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Serving Lee, Whiteside, Carroll, Ogle and Bureau counties Saturday&Sunday, June 7-8, 2014 $2.00

Amboy clipped in state softball semis HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS, B1

LANDMARK ON DIXON FARM GETS A FACELIFT LOCAL, A9

LOCAL ECONOMY | ANCHOR COUPLING EXIT

Jobs moving to Michigan Sterling, Dixon to lose Caterpillar-owned facilities BY MATT MENCARINI mmencarini@saukvalley.com 800-798-4085, ext. 5529

STERLING – Caterpillar, which owns the Anchor Coupling facilities in Sterling and Dixon, will consolidate and move the plants to Michigan. In early May, the company announced plans to consolidate the plants, but didn’t say where it might relocate operations, other than the possible sites were in North America. In meetings Friday, Caterpillar told employees at the Sauk Val-

ley plants that production and distribution operations would be moved to the Anchor Coupling facility in Menominee, Michigan. Closing the Sauk Valley plants will affect about 170 fulltime employees, according to a Caterpillar new release. The decision was made after a yearlong consolidation study by Caterpillar. Sterling Mayor Skip Lee said that until he was informed of the decision Friday afternoon, he had held out hope that the company would stay.

“It’s a sad day for this SterlingRock Falls area,” he said. “Those are jobs that we can’t afford to lose. The best scenario is people follow the job to Michigan, which takes talent out of the area.” In anticipation of expanded operations, the Menominee plant will add about 120 jobs during the next year, Caterpillar spokeswoman Rachel Potts said. Local employees will have relocation opportunities, she added. JOBS CONTINUED ON A3

Philip Marruffo/pmarruffo@saukvalley.com

Anchor Coupling plants in Sterling and Dixon will be closed in early 2015 and operations will be moved to Menominee, Mich., parent company Caterpillar announced Friday.

WEEKEND FEATURE | ST. MARY’S SCHOOL IN STERLING

‘This was my ministry’

DIXON

Financial review on horizon BY MATT MENCARINI mmencarini@saukvalley.com 800-798-4085, ext. 5529

DIXON – An 18-week review of Dixon’s financial controls could begin in just a few weeks. In the coming weeks, officials will meet with Sikich, a Naperville-based accounting firm, to complete an agreement to study the city’s financial controls and cash management procedures. The meeting will happen after the Dixon City Council and city staff have had a chance to review the initial proposal, Mayor Jim Burke said. The review’s purpose, Burke said, is to determine whether the city’s financial controls systems have any weaknesses and, if they do, to possibly get recommendations on how to fix them. “I’m not expecting any problems,” Burke said. “... But we don’t want to take any chances on anything.” Alex T. Paschal/apaschal@saukvalley.com

Kraig Schweiss takes a break while packing up his classroom at St. Mary’s School in Sterling. The English teacher is hanging it up after 41 years.

Longtime St. Mary’s teacher exits, stage left BY KATHLEEN A. SCHULTZ kschultz@saukvalley.com 800-798-4085, ext. 5535

STERLING – If you’re lucky, there’s at least one teacher in your life for whom you’ll always be grateful, who made learning fiery fun, who knew how special you were, and celebrated it. If you’re really, really lucky, you had Kraig Schweiss. For the past 35 years, Schweiss has been the tender beating heart of St. Mary’s School in Sterling. He’s firm

Mostly sunny

VOLUME 4 ISSUE 41 44 Pages

Today: 83/64 For the forecast, see Page A11

but fair, and extraordinarily kind. And funny. His laugh wrinkles have laugh wrinkles. For an English teacher, he’s got a whole lot of that French joie de vivre. Schweiss retired this year, after 41 years of teaching elementary students in the Sterling and Dixon Catholic school systems. No one’s happy about it, except maybe his wife, Valerie, and their two horses, three dogs and four cats. Valerie, an RN who also just retired

The People’s Voice

Curt Phillips has plenty of people helping him to keep Dixon looking good. See Page A3

from the digestive health department at CGH Medical Center, has a honeydo list that grows daily at their rural Sterling home. (On June 24, they will have been married 25 years. They also have two sons, Jonathan Schweiss, 23, a mechanical engineering student at the University of Wisconsin, Platteville, and Mike Wilkinson, 34, who lives in Fulton and works in Princeton, Iowa.) TEACHER CONTINUED ON A5

Nation’s pitch man Meet Clint Dempsey, the man leading the USA into the World Cup. Also inside USA Weekend: Father’s Day gift ideas A talk with Bill Paxton

REVIEW CONTINUED ON A4

COMMUNITY

Setting the scenes The Dillon Home Museum in Sterling was the scene of recent work on the film, “Sons and Daughters of Thunder.” PAGE C12

Index Annie .................C6 Markets ...........A11 Births.................C5 Obituaries ..........A4 Business............C1 Opinion..............A6 Classified ...........D1 Scrapbook ........C3 Community ......C12 Sports ...............B1

Crossword Support groups ..C5 Saturday ............C8 State ...............A10 Crossword Sunday ..............D5 Travel ...............C10 Scoreboard .......B9 Wheels ..............D8 Lottery ...............A2 World ..............A11


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COMMUNITY WATCH

RELAYING TO THE AID OF FRIENDS AND FAMILY IN DIXON

Dixon Police

Were we in

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Photos by Alex T. Paschal/apaschal@saukvalley.com

ABOVE: “Team Jackie,� a group of friends and coworkers of Jackie Cook, speak about their efforts Friday afternoon to help their friend, who is battling cancer. Cook is a paraprofessional at Washington Elementary School in Dixon and is winning her battle against throat cancer. The “Washington Warriorettes� spoke during the opening ceremonies of the Lee County Relay for Life at Dixon High School. TOP LEFT: Friends, family and supporters line the Dixon High School track as survivors of cancer make their way to start the 2014 Lee County Relay for Life. The Whiteside County Relay Life is scheduled to start at 6 p.m. today at Hinder’s Field at Rock Falls High School. BOTTOM LEFT: Jim Marshall speaks about his battle with colorectal cancer Friday evening at the Lee County Relay for Life. Marshall is a 6-year cancer survivor.

Ogle County Sheriff

Jenifer Nash  OF(OLCOMB&RIDAYON(OLCOMB 2OADDOMESTICBATTERYTAKEN TO/GLE#OUNTY*AILANDGIVEN NOTICETOAPPEARINCOURT Shanna Blankenship  OF2OCKFORD4HURSDAY WARRANTFORFAILURETOAPPEAR Sterling Police POSTEDFULLCASHBONDAND Cindy L. Klingman  OF HASNOFURTHERCOURTDATE 3TERLINGAM4HURSREQUIRED DAYINTHEBLOCKOF&IFTH Veronica Lucas  OF !VENUEWARRANTFORFAILURE #HERRY6ALLEY4HURSDAYWARTOAPPEARONACHARGEOF RANTFORFAILURETOAPPEARGIVEN POSSESSIONOFCOCAINE NOTICETOAPPEARINCOURT POSTEDBONDAND Christopher K. Jones PM4HURSDAYAT%AST  OF2OCHELLE4HURSDAY 3ECOND3TREETAND&IFTH WARRANTFORFAILURETOAPPEAR !VENUEDISORDERLYCONDUCT GIVENNOTICETOAPPEARIN GIVENNOTICETOAPPEAR COURT Helena K. Ghadosh  OF Christoper R. Cannone 3TERLINGPM4HURSDAY  OF%LGINPM AT%AST4HIRD3TREETANDTH 4HURSDAYON0ECATONICA !VENUENOSEATBELT USING 2OADSPEEDING DRIVINGWITH CELLPHONEWHILEDRIVINGGIVEN SUSPENDEDDRIVERSLICENSE NOTICETOAPPEARINCOURT TAKENTO/GLE#OUNTY*AIL Tyree D. White  OF ANDHELDINLIEUOFBOND 3TERLINGPM4HURSDAY AT,OCUSTAND7EST&IFTH STREETS7HITESIDE#OUNTY WARRANTFORFAILURETOAPPEAR ONACHARGEOFCONSUMPTION (APPYBIRTHDAYTO4RISHA OFALCOHOLASAMINORTAKEN #AR3KADENAND'LEN%RICKSON BOTHON3ATURDAY TO7HITESIDE#OUNTY*AIL (APPYBIRTHDAYTO.ADINE ,UBBS *OYCE!NDERSON Rock Falls Police +ATHY-ILLER 3HIRLEY3CHULTZ *OYCE!NDERSON !LLYN Kendall Bragg  OF "UHROW $EAN-EURER AND 2OCK&ALLSPM 2,7ILLIAMS ALLON3UNDAY 4HURSDAYDISORDERLYCON(APPYBELATEDBIRTHDAYTO DUCT RESISTINGAPEACEOFFICERGIVENNOTICETOAPPEAR *ENNIFER'ONZALES  AND *ESSICA'ONZALES INCOURT

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THE PEOPLE’S VOICE | CURT PHILLIPS & CO.

Caring for jobs massive and small U

ltimately, the goal of this space I’m given every other weekend is to tell the stories of the everyman. And, Lordy, is Curt Phillips the prototypical subject: a guy who keeps our Sauk Valley world spinning round, yet wouldn’t typically show up in the newspaper. So why don’t you see a big, artfully shot portrait of Phillips? There are a couple of reasons. First off, whereas these columns usually focus on a solitary subject, in order for Phillips to do his job as superintendent of the Dixon Department of Public Properties, it takes a village. Second, he doesn’t want to be seen. “You don’t want to bother with any of that,� he said during our interview. “I just like to do my job.� Sitting in his office evoked memories of my experience working for the Department of Public Works in my hometown of Manitowoc, Wisconsin. But there was a stark difference between that outfit and Phillips’. Sure, we grunts carried out the requirements of our jobs. But we did just enough to do so. Many employees slept in their trucks, and some even slipped the grid altogether for hours at a time after thoroughly casing their supervisors’ schedule. I think the most heinous crime I committed was taking my truck – my partner and I spent the summer changing the bulbs in traffic lights and painting hydrants – through fast-food drivethrus a few times. That was forbidden, but what can I say? I was young and reckless. For a few years, Phillips had no part-timers at his disposal. Instead, he and his two fellow full-timers did their best to keep up the nearly 80-acre Oakwood Cemetery in Dixon, in addition to watering

christopher HEIMERMAN Heimerman is the Night News Editor at Sauk Valley Media. He can be reached at cheimerman@ saukvalley. com or 800-798-4085, EXT

the petunias. And right there is the timeliness of this offering. Last Saturday, Phillips and Co. delivered the plants – and not just any plants. These are the Dixon-original pink magic species – to the 17 blocks on which they’d be planted. Terry Nichols, who has been synonymous with horticulture in Dixon for 4 decades, used to deliver the plants. “He’s been doing this even longer than I have,� Phillips said. And Phillips has been with the department since 1986. When he was at Dixon High School, his summer job with the department saw him – you might have guessed it – watering petunias. So Phillips has a pretty firm grip on what the little pink beauties mean to Dixonites. That’s why having the staff to handle the cemetery and the petunias is such a breath of fresh air. Phillips’ voice turns solemn when he recalls what the cemetery (the department’s primary focus) looked like when the three full-timers were stretching themselves as thinly as possible. “The grounds showed it,� he said. “It’s a lot of area to cover. Lot of rocks to mow around out there.� So you could only imagine how proud he was when attendees of the recent Memorial Day service gushed about the lush-yet-finely-manicured cemetery. Similar-

ly, you can assume arriving at work is easier every day when you know your staff is ample. “Doesn’t get any better than that,� Phillips said. And the importance of making those jobs available is multifold – not just to keep Phillips and his full-timers from working themselves into the ground. (A bad pun, I know, but I can’t bring myself to delete it.) As a former teenager who relied on a city job over the summers to make car payments, buy clothes or take out my main squeeze on the occasional date, I can relate. Today, I’m an adult who understands the importance of shopping local. “They’ve got some money, and I’m sure that some of it goes back into the community when they purchase things,� Phillips said. “It’s good all around.� As for those petunias, like I said, Phillips is aware of what they mean to Dixon. So, while he admits he’s no horticulturist, he is the guy to coordinate the watering, the city decided. There has been a 2-year hiatus on the in-ground flowers, as they were dying off far too often. Commissioner Colleen Brechon suspects they might have been overwatered. So, whereas she assembled a veritable army to carry out the planting last Saturday, watering is strictly Phillips’ jurisdiction. And he is quick to point out that in many years, the petunias have looked glorious. To make sure visitors and longtime resident alike are charmed by the bright-pink staples, the planting zone has been scaled all the way down from some 200 blocks to 17 this summer. Like anything in life, there’s a learning curve. For instance, the relatively new hanging baskets weren’t faring well at

Plants to close in early 2015 JOBS

CONTINUED FROM A1

Employees who lose jobs will receive severance packages, according to the news release. The local plants will begin to “ramp down production� in the fourth quarter of this year, the release said, and are expected to be closed in the first quarter of 2015. Lee said he wasn’t given a specific reason for Caterpillar’s decision to move the operations out of the area, only that the

company was looking to increase efficiency. Greg Folley, a Caterpillar vice president, said the company recognized that the decision would be difficult for employees, and he appreciated the quality work done at the local plants. “This decision is not about the performance of these plants,� he said in the news release, “but rather about improving efficiency across the component manufacturing footprint and reducing the cost structure driven by three independent

facilities, while providing the highest quality products to our customers.� Anchor Coupling is at 2910 W. LeFevre Road and 1005 Commerce Drive in Sterling and 1100 Anchor Road in Dixon. The company manufactures and supplies hydraulic hose assemblies. Lee said he was happy to see the plants stay in the U.S., even if they couldn’t remain in the Sauk Valley. “I hate to see them go,� he said, “and now we have to find out how to replace them.�

Alex T. Paschal/apaschal@saukvalley.com

Vicky Turner was one of several volunteers helping plant petunias the morning of May 31 along the streets of Dixon. Turner, president of Dixon Tourism, was out with secretary Jeanne Kuhn, Karla Brooks and board member Marilyn Trulock. times in recent years. So rather than exclusively watering them over the weekends, Phillips decided it was time to give them a drink every day. After all, they’re not like the in-ground plants that are much better cared for by Mother Nature. Which leads us, ultimately, to a concession: No matter how thor-

oughly staffed Phillips’ department is, and even though six of his seven part-timers are veterans on the job, the man who’s spent 28 years with the Public Properties Department has to leave things up to a higher power. “The ones in the ground, it just depends on Mother Nature how

much we need to water those,� Phillips said. “We just hope we get a decent growing season. There’s not a whole lot we can do, other than control the water and let happen what happens.� So if it takes a village, I guess Mother Nature is its president. But it’s nice to have a right-hand man like Phillips.

IN BRIEF Lewis speaks at Reagan event %52%+!!0 ˆ$OZens of people gathered at Ronald Regan’s alma mater Eureka College to mark the 10th anniversary of the former president’s death. !MONGTHESPEAKERS4HURSDAYWAS!NN Win a Harley or $10,000 Cash 1 for $20 3 for $50 7 for $100 Purchase at Dixon Main Street or

www.petuniafestival.org

Lewis, president of the board of directors at the Ronald Reagan Boyhood Home and Visitors Center IN$IXON4HE0ANTAGRAPH

reportsthat she said that even though Reagan “blossomed on the world stage, his roots remained in Illinois.�

Quarter Mania 6XQGD\ -XQH WK

/DWLQ $PHULFDQ &OXE Ĺ˜ SPSP 2YHU  ORFDO YHQGRU RQ VLWH WR EHQHĹľW +DSS\ 7DLOV Animal Shelter, Rock Falls, and a local Sterling man that needs a lift for his van so he can continue work at Roll-On Ministries

TOP GUN SALES LEADERS MAY 2014

Mike Baker

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Adam Chapman

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Denny Bellows

Ken Nelson Auto Group proudly announces the TOP GUN sales leaders for May 2014. Mike Baker, Chad Conderman, Al Riley, Adam Chapman, Ron Stephenitch, and Denny Bellows had exemplary sales in May. The entire Ken Nelson Auto Group organization wishes to congratulate them. Looking for a new or pre-owned vehicle.........

SEE THE TOP GUN SALES LEADERS TODAY!


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3ATURDAY *UNE 

OBITUARIES Kristy Oncken DIXON – Kristy Oncken, 54, of Dixon, died peacefully Wednesday, June 4, 2014, at her home, after an extended illness. Kristy was born May 3, 1960, in Sterling, the daughter of Keith and Lynn (Hull) Oncken. Kristy grew up on a dairy farm near Milledgeville, and developed a love for animals and nature. Kristy graduated from Milledgeville High School in 1978, and received her Bachelor of Science degree in business and Spanish from Illinois State University in 1982. After college, Kristy worked as a loan processor for SBA loans. After completing paralegal certification, she became a senior paralegal, working for CitiCorp in the hospital financing group. Both positions were in Dallas, where she met and married her devoted husband and friend, Mike Ford, whom she married on May 23, 1991. For the last 2 years, Kristy enjoyed working part time at her niece’s restaurant, The Cobblestone. Kristy’s passions in life included reading, gardening, and a special affinity for her beloved cats. She was devoted to the rescue and neutering of stray cats. Kristy refused to allow her health issues to dominate her life, and fought bravely for many

Gary A. Olsen

years with discipline and a positive spirit. Kristy’s fun-loving nature and her kind and generous disposition were appreciated by all those who knew and loved her. Kristy is survived by her husband, Mike; her parents, Keith and Lynn Oncken of Milledgeville; two sisters, Vicki Sandhu of Elgin and Deborah (Bill) Crowson of Dixon; nephews, Chris (Jennifer) Diehl of Polo and Jamie Diehl of Sterling; nieces, Nicole Diehl and Alison Brantley, both of Dixon; best friends, Gerrie Jakobs and Ann Frank Wake; many cousins; and seven great-nieces and great-nephews. She was preceded in death by her grandparents. Visitation will be from 9:30 to 11 a.m. June 14 and a memorial service celebrating Kristy’s life at 11 a.m. June 14 at First Christian Church in Dixon, with the Rev. Lynn Bond, pastor, officiating. Cremation rites have been accorded. Preston-Schilling Funeral Home in Dixon is handling arrangements. In lieu of flowers, memorials have been established to Hospice of the Rock River Valley and Granny Rose Animal Shelter. Visit prestonschillingfuneralhome.com to send condolences.

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR THE WEEK Today’s visitations: Glenn A. GossOF3TERLING  AMAT!BIDING7ORD #HURCHIN3TERLING Today’s funerals: Melba Prelesnik FORMERLY OF3TERLING AMGRAVESIDE SERVICEIN3ACRED(EARTSEC TIONOF2IVERSIDE#EMETERYIN 3TERLING Betty J. Hall FORMERLYOF /REGON AMMEMORIAL SERVICEAT/REGON#HURCHOF 'OD Glenn A. GossOF3TERLING AMMEMORIALSERVICE AT!BIDING7ORD#HURCHIN 3TERLING Jazmine Hope Randall INFANTDAUGHTEROF:ACHARY 2ANDALLAND%MILY"ECKOF /REGON AMGRAVEIDESER VICEAT#HAPEL(ILL-EMORIAL 'ARDENSIN$IXON Sunday visitations: Irvin “Russ� ParkerOF -ANLIUS  PMAT.EW "EDFORD#HRISTIAN#HURCH Sunday funerals: Dustin L. MerrimanOF

,EAF2IVER CELEBRATIONOFLIFE  PMAT&INCH&UNERAL (OMEIN-OUNT-ORRIS WITH PMPRAYERSANDBALLOON RELEASE Monday funerals: Irvin “Russâ€? ParkerOF -ANLIUS AMAT.EW"ED FORD#HRISTIAN#HURCH June 14 visitations: Kristy Oncken OF$IXON  AMAT&IRST#HRISTIAN #HURCHIN$IXON June 14 funerals: Nancy G. RughOF$IXON AMMEMORIALSERVICE AT&IRST0RESBYTERIAN#HURCH IN$IXON Daniel F. McGowan FORMERLYOF$IXON AM CELEBRATIONOFLIFEAT%LKS0AGE 0ARK0AVILIONIN$IXON Kristy OnckenOF$IXON AMCELEBRATIONOFLIFE AT&IRST#HRISTIAN#HURCHIN $IXON Jimmy H. AdamsOF$IXON  PMCELEBRATIONOFLIFEAT ,OVELAND#OMMUNITY(OUSE IN$IXON

DIXON – Gary A. Olsen, 66, of Dixon, died Thursday, June 5, 2014, at his home. He worked for the state Department of Corrections for 32 years, retiring as a corrections lieutenant. Gary was born Sept. 7, 1947, in Morris, the son of Carl and Dorothy (Henderson) Olsen. He married Donna Ingram on Nov. 17, 1984, in Dwight. He served in the Army during the Vietnam War. Gary was a member of the National Rifle Association, and was one of the first to receive his concealed carry card. He also was a member of the Dixon Evening Lions Club. He was an avid Green Bay Packers and NASCAR fan, and frequently visited Talladega and Texas Motor Speedway. The most important thing in Gary’s life was spending time with his family. During his retirement, his favorite saying was, he was “living a dream.� Survivors include his wife, Donna Olsen; three sons, David (Nancy)

Jazmine Hope Randall OREGON – Jazmine Hope Randall, infant daughter of Zachary Randall and Emily Beck, passed away Sunday, June 1, 2014, at Rockford Memorial Hospital. Survivors include her parents of Oregon; two sisters, her twin Jada Mae Randall and Allison Underwood; one brother, Caden Edward Randall; paternal grandparents, Don Randall of Tucson, Arizona, and Penny Madding-Randall of Grand Detour; maternal grandparents, Donna Beck and Doug

REVIEW

Since Finance Director Paula Meyer was hired in September 2012, in the wake of the arrest of former Comptroller Rita Crundwell, the city has changed much about the finance department and its separation of duties. Because of their size, it’s more difficult for local governments – like Dixon – to have ideal financial controls and separation of duties, said Mike Peddle, an associate professor in the division of public administration at Northern Illinois University. He focuses on, among other areas, public finance. “There’s absolutely no question about that,� Peddle said. “Yes. It is. ... The segregation of duties, which is one of the things you look for in financial control, is much more difficult in a smaller organization.� Setting up adequate and efficient financial controls is not impossible for small local governments or small organizations. Although Peddle wouldn’t speak to specifics about what Dixon should do, much of what he recommended for small municipalities or organizations already has been implemented. Dixon has added an employee to its finance department since Meyer was hired in 2012. In fact, hiring a finance director was among Peddle’s key recommendations. Five employees now work under Meyer, City Administrator David Nord and City Clerk Kathe Swanson. Meyer

Beck of Mount Morris; paternal great-grandmother, Thelma Madding of Grand Detour; and paternal greatgrandfather, Frances Randall of Mobile, Alabama. Graveside service will be at 11 a.m. today at Chapel Hill Memorial Gardens in Dixon, with the Rev. Vincent O. Marrandino, director of pastoral care at KSB Hospital in Dixon, officiating. Visit prestonschillingfuneralhome.com to send condolences.

Joseph R. O’Brien DIXON – Joseph R. O’Brien, 70, of Dixon, died Thursday, June 5, 2014, at Rock Falls Rehabilitation and Health Care Center. Jones Funeral Home in Dixon is handling arrangements.

BILLERICA, Mass. – Katie Marie Yeazel, 88, of Billerica, died peacefully Sunday, June 1, 2014, at her home, surrounded by her children and grandchildren. She was born March 4, 1926, in West Louisville, Kentucky, the daughter of Lillian (MacAtee) and Bill Hayden. Katie and her family moved to Chicago when she was 4 years old. It was there, at the age of 25, that she met and married the love of her life, Gordon Yeazel. For 49 years, until Gordon’s death in 1999, they were true soulmates. Their passion for each other was evident to all who knew them. In 1955, they moved to Dixon, where they raised three children and formed many wonderful lifelong friendships. Katie and Gordon were avid golfers and enjoyed years of memorable times with their friends at Dixon Country

Club. Katie had a keen intellect. She was an ace bridge player, often read two books a week, and loved to travel the world. In the mid-1980s, Katie and Gordon retired to Port St. Lucie, Florida, where they continued to enjoy golf and good friends. In 2013, Katie moved to Massachusetts to be closer to her family. Katie is survived by her three children, Gay (Michael) KellyLeh, Gordon (Maureen Cleary) Yeazel, and Dale (Michael) Hachey; 10 grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. Services will be private. Sweeney Memorial Funeral Home in Billerica is handling arrangements. A memorial has been established to Compassionate Care Hospice Foundation, 800 W. Cummings Park, Suite 3100, Woburn, MA 01801.

Dustin L. Merriman LEAF RIVER – Dustin L. Merriman, 20, of Leaf River, died peacefully Thursday, June 5, 2014, at Serenity Hospice & Home in Oregon. Dustin was born June 8, 1993, in Rockford, the son of Dale and Theresa (Cagle) Merriman. He was a graduate of Ogle County Educational Cooperative through Byron and Oregon. Dustin loved music and dancing, basketball, and balloons. He truly loved Elvis and Barney. Dustin will be greatly missed by his whole family, near and far. Dustin is survived by his father, Dale (Sarah Slater) Merriman of Leaf River; his mother, Theresa Cagle of Rochelle; sister, Samantha “Sam� Merriman of Dixon; two brothers, Caleb Mer-

riman of Oregon and Drake Merriman of Forreston; his great-grandparents, Lloyd and Darlene Merriman of Compton; his grandparents, Dennis Merriman of Winchester, Kansas, and Christine Merriman of Sycamore; and several aunts, uncles, and cousins. He was preceded in death by his greatgrandparents. A celebration of Dustin’s life will be from 6 to 8 p.m. Sunday, his 21st birthday, at Finch Funeral Home, 405 E. Hitt St., Mount Morris. In lieu of flowers, those attending are asked to bring a balloon to share. Balloons will be released after prayers at 8 p.m. A memorial has been established at Stillman Bank in Byron.

Jane A. DiVall Schaaf

JANESVILLE, Wis. – Jane Ann DiVall Schaaf, 85, of Janesville, formerly of Erie, died Tuesday, June 3, 2014, tions box on Page A2 at Huntington Place in Janesville. the next publication day Hansen Funeral Service in Janesville is handling after we are notified of arrangements. an error. Receipt of all obituarMarian Rose Hewitt ies must be confirmed by DIXON – Marian Rose Hewitt died Thursday, June 5, phone. For more information, 2014, at CGH Medical Center in Sterling. call 800-798-4085 ext. 530 McDonald Funeral Home in Rock Falls is handling arrangements or 502.

Obituary information All obituaries, including death notices, are due by 2 p.m. Sunday through Friday if sent via email, obituaries@saukvalley. com or fax, 815-6259390. Obituary corrections and clarifications will appear in the Correc-

Firm will look at city financial controls, cash management CONTINUED FROM A1

Olsen, Chris (Cassie) Olsen, and Aaron Olsen; one brother, Jeff Marx; one sister, Carla (Jim Hodge) Olsen; one sister-in-law, Connie Marx; six grandchildren, Nathaniel Olsen, Nick Olsen, Ryan Olsen, Adra Olsen, Sunnie Simmons, and Dillon Eklund; two greatgrandchildren, Braxton and Sophia; six nieces and nephews, Brandon (Traci) Townsend, Brent (Kim) Townsend, Brina (Jason) Boldig, Sara (Stephen) Cruther, Emily Marx, and Katie Marx; and one great-niece, Holly “Dolly� Cruther. He was preceded in death by his parents; and one brother, Greg Marx. A celebration of life will be at a later date. Cremation rites will be accorded. Preston-Schilling Funeral Home in Dixon is handling arrangements. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Gary’s family. Visit prestonschillingfuneralhome.com to send condolences.

Katie M. Yeazel

has limited, by design, her ability to update or input information into the city’s accounting system. DeKalb went without a finance director until about 2 years ago, Peddle said, and during the lead-up to hiring one, there was some push back. “I had assured people that the money will pay itself back,� he said. In addition to suggesting a finance director, Peddle recommended that small organizations make their money traceable and don’t allow for a single employee to be the one who takes money in and also balances the checkbook. One of the most important things, Peddle said, is an ongoing monitoring of financial control by the governing board. “You need to know where you’re at from a cash-flow perspective and a budget perspective,� he said. During City Council meetings leading up to the end of the past fiscal year, Meyer made regular presentations to the council about the status of the budget and the recovery of funds from the sale of Crundwell’s assets and the settlement with the city’s former auditors and bank. But bringing in Sikich, Meyer said, could bring a new perspective to the city’s financial controls and result in specific recommendations for changes or ideas. “Ultimately, the idea would be that they would come in and have some other ideas on how the city could implement some things, given the staffing level and the software system,� she said.

HONOR FLIGHT

Korean War, WWII vets invited to June 26 meeting STAFF REPORT NEWS SAUKVALLEYCOM    EXT

ROCK FALLS – Veterans of World War II and the Korean War who haven’t yet signed up to participate in an Honor Flight are invited to attend an informational meeting at 6:30 p.m. June 26 at the Rock Falls

American Legion, 712 4th Ave. The meeting will cover information about the registration and eligibility for veterans to view the military memorials in Washington, D.C., built to honor their service to our country. The Honor Flight program, launched in 2005,

offers veterans an allexpenses-paid, 1-day trip to visit Washington to see the World War II, Korean War, and Vietnam memorials, as well as Arlington National Cemetery. If you have questions, call Gary Farral at 309-659-2628 or Bob VanDeVelde at 815499-6100.

Nearly 20,000 “Likes� www.facebook.com/saukvalley

In Loving Memory of

Sharon L. Christensen

6/8/44 - 12/20/10

You left me beautiful memories Your love is still my guide, And though we cannot see you You’re always at my side. Happy Birthday, Mom. Sadly missed by children, grandchildren and great grandchildren


Saturday, June 7, 2014

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367EEKENDs!

THEATER REVIEW

A colorful opening to Timber Lake season ‘Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat’ kicks off TLP’s 53rd year BY SUE LANGENBERG Special to Sauk Valley Media

MOUNT CARROLL – Timber Lake Playhouse opened its 53rd season Thursday night with the musical “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat,� beginning an exciting summer of music, comedy, whodunit and children’s theater that gets better every year. This “Dreamcoat� story began as a short cantata with music by Andrew Lloyd Weber and lyrics by Tim Rice at a London school in 1968. It was their first public collaboration. After “Jesus Christ Superstar,� “Dreamcoat� developed and grew into an enormous

success via West End of London, Broadway, OffBroadway, and revivals picking up productions at schools and colleges along the way. From curtain to standing ovation, the show is solidly built upon songs that express the biblical tale of love, hate, jealousy, intrigue and all the emotions that tell a great story. By its very title, the story suggests ornate attention to a costume of favorite son Jacob. TLP artistic director/choreographer James Beaudry notes, however, that less is more. The less weight of a glitzy visual, the more energy to interpret a simple story. Thus the character of the “Dreamcoat� cos-

About the play and TLP “Joseph and the !MAZING4ECHNICOLOR Dreamcoat� runs THROUGH*UNEAT 4IMBER,AKE0LAYHOUSE "LACK/AK2OAD -OUNT#ARROLL%VENING PERFORMANCESBEGINAT 7:30 p.m. (no show on Mondays), two 2 p.m. Sunday matinees and one 3 p.m. Saturday matinee today. Group RATESAVAILABLE#ONTACT THEBOXOFFICEAT  ORWWWTIMBERLAKEPLAYHOUSEORGFOR more information. tume developed in crepe multi-colored ribbons, strewn about in various scenes and shapes to portray emotions, an influence of American choreographer Alwin

Nikolais. The use of rainbow colors as props also symbolizes larger dreams of tolerance, rather than smaller divisions between ideologies. Once established as a classic that carries theatrical weight, this Genesis production is open to many interpretations. While some Bible scholars might resist contemporary versions that tell and retell sacred literature, the end result of spiritual appreciation is nonetheless gripping. And, thus, Beaudry explored this concept effectively. Most vividly portrayed was the use of movements in the first act that was a throwback of Joffrey Ballet’s “Green Table,� an anti-war piece originally created in 1967 by Kurt Jooss. The futility of peace talks is

central to the idea and best expressed with song, “Joseph’s Dreams.� Iconic 20th century choreographer Jerome Robbins (“West Side Story,� “Fiddler on the Roof� and some 60 ballets) also found his way through this TLP production with reference to a lesser known piece, “Watermill,� a personal journey with fleeting images of struggle. The story unfolded from scene to scene through the wonderfully versatile work of Melissa Weyn as Narrator as she segued mood through the lyrics. Humble and handsome character Joseph was carried fully by Gabriel Brown as he made a strong TLP debut. Also in the cast and making TLP debuts were Grant Brown, Nathan Goodrich, Bethany Fay,

Blake Price, Jessica Palkovic, Allison Hunt, Caroline Murrah and Christian Chambers. Returning TLP talent includes Analisha Santini, Abby Taylor and Lexie Plath whose smooth moves as Mrs. Potifar were notable. Returning is Levi Skoog of Milledgeville, a frequent local addition of talent. The rest represent the best of the best in various universities elsewhere. Musical direction by Chicago-based Christopher Logan was key to the success of this show. The diction was clearly delivered and moved the lyrics, whether solo or group, along to a complete understanding of the tale. Lighting design by returning James Kolditz also brought the images forth.

Schweiss plans to continue to be involved at school TEACHER

CONTINUED FROM A1

Here’s why no one’s happy: “My kids had him for a teacher, and he was phenomenal,� said Jeannie Ramos, the school’s office manager. “He’s just the best. He’s very tough, but it’s amazing how much the kids learn from him.� When former students return for a visit, he’s the first person they want to see, she said. Both Ramos and Principal Rebecca Schmitt have worked with Schweiss for the better part of two decades. “He’s probably the best English teacher Sterling, Illinois, has ever seen,� Schmitt said. “They did research papers in fourth grade. They were diagramming sentences. He’d have to hold classes for the parents sometimes, to remind them how to diagram sentences. “He’s a teacher that the kids never forget. He’s tough, but fair.� He’s also a Eucharistic minister for St. Mary’s parish; he’s not retiring from that aspect of his life. “He is very dedicated, not only to his teaching, but also to his Catholic faith life,� Schmitt said. Dedicated is a good word for the 62-yearold. So is devoted. He’s

devoted to his faith, the theater, the planet, the people in his life and his community, and his profession, all of which have brought him a profound satisfaction. It could have gone another way. Schweiss, a Sterling native, attended Sauk Valley Community College and enjoyed the theater, but didn’t think that would be a viable career. “I thought I would probably starve to death.� “English is probably my forte, I’ll go with that,� he thought. “I could be a teacher.� He attended Illinois State University, majored in English, minored in theater, and decided he wanted to teach junior high. “I thought that would be a really great area to start; it would be an age range I could reach.� He started teaching in 1973 at St. Mary’s School in Sterling, where he lasted all of 1 year. The kids rode roughshod over him. He was just a baby teacher. He didn’t know how to make them behave. It was chaos in his classroom. He was let go. He didn’t give up, though. St. Mary School in Dixon gave him another chance. He taught seventh- and eighth-grade language arts. He began to get his teaching legs under him, to develop a style, a management

Recommended reading 3T-ARYS3CHOOL%NGLISHTEACHER+RAIG3CHWEISS has retired after 41 years. !MONGHISFAVORITETHINGSTODOOVERTHEYEARSWAS READTOHISSTUDENTS!SAPARTING GIFTTOTHOSEWHONEVERWILLHAVETHE pleasure, here’s a list of some of his FAVORITEAUTHORSANDTHEIRBOOKS *UDY"LUMEh4ALESOFA&OURTH 'RADE.OTHING vh3UPERFUDGE v h&UDGE A -ANIAvANDh$OUBLE &UDGEv 'AIL2OCKh4HANKSGIVING4REASUREv ANDh4HE(OUSE7ITHOUTA#HRISTKraig MAS4REEv Schweiss !VIh3OMETHING5PSTAIRSv ,ESLEA.EWMANh(ACHIKO7AITSv #ARL(IAASENh(OOT vh3CATvANDh&LUSHv 2OALD$AHLh*AMESANDTHE'IANT0EACHvANDh4HE 4WITSv "ARBARA2OBINSONh4HE"EST#HRISTMAS0AGEANT Everâ€? %VE"UNTINGh&LY!WAY(OMEv 7ILSON2AWLSh7HERETHE2ED&ERN'ROWSv #HRIS6AN!LLSBURGh4HE0OLAR%XPRESSv 'LORIA(OUSTONh4HE9EAROFTHE0ERFECT#HRISTMAS 4REEv (ALLOWEENEXTRAh)WOULDREADSCARYSTORIESTOALL OFMYCLASSESON(ALLOWEENFROM!LVIN3CHWARTZS @3CARY3TORIESTO4ELLINTHE$ARK @-ORE3CARY3TOries’ and ‘Scary Stories 3.’â€? technique. He stayed 6 years, before coming back home to Sterling to teach fourth-graders. That’s when it all fell into place. Fourth-graders are imaginative and funny, they love to learn, they love their school and their teachers, they love to read and be read to, and singing, and silliness. Heaven. “It was my niche,â€? Schweiss said. “Here I can teach, I don’t have to police.â€? He stayed 35 years.

“This was my ministry. To be a teacher to these kids.� Over the course of his career, he has taught third- through sixthgraders all the general things they need to know, but English was his specialty. He taught grammar and sentence diagrams and creative writing. He also taught kindness, respect for the earth, and love for animals. “We would pray for the animals every day.�

He led the school’s Recycling Rangers the past 5 years. He taught his kids about the evils of palm oil. (Google it, or take a peek at Schweiss’ Facebook page.) He’s still a big ol’ theater geek, and with good reason. It fits right in with his love of learning. “You learn so much about the language and the time period and the people, and how they haven’t changed through the centuries. ... The treachery and the corruption and the goodness, all that hasn’t changed.� His theater background, in fact, stood him in good stead with his students. He loved to play the different characters when reading to them, and he’s put on the Christmas show for years. “They’re the best audience ever,� Schweiss said. “I could just be myself with the kids, because they always loved it, and I loved them.� Still, he enjoys getting outside his own skin, his own head, now and again. It’s a thrill “to pretend to be something you’re not, or to become extremely intimate with literature maybe you’ve only just heard about. ... I enjoy being in the light and just doing something that is far removed from my regular life. I love the applause,� said Schweiss,

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who will play Leonato in the upcoming Shakespeare in the Park production of “Much Ado About Nothing.� He also loves his life of service outside the school. As a Eucharistic minister for the church, he tends to people who can’t make it to Mass. It’s been a joy of his more than 35 years now, almost as long as he’s been teaching. He softens, and tears up, when he talks about the “unbelievable people� who have been his privilege to befriend, who have befriended him. This is tender Kraig. “It’s almost like touching saints, meeting saints, ... they’re real, they’re precious,� he said. “You want to do for them.� Thankfully, he’s not leaving St. Mary’s completely. Schweiss will be a substitute, will keep putting on the Christmas play, and will help mentor students with special needs. Some kids, for example, are auditory learners – they need to be read to to succeed. He wants to be that tool for them, and “that extra pair of hands that the teacher needs.� About his successor, Kim Bradley, he says: “I couldn’t be happier. She is a teacher who is by far the best I have ever, ever worked with.�

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Opinion !s367EEKEND

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3ATURDAY *UNE 

EDITORIAL

Court ruling a victory for public access N

o one should have been surprised by a recent ruling of the Illinois Supreme Court that found the offices of state’s attorneys to be part of the executive branch of state government. We cannot imagine it shocked even the judges of the appellate court that had decided, through some creative legal gymnastics, that state’s attorneys were a part of the judicial branch and, thus, not subject to transparency under the Freedom of Information Act. Every school child who studies American government learns that the U.S. attorney general heads the Justice Depart-

ment and, in his role in the executive branch of government, is a trusted member of the cabinet of the president, the nation’s chief executive. Likewise, federal prosecutors in the Justice Department are also appointed by the president. So it was unlikely a lower court in the Illinois judiciary was going to reorganize American democracy. The appellate court had acted on a 2010 case involving the Kendall County state’s attorney, who had disingenuously argued he was not subject to Illinois’ FOIA even though he had, some time earlier, appointed a staff member to handle

What we think Too bad it took an Illinois Supreme Court decision to confirm that state’s attorneys are part of government’s executive branch, not the judiciary. We hope state’s attorneys will embrace the ruling to improve transparency in criminal cases. requests for public records. Lee County State’s Attorney Anna Sacco-Miller told us she had always assumed the case law might be reversed, but in any case, “I don’t think it will significantly impact anything we already do.� Whiteside County State’s Attorney Trish Joyce, on the other hand,

decried the Supreme Court’s unanimous ruling because it “substantially impairs our ability to effectively prosecute cases.� She called on the Legislature to rewrite the public records law to exempt state’s attorneys. We believe her fears are unfounded and that the law provides adequate protection to avoid jeop-

ardizing pending criminal investigations. Frankly, we have been disappointed at the eagerness with which local state’s attorneys latched onto the appellate decision to shut down access to their records – even for criminal cases that had been closed. The threat their stonewalling posed to open government was compounded by the dual role that state’s attorneys serve in Illinois – as both chief prosecutor and primary legal counsel to county government. If legislators want to tackle a real problem, we suggest they look into the conflicts inherent in state’s attorneys being

responsible for counseling county officials on public access laws while also having the responsibility to prosecute violators of those laws. That unfortunate conflict has seen local state’s attorneys – more than once – give their public clients bad advice on the Open Meetings Act. Sad, but true. We hope they are equally enthusiastic about more transparency now that the Supreme Court has found that “There is no sense ... in which state’s attorneys can be regarded as part of the judiciary or the judicial branch.� May the public be pleasantly surprised.

THE READER’S VOICE

Property control is landlord’s right

amendment and ensure Thomson remains on track to open. I am writing today to thank my colleague, Congressman Adam Kinzinger, and the entire Illinois congressional delegation, for working with me across party lines to do what is best for the people and economy of our state. We need more bipartisanship in Congress, and I am hopeful that here in Illinois, we’ve proved to the entire country what is possible when we put people over politics. Note to readers: Cheri Bustos represents the 17th Congressional District, which includes Whiteside and Carroll counties.

LINDA ADAMS Sterling

If you want to wear your hair long and stringy, that’s your right. If you want to wear baggy, torn clothes, that’s your right. So it’s our right to control our property. We don’t need more government in our faces. If we didn’t have so many ordinances now that aren’t being enforced, things wouldn’t be as bad as they are. Do we need more? I don’t want government to order me around and charge money to come in and pick around to see if it can find something wrong. I try very hard to rent to people who will take care of my property. But not everyone takes the same care, and a lot of damage can be done before we can correct it. Most landlords take care of their property themselves. But when this inspector (probably not a licensed electrician or plumber) interprets something as “wrong,� then he’ll want you to pay for a professional to fix it. Many of the rental houses in Sterling and Rock Falls have at least one thing not quite right, but not everything can be corrected immediately, and it takes time and money. So to discriminate against rental property owners is unfair. Inspect everyone. This will affect every landlord – not just ones in the landlords’ association. Zoning departments know every property that is a rental from court (property tax) records. There is the possibility you’ll be sought out and fined if you don’t participate and sign up for the Rental Inspection Program. Don’t be naive. We, as a group of all landlords, need to stand together. Go to city council meetings, phone or write aldermen, call the mayor, and help us financially so we can stop this. Contact SVLA at P.O. 401, Rock Falls, IL 61071. Help us to help all landlords.

EDITORIAL BOARD Jennifer Baratta Jim Dunn Sam R Fisher Sheryl Gulbranson Larry Lough Jeff Rogers

Buy local when seeking support ORVAL GEARHART Dixon Joe Heller, Heller Syndication

Dave Granlund, Gatehouse News Service

Team effort has prison on track CHERIE BUSTOS East Moline

For far too long, Thomson Correctional Facility has sat vacant and unused. It is estimated that the opening of this facility would create more than 1,100 jobs in our state, save our hard-earned tax

dollars, and improve safety for prison guards across the country by relieving overcrowding. I have fought tirelessly to move this project forward after years of roadblocks and delays, and celebrated the April announcement that hiring had finally begun for the prison. Last week, a congresswoman from Tennessee

4(%&)234!-%.$-%.4 Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

attempted to roll back the progress we’ve made by introducing an amendment to block Thomson prison’s opening and operation. This misguided attempt to stall recent progress also was supported by the same Virginia congressman responsible for the political games that left this state-of-the-art facility vacant for years.

However, the reckless efforts of these two out-of-state lawmakers proved no match for the cooperation and hard work of the Illinois delegation. We banded together, both Democrats and Republicans, and persuaded enough members of Congress to side with us in creating jobs and increasing public safety, to successfully defeat the

“Then there is our printing press, conceived by man’s genius, fashioned by his hands, yet a miracle equal to the divine.� Girdamo Cardano, Italian physician, 1571

1UOTESBROUGHTTOYOUCOURTESYOF

I am writing this knowing that I may ruffle a few feathers. I have noticed that there are some organizations, charitable events, and fundraisers in Dixon that are asking for the people and businesses of Dixon to attend, sponsor, and support their cause. At the same time, they are spending thousands and thousands of dollars outside our community for the same products that could be purchased locally, for the same (sometimes lower) cost with the same high quality. There are four businesses in Dixon that design and letter T-shirts and apparel. Yet, these organizations, charitable events, and fundraisers take the money they raised from the people and businesses of Dixon and spend that money on T-shirts in places like Spring Valley, Wisconsin, or even on the Internet when the businesses in Dixon offer the same pricing and quality. If those thousands and thousands of dollars were spent locally, that money would circulate in Dixon, time and time again, to the benefit of the people and businesses of Dixon. My thought, if you are asking for the attendance, sponsorship, and support of the people and businesses of Dixon, then please support the people and businesses of Dixon.

3HAREYOUROPINIONS Mail: The Reader’s Voice Sauk Valley Media 3200 E. Lincolnway, P.O. Box 498 Sterling, IL 61081 Email: letters@saukvalley.com Fax: 815-625-9390 Website: Visit www.saukvalley.com Policy: Letters are to be no more than 300 words and must include the writer’s name, town and daytime telephone number, which we call to verify authorship. Individuals may write up to 12 letters a year.

