things build to a musical colleagues who have passed on. crescendo in fine EDM fashion. At 78, the Canadian troubadour and cattle rancher has been doing just that for a long Another top track is “Bullets,” with time, going back to the early ’60s, when he its restless beat that refuses to subside. was half of the hitmaking folk duo Ian and There’s nothing in the song to pin it disSylvia. Tyson is still recovering from the tinctly to this decade of dance music as damage his voice suffered in a 2006 outdoor opposed to the last. But perhaps therein performance and a subsequent virus. It’s lies the simplified success of Rebecca & more hoarse and hushed than robust and Fiona. resonant. But that just lends a new intimacy If something can simultaneously be to Tyson’s performances, framed in spare, futuristic and retro, the duo has distilled acoustic-textured folk-country arrangements. that something here. “I Love You, Man” He also maintains all of his usual grace. isn’t great. But it’s fine.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, July 12, 2012 - E7

REVIEWS VIDEO GAMES Chris Campbell, Scripps Howard News Service

‘Theatrhythm: Final Fantasy’ Platform: Nintendo 3DS Genre: Music Publisher: Square Enix ESRB Rating: E, for Everyone Grade: 2.5 stars (out of 5)

“Final Fantasy” has made its imprints in gaming, motion pictures and even concerts where major orchestras belt out the games’ beautiful soundtracks for packed audiences. I was unprepared for the next tendril of this franchise’s legacy, the music-rhythm game. One would think the natural home for this action is the Kinect or PlayStation Move; instead, Square Enix crammed a playful yet challenging cavalcade of tappable circles and music into the 3DS experience. The diversion from the typical role-playing genre jars the senses, seeing heroes battle enemies not with sword swipes but with the power of music. As in other rhythm games, music is accompanied by colored orbs to tap along to, keeping pace and thus defeating enemies. Different circles have different requirements (some need a tap, while others demand directional swiping), and once the track listings get denser, so does the difficulty level. To placate longtime fans, “Theatrhythm” incorporates some role-playing elements, but they come off as tacked-on rather than a true part of the game. This game masks itself in a cloak of “Final Fantasy” goodness, but if you revile music-and-rhythm games, then you’ll want to avoid this wolf in sheep’s clothing.

‘Gravity Rush’ Platform: PlayStation Vita Genre: Action Publisher: Sony ESRB Rating: T, for Teen Grade: 1.5 stars

Gamers have been waiting for “Gravity Rush” for more than a year since its demo at Electronic Entertainment Expo 2011 wowed attendees with its gravity-defying control scheme and original female hero. Kat is an unlikely heroine. Devoid of memory and her home of Hekseville overrun by a nefarious force called the Nevi, she must become the hero the citizens need, even if they don’t exactly like her. As the game’s title suggests, gravity is key for Kat. She can manipulate it (thanks to a cat ... don’t ask), which provides the most interesting aspect as you hurl her around using the Vita’s touchscreen. It’s dizzying and confusing at first, but pop a couple of Tylenol and directing Kat around rooftops and up and down the sides of buildings becomes old hat. The combat, unfortunately, suffers. Where you once enjoyed Kat’s limitless ability, the action becomes bogged down by poor targeting of the Nevi’s weak spots and easily beatable opponents. The comic-book-inspired cutscenes are another matter. These latch onto you in every good way a game’s cutscene could. The artistry and storytelling here are strong and keep you pushing forward even when the game gets tedious and lame.

n Follow Chris Campbell at twitter.com/campbler or email him at game_on_games@mac. com.

Continue the cycle: Please recycle this newspaper


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E8 - Thursday, July 12, 2012

GET INVOLVED ART CALL FOR VINTAGE PHOTOS: The city of Sedro-Woolley needs some help from the public to finish a collection of photos of former mayors to mount on the walls at City Hall. Good quality photos are still needed for: Norris Ormsby, 1898-99; William Curry, 1915; Frank Douglass, 1916-18; Paul Rhodius, 1919-20; L. Britchford, 1931-32; and Gus Gilbertson, 1939-44. The photos will be scanned to create prints, then returned to their owners. 360-855-9922.

arts.org or www.alliedarts. org.

CALL FOR PHOTOS: Photographers are invited to submit photos of Mount Vernon’s historic downtown by Aug. 11 for the Mount Vernon Downtown Association’s 2012 Art in the Alleys juried photo competition. The show, “Engaging Imagination in Downtown Mount Vernon,” will be on display Friday and Saturday, Sept. 21-22, at the Front Gallery, 420 Myrtle St., Mount Vernon. Categories include landscape/architecture, people CALL FOR ARTISTS AND and abstract. “Best Of CRAFTERS: The Mount Show” will receive $250, Vernon Downtown Assowith additional awards for ciation is looking for artists winners of each category and crafters of all ages for and a Judges Choice ribbon the annual Sidewalk Sale, for each judge’s favorite set for 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. photo. Entry fee: $25 for Friday and Saturday, July the first two photos, $10 27-28, in downtown Mount for each additional image. Vernon. For information, MVDA will retain a 35 percall Nancy at 360-336-6106 cent commission for photos or visit www.mountvernon sold during the exhibition. downtown.org. Information: 360-336-3431 or 350-336-3801. Entry CALL FOR ARTISTS: forms are available at www. DOOR ART THROWDOWN: mountvernondowntown. Allied Arts of Whatcom org. County seeks artists for its second annual Door Art SEEKING ARTISTS, Throwdown, set during the CRAFTSPEOPLE, VENFirst Friday Art Walk from DORS: Cascade Days is 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Aug. 3, in accepting applications the Federal Building park- through Aug. 5 for the ing lot in the 1400 block of annual event set for SaturCornwall Avenue in down- day and Sunday, Aug. 18-19, town Bellingham. in Concrete. The event will Up to 10 teams of artinclude a parade, logger ists will have two hours competition, car show, fireto create a mural on a man’s muster, kids’ activirepurposed door, using ties, music, contests and any medium or material. more. For information or Art Walk participants can an application, call 360-853watch the artists work and 7867 or visit www.cascade vote for their favorite by days.com. “tipping” their team of choice. The doors will be sold that evening at a silent ART CLASSES ART WORKSHOPS: auction. Jeanne Gardner will offer Registration costs $25 for teams of up to four art- a series of two-hour workists per team. 360-676-8548, shops for ages 7 to adult doorartthrowdown@allied at That’s Knot All Artists’

Co-op, 128 S. First St., La Conner. $20 per session, includes materials; 10 percent discount for additional family members. Register at the Artists’ Co-op or call 360-766-6419. Next up: Wednesday, July 18: Screen printing, 1 to 3 p.m. Create your own stencil to make an unlimited number of cards using a two-color silkscreen printing process. Thursday, July 26: Drawing 3-D castles, 1 to 3 p.m. Learn to draw simple shapes with shading and shadows to create your own medieval castle. STONE CARVERS SYMPOSIUM: The 25th annual event will take place July 14-22 at Camp Brotherhood, 24880 Brotherhood Road, near Mount Vernon. Stone carvers from the Northwest and beyond will gather for a variety of workshops, demonstrations and hands-on instruction, culminating in a sculpture show on Saturday, July 21. “BIRDS OF A FEATHER: LET’S DRAW TOGETHER!”: Ages 5 to 16, 1 to 3 p.m. Saturday, July 21, Whatcom Museum’s Syre Education Center, 201 Prospect St., Bellingham. Using the museum’s bird collection for inspiration, artist Donna Washington will teach how artists observe details and show participants how to use them to draw a bird and add a colorful watercolor wash. $3 suggested donation, free for museum members. Preregistration required: 360-778-8960. TODDLER ART EXPLORATION: Ages 2 to 4, with an adult, 11 a.m. to noon Thursdays, Aug. 2-16, at the Whatcom Museum Lightcatcher Building, 250 Flora St., Bellingham. With

the help of their parents and teaching artist Gabriel Miles, toddlers will learn about the foundations of art through creative exploration. $25-$35; dropins: $12-$15. Registration required: 360-778-8985 or FIGinfo@cob.org. CARTOONING FOR KIDS: 4 to 6 p.m. Tuesdays, Aug. 7-28, Burlington Parks and Recreation Center, 900 E. Fairhaven Ave., Burlington. Kids ages 7-12 will learn basic drawing skills and leave with a portfolio of their favorite cartoon characters. $40. Register by July 31: 360-755-9649.

AUDITIONS CALL FOR YOUNG MUSICIANS: The Mount Vernon-based Fidalgo Youth Symphony offers opportunities for young musicians ages 5 to 21 to study and perform orchestral music. For information, including tuition costs and rehearsal schedules: 360-293-8180 or www.fysmusic.org.

DANCE

CONTRA DANCE WORKSHOP: 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Thursday, July 19, Depot Arts Center, 611 R Ave., Anacortes. Learn the fundamentals of contra dance and practice dancing to live music. No partner needed. $8 at the door. 360-7553969 or www.skagitcontra. org. BELLY DANCE LESSONS: 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Mondays, Anacortes Center For Happiness, 619 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. $10 drop-in fee per class or $75 for eight classes. To register: 360-4642229 or www.anacortescenterforhappiness.org. DANCE & YOGA FOR BOYS AND GIRLS: Mount

Vernon Parks and Recreation will offer several classes for kids this summer, including ballet, jazz dance and yoga with instructor Sylvia Trask. For information, including class times and fees, call 360-3366215.

