Page 1

2009 ANNUAL REPORT

AIDS ENDS HERE


00– 01

In the not too distant future, we will cross an important threshold. We will wake up to learn that the HIV epidemic has ended. Knowing one’s HIV status will be as commonplace as knowing one’s street address. HIV prevention, care and treatment will be not only accessible to all, but covered by insurance. While this day may seem impossible to some, the first step in getting there is believing it can happen. At San Francisco AIDS Foundation, our belief in this future shapes all that we do. It informs legislative and advocacy efforts. It guides programs and services. It is the rallying cry for the thousands of supporters who contribute time and money. It is why we exist. But it will take more than just believing it can happen. That’s why we’re rolling out a fiveyear strategic plan for San Francisco to radically reduce new infections and ensure proper care for all HIV-positive San Franciscans. The plan contains three goals that we explain on the pages that follow. Make no mistake, they’re ambitious. To get there, we will build on our nationally recognized public policy efforts and programs for the prevention, diagnosis, care and treatment of HIV. We will also try new things. We will let science be our guide. We will reach populations that elude existing efforts for HIV prevention, testing and care. We will not stop until we reverse the steady rate of new HIV infections that occur each year in San Francisco. These goals would be forever out of reach were it not for the support of the thousands of volunteers, event participants, individual donors and corporate sponsors who make our work possible. In their words and deeds, this group is as vital a stakeholder in the end of the epidemic as public officials in Washington or down the road at City Hall. To all of you, we extend our heartfelt gratitude for sharing our vision. Thank you. Together, we will end the HIV epidemic in the city where it began. Then we will work so that San Francisco serves as a model for ending HIV everywhere. Just as HIV started one community at a time, it will end one community at a time.

Barbara Kimport Interim Chief Executive Officer

Dr. Lorna Thornton Board Chairperson


00– 01

In the not too distant future, we will cross an important threshold. We will wake up to learn that the HIV epidemic has ended. Knowing one’s HIV status will be as commonplace as knowing one’s street address. HIV prevention, care and treatment will be not only accessible to all, but covered by insurance. While this day may seem impossible to some, the first step in getting there is believing it can happen. At San Francisco AIDS Foundation, our belief in this future shapes all that we do. It informs legislative and advocacy efforts. It guides programs and services. It is the rallying cry for the thousands of supporters who contribute time and money. It is why we exist. But it will take more than just believing it can happen. That’s why we’re rolling out a fiveyear strategic plan for San Francisco to radically reduce new infections and ensure proper care for all HIV-positive San Franciscans. The plan contains three goals that we explain on the pages that follow. Make no mistake, they’re ambitious. To get there, we will build on our nationally recognized public policy efforts and programs for the prevention, diagnosis, care and treatment of HIV. We will also try new things. We will let science be our guide. We will reach populations that elude existing efforts for HIV prevention, testing and care. We will not stop until we reverse the steady rate of new HIV infections that occur each year in San Francisco. These goals would be forever out of reach were it not for the support of the thousands of volunteers, event participants, individual donors and corporate sponsors who make our work possible. In their words and deeds, this group is as vital a stakeholder in the end of the epidemic as public officials in Washington or down the road at City Hall. To all of you, we extend our heartfelt gratitude for sharing our vision. Thank you. Together, we will end the HIV epidemic in the city where it began. Then we will work so that San Francisco serves as a model for ending HIV everywhere. Just as HIV started one community at a time, it will end one community at a time.

Barbara Kimport Interim Chief Executive Officer

Dr. Lorna Thornton Board Chairperson


GOAL 1:

02– 03

Reduce new HIV infections by 50% in San Francisco Today, one in five people doesn’t know he or she is infected. Research shows that more than half of new HIV infections are transmitted by people who don’t know they’re positive. By connecting these individuals to HIV counseling, testing, care and treatment, we reduce new infections. That means HIV screening must be expanded. It must become a routine part of health care—like checking blood pressure, or cholesterol. For people outside the health system, we must make free rapid testing easily accessible while also expanding sexual and substance-use harm reduction. We have the evidence; we know what works. We must let science be our guide.

50%X2015 Casey first experienced Magnet’s community health services in 2003 as a client. Today, he is also a volunteer.


GOAL 1:

02– 03

Reduce new HIV infections by 50% in San Francisco Today, one in five people doesn’t know he or she is infected. Research shows that more than half of new HIV infections are transmitted by people who don’t know they’re positive. By connecting these individuals to HIV counseling, testing, care and treatment, we reduce new infections. That means HIV screening must be expanded. It must become a routine part of health care—like checking blood pressure, or cholesterol. For people outside the health system, we must make free rapid testing easily accessible while also expanding sexual and substance-use harm reduction. We have the evidence; we know what works. We must let science be our guide.

