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HONORING REAR ADMIRAL MAURICE H. RINDSKOPF, USN (RET.) Class of 1938

ADMIRAL THOMAS B. HAYWARD, USN (RET.) Class of 1948

MR. RALPH W. HOOPER Class of 1951

ADMIRAL LEIGHTON W. SMITH JR., USN (RET.) Class of 1962

he U.S. Naval Academy has a proud tradition of graduating leaders of great character. From this field of superior leaders, a handful of graduates of distinction are chosen annually to receive the U.S. Naval Academy Alumni Association Distinguished Graduate Award. The Distinguished Graduate Award is given to a living graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy whose character, distinguished military and civilian service and stature draw wholesome comparison to the qualities that the U.S. Naval Academy strives for in keeping with its ideals of duty, honor, loyalty and integrity. As well, throughout their lifetime, the individuals have exhibited the core values of the United States Navy and Marine Corps: honor, courage and commitment. The Award identifies to the public the broad national significance of the Naval Academy as one of the nation’s cherished institutions. Serving as role models for the Brigade of Midshipmen, recipients of the Distinguished Graduate Award have demonstrated a strong interest in supporting the Navy and the U.S. Naval Academy; have provided a lifetime of service to the nation or Armed Forces; and have made significant and distinguished contributions to the nation via their lifetime of public service. They are the living embodiment of the Academy’s mission to develop leaders to “assume the highest responsibilities of command, citizenship and government.” We honor these four individuals for the principles they stand for—today and always.

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PROGRAM Medal Presentation 4 p.m. Introduction of Distinguished Graduates for 2007 Invocation March On of the 15th and 25th Companies March On of the Colors The National Anthem Post the Colors Manual of Arms Reports Welcome and Remarks Vice Admiral Rodney P. Rempt ’66, USN Superintendent, U.S. Naval Academy Presentation of Distinguished Graduate Award Medals Admiral Carlisle A.H. Trost ’53, USN (Ret.) Chairman of the Board, U.S. Naval Academy Alumni Association and Midshipman Captain Jade M. Baum ’07 Brigade Commander Remarks Distinguished Graduate Awardees of 2007 Three Cheers Navy Victory March “God Bless America” U.S. Naval Academy Gospel Choir Navy Blue & Gold Retire the Colors Departure of the Official Party


REAR ADMIRAL MAURICE H. RINDSKOPF, USN (RET.) Distinguished Graduate Award—2007

Class of 1938 aurice Herbert Rindskopf was born in Brooklyn, New York, as America entered World War I. As he entered the U.S. Naval Academy with the incoming Class of 1938, Europe again faced war. He excelled in academics as well as sports, playing on the National Championship Lacrosse team of 1938. The Lucky Bag noted that “Mike” had never played lacrosse before arriving at Annapolis, and his mastery of the sport “shows his will to succeed and his wish to tackle something new.” After graduation, Rear Admiral Rindskopf served in the surface fleet aboard USS Colorado (BB 45), but had his sights set on becoming a submariner. He graduated Submarine School in the top five percent of his class. He went to the commissioning team of USS Drum (SS 228), serving in numerous capacities to include torpedo and gunnery officer, executive officer and navigator. He participated in every one of more than 1,000 dives the submarine conducted. After nine war patrols, he became the fourth commanding officer of USS Drum at the age of 26—the youngest in his class to command a fleet submarine—and