OPINIONS EXPRESSED IN LETTERS AND COLUMNS ARE THOSE OF THE WRITERS AND DO NOT REPRESENT THE VIEWS OF SAUK VALLEY MEDIA.


3ATURDAY *UNE 

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SECOND OPINION

Ernie Pyle observed ‘pure miracle’ of D-Day In his undergraduate days of studying journalism at Indiana University, this editor spent a lot of time at Ernie Pyle Hall, along Seventh Street, on the Bloomington campus. Displayed behind glass in the building’s lounge was some of the equipment of the famed World War II correspondent: binoculars, a shovel, his typewriter. Pyle, a Hoosier from the small town of Dana, died while reporting on action from the South Pacific after he had chronicled the fighting of G.I.s in northern Africa, up through Italy, and into the center of the European Theater. Rather than reporting Allied strategy and casualty counts from the safety of war headquarters like a lot of reporters, Pyle lived and – eventually – died with the troops at or near the front lines of battle. His simple style of writing the personal stories of soldiers made Pyle something of a hero back home – and in the world of journalism. This weekend, as the world observes the 70th anniversary of D-Day, we bring you three of Pyle’s columns from the days after troops stormed the beaches of Normandy, France. Below is his first column after having arrived the day after the battle. You can find two subsequent columns online in the Opinion section at saukvalley.com. Permission to distribute and re-publish these columns was given by Scripps Howard Foundation.

A Pure Miracle NORMANDY BEACHHEAD, June 12, 1944 – Due to a last-minute alteration in the arrangements, I didn’t arrive on the beachhead until the morning after D-day, after our first wave of assault troops had hit the shore. By the time we got here the beaches had been taken and the fighting had moved a couple of miles inland. All that remained on the beach was some sniping and artillery fire, and the occasional startling blast of a mine geysering brown sand into the air. That plus a gigantic and pitiful litter of wreckage along miles of shoreline. Submerged tanks and overturned boats and burned trucks and shellshattered jeeps and sad little personal belongings were strewn all over these bitter sands. That plus the bodies of soldiers lying in rows covered with blankets, the toes of their shoes sticking up in a line as though on drill. And other bod-

ies, uncollected, still sprawling grotesquely in the sand or half hidden by the high grass beyond the beach. That plus an intense, grim determination of work-weary men to get this chaotic beach organized and get all the vital supplies and the reinforcements moving more rapidly over it from the stacked-up ships standing in droves out to sea. Now that it is over it seems to me a pure miracle that we ever took the beach at all. For some of our units it was easy, but in this special sector where I am now our troops faced such odds that our getting ashore was like my whipping Joe Louis down to a pulp. In this column I want to tell you what the opening of the second front in this one sector entailed, so that you can know and appreciate and forever be humbly grateful to those both dead and alive who did it for you. Ashore, facing us, were more enemy troops than we had in our assault waves. The advantages were all theirs, the disadvantages all ours. The Germans were dug into positions that they had been working on for months, although these were not yet all complete. A one-hundred-foot bluff a couple of hundred yards back from the beach had great concrete gun emplacements built right into the hilltop. These opened to the sides instead of to the front, thus making it very hard for naval fire from the sea to reach them. They could shoot parallel with the beach and cover every foot of it for miles with artillery fire. Then they had hidden machine-gun nests on the forward slopes, with crossfire taking in every inch of the beach. These nests were connected by networks of trenches, so that the German gunners could move about without exposing themselves. Throughout the length of the beach, running zigzag a couple of hundred yards back from the shoreline, was an immense V-shaped ditch fifteen feet deep. Nothing could cross it, not even men on foot, until fills have been made. And in other places at the far end of the beach, where the ground is flatter, they had great concrete walls. These were blasted by our naval gunfire or by explosives set by hand after we got ashore. Our only exits from the beach were several swales or valleys, each about one hundred yards wide. The Germans made the most of these funnel-

larryLOUGH Larry Lough is executive editor of Sauk Valley Media. Contact him via email at llough@ saukvalley. com.

like traps, sowing them with buried mines. They contained, also, barbedwire entanglements with mines attached, hidden ditches, and machine guns firing from the slopes. This is what was on the shore. But our men had to go through a maze nearly as deadly as this before they even got ashore. Underwater obstacles were terrific. The Germans had whole fields of evil devices under the water to catch our boats. Even now, several days after the landing, we have cleared only channels through them and cannot yet approach the whole length of the beach with our ships. Even now some ship or boat hits one of these mines every day and is knocked out of commission. The Germans had masses of those great sixpronged spiders, made of railroad iron and standing shoulder-high, just beneath the surface of the water for our landing craft to run into. They also had huge logs buried in the sand, pointing upward and outward, their tops just below the water. Attached to these logs were mines. In addition to these obstacles they had floating mines offshore, landmines buried in the sand of the beach, and more mines in checkerboard rows in the tall grass beyond the sand. And the enemy had four men onshore for every three men we had approaching the shore. And yet we got on. Beach landings are planned to a schedule that is set far ahead of time. They all have to be timed, in order for everything to mesh and for the following waves of troops to be standing off the beach and ready to land at the right moment. As the landings are planned, some elements of the assault force are to break through quickly, push on inland, and attack the most obvious enemy strong points. It is usually the plan for units to be inland, attacking gun positions from behind, within a matter of minutes after the first men hit the beach. I have always been amazed at the speed called for in these plans. You’ll have schedules

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calling for engineers to land at H-hour plus two minutes, and service troops at H-hour plus thirty minutes, and even for press censors to land at H-hour plus seventyfive minutes. But in the attack on this special portion of the beach where I am – the worst we had, incidentally – the schedule didn’t hold. Our men simply could not get past the beach. They were pinned down right on the water’s edge by an inhuman wall of fire from the bluff. Our first waves were on that beach for hours, instead of a few minutes, before they could begin working inland. You can still see the foxholes they dug at the very edge of the water, in the sand and the small, jumbled rocks that form parts of the beach. Medical corpsmen attended the wounded as best they could. Men were killed as they stepped out of landing craft. An officer whom I knew got a bullet through the head just as the door of his landing craft was let down. Some men were drowned. The first crack in the beach defenses was final-

ly accomplished by terrific and wonderful naval gunfire, which knocked out the big emplacements. They tell epic stories of destroyers that ran right up into shallow water and had it out point-blank with the big guns in those concrete emplacements ashore. When the heavy fire stopped, our men were organized by their officers and pushed on inland, circling machinegun nests and taking them from the rear. As one officer said, the only way to take a beach is to face it and keep going. It is costly at first, but it’s the only way. If the men are pinned down on the beach, dug in and out of action, they might as well not be there at all. They hold up the waves behind them, and nothing is being gained. Our men were pinned down for a while, but finally they stood up and went through, and so we took that beach and accomplished our landing. We did it with every advantage on the enemy’s side and every disadvantage on ours. In the light of a couple

of days of retrospection, we sit and talk and call it a miracle that our men ever got on at all or were able to stay on. Before long it will be permitted to name the units that did it. Then you will know to whom this glory should go. They suffered casualties. And yet if you take the entire beachhead assault, including other units that had a much easier time, our total casualties in driving this wedge into the continent of Europe were remarkably low – only a fraction, in fact, of what our commanders had been prepared to accept. And these units that were so battered and went through such hell are still, right at this moment, pushing on inland without rest, their spirits high, their egotism in victory almost reaching the smart-alecky stage. Their tails are up. “We’ve done it again,� they say. They figure that the rest of the army isn’t needed at all. Which proves that, while their judgment in this regard is bad, they certainly have the spirit that wins battles and eventually wars.

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3ATURDAY *UNE 

Class of 2014! Congratulations Graduates!

David Wilcox

Rock Falls High School

Bobby Abbott

Sauk Valley Community College: AD Program

Mariah Naftzger

Trinity College of Nursing & Health Sciences

Shannon Daraska

AFC High School

Congratulations Bobby! We are so proud of you. Keep up the good work.

Congratulations Mariah on recieving your Associates Degree of Applied Science in Radiography. Good Luck in your next level of studies.

LOVE, Dad, Mom, and Kandy

LOVE, Mom, Matt & your entire family!

Congratulazioni, Hayley! Illinois State Scholar National Honor Society Future Purdue Boilermaker

Gavin Robert Frank

Allie Rhae Schryver

Erica L. Brooks

Just the beginning of your awesomeness!

Gavin, congratulations! You make us very proud, you’re fantastic!

Congratulations Kiddo, We are all so proud of you.

We are proud of you! Dad is smiling from Heaven!

LOVE, your family

MUCH LOVE, Mom, Dad, Hilary, Jake & Grammy

LOVE, your family

LOVE, Mom, Dad, Grandma Shirley & Grandpa Richie

Congratulations! George, Nick, Mom, Mac & Kids

Marti K. Brandt

Brooke Dugger

Congratulations David! We knew you could do it. We’re all proud of you. LOVE, Uncle Bob, Aunt Brenda, Kandy and Bobby

Congratulations Shannon! We couldn’t be more proud of you! LOVE ALWAYS, Mom & Jeremy

Hayley Elise Osborn Sterling High School

Kyler Hanson Rock Falls High School

Congratulations Kyler! I am so proud to be your mom! I love you!

Alexandria Rhae Schryver Sterling High School

Love You Grandpa Dick

Kalie Conklen Sterling High School

Congratulations, Kalie Elizabeth-Jayne. We’re so proud of you! Good luck at DePaul University. LOVE ALWAYS, Mom, Dad, Kolten & Konner

Sean Leaf Aurora University

We are proud of you for receiving your Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration/Minor in Marketing.

Blackhawk College

Congratulations Marti! Family and friends are proud of you. Good luck on your job on the RFQHRORJ\ ÀRRU DW 7ULQLW\ +RVSLWDO

Congratulations on receiving your masters in social work and getting a job so fast. We are proud of you. Love from all of your family

Kolten Conklen Challand Middle School

Congratulations Kolten Hunter- Scott. We’re so proud of you! Good luck at SHS. LOVE ALWAYS, Mom, Dad, Kalie & Konner

Amanda Grant

Justin Yocum

Sauk Valley Community College

We are so very proud of you and love you.

Congratulations Amanda! We are proud of you! Good luck on making your dreams come true.

Amboy Junior High School

LOVE, Mom, Dad and Josh

St. Ambrose University

LOVE, Mom, Dad, Melissa & Kasey

Seth Wolber Sterling High School

Congratulations, Seth. So very proud of you!

Oregon High School

Sterling High School

Jacob Beck University of Northern Texas

You followed your dream and we are so proud of you.

Kyley Jo Robbins Ashford

From a tiny baby girl to a college graduate, We are very proud of you!

LOVE YOU, Nana

LOVE, Mom, Lance, Tyler, Lyden, Lydea, Grandma and Meme

Baylie Janssen Katie Anderson

Eric Farringer

Rock Falls High School

Congrats Girls! LOVE, The Janssen & Anderson Families

Eastern Illinois University

Congratulations Eric for earning your Bachelor’s Degree. We are so proud of you. LOVE, Mom, Dad & Michael

Taryn McKenna

Newman High School

Blackhawk College

Kylie Knox

Sterling High School

Congratulations! We are so proud of you.

Congratulations! We are so proud of you.

LOVE, Daddy & Jasmine

LOVE, Trent & Mommy

Shannon Daraska

AFC High School

Shannon, we are so proud of you! LOVE, Grandma & Grandpa Tomman

Thomas W. Hopp Dixon High School

Congratulations Thomas! Good luck at Morrison Tech. We are so proud of you.

Andna & Alexis Duncan NIU & Dixon High School

Congratulations girls! God has given you amazing talents & we pray you will experience the full potential of His gifts to you! LOVE, Mom, Dad & Aaron

Ashley Greenwalt Dixon High School

Congratulations Ashley!

LOVE, Mom, Dad & Alan

LOVE, Mom & family

Belle Hubbell

Terah Cheatham

Rock Falls High School

SIU School of Medicine

Congratulations Belle! We are so proud of you!

Best of luck at Rush University. We’re so proud of you!

LOVE, Dad, Cassie, Sophia, Xavier and Reyna

LOVE, Mom, Dad & Drew

Alyssa Folk Drew Cheatham Illinois State University

We are so proud of you and look forward to your future adventures. LOVE, Mom, Dad & Terah

Shannon Daraska

AFC High School

Great job Shannon! You did it! LOVE, Lori & Randy

Gavin Henderson

Rock Falls High School

Congratulations, Gavin! We are so proud of you! Good luck in college. LOVE, your family

Eastland High School

Congratulations! Our love and prayers will be with you always. LOVE, Grandpa John & Grandma Charlene Boward


Saturday, June 7, 2014

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367EEKENDs!

WEEKEND FEATURE | DIXON

DIXON

Downtown Streetscape work rolls on Portions of Peoria Avenue and Ottawa Street to close next week BY MATT MENCARINI mmencarini@saukvalley.com    EXT

DIXON – Two additional sections of downtown streets will be closed next week as work on the downtown streetscape project progresses. The project began in mid May and is expected to last until November. On the west side of the project: Work will continue on Peoria Avenue, between Second and Third streets, where the road will remain closed. Last week, work began on Peoria Avenue, between First and Second streets. The east side of the street will be closed next week, in addition to occasional closures of the west side. The intersection of Peoria Avenue and Second Street may be partially or fully closed, as

Photos by Kimberly Watley/Special to SVM

Merle Topper shows John Rich his aviation log book from WWII. The farm boy turned fighter pilot will be 90 years old in July. His friends and neighbors pulled together for an early gift to restore his silo. Rich, who has known Topper for what he said “seems like forever,� spearheaded the surprise.

Local landmark gets a facelift Old silo still urges passersby to ‘Drink Milk’ silo was painted was about 30 years ago. It was done freehand, by Randy Frey. “Randy was my mentor,� Morley said. “He put the first paintbrush in my hand. It’s an honor to redo his work. I grew up looking at it, and I’m 43, so, it’s been here a long time.� Topper said it looks like new. He was surprised by the kindness, especially since his birthday isn’t for another month. Semi-retired, Topper, who until about a year ago farmed livestock, including dairy and beef cattle, continues to haul livestock. He said he already is seeing cars drive by a little slower to admire the silo’s new shine. Money collected for the project wasn’t needed, so it will be used to throw Topper a big birthday bash at The Shamrock in July.

BY KIMBERLY WATLEY Special to Sauk Valley Media

DIXON — The landmark signifying “You were almost homeâ€? has been fading over the years, Merle Topper said. His famous painted silo, with the words “Drink Milk, Over 96% Fat Free, Associated Milk Producers Inc.,â€? is what so many remember most about that final stretch of road headed north on U.S. Route 52, coming into Dixon. Topper, who still lives in the house where he was born 89 years ago, was treated to an early birthday gift from his friends and neighbors. “I don’t know what they are planning to do with it,â€? he said with a trusting, easygoing, shrug, as a boom lift was being parked in front of the silo. Longtime friend John Rich spent the past year planning to have the mural restored, handpainted the way it was originally. Knowing costs would be pretty high, “Friends of Merle Topperâ€? was formed. A group of regular patrons at Shamrock Pub, who often have shared lunch with Topper, raised nearly $300. Nostalgically, Rich said: “Merle lay his life on the line for his country. There wasn’t no arm twisting or anything. Anybody who knows him, knows he is always the first one to pitch in to help. No one could say nothing but good about Merle Topper. He’s a good guy, ‌ honest as the day is long.â€? The World War II veteran and lifelong farmer was in the Navy. He enlisted in the Navy Reserves in 1946, and worked at the utility company that’s now ComEd. He also continued to farm the same land his father had. He and his wife, Betty, who worked at City National Bank, had three sons and two daughters. Word spread quickly, as it tends to do in these

Randy Betz (pictured) of Turnroth Sign Company in Rock Falls and John Morley of Morley Sign Company in Dixon teamed up to restore a mural on Merle Topper’s stone silo. Topper, 89, a WWII veteran, was born in the house he still lives in on U.S. Route 52 near Dixon, where he farmed until about a year ago. The sign on Topper’s silo, which says “Drink Milk, Over 96% Fat Free, Associated Milk Producers Inc.� has become something of a landmark in the area.

John Morley compares new design mural plans with an old photo taken before it faded. It has been more than 30 years since the silo was last painted by Morley’s mentor, Randy Frey. parts, Rich said, and before long, everyone wanted to simply get it

done for him. “It’s been there forever and is a landmark for anyone who grew up around here,� he added. Randy Betz of Turnroth Sign Co. and John Morley of Morley Sign Co. are business rivals, but when it came to doing something nice for someone so deserving, neither company hesitated. As a team, and at no fee, they put their talents, skills and equipment to use, side by side, for the restoration project, working for 10 hours Thursday until it was complete. Other companies that helped at no charge included Dixon Paint Co., Sherwin Williams, Josh Price Prairie State Painting, Ace Hardware and Rental, and Holland and Sons. The last time the

Roadwork map Go to http://shawurl. COMDIXONMAP for a map of the streetscape work and closed roads. necessary, for pavement removal and water main installation. On the east side of the project: Work will continue this weekend on First Street, between Hennepin and Galena avenues, on excavation and stone placement for the roadway, which is expected to be finished by Monday. Curb and sidewalk installation on this block is expected to begin next week. Ottawa Street, between First and Second streets, will be closed next week for pavement and sidewalk removal, followed by installation of the water main and storm sewer.

DIXON

Sterling man faces charge of aggravated sexual abuse STAFF REPORT news@saukvalley.com    EXT

STERLING – A 22-yearold Sterling man was arrested around noon Friday in the 1300 block of Third Avenue on a Dixon Police warrant for aggravated criminal sexual abuse. Kyle M. Schultz was taken to Lee County Jail, where he was being held on $50,000 bond, Dixon police said in a news release. A convic-

tion carries 3 to 7 years in prison. The arrest stemmed from an incident Kyle M. in NovemSchultz ber 2012 involving a girl younger than 18, Sgt. Matt Richards said. The investigation is continuing, and no other details are being released at this time, he said.

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SYCAMORE

TAKING STOCK OF THE GARDEN IN DIXON

Facebook death threats lead to charges BY KATIE DAHLSTROM KDAHLSTROM SHAWMEDIACOM 3HAW.EWS3ERVICE

SYCAMORE â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Kavoisia D. Thomas was making threats on Facebook to kill his ex-girlfriend before Sycamore police found him hiding in the bushes behind her home Friday, police said. Police received an anonymous tip that Thomas, 18, had written on Facebook that he was planned to kill the victim, a former girlfriend, according to police Lt. Darrell Johnson. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There was a falling out and I guess this is how he planned to handle it,â&#x20AC;? Johnson said. Police said Thomas took a neighborâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bicycle and rode to the victimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s house in Sycamore. After police reviewed the threats Thomas was making, they went to the victimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home. Minutes after midnight, they found Thomas hiding in the bushes in the backyard and arrested him. Johnson said they did not find any weapons on Thomas or in the area. The residents of the house were unaware of the threats, Johnson said. Thomas is charged with harassment through electronic communication, assault, and disorderly conduct.

LOCAL BANKING

The National Bank to get new name Change effective June 30 at 5 locations in Sauk Valley STAFF REPORT NEWS SAUKVALLEYCOM    EXT

MOLINE â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The National Bank, with branches in Sterling, Chadwick, Morrison, Mount Carroll and Savanna, is changing its name. The bank on Friday announced it will become Triumph Community Bank, effective June 30. The full-service community bank is a member of Triumph Bancorp Inc. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The name Triumph Community Bank not only united the bank with our parent company, ... but it also removes some of the confusion around the

Alex T. Paschal/apaschal@saukvalley.com

Trevor Mesner of Amboy waters a bed of plants Friday at Sinnissippi Centers in Dixon. Mesner and other members of the centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gardening program spent the morning planting and mulching the grounds. Proceeds from Gardenstock, the annual music festival at Distinctive Gardens in Dixon, help fund the program.

2014 ELECTION

Quinn campaign means business Strategy: Portray GOPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rauner as outsourcer of jobs CHICAGO (AP) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; First it was allegations of nursing home resident neglect. Then an admitted serial fraudster on a retirement funds board. Now itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s companies outsourcing jobs overseas. Locked into one of the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s closest gubernatorial races, Gov. Pat Quinn is focusing on a key theme as he tries to keep venture capitalist Bruce Rauner from becoming the first Republican in more than a decade to run Illinois: picking apart Raunerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s private equity firm investments and how he made hundreds of millions of dollars. The tactic, used to portray Rauner as a heartless multimillionaire, mimics President Barack Obama campaignâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s portrayal of another businessman â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney in 2012. But political analysts said the strategy has risks, including that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tough to tie Rauner directly to company decisions and that the move could anger the business community. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an indirect way of arguing that this candidate is out of touch with the voters,â&#x20AC;? said Nathan Daschle, the Democratic Governors Associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s former executive director. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But you do have to be careful that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not

3ATURDAY *UNE 

AP

spokesman Mike Schrimpf called the Quinn campaignâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spotlight on the outsourcing companies a â&#x20AC;&#x153;desperateâ&#x20AC;? attack that wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t surprising in light of Quinnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;failures.â&#x20AC;? GTCRâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s business dealings span decades, including managing money for state retirement funds. Rauner was chairman until stepping down in 2012. â&#x20AC;&#x153;GTCR is one of the most respected investment firms in the country,â&#x20AC;? Schrimpf said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;which is why it has been trusted for years to oversee the retirement investments of Illinois teachers and state workers.â&#x20AC;? Political strategists say Quinnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tactic could work in Raunerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s favor. Republican strategist Doug Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien said itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard to show Rauner was directly connected to the business dealings.

Gov. Pat Quinn (left) and his Republican rival, venture capitalist Bruce Rauner, shake hands April 11 after they appeared together at the annual meeting of the Illinois Education Association in Chicago. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Time and again, sending a message that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen billionaire success is a bad thing.â&#x20AC;? Rauner has defended Bruce Rauner profit his accomplishments while workers and the and business record. most vulnerable got the But Quinnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s campaign shaft,â&#x20AC;? said Quinn camis now questioning paign spokeswoman Izaother companies linked bela Miltko. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rauner has to Raunerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s investment said he wants to run our firm GTCR, pointing state like a business. We out details to The Asso- just hope not like one of ciated Press that were his businesses.â&#x20AC;? Rauner campaign confirmed by company statements, news reports and Raunerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s campaign. Among those was a business processing outsourcing company formerly known once as H-Cube. GTCR formed it in 2005. H-Cube acquired other companies and merged, HEATING & COOLING eventually employing thousands of people in 815-631-6232 India and the PhilipKelly Wallingford - Owner pines under a Pennsylr .KEGPUGF r $QPFGF r +PUWTGF vania company named Zenta, which Accenture acquired in 2011. Quinnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s campaign says GTCRâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s profits hinged, in part, on shipping American jobs overseas.

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spelling and location of our company,â&#x20AC;? John DeDoncker, president and CEO of The National Bank, said in a news release. Exterior updates to ATMs around the Quad Cities area already have started. Throughout the summer, signs, forms and other communication materials will be updated with the new name and logo, the release said. Employees, products and services will remain the same, the bank said. Customers with questions about the change can call their local branch or the corporate office at 563-344-3935.

SPRINGFIELD

Illinois to spend $4M for ballot measure mailers SPRINGFIELD (AP) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Illinois will likely spend about $4 million to mail pamphlets and buy newspaper ad space to tell voters about several efforts to change the state constitution in the November election, a state spokesman says. Secretary of State spokesman Dave Druker told The Associated Press on Friday that his agency is required by law to produce almost 6 million pamphlets that include information about the pros and cons of each proposed constitutional amendment. About 5.2 million pamphlets will be mailed to every Illinois household before the election, and others will be available in libraries or political offices. The law also

requires Secretary of State Jesse Whiteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office to post information in newspapers in every county before the election. Illinois voters could see as many as four ballot measures this year. The Legislature overwhelmingly approved a votersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; rights amendment and a crime victimsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; rights amendment, both awaiting approval from Gov. Pat Quinn. A spokesman for the Chicago Democrat said the governor supports both initiatives. The Arlington Heights Daily Herald first reported on Friday that even though legislators approved two ballot measures, they didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t give Whiteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office extra money for the mailing.

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367EEKENDs!

MONEY & MARKETS The following stock quotations, as of 5 p.m., are provided as a community service by Chad Weigle of Edward Jones, Dixon and Raymond James and Associates, Sterling. Abbott .......................40.05 Alcoa .........................14.35 AltriaCorp .................41.39 Autonation ...............57.20 American Express ....94.90 Arris-Group ..............33.16 Apple.......................645.57 ADM..........................45.19 AT&T .........................35.01 Bank of America.......15.57 Boeing.....................138.23 BorgWarner ..............66.15 BP ..............................50.81 Caseyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ......................72.35 Caterpillar ..............108.19 CenturyLink .............36.90 Chevron ..................124.14 Cisco .........................24.83 Citigroup ..................48.93 CNW .........................48.06 CocaCola ..................40.97 ConAgra....................32.69 Dean .........................17.60 Deere & Co ...............92.35 Disney .......................84.59 Donaldson................41.60 DuPont .....................69.67 Exxon ......................101.55 Ford ..........................17.07 Exelon .......................37.39 GE .............................27.14 FifthThird .................21.33 HawaiianElectric .....24.54 Hewlett Packard ......33.84

HomeDepot .............80.62 Intel Corp. ................28.17 IBM .........................186.30 IntlPaper...................47.88 JCPenney ....................8.62 JohnsonControls......50.30 Johnson&Johnson .103.14 JPMorgan Chase ......56.94 Kraft ..........................59.72 Kroger .......................48.12 Leggett&Platt ...........34.48 Manpower ................85.29 McDonaldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ............101.94 Merck&Co ................57.84 Microsoft ..................41.48 3M ...........................144.63 Monsanto ...............121.72 Newell .......................31.02 AGL ...........................53.56 Nike...........................76.22 Parker-Han.............128.19 Pfizer .........................29.42 Pepsico .....................87.91 Procter&Gamble ......80.02 RaymondJames........49.87 Republic ...................36.00 Sears Hldg ................40.80 SensientTech ...........54.59 Sprint ..........................8.78 Staples ......................11.23 TheTravelers ............94.36 UnitedContinental ..48.04 UnitedTech ............118.86 USBancorp ...............42.86 USSteel .....................24.09 Verizon .....................49.41 Walgreen ..................75.02 WalMartStores .........77.20 WalMartMexico .......27.25 WasteMgt .................44.26 Wendyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ......................8.37

Commodities The following quotations are provided as a community service by Sterling Futures: Corn: July 4.59; Sept. 4.56Ÿ; Dec. 4.57ž Soybeans: July 14.57; Aug. 14.01; Nov. 12.18½ Soybean oil: July 39.01; Dec. 39.35 Soybean meal: July 487.60; Dec. 394.20 Wheat: July 6.18Ÿ; Dec. 6.51 Oats: July 3.56ž; Dec. 3.27ž

Live cattle: June 140.75; Aug. 141.90; Oct. 144.80 Feeder cattle: Aug. 200.77; Oct. 201.07 Lean hogs: June 115.05; July 125.17; Oct. 107.70 Sugar: July 16.92 Cotton: July 84.78 T-Bonds: June 136 9â &#x201E;32 Silver: July 19.00 Gold: Aug. 1250.50 Copper: July 3.0590 Crude: July 102.75 Dollar Index: July 80.44

IN BRIEF Putin talks with new Ukraine leader /5)342%(!- &RANCE !0 Â&#x2C6;2USSIAN0RESIDENT 6LADIMIR0UTINSPOKEFACE TO FACEWITH5KRAINES INCOMINGPRESIDENTABOUT

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28374 Milledgeville Road ALL EVENTS AT THE FAIRGROUNDS, MILLEDGEVILLE, IL


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Sports

LET IT FLY

v weekend

Section B

Schwarz a phenom thrower, B3. e-mail: sports@saukvalley.com

Saturday, June 7, 2014

SOFTBALL | STATE EXTRA | 1A SEMIFINALS FULL COVERAGE FROM EAST PEORIA ON B10 & B11

COARSE COURSE ERRORS COST CLIPPERS IN SEMIFINAL LOSS

Philip Marruffo/pmarruffo@saukvalley.com

Amboy’s Micaela McCoy (left) and Kelsie Thurman nearly collide while trying to catch a flyball off the bat of Trico’s Morgan Vogt during Friday’s 1A state semifinal game at EastSide Centre in East Peoria. Defense was an issue for Amboy, as it committed four errors, in a 6-1 loss. The Clippers will play for third place against West Prairie on Saturday morning. Read all about Friday’s action in SVM’s state softball coverage.

Sports inside

OUTDOOR ADVENTURES

BELMONT STAKES

Final scheming time for King Kat, B5.

History hinges on horse, B6.

Suggestion box Comment or story tip? Contact Sports Editor Dan Woessner at dwoessner@saukvalley.com or 800-798-4085, ext. 5555


TOP OF 2

No problem in Houston Jadeveon Clowney 4EXANSSIGN.OOVERALL PICKTO YEAR MILLIONCONTRACT$EALINCLUDES AFIFTH YEAROPTIONWORTH REPORTEDLYMILLION

New recruits Hawks take swings 0ATRICK3HARP "RYAN"ICKELLANDAFEWOTHER"LACKHAWKSTAKEBATTINGPRATICE BEFORE&RIDAYS#UBSGAME AT7RIGLEY&IELD

Your guide to whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going on in sports

"s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

3ATURDAY *UNE 

MY 2 CENTS

Proof that James is not Jordan On the tube TV listings Saturday Arena football 4 p.m.

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Horse racing 3:30 p.m.

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L

eBron James was carried off the court on Thursday, as he succumbed to severe cramps in the heat of Game 1 of the NBA Finals against the Spurs. He missed the final couple minutes, the Spurs pulled away for a 15-point win, and the argument was finally over. King James is not Michael Jordan. Jordan would never leave an NBA Finals game because he was in pain. His will to win was too great for that. He would leave his team for a season and a half so that he could pursue baseball, which probably cost the Bulls a chance at a historic eight-straight titles, but thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s different. Or at least better than leaving a game for being hurt. Right? A few weeks ago, a Facebook post circulated about how Michael Jordan had 38 career 40-point playoff games, while LeBron has nine. End comparison there. If points donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t determine the overall value of a player, than what metric does? Forget that Jordan played in an era when scoring was up, in part,

DANWOESSNER 3PORTS %DITOR 2EACH HIMAT DWOESSNER SAUKVALLEY COMCOM OR   EXT 

because teams werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t allowed to play defense. Remember the illegal defense call, because a teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s man-to-man would look too closely like a zone? Forget that Jordan was the best shooting guard in an era of great shooting guards. While he was a very good defender, he didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t often get assigned the task of guarding the other teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best player in crunch time. Much less was he asked to guard the best player whether that player was a guard, forward or center. LeBron does those things. Just ask Derrick Rose how it turns out when James turns his defensive attention to you. But that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t matter. It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t matter, because LeBron passes too much. Or whines too much (Jordan never bugged officials for

calls, right). Or he has too many commercials. Or he doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sneak off to casinos between playoff games, or lose thousands of dollars on the golf course. But what about the Decision? Yeah, that was a pretty stupid situation. But, not much more stupid than most programming on ESPN these days. But how dare LeBron leave Cleveland? The place that offered him such great running mates like Shannon Brown and Drew Gooden. Take a look at the 2007 Finals roster, and ask how many games that team would have won without LeBron. Oh wait, check out how many games that franchise has won since heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s left. But he should never have left a place not committed to winning. Jordan would have loved to play there. Then James went to a place with a proven commodity like Dwyane Wade and added value with Chris Bosh. Michael Jordan never left his organization â&#x20AC;&#x201C; at least not in his prime. He didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need other superstars to help him win titles and become the greatest.

Although letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ask one question, how many of you out there would pick Wade and Bosh over Pippen and Rodman? The point being that there seems to be a great desire to look at one player through extreme rose-colored lenses, while the other player has every move and misstep put under a microscope. Both are once-ina-generation players boosted by incredible amounts of hype and publicity. I grew up faithfully watching Michael Jordan win titles. No matter how many titles James wins, or shoes he sells, it wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t change my memories of Jordan. And it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t offend me if James strives to be the greatest â&#x20AC;&#x201C; he might fail, he might succeed. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the point of sports. But letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s get one thing straight. One number. One game. One this, or one that, isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t going be the overall determining factor. We are in the middle of the Jamesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; era. If you like basketball, enjoy it while itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s here. The issue of legacy will work itself out later.

Major League Lacrosse 6:30 p.m.

s$ENVERAT#HARLOTTE &3.

NHL playoffs 7 p.m.

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s&RENCH/PEN WOMENS FINAL ."#

Sunday Auto racing Noon

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s,OUISVILLE3UPER2EGIONAL 'AME +ENNESAW3TVS ,OUISVILLE %30. s&ORT7ORTH3UPER 2EGIONAL 'AME 4#5VS 0EPPERDINE %30.5 9 p.m.

TENNIS | FRENCH OPEN

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Showdown set in Paris for final

s8'AMES AT!USTIN 4EXAS %30.

Eight-time champ Nadal to meet rival Djokovic for championship

s8'AMES !"#

BY HOWARD FENDRICH !04ENNIS7RITER

PARIS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; This is what Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic wanted. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what they expected. And now theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll meet in a French Open final with so much at stake for both. Nadal is seeking championship No. 9 at Roland Garros, and his 14th major title overall. Djokovic is hoping to finally conquer the French Open and complete a career Grand Slam. Fittingly, whoever wins the rivalsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 42nd head-to-head meeting Sunday will be ranked No. 1 on Monday; the runner-up will be No. 2. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He has the motivation to win Roland Garros for the first time, for sure. But at the same time, he has the pressure to win for the first time,â&#x20AC;? Nadal said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have the pressure that I want to win â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and the motivation that I want to win â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the ninth.â&#x20AC;? In Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s semifinals, the No. 1-seeded Nadal was at his imperious, and nearly immaculate,

best in a 6-3, 6-2, 6-1 victory over Wimbledon champion Andy Murray that lasted all of 100 minutes. Nadal never faced a break point, converted all six he earned, and whipped his uppercut of a forehand as only he can. Toni Nadal, Rafaelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s uncle and coach, called the match â&#x20AC;&#x153;one of the best that he has ever played here.â&#x20AC;? Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sure saying something. Toniâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nephew is 65-1 at the clay-court tournament and carries a 34-match winning streak into the final. The thick, gray clouds and chill that became a staple these 2 weeks gave way to sunshine and warmth Friday, and Nadal reveled in it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For me, is much better when the weather is like today,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My ball creates more topspin. The ball goes quicker in the air, and with my forehand I am able to create more with less.â&#x20AC;? All in all, Nadal made Murray look rather lost.

Extreme sports 11 a.m.

1 p.m.

Golf 2 p.m.

s0'! 3T*UDE#LASSIC FINALROUND AT-EMPHIS 4ENN #"3 4 p.m.

s53'! #URTIS#UP FINAL ROUNDMATCHES AT3T,OUIS 4'# 8 p.m.

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MLB Noon

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s!SAT/RIOLESOR -ARINERSAT2AYS -," 1 p.m.

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Novak Djokovic smashes his racket Friday against Ernests Gulbis during their semifinal match of the French Open in Paris, France. Djokovic will play top-seeded Rafael Nadal in the final.

Tennis 8 a.m.

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9 p.m.

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30 CLASSIC YEARS | SVM ALL-STAR CLASSIC REWIND Delivering under pressure When:7EDNESDAY *UNE  Where:3AUK6ALLEY#OMMUNITY#OLLEGE Score:4ELEGRAPH 'AZETTE MVP: Ben Rand 2OCHELLE POINTS ASSISTS Recap:2AND WHOWASBOUNDFORTHE5NIVERSITYOF )OWA SANKTWOFREETHROWSWITHSECONDSLEFTAND WITH2OCK&ALLSRobbie MinorJAWINGINHISEARTOGIVE THE4ELEGRAPHTHEWIN4HE4ELEGRAPHWENTONA  RUNINTHELASTTORALLYFROMA DEFICIT!&#S Josh LawrenceADDEDPOINTSFORTHE4ELEGRAPH WHILE-INORHADPOINTSAND3TERLINGSMike RodriguezADDEDFORTHE'AZETTE-OUNT#ARROLLSJeremy HaasTIEDTHESCOREATWITHSECONDSLEFT ,AWRENCEWONTHEDUNKCONTEST

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Saturday, June 7, 2014

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367EEKENDs"

GIRLS TRACK & FIELD

IESA State Track and Field Meet EastSide Centre, East Peoria Class A:-AY  Class AA:-AY 

On the calendar Local events Saturday Softball 10 a.m.

s!STATETOURNAMENT 4HIRD PLACE !MBOYVS West Prairie, at EastSide Centre, East Peoria 11 a.m.

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Alex T. Paschal/apaschal@saukvalley.com

Dixonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tayla Schwarz won IESA titles in the discus and shot put in May. Her throws would have put her in conention in the IHSA 2A title hunt. Next spring, Schwarz will be throwing at Dixon High School.

SOFTBALL

Measuring stick

Jones named TRACâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top player

Schwarz already setting standard for Dixon throws

SVM staff, wire services

Fulton senior shortstop Jenna Jones was named the player of the year in the Three Rivers North Division, in votINGCONDUCTEDBYTHE LEAGUESCOACHES ITWAS announced on Friday. !COMPLETELISTOFTHETEAM CANBEFOUNDONB11. BASEBALL

Brackemyer, Jensen share TRAC honors -ORRISONSOPHOMORES Joey Brackemyer and Justin Jensen were named co-players of the year in the Three Rivers .ORTH$IVISION INVOTING CONDUCTEDBYTHELEAGUES coaches, it was announced on Friday. !COMPLETELISTOFTHE TEAMCANBEFOUNDONB9. LOCAL GOLF

Eastland Cougar Open is Aug. 23 The ninth annual Eastland #OUGAR/PENGOLFOUTING WILLBEHELD3ATURDAY !UG AT,AKE#ARROLLGOLF COURSE)TBEGINSATPM #OSTISPERGOLFERFOR ,AKE#ARROLLMEMBERSOR FORNON MEMBERS)T INCLUDESGOLF CART LUNCH BEVERAGES ASTEAKDINNER and prizes. 0ROCEEDSWILLBENEFITTHE %ASTLAND!THLETIC"OOSTER #LUB RUNNING

Polo 5K slated for June 12 4HETHANNUAL0OLO 4OWN#OUNTRY$AYS+ RUNWALKWILLBEHELD4HURSDAY *UNE)TBEGINSAT PMATTHE0OLO(IGH 3CHOOLFOOTBALLFIELD Cost is $10 per entrant. For more information, contact Terry Jenkins at 946-4165. COLLEGE HOOPS

Academic fraud alleged at UNC In an interview with %30.Sh/UTSIDETHE ,INESvTHATAIRED&RIDAY EX .ORTH#AROLINABASKETBALL player Rashad McCants â&#x20AC;&#x201C; THESECOND LEADINGSCORER on Roy WilliamsFIRST .#!!CHAMPIONSHIPTEAM in 2005 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; said tutors wrote papers for him, and that 7ILLIAMSKNEWABOUTNO show classes popular with athletes. -C#ANTSALSOSAID7ILliams told him he could SWAPAFAILINGGRADEFROM ONECLASSWITHAPASSING one from another to stay ELIGIBLEDURINGTHE  SEASON ACCORDINGTOTHE report.

BY BRIAN WEIDMAN BWEIDMAN SAUKVALLEYCOM 800-798-4085, ext. 5551

For more than 3 decades, the girls track record board at Dixon High School has been unchanged in the shot put and the discus. Tammy Turner set the discus mark of 126 feet, 4 inches in winning a state championship in 1980. A year later, Sue Kent posted a distance of 40-0 in the shot put. Ladies, step aside, because thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about to be a new sheriff in town, and her name is Tayla Schwarz. A 14-year-old who just graduated from Reagan Middle School, Schwarz is on pace to shatter those marks. In fact, sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s already exceeded one of them. In winning a Class AA 8th grade shot put title at the Illinois Elementary School Association state track and field meet on May 24 in East Peoria, Schwarz won with a distance of 41-2. That heave, achieved with an 8-pound, 8-ounce ball of metal, the same as high school and college athletes use, would have placed her third at this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Class 2A IHSA state meet. Her best discus throw is 124-3, at the Challand Invitational earlier this spring, putting her within 2 feet, 1 inch of Turnerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s school mark. Thus, she wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t boasting when pointing out itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a matter of when, not if, she etches her name in the DHS record books, barring unforeseen circumstances. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got 4 years to see how much I can break them by,â&#x20AC;? Schwarz said. That would come as no surprise to her junior high coach, Lee Eastman. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whatever you ask of her, she does,â&#x20AC;? Eastman said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She surprised me with her competitiveness, and is an unbelievable talent.â&#x20AC;? The last time Schwarz lost an IESA competition was in sixth grade. At the state meet, going against seventh graders, she placed fourth in the shot put with a distance of 30-4 1/2. As a seventh grader, she went undefeated in both throws. At state, she won the shot put at 35-11, and the discus at 103-8. Her main competition was Ellie Weltha from Bloomington

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Junior High, who took second both the shot put (35-3 1/2) and discus (103-7). Schwarz was again undefeated as an eighth grader heading into the state meet, but Weltha was waiting. In the shot put preliminaries, Weltha uncorked a throw of 39-11 1/4. It broke the record of 38-4 held by IHSA legend Kelsey Card of Carlinville, who won four consecutive high school state titles, and now competes at Wisconsin. Schwarzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best throw of three in the prelims was 39-9, a personal best, but still short of Welthaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just a great competitor,â&#x20AC;? Schwarz said of Weltha, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like to lose. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m really competitive. I had to get fired up, because I knew I had to throw a really good throw because hers was pretty good.â&#x20AC;? The finals consisted of two throws. On her first attempt, Schwarz added 1 inch to her preliminary round distance, but was still 1 1/4 inch short of Weltha. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I really thought I was going to lose,â&#x20AC;? Schwarz said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I seriously thought that was the best I could do because that was my best. That was my PR.â&#x20AC;? On the final shot put heave of her junior high career, Schwarz put together a perfect storm of an effort. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was definitely a lot of adrenaline that went into the throw,â&#x20AC;? Schwarz said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and I think I went through the ring quicker. Between throws, my coach [Eastman] and my dad [Bob] were trying to give me advice. I was trying to move quicker, and I think that helped. I had more explosion.â&#x20AC;? The final result: a stunning distance of 41-2. â&#x20AC;&#x153;After they said the mark, I left the ring and kind of ran around for a while,â&#x20AC;? Schwarz said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was in shock, because I really wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t expecting that.â&#x20AC;? The fruits of that effort are still being harvested. She made a deal with her parents, Bob and Dawn, that if she reached 40 feet in the shot put this season, they would have to buy her a new iPhone, to replace the now comparatively obsolete

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Galaxy she had earned for winning state as a seventh grader. Also, Dawn has to plop down on the couch and watch the entire Harry Potter movie series with her daughter. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t done that yet, but I think there are eight of them,â&#x20AC;? Dawn said, her eyes rolling at the same time. The discus competition was all but an afterthought. After her seventh grade year, DHS weights coach Brandon Woodward taught her the spinning method to throw, instead of a simple power throw. The more advanced technique was refined by Eastman over the course of the season. The result was a throw of 120-7 at state, more than 18 feet ahead of the runner-up, Weltha. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think that Ellie really wanted to beat me in the shot,â&#x20AC;? Schwarz said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;because she knew she couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t beat me in the discus.â&#x20AC;? Of the two events, Schwarz prefers the shot put. It is more tailored for her brute force style. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Discus throwers are small and have really long arms,â&#x20AC;? Schwarz said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like a ballet through the ring, because youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to be graceful, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not graceful.â&#x20AC;? Last summer, Schwarz made the rounds on the summer track circuit, competing at meets throughout the country. The highlight was the USA Track and Field Junior Olympics, held in Greensboro, N.C. Competing in the 13-14 division, Schwarz placed fifth in the shot put with a heave of 43-3 1/4, but that was with a 6-pound shot. Competitors in that age group use a lighter shot put, and it was the first time she had done so. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It kept slipping out of my fingers,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was not really happy with how I threw down there. Hopefully Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll do better this year.â&#x20AC;? This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Junior Olympics will be held July 21-26 in Houston. After that, it will be off to high school. She plans to play volleyball in the fall, then spend the winter preparing for track season in the spring. The DHS shot put record will likely be the first to fall, an especially

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impressive feat considering Kent threw an 8-pound shot to set her mark 33 years ago. The discus mark, given the right wind conditions, will likely go by the wayside as well. In the bigger prep picture, Schwarz would like to become a 4-time state shot put champion, like Card was during her days in Carlinville. The top non-senior in Class 2A this season was Wauconda junior Christina Meinhardt, who placed fourth at 40-8 1/2. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Freshman year is going to be the hardest,â&#x20AC;? Schwarz said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;because obviously Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going against a lot of older people. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to have to do a lot of work this year to try and get it.â&#x20AC;? After high school, Schwarz hopes to follow in the footsteps of her older sister, Brittany, who earned a Division I scholarship to run track and cross country at Illinois-Chicago. Tayla also hopes to get a free college education, and was already indirectly contacted by a Division I coach after the IESA state meet. Way down the road, if everything falls her way, she would like to represent the United States in a Summer Olympic Games. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think it would be really, really cool to be in the Olympics,â&#x20AC;? Schwarz said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That would be my goal, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to take a lot of work to get there.â&#x20AC;? Woodward, head girls coach at Dixon and a throws specialist, canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait to get started working with Schwarz. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She brings maximum effort,â&#x20AC;? Woodward said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She listens. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unbelievably coachable. I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be a very smooth transition. She had great support from coach Eastman. Her parents drive her all over the country to throw. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s prepared. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ready. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to find the best approach, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to work all the intricacies, and sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to do a fabulous job.â&#x20AC;?