ington State Parks and Recreation Commission seeks volunteers to serve as park hosts for 30 days or more, greeting the public, helping visitors have a pleasant stay and assisting park staff with a variety of tasks. In exchange, hosts receive free camping and CLOG DANCING FOR hookups for their own RV BEGINNERS: Free lesson and camping equipment. from 11 a.m. to noon, folFor a list of volunteer and lowed by regular clog danc- host openings: 360-902ing from noon to 1 p.m. 8612, Cindy.Jorgensen@ Thursdays, at the Mount parks.wa.gov or parks. Vernon Senior Center, wa.gov/volunteers. 1401 Cleveland St., Mount Vernon. No fee, no partner SHELLFISH-TIVAL: Enjoy needed. Wear comfortable low-tide beach walks, butshoes. ton-making, playing “scoop For information, call the poop” and getting an Rosie at 360-424-4608. up-close-and-personal view of marine life during Taylor Shellfish Farms’ RECREATION Shellfish-tival, from 10 OUTDOOR SKILLS FOR WOMEN: Women can learn a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday, July 18, at 2182 Chuckathe basics of fishing, hunting and other outdoor skills nut Drive, Bow. Food and snacks will be available for at a Sept. 14-16 workshop purchase. Register by July at Camp River Ranch in 17, nicoleh@taylorshellfish. Carnation. Coordinated com. The event is free. by Washington Outdoor Women, the workshop KNOW YOUR DUCKS is taught by Washington (AND OTHER BIRDS)!: A Department of Fish and Wildlife experts and other tour for teens and adults, 1 certified instructors. Class- to 3 p.m. Saturday, July 14, at the Whatcom Museum’s es will include archery, basic fishing, fly-fishing and Syre Education Center, 201 Prospect St., Bellingham. tying, kayaking, big-game View the museum’s bird hunting basics, map and collection as former local compass reading, wilderness first aid, survival skills, Audubon Society president Joe Meche shares ways wildlife identification and to identify birds based on more. Workshop particitheir habitat and behavior. pants must be at least 18. A Washington recreational The tour is followed by an optional bird walk along fishing license is required to participate in the fishing nearby Whatcom Creek. $3 suggested donation, free sessions. for museum members. The workshop fee of Preregistration required: $250 includes lodging, 360-778-8960. meals and use of equipment. A limited number TENNIS TOURNAMENT: of partial scholarships are The Skagit Valley Tenavailable for first-time nis Association will host participants. www.washthe fourth annual Nick ingtonoutdoorwomen.org Whiton Memorial Scholaror 425-455-1986. ship tournament Friday PARK HOSTS: The Wash- through Sunday, July 20-22,


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, July 12, 2012 - E9

GET INVOLVED at Skagit Valley College in Mount Vernon. Registration: $35 juniors, $50 adults. Includes snacks, lunch, a tournament gift and free raffle drawings. Spectators are welcome. All proceeds will benefit the Nick Whiton Scholarship Fund. Register by July 17. 360-766-7420 or www.nick whitontennis.com. “TIDES & CURRENTS AT PLAY IN FIDALGO BAY!”: Join the Trail Tales docents for an interpretive walk from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Saturday, July 21, along the Tommy Thompson Trail in Anacortes. Meet at the 34th Street sign along the trail to learn facts about tides and currents, including how they affect the shape of the bay and the quantity and quality of the water it holds. Tides and currents also influence the health of plants and animals, as well as our ability to see them. Free. www. skagitbeaches.org. TRAIL TALES INTERPRETIVE BIKE RIDE: Join the Tuesday evening bike group at 6 p.m. Tuesday, July 24, on Railroad Avenue at the north end of Commercial Avenue in Anacortes. Learn about the cleanup work addressing toxins along the Anacortes shoreline under the Washington Department of Ecology’s Anacortes Baywide Cleanup Project. Along the ride to March Point, Trail Tales docents will share information about cleanup sites on Guemes Channel and Fidalgo Bay. All ages welcome. Free. Don’t forget your helmet. www.skagitbeaches.org.

HOSPICE GOLF TOURNAMENT: The Similk Ladies Golf Club will host the Hospice Golf Tournament on Wednesday, July 25, at Similk Golf Course in Anacortes. Check-in begins at 7:30 a.m. followed by a shotgun start at 8:30. Men and women welcome. $30, includes greens fee, snacks, lunch, prizes and raffle. Proceeds benefit the Hospice Northwest Foundation. For information or to register: 360-293-3334 or 360-420-4889. MARINE NATURALIST TRAINING: The Whale Museum, 62, First St. N., Friday Harbor, is accepting applications for its Marine Naturalist Training Program. Classes will be held July 28-Aug. 2. The course includes presentations on cetaceans, pinnipeds, otters, intertidal invertebrates and marine birds, as well as geology, marine conservation and current research projects. $375, includes an orca adoption and a museum membership. For information or to register: 360378-4710, ext. 23, cindy@ whalemuseum.org or www.whalemuseum.org.

Free improv classes taught by Sheila Goldsmith of Improv Playworks. Registration required: 360-7560756 or www.improvplayworks.com. Especially for seniors: 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. Monday, July 16, The Willows, 3115 Squalicum Parkway, Bellingham. For adults and teens: 7 to 9 p.m., Wednesday, July 25, Improv Playworks Studio, 302 W. Illinois St., Bellingham. SUMMER DRAMA CAMP: The Lincoln Theatre Summer Drama Camp for Teens will take place from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, Aug. 13-17, at the Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. Teens can take part in acting, improv, dance, mime, writing and more onstage at the Lincoln. $275, partial scholarships available. 360-419-7129, ext. 101, or www.lincolntheatre. org.

WORKSHOPS

RABARI EMBROIDERY: 10 to 3 p.m. Saturday, July 28, Harmony Fields, 7465 Thomas Road, Bow. Learn KULSHAN TRAIL the techniques, motifs and CLEANUP: Join a work patterns of traditional party at 10:30 a.m. Sunday, Rabari embroidery from July 29, at the Skagit Valthe nomadic women of the ley Food Co-op, 202 S. First Indian desert. $60. 360-941St., Mount Vernon. Meet 8196 or www.hfproduce. at the Co-op and carpool com/learn.cfm. to the trailhead to spend a couple hours or so “cleanWOOD BLOCK PRINTing house” on the Kulshan MAKING: Saturday and Trail. Bring gloves, water Sunday, Aug. 18-19, at Harand sturdy shoes. Free. 360- mony Fields, 7465 Thomas 336-5087. Road. With instructor Nat-

THEATER IMPROV CLASSES:

alie Niblack. 360-941-8196 or www.hfproduce.com/ learn.cfm.

Please recycle this newspaper


E10 Thursday, July 12, 2012

ON STAGE in the Skagit Valley and surrounding area July 12-21 Thursday.12 THEATER

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: Island Stage Left, 8:30 p.m., Roche Harbor Outdoor Stage, San Juan Island. Free. Donations appreciated. Bring a blanket and dress warmly. www.islandstageleft.org.

Friday.13 MUSIC

Clandestine: Highland Games Kickoff Concert: 7 p.m., Edgewater Park, 600 Behrens Millet Road, Mount Vernon. Free. Bring a nonperishable food donation to benefit the Skagit Food Bank. 360-416-4934 or www.celticarts.org.

THEATER

“No Sex Please, We’re British”: comedy, 7 p.m., RiverBelle Theatre, The Old Town Grainery, 100 E. Montgomery, Mount Vernon. $30, includes dessert buffet and show. Reservations required: 360-336-3012 or www.riverbelledinnertheatre.com. “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: Island Stage Left, 8:30 p.m., Roche Harbor Outdoor Stage, San Juan Island. Free. Donations appreciated. Bring a blanket and dress warmly. www.islandstageleft.org.

Saturday.14 THEATER

THEATER

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: Island Stage Left, 8:30 p.m., Roche Harbor Outdoor Stage, San Juan Island. Free. Donations appreciated. Bring a blanket and dress warmly. www.islandstageleft.org.

COMEDY

Jim Breuer: 8 p.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Pacific Showroom, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. $31-$40. 877-275-2448 or www.theskagit.com.

IMPROV

“All My Children”: Improv by Matt Smith, 8 p.m., The Idiom Theater, 1418 Cornwall Ave., Bellingham. Tickets available at the door or in advance at both Bellingham Food Co-ops. $10. 360-756-0756 or www.improvplayworks.com.

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: Island Stage Left, 8:30 p.m., Roche Harbor Outdoor Stage, San Juan Island. Free. Donations appreciated. Bring a blanket and dress warmly. www.islandstageleft.org.

THEATER

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: Island Stage Left, 8:30 p.m., Roche Harbor Outdoor Stage, San Juan Island. Free. Donations appreciated. Bring a blanket and dress warmly. www.islandstageleft.org.

FRIDAYSATURDAY.20-21 JIM BREUER 8 p.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Pacific Showroom, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. $31-$40. 877-275-2448 or www.theskagit.com.

THURSDAY.12 Trish & Hans Quartet: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-588-1720.

THEATER

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: Island Stage Left, 8:30 p.m., Roche Harbor Outdoor Stage, San Juan Island. Free. Donations appreciated. Bring a blanket and dress warmly. www.islandstageleft.org.

COMEDY

Jim Breuer: 8 p.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Pacific Showroom, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. $31-$40. 877-275-2448 or www.theskagit.com. “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: Island Stage Left, 8:30 p.m., Roche Harbor Outdoor Stage, San Juan Island. Free. Donations appreciated. Bring a blanket and dress warmly. www.islandstageleft.org.

SUMMER FUNDRAISER FOR RICK EPTING FOUNDATION FOR THE ARTS Savage Jazz Band (pictured), Sabrina y los Reyes, Oscar De La Rosa, 2 to 7 p.m., Heart of Anacortes, 1014 Fourth St., Anacortes. $10. www.rickepting foundation.org.

WES JONES BAND 9 p.m. to midnight, Cyndy’s Broiler, 27021 102nd Ave NW, Stanwood. No cover. 360-6294800 or www. cyndysbroiler.com.

Thursday.19

Friday.20

SUNDAY.15

SATURDAY.14

No events submitted.

Saturday.21

THEATER

TUNING UP Playing at area venues July 12-18

Monday-Wednesday.16-18

“No Sex Please, We’re British”: comedy, 7 p.m., RiverBelle Theatre, The Old Town Grainery, 100 E. Montgomery, Mount Vernon. $30, includes dessert buffet and show. Reservations required: 360-336-3012 or www.riverbelledinnertheatre.com.

Sunday.15

Thursday, July 12, 2012 E11

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

FRIDAY.13 Jammin’ Jeff (country, rock): 8 p.m. to midnight, Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

Beach Boys 50th Anniversary Tour: 7 p.m., Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. $69.50$125. 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster.com.

Rock Classix (pop): 9 p.m. to midnight, Cyndy’s Broiler, 27021 102nd Ave NW, Stanwood. No cover. 360-629-4800 or www.cyndys broiler.com.

Rivertalk (world music): 7 p.m., Eagle Haven Winery, 8243 Sims Road, SedroWoolley. Bring a chair or blanket to sit on. $8 cover. 360-8566248 or www.eagle havenwinery.com.

Sister Wives: 9 p.m. to midnight, Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-588-1720.

The Ames, Kelli’s Starlight Wishes: 10 p.m. to midnight, Redlight, 1017 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. www.redlightwine andcoffee.com.

Jambrewrie (open jam): 7 p.m., Birdsview Brewing Co., 38302 Highway 20, Concrete. No cover. 360-826-3406.

SATURDAY.14 Lane Fernando with The Pull and Be Damned Stringband & Heart Lake Owl: 5 to 7:30 p.m., Heart of Anacortes, 1014 Fourth St. $7. Jammin’ Jeff (country, rock): 8 p.m. to midnight, Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-4226411.