50%X2015 Casey first experienced Magnet’s community health services in 2003 as a client. Today, he is also a volunteer.


AIDS Will End Through Programs That Work Good intentions aren’t enough. To make change you have to be strategic and scientific. You have to create programs that work. Last year, San Francisco AIDS Foundation provided 3,500 HIV tests, two million clean needles, 134,000 answers via the AIDS hotline and website, and innumerable resources for people at risk for and living with HIV/AIDS. These include housing subsidies, benefits counseling and mental health and substance-use services. All of this work was made possible with help from nearly 800 volunteers who generously shared their time. This year the foundation added free rapid HIV testing to existing services on Sixth Street, one of the city’s hot spots for HIV infection. The initiative focuses on people who may not otherwise have access to medical care and counseling services, particularly intravenous drug users and AfricanAmerican men who have sex with men.

San Francisco AIDS Foundation / 2009 Annual Report

Looking ahead, San Francisco AIDS Foundation will redouble efforts to make HIV counseling, testing and care available to all communities that continue to experience disproportionate rates of HIV, like African Americans and Latinos, and among groups where behaviors can drive higher rates of infections, such as people who use crystal meth. Evidence shows that HIV testing and connections to prevention and care programs among populations at high risk for HIV help reduce new infections. Discover how programs and services make a difference at sfaf.org/programs.

04– 05

Casey’s Story As a sexually active gay man, Casey had suffered more than his share of awkward conversations with doctors from his managed care plan. They offered little on topics that mattered most to him. He often left appointments embarrassed to ask questions essential to his health. The first time he walked through Magnet’s doors, Casey felt as if he’d come home. Today, he is empowered by the culturally competent health information and services he receives from the Castro-based community health center.

“Magnet gives me the confidence I need to initiate dialogues with partners about HIV status and safer sex, which eliminates doubt and frees my energies to focus on the more exciting aspects of getting to know them.”


AIDS Will End Through Programs That Work Good intentions aren’t enough. To make change you have to be strategic and scientific. You have to create programs that work. Last year, San Francisco AIDS Foundation provided 3,500 HIV tests, two million clean needles, 134,000 answers via the AIDS hotline and website, and innumerable resources for people at risk for and living with HIV/AIDS. These include housing subsidies, benefits counseling and mental health and substance-use services. All of this work was made possible with help from nearly 800 volunteers who generously shared their time. This year the foundation added free rapid HIV testing to existing services on Sixth Street, one of the city’s hot spots for HIV infection. The initiative focuses on people who may not otherwise have access to medical care and counseling services, particularly intravenous drug users and AfricanAmerican men who have sex with men.

San Francisco AIDS Foundation / 2009 Annual Report

Looking ahead, San Francisco AIDS Foundation will redouble efforts to make HIV counseling, testing and care available to all communities that continue to experience disproportionate rates of HIV, like African Americans and Latinos, and among groups where behaviors can drive higher rates of infections, such as people who use crystal meth. Evidence shows that HIV testing and connections to prevention and care programs among populations at high risk for HIV help reduce new infections. Discover how programs and services make a difference at sfaf.org/programs.

04– 05

Casey’s Story As a sexually active gay man, Casey had suffered more than his share of awkward conversations with doctors from his managed care plan. They offered little on topics that mattered most to him. He often left appointments embarrassed to ask questions essential to his health. The first time he walked through Magnet’s doors, Casey felt as if he’d come home. Today, he is empowered by the culturally competent health information and services he receives from the Castro-based community health center.

“Magnet gives me the confidence I need to initiate dialogues with partners about HIV status and safer sex, which eliminates doubt and frees my energies to focus on the more exciting aspects of getting to know them.”