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completed two more war patrols. Involved in firing 125 torpedoes which sank 15 ships and damaged 11 more, USS Drum was eighth in ship tonnage destroyed. On one occasion, after receiving word of the nearby presence of a Japanese ship, the young commander donned a yellow aloha shirt as the Drum pursued, attacked and sank the enemy vessel. Aloha shirts became a tradition for the crew to wear when the submarine was on the hunt, as he instilled in his shipmates a contagious and exemplary will to win. Admiral Rindskopf considers his time aboard USS Drum as the most meaningful tour of his career. His bravery and skill earned him the Navy Cross, Silver Star, Bronze Star and other wartime decorations. Following the war, he assisted in the development of modern submarine fire control and tactics. This progress made the submarine the premier antisubmarine warfare platform throughout the Cold War. He commanded two submarine flotillas and pioneered the concept of hydrofoil craft as he directed Harbor Defense for the Navy. Admiral Rindskopf brought operational submarine experience to the field of intelligence, serving as director of Naval Intelligence and assistant chief of staff for Intelligence for Commander in Chief, Pacific Fleet, earning the Legion of Merit for his performance. In his last tour, he established the Office of the Deep Submergence Program, which sponsored all deep diving submersibles and enhanced the Navy’s knowledge of the oceans. Active in business and national security issues during his retirement, Admiral Rindskopf was a founding member of the national Naval Submarine League. Living in Annapolis, not far from the Yard, he has been a tireless supporter of his alma mater and has served as President of the Class of 1938 for 14 years. He is an active leader of the U.S. Naval Academy Alumni Association, serving as a Trustee, and helping to establish the Council of Class Presidents. In 1984, Admiral Rindskopf, along with his classmates, endowed a Leadership Forum which continues today with his participation, benefiting not only the Brigade of Midshipmen, but seven military colleges and 17 universities. Admiral Rindskopf is married to the former Sylvia Lubow of New London, Connecticut. In April 2007, they will celebrate their 66th wedding anniversary. They have one grandchild and two great-grandchildren. Admiral Rindskopf is a man of enormous talent, energy and determination whose prowess beneath the sea and contributions above it has helped to preserve this country’s freedom.


ADMIRAL THOMAS B. HAYWARD, USN (RET.) Distinguished Graduate Award—2007

Class of 1948 homas B. Hayward was born in Glendale, California, in 1924— a carefree time in America. Nineteen years later, with his country at war, Admiral Hayward was called to active duty as a Naval aviation cadet. His driving ambition was to become a fighter pilot. In 1944, with the advice and guidance of his Navy Preflight V 5 instructors, he competed for a slot at the U.S. Naval Academy and was accepted. This was the launching of a long and rewarding career. At the Academy, Admiral Hayward impressed everyone he met. Fellow midshipman William Crowe would recall years later that “even then he possessed the marks of an exceptional individual.” The Lucky Bag noted that “anything tickling the funny bone would be sure to bring out the abundant sense of humor possessed by this genial ambassador from the West Coast.” The Class of 1948, like other wartime classes, graduated early. Admiral Hayward reported to the carrier USS Antietam (CV 36) and served for two years as a “black shoe” engineer before reporting to flight training to resume his true career ambition. On winning his

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Wings of Gold, Admiral Hayward reported to Fighter Squadron 51. He entered the Naval Academy during one war and completed his training just in time to defend his country in another, on the Korean Peninsula. In the next three years, with more than two of them deployed to Korea, he flew 146 missions from the carriers USS Essex (CV 9) and USS Valley Forge (CVA 45), earning the Distinguished Flying Cross, 10 air medals and three Commendation Medals with Combat V. The battle tested veteran took on increased responsibilities assuming command of Fighter Squadron 103 and later Attack Carrier Air Wing Ten which Admiral Hayward reformed into an all attack wing deployed to a new hot spot—Vietnam. He flew 36 combat missions from USS Intrepid (CV 11), earning the Legion of Merit and three air medals. In 1969, he commanded the attack carrier USS America (CV 66) which deployed to Vietnam and was selected for Rear Admiral. More responsibilities followed. In 1975,Vice Admiral Hayward assumed command of the Seventh Fleet. A year later, Admiral Hayward served as Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet. In 1978, Admiral Hayward became Chief of Naval Operations and a member of the Joint Chiefs. His four year tenure was marked by a surge in pride and professionalism within the ranks, an increase in fleet readiness and a bold zero tolerance drug policy that stopped a growing problem in its tracks. In retirement, Admiral Hayward became chairman of the Ethics Resource Center of America and has worked to promote ethics curriculum and programs. He has actively participated in the establishment of several Navy related museums, including the USS Missouri Foundation and the Military Aviation Museum. He has worked tirelessly for literacy reform in public schools through Voyager Expanded Learning, a company he co-founded in 1994, which now serves well over one million at-risk public school youngsters. Admiral Hayward and his wife, Peggy, are blessed with two children, a grandchild and two great-grandchildren. Admiral Hayward is renowned for his leadership in times of war and peace and respected as an exceptional individual in the service of his country.