Lyle Lovett & His Large Band: 8 p.m., Mount Baker Theatre, 104 N. Commercial St., Bellingham. $49-$89. 360-7346080 or www.mount bakertheatre.com. Lane Fernando: 8:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-766-6266.

Stout Pounders (Celtic music): 8 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $10. 360-336-8955 or www. lincolntheatre.org.

Chris Eger Band: 9:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-755-3956 or www.anacortesH2O. com.

Maggie’s Fury: 7 p.m., Skagit River Brewery, 404 S. Third St., Mount Vernon. 360-336-2884.

Wandering Soles: 9:30 p.m., Brown Lantern Ale House, 412 ComThe Twisters: 9 p.m. to The Ascetic Junkies, midnight, Rockfish Grill, Cars & Trains: 10 p.m. to mercial Ave., Anacortes. 320 Commercial Ave., midnight, Redlight, 1017 No cover. 360-293-2544. Anacortes. No cover. N. State St., Bellingham. 360-588-1720. $5. www.redlightwine andcoffee.com.

Sola Rosa: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $6. 360-778-1067. Eli Westin Band (rock, blues): 8:30 p.m., Big Rock Café & Grocery, 14779 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-4247872.

SUNDAY.15 Gary B’s Church of the Blues (blues, classic rock): 6 to 10 p.m., Castle Tavern, 708 Metcalf St., Sedro-Woolley. 360855-2263.

Wes Jones Band (honky-tonk): 9 p.m. to midnight, Cyndy’s Broiler, 27021 102nd Ave NW, Stanwood. No cover. 360-629-4800 or www. cyndysbroiler.com.

WEDNESDAY.18 Station House Jam with Rich Rorex, Terry Nelson and friends: 4 to 8 p.m., The Station House, 315 Morris St., La Conner. No cover. 360-466-4488.

Summer Fundraiser for Rick Epting Foundation for the Arts: Savage Jazz Band, Sabrina y los Reyes, Oscar De La Rosa: 2 to 7 p.m., Heart of Anacortes, 1014 Fourth St., Anacortes. $10. www. rickeptingfoundation.org.

Orville Johnson: 5:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-766-6266.

The Kiss of Jazz/Trish Hatley Quartet: 5 to 7:30 p.m., The Farmhouse Inn, 13724 La Conner Whitney Road, Mount Vernon. 360-466-4411.

Eli Westin Band (rock, blues): 5 p.m., Anchor Inn Tavern, 1920 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-293-9948.

Spoonshine Duo: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-588-1720.


E10 Thursday, July 12, 2012

ON STAGE in the Skagit Valley and surrounding area July 12-21 Thursday.12 THEATER

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: Island Stage Left, 8:30 p.m., Roche Harbor Outdoor Stage, San Juan Island. Free. Donations appreciated. Bring a blanket and dress warmly. www.islandstageleft.org.

Friday.13 MUSIC

Clandestine: Highland Games Kickoff Concert: 7 p.m., Edgewater Park, 600 Behrens Millet Road, Mount Vernon. Free. Bring a nonperishable food donation to benefit the Skagit Food Bank. 360-416-4934 or www.celticarts.org.

THEATER

“No Sex Please, We’re British”: comedy, 7 p.m., RiverBelle Theatre, The Old Town Grainery, 100 E. Montgomery, Mount Vernon. $30, includes dessert buffet and show. Reservations required: 360-336-3012 or www.riverbelledinnertheatre.com. “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: Island Stage Left, 8:30 p.m., Roche Harbor Outdoor Stage, San Juan Island. Free. Donations appreciated. Bring a blanket and dress warmly. www.islandstageleft.org.

Saturday.14 THEATER

THEATER

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: Island Stage Left, 8:30 p.m., Roche Harbor Outdoor Stage, San Juan Island. Free. Donations appreciated. Bring a blanket and dress warmly. www.islandstageleft.org.

COMEDY

Jim Breuer: 8 p.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Pacific Showroom, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. $31-$40. 877-275-2448 or www.theskagit.com.

IMPROV

“All My Children”: Improv by Matt Smith, 8 p.m., The Idiom Theater, 1418 Cornwall Ave., Bellingham. Tickets available at the door or in advance at both Bellingham Food Co-ops. $10. 360-756-0756 or www.improvplayworks.com.

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: Island Stage Left, 8:30 p.m., Roche Harbor Outdoor Stage, San Juan Island. Free. Donations appreciated. Bring a blanket and dress warmly. www.islandstageleft.org.

THEATER

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: Island Stage Left, 8:30 p.m., Roche Harbor Outdoor Stage, San Juan Island. Free. Donations appreciated. Bring a blanket and dress warmly. www.islandstageleft.org.

FRIDAYSATURDAY.20-21 JIM BREUER 8 p.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Pacific Showroom, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. $31-$40. 877-275-2448 or www.theskagit.com.

THURSDAY.12 Trish & Hans Quartet: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-588-1720.

THEATER

“A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: Island Stage Left, 8:30 p.m., Roche Harbor Outdoor Stage, San Juan Island. Free. Donations appreciated. Bring a blanket and dress warmly. www.islandstageleft.org.

COMEDY

Jim Breuer: 8 p.m., Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Pacific Showroom, 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow. $31-$40. 877-275-2448 or www.theskagit.com. “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”: Island Stage Left, 8:30 p.m., Roche Harbor Outdoor Stage, San Juan Island. Free. Donations appreciated. Bring a blanket and dress warmly. www.islandstageleft.org.

SUMMER FUNDRAISER FOR RICK EPTING FOUNDATION FOR THE ARTS Savage Jazz Band (pictured), Sabrina y los Reyes, Oscar De La Rosa, 2 to 7 p.m., Heart of Anacortes, 1014 Fourth St., Anacortes. $10. www.rickepting foundation.org.

WES JONES BAND 9 p.m. to midnight, Cyndy’s Broiler, 27021 102nd Ave NW, Stanwood. No cover. 360-6294800 or www. cyndysbroiler.com.

Thursday.19

Friday.20

SUNDAY.15

SATURDAY.14

No events submitted.

Saturday.21

THEATER

TUNING UP Playing at area venues July 12-18

Monday-Wednesday.16-18

“No Sex Please, We’re British”: comedy, 7 p.m., RiverBelle Theatre, The Old Town Grainery, 100 E. Montgomery, Mount Vernon. $30, includes dessert buffet and show. Reservations required: 360-336-3012 or www.riverbelledinnertheatre.com.

Sunday.15

Thursday, July 12, 2012 E11

Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

FRIDAY.13 Jammin’ Jeff (country, rock): 8 p.m. to midnight, Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-422-6411.

Beach Boys 50th Anniversary Tour: 7 p.m., Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. $69.50$125. 800-745-3000 or ticketmaster.com.

Rock Classix (pop): 9 p.m. to midnight, Cyndy’s Broiler, 27021 102nd Ave NW, Stanwood. No cover. 360-629-4800 or www.cyndys broiler.com.

Rivertalk (world music): 7 p.m., Eagle Haven Winery, 8243 Sims Road, SedroWoolley. Bring a chair or blanket to sit on. $8 cover. 360-8566248 or www.eagle havenwinery.com.

Sister Wives: 9 p.m. to midnight, Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-588-1720.

The Ames, Kelli’s Starlight Wishes: 10 p.m. to midnight, Redlight, 1017 N. State St., Bellingham. $5. www.redlightwine andcoffee.com.

Jambrewrie (open jam): 7 p.m., Birdsview Brewing Co., 38302 Highway 20, Concrete. No cover. 360-826-3406.

SATURDAY.14 Lane Fernando with The Pull and Be Damned Stringband & Heart Lake Owl: 5 to 7:30 p.m., Heart of Anacortes, 1014 Fourth St. $7. Jammin’ Jeff (country, rock): 8 p.m. to midnight, Big Lake Bar & Grill, 18247 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-4226411.

Lyle Lovett & His Large Band: 8 p.m., Mount Baker Theatre, 104 N. Commercial St., Bellingham. $49-$89. 360-7346080 or www.mount bakertheatre.com. Lane Fernando: 8:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-766-6266.

Stout Pounders (Celtic music): 8 p.m., Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St., Mount Vernon. $10. 360-336-8955 or www. lincolntheatre.org.

Chris Eger Band: 9:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m., H2O, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. 360-755-3956 or www.anacortesH2O. com.

Maggie’s Fury: 7 p.m., Skagit River Brewery, 404 S. Third St., Mount Vernon. 360-336-2884.

Wandering Soles: 9:30 p.m., Brown Lantern Ale House, 412 ComThe Twisters: 9 p.m. to The Ascetic Junkies, midnight, Rockfish Grill, Cars & Trains: 10 p.m. to mercial Ave., Anacortes. 320 Commercial Ave., midnight, Redlight, 1017 No cover. 360-293-2544. Anacortes. No cover. N. State St., Bellingham. 360-588-1720. $5. www.redlightwine andcoffee.com.

Sola Rosa: 10 p.m., The Shakedown, 1212 N. State St., Bellingham. $6. 360-778-1067. Eli Westin Band (rock, blues): 8:30 p.m., Big Rock Café & Grocery, 14779 Highway 9, Mount Vernon. 360-4247872.

SUNDAY.15 Gary B’s Church of the Blues (blues, classic rock): 6 to 10 p.m., Castle Tavern, 708 Metcalf St., Sedro-Woolley. 360855-2263.

Wes Jones Band (honky-tonk): 9 p.m. to midnight, Cyndy’s Broiler, 27021 102nd Ave NW, Stanwood. No cover. 360-629-4800 or www. cyndysbroiler.com.

WEDNESDAY.18 Station House Jam with Rich Rorex, Terry Nelson and friends: 4 to 8 p.m., The Station House, 315 Morris St., La Conner. No cover. 360-466-4488.

Summer Fundraiser for Rick Epting Foundation for the Arts: Savage Jazz Band, Sabrina y los Reyes, Oscar De La Rosa: 2 to 7 p.m., Heart of Anacortes, 1014 Fourth St., Anacortes. $10. www. rickeptingfoundation.org.

Orville Johnson: 5:30 p.m., Edison Inn, 5829 Cains Court, Edison. No cover. 360-766-6266.

The Kiss of Jazz/Trish Hatley Quartet: 5 to 7:30 p.m., The Farmhouse Inn, 13724 La Conner Whitney Road, Mount Vernon. 360-466-4411.

Eli Westin Band (rock, blues): 5 p.m., Anchor Inn Tavern, 1920 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-293-9948.