Area top 10 finishers Class A 7th grade boys 1.+YLE+RUTHOFF%RIE POLE vault 9-6 2.-ATTHEW'ARRISON%RIE POLEVAULT  2."RADY7EBB0OLO !PLINGTON LONGJUMP  3..ATHAN0AUP #AUDILL"6 3OUTH  3.'ARRISON%RIE DISCUS   5. -ORRISONRELAY  6.2OCK&ALLS3T!NDREW 800 relay 1:50.88 6.0AUP #AUDILL"63OUTH HIGHJUMP  7."63OUTH RELAY 4:10.67 9."63OUTHRELAY 1:51.16 Class AA 7th grade boys 6.!LEK$ORAN#HALLAND LONGJUMP  7.#OLIN'RADY2EAGAN 1,600 4:57.52 Class A 8th grade boys 2.*USTICE9OUNGBLOOD %RIE POLEVAULT  3.2OCK&ALLS3T!NDREW 800 relay 1:42.65 6.-ORGAN3TRADER"6 3OUTH   7.0OLO !PLINGTONRELAY 1:44.5 8.-ORRISONRELAY 1:44.55 10.2OCK&ALLS3T!NDREW 1,600 relay 4:00.42 Class AA 8th grade boys 2.*AKE'EBHARDT#HALLAND   2..YRELL3ULLIVAN2EAGAN LONGJUMP  7.2EAGAN-3RELAY  Class A 7th grade girls 1.3AIGE"ARNETT"63OUTH SHOTPUT  3.#ALISSA3TEEL%RIE  HURDLES 3.0EYTON4EGELER-ORRISON DISCUS  5.3TEEL%RIE POLEVAULT  6. 2OCK&ALLS3T!NDREW 800 relay 1:58.85 10."63OUTHRELAY 2:01.44 10.!MBOY RELAY 4:41.24 Class AA 7th grade girls 8.+IRA'ORAL2EAGAN   9.!LLISON"AY2EAGAN DISCUS  10."AILEE&ORTNEY2OCK &ALLS  Class A 8th grade girls 2.+IRSTEN4UNINK2&3T !NDREW  2.(ALEY7EIDNER"6 3OUTH   5.7HITNEY"RAMM%RIE HIGHJUMP  5.-ADDILYN$EERY/HIO SHOTPUT  6."RAMM%RIE POLEVAULT 7-6 7.7EIDNER"63OUTH  2:28.49 7.$EERY/HIO DISCUS 81-10 8. !MBOYRELAY 1:57.26 Class AA 8th grade girls 1.4AYLA3CHWARZ2EAGAN shot put 41-2 1.3CHWARZ2EAGAN discus 120-7

On this date June 7 2009 sRoger Federer completes a career Grand 3LAM WINNINGHISFIRST &RENCH/PENTITLE&EDERER wins his 14th major title to tie Pete SamprasRECORD

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DRAFT COMMENTARY

Honelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tale one of draft caution

I

n the middle of a pitching lesson the other day in Bourbonnais, a young boy turned the tables when he critiqued instructor Kris Honel. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You look like Chris Sale,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122; the kid told Honel. Oh, how the White Sox wish that had been true on the mound. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had people ask, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Is that your brother?â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122; the 6-foot-5, 205-pound Honel said of Sale. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re about the same size. They see some resemblances.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the differences between Honel and Sale that make the comparison worthwhile in the wake of Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s amateur baseball draft in which the Sox selected North Carolina State lefthander Carlos Rodon with the third pick in the first round. Nine years before the Sox took Sale at No. 13 overall in the 2010 draft, they invested hope and money in another tall, lanky starting pitcher â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Honel â&#x20AC;&#x201C; with the 16th pick. But instead of solidifying the Sox rotation, the pride of Providence Catholic in New Lenox encountered so much injury and inconsistency that he never threw a pitch in the majors. All of Honelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 135 pro starts came in the bushes. Now 31 and waiting at home for his phone to ring, Honel never says never about a baseball odyssey that has taken him from the Sox minor league system to obscure independent league stops such as Edmonton and Maui. He stays fit and ready, volunteering as a coach at Kankakee Community College as he ponders the future. Honel planned to pitch this week for the Laredo (Texas) Lemurs of the American Association, but the deal hit a snag. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m just waiting in the wings for the next opportunity to pop up,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122; said Honel, whose last major league shot came at spring training with the Twins in 2009. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I feel pretty good. They say pitchersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; primes are between 26 and 33. I have good genes and besides Tommy John surgery, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had nothing major.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Honelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cautionary tale should temper expectations, if not enthusiasm, over Rodon, considered this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most polished pitcher. Not every firstround pick becomes Sale, no matter how promising the outlook on draft day.

DAVIDHAUGH -#4.EWS 3ERVICE SPORTS COLUMNIST (ECANBE REACHEDAT DHAUGH TRIBUNECOM

When Honel received a $1.5 million signing bonus as an 18-year-old, he embraced all that came with the celebrity of being a local player chosen by his hometown team. He acknowledged being brash. He admitted expecting more. Something happened on Honelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s way to stardom. Baseball happened. The knuckle-curve that worked so well in high school stopped fooling hitters. His control came and went. Velocity mysteriously vanished. In September 2005, with the Sox on the verge of a World Series, Honel underwent Tommy John surgery at the age of 22 to address the nagging elbow problems that had interrupted his ascent. Everything changed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard enough to throw right when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re healthy let alone coming back from that,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Honel said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;After the surgery, it took me 2 or 3 years to really get my feet back under me, and be comfortable on the mound.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122; By then, Honel had allowed the unfamiliar adversity to affect his approach. When frustration outweighed confidence, he finally announced his retirement in 2007, after going 2-2 with a 5.79 ERA at Double-A Birmingham. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve known Kris since high school, and in all his years as an athlete, he was never a guy who couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do whatever he wanted to do,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Kankakee coach Todd Post said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If he wanted to hit 91 [mph], he hit 91. Psychologically, when he couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do what he wanted, it became a challenge.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122; The challenges mounted but the regrets never did. For a guy who symbolizes squandered potential, Honel maintains a healthy perspective about his unfulfilled, but eventful career. It enabled him to meet Bo Jackson and Michael Jordan at a Phoenix nightclub. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had a very good run,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Honel said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are times you get down about some things, but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not the type to be bitter.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

ROUNDUP

Rizzo rescues Cubs in 13th at Wrigley Cardinals fall to Jays; Sox trailing Blue Jays 3, Cardinals Anthony Rizzo stayed at 1: Jose Bautista and Brett "YTHE!SSOCIATED0RESS

the plate for an extra second, as his towering drive headed toward right field. The big first baseman just wanted to make sure it was fair before he got started on one enjoyable trip around the bases at Wrigley Field. Rizzo hit a two-run homer in the 13th inning, and the Cubs beat the Miami Marlins 5-3 on Friday for their season-high fourth consecutive victory. The Cubs recovered after closer Hector Rondon blew a three-run lead in the ninth, earning their first four-game winning streak since last July 6-9. Rizzo also had a two-run double in the eighth, and Jason Hammel pitched seven shutout innings.

Lawrie each homered, rookie Marcus Stroman won his second straight start, as the Blue Jays beat the Cardinals in Toronto. The Cardinals turned their first triple play in 9 years, but still lost for the eighth time in 10 games. They dropped their fifth straight meeting with Toronto. Stroman (3-0) allowed one run and seven hits in six innings.

3ATURDAY *UNE 

RETROSPECTIVE | DON ZIMMER

Baseball loses character Former Cubs manager acted as ambassador for game BY PAUL SULLIVAN #HICAGO4RIBUNE

Zimmer file

Baseball lost one of its great ambassadors Wednesday when former Cubs manager Don Zimmer died in Florida at 83. Zimmer, nicknamed â&#x20AC;&#x153;Popeyeâ&#x20AC;? for his strength and big cheeks, spent 66 years in baseball. But few were as wild as his threeplus seasons managing the Cubs, whom he led to a division title in 1989 with an unpredictable style that never has been replicated. Zimmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 247-239 record in his first three seasons with the Cubs was the highest victory total for a Cubs manager at the time since Leo Durocher won 535 games from 1966-72. His exit was also one of the most memorable in Cubs history. Zimmer handed an ultimatum to Tribune Co. executive Don Grenesko to give him a contract extension early in the 1991 season, asking for the same kind of security the players had. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Am I any different?â&#x20AC;? Zimmer said he told Grenesko. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What am I? A piece of garbage in Lake Michigan?â&#x20AC;? The ploy didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t work, and Zimmer was fired after 37 games. In typical fashion, he invited the beat writers into his New York hotel suite and told them to empty out the minibar so he could charge it to the team. Zimmer began his career with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1954 and later played for the Cubs under the College of Coaches in 1961. He was dumped into the first National League expansion pool when he popped off about the issue on a WGN-9 pregame show and went on to play for the original Mets. He also played for the Reds and Washington Senators during a 12-year career, mostly as an infielder. After spending the 1966 season playing in Japan, Zimmer managed in the minors from 1967-70 before becoming a coach with the Montreal Expos in 1971. He had several coaching stints afterward, and managed the Padres, Red Sox, Rangers and Cubs, going 885-858

Born:*ANUARY IN#IN CINNATI /HIO Died: *UNE IN$UNEDIN &LORIDA MLB teams managed:0ADRES 2ED3OX 2ANGERSAND#UBS FYI::IMMERPLAYED COACHED ANDMANAGEDINPROFESSIONAL BASEBALLFORYEARS

AP

Cubs manager Don Zimmer sits in the dugout before a game against the Cardinals in 1989. Zimmer, a popular fixture in professional baseball for 66 years, died Wednesday. He was 83.

and winning his one division title with the Cubs. Zimmer also was bench coach under Joe Torre on four Yankees World Series championship teams and engaged in a famous brawl with the Red Sox during the 2003 ALCS when pitcher Pedro Martinez flung the then-72-year-old coach to the ground. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The game was his life, and his passing is going to create a void in my life and my wife, Aliâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s,â&#x20AC;? Torre said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The game of baseball lost a special person.â&#x20AC;? Zimmer often was asked about having a steel plate in his head, the result of a beaning in Columbus, Ohio, in 1953, when he was a promising prospect in the Dodgers system. The beanball fractured his skull and led to a blood clot, leaving him unconscious for 12 days. After two operations and five spinal taps, Zimmer eventually returned to baseball and stayed in it the rest of his life. Zimmer seemed indestructible. In 1956, he was hit by a pitch under his left eye, fracturing a cheekbone and almost detaching the retina. In the 1999 AL Division Series, a foul ball struck him in the face. He wore an army helmet

the next day, showing his sense of humor. After being fired as a manager for the Red Sox and Rangers, Zimmer expected to be a coach the rest of his career before Cubs general manager Jim Frey, his old friend, offered him the managerial job in 1988. Zimmer said he never asked about the contract terms. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know if it was a oneyear deal for $20 a month or what,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I trusted Jim Frey to give me what was fair. I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have an agent to negotiate a contract for me. We wrapped it up in one sitting. There were three reasons I took the job. The Cubs fans, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re the best. The ballpark, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something special. And Jim Frey.â&#x20AC;? In 1989, Zimmer reached the zenith of his managerial career, throwing out the book and using crazy strategy to great success, including squeeze bunts with the bases loaded and a triple-steal with a pitcher at the plate. After going 9-23 in spring training, the Cubs came out of nowhere to win the NL East, prompting the nickname â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Boys of Zimmer.â&#x20AC;? Zimmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s popularity in Chicago soared. Despite losing to the Giants in the NLCS, he was named NL Manager of the Year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A couple of breaks here and there, and we could have gone to the Series,â&#x20AC;? he said after winning the award. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m gonna remember this as the greatest year in the 41 years Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been in baseball. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not gonna let the last three games change my mind.â&#x20AC;? Zimmer was proud to be a baseball lifer, and he died as a member of the Rays organization.

AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS | THROUGH JUNE 5 BATTING G          

6-ARTINEZ $%4 #ANO 3%! 2IOS 4%8 "AUTISTA 4/2 2AMIREZ #(7 !LTUVE (/5 #RUZ "!, #ABRERA $%4 "ELTRE 4%8 "RANTLEY #,%

AB          

HOME RUNS R          

HITS

H          

Avg.          

#RUZ "!, %NCARNACION 4/2 !BREU #(7 $ONALDSON /!+ -OSS /!+ 0UJOLS ,!! "AUTISTA 4/2 6-ARTINEZ $%4 /RTIZ "/3 $OZIER -). #ESPEDES /!+

DOUBLES

!LTUVE (/5 #ABRERA 4/2 2IOS 4%8 -ARKAKIS "!, 2AMIREZ #(7 *ONES "!, #ANO 3%! +INSLER $%4 "AUTISTA 4/2 6-ARTINEZ $%4

         

            

2IOS 4%8 "OURN #,% 4ROUT ,!! +ENDRICK ,!! #ESPEDES /!+ 3AUNDERS 3%! 'ARDNER .99 2EDDICK /!+ -ARTIN 4%8 3EAGER 3%! !YBAR ,!! )NFANTE + #

        

0RICE 4 " (ERNANDEZ 3%! +LUBER #,% 6ERLANDER $%4 3HIELDS + # 6ARGAS + # 4ANAKA .99 "UEHRLE 4/2 'RAY /!+ ,ESTER "/3

WON-LOST          

"UEHRLE 4/2 4ANAKA .99 (ERNANDEZ 3%! 0ORCELLO $%4 TIED

#RUZ "!, %NCARNACION 4/2 #ABRERA $%4 -OSS /!+ $ONALDSON /!+ !BREU #(7 "AUTISTA 4/2 "RANTLEY #,% #ESPEDES /!+ 4ROUT ,!!

TRIPLES

0LOUFFE -). (OSMER + # 0EDROIA "/3 +INSLER $%4 !LTUVE (/5 #ABRERA $%4 "OGAERTS "/3 ,OWRIE /!+ %NCARNACION 4/2 %SCOBAR -). 6ICIEDO #(7 !YBAR ,!! %SCOBAR + #

ERA 4ANAKA .99 $ARVISH 4%8 "UEHRLE 4/2 +AZMIR /!+ 'RAY /!+ (ERNANDEZ 3%! +EUCHEL (/5 #HAVEZ /!+ (UGHES -). ,ESTER "/3

RBIS

          

         

SLUGGING PERCENTAGE #RUZ "!,  !BREU #(7  %NCARNACION 4/2 -OSS /!+  6-ARTINEZ $%4  4ROUT ,!!  "AUTISTA 4/2  #ABRERA $%4  $ONALDSON /!+  #ESPEDES /!+ 

TOTAL BASES            

#RUZ "!, %NCARNACION 4/2 $ONALDSON /!+ #ABRERA 4/2 6-ARTINEZ $%4 "AUTISTA 4/2 #ABRERA $%4 4ROUT ,!! -OSS /!+ !BREU #(7 0UJOLS ,!!

INNINGS PITCHED          

ON-BASE PERCENTAGE

          

         

BASES ON BALLS "AUTISTA 4/2 3ANTANA #,% $UNN #(7 &OWLER (/5 #HOO 4%8 /RTIZ "/3 $OZIER -). $ONALDSON /!+ %NCARNACION 4/2 .APOLI "/3

SAVES (OLLAND + # 0ERKINS -). 2ODNEY 3%! 2OBERTSON .99 .ATHAN $%4 3ORIA 4%8 5EHARA "/3 (UNTER "!, *ANSSEN 4/2 !XFORD #,% "ALFOUR 4 "

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0RICE 4 " +LUBER #,% ,ESTER "/3 4ANAKA .99 (ERNANDEZ 3%! 3CHERZER $%4 $ARVISH 4%8 7ILSON ,!! 2ICHARDS ,!! /DORIZZI 4 " ,ACKEY "/3

         

STOLEN BASES

         

!LTUVE (/5 %LLSBURY .99 $AVIS $%4 %SCOBAR + # 'ARDNER .99 $OZIER -). !NDRUS 4%8 2IOS 4%8 -ARTIN 4%8 2AMIREZ #(7

STRIKEOUTS           

RUNS SCORED $ONALDSON /!+ $OZIER -). "AUTISTA 4/2 #RUZ "!, +INSLER $%4 %NCARNACION 4/2 #ABRERA 4/2 "RANTLEY #,% 4ROUT ,!! 'ARDNER .99

         

COMPLETE GAMES

          

0EREZ 4%8 +EUCHEL (/5 0RICE 4 " TIED

   

SHUTOUTS 0EREZ 4%8 4ILLMAN "!, 'RAY /!+ %LIAS 3%!

   

NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS | THROUGH JUNE 5 BATTING G 4ULOWITZKI #/,  0UIG ,!$  ,UCROY -),  !DAMS 34,  0AGAN 3 &  3TANTON -)!  5TLEY 0(,  "LACKMON #/,  'OLDSCHMIDT !2)  3MITH 3 $ 

AB          

HITS 'OLDSCHMIDT !2) #ARPENTER 34, -URPHY .9- 7RIGHT .9- 0UIG ,!$ 0ARRA !2) 3TANTON -)! 4ULOWITZKI #/, 0ENCE 3 & ,UCROY -),

HOME RUNS R          

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DOUBLES          

RBIS

         

3TANTON -)! 'OLDSCHMIDT !2) -ORSE 3 & 4ULOWITZKI #/, 0UIG ,!$ (OWARD 0(, "LACKMON #/, /ZUNA -)! 'ONZALEZ ,!$ -C'EHEE -)!

TRIPLES

5TLEY 0(, 'OLDSCHMIDT !2) ,UCROY -), 0HILLIPS #). !RENADO #/, "YRD 0(, 2AMIREZ ,!$ TIED

       

9ELICH -)! !3IMMONS !4, 'ORDON ,!$ 0OLLOCK !2) 2ENDON 7!3 TIED

                     

7AINWRIGHT 34, #UETO #). 4EHERAN !4, ,OHSE -), ,EAKE #). -ILEY !2) 3TRASBURG 7!3 "UMGARNER 3 & "URNETT 0(, +ENNEDY 3 $

         

SLUGGING PERCENTAGE 4ULOWITZKI #/,  3TANTON -)!  0UIG ,!$  -ORSE 3 &  'OMEZ -),  *5PTON !4,  3MITH 3 $  'OLDSCHMIDT !2)  "LACKMON #/,  -ORNEAU #/, 

TOTAL BASES      

ON-BASE PERCENTAGE

3TANTON -)! 4ULOWITZKI #/, 'OLDSCHMIDT !2) 0UIG ,!$ 'OMEZ -), -ORSE 3 & 0ENCE 3 & *5PTON !4, "LACKMON #/, 5TLEY 0(,

         

4ULOWITZKI #/, 0UIG ,!$ -C#UTCHEN 0)4 3MITH 3 $ 3TANTON -)! 2IZZO #(# ,UCROY -), 2UIZ 0(, #ARPENTER 34, &REEMAN !4,

BASES ON BALLS -C#UTCHEN 0)4 2IZZO #(# 3TANTON -)! (OLLIDAY 34, 4ULOWITZKI #/, #ARPENTER 34, 6OTTO #). 'RANDERSON .9- 2OLLINS 0(, &REEMAN !4, 9ELICH -)!

          

         

RUNS SCORED 4ULOWITZKI #/, 'OLDSCHMIDT !2) 0ENCE 3 & 3TANTON -)! #ARPENTER 34, 'OMEZ -), 2ENDON 7!3 "LACKMON #/, 9ELICH -)! 2IZZO #(#

         

STOLEN BASES 'ORDON ,!$ (AMILTON #). %9OUNG .9- 2EVERE 0(, -ARTE 0)4 "ONIFACIO #(# #ABRERA 3 $ 3EGURA -), "LACKMON #/, 0AGAN 3 & 'OMEZ -),

          

Sox trailing in Anaheim:

The White Sox were down 7-1 to the Angels in the top of the fifth at press time. Alejandro De Aza had a home run to account for Chicagoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lone run. Andre Rienzo gave up nine hits and seven earned runs in 3 2/3 innings.

ERA #UETO #). (UDSON 3 & 4EHERAN !4, 7AINWRIGHT 34, 'REINKE ,!$ 3AMARDZIJA #(# "ECKETT ,!$ ,OHSE -), 7ACHA 34, !LVAREZ -)!

WON-LOST          

'REINKE ,!$ 7AINWRIGHT 34, "UMGARNER 3 & ,OHSE -), 3IMON #). (UDSON 3 & 2YU ,!$ ,YNN 34, "AILEY #). #OLE 0)4 (AMMEL #(#

INNINGS PITCHED          

SAVES 2OMO 3 & 3TREET 3 $ 2ODRIGUEZ -), *ANSEN ,!$ 2OSENTHAL 34, 2EED !2) +IMBREL !4, #ISHEK -)! 0APELBON 0(, 3ORIANO 7!3

STRIKEOUTS          

3TRASBURG 7!3 #UETO #). "UMGARNER 3 & 7AINWRIGHT 34, +ENNEDY 3 $ 'REINKE ,!$ 7ACHA 34, ,IRIANO 0)4 (ARANG !4, -ILEY !2)

         

COMPLETE GAMES !LVAREZ -)! #UETO #). 7AINWRIGHT 34, 4EHERAN !4, TIED

    

SHUTOUTS !LVAREZ -)! #UETO #). 4EHERAN !4, 7AINWRIGHT 34,

   


Saturday, June 7, 2014

www.saukvalley.com

2014 REAGAN RUN 5K

367EEKENDs"

OUTDOOR ADVENTURES

King Kat tournament brings out best

O

pair of running shoes and weather appropriate clothes are all that is When:AM By this time of the year, needed. 3ATURDAY *ULY Dixonites fall into two 7. Develop personal categories: Start: Ronald Reaganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goals: Running is friendly 1. Those planning on BOYHOODHOME  on aging. Running can participating in the 15th South Hennepin Ave, be done at any age, and Reagan Run 5k on July 5. Dixon each individual can set 2. Those who arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. Finish: Haymarket their own standards of Those who arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t are Square, 200 block of success. probably wondering South Higland Ave. The general running what the big deal about community accepts that Participants: Expected running is. goals change as people to draw 2,000 runners/ Why get up earlier than change. walkers I have to? Why waste 8. SANITY: My perDistance:+OR my time? Why do somesonal favorite. Between miles thing so hard? Why risk work, kids homework, an injury? Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wrong Benefits: The Dixon taxi driver, bills to pay, with watching ESPN !HTLETIC"OOSTERS $IXON smart phone overload instead? Well runners, Main Street, Dixon Park and bad news all over non-runners, and those District, Dixon YMCA the world, who doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t thinking about becomStrong Kids need time to escape and ing runners â&#x20AC;&#x201C; hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s your unwind? Fun fact: Event started answers: So whether you run INWITHPAR1. Weight management: alone or with a friend, ticipants. Bryan Glass For those trying to lose inside or outside, mornwon male division and or maintain weight, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ing, lunch break or eveTasha Atchley was difficult to find a better ning, take the time to female winner. exercise than running. take a breath and put Minute per minute, run- 4. The infamous â&#x20AC;&#x153;Runyour, and the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, ning burns more calories nerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s High.â&#x20AC;?: Nonproblems behind you. than any exercise with runners might want to 9. Sleep better, the exception of cross skip this section because improved mental sharpcountry skiing. you just wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t under- ness: Studies have 2. Improve your overall stand. Running releases shown that insomniacs health: Running is a fan- endorphins, causing a fell asleep significantly tastic activity for improv- feeling of happiness or faster on days that they ing and maintaining euphoria. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s that strange run. Just avoid running good health. feeling of exhaustion within an hour or two of It raises the good chocombined with giddiness bedtime. lesterol or HDL, and that keeps many runners Those happy endorreduces the risk of hyper- coming back for more. phins might still be with tension, diabetes, strokes The feeling is enhanced you at lights out time. and heart disease. Runby running outside â&#x20AC;&#x201C; for In addition, running ning puts stress on bones instance - on trails. So might prevent you from and muscles, which in turn off the treadmill and becoming an insomturn strengthens the head to the bike path. niac in the first place. In bones and decreases the 5. Improve your general, runners make risk of osteoporosis and success in any sport: I less mistakes at work, thus, life-threatening hip would challenge anyone are more efficient with fractures. to find a sport that runtheir time, and overall, 3. Meet cool people and ning doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t help with student runners have develop friendships: (bowling, pool, poker and a higher GPA in high I would challenge chess donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t count). school and college. anyone to stand in the By being stronger, fitter, 10. Running the 15th starting line of the Reaimproving lung capacReagan Run 5k: Yes, of gan Run and not find a ity and muscle strength, course, after all your hard friendly person to talk to. performance in any sport work, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve earned the Running with a friend from baseball to golf will ultimate reward â&#x20AC;&#x201C; particiis a great way to catch improve. pating in the best 5k run up, whether you see each 6. Versatile and relain the midwest! tively inexpensive: other on a daily basis, or Enjoy the hills and earn Running can be done the privilege of partaking less frequently. Interestin all the good food and ing conversations always almost anywhere and make the time and miles anytime (using common drink after the race. See sense for safety). A good ya there! pass quickly. BY DEB DRENGENBERG Special to SVM

Reagan Run 5K

Minor accomplishments Weekly update for Sauk Valley natives in minor league baseball Seth Blair

Hometown: Rock Falls Organization: Cardinals Level: Double-A Team: Springfield (Mo.) Cardinals

Jake Junis

Hometown: Rock Falls Organization: Royals Level: Single-A Team: Lexington (Ky.) Legends

Last week

Starts/Games: 0/0 W-L: 0-0 Innings: 0 ERA: 0 Ks: 0 BB: 0 Hits: 0 Runs: 0 Earned runs: 0

Last week

Starts/Games: 1/1 W-L: 1-0 Innings: 7 ERA: 1.29 Ks: 4 BB: 3 Hits: Runs: 1 Earned runs: 1

Season

Starts/Games: 11/11 W-L: 3-4 Innings: ERA:  Ks: 34 BB: Hits: Runs: 39 Earned runs:

Season

Starts/Games: 12/12 W-L:  Innings: ERA: 3.19 Ks: 47 BB: Hits: Runs: 29 Earned runs: 24

15th Annual Reagan 5K Run

SATURDAY JULY 5, 2014 8:00 A.M. Register online before July 2 at www.getmeregistered.com s "IB TAG TIMING s 7ATER STATIONS s 4RAFlC CONTROL s -EDICAL TEAM ON HAND s 2ACE STARTS AT 2EAGAN (OME s &INISH LINE STAFFED  SUPERVISED BY EXPERIENCED workers s -IDDLE MILE OF COURSE ON WOODCHIPS OVER VARYING terrain s 2EFRESHMENTS AFTER THE RACE s -ASSAGE THERAPISTS ON SITE s 3ORRY NO STROLLERS OR PETS s #ORPORATE #HALLENGE 815-285-5836

Race Information & Results at www.reaganrun.com Check Out Our Facebook Page! 288-2655 or nvarga@gmail.com For Questions

Race Day Registration: 3ATURDAY *ULY TH   AM (AYMARKET 3QUARE  (IGHLAND !VE Starting Location: 2ONALD 2EAGAN (OME  3 (ENNEPIN 1 block west of IL 26 'ALENA !VE Walkers: 4HE h2EAGAN 2UNv IS A RUNNING EVENT 7ALKERS ARE WELCOMED

OFlCIAL TIMES WILL BE AVAILABLE FOR ENTRANTS lNISHING WITHIN  HOUR AND  MINUTES Early Race Packet Pickup $IXON 9-#!  . 'ALENA !VE $IXON ), *ULY    PM

s +IDS FUN RUN   

Awards: 5NIQUE AWARD TO ST OVERALL MALE AND FEMALE ST THREE PLACES EACH DIVISION

male & female. !WARDS PRESENTED AFTER THE race. Age Divisions:   UNDER    

       

       

    

/VERALL WINNERS DO NOT RECEIVE AGE GROUP AWARDS +)$3 &5. 25. &REE FUN  SAFE FOR KIDS   UNDER TH OF A MILE &OR QUESTIONS CALL !MY "OSS AT   

Reagan Run BENElTS Dixon Athletic Boosters, Dixon Main Street

Dixon Park District AND YMCA Strong Kids

Reagan Run Entry Form s /NLY ONE ENTRY PER FORM s 3IGNED PHOTOCOPIES ACCEPTABLE s #ANNOT BE PROCESSED UNLESS WAIVER IS SIGNED Please Print Name: ____________________________________________________________________ !DDRESS __________________________________________________________________ #ITY ______________________________________________ 3TATE__________________ Zip: _______________(OME 0HONE _______________Cell Phone: __________________ !GE ________ AS OF  3EX CIRCLE ONE  -ALE &EMALE "IRTH $ATE _________ 4 3HIRT 3IZE CIRCLE ONE  3 - , 8, 88, 93 9- 9, .OTE 3IZES ARE lRST COME lRST SERVE )M ENTERING THE CIRCLE ONE  25.7!,+ +)$3 25. #/20/2!4% #(!,,%.'% !GE 'ROUP &OR 2UN !WARDS   UNDER                          &%% ).&/2-!4)/. CIRCLE ONE  7!,+ /2 25. 0RE REGISTRATION BY  ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? WITH 4 3HIRT 7!,+ /2 25. 0RE REGISTRATION   ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? WITH 4 3HIRT 7!,+ /2 25. $!9 /& %6%.4 ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? -AKE CHECKS PAYABLE TO 22+  &OX 4ROT $IXON ),    

2ELEASE AND 7AIVER 0LEASE ENTER ME IN THE 2EAGAN 2UN )N CONSIDERATION OF THE ACCEPTANCE OF MY ENTRY ) HEREBY FOR MYSELF MY HEIRS

EXECUTORS ADMINISTRATORS AND ASSIGNEES ) DO HEREBY RELEASE AND DISCHARGE $IXON -AIN 3TREET 3HAW -EDIA $IXON 0ARK $ISTRICT THE #ITY OF $IXON 0ETUNIA &ESTIVAL THE $IXON !RMORY AND ANY OTHER SPONSORS SUPPORTERS  PROPERTY OWNERS FOR ALL CLAIMS OF DAMAGES DEMANDS ACTIONS WHATSOEVER IN ANY MANNER ARISING OR GROWING OUT OF MY PARTICIPATION IN THE 2EAGAN 2UN ) ATTEST AND VERIFY THAT ) HAVE FULL KNOWLEDGE OF THE RISKS INVOLVED IN THIS EVENT AND ) AM PHYSICALLY lT AND SUFlCIENTLY TRAINED TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS EVENT __________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ 3IGNATURE $ATE 3IGNATURE OF PARENT FOR CHILDREN UNDER  $ATE .OTE "IB NUMBERS NOT TRANSFERABLE %NTRY FEES NOT REFUNDABLE

SPONSORED BY

Up next

Up next: NA FYI:"LAIRDIDNOT pitch this past week.

ing-in primarily between 3-5 p.m. at Page Park, so try to make it if you can. I remember way back in 2009, when we first got this tourney going. The excitement was through the roof, and there was a buzz in the air in the fishing community. Well, that buzz has never really subsided, and this thing just gets better and better as years go by. This will be the sixth year of the event that many thought would die after the fish kill in â&#x20AC;&#x2122;09. But not so fast my friends, the tourney and the fish are alive and well. This is a tribute to the efforts of sponsors, tournament organizers, fishermen, and the Rock River Valley communities. Many people have played a role in keeping the tourney strong, and returning the river to a top

shelf fishery. We have done well, and we should all be proud of our efforts. As I prepare for the big contest, I am as excited as ever, as my tourney partner for this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s event will be my daughter, Taya. Now you have heard about her many times, if you read my ramblings, and I am stoked to be sharing 2 days of fun with her. I think her favorite part of the whole thing will be giving out prizes at Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s weigh-in, but that is just the way she is. You can bet if we get into some good fish, sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be talking her fair share of smack. I know a few old boys in particular she will be looking for. Like I said, lots and lots of fun to be had this weekend on the water. Come on out to Page Park this weekend, if you have nothing better to do, and take in the weigh-in. Bring the little ones and let them see some great fish, and see why we fishermen and women love this river so much. I wish all competitors good luck and safe travel. See you at Page Park. Go Catfish.

AWARDS/RESULTS

Dixonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s premier run offers health advantages

mattJONES Fishing guide from Prophetstown. He can be reached at catmatt@ catfish academy. com

RACE DIRECTIONS

Benefits of running

RACE FEATURES

Alex T. Paschal/apaschal@saukvalley.com

Over 1,600 runners took to the streets of Dixon last July for the Reagan Run 5K. Training for, and running the race is a great way improve the overall quality of your life.

nce again, the Cabelaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s crew has rolled into town and turned the catfishermanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s world upside down. Normally laid back, relaxed individuals are going nuts, scurrying around gathering bait and tackle for the 2-day Cabelaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s King Kat tournament. Tying and retying rigs, and laying down strategy, and trying to fool-proof plans to put a big check in their pockets on Saturday at the final weigh-in. Sleep wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t come easy, as fishermen dream of that giant fish hooking up, or of the perfect limit of five beauties. Yeah, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s safe to say that by Saturday evening thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gonna be some flat-out drained little fishermen walking around. I know this for sure, things are set up for some great fishing, so it should be a very exciting weigh-in. For those of you who havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been paying attention, I will remind you once more. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s event is 2 days, not 1. That means twice the fish, twice the weigh-ins, and twice the fun. Teams will be weigh-

Special Thanks: 1$7,21$/*8$5'FRP Â&#x2021; *2*8$5' D I X ON

Auto Group

Up next

DIXON

Up next: vs !SHEVILLE  p.m. Monday FYI: Dropped ERA by nearly one halfpoint in 7 strong innings in win.

DON KNIGHTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ELECTRIC, LLC Dixon, IL 61021 815-973-5137 donknight@centurycel.net

PROFESSIONAL BEAUTY PARTNERS

Dixon Aut Autobody obody Clinic

Mama Ciminoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s $INE )N s #ARRY /UT s $ELIVERY

Dixon Food Center City of Dixon Advance EMS RC Trophies 3-D Sound Republic Services Oliverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Corner Market River Country 101.7 WIXN AM 1460 Dr. Tom Lawless United Suppliers Grot Imaging Studio County Market Massage Therapists Wal-Mart Bay Valley Foods Reagan Home Blackhawk Insurance S & D Construction Dixon Park District Dixon Main Street Dixon Police Dept. Dixon Fire Dept. River City Race Mgmt. Dixon Athletic Booster Club

'L[RQ 7UDIĂ&#x20AC;F 0DLQWHQDQFH 'HSW Dixon Kiwanis Morning Club Destinations Travel Services Snyderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hogenson Construction Sauk Valley Properties Midland States Bank Crawford Realty WIPFLi Paul Katner Huffyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Russ Repair Farleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Appliance Shopko Wendyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Arch Vending Weeds Dixon Petunia Festival Shamrock LRB Distributors Rayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tire J. Salon Burke Realty Raynors Holland & Sons


"s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

HORSE RACING

3ATURDAY *UNE 

NBA FINALS | HEAT AT SPURS

Enough time to heal James recovering after Game 1 cramps BY TIM REYNOLDS !0"ASKETBALL7RITER

AP

California Chrome takes a lap during a workout at Belmont Park on Friday in Elmont, N.Y. The Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes winner will attempt to become the first Triple Crown winner since Affirmed in 1978 when he races the Belmont Stakes on Saturday.

Stars align for history Retooled Belmont ready for chance at Triple Crown BY MICHAEL R. SISAK 4HE!SSOCIATED0RESS

NEW YORK â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Martin Panza celebrated California Chromeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s charge to Preakness Stakes victory 3 weeks ago like most fans at the packed Pimlico Race Course â&#x20AC;&#x201C; bumping fists, slapping hands and thinking ahead to Saturday and the possibility of the first Triple Crown winner in 36 years. And then Belmont Parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s director of racing operations thought about everything else: the tens of thousands of additional people who show up for the Belmont Stakes whenever a horse has a chance at history; the millions more in expected wagers; and the need for more of everything, from seating, concessions to bathrooms, security and about 1,000 additional workers. Local officials and business leaders celebrated too, seeing the race and the added interest of a Triple Crown contender as a boon of sold-out hotel rooms, dinners out and

12 attempts at Triple Crown since 1978 Year            

Horse Finish 3PECTACULAR"ID 4HIRD 0LEASANT#OLONY 4HIRD !LYSHEBA &OURTH 3UNDAY3ILENCE3ECOND 3ILVER#HARM3ECOND 2EAL1UIET3ECOND #HARISMATIC 4HIRD 7AR%MBLEM %IGHTH &UNNY#IDE 4HIRD 3MARTY*ONES3ECOND "IG"ROWN$IDNOTFINISH )LL(AVE!NOTHER$IDNOTSTART

free publicity, so long as the writers and broadcasters were aware the track is actually on Long Island, and not in New York City. If California Chrome triumphs, it will happen on Panzaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s turf â&#x20AC;&#x201C; or rather, his dirt â&#x20AC;&#x201C; at a marquee New York-area event that the trackâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new management team reimagined earlier this year as a fusion of sports and entertainment worth attending, even when the Triple Crown is not on the line. They have filled the undercard with highstakes races, increased the dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s total purse to $8 mil-

lion â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the second-richest day in American horse racing behind the final slate of the Breederâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cup â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and surrounded the action with music from rapper and actor LL Cool J, former New York Yankees center fielder Bernie Williams, and Frank Sinatra Jr. singing â&#x20AC;&#x153;New York, New York.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;For the first year of us doing this, under this new format, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not going to get any better than this,â&#x20AC;? Panza said in an interview near his track office, which was filled with boxes of Belmont Stakes caps and bags of other race souvenirs.

Finals, Game 2

SAN ANTONIO â&#x20AC;&#x201C; If the NBA Finals resumed Friday, there would be no way LeBron James could play. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no game until Sunday, and James plans to be ready by then. With his gait still affected by severe cramping and dehydration, and feeling the effects of a sleepless night brought on by several trips to the bathroom â&#x20AC;&#x201C; an unavoidable drawback of having his body filled with fluids â&#x20AC;&#x201C; James insisted he will play when the Miami Heat and San Antonio Spurs get together for Game 2 of the finals. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be in uniform on Sunday,â&#x20AC;? James said Friday. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I should be 100 percent on Sunday. Obviously Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to take it light today. Train-

When:PM3UNDAY Where:3AN!NTONIO TV:!"# Line:3PURSBY ing staff said I should take it light today. Give the body another day to recover. Tomorrow I should be back on my feet full go â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and I got all day Sunday to get ready for Sunday night.â&#x20AC;? When he was there on Thursday, the Heat were right there as well. When he was done, so were the Heat. Up by seven at one point in the fourth quarter, Miami fell apart in the final minutes, and Jamesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ugly departure could have easily had something to do with that. San Antonioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lead was 94-92 after James scored with 4:09 left; he

was out of the game for good and unable to move 10 seconds later. From that point, the Spurs finished on a 16-3 run. Heat coach Erik Spoelstra made no excuses, simply saying the two-time defending NBA champs needed to close the deal, James or no James. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a competitor at the highest level,â&#x20AC;? Spoelstra said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So it was killing him being on that sideline, but you also have your health to look after. Look, 99.9 (percent) of people have never pushed their body to that level, at that level where youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re past the point where your tank is empty and your body shuts down. For a competitor and for the best player in the game at this level to constantly push his body past that point, I think, is incredibly admirable.â&#x20AC;?

AP

Miami Heat forward LeBron James is carried to the bench after cramping against the San Antonio Spurs during Game 1 of the NBA finals on Thursday. James missed a crucial stretch. The Spurs won 110-95.

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367EEKENDs"

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"s367EEKEND Dilbert by Scott Adams

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Saturday, June 7, 2014

Zits® by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

Arlo & Janis by Jimmy Johnson Garfield by Jim Davis

Freshly Squeezed by Ed Stein Get Fuzzy by Darby Conley

Blondie by Dean Young & John Marshall

Wizard of Id by Brant Parker and Johnny Hart

Pearls Before Swine by Stephan Pastis Rose is Rose by Pat Brady and Don Wimmer

Pickles by Brian Crane Big Nate by Lincoln Peirce

Born Loser by Art and Chip Sansom

Baby Blues by Jerry Scott & Rick Kirkman

Soup To Nutz by Rick Stromoski

Family Circus by Bil Keane

The Argyle Sweater by Scott Hilburn

Alley Oop by Dave Graue and Jack Bender

Bridge Frank & Ernest by Bob Thaves

What finesses? I cannot see any

Grizzwells by Bill Schorr

Stacy Keach said, “I can’t think of anything that requires more finesse than comedy, both from a verbal and visual point of view.” There is hardly a bridge deal without at least one finesse. How many potential finesses can you see in this deal? South is in six hearts. What should he do after West leads the diamond queen? North took a slight gamble in wheeling out Blackwood immediately. He planned, of course, to bid six hearts even if partner denied an ace. But it was just possible that his side was off the two top spades. South could have held 14 high-card points without holding the

spade ace or king. But the odds were in North’s favor. There are two possible finesses, one in each black suit. Which one should be tried?