MR. RALPH W. HOOPER Distinguished Graduate Award—2007

Class of 1951 alph W. Hooper grew up in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where a devotion for military service and pride in our nation was passed on to him by his father, a sailing ship master who was one of the earliest bomber pilots in World War I, and his mother, an Army nurse, who treated allied soldiers in Paris. After attending the University of Missouri for a year in the Navy Preflight V 5 program, Mr. Hooper entered the U.S. Naval Academy with the Class of 1951. At the Academy, Mr. Hooper pursued his keen interest in sailing by participating in the off shore sailing program. He became midshipman sailing master of the schooner FREEDOM his first class year. The Lucky Bag called him “the boy with all the superlatives… the loudest laugh, the brightest smile.” After graduation, Mr. Hooper served aboard USS Des Moines (CA 134), graduated from submarine school, joined USS Grampus (SS 523) and served as an aide to Vice Admiral Frank Watkins, Commander, Submarine Force, Atlantic Fleet. Mr. Hooper left the Navy in 1956 to assume responsibilities at Interstate Ocean Transport,

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his family business. Over the next 20 years, Mr. Hooper and his brothers built a shipping company that transported more petroleum products than any other U.S. firm. Under his leadership, Interstate Ocean Transport operated tugs, barges and supertankers, as well as managing port facilities—all keeping the nation’s oil line flowing. His service to his country is also evident in a world where great accomplishments achieve critical results, but in the interest of national security, must remain out of the limelight. That’s very much in keeping with Mr. Hooper’s personality. Throughout his life, his quiet deeds have spoken volumes. In addition to managing a major shipping company, Mr. Hooper became president and chairman of Marine Concrete Structures, Inc., and is an owner of the world class St. Lucia resort, Ladera. He has distinguished himself as a patriot whose unselfish use of his resources and executive skills have been focused on giving back to the U.S. Naval Academy in gratitude for the values and education he received as a midshipman. Through the years, he has been a major contributor to the Academy’s Sail Training program and the Robert Crown Sailing Center. The Hooper Foundation was a major supporter of the Academy’s Ship Model collection and Maintenance Fund that cares for this world famous collection of antique dock yard models. Mr. Hooper supports his alma mater in other meaningful ways, tirelessly meeting with young men and women in search of the best and brightest Naval Academy candidates. Many Naval Academy graduates owe their achievement to scholarship funds provided by Mr. Hooper through the Naval Academy Foundation Athletic and Scholarship Program, where he serves as a Trustee, and the Society of Naval Sponsors. Mr. Hooper enjoys spending time with those he loves, including his three daughters and grandson. Looking back over a magnificent career, Mr. Hooper is most proud that he has been able to maintain the standards he learned at the Naval Academy, and to imbue all in his professional life with the fundamentals of loyalty, the burden of duty, the excellence of decisiveness and the absolute necessity of unfettered integrity. Mr. Hooper, a sailor at heart, is a highly respected philanthropist and successful captain of industry whose bold, lifelong journey has served his country’s interests and touched the lives of countless countrymen.