Spoonshine Duo: 6 to 9 p.m., Rockfish Grill, 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. No cover. 360-588-1720.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E12 - Thursday, July 12, 2012

TRAVEL

PAPER MAPS

Amid GPS boom, nostalgia finds a place By BARBARA RODRIGUEZ Associated Press

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Used to be, Dad would stuff a half-dozen maps in the glove box before setting out with the family on a road trip to see the waterfalls at Yosemite or the granite faces of Mount Rushmore. Colorful maps bearing the logos of the oil companies that printed them — names like Texaco, Gulf, Esso — once brimmed from displays at filling stations, free for the taking. But for the millions of Americans traveling by car for vacation this summer, a good chunk will probably reach for technology before they’re tempted to unfold — and in a tradition that used to bind Americans as tightly as a highway cloverleaf, try to refold — a paper road map. Websites like MapQuest and Google Maps simplify trip planning. Affordable GPS devices and built-in navigation on smartphones downright transformed it — and transportation agencies around the country are noticing, printing fewer maps to cut department costs or just acknowledging that public demand is down. The drop in sales began around 2003, when affordable GPS units became the

go-to Christmas present, said Pat Carrier, former owner of a travel bookstore in Cambridge, Mass. “Suddenly, everyone was buying a Garmin or a TomTom,” he said. “That’s the year I thought, ‘Oh, it’s finally happened.’” Transportation departments around the country are in the middle of reprioritizing their spending amid times of falling revenue, and paper maps could be on the chopping block, said Bob Cullen, spokesman for the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials. “Just based on the current climate, there have been some cuts,” he said. “I would expect map printing to be one area that’s been targeted.” In late June, at the annual exposition of the Road Map Collectors Association in Dublin, Ohio, collector Terry Palmer was selling some of his beloved maps. The 65-year-old from Dallas, wore a T-shirt with intricate route lines of the United States on his chest, back and arms. “The GPS of course now being so available, a lot of new cars are coming out with built-in GPS. People are utilizing those, and they don’t want a road map,” he said. “A lot of the younger

Photos by Amy Sancetta / AP

A scant rack of road maps is seen at a gas station/mini-mart in Solon, Ohio. Colorful maps bearing the logos of the oil companies that printed them — names like Texaco, Gulf, Esso — once brimmed from displays at filling stations, free for the taking. generation, they’re used to having their phone, and they don’t need a road map to figure out where to go.” In Georgia, officials are printing about 1.6 million maps to cover a two-year period — less than half of what they were printing a decade ago. In Pennsylvania, where officials say public demand has gone down, about 750,000 maps are being printed — way down from more than 3 million in 2000. Officials in Oklahoma and Ohio also say map printing is down, and Washington state discontinued them altogether by 2009 because of budget shortA traditional road map of the Pittsburgh area and one showing the same region on an iPad. falls.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, July 12, 2012 - E13

TRAVEL But in other states, printing has remained steady because maps remain popular at visiting centers. In Missouri, officials say they’re printing about 1.5 million maps for a two- to three-year period, consistent with printing from a decade ago. Officials in Connecticut, Mississippi and Nebraska also say printing has remained the same. It’s unclear why some states are affected more than others. Some speculate certain regions affect how people travel there. In Delaware, for example, officials attributed a jump in printing of about 100,000 maps to people visiting beach areas and renewed real-estate interest. There’s a universal theme to paper road maps, especially for baby boomers traveling after retirement, said Kevin Nursick, spokesman for Connecticut’s transportation department. Paper maps, he said, offer an experience that dead batteries and unreliable service connections cannot. “Simpler times are something everyone yearns for. And maybe looking at a map takes you back,” he said. “The technology is neat, but on a personal level, there’s a sense of nostalgia when you look at the paper map. A lot of people are yearning for simpler times.” At the collectors’ association exposition, a carpeted ballroom at an Embassy Suites hotel outside Columbus featured old road maps for sale, and gave collectors a glimpse into an era of romanticized advertising — brightly colored paper maps promising the sunny beaches of Florida, the

mountains of Montana and Chicago’s famous skyline. Free roadside maps boomed between the 1920s and 1970s, when oil companies worked with a handful of publishers. As major highways were being built, those maps became synonymous with the possibilities of the open road. Dick Bloom, a founding member of the group, has been collecting maps since he was 10. The retired airline pilot from Danville, Ky., said there used to be an element of surprise in road trips. “The paper map was all you had back then,” Bloom, 74, said from his merchandise table. “It was the only way to get around. It was a lot more of an adventure back then. Life was much more of an adventure.” Transportation agencies aren’t the only ones printing paper road maps. Companies like AAA and Rand McNally have been in the business for decades and are just as synonymous with trip planning. Members of AAA, whose services are fully integrated online and include a TripTik mobile app, requested more than 14 million paper guides in 2010, spokeswoman Heather Hunter said. The number of paper maps AAA prints has declined, but she wouldn’t go into detail. Rand McNally is known for its road atlases but also offers an interactive travel website and GPS devices; it declined to comment on how many maps it’s printing these days. Carrier, now a consultant in the mapping and travel publishing industry, said the additional services from traditional mapping companies show the incredible

potential in the industry. 23, or stop by the museum.www.whale “There’s no question museum.org. in the U.S. that traditional MEANINGFUL TRAVEL: Author Joyce road maps are diminished,” WHATCOM MUSEUM HISTORY SUNSET Major will present “My Top 10 Inexpensive he said. “But there are CRUISE: 6 to 8:30 p.m. Thursdays, July International Volunteer Vacations” at 7 other areas of the map 19-Aug. 30, departing from Squalicum p.m. Tuesday, July 17, at Village Books, Harbor, 2621 S. Harbor Loop Drive, Bellindustry that are thriving 1200 11th St., Bellingham. Major has traveled around the world volunteering on ingham. Tour guide Brian Griffin will lead a and even growing.” fun, informative evening on board the 110restoration, conservation, sustainability Charlie Regan, who foot tour boat Island Caper. Bring binocuprojects and more. Free. 360-671-2626 or runs the maps division for lars, warm layers and a picnic dinner. $35, www.villagebooks.com. National Geographic, said $30 museum members. 360-778-8963 or the company has sold more WILDLIFE TOURS: Join The Whale Muse- www.whatcommuseum.org. paper map products in the um for land-based wildlife tours of San past three years than it has Juan Island. The tours run from 2 to 5 p.m. DAY TRIPS: Camano Center is offerFridays July 20 and 27, and Aug. 10, 24 ever sold since launching ing several trips for seniors and others, and 31, beginning at The Whale Museum, departing from and returning to Camano the division in 1915. He 62 First St., Friday Harbor. A certified natu- Center, 606 Arrowhead Road, Camano attributed it to customers ralist will escort you via shuttle to the west Island. 360-387-0222 or www.camano learning to appreciate good side of San Juan Island, where you will center.org. map data — and also noted have the opportunity to see killer whales, if Lemay Car Museum, Tacoma: Monday, that sales of international present, and learn about the biology, social Aug. 6. Check out one of the best collecstructure, culture, endangered status and maps have remained contions of vintage, classic and custom autos threats of the Southern Resident killer in the country. $33-$38. Pay by July 20. sistent, and that sales of whales. You may also see Dall’s and harKing Tut Exhibit at the Pacific Science recreational hiking maps bor porpoises, seals, sea lions, humpback Center: Thursday, Aug. 9. Last stop for are on the rise. whales, minke whales, bald eagles and the exhibit before leaving the U.S. Price “It’s almost like a golden various species of seabirds. Stops may includes transportation and exhibit ticket. age in mapping. More include Lime Kiln Point State Park, historic $40-$45. people than ever before American Camp and Cattle Point to explore the world of intertidal invertebrates, tides SHORT TRIPS: Mount Vernon Parks and in history are using maps permitting. The tours are free, but reserva- Recreation offers several travel opportunievery day,” he said. “For tions are required. Call 360-378-4710, ext. ties. 360-336-6215. me, that’s fantastic, and it’s an opportunity.” SVH_4.949x4.75_ JULY What most people agree on is that paper road maps will not go away quietly, like pay phones and phone Paying Out Up To $7.2 Million books. Chris Turner, a collector from Jeffersonville, Ind., shook his head at the notion of paper maps becoming obsolete. “With a GPS or other mapping system that you might use, you feel like you’re beholden to the GPS lady. You know? ‘Turn CASH DRAWING left here. Recalculating.’ Well, with a map, you can SUNDAY - JULY 29 HOT SEAT DRAWING HOT SEAT DRAWING trace your route and you (5) $100 Winners at 11AM TUESDAYS 7PM WEDNESDAYS and 3PM session and (10) can decide for yourself still JULY 3, 10, 17, 24 & 31 JULY 4, 11, 18 & 25 $100 Winners at 7PM where you want to go. session. Guests will receive (2) Winners drawn each (2) Winners drawn at each “And if you want to vary entry forms July 1 - July 28 to be session and each winner will session halftime. Each winner will from the GPS lady, so be deposited in drawing bin located choose a “Star” to choose a pair of “Sunglasses” in front of the callers stand. determine prize. to determine prize. it,” he said. Winners must be present and “But you’re armed with Winners must be present and Winners must be present and playing with a valid bingo playing with a valid bingo playing with a valid bingo that knowledge from that receipt to claim prize. receipt to claim prize. receipt to claim prize. No Seat Hopping Allowed. No Seat Hopping Allowed. No Seat Hopping Allowed. map to do that.”

Local travel

JULY AT TULALIP BINGO

$2,500 STAR

n Follow Barbara Rodriguez at http://twitter.com/ bcrodriguez

Please recycle this newspaper

$2,000

$2 OFF BINGO Any 11AM or 3PM Session

MADE IN THE SHADE

Bring in this ad and receive $2 Off any 11AM or 3PM Session

1 coupon per guest • Redeem at cashier window - Not valid with any other offer. No cash value. Winners must be present and playing with a valid Bingo receipt or at Bingo Slots to win. No seat hopping allowed. Only original ad will be honored for special offers - no copies. Management reserves the right to cancel or amend promotion at any time.