A finessing fan would take both, go down with this distribution and then complain about his bad luck. With the right line of play, though, the contract is guaranteed – how? After declarer wins the first trick with dummy’s diamond king and draws trumps, he should cash dummy’s diamond ace, play a trump to his hand, ruff his last diamond in the dummy, and play a club to his nine, being careful to conserve a trump entry to the dummy. West wins with his 10, but what can he do now? Whatever he leads concedes a 12th trick. If a spade, it is away from the king; if a club, it is around to declarer’s king-eight; if a diamond, South ruffs in one hand and sluffs a spade from the other. © 2014 UFS


Saturday, June 7, 2014

www.saukvalley.com

STATE BASEBALL TOURNAMENT

FRIDAYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SCOREBOARD Baseball STATE TOURNAMENT Class 1A State Tournament at Dozer Park, Peoria Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s semifinals

s7EBBER .EW!THENS INN s)LLINOIS,UTHERAN !RGENTA /REANA Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s games s 4HIRD PLACE .EW !THENS VS !RGENTA /REANA AM s#HAMPIONSHIP 7EBBERVS)LLINOIS,UTHER an, 11:30 a.m. Class 2A State Tournament at Dozer Park, Peoria Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s semifinals s0LEASANT0LAINS &REEBURG s"YRON 7ESTMONT Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s games s4HIRDPLACE &REEBURGVS7ESTMONT PM s#HAMPIONSHIP 0LEASANT0LAINSVS"YRON PM Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s box score

BYRON 6, WESTMONT 2 "YRON    Â&#x2C6;    7ESTMONT    Â&#x2C6;    W â&#x20AC;&#x201C; .ATHAN 0ETERSON    L â&#x20AC;&#x201C; :ACH -ORAN  BYRON (35-5) 4YLER .UNEZ SS    !USTIN #ARLSON CF    *ACK&LEEGERC   "EN2EIBELDH    $AN,OWEB   4YLER2OWLAND B   .ATHAN0ETERSONP   :ACK #OGSWELLPR   $YLAN'ARBUTTLF   "AE"YERSRF   !USTIN6AN,ANKVELTB   Totals: 28-6-8. 0ETERSON)0 2 %2 ( 3/  "" AND&LEEGER2B â&#x20AC;&#x201C;&LEEGERRBI â&#x20AC;&#x201C;#ARL SON &LEEGERE â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2OWLAND 'ARBUTTDP â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1. SB â&#x20AC;&#x201C;'ARBUTTLOB â&#x20AC;&#x201C;"YRON WESTMONT (27-8-1) *OE $ONOVAN C    :ACH -ORAN PB    #HARLIE$ONOVANSS   4OMMY &RANCZAK DH    *OHN +ELLY B    'REG 0IETRZAK CF    +EVIN -ELVIN RFP    !NDREW 2OSOL PH    !NTHONY !LESSILF   !DAM"ERGB   4IM !BBATACOLAB   !USTIN,OEHMANPRF   Totals: 26-2-5. -ORAN)0 2 %2 ( 3/ "" ,OEHMAN)0 2 %2 ( "" -ELVIN)0 2 3/ AND*$ONOVAN RBI â&#x20AC;&#x201C;&RANCZAK +ELLYE â&#x20AC;&#x201C;#$ONOVANSB â&#x20AC;&#x201C;#$ONOVANLOB â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4. Three Rivers North all-conference First team Pitchers: *OEY "RACKEMYER -ORRISON SO +ENNETH#OLE%RIE 0ROPHETSTOWNSR %THAN*ONES&ULTONSR Catchers: *USTIN*ENSEN-ORRISONSO

3HAYNE!LLEN.EWMANJR Infielders: "ILL ,EE 'REUL -ORRISON SR "EN4EGELER-ORRISONSO *ORDAN#HAN DLER% 0SO $ILLAN(EFFELFINGER.EWMAN JR 4IM#LARK!MBOYJR Outfielders: +ALLEN *EPSEN % 0 JR

4REVOR "OLIN .EWMAN JR -ICHAEL %LY .EWMAN SR "RANDON "URKE .EWMAN JR #HRIS*ONES!MBOYJR DH/Utility:0AUL6ELASCO&ULTONSR Second team Pitchers:%THAN(OWARD% 0SR $EVON "ALLARD&ULTONSO 1UINCY#OOMES.EW MANJR ,OGAN4HAKE!MBOYJR Catchers: 'RADY 4ODD % 0 SO 'AGE 3MITH"UREAU6ALLEYJR Infielders:-ASON3ITZMORE-ORRISONJR !USTIN -EADOWS % 0 SR 3ETH 3ANDER SON&ULTONJR #ODY(UFF&ULTONSR !* 3HARP.EWMANSR *OSH-EADE"UREAU 6ALLEYJR Outfielders: +OLLIN "URN -ORRISON SR 2YAN9OUNG"UREAU6ALLEYSR 7ILL#ROWN HART!MBOYJR DH/Utility:.OLAN-ILROY2IVERDALEJR Honorable mention Catcher:*ORDAN%RNST!MBOYSR Infielders: "ROCK 3MITH -ORRISON JR /WEN-C#ONNELL% 0SR 4REY3IMMONS &ULTONSO #HRIS3HYNK"UREAU6ALLEYJR .ATHAN2OCKER2IVERDALESR *OSH,OHM AN2IVERDALESO Outfielder:*ASON(OEHN2IVERDALESR Players of the year:*OEY"RACKEMYER *USTIN*ENSEN-ORRISON Coach of the year: "EN 3ONDGEROTH -ORRISON

UNANIMOUSSELECTION

MLB AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division W L Pct

4ORONTO .EW9ORK "ALTIMORE "OSTON 4AMPA"AY

    

    

    

$ETROIT #HICAGO #LEVELAND -INNESOTA +ANSAS#ITY

    

    

    

    

    

    

Central Division W L Pct

/AKLAND ,OS!NGELES 3EATTLE 4EXAS (OUSTON

West Division W L Pct

GB

Â&#x2C6;  Â&#x17E;   GB

Â&#x2C6;   Â&#x17E; 

GB

Â&#x2C6;  Â&#x17E;  

Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s results /AKLAND "ALTIMORE INNINGS 4ORONTO 3T,OUIS $ETROIT "OSTON 4AMPA"AY 3EATTLE 4EXAS #LEVELAND .99ANKEES +ANSAS#ITY (OUSTONAT-INNESOTA LATE #HICAGO7HITE3OXAT,!!NGELS LATE Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s games 3T,OUIS3-ILLER  AT4ORONTO"UEHRLE   PM (OUSTON&ELDMAN  AT-INNESOTA'IB SON  PM #LEVELAND4OMLIN  AT4EXAS4EPESCH   PM 3EATTLE %LIAS   AT 4AMPA "AY #OBB   PM "OSTON ,ESTER   AT $ETROIT 3CHERZER   PM .99ANKEES0HELPS  AT+ANSAS#ITY $UFFY  PM /AKLAND'RAY  AT"ALTIMORE'AUSMAN   PM 7HITE3OX3ALE  AT,!!NGELS3HOE MAKER  PM Sundayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s games 3T,OUISAT4ORONTO PM /AKLANDAT"ALTIMORE PM 3EATTLEAT4AMPA"AY PM (OUSTONAT-INNESOTA PM .99ANKEESAT+ANSAS#ITY PM #LEVELANDAT4EXAS PM 7HITE3OXAT,!!NGELS PM "OSTONAT$ETROIT PM NATIONAL LEAGUE East Division W L Pct

!TLANTA -IAMI 7ASHINGTON .EW9ORK 0HILADELPHIA

    

    

    

-ILWAUKEE 3T,OUIS 0ITTSBURGH #INCINNATI #HICAGO

    

    

    

3AN&RANCISCO ,OS!NGELES  #OLORADO  3AN$IEGO  !RIZONA 

    

    

Central Division W L Pct

West Division W L Pct

GB

Â&#x2C6; Â&#x17E;   Â&#x17E; GB

Â&#x2C6;   Â&#x17E; 

GB

Â&#x2C6; Â&#x17E; Â&#x17E;  

Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s results #HICAGO#UBS -IAMI INNINGS 0ITTSBURGH -ILWAUKEE 4ORONTO 3T,OUIS 0HILADELPHIA #INCINNATI ,!$ODGERSAT#OLORADO LATE !TLANTAAT!RIZONA LATE 7ASHINGTONAT3AN$IEGO LATE .9-ETSAT3AN&RANCISCO LATE Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s games 3T,OUIS3-ILLER  AT4ORONTO"UEHRLE   PM -IAMI 7OLF   AT #HICAGO #UBS 3AMARDZIJA  PM -ILWAUKEE 'ARZA   AT 0ITTSBURGH 6OLQUEZ  PM

,! $ODGERS 'REINKE   AT #OLORADO #HACIN  PM 0HILADELPHIA2(ERNANDEZ  AT#INCIN NATI3IMON  PM .9 -ETS #OLON   AT 3AN &RANCISCO (UDSON  PM !TLANTA %3ANTANA   AT !RIZONA -ILEY   PM 7ASHINGTON 4REINEN   AT 3AN $IEGO #ASHNER  PM Sundayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s games 3T,OUISAT4ORONTO PM 0HILADELPHIAAT#INCINNATI PM -ILWAUKEEAT0ITTSBURGH PM -IAMIAT#HICAGO#UBS PM .9-ETSAT3AN&RANCISCO PM !TLANTAAT!RIZONA PM ,!$ODGERSAT#OLORADO PM 7ASHINGTONAT3AN$IEGO PM Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s box scores

CUBS 5, MARLINS 3, 13 innings Miami

Chicago ab r h bi ab r h bi 9ELICHLF     "NIFCB CF     ,UCASB     ,AKECF LF     3TANTONRF     2IZZOB     -C'EHB     3#ASTROSS     '*ONESB     6ALUENB     /ZUNACF     3CHRHLTRF     (CHVRRSS     6ILLANVP     -ATHISC     #OGHLNLF RF     "OURPH     *O"AKRC     2EALMTC     /LTPH     %OVALDIP     3CHLITTRP     -ORRISP     "ARNEYB     2*HNSNPH     (AMMLP     -$UNNP     7RGHTP     !2AMSP     .2MRZP     *E"AKRPH     2UGGINPH     $*NNGSP     (2NDNP     3LOWEYP     7HITSDC     Totals 49 3 12 3 Totals 46 5 10 5 -IAMI    Â&#x2C6;  #HICAGO    Â&#x2C6;  .OOUTSWHENWINNINGRUNSCORED DPâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;#HICAGO  LOBâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;-IAMI  #HICAGO 7. 2Bâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;9ELICH '*ONES 2IZZO #OGHLAN 2UGGIANO 3Bâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;3CHIERHOLTZ  HRâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;2IZZO SBâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;/ZUNA #OGHLAN  Sâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;(ECHAVARRIA IP H R ER BB SO Miami %OVALDI       -ORRIS       -$UNN       !2AMOS       $A*ENNINGS       3LOWEY,         Chicago (AMMEL       77RIGHT(        .2AMIREZ(        (2ONDON"3         3CHLITTER       6ILLANUEVA7         3LOWEYPITCHEDTOBATTERSINTHETH WPâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;-ORRIS Tâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;4:02. Aâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;   

BLUE JAYS 3, CARDINALS 1 St. Louis

Toronto ab r h bi ab r h bi -#RPNTB     2EYESSS     4AVERSRF     -E#ARRLF     (OLLIDYLF     +RATZC     #RAIGB     "AUTISTRF     9-OLINDH     ,INDB     *AYCF     %NCRNCDH     *H0ERLTSS     *&RNCSB     $ESCALSB     3T4LLSNPH B    4#RUZC     ,WRIEB B    $.AVRRC     0ILLARPR LF     'OSECF     Totals 33 1 7 1 Totals 34 3 11 3 3T,OUIS    Â&#x2C6;  4ORONTO   X Â&#x2C6;  Eâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;$ESCALSO  -#ARPENTER   DPâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;St. ,OUISTPâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;3T,OUISLOBâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;3T,OUIS 4ORONTO"n(OLLIDAY 3Bâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;'OSE  HRâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;"AUTISTA ,AWRIE SBâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;(OLLIDAY  2EYES 

367EEKENDs"

IP H R ER BB SO St. Louis ,YNN,         Maness 1 2 0 0 0 0 #HOATE       -OTTE       #-ARTINEZ       Toronto 3TROMAN7         #ECIL(        -C'OWAN(        *ANSSEN3         3TROMANPITCHEDTOBATTERINTHETH HBPâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;BY3TROMAN(OLLIDAY WPâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Stroman. Tâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;3:12. Aâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;   

Auto racing NASCAR Sprint Cup Pocono 400 After Friday qualifying; race Sunday At Pocono Raceway Long Pond, Pa. Lap length: 2.5 miles  $ENNY(AMLIN 4OYOTA   +URT"USCH #HEVROLET   "RAD+ESELOWSKI &ORD   +EVIN(ARVICK #HEVROLET   *EFF'ORDON #HEVROLET   +YLE"USCH 4OYOTA   *OEY,OGANO &ORD    $ALE %ARNHARDT *R #HEVROLET   "RIAN6ICKERS 4OYOTA   #ARL%DWARDS &ORD   !USTIN$ILLON #HEVROLET   4ONY3TEWART #HEVROLET   'REG"IFFLE &ORD   +YLE,ARSON #HEVROLET    2YAN .EWMAN #HEVROLET    $ANICA 0ATRICK #HEVROLET    -ARTIN 4RUEX *R #HEVROLET    *AMIE -C-URRAY #HEVROLET   #LINT"OWYER 4OYOTA    *IMMIE *OHNSON #HEVROLET    ! * !LLMENDINGER #HEVROLET   !RIC!LMIROLA &ORD   0AUL-ENARD #HEVROLET   *USTIN!LLGAIER #HEVROLET   #ASEY-EARS #HEVROLET   -ATT+ENSETH 4OYOTA   +ASEY+AHNE #HEVROLET   2ICKY3TENHOUSE*R &ORD   -ARCOS!MBROSE &ORD   -ICHAEL!NNETT #HEVROLET    ,ANDON #ASSILL #HEVROLET   $AVID2AGAN &ORD   4RAVIS+VAPIL &ORD   !LEX"OWMAN 4OYOTA   $AVID'ILLILAND &ORD    2EED 3ORENSON #HEVROLET   *OSH7ISE &ORD /WNER0OINTS   ** 9ELEY #HEVROLET /WNER 0OINTS  4IMMY(ILL 4OYOTA /WNER0OINTS  #OLE7HITT 4OYOTA /WNER0OINTS  2YAN4RUEX 4OYOTA /WNER0OINTS   !LEX +ENNEDY #HEVROLET /WNER 0OINTS  $AVE"LANEY &ORD /WNER0OINTS

NBA playoffs FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s result 3AN!NTONIO -IAMI Sundayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s game -IAMIAT3AN!NTONIO PM Tuesday, June 10 3AN!NTONIOAT-IAMI PM Thursday, June 12 3AN!NTONIOAT-IAMI PM Sunday, June 15 X -IAMIAT3AN!NTONIO PM

Tuesday, June 17 X 3AN!NTONIOAT-IAMI PM Friday, June 20 X -IAMIAT3AN!NTONIO PM

NHL playoffs FINALS (Best-of-7; x-if necessary) Wednesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s result ,OS !NGELES  .9 2ANGERS  /4 ,OS !NGELESLEADSSERIES  Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s game .92ANGERSAT,OS!NGELES PM Monday, June 9 ,OS!NGELESAT.92ANGERS PM Wednesday, June 11 ,OS!NGELESAT.92ANGERS PM Friday, June 13 X .92ANGERSAT,OS!NGELES PM Monday, June 16 X ,OS!NGELESAT.92ANGERS PM Wednesday, June 18 X .92ANGERSAT,OS!NGELES PM

Transactions BASEBALL American League "!,4)-/2% /2)/,%3 Â&#x2C6; 0LACED 2(0 -IGUEL'ONZALEZONTHE DAY$, RETRO ACTIVETO-AY2ECALLED2(04IM"ERRY FROM"OWIE%, 3ELECTEDTHECONTRACTOF 2(0%VAN-EEKFROM.ORFOLK), /PTIONED 2(00RESTON'UILMETTO.ORFOLK #,%6%,!.$ ).$)!.3 Â&#x2C6; !CTIVATED ).& #ARLOS 3ANTANA FROM THE  DAY $, /PTIONED ).& *ESUS !GUILAR TO #OLUMBUS ),  /!+,!.$ !4(,%4)#3 Â&#x2C6; !CQUIRED ,(0 *USTIN -ARKS FROM +ANSAS #ITY FOR CASH CONSIDERATIONS$ESIGNATED/&+ENT-AT THESFORASSIGNMENT National League #/,/2!$/ 2/#+)%3 Â&#x2C6; 3ELECTED THE CONTRACT OF 2(0 %DDIE "UTLER FROM 4ULSA 4,  ,/3 !.'%,%3 $/$'%23 Â&#x2C6; /PTIONED ).& %RISBEL !RRUEBARRENA TO !LBUQUERQUE 0#, 3ELECTEDTHECONTRACTOF).&-IGUEL 2OJASFROM!LBUQUERQUE4RANSFERRED2(0 #HRIS7ITHROWTOTHE DAY$, 0(),!$%,0()!0(),,)%3Â&#x2C6;2ECALLED).& 2ONNY #EDENO FROM ,EHIGH 6ALLEY ),  $ESIGNATED,(0#ESAR*IMENEZFORASSIGN ment. 3!.$)%'/0!$2%3Â&#x2C6;0LACED"*EDD 'YORKOONTHE DAY$, 3!. &2!.#)3#/ ')!.43 Â&#x2C6; !CTIVATED 2(0-ATT#AINFROMTHE DAY$,$ESIG NATED,(0$AVID(UFFFORASSIGNMENT BASKETBALL National Basketball Association -)..%3/4!4)-"%27/,6%3Â&#x2C6;.AMED &LIP3AUNDERSCOACH 54!(*!::Â&#x2C6;.AMED1UIN3NYDERCOACH FOOTBALL National Football League #,%6%,!.$ "2/7.3 Â&#x2C6; 2ELEASED ," 1UENTIN'ROVES (/534/. 4%8!.3 Â&#x2C6; 3IGNED $% *ADE VEON#LOWNEY HOCKEY National Hockey League 0)443"52'(0%.'5).3Â&#x2C6;&IREDCOACH $AN"YLSMA.AMED*IM2UTHERFORDGEN ERALMANAGER SOCCER Major League Soccer 3%!44,% 3/5.$%23 &# Â&#x2C6; ,OANED ' *OSH&ORDTO/RANGE#OUNTY53,0RO UNTIL June 14. 4/2/.4/ &# Â&#x2C6; !CQUIRED & $OMINIC /DUROFROM#OLUMBUSFOR&!LVARO2EY COLLEGE !2):/.!34!4%Â&#x2C6;.AMED3COTTIE'RA HAMSENIORASSOCIATEATHLETICSDIRECTOR -!29,!.$Â&#x2C6;!NNOUNCEDJUNIORBASKET BALL & 2OBERT #ARTER *R TRANSFERRED FROM 'EORGIA4ECH

Byron advances to 2A title game Peterson tosses 5-hitter for Tigers 36-3PORTS3TAFF

PEORIA â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Nathan Peterson tossed a fivehitter, and Jack Fleeger drove in a pair of runs as Byron beat Westmont 6-2 at the 2A state baseball tournament held Friday at Dozer Park. Peterson (13-0) went the distance, allowing two runs (one earned), five hits and one walk, while striking out 10. Fleeger had the key hit for the Tigers (35-5), a two-run double in the top of the sixth inning. It made the score 5-2, and another run scored on the play after a throwing error by Westmont shortstop Charlie Donovan. Byron scored its other three runs in the fourth inning, with the help of a pair of balks by Westmont reliever Austin Loehman. Austin Carlson also drove in a run with a sacrifice fly. Westmont (27-8-1) took a 1-0 lead in the bottom of the first on an RBI single by Tommy Franczak. The Sentinels made it 2-0 in the third on a run-scoring groundout by John Kelly. Zach Moran (7-2) took the loss for Westmont. He allowed three runs (all earned), six hits and four walks in three innings. He also struck out four. CLASS 1A

Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s championship games 1A:7EBBERVS)LLINOIS ,UTHERAN AM 2A:0LEASANT0LAINSVS "YRON PM in the top of the 10th inning scored Logan Ganieany with the goahead run, and Webber made it stand up in a 1A semifinal at Dozer Park. Bush drove in three runs for the Trojans (237). Jordan Wheeler (6-4) went the distance for Webber, allowing four runs (0 earned), nine hits and nine walks, while striking out six. He threw 175 pitches. For New Athens (1918), Jimmy Kiefer had a pair of hits, including a double, and drove in two runs. Illinois Lutheran 1, Argenta-Oreana 0:

Dylan Gouldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s double in the bottom of the fifth inning plated Joey Kendrick with the lone runs of the game as Lutheran edged Argenta-Oreana. Grant Farmer (10-0) got the win for the Chargers (26-2), allowing just two hits in six innings. He struck out five and walked three. Sam Geraci got the save, striking out two in a perfect seventh. Gage Eller (7-1) took the loss for ArgentaOreana (23-6), allowWebber 5, New Ath- ing one earned run, one ens 4, 10 inn.: Christian hit and six walks, while Bushâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s two-out single striking out eight.


"s367EEKEND

STATE SOFTBALL EXTRA

Saturday, June 7, 2014

#,!33!3%-)&).!,3s%!343)$%#%.42%s%!340%/2)! TRICO 6, AMBOY 1

Philip Marruffo/pmarruffo@saukvalley.com

Amboy’s Kaitlyn Liebing walks a ball back to the circle after Trico’s Jessica Prange hit a home run in the fifth inning of Friday’s 1A state semifinal game at EastSide Centre in East Peoria. The Clippers’ 10-game winning streak came to an end in a 6-1 loss to the Pioneers.

JITTERS BUG CLIPPERS

Trico takes advantage of Amboy errors in semifinal victory BY TY REYNOLDS treynolds@saukvalley.com 800-798-4085, ext. 5552

EAST PEORIA – On the state tournament stage, runs are usually at a premium, and mistakes have a way of biting you. The Amboy Clippers found that out the hard way Friday afternoon, as four errors and a lone walk led to five Trico runs in a 6-1 loss in the Class 1A state semifinals at EastSide Centre. “We let some runners get on base, and didn’t play the tight defense that you need to at the state tournament,” Amboy coach Kelly Whitman said. “We came in nervous, and a couple of innings set a tough tone.” After cruising through the first two innings, Amboy freshman Karlee Doege got the first two outs in the top of the third. But an errant throw on a two-out bunt brought the top of the order back up, and Jessica Prange singled home Bailey Witthoft to break up the shutout and Doege’s no-hitter in one fell swoop. With Prange advancing to second on the throw home, she scored on an errant throw on Ashley Modglin’s two-out bunt single. The speedy Modglin went to second on the play, took third on a passed ball, and scored one pitch later on a wild pitch to make it 3-0 Trico. “It was just fundamentals today,” Amboy senior center fielder Micaela McCoy said. “We didn’t do the little things, and we let it get to us.” The turning point of the game truly came in the bottom of the fourth. Madeline Ely bunted and was safe when the Trico third baseman bobbled the barehand pickup, then scored one batter later when Kaitlyn Liebing smoked a line drive down the left-field line for an RBI double.

Star of the game: Jessica Prange, Trico, 2-for-4, RBI single, 3-run HR, 2 runs scored Key performers: Jordan Lodge, Trico, 4-hitter, 12 Ks, 1 BB, 0 earned runs; Kaitlyn Liebing, Amboy, 2-for-2, RBI 2B; Karlee Doege, Amboy, 4-hitter, 2 earned runs, 7 Ks, 1 BB Up next: 1A third-place game, Amboy vs. West Prairie, 10 a.m. today

Philip Marruffo/pmarruffo@saukvalley.com

Trico catcher Jessica Prange pumps her fist after a strikeout by Amboy’s Kelsie Thurman during Friday’s 1A state semifinal game in East Peoria. Four errors cost the Clippers in a 6-1 loss to the Pioneers. Liebing took third on the throw home, and the Clippers (22-10) had a run in, a runner on third, and nobody out. But Jordan Lodge (24-2) wiggled off the hook. Doege lifted a fly ball to short left field, but it was too shallow for Liebing to tag up. Lodge then struck out McCoy and kept Destinee Oenes in the yard on a deep flyout to center field to end the inning. “That was a key point in the game, because it easily could have been 3-2 and things get a little tight again,” Trico coach Drew Franklin said. “But Jordan worked out of it, and she was excellent in the circle all game, hitting her spots and having complete faith in her pitches.” The missed opportunity haunted the Clippers almost immediately. Morgan Vogt led off the top of the fifth with the

only walk Doege issued all game, then Witthoft laid down a sacrifice bunt but was safe on another errant throw. With runners on second and third and nobody out, the lineup again turned over, and Prange made Amboy pay again. The junior catcher ripped a fullcount smash over the fence just left of straightaway center field to give Trico (32-3) a five-run cushion. “Once we went through the lineup one time, I think we really settled down,” Prange said. “Then, once we came back out with that 6-1 lead, that was the securing point for us. We knew we only needed nine outs, and that gave us some confidence, and a real lift.” Amboy didn’t give in, but couldn’t string anything together. Delaney Wil-

helm doubled with two outs in the fifth but was stranded, then Liebing drew a one-out walk in the sixth – only to be erased by a hard-hit comebacker that turned into a 1-6-3 double play. McCoy seemed poised to spark a patented Clipper comeback in the bottom of the seventh, leading off by stroking Lodge’s first pitch of the inning into the right-center field gap for a double. But Lodge again had the answer, getting a popout back to the circle and back-toback strikeouts to send the Pioneers into Saturday’s 1A state title game. “I was ready for that pitch, and I was ready to start the rally,” McCoy said. “I put a good swing on a first-pitch strike, did what I needed to do. But the comeback didn’t happen, and we’ll have to adjust and play better tomorrow.” Lodge struck out 12 and walked one, allowing four hits and one unearned run. Doege (16-8) struck out seven and walked one while matching Lodge’s four-hitter, and only two of the six runs were earned. “We started strong, then it fell apart there in the middle,” Liebing said. “But we’ll bounce back. We’re going to play hard until the end [today], just like we did in this game, and build from it and recover and play better.”

Clippers’ faithful show strength at state E

AST PEORIA – There weren’t too many bugs flying or crawling around EastSide Centre on a warm, sunny day Friday at the 1A state softball semifinals. There were plenty of butterflies, though, in both dugouts. The Amboy Clippers, playing on the state tournament stage for the first time in the history of the softball program, found the big-stage butterflies a little harder to tame than the ones they usually get before a game. “We were all pretty nervous, and I think the game was pretty much all mental for us,” junior catcher Kaitlyn Liebing said. “We definitely didn’t play the way we wanted to, but we’ve gotten this far, and I know we’re going to recover and play better [today].” After dreaming about playing at the state tournament for most of their lives, the Clippers all

tyREYNOLDS Sports reporter. He can be reached at treynolds@ saukvalley. com or 800798-4085, ext. 5554.

agreed that despite a 6-1 semifinal loss to Trico, the atmosphere was everything they had ever imagined. “There are so many people, and everything is so much more intense here,” senior center fielder Micaela McCoy said. “There were a lot of nerves, and it took awhile to fight through them. But we have a feel for this environment now, and that will help us [today].” The town of Amboy and surrounding communities turned out in droves, easily filling up the third-base stands and lining the fence

down the left-field line. Cameras were everywhere, smiles were ever-present, and the cheers from the Clipper faithful drowned out most of the noise coming from the Trico side of the diamond. “We’ve gotten so much support through the season, and we had a ton of it today,” Liebing said. “That means a lot to us, and we want to put on a good show for our fans.” See, that’s what the state tournament is all about: representing your family, your school, and your town with pride, no matter the outcome. And the Clippers did that beautifully. Despite the first loss in 10 games, there wasn’t a single disappointed expression or harsh word spoken amongst the Amboy crowd. Every word was positive, every hug was heartfelt, and every hit or catch or throw was greeted with a rousing

round of applause … the same greeting the team received upon exiting the dugout after the game. Of course, one should expect no less from a town as sports-crazy as Amboy, in the first trip ever to a team state tournament in girls sports. “We appreciate everything, and we’ll carry over this experience and use it to our advantage [today],” coach Kelly Whitman said. “We’re going to come back tomorrow and refocus, compete like Amboy always does, and give these fans something to really cheer about.” So, no more butterflies? “There will be some,” Liebing admitted, “but we’ll be more mentally focused. We have a game under our belts now, and our biggest downfall [Friday] was getting into our own heads. We won’t let that happen [today], and we’ll play our game … and play it better.”

Philip Marruffo/pmarruffo@saukvalley.com

Amboy’s Destinee Oenes (right) talks to Courtney Rhine before an at-bat during Friday’s 1A state semifinal loss to Trico. The Clippers will play for third place Saturday against West Prairie.


Saturday, June 7, 2014

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs"

#,!33!3%-)&).!,3s%!343)$%#%.42%s%!340%/2)! THIRD-PLACE GAME PREVIEW

No rest, no reason to be weary Sloppy first game has Amboy eager for redemption in Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s third-place game BY TY REYNOLDS treynolds@saukvalley.com 800-798-4085, ext. 5554

EAST PEORIA â&#x20AC;&#x201C; After committing four errors in a 6-1 1A semifinal loss Friday afternoon, the Amboy Clippers were really looking forward to getting back on the diamond as quickly as possible. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll get a chance to get that bad taste out of their mouths at 10 a.m. Saturday, when the Clippers face West Prairie in the 1A third-place game at EastSide Centre in East Peoria. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be fine,â&#x20AC;? Amboy coach Kelly Whitman said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just a matter of playing solid defense and putting together some hits. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll shake off this loss and be ready to go.â&#x20AC;? The Clippers (22-10) were already thinking ahead, showing what short memories they have for what they called one of their worst games in a long time. Besides the four errors that led to four unearned runs, Amboy managed four hits and struck out 12 times against hard-throwing Trico senior Jordan Lodge. But the Clippers are taking some positives forward with them. After seven of the first eight batters struck out, Amboy started to time Lodge and put the ball in play. Three of the four hits were doubles, and the Clippers had baseunners in each of the last four innings. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to build from this game,â&#x20AC;? junior catcher Kaitlyn Liebing said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve still got work to do, and we know we can finish the season with a win.â&#x20AC;? Standing in their way of that is West Prairie (26-10), which lost 3-1 to Altamont in the first 1A semifinal FriPhilip Marruffo/pmarruffo@saukvalley.com day. The Cyclones boast six starters and Amboyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Madeline Ely cheers after teammate Kaitlyn Liebing hit a double to score one reserve hitting better than .300, and her during the fourth inning of Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1A state semifinal against Trico. It turned eight players with at least 12 RBIs. out to be the Clippersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lone run in a 6-1 loss. Senior center fielder Jen Reedy leads the

SCOREBOARD Softball CLASS 3A Marengo Sectional Tuesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s result s3TERLING "URLINGTON#ENTRAL INN Wednesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s result s-ARENGO "ELVIDERE Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s game s#HAMPIONSHIP 3TERLINGVS-ARENGO AM Winner advances to Barrington Supersectional vs. Ridgewood Sectional winner, 4:30 p.m. June 9 Class 1A State tournament at EastSide Centre, East Peoria Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s semifinals s!LTAMONT 7EST0RAIRIE s4RICO !MBOY Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s games s4HIRDPLACE 7EST0RAIRIEVS!MBOY AM s#HAMPIONSHIP !LTAMONTVS4RICO PM Class 2A State tournament at EastSide Centre, East Peoria Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s semifinals s!LLEMAN -ONTICELLO s4EUTOPOLIS "EECHER Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s games s4HIRDPLACE -ONTICELLOVS"EECHER PM s #HAMPIONSHIP !LLEMAN VS 4EUTOPOLIS PM Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s box scores Class 1A semifinals

TRICO 6, AMBOY 1 4RICO    Â&#x2C6;    !MBOY    Â&#x2C6;    W â&#x20AC;&#x201C; *ORDAN ,ODGE    L â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Karlee $OEGE  TRICO (32-3) ab r h bi bb so *ESSICA0RANGEC       !SHLEY-ODGLINCF       *ORDAN,ODGEP       #HLOE4HIESB       3YDNEY,EVANSS       "ROOKE(IGGERSONB       %MILY"AUERSACHSDP       -ORGAN6OGTB       "AILEY7ITTHOFTLF       Carly Fults rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 Totals 26 6 4 4 1 7 AMBOY (22-10) ab r h bi bb so +ELSIE4HURMANB       -ADELINE%LYSS       +AITLYN,IEBINGC       +ARLEE$OEGEP       -ICAELA-C#OYCF       $ESTINEE/ENESB       #OURTNEY2HINEDP       (ANNAH-C#OYLF       +YLIE(IGHBARGERPH       $ELANEY7ILHELMRF       3YDNEY7ILHELMB       Totals: 25 1 4 1 1 12 E â&#x20AC;&#x201C;-ODGLIN 4HIES 4HURMAN 37ILHELM 2. DP â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Trico 1. LOB â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Trico 2, Amboy 4. 2B â&#x20AC;&#x201C;,IEBING --C#OY HR â&#x20AC;&#x201C;0RANGE IP H R ER BB SO Trico ,ODGE       Amboy $OEGE       How they scored Top 3 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;0RANGE2")" SCORING7ITTHOFT -ODGLIN2")" SCORING0RANGE-ODGLIN SCOREDONWILDPITCH Bottom 4 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;,IEBING2")" SCORING%LY Top 5 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;0RANGE(2 SCORING6OGTAND7ITTHOFT

ALTAMONT 3, WEST PRAIRIE 1 7EST0RAIRIE    Â&#x2C6;    !LTAMONT   8 Â&#x2C6;    W â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$EIDRE,EDBETTER  L â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Kourtney Campbell (26-9) WEST PRAIRIE (26-10) 4ABBY "ILDERBACK B    *ENNIFER 3CHWERERB   (ANNA2UNNERSS   *EN 2EEDY CF    -ORGAN 7EAVER DP   #AMPBELLP   (ALIE2UNNER PR   0AIGE7EBSTERC   *ESSICA (ERNDON    3HYANNE 4HOMAS LF    (ANNAH 4HOMPSON PH    3YDNEY "ROODHEADRF  Totals: 27-1-5. #AMPBELL  )0  2  %2  (  3/  BB) and Webster. 2B â&#x20AC;&#x201C; (ANNAH 2UNNER Reedy. RBI â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Reedy. LOB â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5. ALTAMONT (28-4) -ADISON/HNESORGECF   3HELBY0HILLIPS B    $EIDRE ,EDBETTER P    ,AUREN/HNESORGEB   ,AUREN7HITE C   !LEX4EASLEYB   .IKKI4HARP rf 2-0-0, Brooke Burns dp 2-0-0, Audrey 7INTERSSS   #HANDRA3MITHLF   Totals: 23-3-6. ,EDBETTER  )0  2  %2  (  3/ AND 7HITE 2B â&#x20AC;&#x201C; -/HNESORGE ,EDBETter. HR â&#x20AC;&#x201C;,/HNESORGERBI â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Ledbetter, ,/HNESORGE 7HITECS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Ledbetter. E â&#x20AC;&#x201C; ,/HNESORGELOB â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

Who: Amboy (22-10) vs. West Prairie (26-10) When: 10 a.m. Saturday Where: EastSide Centre, East Peoria Twitter: Follow Ty Reynolds (@STyReynolds) way with a .416 batting average to go with 23 RBIs, and designated player Morgan Weaver has a .321 average with a teamhigh 25 RBIs. First baseman Tabby Bilderback sets the table from the leadoff spot, hitting at a .374 clip with three doubles, four triples, three home runs and 21 RBIs, and No. 3 hitter Hanna Runner is hitting .360 with 13 doubles, two triples, two homers and 24 RBIs. Pitcher Kourtney Campbell is 26-8 with a 1.62 ERA, having allowed 206 hits and striking out 200 batters in 225 1/3 innings coming into the state tournament. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a quality team, but they all are at this point,â&#x20AC;? Whitman said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to put the ball in play, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to make some errors, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have to play solid defense and put together some hits if we want to win.â&#x20AC;? Despite watching the first semifinal, the Clippers are more focused on fixing their mistakes than what West Prairie brings to the table. The Amboy players and coaches were adamant that they couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hang their heads, and instead are ready to finish off the dream season in much better fashion than their first state tournament game. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We just need to stick together, and play softball like we know how,â&#x20AC;? senior center fielder Micaela McCoy said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We know what weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re capable of, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll adjust and come back and play better in our last game of the season.â&#x20AC;?

ROUNDUP

Class 2A ALLEMAN 7, MONTICELLO 5 -ONTICELLO    Â&#x2C6;    !LLEMAN   8 Â&#x2C6;    W â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Emily Hoffman (12-1). L â&#x20AC;&#x201C; #HRISSY Gadbury (25-5). MONTICELLO (30-5) 3AMANTHA 6ALENTINE SS    #HRISSY 'ADBURYP   (ANNAH3MITHPR   !LLIE (ISLOPE C    -ALLORY "ECKER PR   -EGAN4AYLORB   3OPHIE #ATLIN DP    -EGAN -AGSAMEN CF    !SHLEY 'ULLIFORD B    %MILY #HITWOODRF   #LAIRE(UISINGALF   ,AYNE "UZAN BPR    Totals: 31-5-11. 'ADBURY)0 2 %2 ( 3/  BB) and Hislope. 2B â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Valentine. HR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Gadbury, Hislope. RBI â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Gadbury 4, Hislope. CS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Valentine. LOB â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7. ALLEMAN (31-6) !NNA 7ETHERELL LF    ,EXI &ERRARI B    )SABELLE !NDERSON B    -OLLY %THINGTONB   -ACKENZIE3ANCHEZSS    !BBY4HOMPSONDP   $AKOTA Stout p 2-0-0, Emily Hoffman p 1-0-1, ,IZZIE-ALCOLM   *ULIA4HOMERC   -ARIS"OELENSPH   #AITLIN$E7ITTE CF    !SHLEY 4HOLL RF    Totals: 28-7-11. 3TOUT)0 2 %2 ( 3/ "" (OFFMAN  )0  2  %2  (  3/ and Hislope. 2B â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7ETHERELL %THINGTON 4HOMPSONHR â&#x20AC;&#x201C;3ANCHEZSB â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Ferrari. E â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Ferrari. LOB â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5.

TEUTOPOLIS 6, BEECHER 5 "EECHER    Â&#x2C6;    4EUTOPOLIS   8 Â&#x2C6;    W â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Kadi Borries (18-1). L â&#x20AC;&#x201C;3ARAH#REWS   BEECHER (33-8) )SABELLA 7OOLSLAYER SS    %MILY ,ANDISC   4AYLOR*OHNSON   3ARAH Crews p 4-0-2, Alexis Abbate pr 0-0-0, 3YDNEY:UPANB   3AVANNAH,OWE B   #ARSON3OLISLF   3AVANAH 3TLUKA CF    -ADISON "AINBRIDGE DP    3ALEM 'ARZA PH    -ARGARET HANLEYRF  Totals: 34-5-11. #REWS  )0  2  %2  (  3/  BB) and Landis. 2B â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Zupan. HR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; *OHNSON RBI â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7OOLSLAYER *OHNSON Garza 2. E â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7OOLSLAYER *OHNSONLOB â&#x20AC;&#x201C;"EECHER TEUTOPOLIS (28-3) -ADISON#OWMANB   !NNI"ORRIESC    +ADI"ORRIESP   !LLISON!PKEB    $ANIELLE2EPKINGSS   *ULIE7ENTE CF    #HELSEY (ARDIEK RF    +AITLIN 3MITH DP    *ESSICA $REES PH    2AEGEN$REESLF   *ESSICA3CHUMACHER 1b 0-0-0. Totals: 25-6-6. +"ORRIES)0 2 %2 ( 3/ "" and A.Borries. 2B â&#x20AC;&#x201C; K.Borries. 3B â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Wente. HR â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Apke. HBP â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Apke (by Crews). E â&#x20AC;&#x201C; #OWMAN 2EPKING 3CHUMACHERLOB â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Three Rivers North all-conference First team Pitchers: +YLIE!CKERMAN%RIE 0ROPHETstown so.), Brooke Stralow (Morrison fr.), ,AYKN7ALDSCHMIDT.EWMANFR Catchers: *Kaeli Kovarik (E-P sr.), KaitLYN,IEBING!MBOYJR *ULIE(URD.EWMANJR Infielders: *Jenna Jones (Fulton sr.), *Allie Wiersema (Morrison sr.), Clare Kramer (E-P JR #HELSEA,ESNIEWSKI&ULTONJR 3YDNEY Mericle (Riverdale sr.) Outfielders: *Micaela McCoy (Amboy sr.),

%MILY #OX % 0 SO 3HANNON &INNERAN -ORRISONJR /LIVIA%DFORS&ULTONSR DH/Utility:#OURTNEY2HINE!MBOYJR Second team Pitchers:+ARLEE$OEGE!MBOYFR ,AUren Rice (Morrison fr.), Lexi VenHuizen 2IVERDALEJR Catcher:#HELSEA%ADS-ORRISONSR Infielders:!SHLEY0HILLIPS"UREAU6ALLEY SO 3AVANNAH -ETTLER % 0 JR -ADELINE %LY!MBOYJR *AEDEN7ORKMAN-ORRISON FR -ARY!LICE/SWALT.EWMANSR Outfielders: (ANNAH -C#OY !MBOY SR -EGAN'ROVES2IVERDALEJR 2ACHEL $AVIS -ORRISON JR 3TEPHANIE 4HULEN (E-P so.) DH/Utility: Ann Renkes (Fulton sr.) Honorable mention Pitcher:)RINI0ETROS"UREAU6ALLEYJR Catchers:#HLOE3ULLIVAN2IVERDALESO -ADDY!NDRESEN&ULTONJR Infielders: 3TACIA 7ALTER .EWMAN SR $ESTINEE/ENES!MBOYSR +ELSIE4HURman (Amboy sr.), Darcy Kepner (Bureau 6ALLEY SO *ENNA 3TEVENS .EWMAN JR -ADY&ERRIS.EWMANFR ,AUREN0ANNIER -ORRISONSO 4AYLOR7AINWRIGHT2IVERDALE JR Outfielder: +ENNEDY$INGES!MBOYJR DH/Utility:+AYLEE$ONNA2IVERDALEJR Player of the year: Jenna Jones (Fulton sr.) * unanimous selections

Philip Marruffo/pmarruffo@saukvalley.com

ABOVE: Amboyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sydney Wilhelm fields a bunt from Tricoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bailey Witthoft during the 1A state semifinal game. The Clippers lost 6-1, and they will play West Prairie Saturday in the third-place game. BELOW: Amboyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Courtney Rhine takes a swing during Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s loss to Trico.

Homers key for Altamont Indians hit back-to-back dingers in win over Cyclones By SVM Sports Staff

EAST PEORIA â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Lauren Ohnesorge and Lauren White led off the second inning with back-toback home runs off West Prairie starter Koutney Campbell to provide all the offense that Altamont would need in a 3-1 win in a 1A state semifinal Friday at EastSide Centre. Altamont (28-4) advances to play Trico (33-3) in the championship game at 12:30 p.m. on Saturday. Altamont pitcher Deidre Ledbetter (25-3) allowed five hits, one earned run, and she had 15 strikeouts and no walks. Ledbetter also doubled to score Madison Ohnesorge in the third inning to complete the Indiansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; scoring. Campbell (26-9) allowed six hits, three runs (all earned) with six strikeouts and a walk for the Cyclones (26-10). Jen Reedyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s RBI double scored Jennifer Schwerer in the sixth for the Cyclones lone run.

allowed eight hits, and four earned runs with, two strikeouts and a walk. Molly Ethington had three hits and two RBIs for Alleman. Chrissy Gadbury (25-5) took the loss, allowing 11 hits, seven earned runs with two strikeouts and a walk for Monticello (305). Gadbury also had two hits and four RBIs.

Teutopolis 6, Beecher 5: Allison Apkeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s three-

CLASS 2A

Alleman 7, Monticello 5: Mackenzie Sanchezâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

grand slam in the fifth inning helped the Pioneers rally from a 4-2 deficit to advance to the 2A title game. Alleman (31-6) will face

Teutopolis in the championship at 5:30 p.m. Saturday. Emily Hoffman (12-1) pitched three innings of relief, allowing one run with two strikeouts and no walks, to pick up the win. Dakota Stout started the game for Alleman. She

run home run was the big blow in a four-run fifth inning for the Wooden Shoes in a 2A semifinal win over Beecher. Teutopolis (28-3) trailed 5-2 going into the fifth, before finally getting to Beecher pitcher Sarah Crews (23-4) Crews allowed six earned runs on six hits, and had four strikeouts and one walk. Pinch hitter Sarah Garza had a two-run single for Beecher (33-8). Kadi Borries (18-1) allowed 11 hits and five runs, only three earned, in seven innings. She had two strikeouts and a walk.


"s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

3ATURDAY *UNE 

THERE IS A REASON WE SELL MORE USED VEHICLES THAN ANYONE ELSE IN TOWN! 13 CHEVY

13 CHRYSLER

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200 TOURING

STK# U968

199

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/MO.

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LT2, LEATHER WAS $17,875 PETEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S $ PRICE

BIG HORN WAS $36,850 PETEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S $ PRICE

13 CHEVY

12 CHEVY

CRUZE

25,981*

STK# U966

ELECTRIC WAS $31,775 PETEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S $ PRICE

LS, ECONOMY WAS $17,125 PETEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S $ PRICE

TOURING WAS $20,150 PETEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S $ PRICE

28,996

15,981

*

09 PONTIAC

VIBE

STK# U921A

14 FORD

TAURUS

IMPALA

STK# U953

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156

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SLEEK! WAS $17,950 PETEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S $ PRICE

SE, FACTORY WARRANTY WAS $19,991 PETEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S $ * PRICE

LT, NEW BODY STYLE! WAS $27,497 PETEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S $ * PRICE

SEL, GREAT EQUIPMENT WAS $25,975 PETEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S $ * PRICE

14 RAM

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18,987

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24,981

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STK# U937

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23,891

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CAPTIVA

09 DODGE

GRAND CARAVAN

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CARGO, VERSATILITY WAS $29,975 PETEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S $ * PRICE

28,981

343

$

09 HONDA

ODYSSEY

A

/MO.

STK# B859A

SUMMIT, HEMI WAS $56,850 PETEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S $ PRICE

42,891*

23,981*

14,981*

MALIBU

VERANO

199

$

TOWN & COUNTRY STK# D943A

LOADED WITH EQUIPMENT WAS $28,550 PETEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S $ * PRICE

23,981

14 FORD

A

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24,988*

9,998*

14 LINCOLN

STK# H2846

STK# H2842

CONVERTIBLE WAS $24,950 PETEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S $ PRICE

CONV., PREMIUM LEATHER WAS $26,950 PETEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S $ * PRICE

AWD WAS $44,855 PETEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S $ PRICE

*

14 CHEVY

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STK# H2837

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2.5 WAS $13,750 PETEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S $ PRICE

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13 CHEVY

08 SATURN

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FIESTA

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ALTIMA

$

*

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23,658

LTZ WAS $25,850 PETEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S $ PRICE

$

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EXTENDED WAS $10,996 PETEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S $ PRICE

14 FORD

MUSTANG MUSTANG

359

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06 CHRYSLER

14 BUICK

STK# U938

FAMILY MOVER WAS $15,425 PETEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S $ PRICE

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SUV WITH ECONOMY WAS $23,950 PETEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S $ * PRICE

SX

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STK# U919

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15,981*

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14 CHEVY

FOCUS

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$

LT WAS $17,975 PETEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S $ PRICE

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14 CHRYSLER

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$

32,781*

13 CHEVY

300

STK# U932

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VOLT

14,981*

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1500

STK# U970

16,981*

A

SLEEK! WAS $15,975 PETEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S $ PRICE

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TAURUS

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S/SV, LOW MILES

21,988*

PETEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S $ PRICE

SE WAS $14,725 PETEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S $ PRICE

14,688*

10 DODGE

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AVENGER

FOCUS

146

STK# F4356B

STK# F4441A

$

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LT, BEST VALUE! WAS $16,975 PETEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S $ PRICE

14,871*

SHO

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PETEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S $ PRICE

SE WAS $14,250 PETEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S $ PRICE

VUE

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SX WAS $12,950 PETEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S $ PRICE

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11,383*

Better Valueâ&#x20AC;¦ Better Qualityâ&#x20AC;¦ Better Serviceâ&#x20AC;¦ Out Our Complete Inventory

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* Plus tax, title, license and doc fees. A) 3.9% for 72 months with approved credit. Plus tax, title, license and doc fees. $2,000 cash or trade-in value. Photos for illustration only. Dealer not liable for errors.

Tylor Bonnell

Brandon Wyatt

Sales Professional Internet Sales Manager Pete Harkness Chrysler Pete HarknessAuto


Section C

Business

www.saukvalley.com

SV Weekend

Saturday, June 7, 2014

daveRAMSEY

STERLING I SILVER CITY TREASURES

Shop specializes in unique

Financial straight talk. For more advice, plus special readers offers, visit davesays. org or call 88822-PEACE.

Roll 401(k) savings Dear Dave, How should I handle my 401(k) when moving from one job to another? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Tracy

Photos by Philip Marruffo/pmarruffo@saukvalley.com

Silver City Treasures owner Ray Scheff travels all over to find unique antiques for his store, which has finally opened in downtown Sterling.

Remember all that stuff in the window? Now you can buy it BY KATHLEEN A. SCHULTZ kschultz@saukvalley.com 800-798-4085, ext. 5535

STERLING â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The nosesmudged-window store finally has opened downtown. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the informal name of the new shop at 117 E. Third St., an erstwhile glass-fronted storage space that for years has enticed passersby to press their noses to the showcase window and wonder, Just what in the name of all thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good and holy is all that stuff in there?

A silver tea kettle from the 1700s. A brass hook shaped like a mermaid. A hand-carved African fertility god. An ultracool set of vinyl and aluminum rock â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; roll bar stools. A reproduction Andy Warhol poster. A Peter Max maybemaybe-not reproduction poster, research still pending. A bug-eyed foam-rubber gremlin with green surfer shorts and hair growing out his toes (back off, I saw it first). UNIQUE CONTINUED ON C8

Sliver City Treasures in downtown Sterling offers a wide variety of items for just about everyone â&#x20AC;&#x201C; even the guitarist in your life.