ADMIRAL LEIGHTON W. SMITH JR., USN (RET.) Distinguished Graduate Award—2007

Class of 1962 eighton W. Smith Jr., was born in Mobile, Alabama, on the eve of World War II and entered the U.S. Naval Academy at the height of the Cold War as a member of the Class of 1962. Admiral Smith struggled during plebe year, but in his words, he “got his act together,” realizing his future was up to him, thanks to the leadership of Captain William F. “Bush” Bringle ’37, Commandant of Midshipmen. Academic difficulties, almost resulting in dismissal, brought him before Captain Bringle, where he learned a key lesson which shaped his career and concept of leadership: “It’s all up to you!” This event was the turning point in his life. The Lucky Bag described him as “a gentleman in every sense of the word…always ready with his generous smile and big laugh that was synonymous with Southern hospitality.” After graduation, Admiral Smith headed for flight school, earning his Wings in 1964 and eventually flying three combat tours over Vietnam and the Tonkin Gulf. On 6 October 1972, Lieutenant Commander Smith, now nicknamed “Snuffy,” led a four-plane strike against the famed Thanh Hoa Bridge.

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Despite intense enemy anti-aircraft fire, the division delivered their 2,000 pound bombs precisely on target, knocking out the heavily defended and vital target. For their actions, Admiral Smith and the division were awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. More responsibility followed: command of air wings and major sea commands, including USS Kalamazoo (AOR 6) and USS America (CV 66). Selected for Flag rank in 1986, Admiral Smith served as director of Tactical Readiness, led a battle group and served as director of Operations, U.S. European Command. The Cold War was ending, but the Gulf War loomed. Admiral Smith’s work with European allies, notably Turkey, proved invaluable in that conflict. Appointed Vice Admiral in 1991, Admiral Smith played a key role in shaping America’s evolving naval policy in the post Cold War world. As deputy chief of Naval Operations for Plans, Policy and Operations, he became known for his ability to deal with rapidly changing and complex political and military issues at the highest levels of government. He received his fourth star in 1994, and served as commander in chief, Allied Forces Southern Europe and commander of the NATO Implementation Forces, Bosnia; leading troops from 34 different nations. Admiral Smith has received two Defense Distinguished Service Medals, the Navy Distinguished Service Medal, three Legion of Merit, two Distinguished Flying Crosses, two Meritorious Service Medals and 29 air medals. His international leadership resulted in honors from four allied nations including his recognition as an Honorary Knight of the British Empire. Retiring from active duty in 1996, Admiral Smith has remained active in business, advising major defense companies and consulting on emerging war fighting technologies. He remains a tireless advocate for his alma mater. He served for six years as the Chairman of the Board of Trustees for the U.S. Naval Academy Alumni Association and remains a member. He is a Trustee of the Naval Academy Foundation Athletic and Scholarship Program and serves on the Naval Academy Board of Visitors. Admiral Smith and his wife, Dottie, have a wonderful family—three children and five grandchildren. To this day, his proudest accomplishment is the tenacity he showed in surviving plebe year. He’s better for it—and so is his country! Admiral Smith—A consummate naval officer in times of war and peace—and an inspiration to all who have followed him.


DISTINGUISHED GRADUATE AWARD

he 2007 selection committee was chaired by Admiral Robert J. Natter ’67, USN (Ret.). Members include Mr. James Kinnear ’50; 2001 DGA Captain James Lovell ’52, USN (Ret.); 2000 DGA Major General William Anders ’55, USAFR (Ret.); Admiral Bruce DeMars ’57, USN (Ret.); Dr. William C. Miller ’62, Academic Dean; Lieutenant General Jack Klimp ’68, USMC (Ret.); and George P. Watt Jr. ’73, President and CEO of the U.S. Naval Academy Alumni Association & Foundation.

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PAST AWARDEES

ADMIRAL THOMAS H. MOORER, USN (RET.)

DR. JOHN J. McMULLEN

Class of 1933—DGA 1999 (1912-2004)

Class of 1940—DGA 2000 (1918-2005)

ADMIRAL JAMES L. HOLLOWAY III, USN (RET.)