Valid 7/01/12 - 7/31/12 SVH BNG0712

1-800-631-3313


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E14 - Thursday, July 12, 2012

HOT TICKETS TUTANKHAMUN: Through Jan. 6, 2013, Pacific Science Center, Seattle. 800-664-8775 or www. pacificsciencecenter.org. BEACH BOYS 50TH ANNIVERSARY TOUR: July 13, Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. 800745-3000 or ticketmaster.com. SLASH: July 13, Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.livenation.com. RINGO STARR & HIS ALL STARR BAND: Saturday, July 14, Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster. com. MARINA AND THE DIAMOND: Saturday, July 14, Showbox at the Market, 1426 First Ave., Seattle. 800745-3000 or www.showboxonline. com. RAY DAVIES: July 14, Neptune Theatre, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com. LYLE LOVETT & HIS LARGE BAND: July 14, Mount Baker Theatre, Bellingham. 360-734-6080 or www.mountbakertheatre.com; July 15, Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or www. ticketmaster.com. SLACKFEST: July 14, Slime Dog Race Track, Stanwood. www.face book.com/slackfest. EARTH, WIND & FIRE: July 20, Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or www.ticket master.com. MINT CONDITION: July 20, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-7453000 or www.showboxonline.com. WINTHROP RHYTHM & BLUES FESTIVAL: July 20-22, Blues Ranch, Winthrop. 800-422-3048 or www. winthropbluesfestival.org. JIM BREUER: July 20-21, Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Bow. 877-2752448 or www.theskagit.com. DARRINGTON BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL: July 20-22, Darrington Bluegrass Music Park. 360-436-1006 or www.glacierview.net/bluegrass. FLORENCE + THE MACHINE: July 21, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn. 800-745-3000 or www.live nation.com. CHRIS ISAAK, SHAWN COLVIN: Sunday, July 22, Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. 800745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com. SNOOP DOGG: July 22, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. STEVE MARTIN & THE STEEP CANYON RANGERS, EMMYLOU HARRIS: Tuesday, July 24, Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. 800745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com. THE ANGRY SAMOANS: July 28, El Corazon, Seattle. 800-514-3849 or www.cascadetickets.com. NEIL DIAMOND: July 23, KeyArena, Seattle. www.ticketmaster.com. DIRTY PROJECTORS: July 23,

Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showbox online.com. JOURNEY, PAT BENATAR, NEIL GIRALDO AND LOVERBOY: July 28, Gorge Amphitheatre. 800-745-3000 or www.livenation.com. IRON MAIDEN: July 30, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn. 800745-3000 or www.livenation.com. LAMB OF GOD, DETHKLOK: Aug. 1, WaMu Theatre, Seattle. 800-7453000 or www.ticketmaster.com. MOUNT BAKER R&B FESTIVAL: Aug. 3-5, Deming Log Show Fairgrounds, Bellingham. 360-6769573; 360-757-0270 or www.baker blues.com. Info: 360-383-0850. WATERSHED COUNTRY MUSIC FESTIVAL: Aug. 3-5, Gorge Amphitheatre, George. 800-745-3000 or www.livenation.com. THE LAST SUMMER ON EARTH TOUR: Aug. 3, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 800-745-3000 or www.ticket master.com. ALISON KRAUSS & UNION STATION: Saturday, Aug. 4, Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or www.ticket master.com. VANS WARPED TOUR: Aug. 4, Marymoor Park, Redmond. www. vanswarpedtour.com. AEROSMITH, CHEAP TRICK: Aug. 8, Tacoma Dome. 800-745-3000 or www.livenation.com. DEAD CAN DANCE: Aug. 10, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 800-7453000 or www.ticketmaster.com. KASKADE: Aug. 10, WaMu Theater, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.livenation.com. DEAD CAN DANCE: Aug. 10, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 800-7453000 or www.ticketmaster.com. NICKI MINAJ: Aug. 11, Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or www.livenation.com. ELECTRIC FRANKENSTEIN: Aug. 14, El Corazon, Seattle. 800-5143849 or www.cascadetickets.com. HEART: Aug. 16, Northwest Washington Fair, Lynden. 360-354-7777 or www.nwwafair.com. JOHN ANDERSON: Aug. 17, Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Bow. $28-$37. 877-275-2448 or www.theskagit. com. BILLY CURRINGTON: Aug. 17, Northwest Washington Fair, Lynden. $48-$58. 360-354-7777 or www.nwwafair.com. KISS, MOTLEY CRUE: Aug. 18, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn. 800-745-3000 or www.livenation. com. NORAH JONES: Aug. 18, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 800-7453000 or www.ticketmaster.com. DAVE MATTHEWS BAND: Aug. 31-Sept. 2, Gorge Amphitheatre, George. www.livenation.com or 1-800-745-3000.

AMON TOBIN: Sept. 1, WaMu Theater, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com. DIANA KRALL, DENZAL SINCLAIRE: Sept. 1, Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. 800745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com. UNITY TOUR 2012: Sept. 5, Marymoor Park, Redmond. 800-7453000 or www.ticketmaster.com. LINKIN PARK, INCUBUS: Sept. 5, Tacoma Dome. 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com. PUYALLUP PRO RODEO, JUSTIN BOOTS PLAYOFF: Sept. 7, Puyallup Fair. 888-559-3247 or www.thefair. com/concerts. BLONDIE & DEVO: Sept. 7, Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or www.ticket master.com. WILLIE NELSON: Sept. 7, Puyallup Fair. 888-559-3247 or www.thefair. com/concerts. BONNIE RAITT, MAVIS STAPLES: Sept. 8-9, Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com. HEART: Sept. 10, Puyallup Fair. 888-559-3247 or www.thefair.com/ concerts. MARTINA MCBRIDE: Wednesday, Sept. 12, Puyallup Fair. 800-7453000 or www.ticketmaster.com. TOBYMAC: Sept. 13, Puyallup Fair. 888-559-3247 or www.thefair. com/concerts. JEFF FOXWORTHY: Sept. 14, Puyallup Fair. 888-559-3247 or www.thefair.com/concerts. CROSBY, STILLS & NASH: Sept. 14, Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com. CHICAGO: Sept. 15, Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. 800745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com. HUEY LEWIS AND THE NEWS: Sept. 16, Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery, Woodinville. 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com. BIG TIME RUSH: Sept. 17, Puyallup Fair. On sale 10 a.m. March 10. 888-559-3247 or www.thefair.com/ concerts. ENRIQUE IGLESIAS: Sept. 18, Puyallup Fair. 888-559-3247 or www.thefair.com/concerts. DOOBIE BROTHERS: Sept. 19, Puyallup Fair. 888-559-3247 or www.thefair.com/concerts. JEFF DUNHAM: Sept. 20, Puyallup Fair. 888-559-3247 or www.thefair. com/concerts. TIM MCGRAW: Sept. 22, Puyallup Fair. 888-559-3247 or www.thefair. com/concerts. KREATOR, ACCEPT: Sept. 22, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or showboxonline. com. JASON MRAZ, CHRISTINA PERRI: Sept. 22, The Gorge Amphitheatre. 800-745-3000 or www.livenation.com.

UPROAR FESTIVAL: With Shinedown, Godsmack, Staind, Papa Roach, Adelitas Way and more: Sept. 22, White River Amphitheatre, Auburn. 800-745-3000 or www.live nation.com. TRAIN: Sept. 23, Puyallup Fair. 888-559-3247 or www.thefair.com. FURTHUR, FEATURING PHIL LESH & BOB WEIR: Sept. 25, WaMu Theater, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com. HATEBREED: Sept. 25, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-7453000 or www.livenation.com. “MY FAIR LADY”: Lyric Light Opera: Sept. 29-Oct. 6, McIntyre Hall, Mount Vernon. 360-416-7727. NIGHTWISH: Oct. 1, Showbox SoDo, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com. IL VOLO: Oct. 2, Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 877-784-4849 or www.livenation.com. MADONNA: Oct. 3, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.live nation.com. BEACH HOUSE: Oct. 3-4, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-7453000 or www.showboxonline.com. CITIZEN COPE: Oct. 3, Paramount Theatre, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com. CARRIE UNDERWOOD: Oct. 6, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.ticketmaster.com. JUSTIN BIEBER: Oct. 9, Tacoma Dome. www.AEGLive.com. THE PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA: Oct. 12-13, Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Bow. 877-275-2448 or www.theskagit.com. D.R.I.: Oct. 13, El Corazon, Seattle. 800-514-3849 or www.cascade tickets.com. BOMBAY BICYCLE CLUB: Oct. 21, Showbox at the Market, Seattle, 800-745-3000 or www.livenation. com. MENOMENA: Oct. 26, Showbox at the Market, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.showboxonline.com. “FOOTLOOSE”: Theater Arts Guild, Nov. 3-17, McIntyre Hall, Mount Vernon. 360-416-7727. LEONARD COHEN: Nov. 9, Key Arena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.livenation.com. NEIL YOUNG & CRAZY HORSE: Nov. 10, KeyArena, Seattle. 800745-3000 or www.livenation.com. THE FRESH BEAT BAND: Nov. 10, Comcast Arena, Everett. 866-3328499 or www.livenation.com. RUSH: Nov. 13, KeyArena, Seattle. 800-745-3000 or www.livenation. com. ERIC CHURCH: Nov. 13, Comcast Arena, Everett. 866-332-8499 or www.comcastarenaeverett.com. DON MCLEAN: Nov. 30-Dec. 1, Skagit Valley Casino Resort, Bow. 877-275-2448 or www.theskagit. com.

NEW! DELUXE BURGER W/FRIES ONLY $4.99 11:30-4pm FRIDAY & SATURDAY

PRIME RIB & PASTA DAILY FAMILY SPECIAL: Kids 12 & Under FREE with purchase of an adult meal

THURS NIGHTS:

ALL YOU CAN EAT PRAWNS

FRI 7/13 & SAT 7/14 Jammin' Jeff

422-6411

18247 State Route 9 Mount Vernon

Buy 1 breakfast Get 1 breakfast

FREE!

with purchase of 2 drinks. Offer good 8-10:30am.

NEW OWNERS! NEW HOURS!

Open Daily, 8am - 3pm 15426 Airport Dr.

Burlington 360.707.0348 Limit one per table. Expires 7/31/12.

CONWAY PUB & EATERY

BURGERS • STEAK SEAFOOD • SALADS I-5 Exit 221 360-445-4733

Open 9 AM daily Breakfast Daily Pulltabs Galore VISIT OUR 2ND LOCATION IN STANWOOD! CONWAY BOXCAR

KARAOKE Fri/Sat HAVE YOUR PARTIES HERE!!


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, July 12, 2012 - E15

VOTED BEST OF ANACORTES 12 YEARS RUNNING

THURSDAY 6/12

NO W O PEN! Tues thru Sat 11-8pm Spectacular BBQ Ribs Brisket Sandwiches Salads KIDS MENU

TRISH HATLEY

FRIDAY 6/13

SISTER WIVES

SATURDAY 6/14 THE TWISTERS

ROCKFISH GRILL

Local Food, Local Beer, Made Here 855-0117 • 208 Ferry st Sedro-Woolley www.tonysbbqhouse.com

Fresh Local Strawberries

TRY OUR MONTE CRISTO SANDWICH!

Featuring 24 Handles • Craft Cocktails Live Music • Full Menu

SAT 7/14 - Chris Eger Band 314 Commercial • 360-755-3956

360.466.4411

LaConner Whitney Rd. & Hwy. 20

FULL BAR TAKE OUT GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE

COSTCO

JAPANESE STEAKHOUSE & SUSHI BAR

Exit 229

I-5

ARCO S. Burlington Blvd.