Dear Tracy, I would roll it to an IRA. Your new company, if you move it there, will have limited choices for your 401(k). Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d also probably have a lengthy waiting period for verification and the potential add-on fees and taxes. Plus, with an IRA, you can cash it out if something really bad happens. But I rarely ever advise people to cash out their IRAs. The only exceptions are extreme cases, like to avoid bankruptcy or foreclosure. Even then, hardship withdrawals are very difficult to get. And again, this kind of thing should never be done, except in an absolute worst-case scenario. Just roll your money into a traditional IRA, Tracy. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s called a direct transfer IRA, and that way there will be no taxes on it. You want the money to go directly from the 401(k) to the IRA. Then, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have the freedom to choose from about 8,000 mutual funds and move the money around, if you like. In other words, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in control. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the way it should be, when it comes to your money. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Dave

It all evens out

Startup lab offers path to entrepreneurship

Dear Dave, We have three children, ages 15, 10 and 9. With our oldest starting high school and just being a teenager, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re spending lots more money on her than the others. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s almost like sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the favorite child. Should we spend more on the other kids to make things seem a little more fair? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Julie

and male-dominated Silicon Valley startup world, they are forging ahead. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have no fear,â&#x20AC;? said Jodi Murphy, 57, of San Mateo County, who joined the Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Startup Lab in February to build Geek Club Books, a storytelling app about children with autism. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everything that I have done has led to this. Even though I am older, I literally leap out of bed every day, because this is my time for doing this.â&#x20AC;? The lab also has an ambitious mission: To equip women founders with the skills they need to thrive in the macho tech industry, which has made it difficult for women to build and fund startups.

Dear Julie, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think so. In 5 or 6 years, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be their turn, and you guys will be spending that kind of money on them, too. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the way it is with teens. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a question for you. When the 15-year-old is 23, and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re buying prom dresses and all the other teenage stuff for the younger kids, are you going to turn around and give the older child extra money just to â&#x20AC;&#x153;even things up?â&#x20AC;? Of course not. That would be silly. She had her moment in the sun, and now itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s their turn.

SMALL BUSINESS

Helping women realize their dreams BY HEATHER SOMERVILLE MCT News Service

MENLO PARK, Calif. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; In an unassuming office building here, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a group of startup founders working feverishly to fulfill their entrepreneurial dreams, and not one of them is a Stanford University dropout in his 20s. You wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t find baby-faced coders hunched over MacBooks, empty ramen containers or kegs of beer. Instead, you will find mothers and other women, most in their 40s and 50s, with backgrounds in fashion, music and law. Many have never worked in the tech industry or attempted a startup. Despite the odds stacked against them in the youth-

WOMEN CONTINUED ON C8

MCT News Service

Founders Jaclyn Baumgarten (left) and Ari Horie discuss a project during a meeting with entrepreneurs May 27 at the Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Startup Lab in Menlo Park, California. The year-old women-only accelerator is hoping to help more mid-career women realize their entrepreneurial dreams.

RAMSEY CONTINUED ON C8

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#s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

PRIDE WINNERS

3ATURDAY *UNE 

READ 130 BOOKS

The fourth quarter Rock Falls High School PRIDE Program winners have been announced. Mike Berentes, principal, is with the winners (from left) Taylor Clifton, who received a 32-inch TV; Aaron Frank and Alexis Arrezola, a $150 Samsung Galaxy; and Destiny Dahler, a $100 Visa card. Not pictured is Josh Hewitt, who won a $100 Visa card. Photo submitted by Myra Nusbaum.

Amy Zeigler, a fifth-grade student at Washington Elementary School in Sterling, broke a 20-year school record by reading 130 books for the Accelerated Reader Program. With her is Matt Bridsley, principal. Zeigler earned 1,028.4 AR points. She has won the Gordon Nunemaker Memorial Accelerated Reader of the Year Award for 3 years. Zeigler is the daughter of Greg and Dawn Zeigler. Photo submitted by Vicky Salas.

DIXON HIGH SCHOOLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PROM ROYALTY SCHOLARSHIP AWARDED

The Dixon High School prom court members are (from left) Kylie Piper, Alexis Duncan, Alexander Murdock, and James Bass, senior attendants; Kaitlynne Pitman, queen; Kylian Lally, king; and Kirsten Pitman, Alexis Plumb, Ryan Dixon, and Trent Brinkmeier, senior attendants. Photo submitted by Richard Pitman of Dixon.

PFLAG Sauk Valley recently awarded a $250 scholarship to Shay Farley, a Sterling High School senior, who will attend Sauk Valley Community College in Dixon. Presenting the scholarship are Michael Soto, PFLAG Sauk Valley president; Farley; and Barb Schwamberger, a PFLAG member. Photo submitted by Schwamberger.

Dixon students Bureau Valley pupils take on Spanish earn recognition MANLIUS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Foreign language students from Bureau Valley High School attained national recognition for excellent performance on the National Spanish Examinations. The test was administered April 3 and 4 at the high school. In Spanish 1, three received the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Premio de MenciĂłn HonorĂ­fica.â&#x20AC;? Chase Gripp scored in the 61st percentile, Pres-

ton Balensiefen scored in the 64th, and Josie Lind earned the top score of Level 1 BVHS students with a 71st. In Spanish 2, three students also received the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Premio de MenciĂłn HonorĂ­fica.â&#x20AC;? They are Emily Wall with a 53rd percentile, Chelsea Higgins with a 54th, and in the top spot at BVHS, Harrison Brousseau with a 66th. In Spanish 3, Haley

DeVoss received the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Premio de Plataâ&#x20AC;? by scoring in the 85th percentile and also will receive American Association of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese Northern Illinois Chapter Award for scoring the highest within the category at the school. In Spanish 4, Kate DeBrock scored in the 42nd percentile and Sabrina Johnson in the 18th. They did not receive awards, but

have done very well overall for 4 years according to Tina Eller, Spanish teacher. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Attaining a medal or honorable mention for any student on the National Spanish Examinations is very prestigious,â&#x20AC;? Kevin Cessna-Buscemi, national director of the exams, said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;because the exams are the largest of their kind in the U.S. with 154,000 students participating in 2014.â&#x20AC;?

BURKARDT FOUNDATION

DIXON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Dixon High School students were recognized May 22 at an honors night for athletic and academic achievements. Seniors, who will continue their education, were awarded $187,200 in scholarships. Those recognized are Haylee Altenburg, Annalise Ankney, Brooke Bailey, Lucas Bonnette, Shay Bowser, Joan Bratt, Trent Brinkmeier, Andrew Clark, Ryan Dixon, Alexis Duncan, Isabella Dunklau, Rachel Gascoigne, Daytona Geesey, Jonathan Gerdes, Holly Grim, Halie Harkins, Scott Heath, Brandon Hel-

frich, Paige Himes, Addison Huizenga, Nancy Hummel, Maribeth Johnson, Hayley Kent, Connor Kirk, Chris Kooy, Kylian Lally, Alex LaMendola, Derek Linscott, Jenna Longan, Autumn Macek, Rachel McKinley, Skylar Mitchell, Zahra Muhsin, Katie Pitman, Kirsten Pitman, Alexis Plumb, Maggie Provo, Samantha Riggen, Caitlin Rozek, Dane Schielein, Erin Smith, Cody Sondgeroth, Kacie Spelde, Simon Thorpe, Nate Tipton, Dante Victum, Jessica VanOosten, Catherine Weinzierl, Thomas Whitcombe, Whitney Wildman, and Kari Wolfe.

ASHLAND UNIVERSITY

The William and Beverly Burkardt Family Foundation awarded scholarships May 18 to eight Polo Community High School graduates during the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s honors night. The Burkardts (center) are with the recipients, Owen Bailey (from left), Casandra Kurschner, Ashlie Lowry, Allison Reeder, Miguel Dominguez, Justin Archer, Peyton Taylor, and A.J. Dollmeyer. Dominguez earned a $1,000 scholarship, while the others received $500. Photo submitted by Paula Faivre.

Nicole Van Zuiden (right), a teacher at River Bend School District in Fulton, received a full scholarship to the Master of Arts in Teaching and Learning with Technology Program at Ashford University in Clinton, Iowa. She received the certificate from Joen Larson, dean of Ashfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s College of Education. Photo submitted by Larry Libberton.


Saturday, June 7, 2014

Scrapbook

THE BIRDS

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs#

INGENIOUS SQUIRREL

This oriole made a recent stopover at a backyard in Oregon. Photo submitted by Eileen Considine of Oregon.

This squirrel went to great lengths to get at a suet feeder in Keith Zickuhr’s yard in Oregon. Photo submitted by Zickuhr.

TREE VS. TRUCK

A barred owl peers through its shelter in April at Page Park in Dixon. Photo submitted by Fern Nuttal of Dixon.

Baby robins chirp from a nest during the week of May 11 outside Carlotta Mitchell’s house in Rock Falls. Photo submitted by Mitchell.

David Flenner of Dixon photographed a truck May 15 at Galena Avenue and 10th Street in Dixon. A large tree limb was removed between the cab and trailer after it fell. Dixon Police blocked 10th Street to let the work proceed. Photo submitted by Flenner.

TAXIDERMIST AND HUNTER

Dom Castaldo of Mount Morris shows his kill from a hunting trip last fall. Castaldo and his family enjoy eating rabbit meat. Photos submitted by Dom Castaldo.

Castaldo, an amateur taxidermist, displays preserved animals in his dining room. He learned taxidermy when he was in high school in the 1970s. He and his wife, Kitty, open the room to Boy Scouts, school groups, and other youth organizations.

Wanted: Photos from you A scrapbook is a book with blank pages, and that’s what our Scrapbook page is without your pictures. We want to fill the page with images that capture lives in the Sauk Valley. They can be submitted by email to photos@saukvalley.com or can be taken to the Sterling and Dixon offices.


#s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

TOURING YWCA OF THE SAUK VALLEY

3ATURDAY *UNE 

IN BRIEF Hennepin walk set for Sunday

Guests from the Middle East visit the career center at YWCA of the Sauk Valley in Sterling. YWCA staff recently spent 3 hours showing the facility and shelter, explaining services, and answering questions. The travelers work in domestic violence situations in their own countries, and are in the U.S. to learn how Americans deal with the issue. They are from Bahrain, Chad, Egypt, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Palestinian Territories, Saudi Arabia, and Yemen. The visit was made possible through the Rock River Valley International Fellowship. Photo submitted by Carol Fitzgerald.

Bus trip to head to Memphis POLO â&#x20AC;&#x201C; A Sept. 14-20 journey to Memphis, Tennessee, will be sponsored by Polo Senior Center, 101 E. Mason St. The 7-day, 6-night trip is $555 per person, based on double occupancy. Single occupancy is $750. A $75 deposit is required when signing up, with the final payment due by July 7. The price includes 10 meals. Trip protection insurance is available through Travel Confident for an additional $45 for double occupancy, $69 for single occupancy, and $45 for triple occupancy. Call the center at 815946-3818 to make a reservation. Other plans at the center, all open to the public, include: July 16 trip to the House on the Rock in Dodgeville, Wisconsin: The cost is $65 for members or $70 for non-

members, and includes transportation, entrance to the house and an ultimate package, and dinner at Country Kitchen. Reservations are required. A breakfast and bake sale will be from 7 to 11 a.m. June 14. The cost is $3 for children 12 and younger and $6 for all others. The menu is sausage, pancakes, applesauce, orange juice, milk, and coffee. Darlene Shafer, a certified Medicare specialist, will answer Medicare questions on a confidential basis. Call for an appointment. Joanne Bauman will lead a new, free, line dancing program at 10:30 a.m. Tuesdays. A â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fit for Lifeâ&#x20AC;? lowimpact exercise class takes place from 9 to 10 a.m. each Tuesday and Thursday. It is open to adults of any age. Cher

Weegens of Forreston is the instructor. The cost is $20 per month. The centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s grief support group will not meet in June. The next meeting is 3 p.m. July 11. Children can participate in a free bingo competition from noon to 1 p.m. Wednesday. Adult players are welcome to bring children with them. Prizes and snacks will be provided. Bingo also will be from 1 to 3 p.m. June 16. Blood pressure checks will be available from 9 to 10:30 a.m. Wednesday. A caregiver support group will meet at 1:30 p.m. June 17 in Franklin Room. Pastor Terri Wilder leads the group. There is no charge. A free card game night for adults only will be at 6:30 p.m. June 20. Games will include Phase 10 and euchre. Participants are welcome to bring snacks.

WILLBEACCEPTED&ORSETS OFITEMS BRINGONEPIECE ANDALISTOFTHEOTHER 4HE&RIENDSOFTHE#ANAL ITEMSINTHESET!NTIQUE WILLHAVEITSMONTHLY(IKE FIREARMSAREPERMITTED BUTMUSTBEPRESENTED THE#ANALOUTING3UNUNLOADED0ARTICIPANTS DAYFROM"RIDGETO ARERESPONSIBLEFORTHE "RIDGE CAREANDHANDLINGOFTHEIR 4HEHIKE CALLEDTHE PROPERTY ,EOPARD&ROG IS 6ISITBYRONMUSEUMORG MILES ORCALLTHEMUSEUMFOR 4HEGROUPWILLMEETAT MOREINFORMATION PMAT,OCK ANDTHENHEADTO"RIDGE 4HEYWILLBESHUTTLED Estate plans, FROMTHERETO"RIDGE Medicare on slate TOBEGIN4OGETTO,OCK  FOLLOWTHECANALSIGNS 34%2,).'n)NFORNORTHOUTOF!TKINSON MATIONALPROGRAMSARE 4HENEXTHIKEIS*ULY PLANNEDAT7HITESIDE !LLAREFREEANDOPENTO #OUNTY3ENIOR#ENTER THEPUBLIC 7.INTH3T &ORMOREINFORMATION $AN(AWKINS ANATTORVISITFRIENDS HENNEPIN NEYWITHYEARSOF CANALORGORCONTACT%D PRACTICEINELDERLAW WILL (ERRMANNATHIKES SPEAKATAM-ONDAY FRIENDS HENNEPIN CANAL (EWILLDISCUSSADVANORGOR   TAGESANDDISADVANTAGES OFREVERSEMORTGAGESAND LEGALISSUESSURROUNDING Antiques to be ELDERESTATEPLANNING4HE analyzed in Byron PROGRAMISFREE /N&RIDAY AFREE-EDI"92/.n4HE"YRON CAREINFORMATIONCLASS -USEUMOF(ISTORYS WILLBEATPM4O ANNUALh!NTIQUE2OAD REGISTER CALLTHECENTERAT 3HOWvWILLBEFROM TOPM7EDNESDAY    &ORMOREINFORMATION ATTHEMUSEUM . ABOUTEITHERPROGRAM CALL 5NION3T THECENTER 4HEPROGRAMISFREE ANDOPENTOTHEPUBLIC 6ISITORSAREWELCOMETO Area seniors can VIEWTHEEXHIBITS WATCH dance night away THESHOW ANDHAVE ANTIQUESANALYZED4HOSE 2/#(%,,%n(UB#ITY WHOWOULDLIKETOHAVE 3ENIOR#ENTERS3ENIOR THEIRHEIRLOOMSVALUED 0ROMWILLBEATPM CANRESERVEATIMESLOT *UNEAT(OLCOMB3TATE BETWEENAND "ANKS2OCHELLEBRANCH PMBYCALLING  STATE2OUTE 4HEREISALIMITOF 7ALLYANDTHE'OOD THREEITEMSPERPERSON AT 4YME2AMBLERSWILLPROACOSTOFEACH VIDEMUSIC )TEMSBROUGHTINMUST 2OCHELLE#OMMUBESMALLANDPORTABLE NITY(OSPITALWILLCATER .OLARGEFURNITUREPIECES THEMEAL WITHAMENU

OFLEMONCHICKENWITH LEMONBUTTERANDOREGANOSAUCE TWICEBAKED POTATOES GREENBEANS ALMANDINE DINNERROLLS HOMEMADEPIE COFFEE ICEWATER ANDPUNCH .OMINATIONSARENEEDED FORTHISYEARSPROMKING ANDQUEEN ANDCANBE MADEATTHESENIORCENTER #HERRY!VE4ICKETS AREANDMUSTBE PURCHASEDINADVANCEAT THECENTER.OTICKETSWILL BESOLDATTHEDOOR

&ORMOREINFORMATION CALLTHECENTERAT  

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VISITING FAMILYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ROOTS

Plenty to do at council on aging DIXON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Computer and genealogy classes will be available at Dixon Senior Center, 100 W. Second St. A basic computer class will be from 2 to 4 p.m. June 24 and 25. Justin Wiggins from Wiggins Computing in Dixon will teach the class. Students will learn how to use a mouse and keyboard, and computer terminology. The cost is $15 for both classes, which includes a beginnerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s guide. A free genealogy class will be from 9 to 11 a.m. every Tuesday in June. Students will trace their family trees. Sandy Fry, a local genealogist, will lead the class. For more information, or to register for a class, call 815-288-9236. Lee County Council

on Aging will host a line dancing party from 5:30 to 10 p.m. June 18 at the Post House Ballroom, 100 W. Second St. Experienced dancers, beginners, and spectators of all ages are all welcome. The cost is $2. Soda, wine, beer, and spirits will be available for purchase. Quarter Mania, a vendor fair that is a cross between an auction and a raffle, will be Thursday at the Post House Ballroom. The doors open at 5:30 p.m. Sloppy Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, chips, and cookies will be served from 5:30 to 7. The auction is from 6:30 to 8:30. Participants bid with quarters to win a product or prize donated by local businesses.

In addition to the auction, there will be a 50-50 drawing to benefit LCCOA. The vendors also will have items for purchase. Visit dixon quartermania.com or call LCCOA for more information at the above number. A free Rules of the Road course will be held at the center, courtesy of Secretary of State Jesse White and the Lee County Senior Center. The review will be from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. June 18. The course is designed to help participants pass the state driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s license renewal examination. It will prepare the applicants for the general written and road exams, and provides information on the vision screening.

Space available for rummage sale OREGON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Indoor space is available for Oregonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s citywide garage sale days Friday and June 14 at Rock River Center, 810 S. 10th St. Each space is 10 feet by 10 feet, and can be reserved for $20. Tables are $6 each. The building is wheelchair accessible. The hours are 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday and 9 a.m. to noon June 14. For more information or to reserve place, call the center at 815-7323252.

Two beginning art classes for teens and adults will be available in June and July at the center. Kathryn Paigen, a local artist, will teach the sessions. Beginning Art will be from 12:30 to 3 p.m. June 17 and 20. Participants will learn about the different mediums of art, and explore pencil, ink, pastels, watercolor crayons, and acrylic paints. Each student will complete one piece of art to

take home. The cost is $15 for members and $20 for nonmembers. Starting an Art Journal will be from 12:30 to 3 p.m. July 15 and 18. The students will learn how to create and start an art journal for exploring mixed-media, stencils, and doodling. The cost is $20 for members and $25 for nonmembers. Prepaid registration is required for the classes. Payment may be made in person by cash, check, or credit card.

Deadline for submitting copy is 2 weeks The deadline to submit Information may be subevent information, includ- mitted in writing by hand, ing photos, for the SV Week- mail, fax or email at the end Community pages is 2 Dixon or Sterling offices. weeks before the event. Information on events

that already have taken place will be published as soon as possible, in the order in which it is received.

Descendants of Gen. Edward Kirk stopped May 15 to visit the home their ancestor built, now the Dillon Home Museum in Sterling. Standing in front of the homeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s carriage house are (from left) Kim Smith, Dillon staff member; Terence Buckaloo, Sterling-Rock Falls Historical Society director and curator; Linda Heckler, Dillon curator; and Kirk descendants, Robin Rosenquist of Vermont, Jim Boericke of Indiana, and Peter Broericke of Pennsylvania. Their ancestor was killed during the Civil War. Photo submitted by Buckaloo.

Camp, picking up part of summer AMBOY â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Teen Turf will have a free summer camp Monday until July 18 at the Boehle Youth Center, 235 W. Main St. The activities are for preschool and kindergarten children on Mondays, students in first and second grade on Tuesdays, and third and fourth grade on Wednesdays. All sessions are from 1 to 3 p.m. Participants should wear sunscreen, bug spray, and swimming wear under their

clothes. They do not have to attend every session. The Clean and Green Program, for those in fifth grade and older, will take place from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Thursday. The students work in the community garden, pick up around roadsides and parks, help at the nursing home, and become camp counselors after lunch. In other news at Teen Turf:

Cody Thompson was the junior high winner of the Homework Club cash prize. Emma West and Sophia Nelson shared a cash prize. The three were the top point winners. Senior Moments chair aerobics will not meet again until September. High intensity aerobics continues from 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. Wednesdays. Donations are accepted. Cans for recycling can be left on the red trailer behind the fence.

Firefighters continue drawdown plans MANLIUS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Members of the Manlius Fire Department met in May at the fire hall. President Robert Reglin conducted the meeting with nine members present. Among the business discussed was the June 14 drawdown. It will be from 5 to 9 p.m. at the fire hall, 225 Maple St. Tickets are $40 per couple. Pulled pork sandwich-

es and door prizes are included. The drawdown prizes are $1,000 for first place, $500 for second, and $10 each for third through seventh place. Ticketholders need not be present to win. To buy tickets, call Aaron Roush at 815-915-5079 or Justin Doty at 815-213-2964. The event also includes gun raffles, 50-50 raffle, a pie auction, disc jock-

ey music, and a street dance. Lola Charlet sent the department a thank-you note and donation. Bob Neahring, Ryan Allen, and Doty won attendance awards. The next regular meeting will be at 6:30 p.m. Thursday at the firehouse. Robert Reglin and Chris Maynard will be the lunch committee.


Saturday, June 7, 2014

www.saukvalley.com

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENTS Zachary Peyton Gullickson Doug and Megan Gullickson of Las Vegas are the parents of a son born at 9:01 a.m. May 11, 2014, at Summerlin Hospital in Las Vegas. Zachary Peyton Gullickson weighed 9 pounds, 10 ounces at birth and was 21 inches in length. He is welcomed by Dylan, 8, and Brady, 4. Maternal grandparents are Beth Eikenberry of Sterling and the late Steve McCormick. Paternal grandparents are Dennis Gullickson of Las Vegas and Loreen Tackes of Milwaukee.

Isayah Allen Lee Stratton Danelle Domdey of Fulton and Jace Stratton of Camanche, Iowa, are the parents of a son born at 1:24 a.m. May 20, 2014, at CGH Medical Center in Sterling. Isayah Allen Lee Stratton weighed 5 pounds, 8 ounces at birth and was 18 inches in length. He is welcomed by Noah Stratton, 2. Maternal grandparents are Janelle Proud of Fulton and Craig Domdey of Clinton, Iowa. Paternal grandparents are Jennifer and Thomas Stratton of Camanche, Iowa. Maternal great-grandparents are Eilene Proud and Barb and Donald Domdey, all of Morrison. Paternal great-grandparents are Ivy Fuglsang of Clinton, Iowa, and Bobby and Joyce Stratton of Belfair, Washington.

Magdalena Jo May Jessica and Thomas May of Dixon are the parents of a daughter born at 3:03 a.m. May 22, 2014, at CGH Medical Center in Sterling. Magdalena Jo May weighed 7 pounds, 3 ounces at birth and was 21 inches in length. She is welcomed by Blaine Howard May, 4, and Molly Marie May, 1. Maternal grandparents are Johanna Robers of Amboy and Marvin Robers of Sublette. Paternal grandparents are Howard May and Barb May, both of Dixon.

Hunter Trapper Fisher Peggy Craft and Josh Fisher of Sterling are the parents of a son born at 11:09 p.m. May 14, 2014, at KSB Hospital in Dixon. Hunter Trapper Fisher weighed 6 pounds, 14 ounces at birth and was 20 inches in length. He is welcomed by Ryder, 5, and Kyrie, 4. Maternal grandparents are Marilyn Kollie and Howard Craft, both of Sterling. Paternal grandparents are Charlotte Chounard of Cleveland and Larry Fisher of Sterling. Maternal great-grandfather is Walter Godfrey of Orlando, Florida. Paternal great-grandmother is Trudy Fisher of Rock Falls. Paternal great-greatgrandfather is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Budâ&#x20AC;? Stegal of Rock Falls.

Wyatt Adam Thacker Megan M. Yoeckel and Jacob A. Thacker of Rock Falls are the parents of a son born at 6:07 p.m. May 25, 2014, at CGH Medical Center in Sterling. Wyatt Adam Thacker weighed 7 pounds, 6 ounces at birth and was 21.5 inches in length. Maternal grandparents are Jerry and Ruth Yoeckel of Milledgeville. Paternal grandparents are Sandra Thacker of Rock Falls and William B. Thacker of Hazelhurst, Wisconsin.

Carson Jay Kenseth Dana Vedick and Jon Kenseth of Morrison are the parents of a son born at 7:30 p.m. May 25, 2014,

at CGH Medical Center in Sterling. Carson Jay Kenseth weighed 7 pounds, 9 ounces at birth and was 20 inches in length. He is welcomed by Hailey Kenseth, 5. Maternal grandparents are Doug and Lynn Wiebenga and David Verdick and Kelli Williams, all of Morrison. Paternal grandparents are Brian and Jane Kenseth of Morrison. Maternal great-grandparents are Marilyn Habben, Bob and Janie Nelson, and Robert and Lois Wiebenga, all of Morrison. Paternal great-grandparents are Rich and Barb Robey of Huntley.

Ella Grace Burtlow Amber Dowd and Colton Burtlow of Dixon are the parents of a daughter born at 7:57 p.m. May 5, 2014, at KSB Hospital in Dixon, Ella Grace Burtlow weighed 7 pounds, 11 ounces at birth and was 21 inches in length. She is welcomed by Abbie Bellows, 9, and Zachary Bellows, 8. Maternal grandparents are John and Denise McFadden of Rock Falls and Pat and Karla Dowd of Dixon. Paternal grandparents are Terol and Marty McCarty and Dave and Sharon Burtlow, all of Rock Falls. Maternal great-grandparents are Peggy and James McFadden of Rock Falls. Paternal great-grandparents are Ann and Jim Hicks and Lyle and Lilian Burtlow, all of Sterling.

367EEKENDs#

THANK GOODNESS

Thanks for postal food drive success

families always is appreciated. Again, we extend a sincere and heartfelt thank you to everyone who was involved. Note to readers: Edythe EDYTHE GEIGER Geiger is the food panSterling try chairwoman for First The Rock Falls First Christian Church of Rock Christian Church Food Falls. Pantry wishes to thank the Rock Falls and Sterling Post offices for the May 10 Postal Carriersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Food Drive. A special thank you to Dennis Haag of the Rock Falls Post Office who helped BETH MATHEW organize. STERLING We express our grati- The Fish Food Pantry tude to the post office gives a special thank you staff that was involved, to the postal workers and especially the dedicated the Sterling-Rock Falls postal drivers and mail community for the May carriers who picked up food. We would like to 10 food drive. The number of families thank the people of our community who donated that we are serving is up food and everyone who about 40 percent since helped to distribute the November 2013. This is food. Our shelves were a significant increase. filled, and this is greatly In order to meet this increased demand we appreciated. The food pantry contin- need more food to fill our ues to be a much-needed shelves. ministry in our commu- We are supported by the nity and is a wonderful community with volunway to share Godâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Love. teers who fill orders and Though we are a smaller donations of money and food pantry, in March we food items from individserved 166 families with uals and churches. It was 496 members. We serve a joy to sort items and fill single people as well as our shelves. The board andl most of large families, and the number of people we all, the families we serve say â&#x20AC;&#x153;thank youâ&#x20AC;? to all help continues to grow. The food received by the who gave of their time

Thank you to postal workers for food drive

and contributed food items. Note to readers: Beth Mathew is the board president.

Hospice garden luncheon is successful LYNN KNODLE Byron

The third annual Serenity Hospice & Home Garden Luncheon was May 10, on the grounds of the Serenity Home. Guests were welcomed with beautiful harp music provided by Mary Ley, with the gazebo and gardens providing a lovely backdrop for the tented event. The elegant luncheon was catered by SKM and served by Serenity volunteers. Silent and live auction items were generously donated by area merchants, nurseries, and individuals. Live auction services were provided by Joyce and Sheldon Rueff, who were entertaining, encouraging, and delightful in their efforts to raise funds for Serenity. While the food was delicious, the surroundings beautiful and elegant, and the guests entertained, the purpose of

this event is to raise funds to be used for providing care for patients in the Serenity Home. Thanks to the generosity of the community, the people in attendance, and the committees whose efforts served to make this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s garden luncheon a resounding success. Special thanks to: Burkardtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s LP Gas, Spectrum Preferred Meats, White Pines Ranch, and to the numerous individual sponsors; Susan, Michael, Emily and Bryce Madduxâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s catering expertise and a delicious lunch; and to the Serenity staff for all the hard work to make the event a success. Thank you to Mary Meiners and Pam Gambrel for their imagination and creativity in decorating and making everything beautiful; Mincemoyer Jewelry, Rockford, for its expertise; and to all of our volunteers for helping with setting up, serving food, cleaning up, traffic control and parking. Thanks also to all the auction item donors, especially Anneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Garden Center and the Petal Pushers. Note to readers: Lynn Knodle is the executive director.

NEW SIGN

Miles Joseph Guerrero Alison and Michael Guerrero of Pontiac are the parents of a son born at 8:24 a.m. March 26, 2014, at BroMenn Regional Medical Center in Normal. Miles Joseph Guerrero weighed 5 pounds, 11 ounces at birth and was 19 inches in length. Maternal grandparents are Cherrie Rosander and Richard Rosander, both of Bishop Hill. Paternal grandparents are Sheri Guerrero and Jack Guerrero, both of Sterling. Maternal great-grandparents are Joan Collinson and Gordon Collinson, both of Galva. Paternal great-grandparent is Jerri Spaulding of Sterling.

Zeke Allan Lee Marcella A. and Greg A. Lee of Rock Falls are the parents of a son born at 8:19 a.m. May 9, 2014, at CGH Medical Center in Sterling. Zeke Allan Lee weighed 6 pounds, 11 ounces at birth and was 19 inches in length. Maternal grandparents are John A. Canas and Rose Canas, both of Sterling. Paternal grandparents are Delbert Lee of Rock Falls and Karen Dewey of Missouri. Maternal great-grandmothers are Rachel Canas of Beeville, Texas, and Thomasa Cavazos of Sterling. Paternal great-grandmother is Lois Nelson of Niagua, Missouri.

Cadance Rose Bender Lacy Lewis and Austin Bender of Lyndon are the parents of a daughter born at 7:20 p.m. May 22, 2014, at CGH Medical Center in Sterling. Cadance Rose Bender weighed 7 pounds, 3 ounces at birth and was 20 inches in length. Maternal grandparents are Jeanne Osteen of Lyndon and James Lewis Jr. of Morrison. Paternal grandparents are Stacy Riesselman of Springfield, Illinois, and Randy Bender of Prophetstown. Maternal great-grandparents are Carole and James Lewis Sr. of Rock Falls. Paternal great-grandmother is Ruby Riesselman of Canton.

Visitors to the Ronald Reagan Birthplace on Main Street in Tampico will find a new sign, created by Ted Sumner. Photo submitted by Joan Johnson.

SUPPORT GROUPS, CLUBS, AND SERVICES Today Alcoholics Anonymous, 9 a.m., closed, Big Book, United MethodIST#HURCH %#HICAGO!VE Davis Junction. Alcoholics Anonymous, 9 a.m., open, womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s; noon, open; 6 p.m., open, 90-92 S. Hennepin !VE $IXON Alcoholics Anonymous, 9 a.m., open, tradition; 12:30 p.m., closed; PMCLOSED "AZAAR!MERIcana, 609 W. Third St., Sterling. Alcoholics Anonymous, 9:30 AM FORMER3T!NNE'RADE 3CHOOL .*ONES!VE !MBOY    Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Alcoholics Anonymous, 10:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., closed, 808 Freeport Road, Sterling. Mercy Nursing Services free blood pressure clinic, 11 a.m.NOON 7ALMART &IRST!VE Rock Falls. Reality Check Narcotics Anonymous,NOON PM &IRST#HRISTIAN#HURCH &IFTH!VE 2OCK &ALLS   $OWNSTAIRS west door. Sauk Valley Alcoholics Anonymous Group, noon, open, Old School; 8 p.m., open, Fun Night, BRINGAFRIEND &IRST!VE 2OCK&ALLS BACKDOOR Mercy Nursing Services free blood pressure clinic, 1-2:30 PM 3AVE ! ,OT &IRST!VE Rock Falls. Alcoholics Anonymous, 7 p.m., OPEN &IRST0RESBYTERIAN#HURCH #ALVIN2OAD 2OCHELLE Chapter 410 of the Experimental Aircraft Association, 7:30 PM 7HITESIDE#OUNTY!IRPORT TERMINALBUILDING (OOVER 2OAD 2OCK&ALLS    Alcoholics Anonymous, 8 p.m., closed, Village of Progress, 710 S. 13th St., Oregon. Sunday Alcoholics Anonymous, 7 a.m., closed; 7 p.m., open, Rochelle #OMMUNITY(OSPITAL .3ECond St. Alcoholics Anonymous, 8 a.m., closed; 11 a.m., open; 1 p.m., closed, Spanish; 7 p.m., closed, "AZAAR!MERICANA 74HIRD St., Sterling.

Alcoholics Anonymous, 9 a.m., closed; noon, open; 6 p.m., closed, step, 90-92 S. Hennepin !VE $IXON Alcoholics Anonymous, 10 AM OPEN (ORIZON6IEW&ARM BARN .2IVER2OAD /REGON Sauk Valley Alcoholics Anonymous Group, 10 a.m., open, Big "OOK &IRST!VE 2OCK&ALLS BACKDOOR Alcoholics Anonymous, 6 p.m., CLOSED #HURCHOF3T!NNE . #HERRY3T -ORRISON Reality Check Narcotics Anonymous,PM &IRST#HRISTIAN #HURCH &IFTH!VE 2OCK&ALLS   $OWNSTAIRS WEST door. Alcoholics Anonymous, 7 p.m., closed, clearance required, "!!BBLEONFOR,IFE0RISON'ROUP    Alcoholics Anonymous, 7 p.m., closed, Spanish, St. Patrick #ATHOLIC#HURCH +ELLY$RIVE Rochelle. Alcoholics Anonymous, 7 p.m., closed, 808 Freeport Road, Sterling. Alcoholics Anonymous, 7:30 PM CLOSED 3EVENTH!VE7 ,YNDON Alcoholics Anonymous, 8 p.m., CLOSED -OUNT-ORRIS3ENIOR #ENTER %&RONT3T Monday Childhood immunization clinic; women, infants and children clinic; and family planning services ALLBYAPPOINTMENTONLY ,EE #OUNTY(EALTH$EPARTMENT 309 3'ALENA!VE 3UITE $IXON    Abuse Changing team,   American Red Cross blood drive, AM 3TERLING!NCHOR #OUPLING)NC 7,E&EVRE 2OAD!PPOINTMENTS  2767. Alcoholics Anonymous, 8 a.m., open, Methodist church, 402 First !VE &ORRESTON Veterans Affairs representative, AM 2OCK2IVER#ENTER 3 TH3T /REGON    Whiteside County Senior Center outreach caseworker, 10-11 AM /DELL0UBLIC,IBRARY 3

-ADISON3T    Reverse mortgages and estate planning program, 11 a.m., 7HITESIDE#OUNTY3ENIOR#ENTER 7.INTH3T 3TERLING  622-9230. American Red Cross blood drive,AM PM 0ROPHETSTOWN ,YNDON 4AMPICO 3CHOOL$ISTRICT 'ROVE3T 0ROPHETSTOWN!PPOINTMENTS 733-2767. Alcoholics Anonymous, noon, CLOSED 3T0AUL,UTHERAN #HURCH 3&IFTH3T /REGON Alcoholics Anonymous, noon, closed, step; 6 p.m., open, 90-92 3(ENNEPIN!VE $IXON Dixon Rotary Club, noon, lower LEVEL 3T,UKE%PISCOPAL#HURCH 74HIRD3T $IXON Alcoholics Anonymous, noon, closed, Big Book; 6 p.m., closed, 3PANISHPM OPEN "AZAAR !MERICANA 74HIRD3T Sterling. Reality Check Narcotics Anonymous,NOON PM &IRST#HRISTIAN#HURCH &IFTH!VE 2OCK &ALLS   $OWNSTAIRS west door. Sauk Valley Alcoholics Anonymous Group, noon, open, SunSHINEMEETING &IRST!VE 2OCK&ALLS BACKDOOR Crochet-Knitting Club, 12:30 PM 7HITESIDE#OUNTY3ENIOR #ENTER 7.INTH3T 3TERLING Senior Information Services,  PM #ARROLL#OUNTY&AMILY (EALTH#ENTER (EALTHCARE $RIVE -OUNT#ARROLL    Mercy Nursing free blood pressure clinic, PM % 23rd St., No. 1, Sterling. Mercy Nursing free blood pressure clinic, 3:30-4:30 p.m., ParkWAY!PARTMENTS 7,E&EVRE Road, Sterling. TOPS, 4 p.m. weigh-in, 4:30 PMMEETINGPMWEIGH IN PMMEETING (UB#ITY3ENIOR #ENTER #HERRY!VE 2OCHELLE TOPS Chapter IL 634 meeting,PM 37ALNUT3T &RANKLIN'ROVE Mercy Nursing free blood pressure clinic,  PM !RROWWOOD -ARTIN2OAD Rock Falls. TOPS,PMWEIGH IN 

PMMEETING 0OLO#HURCHOFTHE "RETHREN 3#ONGRESS!VE 0OLO    Celebrate Recovery, 6-8 p.m., 7-ARKET3T -ORRISON    Celebrate Recovery, Christcentered Recovery Group, 6-8 PM 2EVIVE#OMMUNITY#HURCH %&RONT3T -OUNT-ORRIS  994-0428. Epilepsy-Seizure Support Group, PM #'(-EDICAL #ENTER#LASSROOM %,E&Evre Road, Sterling, 309-373-0377. Rock Falls Rotary, 6 p.m., Beelendorfâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 200 W. 10th St., Rock Falls. Rock Falls Optimist Club, 6:30 PM #ANDLELIGHT)NN &IRST !VE 2OCK&ALLS Rock Falls Boy Scout Troop 306, 6:30 to 8 p.m., Harvest Time "IBLE#HURCHFELLOWSHIPHALL  $IXON!VE 2OCK&ALLS Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 5418,PM &IRST!VE 2OCK &ALLS    Al-Anon,PM #HURCHOF'OD #LAY3T -OUNT#ARROLL Petunia City Quilters, 7 p.m., ,OVELAND#OMMUNITY(OUSE  73ECOND3T $IXON   6627. Survivors of Suicide Support Group, 7-9 p.m., Second 2EFORMED#HURCH TH!VE &ULTON    Tampico Lions Club, 7 p.m., 'OOD4IMES .-AIN3T 4AMPICO    Alcoholics Anonymous, 7 p.m., closed, step study, New Hope FelLOWSHIP#HURCH STATE2OUTE  +INGS Alcoholics Anonymous, 7 p.m., closed, 808 Freeport Road, Sterling. Samuel H. Davis Masonic Lodge 96,PM 7 ,INCOLN3T -OUNT-ORRIS    Alcoholics Anonymous, 7:30 PM CLOSED 3T,UKE%PISCOPAL #HURCH 74HIRD3T $IXON Alcoholics Anonymous, 8 PM CLOSED &IRST0RESBYTERIAN #HURCH 4HIRD3T 3AVANNA Sauk Valley Al-Anon Group, 8 PM OPEN &IRST!VE 2OCK &ALLS BACKDOOR


#s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

3ATURDAY *UNE 

Freeloader may have to pay price of lost friends Dear Abby: I have been best friends with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jeanâ&#x20AC;? ever since grade school. We get along great, except for one thing â&#x20AC;&#x201C; sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a cheapskate. Jean is single and still lives with her parents; I am a single mother living on my own. We earn about the same amount of money. Whenever Jean is invited out for drinks, she brings only enough cash for one drink, and then comments loudly that she doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have enough money on her for another one and waits until someone offers to pay for it. When going out to eat, she eats at home first,

to pay for nothing. It has reached the point where I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to do anything with her because of her penny-pinching ways. Mutual friends have asked me to speak to her. What can I say to keep my friendship intact? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Separate Checks, Please, in Ohio

one else. And unless you know for a fact that her stingy behavior is keeping $EAR!BBY her from having serious ISWRITTEN BY!BIGAIL relationships with men, 6AN"UREN keep it to yourself. ALSOKNOWN In the future, if you go AS*EANNE 0HILLIPS4HE out with Jean and she COLUMNISPROsays she didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t bring VIDEDTHROUGH enough money for a sec5NIVERSAL ond drink, allow her to 5CLICK suffer the consequences. Dear Separate Checks: And when she asks to and then asks to â&#x20AC;&#x153;sampleâ&#x20AC;? Because you have â&#x20AC;&#x153;sampleâ&#x20AC;? what youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re eateveryone elseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s food. If reached the point that ing, tell her calmly youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d she wants to see a movie, your relationship with rather she didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. I agree she makes sure to bring a Jean is in jeopardy, talk that when behavior like date to pay for her ticket. with her about how her hers becomes a pattern I think her stingy behav- behavior has affected you. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and the person is able ior is keeping her from But do not allow yourto pay, but is mooching having serious relationself to be the appointed â&#x20AC;&#x201C; that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s obnoxious. But ships because she expects spokeswoman for anyit wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be corrected by

DEARABBY

enabling her, and that is what everyone has been doing.

since. Was I wrong? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Miffed Myself in New York

Dear Abby: Because Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a florist, my niece asked me to do the flowers for her wedding. I gladly agreed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mistyâ&#x20AC;? put the priest through a lot to make this a very special occasion. She hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t attended church prior to the wedding. When the priest asked Misty for a contribution to the church for having her wedding there, she was miffed. I asked her, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Who do you think pays the utilities and upkeep for the church for one-time users like you?â&#x20AC;? She hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t spoken to me

Dear Miffed: Wrong? You gave your niece a dose of reality, and stated it very well. It appears Misty has some growing up to do. Perhaps when her â&#x20AC;&#x153;bridal feverâ&#x20AC;? subsides, she will realize that life isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t one freebie after another, and offer the apology she owes you. P.S. I hope she thanked you for the flowers. Contact Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

IN BRIEF Musician to give performance

NIGHTON7EDNESDAY CAMOUFLAGE MILITARYON 4HURSDAY ANDROCKSTAR 34%2,).'n$AN$UET CRAZYHAIRON&RIDAY 4HEREISNOCHARGETO A#ATHOLICRECORDINGARTATTEND BUTDONATIONSOF IST WILLSTARTHISSUMMER MINISTRYTOURFORTHISYEAR CHANGEWILLBECOLLECTED EACHDAYFOR-ERCY WITHACONCERTATPM (OMEIN.EPAL WHICH *UNEAT3T-ARY0ARISH#ENTER !VENUE" MINISTERSTOCHILDREN 4HECLASSWITHTHEMOST 4HEPROGRAMISTITLED h"RING-ETO,IFE vANDWILL WEIGHTINCHANGEEACH DAYWILLWINAPRIZE&OR LASTMINUTES$ONATIONSWILLBEACCEPTEDFOR MOREINFORMATION CALL   OR THISFAMILYSHOW   &ORMOREINFORMATION CALL  

SwedishAmerican St. Paul to host offers physicals wonders workshop 2/#(%,,%n3PORTS

Rock River Area Christian Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Connection members (standing, from left) Rosemary Egan and Deb Taylor, and (seated) Judy Wolff, prepare for the groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s June 18 meeting, which will be at 11:30 a.m. at the Candlelight Inn, 2200 First Ave., Rock Falls. Photo submitted by Nancy Lenhart.

Gardening, music with lunch ROCK FALLS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Members of the Rock River Area Christian Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Connection will gather for their Color Your Garden Luncheon at 11:30 a.m. June 18 at the Candlelight Inn Restaurant, 2200 First Ave., Rock Falls. The guest speaker will

be Diane Dassing of Crest Hill. She will discuss â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Tale without the Fairy.â&#x20AC;? Her talk will be about searching for a Prince Charming and the fairy tale of life. Music for the meeting will be by Nancy Janssen on the flute and Grace

Stahr on the violin. Bud LeFevre of Distinctive Gardens will present the special feature on garden tips. The cost is $10. Reservations are due by 9 p.m. June 16; call Irene at 815948-2107. Notice for cancellations is necessary.

Justice, elder care part of program STERLING â&#x20AC;&#x201C; A three-part series on end-of-life issues will start this week at First Presbyterian Church, 410 Second Ave. Sessions of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Crucial Conversations: Beginning the Conversations We All Need to Haveâ&#x20AC;? will be at 6 p.m. Wednesday and June 18 and 25. A light supper will be served at each meeting. Wednesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s program will be â&#x20AC;&#x153;Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Talk Before

the Crisis: Health Care Decisions.â&#x20AC;? Comfort care and hospice will be the June 18 topics. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tell Me How I Say Goodbye,â&#x20AC;? concerning funerals and memorial services, will be the final portion June 25. All sessions are free and open to the public. Reservations are requested, but are not necessary. The church also will be the site of a rally for June-

teenth Weekend at 7 p.m. Friday. The Rev. Eddie Knox, pastor of Pullman Presbyterian Church in Chicago, will speak about charity and justice. He will discuss ways to enact both with others in the community. For more information or to register for the program, contact the Rev. Christina Berry at first presbyteriansterling@live. com or 815-625-0452.