VICE ADMIRAL WILLIAM P. LAWRENCE, USN (RET.)

Class of 1943—DGA 2000

Class of 1951—DGA 2000 (1930-2005)

MAJOR GENERAL WILLIAM A. ANDERS, USAFR (RET.)

MR. ROGER T. STAUBACH

Class of 1955—DGA 2000

Class of 1965—DGA 2000


CAPTAIN JOHN W. CRAWFORD JR., USN (RET.)

ADMIRAL WILLIAM J. CROWE JR., USN (RET.)

Class of 1942—DGA 2001

Class of 1947—DGA 2001

VICE ADMIRAL JAMES B. STOCKDALE, USN (RET.)

ADMIRAL JAMES D. WATKINS, USN (RET.)

Class of 1947—DGA 2001 (1923-2005)

Class of 1949—DGA 2001

CAPTAIN JAMES A. LOVELL, USN (RET.)

VICE ADMIRAL CHARLES S. MINTER JR., USN (RET.)

Class of 1952—DGA 2001

Class of 1937—DGA 2002

THE HONORABLE JAMES E. CARTER JR.

ADMIRAL CARLISLE A.H. TROST, USN (RET.)

Class of 1947—DGA 2002

Class of 1953—DGA 2002

COLONEL JOHN W. RIPLEY, USMC (RET.)

AMBASSADOR WILLIAM H.G. FITZGERALD

Class of 1962—DGA 2002

Class of 1931—DGA 2003 (1909-2006)


REAR ADMIRAL EUGENE B. FLUCKEY, USN (RET.)

REAR ADMIRAL ROBERT W. McNITT, USN (RET.)

Class of 1935—DGA 2003

Class of 1938—DGA 2003

VICE ADMIRAL WILLIAM D. HOUSER, USN (RET.)

LIEUTENANT GENERAL VICTOR H. KRULAK, USMC (RET.)

Class of 1942—DGA 2003

Class of 1934—DGA 2004

VICE ADMIRAL GERALD E. MILLER, USN (RET.)

VICE ADMIRAL JAMES F. CALVERT, USN (RET.)

Class of 1942—DGA 2004

Class of 1943—DGA 2004

LIEUTENANT GENERAL CHARLES G. COOPER, USMC (RET.)

REAR ADMIRAL RONALD F. MARRYOTT, USN (RET.)

Class of 1950—DGA 2004

Class of 1957—DGA 2004 (1934-2005)

CAPTAIN SLADE D. CUTTER, USN (RET.)

REAR ADMIRAL ROBERT H. WERTHEIM, USN (RET.)

Class of 1935—DGA 2005 (1911-2005)

Class of 1946—DGA 2005


ADMIRAL RONALD J. HAYS, USN (RET.)

MR. H. ROSS PEROT

Class of 1950—DGA 2005

Class of 1953—DGA 2005

CAPTAIN THOMAS J. HUDNER, USN (RET.)

ADMIRAL KINNAIRD R. McKEE, USN (RET.)

Class of 1947—DGA 2006

Class of 1951—DGA 2006

GENERAL ROBERT T. HERRES, USAF (RET.)

ADMIRAL CHARLES R. LARSON, USN (RET.)

Class of 1954—DGA 2006

Class of 1958—DGA 2006

NAVY VICTORY MARCH

NAVY BLUE & GOLD

On Navy Blue and Gold, fight on down the field. Vict’ry for us today, so set your sights for this new fray and hold the foe at bay, Fight! Fight! Fight! On, team, and never rest, ’Till stands high that Navy crest. Carry on Blue and Gold both in thought and action bold, for a Navy victory!

Now colleges from sea to sea May sing of colors true, But who has better right than we To hoist a symbol hue? For Sailors brave in battle fair Since fighting days of old Have proved the Sailor’s right to wear The Navy Blue and Gold.



2007 Distinguished Graduate Award Program