Shortcake Waffles Pies • Shakes Daiquiris

E George Hopper Rd Lighting Universe Japanese Steakhouse Hampton Inn

Sushi & Hibachi - Lunch Happy Hour Every Day Until 3pm

1830 South Burlington Blvd.

(360) 588.4281

www.sakuraburlington.com

Great Food! Great Fun! Bellingham

360.714.1065

Mount Vernon 360.424.5514

Burlington

360.755.9010

Thurs. 7/12 at 7pm - no cover

Fri. 7/13 at 8pm - $10 cover

La Conner

He’s a one-man band

Bluegrass, funk, reggae & rock grooves

Sat. 7/14 at 8pm – $7 cover

BEN sTARNER at the piano

360.466.0267

No time for lunch?

Ask about our Express Lunch Monday-Friday!

$5.99

NICK MOYER

The gREg pITCH Band

Blues, rock & original Americana

www.anacortesrockfish.com 1/2”

A Perfect Dining Experience.

ALL NEW SUMMER MENU! NOW OPEN FOR LUNCH

320 Commercial Ave • 360.588.1720

NEw fORgE

Sun. 7/15 at 6:30pm - no cover

Impressions of gershwin, Joplin & other great American composers

Follow the Fish

3/4”


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E16 - Thursday, July 12, 2012

MOVIES

20th Century Fox via AP

Manny (from left, voiced by Ray Romano), Diego (Denis Leary), Sid (John Leguizamo), Granny (Wanda Sykes) and Shira (Jennifer Lopez) are shown in a scene from “Ice Age: Continental Drift.”

Fourth chapter of ‘Ice Age’ will appeal only to the very young

‘I

ce Age: Continental Drift” will perhaps be a delight for little kids, judging by their friendly reaction at a Saturday morning sneak preview I attended. Real little kids. Real, real little kids. I doubt their parents will enjoy it much, especially after shelling out the extra charge for the 3-D tickets. On the other hand, give the filmmakers their due: This is one movie that, when it says 3-D, it means 3-D. Almost the entire story seems to have been fashioned to provide excuses for its cute prehistoric characters to zoom toward us and away from us and out into space and down to the Earth’s core. It’s a wonder they find time for dialogue in between being jolted into other dimensions. This fourth installment in the

Ice Age series continues its hopeless confusion of geological time on Earth. Our planet’s original great big single continent began to break Roger up and drift apart Ebert into the modern continents a few hundred million years before any of these creatures evolved, but never mind. This is no time to start putting the series to the test of realism. A pre-title sequence, which I vaguely recall appearing in an earlier film in the series, puts the blame for the continental breakup on Scrat the squirrel, who you will recall is obsessed with an acorn. If this is the same acorn we first

saw Scrat pursuing, it is a remarkable nut indeed, having survived a decade’s wear and tear. If it takes Scrat that long to secure one acorn, one wonders how many eons it took him to discover he liked to eat acorns in the first place. For that matter, even this acorn is never eaten; just as well, because I, for one, would sorta miss it, after all it’s been through. My hope is that it survives long enough for evolution to produce oak trees, although don’t get me started on which came first, the acorn or the oak. There are no oak trees to be found in this movie, or indeed much of anything in the way of vegetation. The movie reunites many of the same characters from the earlier films, including Manny the mammoth (voice by Ray Romano), Sid the sloth (John

“We Are Family.” It’s even more hopeful that they think that way, since the carnivores among them have nothing at all to eat but one HH another. Spoiler: The only creaManny................... Ray Romano ture who even tries to eat one of Sid................... John Leguizamo the characters isn’t a mammal, Diego..................... Denis Leary but a fish. In the scale of creature Granny..................Wanda Sykes Shira.................. Jennifer Lopez morality that applies here, apparEllie.................... Queen Latifah ently fish are outlaws. Crash......... Seann William Scott Watching this film was a cheerEddie........................Josh Peck less exercise for me. The charCapt. Gutt........... Peter Dinklage acters are manic and idiotic, the n Running time: 87 minutes. dialogue is rat-a-tat chatter, the MPAA rating: PG (for mild rude action is entirely at the service of humor and action/peril). the 3-D, and the movie depends on bright colors, lots of noise Leguizamo) and Diego the saber- and a few songs in between the toothed tiger (Denis Leary). whiplash moments. But then, I’m Considering Manny is separated not a 10-year-old kid. For that from his family by a breakaway matter, I’m not a 6-year-old kid. I ice floe, it’s a hopeful sign, I sup- imagine 10-year-olds might think pose, that the film succeeds in this was more for their younger ending with a performance of siblings.

‘ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT’


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, July 12, 2012 - E17

MOVIES MINI-REVIEWS Compiled from news services. Ratings are one to four stars. “Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter” — Vowing vengeance after a vampire kills his mother, Abe Lincoln (Benjamin Walker) learns the skills of vampire-killing while a young law student in Springfield and goes on a murder spree, chopping off the heads of six vampires with the silver blade of his ax, which he can twirl like a baton. During the Civil War, the Union faces defeat because the vampires are fighting on the Confederate side, but Lincoln’ quick thinking and vampire expertise turns the tide of battle at Gettysburg. The movie handles these matters with straightforward seriousness, which may be the only way they could possibly work. Action fantasy, R, 105 minutes. HHH “Brave” — The new animation from Pixar poaches on traditional Disney territory. Instead of such inventive stories as “Up” and “WALLE,” we get a spunky princess, her mum the queen, her dad the gruff king, an old witch who lives in the woods and so on. The artistry looks wonderful. Kids will probably love it, but parents will be disappointed if they’re hoping for another Pixar groundbreaker. Animated action, PG, 100 minutes. HHH “Ice Age: Continental Drift” — Will perhaps be a delight for little kids, judging by their friendly reaction at a Saturday morning sneak preview I attended. Real little kids. I doubt their parents will enjoy it much, especially after shelling out the extra charge for the 3-D tickets. In this fourth outing for the franchise, familiar characters are joined by a few new ones as continental drift breaks up families and the 3-D threatens to give them whiplash as they zoom back and forth and up and down. Not recommended for unaccompanied adults. Animated adventure, PG, 87 minutes. HH “Magic Mike” — Steven Soderbergh’s film is a crafty mixture of comedy, romance, melodrama and some remarkably well-staged strip routines involving hunky,

AT THE LINCOLN good-looking guys. I have a feeling women will enjoy it more than men. Channing Tatum stars as the title character, Matthew McConaughey is the no-nonsense impresario, Alex Pettyfer is a kid recruited into the business, and Cody Horn is his protective sister. Starts as a backstage comedy, and enters darker realms. Comedy drama, R, 110 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “Marvel’s The Avengers” — A threat to Earth from the smirking Loki, resentful adoptive brother of the Norse god Thor, causes Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) to assemble all of the Avengers: Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.), Captain America (Chris Evans), the Hulk (Mark Ruffalo), Thor (Chris Hemsworth), Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson) and Hawkeye (Jeremy Renner). Actionadventure, PG-13, 142 minutes. HHH “Men in Black III” — Fifteen years after the original and a decade after the blah sequel, this third installment is the best in the series. Tommy Lee Jones and Will Smith are back as anti-alien Agents K and J, and Josh Brolin has a movie-stealing role as the young Agent K, looking and sounding uncannily like Jones. Comedy adventure, PG-13, 103 minutes. HHH “People Like Us” — A slick salesman from New York (Chris Pine) flies home to LA after the death of his father, and is given a shaving kit holding $150,000 and instructions to deliver it to the half-sister (Elizabeth Banks) he never knew he had. He manages to “meet” her at an AA meeting, befriends her little boy (Michael Hall D’Addario), and confides in her. The movie’s flaw is that he waits so long to reveal their relationship that it stops being a human fact and grows into a tiresome plot device. Still, that aside, a good-hearted and well-intentioned film. Drama, PG-13, 115 minutes HH1⁄2 “Savages” — Oliver Stone’s thriller involves a bloody war between two best buddies in Laguna Beach and the queen of a Mexican drug cartel. A return to form for Stone’s dark side, the movie is a battle between

AT AREA THEATERS ANACORTES CINEMAS July 13-19 The Dark Knight Rises (PG-13): Thursday, 11:59 p.m. Ice Age: Continental Drift (PG): Friday-Thursday: 12:40, 3:10, 6:30, 8:40 The Amazing Spider-Man (PG-13): Friday-Thursday: 12:30, 3:20, 6:10, 8:55 Moonrise Kingdom (PG-13): Friday-Thursday: 12:50, 3:00, 6:20, 8:30 360-293-7000 BLUE FOX DRIVE-IN Oak Harbor 360-675-5667 CASCADE MALL THEATRES Burlington For listings and times, call 888-AMC4FUN (888-262-4386). CONCRETE THEATRE Brave (PG): 7:30 p.m. Friday, July 13; 5 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday, July 14; 4 p.m. Sunday, July 15. Tickets: $6 general admission, $5 adults over 65 and kids under 12; $1 off all tickets on Sunday. 360-941-0403

good and evil, except that everyone in it is evil -- but some are less evil than others, and they all have their good sides. Taylor Kitsch and Aaron Johnson are partners in growing primo pot, Blake Lively is the beach bunny they share, Salma Hayek is the queen of the cartel, Benicio Del Toro is her enforcer and John Travolta is a crooked FDA agent. Violent, ingenious, deceptive and funny, but not too funny. Crime thriller, R, 129 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “Snow White and the Huntsman” — Reinvents the legendary story in a film of astonishing beauty and imagination. It’s the last thing you would expect from a picture with this title. Starring Kristen Stewart, capable and plucky, as Snow White, and Charlize Theron as the evil Queen, with Chris Hemsworth as the Huntsman and Sam Claflin as the loyal Prince William. Fantasy adventure, PG-13, 127 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “Take This Waltz” — Romantic triangle in a dreamy version of Toronto, involving Michelle Williams as the angelic wife of unpublished cookbook author Seth Rogen, and who is slowly and