$)8/.n6ACATION"IBLE SCHOOLFORCHILDREN YEARSOLDASOF*ANUARY THROUGHTHOSEINFIFTH GRADE WILLBEFROMAM TONOON*UNE AT 3T0AUL,UTHERAN#HURCH 30EORIA!VE 4HETHEMEISh7ORKSHOP OF7ONDERS)MAGINEAND "UILDWITH'ODv4HEREIS NOCHARGE BUTDONATIONS WILLBEACCEPTEDFORTHE LOCAL(ABITATFOR(UMANITY &AMILIESAREWELCOME TOATTENDTHEAM OUTDOORWORSHIPSERVICE FOLLOWEDBYAPICNICAND OTHERACTIVITIES 2EGISTRATIONFORMSARE AVAILABLEATTHECHURCH 4HEOFFICEHOURSARE AMTOPM-ONDAY THROUGH&RIDAY2EGISTRATIONALSOMAYBEMADEBY CALLINGTHECHURCHAT  BY*UNE

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&ORMOREINFORMATIONOR TOSIGNUP CALL   EXT

Help with grief focus of group -/5.4-/22)3n !NEWGRIEFRECOVERY METHODGROUPISBEING ORGANIZED5NITY(OSPICEOF7ESTERN)LLINOIS WILLOFFERANINFORMATIONALMEETINGATPM *UNEATTHE-OUNT -ORRIS3ENIOR#ENTER  %&RONT3T 'RIEFISANORMALAND NATURALREACTIONTOSIGNIFICANTEMOTIONALLOSSOF ANYKIND ANDTHERANGE OFEMOTIONSASSOCIATED WITHITISVARIED4HE 'RIEF2ECOVERY-ETHOD TEACHESABOUTTHEMYTHS OFGRIEVINGANDPROVIDES TOOLSTOHELPACHIEVE RECOVERY &ORMOREINFORMATIONON THEPROGRAM CALL.ANCY 2AMOSAT   OR  

Library stretches out to YMCA

34%2,).'n$URING THESUMMER CHILDREN ENROLLEDINDAYCARE PROGRAMSMAYNOT HAVEANOPPORTUNITYTO PARTICIPATEINSUMMER READINGATTHELIBRARY Exercise class to 4HISYEAR CHILDREN start next month ENROLLEDINTHE3TERLING 2OCK&ALLS&AMILY9-#! DAYCAREPROGRAMWILL -),,%$'%6),,%n h3TRONG7OMEN 3TRONG BEABLETOTAKEPARTAT "ONESvWILLSTART*ULYIN THE9 7ITHA ,IBRARY -ILLEDGEVILLE 3ERVICESAND4ECHNOLOGY 4HE WEEKEXERCISE Dressing up part CLASSISPROVIDEDBY#'( 'RANTFROMTHE)LLINOIS of Bible school 3TATE,IBRARY THECHIL-EDICAL#ENTERS#OMDRENWILLHAVEAPROGRAM MUNITY3ERVICES$EPART$)8/.n3HINE6ACATION"IBLE3CHOOLKICKSOFF MENTANDTHE#'((EALTH WITHASCIENCEANDMATH THEME4HEGRANTHAS *UNEANDRUNSTHROUGH &OUNDATION)THELPSTO ALLOWEDTHELIBRARYTO INCREASEBONESTRENGTH *UNEAT"ETHEL%VANUPGRADETHESEMATERIBALANCE ANDFLEXIBILITY GELICAL#ONGREGATIONAL ALSINITSCHILDRENSAND #HURCH .ORTH#OURT 4HEGROUPWILLMEETAT YOUNGADULTSDEPARTPM-ONDAYSAND 3T4HEHOURSARETO MENTS4HEUPGRADES 7EDNESDAYSAT-ILLEDPM 4HEPROGRAMISOPENTO GEVILLE-ENS#LUB . WILLBECHECKEDOUTIN BULKTOTHE9-#!FORUSE THECOMMUNITY ANDWILL -AIN!VE FROM*ULYTO!UG 3HERRY$E7ALTOF3TERFEATURETHE"IBLE SKITS 3TUDENTSWILLHAVE LING AHEALTHCOACHAND SNACKS MUSIC AND AREADINGGOALANDA GROUPFITNESSINSTRUCTOR GAMES CERTIFIEDBYTHE!MERICAN WEEKLYHANDS ONPRO%ACHDAYPARTICIPANTS GRAM4HELIBRARYWILL WILLDRESSUPINDIFFERENT #OUNCILON%XERCISE WILL REWARDMEDALSBOOKSTO LEADTHECLASS STYLESMUSTACHESON THOSEWHOREACHTHEIR -ONDAY SPORTSFANNIGHT 4HECOSTIS2EGISON4UESDAY SUPERHERO TRATIONISDUEBY*UNE GOAL

Area native to lead media department SANTA MONICA, Calif. activities of FTP, part of â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The Rev. David Guffey, Holy Cross Family MinisCongregation of the Holy tries, which Cross of St. Monica Cathuses mass olic Community in Santa media for Monica, California, forevangelism. merly of Mount Carroll, G u f f e y has been appointed as was born the national director of and raised Family Theater Producin Mount David Guffey tions in Hollywood, CaliCarroll and fornia. a t t e n d He is responsible for all ed Mount Carroll High

School. He was ordained in 1991. He is a member of Film Independent, Catholic Academy of Communication Arts Professionals and Catholics in Media Association. He serves on the board of directors of Ave Maria Press and the Religious Life Commission of the Congregation of Holy Cross.

Registration taken for rocket car drawing DIXON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; A drawing will be held June 14 for a rocket car powered by baking soda and vinegar. To register for the drawing, stop from 1 to 4 p.m. Saturdays or Sunday at Lowell Parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ruth

Edwards Nature Center, 2114 Lowell Park Road. From 8 to 10 p.m. June 14, the family campfire program will be at the center, Alan Harrison, a teacher at Faith Christian School in Grand Detour, will give

a Native Americanâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;early American demonstration. The drawing will be during the campfire. The winner need not be present. For more information, call the center at 815-2885209.

Spoken4, a menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quartet, will perform Sunday at Spring Valley Reformed Church near Fulton. Photo submitted by Penny VanKampen.

Farming vehicles part of church service FULTON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Farmers can bring small tractors, antique tractors, and farm equipment Sunday for a concert at Spring Valley Reformed Church, 10960 Spring Valley Road. Farmers will be recognized for the work they do.

Activities start at 7 p.m. with a return concert by Spoken4, a menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quartet. The group has performed Gospel music for more than 8 years. Visit spoken4quartet.com for more information about them. Space is not available for large tractors and farm

equipment-machinery. Ice cream sundaes will be served after the concert. For more information, visit sites.google. com/site/springvalleyre formedchurch/what-shappening or call Randy Venema at 815-589-2843.


3ATURDAY *UNE 

www.saukvalley.com

PHI BETA LAMBDA LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE

COLLEGE HONORS Hesston College HESSTON, Kan. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Joshua Landis of Sterling was named to the spring deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s list at Hesston #OLLEGE(EISTHESONOF Keith and Lois Landis.

Ashford University #,).4/. )OWAn'RADUates, outstanding students, and student organizations recognized!PRILAT Ashford University include Shelby Wilkens of Fulton, Alex Esquivel Promising Teacher Award: Loren Thacher of Mount Carroll, Outstanding Student Leaders, Student Government Association Awards; and Aaron -C#RAYOFChadwick AND#HARLEY(OLSINGEROF Stillman Valley, Student Government Association Awards.

Tulane University NEW ORLEANS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Luke Pro of Rock Falls graduated -AYFROMTHE School of Medicine with a Master of Science degree at Tulane University.

Bob Jones University '2%%.6),,% 3#n 2EBECCA6AN$EBURGH of Lanark graduated in May with a Bachelor of Music degree in piano pedagogy from Bob Jones University. She also was named to the spring deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s list.

St. Ambrose University $!6%.0/24 )OWAn Students earning bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degrees May FROM3T!MBROSE 5NIVERSITYINCLUDE#HELsea Rakuc of Byron, magna cum laude, early childhood education; Katie Bassett of Dixon, magna cum laude, forensic psychology, sociolOGY#HRISTINE'LOMB of Lanark, cum laude, English; Erin Stansifer of Morrison, elected studies; Adele Ackert, magna cum laude, and Alixandra #ORWELL BOTHPSYCHOLOGY and Samantha Stange, business administration, all of Sterling; and Ashley Whitlow of Stillman Valley, deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commendation, political science. Those earning masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degrees include Lindsey Masscho of Erie, social WORK"ROOKE$UGGEROF Rock Falls, social work; AND7HITNEY#ERVANTEZ of Sterling, speech-language pathology.

Coe College #%$!22!0)$3 )OWA n:ACH$AVISOFMilledgeville graduated May WITHABachelor of Arts degree in English FROM#OE#OLLEGE

Highland Community College FREEPORT â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Students earning associate degrees-AYFROM (IGHLAND#OMMUNITY#OLlege include: Science: Elizabeth Brunner and Shelley Larem, both of Mount Carroll; Rachael Hagemann and Allison Ludwig, both of Forreston; Brady Hazelbower, Samantha Kane, Kyndra Nielsen, AND#ODY0OLIZZI ALLOF Lanark; and Theresa Walton of Mount Morris. Engineering science: Ryan Kerr of Mount Carroll. Arts: Kaitlyn Anderson and Nikayla Rager, both of Forreston; Audrie !SHBYAND#OLIN(AMLING

both of Savanna;$AWN Berkeley of Milledgeville; and Brady Hazelbower, Megan Miller, Kara Weber, and Wolodymyr Wirchnianski, all of Lanark. General studies: Sarah Slater of Leaf River. Applied science: Nicolle Zellers of Forreston, accounting. She also received account clerk, professional tax preparer, and Quickbooks professional certificates. Agricultural management: Jozi Wheat of Mount Morris and Kayla Wilson of Mount Carroll. Automotive mechanics:3TEPHANIE#ALSYNAND Beau Schrader, both of Rock Falls; Ryan Hatheway of Mount Carroll; Joshua Oldenburg of Baileyville; and Susan Sugden of Forreston. Early childhood education: Ilean Mauricio of Oregon. Information technology, healthcare: Melanie Howells of Oregon. Medical assistant: Kristin Kloepping of Baileyville. Nursing: Beverly Ahlgrim and Lisa Mayes, both of Oregon; Katelin Breuning, Sarah Senneff, and Sara Urbanowitz, all of Mount Carroll; Nickole Butler of Forreston; Jennifer Hernandez of Dixon; Ashley Lower and Sarah Slater, both of Leaf River; Tracy Melges of Mount Morris; Schae Sipe of Thomson; and Erinn Strauch of Tampico. Wind technician: Nicholas Hess of Davis JunctionAND#URTIS7HEETLEY of Mount Carroll. Those earning certificates include: Medical coding, medical transcriptionist, clerk typist, clerical business (two): Melanie Howells of Oregon. Cosmetology: Maryssa Howell and Brittney Worley, both of Dixon. Early childhood education: Vanessa Frederick of -OUNT#ARROLL Practical nursing: Bricelynn Myers of Mount Carroll, Natasha Rippy of Forreston, Jelena Runions of Savanna, and Barbara Walker of Mount Morris.

Columbia College #/,5-")! -On3TARlet A. Stoffel of Forreston and Theresa A. Walton of Mount Morris were named to the January through March and March through May sessions deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s list at the FreePORTCAMPUSOF#OLUMBIA #OLLEGE

UW â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Madison -!$)3/. 7ISn3TUdents named to the spring semester deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s list at the University of Wisconsin â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Madison include Ashley Stromberg of Oregon, Brook Hatfield of Rochelle, and Thaddeus Hawley of Stillman Valley. Suzanna Rasmussen of Byron was named to the deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s honor list.

Iowa State University AMES, Iowa â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Students receiving bachelor degrees -AYFROM Iowa State University include EllieJo LaFever of Dixon, fine arts, interior design; Jacob Hanrahan of Fulton; kinesiology and health, international STUDIES#ONNER"EALER mechanical engineering, and Ashley Vegter, animal science, summa cum laude, both of Morrison; AND$ONNA-C#UNEOF Walnut, agricultural busi-

ness, cum laude; -ELISSA-C$ONALDOF Walnut earned a masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in fine arts, graphic design.

Bradley University PEORIA â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Students named to the spring deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s list at Bradley University include Kayla L. Hussey of Franklin Grove; Jolee A. Parks of Milledgeville; and Thea K. Baldwin, Joshua A. $OBER AND7ILLIAM* Moser, all of Dixon.

St. Norbert College $%0%2% 7ISn4AYLOR Miller of LaMoille was named to the spring semester deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s list at 3T.ORBERT#OLLEGE

Trinity College of Nursing ROCK ISLAND â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Students receiving associate degrees-AYFROM 4RINITY#OLLEGEOF.URSing & Health Sciences include Alexis M. Pratt of Erie, radiography; and Heather J. Vahle of Prophetstown, nursing. Jennifer Hurd of Sterling received a Bachelor of Science degree in nursing.

MacMurray College *!#+3/.6),,%n"RIana Jungnickel of Coleta was named to the spring deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s list at MacMurray #OLLEGE

Butler University ).$)!.!0/,)3n!ARON Brenner of Sterling and Kaylie Ricks of Dixon were named to the spring deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s list at Butler University.

SIU â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Edwardsville %$7!2$36),,%n"RIanna M. Mallory of SterlingAND+YLE%$ILLON Mohammad A. El-Ahmad, AND!USTIN*$ILLON ALLOF Dixon, have been named to the spring deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s list at Southern Illinois University â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Edwardsville.

Educators of Beauty STERLING â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Andrea 6AN$YKEOFSterling graduated from the cosmetology program at Educators of Beauty.

Monmouth College MONMOUTH â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Students named to the spring deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s list at -ONMOUTH#OLLEGE include Paige L. Rus of Albany; Tanner J. Wilhelm of Amboy; -C#AHL F. Murray and Stephanie 2/$ELL BOTHOFByron; Elizabeth K. Bryant of Chadwick; #OURTNEY! Jonsson of Compton; Andrea K. Sandrock of Deer Grove; Allison N. $E!RVIL *ASE-&ANE and Susan L. Hicks, all of Dixon; Ashley M. Schrader of La Moille; Morgan L. Burn of Morrison; Aliesha M. Handel of Mount Carroll; Kristen N. $ILLONOFOregon; John E. Hanlon and Austin M. Reeder, both of Polo; Justin H. Boston and Mikaela N. Rogers, both of Rochelle; Jessica M. Bouwens of Rock Falls; $USTIN27ATTSOFSterling; and Ashley E. Atwell of Walnut.

Ogle County students earn scholarships BYRON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Staff at Exelonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Byron Generating Station awarded $3,000 in scholarships to Christopher Brauns and Sydney Gatz, both of Stillman Valley High School; Sawyer Reynolds of Oregon High School; and John Gordon and Lyndsey Schultz of

367EEKENDs#

Byron High School. Gatz, class valedictorian, will attend Liberty University in Lynchburg, Virginia, to study biomedical science. Brauns will attend Cedarville University in Ohio. Reynolds will attended Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa, to study struc-

tural engineering. Schultz will study nursing at the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana. Gordon, a National Honor Society member who graduated in the top 10 of his class, will study aerospace engineering at the University of Illinois-Champaign-Urbanna.

Andrea Herin (seated, third from left) of Chadwick and Charles Holsinger (standing, seventh from left) of Stillman Valley, are two of 40 Ashford University in Clinton, Iowa, students who competed at the April Spring Iowa Phi Beta Lambda Leadership Conference. in Fayetteville, Iowa. Herin took second in accounting analysis and decision making and third in financial concepts and sports management and marketing. Holsinger took second in marketing analysis and decision making and fifth in public speaking. The chapter won first place for the largest local chapter in Iowa with 40 members, second for largest percentage increase in membership -17 percent, and third for conference sponsors- $225. Photo submitted by the college.

Sports physicals available FREEPORT â&#x20AC;&#x201C; FHN Memorial Hospital staff will conduct a series of sports physical clinics in June and July. Proceeds from the clinics will be donated to local schools. Sessions in the Sauk Valley area, schools the funds will go to, and phone numbers for appointments are: 1-3 p.m. Wednesday at Chadwick Junior High School, 19 School St., Chadwick-Milledgeville School District. Walk-ins are welcome. 1-5 p.m. June 18 and July 30, FHN Forreston, 803 First Ave., 815-938-

3130, Forreston School District, 815-938-3130. 3-5:30 p.m. June 19, FHN Lanark, 602 W. Olympic Drive, Eastland School District, 815-4936341. 3-5 p.m. July 10, FHN Savanna, 2107 Chicago Ave., West Carroll School District. Walk-ins are welcome. 1-3 p.m. July 30, FHN Mount Carroll, 1120 Healthcare Drive, West Carroll School District, 815-244-4181. The cost is $20. The exams meet state eligibility requirements for all sports, and are

good through the 2014-15 school year. They do not fulfill requirements for a full school physical. Parents should contact their childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s healthcare provider for such physicals. An Illinois High School Association, Illinois Elementary School Association Sports Physical Form must be completed and signed by a parent or guardian before the physical. If a parent does not accompany the athlete, a parent or guardian must fill out and sign a Consent for Medical Care form. Visit fhn.org for all forms.

Recruits complete instruction Air Force Airmen Jacob J. Moeller and Saul Valdez graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San AntonioLackland in San Antonio. They completed an intensive, 8-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air

Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an Associate in Applied Science degree through the Community College of the Air Force.

Moeller is the son of Mark N. Moeller of Dixon and Darci K. Ludwig of Rock Falls. He is a 2012 graduate of Rock Falls High School. Valdez is the son of Jesus and Micaela Valdez of Rochelle. He is a 2012 graduate of Rochelle Township High School.

HONOR ROLLS Unity Christian Junior High and High School, Fulton

and Abby Workman. Seventh grade: Alec !KERMAN *ESSICA#LEVENGer, Matthew Laws, Matthew Moeller, Tommi Myers, MacKenzie Olson, SamanHighest Honors THA2OYER $EVON3UMSeventh grade: Ellie Lenz mers, Alfred Sutton, Jenna and Zach Wilbur. Valdivia, Keyon Wolber, and Eighth grade: Rachel ElliPayton Yanes. nor and Jack Lenz. Eighth grade: Alexis Freshmen: Alex Hoppe "AUER +ARLEY#RADY and Eric Medenblik. Katie Kuhlemier, Madeline Sophomores: Natalie LeFevre, Jalen Morthland, Hirl, Sam Lenz, and Maria Payton Murray, Emily MusStriley. selman, Nicholas Rozhon, Juniors:#OLBY$YKSTRA Faith Sandrock, Abbee Serene Hamad, and Nolan Sigel, and Alexandria Willoughby. Wheat. Seniors: Natalie Bussie Honors Montmorency and Sean Hansen. Fourth grade: Austin High Honors School, Rock Falls #ERNICH "OOKER#ROSS Seventh grade: Bekah High Honors %MMA#UNNIFF 'ABRIEL Smith and Lizzy Weber. Fourth grade: Brady &UNDERBERG #ARA'OFF Eighth grade: $ALTON "AKER -EG&RANK #ALIN 4REY(ENRY #OOPER(EWITT Hlubek, Elizabeth Striley, Gaulrapp, Aidan Langley, Jasmine Mills, Easton Morand Alexis Wauford. Braxton Law, Breanna gan, Paige Mulnix, Lexadie Freshmen: Jessi Vander Morgan, Autumn Nelson, .ELSON $ENNING $AWSON Eide and Katie Vander Eide. Owen Pillars, Mallory PinNewendyke, Joseph ParSophomore: Hobs Winske, Mason Poci, Madison ters. Robbings, Alexandra Royer, ent, Shayla Schmall, and Sloan Schutz. Junior: Shawn Hintz. !LAINA3CHREINER $EVIN Fifth grade:#ONNOR"RYHonors 3CHULTZ #ADENCE3TONANT -ADELYN#OCHRAN Seventh grade: #ECELIA itsch, Hailey Vos, and Katie +HLOE$EVERS #HEYENNE Abbott, Blake Brown, and Witherow. $UCHAY ,ANE.EAR #ARA #ALEB(IRL Fifth grade: Luke AkerOrban, Tanner Raab, Alexa Eighth grade:$AYNE man, Tyler Buckingham, Holesinger. #HLOE#OOK *ERIAH'EORGE Reynolds, and Madison Thatcher. Freshmen: Liz Ash, Ainsleigh Hendrix, Joshua Sixth grade: Jalen BickElizabeth Frana, Alex Muss- Howard, Avery Johnson, ETT !LAURA"USCH #LARA mann, and Lilly Othon. #AILIN+YARSGAARD *ORDAN Sophomore: Josh Ellinor. Morthland, Jadyn Osborne, #ONKLEN #AMRYN*OHNSON Kilie Law, Alyssa Mathews, Senior: Jaime Kammerer. Savannah Pinske, Tyler Elise Moeller, Shannon 2ICHARDS #ONNER3UTTON 7EIR AND#INDY7ILLIAMS St. Andrew School, Peyton Ward, Madison Seventh grade: Sonia 7ESCOTT #ADENCE7HEAT Rock Falls Kylie Witherow, and Logan !HSMANN #AMERON!NDERson, Nickolas Eddinger, Highest Honors Young. Miranda Hewitt, Brody Ivey, Eighth grade:$ELANEY Sixth grade: Madison Ashli McGrath, Emma ReinHinrichs and Audrey !RICKX #ODY"RITT -EGAN Melton. #HRISTENSEN %MMA&RANK hardt, Makayla Robbings, Seventh grade: Michael Lilian Gaulrapp, Audra Goff, Hannah Schultz, and Glen Frank, Megan Marcum, and Evan Laws, Lauren Moeller, Wicks. Eighth grade: Branden Breann Rosengren. Erin Porter, Perry Ports, Sixth grade: Mattea Bian- Josie Rank, Jared Rasmus- Gordon, Madison Shetley, chi, Victoria Erickson, and sen, Spencer Schutz, Whit- 4AYLOR3TEVENS $ELANEY ney Schwindenhammer, #LARE3ANDERS Wetzell, and Ty Wille. High Honors Eighth grade: Ashly Torres. Seventh grade: Kyle Ellefsen, Mackenzie Fowkes, Brianna Jackley, and Melissa Osuna. Honors Eighth grade: Easton Bianchi, Natalie Brotheridge, Ana Padilla, and April Torres. Seventh grade: Hannah -C#ARTY *ACOB4ERVEER and Emily Young. Sixth grade; Aidan Brown, Macaire Brown, and Alejandra Padilla.


#s367EEKEND

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3ATURDAY *UNE 

Put hold on anniversary trip mean, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not against the law or anything like that. I just donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good idea. I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do it, and I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t suggest taking the trip then rolling it into your debt snowball, either. I know this probably sounds mean, but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m just not a big romantic when it comes to people who are deeply in debt. A rare exception may be a situation where you have a really small debt snowball and a nice, fat income. But most people in your shoes have average incomes and mountains of debt. On top of

RAMSEY

CONTINUED FROM C1

Just make sure you hug all of them equally, and let them know you love them. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Dave

Wait for it

MCT News Service

Jennie Wong (right) makes a point as Cynthia Litchi looks on during a meeting of entrepreneurs at the Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Startup Lab in Menlo Park, California. The year-old Menlo Park women-only accelerator is hoping to help more mid-career women realize their entrepreneurial dreams.

Startups have seen success WOMEN

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According to research from the Kauffman Foundation, a nonprofit focused on education and entrepreneurship, between 2004 and 2007 women founded only 3 percent of technology firms. And just 1.3 percent of venture-backed startups have a female founder, while 6.5 percent have a woman as CEO, according to Dow Jones. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A woman entrepreneur coming out of a place like the Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Startup Lab will be better prepared,â&#x20AC;? said Andrea Rees Davies, associate director of the Clayman Institute for Gender Research at Stanford University. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These women will have the strategies to cope.â&#x20AC;? The dearth of women startup founders not only perpetuates the inequality that has long plagued the tech industry, experts say, but also creates a void of women role models needed to encourage more girls to pursue careers in tech. The shortage of women in computer science is a well-documented problem â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a quarter of Stanford University computer science degrees are awarded to women, and about 20 percent of the countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s computer programmers and software developers are women â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and organizations and academic programs are working to push more girls into these fields. But experts say change can only happen when more mid-career women emerge as successful startup founders to inspire younger generations. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Once you see more Jack Dorseys that are women, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll start to see more girls majoring in computer science,â&#x20AC;? Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers venture capitalist Stephanie Tilenius said, referring to the co-founder of Twitter. While none have yet risen to Twitter-like stardom, some startups coming out of the 1-year-old lab have seen success. Monique Giggy,

Women in startups sPERCENTOFPRIVATELYHELDCOMPANIESHAVEA FEMALEFOUNDER s&ORSTARTUPSWITHFIVE ORMOREFEMALES  PERCENTWERESUCCESSFUL ANDPERCENTFAILED a 35-year-old mother of two from Palo Alto, last month sold her company, Swing by Swing, a smartphone app that maps golf courses and keeps score. Liesl Capper joined the lab last fall, and last month her Australian startup, Cognea, which makes virtual assistant software that responds with different personalities, was acquired by IBM. Neither price was disclosed. And San Francisco-based Style Lend, a peer-to-peer marketplace for renting designer dresses, grew 26 percent week over week during the first quarter of 2014. Like other accelerators, the Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Startup Lab is a springboard for aspiring entrepreneurs to turn ideas into full-blown businesses, and founders to grow fledging companies. But the lab is also atypical: It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t offer money or the chance to mingle with celebrities, and its focus is less on hitting revenue growth targets than instilling confidence and leadership skills. The women meet with life coaches and business advisers â&#x20AC;&#x201C; some of whom are men â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and gather for weekly problem-solving sessions. Many juggle their startups with picking up children from school and making sure the grocery shopping is done. Women must apply and pay $4,500, plus the lab takes a 2 percent stake in the company. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the luxury of just up and leaving their lives,â&#x20AC;? said lab founder Ari Horie, who has previously worked at IBM and a handful of mid-size startups. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll work around the clock, but still leave to drive their kids to ballet and karate class.â&#x20AC;? Alumni describe the experience as nurturing and supportive â&#x20AC;&#x201C; in contrast to the hypercom-

sPERCENTOFSTARTUPS HAVENOFEMALEEXECUTIVES sPERCENTOFTECH STARTUPSAREFOUNDEDBY WOMEN Source: Dow Jones, Kauffman Foundation

petitive Y Combinator, where entrepreneurs hole up in Mountain View, leaving behind families to vie for investorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; attention. Y Combinator â&#x20AC;&#x153;is pretty much just numbers, numbers, numbers,â&#x20AC;? said Style Lend founder Lona Alia Duncan, 33, who completed stints at both Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Startup Lab and Y Combinator. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re so focused on the metrics, and no one is worried about your needs. With the Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Startup Lab, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very welcoming, very open. People are willing to collaborate and share.â&#x20AC;? Not everyone is a fan. Amanda Kahlow, who founded San Franciscobased 6Sense, a software company that makes sales and marketing predictions using big data, said all-female accelerators give woman a false perception of the workforce. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to attend a womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s-only incubator, because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not the reality of the situation Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be heading into,â&#x20AC;? Kahlow said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Women need to be interacting with men because thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s who they will be facing in the industry. I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t tell you how many times I walk into a room and there are 300 or 400 CEOs and I am the only woman.â&#x20AC;? Even with a Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Startup Lab diploma, women still face obstacles such as overcoming ageism, experts said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are much more open to the ideas of a Stanford graduate student than we are a 45-year-old woman,â&#x20AC;? said Marilyn Nagel, CEO of Watermark, a womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s executive and entrepreneur group in the San Francisco Bay Area. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When we think of the next big tech breakthrough, we perceive that it will come from a millennial.â&#x20AC;?

Owner enjoys strange items UNIQUE

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In short, all the geegaws, knick-knacks, whatsamadoodles and crippy-crap one could possibly imagine can be found at Silver City Treasures, next door to Airplay Sports and Espresso. Owner Ray Scheff, in the grand tradition of all purveyors of objects dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;art and objects dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;junque, buys, sells and trades â&#x20AC;&#x153;just about anything of value,â&#x20AC;? although his personal penchant is for the odd and unusual, the grotesque and goofy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The stranger the item, the better I like it,â&#x20AC;? says Scheff, a smiley man whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been collecting for years, and in fact is starting to

Philip Marruffo/pmarruffo@saukvalley.com

Silver City Treasure offers many unique gifts. look a bit like a lovable, collectible teddy bear himself. Vintage clothes and modern jeans are in his plan for future store stock, says Scheff, 51, of Sterling. He lives above the shop, in fact.

Silver City Treasures is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. every day of the week except Thursday. You can find it on Facebook, or call Scheff at 630-209-8749 for more information.

Dear Dave, Would it be okay to go on a 10th anniversary honeymoon while weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re working on our debt snowball? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Karen Dear Karen, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think so. I

that, they want to take a big celebration vacation? I would say no. At some point, you have to stop the spending and concentrate on getting your finances in order. Besides, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got a lifetime together to take romantic vacations and celebrate your marriage. Just wait until you can afford something like that. Trust me, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll enjoy it even more. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Dave Follow Dave on Twitter (@DaveRamsey) and on the web at daveramsey.com.

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Saturday, June 7, 2014

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs#

Program helps students learn healthy eating habits Staff from the University of Illinois Extension presented Great Garden Detectives to students in third and fourth grade at Centennial Elementary School in Polo and Lincoln Elementary School in Rochelle. The students discovered whcih fruits and vegetables are the sweetest, crunchiest, and juiciest through a series of investigations and experiences connecting newly-planted school gardens to the classroom, school cafeteria and home. They also participated in weekly taste testings, developed the skills to plant a garden, ate more fruit and vegetables, and learned cooking skills by making fruit salad and chicken Caesar wraps. In small groups, thestudents researched a particular fruit or vegetable and produced educational and entertaining Public Service Announcements. All groups participated in a school contest where the winning PSA teams from Polo and Rochelle were invited to 1060 AM WRHL/102.3 The Coyote to record their messages which were aired during May. The students also learned about food pantries and the importance of giving back to the community. The produce harvested from the school gardens will be donated to food

Public Service Announcement contest winners from Lincoln Elementary School in Rochelle are (from left) Lalia Milan, Zoey Tabor, Haley Thompson, and Destiny Lozada. The broadcasts were aired in May on 1060 AM/ WRHL/102.3.

pantries in Polo and Rochelle. The students and families, along with key community members, will continue to care for and harvest the garden during the summer. The program ended with a dinner in the cafeteria at each school, hosted by the extension. School staff, students, and families feasted on a meal voted on by the students from weekly taste testings. The meal included roasted red beets, carrot salad, and smoothies. The Great Garden Detective adventure had a positive impact on students. â&#x20AC;&#x153;All of you are very nice, and thank you for coming to our school and teaching us the importance of gardening. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll try my best to be healthy,â&#x20AC;? Molly, a student from Polo, said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thank you for teaching us to how to read and make recipes. Thank you for making it fun to be healthy,â&#x20AC;? Isela, a Rochelle student, said. The Great Garden Detective Adventure was made possible through a grant written by Mary Beth Christen, University of Illinois Extension SNAPEd community worker; and Lisa Valle, U of I Extension Ogle County. Additional support for this program was provided by University of Illinois Extension Ogle County Master Gardeners.

Faith Ukena (from left) Natalie Allen, Madissen Allen, Kaylah Boelens, and Matthew Rienstra, students at Centennial Elementary School in Polo, also won a chance to air their PSA.

Photos submitted by Lisa Valle

IN BRIEF Members sought for equine group

Public owl prowl planned at refuge

ty Extension office, 100 E. +NOX3T -ORRISON#ARROLL #OUNTY%XTENSIONOFFICE MILLEDGEVILLE â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The 3!6!..!n"OB7ALTON $3#LAY3T-OUNT #ARROLLANDAT0LUM#REEK NEXTMEETINGOFTHE#ARand the Stewards of the !RBORETUM 0ALMYRA ROLL#OUNTY ((ORSE Upper Mississippi River Road, Dixon. #OMMITTEEWILLBEAT Refuge will travel into Sonja Lallemand, U of I PM*UNEATTHE#ARthe night to listen for the horticulture educator, will ROLL#OUNTYFAIRGROUNDS hoots, wails, and shrieks TALKABOUTGROWINGFRUITS  (HORSEARENA  of owls June 14 at the in the home garden. She Milledgeville Road. In case Lost Mound Unit of the also will focus on getting of inclement weather, the Upper Mississippi River group will meet at the .ATIONAL7ILDLIFEAND&ISH started in developing and cultivating an orchard. 3TEVEAND"RYAN(OLLEWELL Refuge. 4HEPROGRAMWILLBEPREhome 4HEPROWLWILLBEGINAT sented via the University Anyone interested in PM4HEPUBLICISWELof Illinois distance learning working with youth and come. Walton will coax system and local comtheir horse and pony projout the owls for a closer PUTER0OWER0OINTPREects is welcome. view. Wheat Association Agenda items include ,OST-OUND5NIT/FFICE sentations, allowing live to sponsor program (formerly the Savanna DISCUSSIONBETWEENTHE summer learning opporpresenter and gardeners tunities, upcoming horse !RMY$EPOT ISAT 3(!"/..!Â&#x2C6;!.ORTHthroughout Illinois. SHOWS ANDTHE (FAIR #RIM$RIVE ABOUTMILES ern Illinois Small Grains The cost is $5; free to horse show. PRESENTATIONWILLBEAT north of Savanna off state active Master Gardeners. For more information or Route 84. Turn left on p.m. June 17 at the Unito sign up, contact Leanne VERSITYOF)LLINOIS.ORTHERN Army Depot Road and fol- Registration is due 1 week Rahn at the University of Illinois Agronomy Research LOWTHEBROWNSIGNS4HE BEFOREEACHWEBINAR4O register, go to extension. Illinois Extension office at PARKINGLOTISBEHINDTHE #ENTER 5NIVERSITY illinois.edu/clw or call 815lrahn@illinois.edu or 815office. Road.     For more information, The program is open contact the refuge office to wheat and other small at stewardsumrr@gmail. grains producers. It is Daytime activities Extension unit COMOR   SPONSOREDBYTHE)LLINOIS to start Tuesday director retires Wheat Association and the Registration is suggested, BUTNOTREQUIRED University of Illinois ExtenThe University of Illinois The University of Illinois sion, and will feature several Extension office in White%XTENSION#ARROLL ,EE Whiteside Unit has named presentations from extenOrchards topic of SIDEAND#ARROLLCOUNTIES sion and university agronooffer Amazing Arts *ANICE-C#OYOF$IXON seasonal program will MISTS BREEDERSANDPLANT 3UMMER#AMPSFORSTUas the new unit director. pathologist. dents in third through sixth The summer series of -C#OYTOOKOVERFROM &RED+OLB 5OF)PROFESSOR the University of Illinois grade. *OE3CHWAMBERGER WHO ANDSMALLGRAINSBREEDER The group will meet from %XTENSIONS&OUR3EAretired June 1. will discuss oat and wheat sons Gardening program, TOAM4UESDAY -C#OYJOINEDTHEEXTENvariety development. which focuses on environ- Wednesday, and Thurssion in 2001, as a family day, and June 17, 18, and mental stewardship and LIFEEDUCATOR3HEHASBEEN To register, for more BACKYARDFOODPRODUCTION AT,INCOLN%LEMENTARY PRIMARILYBEENRESPONSIBLE information, or directions, CONTACT#HARLENE"LARYAT School, 1501 E. Sixth St., will start this month. for educational programs CBLARY ILFBORORTHE)LLINOIS 3TERLING ANDATTHE#ARROLL The first session of the for families with children Wheat Association office at SERIES (OME/RCHARDS #OUNTY&AIRGROUNDS ( and professionals who ILLINOISWHEATCOMOR WILLBEATPM*UNE BUILDING -ILLEDwork with families. She   ATTHE7HITESIDE#OUN- geville Road, Milledgeville. HASABACHELORSDEGREE in mass communications ANDAMASTERSDEGREEIN college student personnel, BOTHFROM7ESTERN)LLINOIS University. -C#OY has spent her career working with educational and nonprofit Janice organizaMcCoy tions. She worked for THE97#!OFTHE3AUK6ALLEYFORYEARSASTHEDIRECtor of crisis services.

The cost is $20 per child. Visual arts students WILLLEARNABOUTDIFFERENT forms of media and make a variety of items that will INCLUDENO SEWBLANKETS mason jar lights, and canvas creations. For more information and to register, go to extension. illinois.edu/clw or contact Allie Lancaster at lancast@ illinois.edu or 815-7724075.

Amboy leader attends session ",//-).'4/.n !NDREW+LEINOF!MBOY Illinois FFA Section 2 president, recently completed the Illinois Farm Bureau & !FFILIATES0REMIER,EADERSHIP#ONFERENCE Klein and other FFA AND ( MEMBERS participated in various leadership Andrew and personal Klein development sessions PROVIDEDBY)LLINOIS&ARM Bureau and affiliated companies. #OURSESINCLUDEDLEADERship management, college to career success, working with the media and understanding and dealing with diversity, as well as KNOWINGONESVALUESAND discovering passion. 0ARTICIPANTSALSOATTENDed a communication and TEAMBUILDINGSESSIONAT THE#HALLENGER,EARNING #ENTERAT(EARTLAND#OM-

MUNITY#OLLEGE Klein was invited to participate in the conference through participation in THE&&!3ECTION0RESIDENT!WARD0ROGRAM4HE award recognizes those section presidents on their leadership and professionalism during their term as section FFA president. Both the award and the conference are sponsored BYTHE)LLINOIS&ARM"UREAU '2/7-!2+)NC #/5.429&INANCIAL 0RAIRIE Farms Dairy, and the IAA #REDIT5NION

Basil and more top program agenda The University of Illinois %XTENSION #ARROLL ,EE Whiteside Master GardenERSWILLPRESENTTHE(ERB of the Month program FROMTOPM June 25 at Rock Falls 0UBLIC,IBRARY 3EVENTH!VE ANDFROMTO PMAT-OUNT#ARROLL0UBLIC,IBRARY .-AIN3T Topics will include how TOGROWANDADDBASIL rosemary, mint, dill, and garlic to a daily menu. 3AMPLESWILLBEPREPARED BY.ATALIE2ODAKOSKI nutrition educator. RegisTRATIONISNEEDEDBY*UNE 18. The cost is $5 per session. To register online or for future program topics, go to extension.illinois. EDUCLWORCALLTHE#ARROLL #OUNTYOFFICEAT  ORTHE7HITESIDE #OUNTYOFFICEAT  4075.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gifted Handsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; June book group selection at Dixon library DIXON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; New books have arrived at Dixon Public Library, 221 S. Hennepin Ave. Fiction: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Blossom Street Brides,â&#x20AC;? by Debbie Macomber; â&#x20AC;&#x153;West Fork,â&#x20AC;? by Tom McKay; â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Family Affair,â&#x20AC;? by Fern Michaels; â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Sea House,â&#x20AC;? by Elisabeth Gifford; â&#x20AC;&#x153;One Manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Castle,â&#x20AC;? by J. Michael Major; â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Detective,â&#x20AC;? by James Hunt; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Live to See Tomorrow,â&#x20AC;? by Iris Johansen; â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Poor Boyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Game,â&#x20AC;? by Dennis Tafoya; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Natchez Burning,â&#x20AC;? by Greg Iles; â&#x20AC;&#x153;John Saturnallâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Feast,â&#x20AC;?

by Lawrence Norfolk; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Field of Prey,â&#x20AC;? by John Sandford; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Unlucky 13,â&#x20AC;? by James Patterson; â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Keeper,â&#x20AC;? by John Lescroart; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Delicious,â&#x20AC;? by Ruth Reichl; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fallout,â&#x20AC;? by Sadie Jones; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Glorious,â&#x20AC;? by Jeff Guinn; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Walking on Water,â&#x20AC;? by Richard P. Evans; â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Snow Queen,â&#x20AC;? by Michael Cunningham; â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Painter,â&#x20AC;? by Peter Heller; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Big Sky Secrets,â&#x20AC;? by Linda Lael Miller; â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Hidden Child,â&#x20AC;? by Camilla Lackberg; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Starfire,â&#x20AC;? by Dale Brown; â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Bees,â&#x20AC;? by Laline Paull; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Safe with

Meâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heart Like Mine,â&#x20AC;? by Amy Hatvany; â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Returned,â&#x20AC;? by Jason Mott; â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Target,â&#x20AC;? by David Baldacci; â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Skin Collector,â&#x20AC;? by Jeffery Deaver; â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Kill Switch,â&#x20AC;? by James Rollins; â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Kraken Project,â&#x20AC;? by Douglas Preston; â&#x20AC;&#x153;To Rise Again at a Decent Hour,â&#x20AC;? by Joshua Ferris; â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Possibilities,â&#x20AC;? by Kaui Hemmings; â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Last Kind Words Saloon,â&#x20AC;? by Larry McMurtry; and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sting of the Drone,â&#x20AC;? by Richard A. Clarke. Mysteries: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Midnight Crossroad,â&#x20AC;? by Char-

laine Harris; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cheap Shot,â&#x20AC;? by Ace Atkins; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pearls and Poison,â&#x20AC;? by Duffy Brown; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Black Skies,â&#x20AC;? by Arnaldur Indridason; and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Any Other Name,â&#x20AC;? by Craig Johnson. Christian Fiction: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Undetected,â&#x20AC;? by Dee Henderson; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Echoes of Mercy,â&#x20AC;? by Kim V. Sawyer; â&#x20AC;&#x153;One Perfect Spring,â&#x20AC;? by Irene Hannon; and â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Broken Kind of Beautiful,â&#x20AC;? by Katie Ganshert. Westerns: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Sunset Trail,â&#x20AC;? by L.P. Holmes; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Poison Spring,â&#x20AC;? by Johnny Boggs; and

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ragtime Cowboys,â&#x20AC;? by Loren Estleman. Science Fiction, Fantasy: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Storm Surgeâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Deadly Shores,â&#x20AC;? by Taylor Anderson; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Love Minus Eighty,â&#x20AC;? by Will McIntosh; and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Words of Radiance,â&#x20AC;? by Brandon Sanderson. Large Print: â&#x20AC;&#x153;NYPD Red 2,â&#x20AC;? by James Patterson; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Frog Music,â&#x20AC;? by Emma Donoghue; â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Guts,â&#x20AC;? by Roddy Doyle; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cries of the Lost,â&#x20AC;? by Chris Knopf; â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Ascendant,â&#x20AC;? by Drew Chapman; â&#x20AC;&#x153;The New Countess,â&#x20AC;? by Fay Weldon; â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Winter Peo-

ple,â&#x20AC;? by Jennifer McMahon; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cavendon Hall,â&#x20AC;? by Barbara T. Bradford; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Love & Treasure,â&#x20AC;? by Ayelet Waldman; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Betting the Rainbow,â&#x20AC;? by Jodi Thomas; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Once Upon a Lie,â&#x20AC;? by Maggie Barbieri; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Runner,â&#x20AC;? by Patrick Lee; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Stone Cold,â&#x20AC;? by C.J. Box; and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Waiting on You,â&#x20AC;? by Kristan Higgins. The book group selection for June is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gifted Hands,â&#x20AC;? by Dr. Ben Carson. Visit dixonpubliclibrary.org or stop at the library for the list of new nonfiction titles.


367EEKENDs#

Travel www.saukvalley.com

3ATURDAY *UNE 

‘Art of the people’ L.A.’s Velveteria celebrates kitsch art form BY SAM MCMANIS MCT News Service

LOS ANGELES – It could be argued, maybe not by snooty art historians but certainly by congenitally low-brow connoisseurs of kitsch, that to be famous in America, truly iconic, one’s likeness must be painted on black velvet. Step into a cramped, dimly lit storefront museum in the Chinatown neighborhood of Los Angeles, and you encounter ample evidence supporting this theory. It’s a veritable gallery of greats, all brushed in velvet for posterity: Jesus and Elvis, MLK and MJ, Marilyn and Liberace, Kennedy and Nixon. Of course, there are the requisite sad clowns, dogs playing poker, and bulls squaring off against matadors, too. But the legendary figures in this artistic movement are afforded wings: such titans of tufted fabric as Edgar Leeteg, father of velvet painting, Charles McPhee, dubbed the “Velvet Gauguin,” and 94-year-old Cecelia Rodriguez, whose career took off when she eschewed masonite for velvet. Never heard of these “Old Masters” of the velvet medium? Well, that alone is reason to stop at the Velveteria, a museum-cum-gallery boasting more than 2,500 examples of this art form that first gained popularity when Marco Polo discovered it along the Silk Road, arguably peaked in the United States during the Vietnam War, and endures today at swap meets, inside certain dive bars, and in antiques stores that don’t take themselves too seriously. Carl Baldwin, founder of the Velveteria along with his wife, Caren Anderson, will never be accused of excessive seriousness. In fact, he may be the most whimsical art curator around, reveling in showing off such gems gracing his museum walls as Howard Stern’s, uh, dignified profile, Lucha Libre wrestlers in attack position and, in the back, behind a blushing pink curtain, bare nekkid ladies in certain suggestive motifs. But this isn’t some winking, ironic lark for Baldwin, and to dismiss his collection as mere hack work is to invite his scorn. “Look at this guy here, Edward Leeteg,” he says, pointing to a series of works featuring topless Tahitian women and an intricate portrait of a farmer with weathered lines creasing his face. “He’s got some really fine stuff. He was the godfather, the master, whatever you call it. He died in ’53. Fell off a motorcycle. Tragic. He was a crazy dude, a womanizer, dope head, all those things. He had a place in Tahiti called the Villa Velour. Lived in paradise. What a life. “And look at this stuff over here. CeCe Rodriguez. Last of a generation. Last woman standing. Look at this picture of a

If you go Velveteria 711 New High St., Los Angeles Hours: 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Thursday through Sunday Cost: $10 Contact: 503-309-9299; http://velveteria.com

wall for $5,000 a month. Crazy. Then I thought, ‘Why not Chinatown?’ Downtown L.A. is a booming place, man, like San Francisco in the Gold Rush. Everybody’s moving here.” There were no worries that the splendors of velvet painting would get lost in translation, Baldwin said, since this genre has always transcended borders. It was huge in Hawaii and French Polynesia in the early to mid-20th century, thrived overseas during the Vietnam conflict, and long has been the top (OK, maybe the second-largest) import crossing the border from Mexico. To broaden the museum’s cultural cachet, Baldwin put up signs in his front window in English, Spanish, Chinese and Vietnamese. The response, he said, has been gratifying. He said Vietnam veterans are particularly enamored. “Guys [in Vietnam] would go to the Philippines on R-and-R, buy velvet and ship them back home,” he said. “Look at this one: It’s a GI in full camo.” The painting is arresting. It shows a soldier tying himself off with a red rubber rope and preparing to plunge a syringe into the crook of his elbow. “I guess they saw us as heroin-fueled crazy people bent on killing people,” Baldwin said. Well, that’s one interpretation. Most of the velvet art eschews overt political messages in favor of the sensual MCT News Service or celebrity worship. But one The Velveteria in Los Angeles features an “Elvis Hallway,” replete with velvet art of the King and a wing is dedicated to Africanwooden tiki of his head. Americans. “Here’s Bobby Seale getting guy in the sugar cane fields [of cool about it. Because it’s art of eler,” “No Reservations With ready for court in the Chicago Hawaii]. See the attention to the people, stuff people actuAnthony Bourdain,” NPR, Al 7, 8, 6, whatever, trial,” he said. detail? This is true fine art. It’s ally hang in their house. It’s Jazeera America and Penthouse “Tupac is very big. And I had to very difficult to paint onto velnot intimidating. I mean, who magazine. get Barry [White, soul singer] vet, you know. You can’t make doesn’t want to own E.T. on Until just 4 months ago, the done after he died. And, of a mistake because the matte of velvet? I’ve got these guys down Velveteria was headquartered course, here’s Martin Luther the velvet is unforgiving, like in Mexico painting for me, so in Portland. Though they liked King. He’s in velvet in everywatercolor. If you aren’t perif somebody wanted an image the quirky vibe of that hip body’s house.” fect, it’s tossed.” done, we can get any image on Northwest burg, Baldwin and Perhaps the most velvety Yet, not 10 feet away from the velvet for you.” Anderson are native Califorpersonage in the world is Elvis work of Leeteg and Rodriguez One image, alas, not on disnians and longed to get back. Presley, and Baldwin has dediare examples of those massplay is a portrait of Baldwin Plus, a major metropolitan cated an entire hallway to the produced staples of the genre himself. He’s quite the charac- market would boost the profile King. That hallway leads to the – dogs playing poker – and ter, with shaggy salt-and-pepof velvet art, sadly ignored, in bathroom, where, yes, there celeb likenesses. Miley Cyrus per hair he brushes out of his Baldwin’s opinion. are velvet paintings of people captured in mid-twerk, or Wil- eyes, a matching bushy musBut why Chinatown, not “on the pot,” from Frank Zappa liam Shatner in full “Star Trek” tache and a disarming, tranexactly known as a velvet-art to matadors. Over the toilet? regalia, will never meet even quilo manner. He’s become hub? A 4-foot full-frontal portrait of the kindest critic’s definition of something of a media darling, “We were looking around, Anderson Cooper in nothing sublimity. too, having appeared with his thinking, ‘Where do we want but a G-string. “Yeah, man, we embrace it cache of crushed velvet on to be?’” Baldwin said. “The Why? Who knows and who all,” said Baldwin, issuing a “The Tonight Show,” “National beach! So I went to Venice, and cares? You won’t see that in the bark of a laugh. “That’s what’s Geographic Intelligent Travthe guy wanted to rent me a Louvre.