OAK HARBOR CINEMAS July 13-19 The Dark Knight Rises (PG-13): Thursday: 11:59 p.m. Ice Age: Continental Drift (PG): Friday-Thursday: 1:15), 3:55, 6:20, 8:30 The Amazing Spider-Man (PG-13): Friday-Thursday: 12:45, 3:40, 6:35, 9:30 Ted (R): Friday-Thursday: 1:00, 3:25, 6:50, 9:10 360-279-2226 STANWOOD CINEMAS July 13-19 The Dark Knight Rises (PG-13): Thursday, 11:59 p.m. Ice Age: Continental Drift (PG): Friday-Thursday: 1:10, 3:30, 6:40, 8:45 The Amazing Spider-Man (PG-13): 12:30, 3:20, 6:10, 9:00 Magic Mike (R): Friday-Thursday: 12:40, 3:10, 6:20, 9:10 Ted (R): Friday-Thursday: 12:50, 3:40, 6:30, 8:50 Brave (PG): Friday-Thursday: 1:00, 3:50, 6:50, 9:05 360-629-0514

skillfully seduced by Luke Kirby, an artist and rickshaw puller. A little precious, and how do they afford that neighborhood? Some realism comes in with Sarah Silverman as the husband’s alcoholic sister. Only lovable Williams could make this work. Written and directed by Sarah Polley. Romantic drama, R, 116 minutes. HHH “Ted” — The funniest movie character so far this year is a stuffed teddy bear. And the best comedy screenplay so far is “Ted,” the saga of the bear’s friendship with a 35-year-old man-child. Mark Wahlberg stars as the teddy’s best friend, Mila Kunis is his long-suffering girlfriend, and director Seth McFarlane (“Family Guy”) does Ted’s potty-mouthed Beantown accent. The movie doesn’t run out of steam. McFarlane seems unwilling to stop after the first payoff of a scene and keeps embellishing. (Definitely not for kids.) Comedy, R, 106 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “The Amazing Spider-Man” — The Spider-Man franchise is back for a reboot only 10 years after its first picture and five years after the most recent one. This is a more thoughtful and carefully

written remake of the 2002 original with more attention to the origin story of Peter Parker/Spider-Man. Andrew Garfield and Emma Stone have warm chemistry as Spidey and Gwen, and this new-generation Spidey is more impulsive and takes more chances; sometimes he leaps from buildings with no clear plan in mind. Costarring Rhys Ifans as the city-destroying Lizard, Denis Leary as Gwen’s father the police captain, and Sally Field and Martin Sheen as Aunt May and Uncle Ben. Action, PG-13, 136 minutes. HHH1⁄2 “What to Expect When You’re Expecting” — An all-star comedy about five couples in search of pregnancy. They’re so much in synch that three deliveries and an adoption occur on the same day. The actors are likable, the movie is cheerful, but there’s too much story, and I grew weary of the roundrobin as all the stories were kept updated. With Cameron Diaz, Jennifer Lopez, Elizabeth Banks, Anna Kendrick, Brooklyn Decker, Matthew Morrison, Chace Crawford, Chris Rock and Dennis Quaid. Comedy, PG-13, 109 minutes. HH1⁄2

712 S. First St., Mount Vernon 360-336-8955 www.lincolntheatre.org

‘Re-enactors’

7:30 p.m. Friday, July 13 5:30 p.m. Sunday, July 15 7:30 p.m. Monday, July 16

Enjoy the premiere of the comedy from the Hamer Brothers and ZN Productions. Jed Hankley lives to relive. From Civil War battles to old Western shootouts, Jed stops at nothing to create the most “historical” re-enactments. When Jed is offered his dream job, a temp tour-guide at the Milltown Pioneer Village, he must set aside his differences with his old rival, Douglas MarshallPickett, to create the most “authentic” experience possible. But will Jed and Doug’s hardcore re-enacting standards clash with the cushy lifestyle of the Pioneer Village campers? For Jed and Doug the summer has now become 1866; for the campers, it’s become a living nightmare. The directors and actors will attend the Friday night premiere. $9 general admission, $8 seniors, students and military, $7 members, $6 ages 12 and younger.

‘Lucia De Lammermoor’

6:30 p.m. Wednesday, July 18

Anna Netrebko sings the title role of Donizetti’s bel canto tragedy in her Met role debut, with Piotr Beczala as her lover, Edgardo. Mariusz Kwiecien is her tyrannical brother. Mary Zimmerman’s hit production is staged as a Victorian ghost story. Original transmission: Feb. 7, 2009. $15 general admission, $13 seniors, $11 students and children with $2 member discount.


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

E18 - Thursday, July 12, 2012

OUT & ABOUT ART “IN THE SHADOW OF OLYMPUS”: Jack Gunter’s mock history of the Olympic Peninsula, with art and artifacts, continues through Oct. 7 at the Port Angeles Fine Arts Center, 1203 Lauridsen Blvd., Port Angeles. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday. 360-457-3532 or www.pafac. org. “BIRTHDAY GIRLS”: Small paintings by Anne Martin McCool and jewelry by Debbie Aldrich are featured in a show that continues through July 31 at Anne Martin McCool Gallery, 711 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. McCool’s small paintings have the feeling and tone of the Northwest. Aldrich’s jewelry is made with turquoise, coral and other semi-precious stones and pearls. Work by other gallery artists will also be on display. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday and noon to 4 p.m. Sunday. 360-2933577 or www.mccoolart.com. “OUR WORLD IN FOUR CAMERAS”: The exhibit continues through July 28 at the Allied Arts of Whatcom County Gallery, 1418 Cornwall Ave., Bellingham. The juried show features photos by Kate Henze, Craig Dunstan-McGrail, David Inscho and Tommy Gibson. Their images are all recognizable, but some are abstracted by the angle of the camera, motion, special lenses, filters or digital manipulation. The gallery will continue its Inside the Box Series with Jan Landin’s one-of-akind jewelry pieces, created using silver and semi-precious stones. Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and noon to 5 p.m. Saturday. 360-6768548 or www.alliedarts.org. “DEEP LISTENING”:

workshops, stone carving, discussion about art and more. www.nwssa.org.

Enjoy live music, wine and beer tasting, arts and crafts, children’s activities, food, loganberry pie and more. ARTISTS STUDIO TOUR: Free admission. Parking by Skagit Artists Together will donation. 360-678-7700 or present its ninth annual www.greenbankfarm.com. Open Studio Tour from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday CEMENT CITY STREET and Sunday, July 21-22, at FAIR: The fifth annual cele16 artists’ studios. The free, bration of healthy living and self-guided tour will show- family fun will take place case original works by 23 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturartists, including painters, day, July 28, in downtown sculptors, glass and ceramic Concrete. Enjoy music, movartists, fiber artists and ies, arts and crafts, health more. www.skagitart.com. screens and information, 5K fun run, motorcycle show, “THE STUMP RANCH”: kids’ activities, food and The exhibit will be on dismore. Sponsored by United play through Labor Day General Hospital in collaboat the Concrete Heritage ration with the Concrete Museum, 7380 Thompson Chamber of Commerce and Ave., Concrete. Presented local businesses. Free admisby the Concrete Heritage A show of new work by Amanda Houston continues through July 31 at Scott Milo Association in cooperation sion. 360-853-8784 or www.unitedgeneral.org. Gallery, 420 Commercial Ave., Anacortes. Houston’s brightly colored landscapes with the Skagit County and misty waterscapes will be joined by a collection of summer scenes in oil by Historical Museum, the Joanne Shellan, oils by Keith Sorenson, oils by Lorna Libert, watercolors by Eric LECTURES Wiegardt and acrylics by Jennifer Bowman. Gallery hours are 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 exhibit tells the history of AND TALKS stump ranches in Skagit p.m. Monday through Saturday or by appointment. 360-293-6938 or www.scott County, shares the story of MT. BAKER-SNOQUALMIE milo.com. Pictured: “Coastal Color,” by Amanda Houston. the Tom and Mabel Royal SUMMER SPEAKERS: Free family’s experiences and programs about local history, features a diorama of the where to find the best hikes The show of contemplative original artworks by more with a potluck party from art will run Friday, July 13, than 100 juried artists, along 4:30 to 9 p.m. Saturday, July original Stump Ranch cre- and how to stay safe in the ated by Howard Royal. outdoors are offered on Satthrough Aug. 26 at Gallery with live music, plants, food 14, and continue through Museum hours are noon urdays at the Mt. Baker-SnoCygnus, 109 Commercial Sept. 9 at Matzke Fine Art and more. Free admission. to 4 p.m. Saturdays or by qualmie National Forest’s Ave., La Conner. Gallery & Sculpture Park, www.stanwoodcamanoarts. 2345 Blanche Way, Camano appointment. 360-853-7041 Gold Basin Campground Meet the artists durcom. Island. The show will feature or stumpranchonline.com/ Amphitheater, located 2.5 ing a reception from 3 to 5 concreteheritagemuseum. east of Verlot Public Service p.m. Saturday, July 14. The ARTISTS’ STUDIO TOUR work by 30 artists working Center on the Mt. Loop in a variety of techniques. exhibit reveals an artmaking PREVIEW: Skagit Artists Highway. 360-691-7791 or process that requires a kind Together will present a pre- Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to FESTIVALS of deep listening or medita- view show from 10 a.m. to 6 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday CHILDREN’S ART FESTI- www.fs.usda.gov/mbs. Next up: tion. Artists include Heidi p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. to or by appointment. 360-387- VAL: The 28th annual event July 14: History and Epstein, Jules Faye, Marilyn 4:30 p.m. Sunday, July 14-15, 2759 or www.matzkefineart. will take place from 10 a.m. Frasca, Theodora Jonsson, in the schoolhouse building com. to 4 p.m. Saturday, July 21, at High Technology, 8 p.m., Fred Crueger, Granite Falls Natalie Niblack, Elizabeth at Christianson’s Nursery Hillcrest Park, 1717 S. 13th Historical Society. STONE CARVERS ARTTapper and Maggie Wilder. and Greenhouse, 15806 Best St., Mount Vernon. Enjoy July 21: How to Pan Gallery hours are noon to 5 Road, Mount Vernon. Check WALK: The Northwest children’s entertainment, 30 Gold and Prospecting p.m. Friday through Sunday. out examples of the artwork Stone Sculptors Associabooths with hands-on arts tion’s annual Artwalk show and crafts, face-painting, free Equipment, 7 p.m., Debbie 360-708-4787 or www.gallery that will be on display durLueder, Washington Proscygnus.com. ing Skagit Artists Together’s and sale will take place balloons and more. Bring a from 1 to 5 p.m. Saturday, ninth annual Open Studio picnic or buy food from one pectors Mining Association. July 21: Along the Trail: ART BY THE BAY: The Tour, set for 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. July 21, at Camp Brotherof the vendors. Free admisHikes Around Darrington hood, 24880 Brotherhood Stanwood Camano Arts Saturday and Sunday, July sion. 360-336-6215. Ranger District, 8 p.m., Road, near Mount Vernon. Guild will present the 20th 21-22. Free. www.skagitart. The show is part of the annual event from 10 a.m. to com. LOGANBERRY FESTIVAL: Wilderness Ranger Matt Riggen. NWSSA’s 25th annual 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, The annual festival is set July 28: Gold Panning symposium, where stone July 14-15, at the Stanwood“SUMMER MOMENTS: for 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturcarvers from the Pacific Camano Community FairGLASS, METAL, STONE day and Sunday, July 21-22, 101, 7 p.m., Eras Gattshall, Everett Chapter Gold Northwest and beyond will at Greenbank Farm, 765 grounds, 6431 Pioneer High- AND NORTHWEST PAINTProspectors Association. INGS”: The exhibit will open gather for eight days of way, Stanwood. Check out Wonn Road, Greenbank.

OILS AND PASTELS


Skagit Valley Herald / goskagit.com

Thursday, July 12, 2012 - E19

OUT & ABOUT FILM SCREENING: Skagit MoveOn and Living Democracy will host the movie “Heist” at 7 p.m. Thursday, July 19, at the Anacortes Public Library, 1220 10th St. The documentary presents the view of who is dismantling the “American Dream” and what we can do about it. Free. 360-424-4264. “HOLY LAND, WHOSE LAND?: MODERN DILEMMA, ANCIENT ROOTS”: 7 p.m. Wednesday, July 25, Anacortes Public Library, 1220 10th St. Author Dorothy Drummond will discuss how the conflicting claims of the Israelis and the Palestinians for the same real estate arose and the peacepreventing issues. Free. 360293-1910, ext. 21, or library. cityofanacortes.org.

MUSIC AMERICAN ROOTS CONCERT SERIES: Discover the roots of American music at a series of free summer concerts at 7 p.m. Saturdays in the West Beach amphitheater at Deception Pass State Park. If it is raining, concerts will be moved to the East Cranberry Lake picnic shelter. Discover Pass required for Park admission. 360-675-3767. Next up: July 14: Phil and Vivian Williams, traditional fiddle tunes and string music from the Northwest and Oregon Trail. July 21: La Famille Léger, Acadien and Quebecois house music from eastern Canada. SINGING AND BARBECUE: The 57th annual AnO-Chords Summer Show is set for 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, July 27-28, at Brodniak Hall, Anacortes High School, 1600 20th St., Anacortes. The show will feature The Humdingers (aka the Dapper Dans at Walt Disney World in

Saturday, July 14: “Spy Kids 4”: Kiwanis Park, 500 S. 18th St. Friday, July 27: “Bolt”: Bakerview Park, 3101 E. Fir St.

‘ALWAYS A SELF-PORTRAIT’

A show of paintings, prints and sculptures by Anne Belov and Sharon Spencer continues through Aug. 1 at Rob Schouten Gallery, 765 Wonn Road, Greenbank. Inspired by a poem of the same name, the show features Belov’s vibrant paintings and hand-pulled prints, and Spencer’s quiet, powerful sculptures. The gallery is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. 360-2223070 or www.robschoutengallery.com. Pictured: “Exuberance” by Anne Belov. Orlando), The Jaybirds and the An-O-Chords. $16-$25. Senior discount available Friday only. Proceeds benefit local school vocal music programs. The An-O-Chords Famous Salmon Barbecue and Amateur Barbershop Quartet Contest will take place from noon to 4 p.m. Sunday, July 29, in Washington Park, 6300 Sunset Ave., Anacortes. Salmon dinner: $13. Kids’ hot dog meal: $7. 360-679-7473 or www. anochords.org.

250 independent bookstores are hosting “Find Waldo” contests around the country. Pick up a list of participating businesses at Next Chapter Bookstore, 721 S. First St., La Conner, then collect an “I Found Waldo” card for each Waldo you spot around town. Eight cards will earn a button from Next Chapter Books; 16 will win a button and an entry for a prize drawing on July 31. There’s no charge to participate. 360-466-2665.

MOVIES IN THE PARKS: Mount Vernon Parks & WHERE’S WALDO?: The Recreation will present free famous fellow in the striped movies this summer in parks around Mount Vernon. shirt and black-rimmed Movies begin at dusk. Festispecs will visit 20 different val seating. Limited vendors La Conner businesses during July. If you spot him, you on-site. No pets. For information, call 360-336-6215 or can win prizes, including buttons, books and more. In email mvparks@mount celebration of Waldo’s 25th vernonwa.gov. Next up: birthday, his publisher and

MORE FUN

from 6 to 9 p.m. Free. 360293-1918.

GOLF AND WINE: The 25th annual EDASC Golf and Wine Festival will take place Friday, July 27, at “B IS FOR BEER”: Enjoy Avalon Golf Links, 19345 Kelleher Road, Burlington. an evening with novelist The day will begin with a Tom Robbins from 6:30 to 10 p.m. Saturday, July 14, at scramble format golf tournament with food and beverthe Children’s Museum of Skagit County, located inside ages, hole contests and more. The evening wine festival the Cascade Mall, Burlingwill feature food, wine-tastton. Robbins will offer a reading and book signing of ing, music, raffles and more. “B is for Beer: A Children’s Registration: $560 foursome, Book for Grown-ups and A includes golf tournament and wine festival admission. Grown-up Book for Chil$50 wine festival only. Limdren.” A selection of Robbins’ books will be available ited sponsorships available. Proceeds benefit EDASC for purchase. Adults only. programs. For information $65, $100 couple. Includes or to register, call 360-336local brews and appetizers. 6114 or visit www.skagit.org. Proceeds will benefit the Children’s Museum. 360SUMMER FILM SERIES: 757-8888 or www.skagit Enjoy free film screenings childrensmuseum.net. at 7 p.m. Fridays at the AnaKIDS DAY AT THE MARI- cortes Public Library, 1220 10th St., Anacortes. Nick NA: 1 to 3 p.m. Saturday, Alphin, an Oscar nominee July 14, Cap Sante Boat Haven, Anacortes. Kids can and voting member of the check out wild critters from Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences, will introPredators of the Heart, a duce each film with facts and bouncy house, ice cream sandwiches and more. Free. anecdotes about the actors, 360-293-3134 or www. directors, studios and more. portofanacortes.com. 360-293-1910, ext. 21, or library.cityofanacortes.org. CONCRETE YOUTH Next up: ACTIVITY DAY: The fifth July 27: “Mutiny on annual event will take the Bounty.” Clark Gable place from 12:30 to 4:30 stars as firstmate Fletcher p.m. Thursday, July 19, at Christian against Charles Silo Park, Concrete. Enjoy Laughton as the brutal Capgames, entertainment, tain Bligh aboard the HMS resource booths, food, an Bounty. Oscar winner for outdoor family movie and Best Picture. more. Kids can enter a skateboard competition BITE OF SKAGIT: The from 12:30 to 2 p.m. Free fourth annual Bite of Skagit admission. 360-419-3307. to benefit the Skagit Food Share Alliance (SFSA) will SKATEFEST: Check out be held from noon to 4 p.m. some of the area’s best Saturday, July 28, on First skateboarders from 5 to 9 Street in Mount Vernon. p.m. Friday, July 20, at Ben Enjoy local restaurants, live Root Skate Park, 2313 R music, beer and wine garden, Ave., Anacortes. Registraand the Best Bite of 2012 tion begins at 5 p.m., folcontest. Free admission. lowed by skateboard demFood and beverage tickets onstrations and competition are $1 each, with the aver-

age bite between two to four tickets each. Nonperishable food donations will be accepted. For more information, contact Susan Lanahan at 360-685-4005 or slanahan @northcoastcu.com. BARK FEST: The second annual event will take place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, July 28, at the Mount Vernon Dog Park at Bakerview Park, 3101 E. Fir St., Mount Vernon. Bring your four-legged friends for doggie cake walks, agility demonstrations, pet-licensing information, Canine Good Citizen testing and more. Free admission. 360-3366215. MOTORCYCLE POKER RUN: The third annual Yellow Ribbon Troop Support Motorcycle Poker Run is set for 7 a.m. Saturday, July 28, at Coho Liquidation, 408 Metcalf St., Sedro-Woolley. Breakfast will be served by Hottie Tottie Deli. The End of Day Party will be with Eagles in Flight in Concrete, with food at the Sissy Bar and live music from Pain ‘N Full. $20 for bike and rider, $15 passengers. Includes breakfast, End of Day Party and one poker hand. Additional hands may be purchased on the day of the event for $5. Up to two extra cards may be purchased for each hand for $1 per card. Proceeds will benefit the Sedro-Woolley Community Troop Support 2012 Christmas Care Package Campaign. Register online until noon, Friday, July 27, or the morning of the event. First 50 registrations will receive a Biker Gift Bag. info@ swcommunitytroopsupport. com. n To submit an item for Thursday’s 360 section, send the information in writing to P.O. Box 578, Mount Vernon, WA 98273, or email: features@skagitvalleyherald. com or by fax: 360-428-0400.


T H U R S D AY , J U LY 1 2

MORE WINNERS MORE REWARDS

TICKETSST! GOING FA Saturday Night Live Comedian/Alumni

JIM BREUER Friday & Saturday, July 20 & 21 at 8 pm

UP TO

IN TRUCKS 'N BUCKS!*

ALL THE TIME!

TM

On I-5 at Exit 236 theskagit.com 877-275-2448

W I N A 2012 C H E V R O L E T C O L O R A D O !

Cash & Prize Drawings: Hourly, 2 – 8 pm

8 pm Grand Prize Drawings:

CHEVY COLORADO – 1 WINNER $5,000 CASH – 2 WINNERS

$500 SLOT TICKET – 4 WINNERS

Display vehicles courtesy of Blade Chevrolet, Mount Vernon. Photos are representative of prize makes & models. Colors, trim levels and options may vary.

Blackened Pacific Salmon Sunday – Thursday, 5 - 9 pm

Grammy Nominee & CMA Horizon Winner

J OHN ANDERSON Friday, August 17 at 7 & 9:30 pm

Open for Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Daily, 7 am – 1:30 pm • Sunday – Thursday, 5 – 9 pm Friday & Saturday, 5 – 10 pm

Singer/Songwriter & Grammy Nominee

JOAN O SBORNE Friday & Saturday,

September 21 & 22 at 8 pm Owned by Upper Skagit Indian Tribe

Casino opens at 9 am daily. Must be 21 or older with valid ID to enter casino, buffet or attend shows. *Must be a Rewards Club Member – Membership is FREE! Must be present to win. Visit Rewards Club Center for details. Management reserves all rights.

SVH-AE

12

$ 95 Only with your Rewards Club Card!

$15.25 without Rewards Card. Tax and gratuity not included.

Rewards SAVE 10 % with your Club Card!

WA: 800-745-3000 theskagit.com Buy Show Tickets Service Charge Free at the Casino Cashier Cage


360: Arts - Entertainment - Recreation