Hooray for Hollywood: Five icons beyond the Walk of Fame BY GEORGE HOBICA MCT News Service

As a resident of Los Angeles, I’m always surprised to hear people speaking poorly of the “Hollywood” experience, as if a few persistent buskers and a bad wax museum near the corner of Hollywood Boulevard and Highland Avenue actually define the entire neighborhood. That would be like writing off midtown Manhattan, simply because Times Square can sometimes be awful. A century after the first motion-picture companies set up shop here, today’s Hollywood can, at times, still feel incredibly close to its colorful past. For that reason alone, it’s impossible to exclude it from any Southern California itinerary. Here are five essential stops to get you started. The Hollywood Bowl: This

historic amphitheater tucked away in the hills rates as one of the best venues of its kind on the planet, featuring a worldclass lineup of classical, jazz and pop. It’s one on a short list of places that people from all over traffic-choked Southern California will agree is absolutely terrific – a picnic on a warm summer evening with a backdrop of terrific live music will be a highlight of your visit to L.A., guaranteed. Shuttles and a nearby subway station mean you never have to deal with parking. Contact: http://www.hollywoodbowl.com American Cinematheque at The Egyptian: Before there was Grauman’s Chinese, there was Grauman’s Egyptian, notably the site of the first actual Hollywood premiere – literally, the first movie premiere in the

Hollywood area – in the early 1920s. Fittingly, the Egyptian is now the permanent home of American Cinematheque, a non-profit, viewer-supported organization screening a nonstop selection of what they call “America’s indigenous art form.” (The rest of us call it the movies.) From the best classics to exciting new art, this is essential viewing for any film buff. Contact: http://www.americancinematheque.com/

of her own living space at one time or another; the restaurant certainly does retain a pleasantly haunted quality. Better still, the food remains quite good – you can’t go wrong with a juicy steak, a wedge salad and a side of potatoes (Lyonnaise would be best). Wash it all down with as many martinis as you can handle. Contact: http://mussoandfrank.com

Hollywood Heritage Museum: You might wonder what Musso & Frank’s: Opened a renovated barn on Highland in 1919 and still going strong, Avenue has to do with Hollythis dimly lit hideout is a living wood history. Except that this monument to a very different isn’t just any barn; this is where time, back when waiters wore New Yorker Cecil B. DeMille cool outfits and everyone drank set up shop to produce “The martinis like they were water. Squaw Man,” said to have been From F. Scott Fitzgerald to the first American featureGreta Garbo, there’s hardly a length moving picture, just star who isn’t said to have con- over 100 years ago. Today, the sidered Musso’s an extension barn is a small but interesting

museum paying tribute to Hollywood past. Contact: http://www.hollywoodheritage.org/ Hollyhock House: It’s a short drive – or a couple of stops on the subway – down the Boulevard, but this Frank Lloyd Wright home, built for oil heiress Aline Barnsdall in 1921, perched above the city in what’s now a pleasant public park, is one in a long line of incredible architectural treasures tucked away within the city of Los Angeles. As with so many Wright homes, it’s almost always under some sort of renovation, but docent-led tours are available. Tip: Come on Wednesday afternoons for the fun farmers market, held right in the park. Contact: http://hollyhockhouse.net/


3ATURDAY *UNE 

www.saukvalley.com

NEW BUSINESS

367EEKENDs#

IN BRIEF Community input Reagan Home needed for surveys earns certificate

The Morrison Chamber of Commerce held a ribbon-cutting ceremony May 30 for Pressure Washing Unlimited Inc., 100 W. Main St., Morrison, to welcome it as a new business and as a new chamber member. Joining Nicole Mioletti (holding the scissors), owner, are (front row, from left) Ryne Mioletti, brother; Ethan Mioletti, son; and Ed Mioletti, father; and (back row) Corinne Bender, Morrison Chamber; Christopher Morris, Open Hand Self Defense; Michael Blean, Kophamer & Blean Realty; Kimberly Mioletti, sister; Morrison Mayor Everett Pannier; Heather Toppert, More Insurance; Barry Dykhuizen, Morrison city administrator; Frances and Henry Plude; Stephanie Vavra, thecity1.com; and Ruth and Stan Mitick. Photo submitted by the chamber.

34%2,).'n4RI #OUNTY /PPORTUNITIES#OUNCILSOON WILLSENDOUT#OMMUNITY Partnership Surveys to area organizations and businesses within the agencyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 9-county service area, including Bureau, #ARROLL ,EE /GLE AND Whiteside counties. The surveys will be used to determine what organizations and businesses feel are the greatest obstacles and assets for low-income people in becoming selfsufficient, and for planning purposes for the agencyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s #OMMUNITY!CTION0LAN The survey also will determine how well-informed organizations and businesses are toward proGRAMSOFFEREDAT4#/# The data collected will be used to collaborate with other organizations and businesses more effectively within the communities. !NYONEINTERESTEDINTAKing the survey online can go to tcochelps.org or the agencyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Facebook page. When complete, the survey will be posted on the agencyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website and Facebook page.

DIXON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The Ronald Reagan Boyhood Home, historic site and tourist destination, announced that it has RECEIVEDA4RIP!DVISOR #ERTIFICATEOF%XCELLENCE award. The accolade, which honors hospitality EXCELLENCE ISGIVENTO establishments that consistently achieve outstanding traveler REVIEWSON4RIP!DVISOR ANDISEXTENDEDTO qualifying businesses. Establishments awarded the certificate represent the upper echelon of businesses listed on the website. When selecting winNERS 4RIP!DVISORUSESA proprietary algorithm to determine the honorees that takes into account reviewsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ratings. Businesses must maintain ANOVERALL4RIP!DVISOR bubble rating of at least four out of five volume and recency of reviews. !DDITIONALCRITERIA include a businessâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; tenure and popularity ranking on the site.

ROCK FALLS ROTARY

Penny Roth (from left) of the Illinois Department of Human Services; Kathy Schutz, Jessica Lemmer, and Lora Fassler, all of the Lee County Health Department; and Steve Strode, IDHS, attended the Illinois Women Infants and Children Training and Educational Conference. Lee and Whiteside County Health Departments received the Rising Star Ruby Award. Photo submitted by Cathy Ferguson.

Health departments earn recognition Lee and Whiteside County Health departments were two of 12 health departments to receive the Rising Star Ruby Award at the Illinois Women Infants and Children Training and Educational Conference. The award was presented by the Illinois Department of Human Services. As part of the We Choose Health Baby-Friendly grant project, each of the recognized health departments has been successful in developing baby-friendly communities with the goal

of improving support for breast-feeding families at area hospitals. These coalitions and working groups have attracted the attention of many other hospitals throughout the state and have inspired them to seek out health department partners to begin work on the designation, and building a more breast-feedingfriendly community. The two departments work with KSB Hospital in Dixon and CGH Medical Center in Sterling.

Both hospitals are well on the way to baby-friendly accreditation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Baby-Friendly Hospital initiative aims to increase the rate of breastfeeding initiation and uptake by making hospital environments especially conducive and supportive of breast-feeding. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hospitals earn BabyFriendly Hospital designation when they have implemented the Ten Steps to Successful Breast-feeding,â&#x20AC;? Beth Fiorini, WCHD administrator, said.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;We recognize the hard work and time the hospitals are putting into this process. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I believe it will all be worth it in the end and will be a benefit to our communities.â&#x20AC;? The evidence is overwhelming that breastfeeding benefits both mother and baby short and long-term.â&#x20AC;? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exciting to be part of this movement occurring throughout the state,â&#x20AC;? Cathy Ferguson, LCHD administrator, said.

Bob Sondgeroth, Rock Falls Rotary Club president, presented two pieces of luggage to Kritsana â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kritsâ&#x20AC;? Jedjinda, as a farewell gift for his return to Thailand after a year in the country. His sponsorship came from both the Rock Falls and Morrison Rotary clubs. Photos submitted by Betty Clementz.

SACRED HEART CATHOLIC CHURCH

High school youth and families from St. Paul and St. John Lutheran churches in Sterling volunteered April 27 to help clean up trash along roads in Nelson Township. For their efforts, the group received state grant money from the township. The donation will be used for a July trip to the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America high school youth gathering in Detroit. Photos submitted by Gerad Von Holten.

Members and leaders of the high school youth mission group from Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Sterling also picked up roadside garbage April 27 in Nelson Township. Their donation from the township will help fund a June mission trip to Cleveland.

Sondgeroth and Mark Young, also of the Rock Falls Rotary Club, accept reindeer skin boots from Kaylene Shaw, a Rotary Exchange student who went to England in 2009-10. She wears a hat typical of the Lapland area. She shared her year abroad and the culture of the Finish people during a recent Rotary meeting. Shaw has returned once to her host family in Finland and plans to return on an internship soon.

DEALERSHIP RECOGNITION

Bob Pilling (from left) Ken Nelson Auto Group sales manger, and Rick Curia, Ken Nelson president, chief executive officer, accept a plaque from Stee Jenson, Nissan North America district operations manager. The dealership was recognized May 28 for 30 years of service. Photo submitted by Linda Ross.


Community

New photos every day www.saukvalley.com

3ATURDAY *UNE 

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs#

SONS AND DAUGHTERS OF THUNDER

THE SEQUEL

Photos by Michael Krabbenhoeft/mkrabbenhoeft@saukvalley.com

ABOVE: Thomas Alan Taylor, an actor from Davenport Iowa, plays Theodore Welding in the film “Sons and Daughters of Thunder.” Cast, crew and local extras returned to the Dillon Home Museum on May 25 for the second of two planned shoots of the feature film. The first shoot happened April 18.

Extra! Extra! Extra!

Joe Cook of Deer Grove

Adam Johnson of Rock Falls

Adam Porter of Sterling

TOP: Director Kelly Rundle lines up a scene and tells actress Kim Furness of Bettendorf, Iowa, where to stand during filming of the true story of anti-slavery debates in 1834 at Lane Theological Seminary, where students debated the slavery issue during an 18-night revival. ABOVE-LEFT: Rundle (left) and Kevin Railsback review footage shot during the outdoor “lantern scene” on the back lawn of the Dillon Home Museum. ABOVE: The extras prepare to shoot a scene for the movie “Sons and Daughters of Thunder.” About 20 extras showed up to help film a scene. LEFT: The extras record chanting and discussion sounds before shooting an outdoor scene. Traffic and train noise would disrupt the outdoor filming.


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CLASSIFIED SAUK VALLEY

Section D

Saturday, June 7, 2014

Dixon 815.284.SOLD(7653)

Sterling 815.626.SOLD (7653)

• we reach over 48,000 readers every day • LOST

110

IS YOUR PET MISSING? Read our found section in todays paper. Just in case it is not there, call one of your area animal shelters listed below: Lee County Animal Control (815)284-3833 Granny Rose Animal Shelter (815)288-7387 Whiteside County Animal Control (815)625-3507 Happy Tails Humane Society (815)626-2994 A public service of Sauk Valley Media Lost cat, black 1yr old male, long hair. Answers to Scotty. Will be frightened and has no collar. 12th Ave. Sterling. 815-626-5316.

FOUND

115

Found Yorkie, female, on First Ave., Sterling. Wearing collar. Call 815441-7051.

VOLUNTEERS

126

CASA 15th Judicial Circuit (Lee/ Carroll/Ogle Counties) is seeking volunteers to advocate for children in the court system involved in abuse and neglect cases. Your involvement can impact a child’s future. Contact Vanessa White, Director of Advocate Services (815) 288-1901 www.casalee carroll.com

VOLUNTEERS

126

Friendly Kind Compassionate Individuals Needed. Volunteer with Unity Hospice. Share your unique talents with a family in our community. Help someone live everyday to the fullest, making every day special. Create your own schedule, volunteer when you are able. Several opportunities available: *Patient Care *Vigil Care *Pet Therapy *Veterans *Bereavement *Administrative Training Provided. Support. Comfort. Companionship Unity Hospice Helping you help the ones you love 815.561.8866 The YWCA of the Sauk Valley Sexual Assault Program is seeking individuals who want to make a difference in their community by becoming victim advocates. Volunteers provide medical and legal advocacy, crisis intervention & information referral to victims of adult and child sexual assault. Comprehensive 40 hour training is provided. For more information, contact: Stacey Rosalez at 815-2881232

Looking for the perfect home? Read Sauk Valley estate section and Real Estate Weekly on Thursdays.

REAL ESTATE 202 SERVICES PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference , limitation or discrimination based on race, color,religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-279275.

Need to place an ad? Call us 625-3600 284-2222

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STERLING NEW TODAY Located in one of the premier neighborhoods in Sterling OPEN HOUSE Sun. June 15th 1-3pm 1812 33rd Ave. this luxurious custom built 2000 home features: 2 story entrance foyer which opens into a large living rm w/ soaring ceilings and two-story windows. Elegant designer kitchen w/stainless appliances and granite counter tops. 4BR, 3.75 ba. (one ba. has 2 showers) Two master suites: one w/Jacuzzi. Loft over-looking living area. Lg. wooden overlooking deck park-like back yard Full bsmt. 3.5 car garage. Walking distance to Sinnissippi Park and river. $287,000. Take a tour at http://

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312-373-0601. Realtors welcome

2 Farmettes Milledgeville 2+ acres + large out buildings $129,900 #122937 Polo 4BR, 2BA, 3+ acres. Out building Fenced pasture. $153,900 #122817 Call Brian at RE/MAX Sauk Valley, 815-716-0772 or visit www.briancornwell.com

Near Amboy, 15 acres of Woods. Ideal hunting, has cabin. Beautiful to build your home on. Now is the time to buy! Reduced to $9,000 per acre. Contact Sublette Realty for tour. Jerry Leffelman, Broker 815849-5286

Sterling Home for Sale 3BR, 2BA, ranch with 6 panel doors & hardwood floors. $149,900 #122832 www.1202ParkviewRd.com Call John Rosengren at RE/MAX Sauk Valley 815284-4663 or visit www.SaukValleyhomes.net

MOBILE HOMES 230

★ ★For Sale★ ★ Dixon Home 3BR/4 car garage large fenced yard 833 N. Dixon Ave. PH: 815-288-2606 Call for details. dixonil.com/home

Need to place an ad? Call us 625-3600 284-2222

MOBILE HOMES

230

Advertise your mobile homes for sale here!!

DIXON

CHATEAU ESTATES

SUBLETTE A Great Community! 3BR Ranch, 1300 sq.ft. Lg. lot, lg. garage. Reduced to $114,500. Good financing avail. To walk through call Jerry Leffelman, Broker 815-8495286.

OPEN HOUSES

DIXON

LOTS / LAND 225 FOR SALE

STERLING

215

Open House in Sterling 6/8 1-5, 4BR, 3BA Ranch on the river, Move in ready, 1702 Gregden Shores. $389,900 815-625-7429 For Sale by Owner

LOTS / LAND 225 FOR SALE 1½ acre building lot 5 mi. N/W of Sterling $18,000 815-631-6825 Will Trade or sell a wooded lot on Lost Lake for a fishing boat. 815652-2156

AND ROCK RIVER ESTATES Homes for sale and rent. Call our VMÄJL MVY KL[HPSZ

815-284-2000 APARTMENTSFURNISHED 305 ROCK FALLS EFFICIENCIES! -InclusiveClean & Quiet

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APARTMENTS UNFURNISHED 306 HAVING TROUBLE wording your ad? Call our Classified Department today. We'll be glad to help you. 626-SOLD or 284-SOLD

AMBOY

DIXON

HARMON

$200 off 1st mo/rent Nice 2BR w/ appls. $480mo. + lease & dep. 815-716-0123

Large upper 2BR apt. stove, refrig, garbage, and garage. All new carpet. No smoking & NO PETS $500/mo. + $500 dep. Now Available 815-288-1736

1st Month Free! 2BR, appl. incl. Pet friendly. $475/mo. 815-562-7368

FRANKLIN GROVE

2BR $450/mo. Lease & dep. Req. H & H Rental Properties. Call or text 815-625-7995.

ASHTON ★★ 1&2 BR., Ashton/ F.G. 815-7512712/562-5075.★

DIXON Newer 2 BR, apartment Fieldstone area: W/D hookup, appls. incl. Fireplace, garage w/opener. $625 mo., $500 dep. 960 sq. ft. 815-626-1431 or 815-631-5855 2 Bedroom 1004 Idlewild Dr. Freshly painted, no pets, no smoking $600 mo. 309-645-3361 2BR Very clean, Garage, quiet, Laundry No smoking or pets. $500 & Dep. 815-6523365. 2BR, 1st floor, applcs., porch & garage, $650 mo. + ref. & dep. No pets. 815-288-5445 2BR, family room room., Utility $530/mo. + dep. No pets 815-2745705 3BR, 2 full ba., all utilities incl. except elec. $675/mo. 2br, $550/mo. 1BR upper, $425/mo. All newly remodeled, no pets. Call 815-973-3281 DIXON MANOR APTS- 1BR CLEAN QUIET, WALK TO DOWNTOWN, ONSITE LAUNDRY, APPLIANCES INCLUDED, HEAT, WATER INCLUDED. CALL ERICK 815-739-5806 Upper 3BR, 204 W. 1st, $600/mo. + dep., Pick up apps at 210 W. 1st.

NEW TODAY FRANKLIN GROVE – 2 bedrooms Apartments AVAILABLE NOW! Rent is based on 30% of adjusted gross income and includes water, sewer, and garbage collection. There are laundry facilities at the property. Upon your second month of occupancy, you will get a $100 Wal-mart gift card for free! HURRY! To receive an application, or for more information, please call 1-800686-5538. This Institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer.

ROCK FALLS 1BR, applcs furn., spacious, no pets 815-625-0624

2BR apt. $475/mo. Hampton Apts. 815-625-7043 406 Circle Dr., 2BR 1BA. $500 per month + utilities. Call 815-378-2151 Lg. 1BR. + appl. No pets. $425 + dep. 815-625-4701 Nice 2BR Duplex, $400/mo. + dep. 815-535-6116

STERLING

RIVER RIDGE APARTMENTS

2 Bedroom Great Location Garages Available

FULTON NEW TODAY FULTON – Great 2 bedroom apartments available now starting at $462 a month! Rent includes water, sewer and garbage pickup. On-site laundry, major appliances, off street parking and air conditioning. Please call 1800-686-5165 or (608)822-7368. This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer. Equal Housing Opportunity.

$

495 1st Month’s Rent

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1 or 2BR, $430 815-562-7368 Rochelle Realty. 2 BR for $525 Water, sewer, garbage incl. Coin W/D, No pets/ No parties. Call Diana: 630-327-7046

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A1

SAUK VALLEY MEDIA â&#x20AC;˘ Saturday, June 7, 2014 â&#x20AC;˘ PAGE D2

SERVICE DIRECTORY SAUK VALLEY

Air Cond./Heating

Business Services

Eikenberry Sheet Metal 412 E. 3rd, Sterling Service work heating & cooling; gas, electric. Free estimates. Accept Visa & MC on all new installations.

We Buy & Sell Guns, Conceal Carry Classes, Gun Smithing, International Hunting Adventures, Professional Gun Dog Training, Puppies, Trap Shooting, Indoor/ Outdoor Pistol & Rifle Range Full Service Restaurant & Banquet Facilities, Sand Volleyball Leagues, Fishing & Camping

CALL 815-625-0955

FARLEY'S APPLIANCE Heating & Cooling Sale & Service Free Estimates New & Replacement Units We service all brands! Call Today (815)284-2052

Alterations BASEBALL GLOVE, SHOE & ZIPPER REPAIR ALTERATIONS Grummerts Hardware Sterling Rock Falls 815-388-8047

Asphalt

www.Rockhollowhuntclub.com (815) 232-

5428 Freeport, IL

*Seal Coating *Crack Repair *Asphalt Repair *Line Striping *Infrared heat patching License, Insured & Bonded 815-632-9555 **FRANKLIN** MAINTENANCE Pothole Repair Hot Pour Crack Filling Seal Coating Line Striping Bonded-Insured 815-284-6806 T & M PAVING

â&#x153;ąCarpet/ Upholstery â&#x153;ąMaid/Janitorial Business/ Residential Free Estimates 815-632-3822 EVERYBODY NEEDS AN ALICE Need your home cleaned? *Professional background check *Check me out on Facebook Let me be your Alice, and come home to a clean house! 779-245-3033 815-626-5391 GX CLEANING SOLUTIONS â&#x20AC;˘Commercial & Residential Window Washing â&#x20AC;˘Power Washing â&#x20AC;˘Deck Stripping & Cleaning â&#x20AC;˘Office Cleaning AND MORE! Free Estimates Call 815-202-9413

Computer Repair *Asphalt paving & Patch work * Seal Coating *Skid loader/ Dump Truck Work (Concrete Removal, Dirt and Gravel Hauling) Call for free, no obligation estimates 815-499-7195. Locally owned And Operated. Over 25 Years Asphalt Exp. Fully Insured

Simple Tech Repair 779-245-8417 Computer Repair Technology Products â&#x20AC;˘Installations â&#x20AC;˘Tutorials â&#x20AC;˘Virus Removals â&#x20AC;˘Speed Ups â&#x20AC;˘Data Transfers â&#x20AC;˘System Restores â&#x20AC;˘Tune-Ups & More! Call Today for Quick & Affordable Services!

Concrete Contractors

Basement Waterproofing Prater Paint & Waterproofing We Dry Up Basements & Crawl Spaces, Remediate Mold & Install E-Z Breatheâ&#x201E;˘ Ventilation Systems 815-626-5165

www.praterpaintand waterproofing.com

Bicycles GREEN RIVER CYCLERY

CONCRETE â&#x20AC;˘ Driveways â&#x20AC;˘ Sidewalks â&#x20AC;˘ Patios

%LF\FOH 5HSDLUV Tune-Ups 2YHUKDXOV 205 E. 1st St. Dixon, IL 61021 (815)622-8180

www.greenrivercyclery.com 7XHV  )UL  Â&#x2021; 6DW QRRQ

Brick & Masonry LAUTS MASONRY & GENERAL CONTRACTING â&#x20AC;˘Brick Block Stone & Cultured Stone Work â&#x20AC;˘Tuck Pointing Chimney Repair & Removal Over 35 Years Experience Quality work for a reasonable price. Bonded & Insured 815-718-4885 MASONRY PRO'S â&#x20AC;˘Brick-Block-Stone â&#x20AC;˘Chimneys repaired or rebuilt â&#x20AC;˘New Masonry or restoration & tuck-pointing Get masonry repairs done before winter. Free estimates-25 yrs. exp. Insured & bonded. 815-564-8754

Looking for the perfect home? Read Sauk Valley estate section and Real Estate Weekly on Thursdays.

Excavating

A&M Excavating & Demolition Rock Falls, IL 61071 815-590-1677 â&#x20AC;˘Will beat all written bidsâ&#x20AC;˘ Black Dirt â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Sand -Gravel â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Land Clearing Trucking Tree line & Fence Removal

Furniture Repair Days Furniture Repair Expert repairs on sofas, recliners, chairs, tables, beds. Stripping/ refinishing/ re-gluing. 815-626-5136

Genl. Contracting COOK'S QUALITY CONSTRUCTION Your Area Leader in Home Repair, Remodeling, Siding, Decks, Drywall, Elect., Plumbing and much more. Int./ext. painting, power washing, decks, houses, RV's, etc. 10% Spring Disc., additional 5% for AffordSeniors. able, reliable, professional. Free All estimates. calls returned. Licensed, Insured, Bonded. 815-535-0248

â&#x20AC;˘Garages â&#x20AC;˘Additions â&#x20AC;˘Remodeling â&#x20AC;˘Decks â&#x20AC;˘ Homes 36 yrs. Experience. 815-626-9026

C & C SWORD CONSTRUCTION Licensed, Bonded, Insured. Windows, Doors, Siding, Remodeling, Painting, Additions, & Roofing. (815)-632-3617 (779) 245-1067 p.sword@ comcast.net RAM CONSTRUCTION â&#x20AC;˘Carpentry â&#x20AC;˘Concrete â&#x20AC;˘Drywall â&#x20AC;˘Texturing â&#x20AC;˘Painting Licensed, Insured & Bonded 815-285-8148

Deck Builders

Hauling

Painting

A-1 HAULING Small or Large Truck Rentals Estate Clean-ups Garage & Building Demolition Roofing Construction Seamless Gutters Skid Loader & Back Hoe Work Materials Hauled 815-626-1956

Working Girl Painting *Int. & Ext. painting *Wallpaper removal *Decks *Basement sealing Insured Free estimates Credit Cards OK 815-508-6131

Lewis Plumbing 815-288-0028 Serving All of the Sauk Valley Area Lic.#058-173956

Home Improvement

Power Washing

Complete Kitchens Design-Sell-Install Cabinets Countertops Reface or Replace â&#x20AC;&#x153;Visit our Showroomsâ&#x20AC;? Anselmo's 1235 W. LeFevre Sterling 815-625-3519 K.C. Lilly Const. & Dev. Inc. Doors, Windows, Siding, Gutters, & Roofing, Drywall, Painting, Walk-in Tubs & Showers, Baths, Kitchens, Garages, Concrete Licensed-BondedInsured IL Lic.# 104015194 (815) 718-0546

Frank's Anything Power Washing Stripping Paint & Cleaning Homes, Decks, Driveways Commercial & Residential * Fully Insured * Call 815-213-0675

Reyes Remodeling & Drywall Remodeling of All Sizes Kitchens, Bathrooms, Basements, Family Rooms â&#x20AC;˘Drywall â&#x20AC;˘Finishing â&#x20AC;˘Painting â&#x20AC;˘Floor Finishing Commercial & Residential Call 815-535-8488

â&#x153;śSince 1981â&#x153;ś â&#x2014;&#x2020;Home Improvement â&#x2014;&#x2020;New Construction

SPRING is the perfect time to build your garage, addition or remodel Re-roof / Reside your home!

Randy L. Moore

815-626-1333

Handyman

(815) 857-3281

HANDYMAN/ GENERAL Contracting, siding, drywall, concrete work, decks, flooring (tile, linoleum, carpet, wood), bathroom and kitchen, complete remodels, additions all types of home repairs. Free Estimates and Insured-Bonded 815-564-7428 K.C. Handyman Complete Home Repairs *35 yrs. experience *All Aspects of Home Repairs (815) 718-0546 Next Day Service Licensed-InsuredBonded

Landscaping DREAMSCAPES BY DENNIS, INC Complete Landscape Services & Designs www.dreamscapes bydennis.com

Lawn & Garden LAWN MAINTENANCE INSURED Tilling, Mowing, Hedges Residential & Commercial Brian Stouffer * 815-440-2753 *

Rototilling

All home repairs and remodeling. Call Charles 815-994-1082

www//Call Charles.org

Lawn Care BOB BOYD LAWN CARE SERVICES â&#x20AC;˘Mowingâ&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘Leaf Cleanupâ&#x20AC;˘ Free Estimates Reasonable Rates Fully Insured 815-973-0699 LAWN CARE Residential & Commercial Mowing-Trimming Clean up, General Maintenance 20 Yrs. Experience Call for Estimate â&#x2DC;&#x2026;815-631-3418â&#x2DC;&#x2026;

Painting We specialize in exterior decks & privacy fences â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll always be a winner if we cut the deckâ&#x20AC;? 815-288-4089 www.cosscustom woodworking.com

Need to place an ad? Call us 625-3600 284-2222

PAULâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S HANDYMAN SERVICE â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anything Your Husband Wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Do!â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;˘Experience On All Manner of Home Repairs & Maintenance since 1986 (815)625-2607 www.mullerslane farm. com

R & D HOME REPAIR â&#x20AC;˘Maintenance â&#x20AC;˘Remodeling â&#x20AC;˘Basement Finish â&#x20AC;˘Kitchen Remodel â&#x20AC;˘Int./Ext. Painting â&#x20AC;˘Drywall, Texturing â&#x20AC;˘Roofingâ&#x20AC;˘Pw wash â&#x20AC;˘Ceramic Tiling â&#x20AC;˘Wallpaper & More 815-973-8213

Plumbing

JOHN'S CLEANUP & REMOVAL Anything goes!! Estate Cleanups PHONE 815-622-0240

IL State Roofing Licensed 104-002247(1986) Bonded-Insured

A Families Handyman Roofing, siding, decks and all phases of home improvement! Families Handyman! 815-994-0075

shirleypaints@ymail.com

Haul/Clean Service

Gilbertson Construction Residential & ReCommercial. modeling, house winadditions, & dows, siding doors. Also mobile home repairs. Licensed, Bonded, Insured. No Job Too Small. 30 yrs (815)622exp. 0087.

CONSTRUCTION

Construction We Take Your Fun Seriously!

Dumpster Rental for Clean-ups & Construction Small & Large containers avail. Tidy Bug Inc. Dixon, IL tidybuginc.com 815-456-3001

Cleaning Service

www.advanced cleaners.biz

PROFESSIONAL LOT MAINTENANCE

Dumpster Rental

Handy Woman

Marsha Baker Residential Painting & 15 yearsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; experience New Construction

ŕ Ž 7HPU[PUN Inside/Out ŕ Ž -H\_ 7HPU[PUN ŕ Ž 7V^LY >HZOPUN ŕ Ž +LJRZ ŕ Ž :THSS /VTL 0TWYV]LTLU[Z

(815) 973-0858 ZOHa[H'TZUJVT

Mobil Pressure Wash Service â&#x20AC;˘ Commercial, â&#x20AC;˘ Residential & â&#x20AC;˘ Semis You name it.... we clean it! Call Ben 815-590-2694

Property Maint.

â&#x2DC;&#x2026;â&#x2DC;&#x2026;â&#x2DC;&#x2026;â&#x2DC;&#x2026;â&#x2DC;&#x2026;â&#x2DC;&#x2026;â&#x2DC;&#x2026; JR's Property Maintenance â&#x2DC;&#x2026;â&#x2DC;&#x2026;â&#x2DC;&#x2026;â&#x2DC;&#x2026;â&#x2DC;&#x2026;â&#x2DC;&#x2026;â&#x2DC;&#x2026;â&#x2DC;&#x2026; â&#x2DC;&#x2026;â&#x2DC;&#x2026; SAVE MONEY!!

------------CALL AS NEEDED MOWING SERVICE ------------â&#x20AC;˘Hedge Trimming â&#x20AC;˘Mulch Delivery â&#x20AC;˘Gutters â&#x20AC;˘Hauling â&#x20AC;˘Clean out â&#x20AC;˘Interior Painting â&#x20AC;˘Drywall/ Plaster Repaired â&#x20AC;˘General Labor â&#x20AC;˘Friendly Service â&#x20AC;˘Small jobs welcome â&#x20AC;˘Lowest Rates In Whiteside County References avail. Senior Discounts Call FREE Quote 815-213-3383 Local Cell# LawnCare Service â&#x20AC;˘Mowing â&#x20AC;˘Leaf clean up & removal â&#x20AC;˘House cleanup â&#x20AC;˘Small hauling â&#x20AC;˘Gutters â&#x20AC;˘Pressure washing â&#x20AC;˘Mulch â&#x20AC;˘Potholes/Sealer â&#x20AC;˘Free Estimatesâ&#x20AC;˘ 815-590-6336

Roofing

Illinois License #104.016127 Bonded/Insured â&#x20AC;˘Roofing â&#x20AC;˘Siding â&#x20AC;˘ Windows â&#x20AC;˘Doors â&#x20AC;˘Additionsâ&#x20AC;˘ Garages â&#x20AC;˘Drywallâ&#x20AC;˘ Decks and more Free Estimates 815-213-0556

Roofing/Siding â&#x2DC;&#x2026;ALL SEASONSâ&#x2DC;&#x2026; CONSTRUCTION â&#x2DC;&#x2026;â&#x2DC;&#x2026;Better Service, Better Quality!â&#x2DC;&#x2026;â&#x2DC;&#x2026; â&#x2DC;&#x2026;Custom Siding â&#x2DC;&#x2026;Windows â&#x2DC;&#x2026;All Doors- Aluminum, Steel, Wood Soffit â&#x2DC;&#x2026;Fascia Roofingâ&#x2DC;&#x2026; â&#x2DC;&#x2026;Family Owned & Operatedâ&#x2DC;&#x2026; â&#x2DC;&#x2026;Over 30 Years Experienceâ&#x2DC;&#x2026; â&#x2DC;&#x2026;Licensed, Bonded, & Insuredâ&#x2DC;&#x2026; â&#x2DC;&#x2026;815-590-2231â&#x2DC;&#x2026;

DIXON

NORTHLAND PARK APARTMENTS Studio, 1 & 2 Bedroom Washer & Dryer Units Fitness Center Balconies / Patios Open House Daily

Roofing/Siding 1st Month FREE! Specializing in: â&#x20AC;˘Seamless Gutters â&#x20AC;˘Siding â&#x20AC;˘Roofing â&#x20AC;˘Doors/Windows General Contracting & Construction 815-625-6142 Free Estimates â&#x20AC;˘Licensed â&#x20AC;˘Bonded â&#x20AC;˘Insured

Storage

â&#x153;°CORNERâ&#x153;° STORAGE

Dixon near Walmart Sterling near Menards Various Sizes

GREAT RATES

815-973-3613 Franklin Storage Sizes 10x10 thru 10x40 2011 N. Brinton Ave. Dixon (815)285-0201 or (815)440-9563

www.allsafe center.com High-Security Storage Solutions and Much More! â&#x20AC;˘Climate Controlled Storage â&#x20AC;˘Low-Cost Moving Truck Rental â&#x20AC;˘Confidential Document Shredding â&#x20AC;˘We Ship FedEx & UPS! â&#x20AC;˘Expert Packaging Services â&#x20AC;˘Value Boxes & Packaging Supplies â&#x20AC;˘EBAY and EMOTORS Internet Auction Sales Over 15,000 Sales â&#x20AC;˘Office Hours: Mon-Fri. â&#x2DC;&#x203A; 8:306, Sat. â&#x2DC;&#x203A; 8:30noon 690 Timber Creek Rd. Dixon, (815)285-2212

Stump Removal CLARK'S

Call Me 2-Rent (815)632-7368 (Located Behind Northland Mall)

Sterling Rentals Newer 2 Bedroom $599.00 & Up Applcs., Fireplaces 2002 3rd Ave. 1836 First Ave. 606 W. Lefevre 2 BR $535.00 1 BR $465.00 1 Studio $390.00 Partial Heat, Water, Sewer, Refuse Removal, Laundry Facilities, Satellite

(815)626-1431 2 BR., clean, QUIET, coin laundry. 641-777-7261 2BR Townhouse, 1831 N. 2nd Ave. 1½ BA, C/A, lots of storage. 1100 sq. ft. w/garage. $600 mo. + dep., util. refs. 815-652-4517 2BR. Stove & refrig. provided. Pay own utilities. Share garage. Lease & dep. Req. 815441-8652. 2 floor efficiency 1BR for $325, $400. Quiet bldg. Small pet may be OK. 815-441-1389 or 630-399-1204. nd

3 Nice Apts. No pets/ smoking. 815-590-3004. Sinnissippi Townhomes First Mo. Free! Spacious 2 BR. 2 story townhomes. Central air, good location. Laundry hookup. (815)6261130.

HOMES FOR RENT

310

FOR RENT HOUSES & APTS. svla.org

2BR, glassed in porch, appl., W/D Hook-up, garage & basement. $550+ dep. 815-973-0670 3 BR, 1 car garage, full basement. $750/mo. First, Last, Deposit, & References Req. No smoking. Call 815-677-2170

LYNDON 2BR home. 510 1st Street East. Lyndon IL, ON RIVER. $800/mo. Kophamer & Blean Realty 815-772-2728

ROCK FALLS 1BR, applcs. bsmt. No pets. $425+ dep. 815-625-4701 Large, clean, quiet 2 story, 2BR, 1.5 bath. 1 car garage. C/A. All applcs. inc. W/D. New bathroom, paint, & more. Nice area, walk to library & park. 521 W. 11th St. Sorry no pets or Sec. 8. $650 + sec. 630-902-1060 Looking for a roommate to share a house, $400/mo., includes utilities, Call 815499-8857

STERLING 3BR, 1908 21st Ave. $925 mo. 815-626-8790 Looking for someone to share a home. One private $300/mo. Everything inc. Call 815-626-1122 RTO 2BR $49,900 $5,000 down.4413515.Agent owned. Sunny 2BR, MONSTER GARAGE, WHY RENT?â&#x201E;˘ 1403 Griswold $598/mo., 815-878-7399

COMMERCIAL RENTAL

Need to place an ad? Call us 625-3600 284-2222

MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT

315

WANT TO RENT 335 *WANT TO* RENT 1 story ranch or duplex within Dixon city limits. 3-4 BR, 2BA, C/A, main floor washer dryer or hookup. Preferably an attached garage. We are 2 sisters that have lived together for 16 years. We are respectable, responsible, and would be respectful of your property. We smoke outside ONLY! Must be able to have a cat, she is declawed and fixed. 815-973-7042 THANK YOU!

LOANS

402

THE CLASSIFIED Advertising Department of Sauk Valley Media does not have the opportunity to fully investigate the credibility of each advertiser appearing within these columns. If an offer sounds â&#x20AC;&#x153;too good to be trueâ&#x20AC;? it probably is. Proceed with caution if you are asked to send money or to give a credit card number. Proceed with caution in calling 900 phone numbers. All phone numbers prefixed by â&#x20AC;&#x153;900â&#x20AC;? are charged to the CALLER. Charges may be assessed on a â&#x20AC;&#x153;per minuteâ&#x20AC;? basis rather than a â&#x20AC;&#x153;per callâ&#x20AC;? basis. Sauk Valley Classified makes every effort to qualify these charges for the reader. If you have a concern about an advertiser, please contact the Better Business Bureau 330 N. Wabash, Chicago, IL 60611. 312-832-0500

Need to place an ad? Call us 625-3600 284-2222

FIND

Your next New or Used Car in

Tree Service A&M TREE SERVICE

311

Secured 3 acre w/ high bays and office, 3818 River Rd., Sterling. 815-626-8790

â&#x20AC;˘ Stump Grinding â&#x20AC;˘ Small Trees â&#x20AC;˘ Clean Up â&#x20AC;˘ Bush Removal 815-718-2663 or 815-590-0423

C CLASSIFIEDS

WE'LL BEAT ALL WRITTEN BIDS! Free Estimates 25 yrs. Experience Fully Licensed/ Insured. Serving Sterling /Rock Falls/ Whiteside County Area 815-590-1677 â&#x153;¤â&#x153;¤â&#x153;¤â&#x153;¤â&#x153;¤â&#x153;¤â&#x153;¤â&#x153;¤â&#x153;¤â&#x153;¤â&#x153;¤â&#x153;¤

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Area's #1 Roofing Contractor IL Lic# 104-015191 Licensed, Bonded & Insured â&#x20AC;˘Roofing â&#x20AC;˘Siding â&#x20AC;˘Windows â&#x20AC;˘Decks â&#x20AC;˘Additions â&#x20AC;˘Garages & More Residential & Commercial Call now to schedule your FREE Estimate! Will beat any leading competitor price 815-590-2677

STERLING

BRAD'S TREE SERVICE Tree & Limb Removal Stump Removal Storm Clean-up Mulch & Firewood â&#x20AC;˘Free Estimates â&#x20AC;˘Fully Insured 815-857-3674 Amboy, IL

TV Repair

TELEVISION IN HOME REPAIR 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE! Work on all Brands & Models old or new All LCD & DLP lamps $99-$129 SERVING THE SAUK VALLEY Call Ron for a free quote at 815-561-0011 Dixon, IL

Water Softeners The Softener Man Repair on all makes & models Service Call Special $19.95 Over 30 years experience 815-323-1622

Need to place an ad? Call us 625-3600 284-2222

SAUK VALLEY SAUK VALLEY

LASSIFIEDS dailyGAZETTE

dailyGAZETTE 815-625-3600

TELEGRAPH

TELEGRAPH 815-284-2222


SAUK VALLEY MEDIA â&#x20AC;˘ Saturday, June 7, 2014 â&#x20AC;˘ PAGE D3

A1

saukvalley.com

EMPLOYMENT

Contact us to place an ad call 815-626-7653 815-284-7653

Search for local job listings at saukvalley.com/jobs/ BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 501 NOTICEPURto the SUANT Business Opportunity Sales Law of 1995, every business opportunity must be registered with the Illinois Securities Department. Protect yourself and get the facts before you hand over your hard earned money by contacting the Illinois Secretary of State's Securities Department at 1800-628-7937. This notice provided as a public service by Sauk Valley Classifieds.

HEALTH / MEDICAL

504

C.N.A. Needed, Must be reliable and available for all shifts and on call. Apply within at Tammerlane, 3601 16th Ave. Sterling No phone calls. Wanted Full-Time 3rd Shift C.N.A. & Part-Time 2nd Shift C.N.A. Apply at Heritage Square 620 N. Ottawa Ave Dixon, IL EOE NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE WANTED P.R.N. Apply at Heritage Square 620 N. Ottawa Ave Dixon, IL EOE NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

EMPLOYMENT

505

Advertising Sales $1,000-$1,500/ Week Commissions No Nights or Weekends 888-338-3053 or 816-777-0365 Detasslers wanted. Competitive wages. Call Jeff Neubauer 815-626-6056.

EMPLOYMENT

505

Brechon Farm Services, Inc. is looking for experienced people in the following areas: Electronic payroll in Quick Books, Mechanics and Farm help. Contractors Welcome. Send resumes to: 1270 IL. State Route 26 S. Dixon, IL 61021

Automotive Technicians needed for multiple locations, full time, excellent benefits available. Email resume to: Hiring@tire tracksusa.com fax to 815-4390699 or call 815-625-6666 Tire Tracks USA

â&#x2013; â&#x2013; â&#x2013; â&#x2013; â&#x2013; â&#x2013; â&#x2013; â&#x2013; â&#x2013; 

EMPLOYMENT

505

Drivers-CDL-A Mendota AgriProduct/ Mahoney Environmental Local route based company has outstanding opportunities for CDL-A drivers with a clean record. â&#x20AC;˘Excellent benefits â&#x20AC;˘Great place to work Call Today for more info! Contact Sam 8-4:30 CDT at: 815-272-2095 or Fax resume to: 815-301-9889 or employment@ mahoneys.com

Help wanted to assist in taking rides down at the Northland Mall in Sterling. Apply June 7th at 9 p.m. at the mall.

Class A Drivers ProDrivers has great opportunities for Class A Truck Drivers interested in running OTR. HOME WEEKENDS! If you have a year of recent driving experience and are interested, please call our National Recruiter at: 901-881-0733

â&#x2013; â&#x2013; â&#x2013; â&#x2013; â&#x2013; â&#x2013; â&#x2013; â&#x2013; â&#x2013;  Detasslers Needed Paying Top $$ Contact: Max Gaumer: 815-441-3748 Mark Johnson: 815-622-8547 Tori Ladner: 228-236-5952 Exp. Licensed Nail Tech. FT or PT. Apply in person at Nails You Love, 2900 E. Lincolnway, Sterling.

Vacancy Postings Eastland CUSD #308 Lanark, IL 61046

&HUWLÂżHG SRVLWLRQV Jr/Sr High School Instrumental and Vocal Music Instructor for 2014-15: To apply, submit a letter of interest, resume, copies of transcripts and Illinois teaching license, list of references with contact information to: Monica Burkholder, Principal Eastland Jr/Sr High School  6 6FKRRO 'U Â&#x2021; /DQDUN ,/  Application deadline: Friday, June 13, 2014

PARTS MANAGER, SERVICE MANAGER & SERVICE TECHNICIANS NEEDED:

Ken Nelson Auto Group is in need of Full time Experienced Parts & Service Managers as well as a Service Technician for our growing Chrysler-Toyota-Nissan service department in Dixon Il. Previous dealership experience preferred. :H RIIHU EHQHÂżWV LQFOXGLQJ PHGLFDO GHQWDO N SDLG YDFDWLRQ WUDLQLQJ Apply in person 1000 N. Galena Ave. Dixon Il RU VHQG UHVXPH ZLWK TXDOLÂżFDWLRQ to jeremy.jahn@KenNelsonAuto.com.

Local fertilizer company has positions for truck drivers. Applicants must have a minimum of Class B CDL with tanker endorsement and current medical card. Interested may candidates submit resume to: Rock River Lumber & Grain Co. P.O. Box 68 Prophetstown, IL 61277 Phone inquiries may be directed to: 815-537-2630

Northern Grain Marketing is seeking Experienced CDL drivers. Immediate openings for temporary local grain hauling. Hours may vary. To inquire call Tom Wilson @ 815-973-3016

Now Hiring Customer Service person, H.V.A.C Technicians, Licensed Plumbers and Apprentice plumbers send resume to: P.O. Box 767 Rock Falls, Il 61071. or fax 815-626-0919 or email bdsupply@comcast.net

EMPLOYMENT

505

Position Opening The Prophetstown Police Department is accepting applications for a fulltime Police Officer, Lateral Transfers Accepted, negotiable wages. City offers a pension plan, health insurance coverage, holiday pay, paid vacations, sick pay, personal time, and negotiable wages. Applications may be mailed, emailed or dropped off at Prophetstown City Hall, 339 Washington St., Prophetstown IL 61277, e-mail ptowncy@thewisp.net., applications available at prophetstownil.org. Retail Sales Position, local farm in need of outgoing, energetic, individuals to sell at a farmers market. Must be able to work outdoors in the summer heat. Call Matt at 815600-4357 Social Services COUNSELOR CASE MANAGER Kenmore Center: Women's Residence is seeking a Counselor Case Worker. Candidate must have Substance Abuse Certification LSW/LPC or LCSW/LCPC; with a minimum CADC. Applicants will also demonstrate an ability to communicate both verbally and in writing in a clear, comprehensible manner. Fax or e-mail resume to Attn: Fred Harris and Stephanie McSharry at: 773-2713550 or e-mail: Fred.Harris@lssi. org and/or Stephanie.McSharry@lssi.org. EOE Summer Work Detasseling Contact: Rod Scott 815-626-8962 Detasseling Meeting June 10 6-7pm United Methodist Church 210 4th Ave. RF. Starting wages $9.25/hr, ages 13 & older. www.detasseling whiteside.com

EMPLOYMENT

505

TO OUR

READERS:

Sauk Valley Media does not knowingly accept advertising which is in violation of the law. Likewise, we do not knowingly accept advertising which is fraudulent or has malicious intent. While we attempt to screen advertising with potential fraud, it is impossible to screen all potential We problems. strongly encourage our readers to exercise caution and common sense, particularly when dealing with companies with which you are not familiar.

CHILD CARE

NO INDIVIDUAL, unless licensed or holding a permit as a childcare facility, may cause to be published any advertisement soliciting a child care service.* A childcare facility that is licensed or operating under a permit issued by the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services may publish advertisements of the services for which it is lispecifically censed or issued a permit. Sauk Valley Media strongly urges any parent or guardian to verify the validity of the license of any facility before placing a child in it's care. *Family homes that care for no more than three (3) children under the age of twelve or which receive only children from a single household, for less than 24 hours per day, are exempt from licensure as day care homes. The three children to whom this exemption applies includes the family's natural or adopted children and any other persons under the age of 12 whether related or unrelated to the operator of the day care home. (DCFS Rule, Part 377.3 (c))

Streets

Route

Customers

Call for Available Routes in Rock Falls Area! Call for Available Routes in Morrison & Milledgeville Area! Sterling Sterling Sterling

W. 8th-W. 10th, Ave. I-Ave. K W. 3rd-W. 6th, Ave. C-Ave. E. Douglas Dr., Harvey, E. Ave., W. Ave. Ash, Elm, Oak

25 19

73 73

56

45

Franklin Grove State - Sycamore, Maple-Brown

3301

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Dixon Dixon Dixon Walnut

E. North St., Brewer St., Heaton St., McDonald St., Liberty St., Meltzer St., Stephens Ave., Rodney Ave.

LOOKING FOR HELP IMMEDIATELY!! ASK ABOUT $50 SIGN ON BONUS! Sauk Valley Media 3200 E. Lincolnway Sterling, IL 61081

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Towns

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Telegraph 113 S. Peoria Dixon, IL 61021

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Territory Sales Reprsentative - Base Salary Plus Commission!

Culligan is currently seeking a motivated sales representative to sell our well known, high quality products in homes. The primary reponsibilities for this position are to analyze customersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; water composition, design water treatment solutions, make sales presentations, and build solid, long lasting relationships within customersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; homes in your assigned territory. In addition to generating your own leads, you will be given company leads and marketing support to help build your territory. You will receive formal training to prepare you for a successful career in sales with potential career advancement opportunities! Requirements: Â&#x2021; $ PLQLPXP RI RQH \HDU VDOHV H[SHULHQFH Â&#x2021; 3RVVHVV D VNLOO VHW DV D VXFFHVVIXO KXQWHU FORVHU DQG PDUNHWHU Â&#x2021; $ELOLW\ WR JHQHUDWH OHDGV DQG EXLOG D WHUULWRU\ Â&#x2021; 6HOI VWDUWHU ZKR HQMR\V VROYLQJ FRPSOH[ SUREOHPV Â&#x2021; ([FHOOHQW LQWHUSHUVRQDO FRPPXQLFDWLRQ DQG SUREOHP VROYLQJ VNLOOV Â&#x2021; ([FHOOHQW FXVWRPHU VHUYLFH VNLOOV Â&#x2021; +LJK VFKRRO GLSORPD*(' UHTXLUHG EDFKHORUV GHJUHH SUHIHUUHG Â&#x2021; :LOOLQJQHVV WR ZRUN D Ă H[LEOH VFKHGXOH QLJKWV DQG ZHHNHQGV

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Send resume to kthomas@uswatercompany.com or fax 866-649-5835

Sauk Valley Media is looking for

Motor Route Drivers

815-625-3600 ext. 5301

LOOKING FOR A CHANGE OF SCENERY?

CHECK OUT OUR NEWLY REMODELED FACILITY! Sterling Pavilion is currently seeking dedicated, caring, compassionate, career minded, individuals for the following positions:

Director of Nursing-Must have an active RN license and previous supervisory experience.

Activities Director4XDOLÂżHG FDQGLGDWHV PXVW KDYH D +LJK 6FKRRO 'LSORPD DQG EH FHUWLÂżHG RU EH DEOH WR EH FHUWLÂżHG We offer a competitive salary, vacation & sick time, health GHQWDO LQVXUDQFH Ă&#x20AC;H[LEOH VFKHGXOHV DQG WKH FKDQFH WR work with an excellent staff to provide quality care to the best residents around!

Motor Routes Available

4XDOLÂżHG LQGLYLGXDOV DSSO\ LQ SHUVRQ RU 6HQG UHVXPHV WR Sterling Pavilion Attention: Human Resources 105 E 23rd Street Sterling, IL 61081 Or Email Resumes to: athompson@sterlingrehab.com (No phone calls please)

Sauk Valley Media 3200 E. Lincolnway Sterling, IL 61081

Inquire in person at:

Telegraph 113 S. Peoria Dixon, IL 61021

or call: 625-3600 or 284-2222, ext. 301


A1

SAUK VALLEY MEDIA â&#x20AC;˘ Saturday, June 7, 2014 â&#x20AC;˘ PAGE D4

VALLEY

LIC NOTICES LEGAL AD INVITATION TO BID Sterling Community Unit School District #5 is accepting bids for diesel fuel. Specifications are available at the Sterling CUSD #5 office, business E LeFevre 410 Road, Sterling, IL 61081; Telephone (815) 626-5050. Bids must be received no later than 2:00 PM, Wednesday, June 25, 2014. Sterling Community Unit School District #5's Board of Education reserves the right to reject any or all bids and to accept that bid which is in the best interest of the District. June 7th, 2014

AREA GARAGE SALES 624

View Classifieds Online!

AREA GARAGE SALES 624 Fri. & Sat., 8-4, 1297 Hickory St., Eldena. Name brand clothes, furniture, home decor & misc.

Locate

COLETA GARAGE SALES 624

the items you want to buy or sell! www. saukvalley. com

Call

Saturday 8-2 207 N. Main 6 Families Girls 12 mo.- 6T, Men L-2XL, women L-2X, Avon, curtains, beer steins, VCR Tapes, Longaberger baskets, books, Holiday items, Toys, step 2 sandwater table, John Deere Gator, PS2 games, Nintendo DS w/ games, PS2 and much more! Townwide Coleta Garage Sales Saturday June 7th 207, 303 N. Main St., 309 S. Main St., 308 E Grove St. 17309, 21606 Coleta Rd.

Classified

Great Garage Sales Call

To sell those extra items easily and economically!

625-3600

DIXON GARAGE SALES 624

DIXON GARAGE SALES 624

ROCK FALLS GARAGE SALES 624

ROCK FALLS GARAGE SALES 624

STERLING GARAGE SALES 624

Fri & Sat. 8-4 411 Rock Island Road. Complete twin bed, camping gear, weight bench w/ weights, jr.guitar w/ case, longaberger cookie molds, books, home school curriculum, dishes, home dĂŠcor, lots of good clean clothes, mens, ladies & boys 10-18

Fri. 11-5 Sat. 9-1 923 Center St. (Corner of Center & Barker) Girls 6/6X-14, women & mens XL, household items, furniture, A/C, electronics, toys, lawn items & misc.

Fri. & Sat. 8-2 Luke Lane off of Dixon Ave. (follow signs) Meadows of Luke Ridge Mutli Family Sale!

Thrus. Fri. 8-6 & Saturday 8-? 200 6th Ave. (in alley) Cargo carrier, CD radio, cake decorating supplies, cake toppers, jewelery, and lots of misc!

Sat. only 7-noon 2003 15th Ave. 4 Family Sale Name brand clothing, all sizes, purses, fashion jewelry, shoes, candles, decorations, seasonal items, CDs, DVDs, Close-out sale on Stampin' Up stamp sets, scrap booking supplies, & storage containers, ...

Fri & Sat. 8-? 1003 E Chamberlin. Estate Sale. Furniture & Misc Cash only. Fri 7:30-4- Sat 712. 1111 Chestnut Ave Furniture, clothes, dishes, yarn, cook books, carpet shampoo, vacuum cleaner, patio furniture, lg picture frame, bed frame, dresser, concrete flower planter, glass show case, delta drill press,misc Fri. & Sat. 9-? 912 Chicago Ave. Beautiful 6-7-8 yr. Girls clothes, toys, 2X womens clothes, lots of STUFF!!!! Fri. & Sat., 8-5 Sunday, 3-6 1836 W. 1st St. Multi-Family Sale. Clothes, household items, auto parts, quad rims & tires, tables & lamps, toys, grills and much more!

Fri. 12-4 Sat. 9-4 1028 Franklin Grove Rd. Moving Sale! Dell computer, holiday decorations, misc. household items, lots more! Fri. 8-5, Sat. 8-3 1639 U.S. Route 52 South. Dishes, linens, sm. appliances, clothing, cookware, Holiday items marked cheap, end & coffee table, night stand, toys, books, lots of misc. items. Saturday 7-2. 615 Palmyra Rd. Furniture,kitchenware, bikes,misc. Saturday 8-4 2014 W. 1st Street Women's clothes S-2X, loveseat, office chairs, 4 drawer dresser, full sz. bed set, futon w/twin bunk bed, baby items, Craftsman truck tool box, Bostitch coil nailer, assrtd. wrenches, chimney cap, hasps, lock sets.

Fri. 8-4, Sat. 8-Noon 1502 Flock Ave. HUGE Multi-Family Sale! Name brand kids & adult clothes sz. 6 to womens 2X, shoes, TV's, lots of kids toys, some misc. items.

STERLING GARAGE SALES 624 Fri. & Sat. 7-2 17309 Coleta Rd. Furniture, Power Horse exc. equip., air hocky table, kitchen items, Jr. girl clothes-adult, toys & much more!

Fri., Sat., Sun. 9-2 610 W. 14th St. Rummage Sale Furniture, baskets, knick knacks, clothing, DVD's, lots of stuff. Canceled if raining.

Fri. 1-5 Sat. 8-12 2000 39th Avenue Brand name girl's 18-24 mo., 3T/4T, 7-12, men's & women's XL clothes, tons of housewares & toys, shoes, DVDs, books, holiday, ...

Sat. 7:30-4 608 Grace Ave. 1/2â&#x20AC;? 5 sp. drill press NIB, Thetford 27 XL smart tote, huge rollerwall kit, Sm. & Lg. Bowl Cozies, womens clothes 16-3X, Wilton cake pans, paint ball items, tools, comics, toys & much more!

Fri. 8-5 & Sat. 7-1 1802 Avenue L Multi-Family Sale Girl's clothing, home dĂŠcor, DeWalt & Milwaukee power tools, books, Keurig Mini, and lots of misc. Many new, unused items.

Looking for the perfect home? Read Sauk Valley

Saturday 8-? 1910 Reno Road Moving Sale! Electronics, lighting, treadmill, clothing, kitchen & household items, dĂŠcor, & more!

estate section and Real Estate Weekly on Thursdays.

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easy to find CLASSIFIEDS C what you want... SAUK VALLEY SAUK VALLEY

815-284-2222

Classifieds Work!

Terry of Rock Falls sold his 2002 Pontiac Grand Am for $4200 using

www.saukvalley.com www.saukvalley.com

TELEGRAPH

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SAUK VALLEY SAUK VALLEY SAUK VALLEY

LASSIFIEDS dailyGAZETTE

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815-284-2224 815-625-3600

Contact us to place an ad call 815-626-7653 815-284-7653

1948-1950 RockOla Shuffleboard w/ electronic score board. Good condition. $2000 OBO. 815-537-2992 after 4:30 pm I Buy: Antique furniture, fishing tackle, toys, post cards junk. 815-445-6151 Original WW2 German model K98 Mauser Rifle must have FOID card. $600 OBO 815-284-9967

GUNS & ARCHERY

706

22 long ammo. Box of 50 $6. box of 500 $55. FOID req. Call 815-9731334.

CLOVER HILLS LEASE TO OWN APPLIANCES TVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MATTRESSES

815.625.8529 Frigidaire electric glasstop stove, bisk, $200/obo 419-376-9090 WASHER/ DRYER $450. Electric, (720) 556-9350

AIR CONDITIONERS 711 12,000 BTU Whoorlpool window A/C used 12 wks., $280 OBO 815-225-7904 New in box 10,000 BTU Kenmore window A/C. $300 OBO 815-225-904

FURNITURE

755

8pc. King bedroom set, black lacquer. Like new $500/obo. 630201-2888 Rock Falls England Sofa 2 matching blue lane recliners. Bought at Harold's Furniture. Paid $1439. Barley used. Exc. cond. $700 815-4994187 or 815-4384451 Light Oak table 2 leaves, 4 padded chairs + 2 captain chairs, well made! $450 815-9738903

www.saukvalley.com www.saukvalley.com

815-625-3600

ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES 705

710

www.saukvalley.com www.saukvalley.com www.saukvalley.com www.saukvalley.com www.saukvalley.com

LASSIFIEDS TELEGRAPH

dailyGAZETTE dailyGAZETTE

Saturday 8-noon 619 Green Court pub table, bar stools, misc. furniture, kitchen items, planters & gardening items, & other odds & ends

APPLIANCES

www.saukvalley.com

www.saukvalley.com www.saukvalley.com www.saukvalley.com www.saukvalley.com www.saukvalley.com

saukvalley.com

EMPLOYMENT Search for local job listings at saukvalley.com/jobs/ Are you an experienced Forklift Operator

2ND AND 3RD SHIFT ELETRONIC PRODUCTION SUPPORT TECHNICIANS

Work for a dynamic, innovative and growing World-Class automotive supplier! BorgWarner is currently accepting applications and resumes for the following hourly positions. If you are self-motivated and are committed to continuous learning, professional growth and success, please read onâ&#x20AC;Ś Our Electronic Technicians set-up, trouble shoot, UHÂżW DQG PDLQWDLQ HTXLSPHQW RQ RXU SURGXFWLRQ OLQHV DQG PDQXIDFWXULQJ RSHUDWLRQV Successful candidates will possess strong knowledge and abilities in the following: equipment and machine troubleshooting, PLCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, electro-mechanical devices, machine guarding, automation, instrumentation and mechanics. A related Associateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Degree or equivalency along with communication, problem-solving, organizational and team-work abilities are also required. Our work environment values learning, team work, innovation and continuous improvement. Professional development is supported through a generous educational assistance policy. We offer a very competitive FRPSHQVDWLRQ DQG EHQHÂżWV SDFNDJH LQFOXGLQJ D VDYLQJV and investment plan with company match. BorgWarner is an Equal Opportunity Employer. For immediate consideration please submit your resume and please indicate which position(s) you are applying for toâ&#x20AC;Ś BorgWarner Emissions Systems Attention: Human Resources awolcott@borgwarner.com 1350 Franklin Grove Road Dixon, IL 61021 Fax: (815) 288-7613 EEOC

WOODY INC. LV VHHNLQJ WR Ă&#x20AC;OO WKH IROORZLQJ IXOOWLPH \HDU URXQG SRVLWLRQ LP Delivery Manager (in training) 7KLV SRVLWLRQ LV UHVSRQVLEOH IRU VDOHV DQG GHOLYHU\ RI /3 *DV DQG RWKHU 6HUYLFH &HQWHU PHUFKDQGLVH DQG LV GLUHFWO\ UHVSRQVLEOH IRU WKH VXSHUYLVLRQ RI  HPSOR\HHV $SSOLFDQWV PXVW EH  \HDUV RI DJH DQG VKRXOG SRVVHVV RU KDYH WKH DELOLW\ WR REWDLQ D &'/ FODVVLĂ&#x20AC;FDWLRQ GULYHU¡V OLFHQVH ZLWK KD]DUGRXV PDWHULDOV DQG DLU EUDNH FHUWLĂ&#x20AC;FDWLRQ $SSOLFDQWV PXVW EH DEOH WR SDVV D PHGLFDOGUXJ WHVW 6RPH KHDY\ OLIWLQJ UHTXLUHG :RRG\ ,QF RIIHUV DQ H[FHOOHQW EHQHĂ&#x20AC;WV SDFNDJH ,QWHUHVWHG DSSOLFDQWV VKRXOG DSSO\ LQ SHUVRQ RQOLQH DW ZZZZRRGKDYHQDVVRFLDWLRQFRP RU E\ UHVXPH WR :RRGKDYHQ $VVRFLDWLRQ +XPDQ 5HVRXUFHV 'HSDUWPHQW 32 %R[  6XEOHWWH ,/  )D[  3KRQH 

looking for opportunities with a FORTUNE 500 LOOKING FOR QUALIFIED APPLICANTS TO FILL THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS:

*Forklift Operators*

provider of leading-edge transportation, logistics and supply chain management solutions?

Enjoy a 4 day work-week schedule!! If so then join our new, dry Distribution 1st Shiftâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;6:00 a.m.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;4:30 p.m.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;$13.50/hr

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2nd Shiftâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;5:30 p.m.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;4:00 a.m.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;$14.25/hr

JOIN OUR FAST-PACED AND GROWING FACILITY!

To apply go to https://rydercareers-ryder.icims.com

Scroll to the search area and for location

RYDER OFFERS A COMPREHENSIVE BENEFITS PACKAGE AFTER 90 DAYS OF EMPLOYMENT WHICH INCLUDES:

choose US-IL-Rochelle

MEDICAL

Choose Requisition # 2014-7380 and follow

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401K STD/LTD FLEXIBLE SPENDING ACCOUNTS COMPANY PAID LIFE INSURANCE AND MUCH, MUCH MORE!

**All of our positions require successfully passing a background screen and drug-screen**

PART-TIME NIGHT CUSTODIAN Milledgeville School is accepting applications for the position of Part-Time Evening Custodian. Position to start August 1, 2014. Wages negotiable based on experience and skills. Submit letter of interest and resume by June 30, 2014 to: Paula Rademacher, Principal Milledgeville Elementary School 100 E. 8th Street, Milledgeville IL 61051 Phone 815-225-7141, Ext. 224 Email: prademacher@dist399.net

CAN YOU QUALIFY FOR A CAREER AS A ROCK FALLS FIREFIGHTER?

The Rock Falls Board of Fire and Police Commissioners are seeking FDQGLGDWHV IRU WKH SRVLWLRQ RI Ă&#x20AC;UHĂ&#x20AC;JKWHU DQG ZLOO FRQGXFW HQWUDQFH H[DPLQDWLRQV DW WKH 5RFN )DOOV &RPPXQLW\ %XLOGLQJ RQ 6DWXUGD\ -XQH   3K\VLFDO DJLOLW\ H[DPLQDWLRQ ZLOO EH DGPLQLVWHUHG DW  DP DQG WKH ZULWWHQ H[DP ZLOO IROORZ

Requirements

1) Resident of the State of Illinois. 2) Valid driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s license 3) Must be 21 years of age and not reached your 35th birthday 4) Have a high school diploma or equivalent. 5) Must pass physical exam, skills evaluation, and written examination

)ULQJH EHQHĂ&#x20AC;WV LQFOXGH *RRG SHQVLRQ SODQ PHGLFDO LQVXUDQFH SDLG YDFDWLRQ RYHUWLPH SD\ DQG XQLIRUP DOORZDQFH Physicians Immediate Care is a Midwest leader in urgent care and occupational health services with 30 locations in three states and growing. We are opening a brand new, state of the art clinic in Dixon, IL this summer! The clinic will be located at 1672 S. Galena Ave. Dixon, IL 61021.

$SSOLFDWLRQ IRUPV PD\ EH REWDLQHG DW WKH 5RFN )DOOV )LUH RU 3ROLFH 'HSDUWPHQW ORFDWHG DW  : WK 6WUHHW 5RFN )DOOV ,/ DQG PXVW EH FRPSOHWHG E\ )ULGD\ -XQH   RQ RU EHIRUH  SP 7+( &,7< 2) 52&. )$//6 ,6 $1 (48$/ 23325781,7< (03/2<(5

We are currently seeking highly motivated and talented RNâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S, LPNâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S AND MEDICAL ASSISTANTS with a passion for customer service and patient FDUH WR MRLQ RXU WHDP 3K\VLFLDQV RIIHUV D JHQHURXV EHQHĂ&#x20AC;W SDFNDJH DQG competitive compensation.

The Rock Falls Board of Fire and Police Commissioners

Please complete an application online at www.visitphysicians.com/careers or e-mail your resume to mpilcher@visitphysicians.com.

Visit Sauk Valley Classifieds at saukvalley.com

Physicians Immediate Care is an equal opportunity employer.


SAUK VALLEY MEDIA • Saturday, June 7, 2014 • PAGE D5

FURNITURE

755

Mattress sets: $99, Full Twin $129, Queen $159, King $199. Will deliver! Kern Mattress Outlet, call 309452-7477. Sectional Sofa good condition. $200. 815-9733521 Wood kitchen table and two chairs. $60 815625-8895

MEDICAL SUPPLIES

762

Wheeled walker w/cup holder/ storage. Exc. Cond. $80. 815-625-9195

PETS & PET SUPPLIES 775 5 Free cute kittens to good indoor homes only, about 12 wks., 217-5539594 DOG OBEDIENCE Train, don't complain! Dog Obedience Class Mon. June 9 Two Sessions 5:30 & 6:30pm. 6 week course $85. Sign up at Granny Rose Animal Shelter, 613 River Lane, Dixon Proof of vaccinations is required. Call 815-288-7387 if you have any questions. English/American Bulldog, spayed, $100 815-8757567 For Sale Shiba-inu puppies, 1M, 1F, ACA reg. 815-4999636 or 815-6254351.

PETS & PET SUPPLIES 775

LAWN MOWERS

779

Yard Machine 46” deck new motor new blades, good shape! $400 OBO 815-590-1677 SugarDoodles: $600. 7 males. Call 563-2127307 WARNING ADS FOR FREE PETS Your beloved pet deserves a loving, caring home. The ad for your free pet may draw response from individuals who will sell your animal for research or breeding purposes. Please screen respondents carefully when giving an animal away. Your pet will thank you!

LAWN MOWERS

779

1990 John Deere 318 runs great & looks great! $850 Call after 4. 815625-6463 MTD Yard Machine 15.5hp B&S, 42” cut, 7spd shift on the go. Very good cond. $475. 815-973-3223.

Need to place an ad? Call us 625-3600 284-2222

LAWN & GARDEN

781

Pull-type Mower, 8hp eng. 44” deck, off-set hitch, runs & mows good $325 815-625-1606

TICKETS / TRAVEL 787 & EVENTS No person or business, unless properly licensed by the Illinois Secretary of State, may sell ticket(s) for any sporting event or otherwise, for more than the price printed upon the face of the said ticket(s). Only licensed ticket brokers may legally advertise, negotiate and execute the sale of ticket(s) for any amount over what is printed upon the face of ticket.

WANT TO BUY 795 Buy gold & silver coins, scrap silver & gold, & guns. 815-625-0966 Looking to buy 500 gallon LP tank. 815-285-1162.

Looking for the perfect home? Read Sauk Valley estate section and Real Estate Weekly on Thursdays.

MISCELLANEOUS 796 FOR SALE

MISCELLANEOUS 796 FOR SALE

MISCELLANEOUS 796 FOR SALE

10x6 utility trailer, tilt, good cond. $300. 815-7185891 20 gal aquarium w/ accessories & metal stand $ 30 815946-4094 20 gal aquarium w/ accessories & oak cabinet $ 40 815946-4094 2007 YAMAHA Vino Y.J. 125CC, Motor Scooter. Exc. 1100mi., Con., $1,400 FIRM 815-772-4060 27” Sephra commercial chocolate fountain. Great con. $1200. 815288-2924 32” Color TV. $40 815-625-8895 5 drawer steel filing cabinet. $10. 815- 288- 3276

Hot water pressure washer. 5GPM 3000 PSI mounted on single axial trailer. $3500 815-266-1898

See More Online Photos, Commerce, Expanded Text

1950 Chevy 4 dr., 219 engine ready to drive, many extra parts, $10,500 815-625-4364

2005 Ford Taurus SE, A/C, AMFM CD, 123k mi. Asking $4,750. Call 815-499-8432

➛Look for WEB ID ➛Log on to: www.saukvalley. com classifieds ➛Enter the WEB ID in the WEB ID Box ➛View Photos, Expanded Text BUY ONLINE!! saukvalley.com CLASSIFIEDS

1977 Ford LTD Landau 46k mi. all original, mint condition! $12,000 815-973-0232

Credit Problems? Bad Credit? No Credit? We might be able to help! If you're looking to buy a vehicle we have many financing options available through qualified lenders. Call Brett Simpson today at 815-2855313. Ken Nelson Auto Plaza.

5,000 mulch, fertilizer, lawn care, Scott's Crab Grass Preventer. $25 Builder Discount

Microwave. $10 815-973-3521

Blacktop Seal Coating Fritz Asphalt 815-499-2940 Brand New Nordictrack Treadmill C700. Paid $850 asking $650. Call 815-535-3835 Chapel Hill Cemetery Sec. M. 2 graves. $450 ea. Please Call 815718-3164 E-Z up Canopy $50 815-652-4415 Freezer chest. 9 mo. old. $60. 815626-9046 Glazed porcelain 6x6 beige tiles. Qty 34. $25 (815) 284-2685

Huffy 2 person bicycle, good shape, year unknown.$60. 815-973-2899 Ladies Blue suede sports jacket, size small. Like new. $25 815-284-2685 Lg. China hutch, glass shelves, and lower storage. $175. 815-9733521 Lg. stack of Rough Sawn hardwood lumber, oak, walnut cherry. $750 Or $1.50 per running ft. 815-2883301 Microwave cart. $15. 815-973-3521

Presidential pocket knives, 43, new with case. $75. 815-716-6574. Rybobi Router 160H/A & Vermont American Table $90 815-284-1094 Salon wet station: mirror, cabinet, shampoo bowl & chair. Exc. Cond. $1200/obo, over $2000 new. 815718-0245. Student desk. $15. 815-973-3521 TV Stand Cherry finish 43x17x22H. Never used. $80 815-284-2685

NEW TODAY Used washer, 10,000 BTU air cond., several Miche skins. Call 815-625-5273.

FARM LAND FOR SALE

805

160 Acre Farm, Lee County 135 tillable, May Township. $7,500 per acre. Call Tim Crawford, Crawford Realty LLC 815-535-3444 21 acres, 10 tilltimber, able,11 w/electricity Lee Co. $139,900 Tim Crawford, Crawford Realty LLC 815-535-3444

HORSES & SUPPLIES

835

4 Horses at least 2 must go. Call 815762-1716

FARM EQUIPMENT

CLASSIC CARS

904

1988 Mustang 5.0 5 speed, new parts, $3500/obo 815-631-8220

AUTOMOBILES

905

NEW REAL DEAL

FOR ITEMS OVER $300

A 5 Line REAL DEAL

ad runs for 30 days in Sauk Valley Classifieds, 4 Ogle County Papers, The Review and saukvalley.com all for only $38! Special must be mentioned at time of ad placement. Offer expires 12/31/14 No Commercial Advertising, Pets, Garage Sales, Wood/ Fuel, Tickets/ Travel or Real Estate

1986 Bronco w/ 7' snow plow $800 815-716-6745 1993 Mercury Topaz GS, $1,000, needs work. 815626-5629

AUTOMOBILES

905

creditautosales dixon.com Always over 100+ vehicles to choose from. HAVING TROUBLE wording your ad? Call our classified department today. We'll be glad to help you. 626SOLD or 284SOLD.

TRUCKS

910

1993 Chevy Ext. Cab, 350 motor, runs-needs valve job, some rust, $3500 in parts/ $2000/obo 815535-7159

TRUCKS

910

1993 Ford F150 $1,500 Pickup, needs work. 815626-5629 1994 Chevrolet truck ext. cab, high mileage, runs good, $1200/obo 815-626-5165 1994 Chevy Half ton, runs good! $1,400 OBO. 815625-5911 1997 F-150 XLT Super Cab 4x4 155k mi., runs good, bed liner, new brakes. Priced Reduced. $3995 815-440-3141 2000 Chevy S10, ext. cab, new tires, 145k. mi. runs good. $3,000 Call 817-240-4163 2002 Dodge Dakota Quad Cab. V8, 4.7L, 4X4. 125K Clean and in good shape. $5500. 815973-7870.

VANS

911

2001 Oldsmobile Silouette 97k miles, like new! $5200 815-973-0232

855

Case skid loader 1816B. Exc. cond. $3500/obo. Call 815-871-8281

CLASSIC CARS

904

1923 T Bucket 350/350, Ford 9”. Price Negotiable. 815-625-3812. 1947 Mercury 4 door Sedan, 56k mi. (actual), 815440-8885

Going on Vacation?

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Keep in touch with Sauk Valley News While you’re away!

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CLASSIFIEDS deals small ads BIG

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Go BOLD

Get SOLD

Sud oku! Answer on D2

815/625.3600

CELEBRITY CIPHER by Luis Campos Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present. Each letter in the cipher stands for another.

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Get your ad noticed!

GO BOLD CALL

815-625-3600 815-284-2222

To place your AD TODAY!

CLASSIFIEDS SAUK VALLEY dailyGAZETTE

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Astrograph Make meaningful advances Saturday, June 7, 2014 You will see significant improvements in your business dealings this year. Remarkable opportunities will become available as professionals and people of influence gravitate to you. You have made some noteworthy contributions to your field, and now it’s time to reap the rewards. Be gracious.

responsibilities. You don’t want your reputation to take a hit.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Make sure your intentions are clear. You will lose valuable allies if you are too vague or wishy-washy. Take a stand and stick to your plans.

SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- A donation or fee may have strings attached. It may be difficult to say no, but you will be disappointed and short of funds if you don’t get what you expect in return.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Don’t allow others to take advantage of your good nature. If you are faced with someone else’s personal problem, don’t meddle; just suggest that he or she find a qualified counselor.

CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- You can make meaningful advances in your career. Feel out the situation and consider asking for a promotion. Make a point to draw attention to your positive work habits.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- You’ll have a problem separating reality from fantasy. All is not as it seems. Take a closer look at the situation before you make a commitment.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- You will be faced with a variety of conflicting emotions. Love and romance will be on your mind, but keep both feet on the ground. Your work will suffer if you become distracted.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- You can’t get rid of insecurities by spending on luxury items. Make a list of your good qualities, and you will discover that you have a lot going for you.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Keep your priorities straight. Don’t let your desire to have fun cause you to become lax in your

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- You may be missing a vital piece of information. If the answer is not clear, ask

PUZZLE ENTHUSIASTS: Get more puzzles in questions until you have a better understanding. Don’t be tempted to blow your budget with extensive home improvements. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- You’ll have second thoughts and will feel growing uncertainty regarding a partnership. Honor the time you’ve invested and see matters through to the end. It’s better to be safe than sorry. ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- It’s time to tie up loose ends. Finish pending projects and organize your personal papers. You will be satisfied with what you accomplish, leaving you room to take on a new challenge. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Contractual agreements or legal decisions should be put on hold for the moment. Take the time to do your research carefully, or you may put yourself in financial jeopardy.

©2014 UFS

“Random House Crossword MegaOmnious” Vols. 1 & 2


SAUK VALLEY MEDIA â&#x20AC;˘ Saturday, June 7, 2014 â&#x20AC;˘ PAGE D6

OVER 5,000 CARS SOLD SINCE 2005 2013 GMC Acadia SLT

LOW MILES

$33,999* 2012 Cadillac CTS 4 AWD

SEMI TRUCKS / 913 RIGS

MOTORCYCLES

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935

BOATS/MOTORS

2000 Harley Super 20K mi. Glide, Newer battery & tires. Detached windshield. Burgundy. Saddlebags. Runs great! $6300/obo. 815499-2907. 2010 Fatboy Lo black (VIN:1HD1JN 517AB011422) Well kept, 8K mi. $13,500 Garaged in Morrison, IL. Call or text: Stan 563212-9507.

935

940

TRAILERS/RVS

945

NEW TODAY 17 ft. 2009 Shasta Camper, $11,000 firm. Very clean. Like new. 815625-0067. 803 Ave. D Rock Falls 1999 Salem 5th wheel, 27', bunks, 6' slide, C/A/heat, $5200 815-6771206

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2014 Mazda 3 Sport

2014 Mazda 3 Sport

Stk# FE8255

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$

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:::0$-(6.,027256,1&&20

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$

* Not including tax, title, license or doc fees. All rebates and incentives applied. AActive military appreciation (Must Qualify). B Owner loyalty / (Must own a Mazda to qualify). C Recent college graduate must have transcripts to qualify. D Trade in assistance (Must trade in a vehicle to qualify). Photos for illustration only. Offer ends 06/30/2014.

Online! saukvalley .com


SAUK VALLEY MEDIA â&#x20AC;˘ Saturday, June 7, 2014 â&#x20AC;˘ PAGE D7

´67(5/,1*¡6 $872 683(56725(¾

STERLING CHEVROLET 1824 N. Locust, Sterling 815-625-2700

w w w. s t e r l i n g c h e v y. c o m

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*

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*

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*

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13 Chevrolet Impala

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14 Chevrolet Cruze 1LT

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04 Chevrolet 2500HD LT

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11 GMC Terrain SLT-2

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*

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$

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$

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14 Chevrolet Malibu LT

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*

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10 Chevrolet Equinox LT

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$

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14 Chevrolet Traverse LT

10 Chrysler Town & Country

 ,QĂ&#x20AC;QWL G35 AWD Stock #R656A

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13 Chevrolet Malibu LTZ

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$

*

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$

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*

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12 Chevrolet Impala LTZ

Under 1,000 Miles, STK# R663

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*

*

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$

*

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12,480

$

*

03 Chevrolet

10,988

$

*

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11,988

$

*

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10,988

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*

Only 40,000 Miles

Stock #R672

11,988

$

*

05 Chevorlet Equinox LT BEst Buy

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8,188

$

*

04 GMC Sierra HD SLE

08 Pontiac G6

AWD

Stock #1675A

$

*

Work Truck

Stock #1965B

11,988

$

*

06 Chevrolet Cobalt LT Rally Yellow

Stock #R655A

7,988

$

*

11,280

$

*

7,488

$

10,988

*

05 Ford Freestar SES

06 Chrysler 3DFLĂ&#x20AC;FD Affordable Ride

14,988

*

$

*

Very Clean

Stock #R599A

6,988

$

*

14,988*

$

Only 37,000 Miles

$

Rare Vehicle

Stock #R623A

Stock #R609

11 Chevrolet Impala LT

07 Chevrolet Monte Carlo LT

Must See

Stock #R504B

14,988

*

1-Owner

Stock #2015A

11 Chevrolet HHR LT Stock #2000C

Nice Ride

$

10 Chevrolet Impala LTZ

18,988

*

06 Cadillac STS V6

09 Chevrolet Impala LT

02 Chevrolet Suburban LT

VISIT OUR ALL NEW WEBSITE NOW

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$

Great Equipment

Stock #R555

13 Chevrolet Impala

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$

13 Chevrolet Impala LT

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Stock #R651

11 DODGE CALIBER

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Bluetooth

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Stock #1989A

04 FORD F-250 XLT

13 Chevrolet Impala

12 Chevrolet Malibu LS

Stock #2030A

13,988*

$

08 Dodge Avenger SE Only 48,000 Miles

Stock #R697

10,988*

$

04 Chevrolet Venture LT Family Ride

Stock #R588B

5,288*

$

(815)625.2700 *Prices do not include tax, title, license and doc fees. Pictures are for illustration purposes only. See dealer for details. Dealer not liable for errors in this ad. All pricing ends 06/13/14.


Wheels

Paid Advertisement

Saturday, June 7, 2014

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs$

Full 2014 Dodge Journey integrated second-row child booster seats, a rear-seat enter tainment system, a navigation system (paired with the 8.4-inch touchscreen) and WiFi connectivity.

Submitted by Ken Nelson Auto Group

T

he 2014 Dodge Journey is a roomy, versatile crossover SUV that straddles the divide between compact and midsize utility vehicles. It’s one of the few remaining crossovers in its price range that offers both an available V6 engine and a third-row seat. In addition, its interior is pleasant, welltrimmed and comfortable. However, in a segment full of strong competitors, the Journey comes up short in a couple of critical areas. A lackluster four-cylinder engine is by far the weakest link on the 2014 Dodge Journey. Not only is acceleration sluggish on this version but fuel economy is well below average, mainly due to Dodge’s continued use of an outdated four-speed automatic transmission. If you’re going to buy a Dodge Journey, it’s worth springing for the optional 3.6liter V6 -- something you’ll have to do anyway if you want all-wheel drive, which isn’t offered with the four-cylinder. The six-cylinder is potent and smooth, and paired with a more modern six-speed automatic transmission. Of course, equipping your Journey with the V6 also raises the price by several thousand dollars. If you can get past those issues, the 2014 Dodge Journey can be more useful for families than some other compact SUVs. It has an optional third row of seating appropriately sized for two small children, and you can get built-in booster seats in the second row. There are useful storage areas, too. You can store snacks and cold drinks in bins built into the floor of the second-row seating area, and a compartment under the front

The 2014 Dodge Journey receives minor trim level updates but is otherwise unchanged. passenger seat is handy for stashing valuables. T h e s e c o n v e n i e n c e s a re certainly nice to have, but consumers have plenty of choices for a compact or midsize utility vehicle. The popular 2014 Honda CR-V is one of our favorites and an excellent pick if you want a small crossover with a refined, fuel-efficient four-cylinder engine and don’t need a third row of seating. Rivals like the Mazda CX-5 and Ford Escape feel sportier from behind the wheel and also offer superior fuel economy. Based on the strength of the competition, the 2014 Dodge Journey is not among our top picks for a seven-passenger crossover. However, if you run across a good deal on a V6 model, it’s still worth a testdrive.

passenger configurations. It is available in American Value Package (AVP), SE, SXT, Limited and R/T trim levels. The American Value Package comes standard with 17-inch steel wheels, heated mirrors, keyless ignition/entry, cruise control, dual-zone manual climate control, a heightadjustable driver seat, a tiltand-telescoping steering wheel, a sliding and reclining secondrow seat and a six-speaker sound system with a compact 4.3-inch touchscreen interface, a CD player, an auxiliary audio jack and an iPod/USB audio interface. The SE adds tinted glass, roof rails and LED taillights. Moving up to the SXT adds 17-inch alloy wheels, foglamps, unique front/ rear fascias, a cargo cover and net, and satellite radio. The Limited adds a V6 engine as standard, remote start, Body Styles, Trim Levels, and 19-inch alloy wheels, automatic headlamps, leather upholstery, Options The 2014 Dodge Journey is heated front seats, a heated available in five- and seven- steering wheel, a six-way

2014 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO 4X4 JE073

2014 RAM 2500 CREW TRADESMAN 4X4

Was.................. $33,990 DISCOUNT......... $1,995

$9,000 OFF!

YOUR PRICE $31,995*

2014 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY TOURING L CE003

Was.................. $37,855 DISCOUNT......... $1,860 REBATE .............$2,500

YOUR PRICE $33,495*

2014 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN AVP/SE DE073

Was.................. $21,885 DISCOUNT............ $890 REBATE ............. $1,000

YOUR PRICE $19,995* OR $278/mo + $1,000 Rebate +

0%x72 + No Payments for 90 Days**

DE063

2014 DODGE DART SXT

Was.................. $21,190 DISCOUNT......... $1,195 REBATE .............$2,000

power driver seat (with fourway lumbar adjustment), dual-zone automatic climate control, Bluetooth phone and audio connectivity, an 8.4-inch touchscreen audio display, an auto-dimming rearview mirror, a 115-volt power outlet and a fold-flat front passenger seat with hidden storage bin. The R/T includes all the Limited features (minus the roof rails) and adds a monochrome exterior treatment, special 19-inch wheels, a sport-tuned suspension, black perforatedleather upholstery with red stitching and a premium audio system. Many of the features on the Limited and R/T are available on the lower trims via option packages. Other available features (depending on trim) include the Blacktop package (gloss black 19-inch wheels, grille and exterior trim), a sunroof, rear parking sensors, a rearview camera, a folding and reclining third-row seat, threezone automatic climate control (with rear air-conditioning),

2014 JEEP CHEROKEE LATITUDE FWD JE045

Was.................. $26,580 DISCOUNT......... $1,585 REBATE ............. $1,000

YOUR PRICE $17,995* YOUR PRICE $23,995* OR $293/mo x 72 mo at 1.9%

2014 DODGE AVENGER SE

DE016

Was.................. $21,590 DISCOUNT............ $595 REBATE ............. $4,500

YOUR PRICE $16,495* OR $258/mo for 72mo** 2014 JEEP WRANGLER SPORT 4X4

JE069

Was.................. $30,660 DISCOUNT......... $1,665

YOUR PRICE $28,995*

DE054

Powertrains and Performance The 2014 Dodge Journey AVP, SE and SXT are powered by a 2.4-liter four-cylinder engine that produces 173 horsepower and 166 pound-feet of torque. A f o u r- s p e e d a u t o m a t i c transmission is standard, and you can only get front-wheel drive with this engine. Fuel economy ratings are 21 mpg combined (19 city/26 highway) well below average for a fourcylinder crossover. Optional on the SXT and standard on the Limited and R/T is a 3.6-liter V6. It’s good for 283 hp and 260 lb-ft and is matched to a six-speed automatic. Front-wheel drive is standard and all-wheel drive is optional. We recorded a 7.8-second 0-60-mph time in a front-drive, V6-equipped Journey, which is about average for a V6 crossover in this price range. Fuel economy stands at 19 mpg combined (17/25) with front-wheel drive and 19 mpg combined (16/24) with all-wheel drive; both are below average for a V6-powered crossover in this price range. Safety Every 2014 Dodge Journey comes standard with antilock disc brakes, traction and stability control, active front head restraints, front side airbags, side curtain airbags and a driver knee airbag. Integrated second-row child booster seats and rear parking sensors are optional on every Journey. A rearview camera is available as an option on the SXT, Limited and R/T.

Was.................. $49,505 DISCOUNT......... $6,000 REBATE ............. $3,000

YOUR PRICE $40,505*

2014 DODGE CHARGER SE RWD

DE057

Was.................. $28,685 DISCOUNT......... $1,690 REBATE ............. $2,500

YOUR PRICE $24,495*

2014 DODGE JOURNEY SE FWD

DE055

Was.................. $20,995 DISCOUNT............ $500 REBATE ............. $1,500

YOUR PRICE $18,995*

OR $299x72 mo with 1.9% In lieu of Rebate***

2014 JEEP PATRIOT LATITUDE 4X4

JE081

Was.................. $26,830 DISCOUNT......... $1,282 REBATE ............. $2,000

YOUR PRICE $23,548*

In lieu of Rebate***

2014 RAM 1500 SLT QUAD CAB 4X4 DE065

Was....... ................$42,755 DISCOUNT................$4,000 REBATE ...... ............$1,000 Truck Month BC ......$2,000 Bonus Buck ...... .......$1,000

YOUR PRICE $34,755* or $497/mo + $3,000 rebate + *** 0%x72 mo

1000 N. GALENA, DIXON, IL 815-288-4455

www.KenNelsonAuto.com

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TEL_06072014