GOAL 2:

06– 07

Ensure that all San Franciscans know their current HIV status People at risk often don’t think they are. As a result, they may “opt out” when an HIV test is offered and miss opportunities for diagnosis. We change this by making it commonplace for everyone to want to know his or her current status. We must make clear the advantages of having that knowledge. Regardless of the test result, it boils down to having the information needed to take care of oneself. And let’s not forget a key word when it comes to status: “current.” A test result has an expiration date—it’s the next risk encounter. Finally, if everyone who needs an HIV test is to get one, we’re going to need a lot more HIV tests. Capacity for HIV testing in San Francisco must grow.

knows Jahaira works for the HIV Prevention Project, the needle exchange program of San Francisco AIDS Foundation.

status

their

everyone


GOAL 2:

06– 07

Ensure that all San Franciscans know their current HIV status People at risk often don’t think they are. As a result, they may “opt out” when an HIV test is offered and miss opportunities for diagnosis. We change this by making it commonplace for everyone to want to know his or her current status. We must make clear the advantages of having that knowledge. Regardless of the test result, it boils down to having the information needed to take care of oneself. And let’s not forget a key word when it comes to status: “current.” A test result has an expiration date—it’s the next risk encounter. Finally, if everyone who needs an HIV test is to get one, we’re going to need a lot more HIV tests. Capacity for HIV testing in San Francisco must grow.

knows Jahaira works for the HIV Prevention Project, the needle exchange program of San Francisco AIDS Foundation.

status

their

everyone


AIDS Will End Through Effective Public Policy For a community—or a country—to end HIV, it must be bolstered by evidence-based public health policies that reduce harm, ensure access to proper care and promote long-term health and wellness. That is the focus of policy and advocacy efforts at San Francisco AIDS Foundation. In 2009, the foundation played an instrumental role in the reauthorization of the Ryan White Care Act, development of the first-ever National HIV/AIDS Strategy and historic reversal of two federal bans—one prohibiting funding for needle exchange programs and the other making it illegal for HIV-positive people to enter the United States. In California, San Francisco AIDS Foundation co-sponsored and helped pass a bill reducing phlebotomist licensing requirements, which had been a significant barrier to the expansion of rapid HIV screening in non-medical settings.

Additionally, the foundation protected funding for the AIDS Drug Assistance Program (ADAP) that was threatened by looming state budget cuts. San Francisco AIDS Foundation mobilized resources and hundreds of citizens across the state rallied in Sacramento, sending a clear message to Governor Schwarzenegger: ADAP saves lives, is essential to HIV prevention efforts, and must be preserved. Looking ahead, the foundation will build on its success translating emerging evidence into policy action on timely topics like HIV and aging, and HIV treatment for prevention. Learn more about all public policy and advocacy efforts at sfaf.org/advocacy.

San Francisco AIDS Foundation / 2009 Annual Report

08– 09

Jahaira’s Story Jahaira earned her masters in clinical psychology with a clear vision for her career—she wanted to help drug users. A former addict, Jahaira knew firsthand what it’s like to wrestle with a commonly misunderstood disease where the afflicted is often blamed. In 2005, she joined San Francisco AIDS Foundation’s needle exchange program because of its special, humanistic approach to reducing the spread of HIV among people who use drugs. Today, she coordinates volunteer efforts and a peer education program for secondary exchangers, individuals who get sterile needles for people who are unable to visit the exchange site themselves.

“By introducing HIV testing to needle exchange, we honor our commitment under the harm-reduction model which requires that we meet clients where they are and encourage any positive change.”


AIDS Will End Through Effective Public Policy For a community—or a country—to end HIV, it must be bolstered by evidence-based public health policies that reduce harm, ensure access to proper care and promote long-term health and wellness. That is the focus of policy and advocacy efforts at San Francisco AIDS Foundation. In 2009, the foundation played an instrumental role in the reauthorization of the Ryan White Care Act, development of the first-ever National HIV/AIDS Strategy and historic reversal of two federal bans—one prohibiting funding for needle exchange programs and the other making it illegal for HIV-positive people to enter the United States. In California, San Francisco AIDS Foundation co-sponsored and helped pass a bill reducing phlebotomist licensing requirements, which had been a significant barrier to the expansion of rapid HIV screening in non-medical settings.

Additionally, the foundation protected funding for the AIDS Drug Assistance Program (ADAP) that was threatened by looming state budget cuts. San Francisco AIDS Foundation mobilized resources and hundreds of citizens across the state rallied in Sacramento, sending a clear message to Governor Schwarzenegger: ADAP saves lives, is essential to HIV prevention efforts, and must be preserved. Looking ahead, the foundation will build on its success translating emerging evidence into policy action on timely topics like HIV and aging, and HIV treatment for prevention. Learn more about all public policy and advocacy efforts at sfaf.org/advocacy.

San Francisco AIDS Foundation / 2009 Annual Report

08– 09

Jahaira’s Story Jahaira earned her masters in clinical psychology with a clear vision for her career—she wanted to help drug users. A former addict, Jahaira knew firsthand what it’s like to wrestle with a commonly misunderstood disease where the afflicted is often blamed. In 2005, she joined San Francisco AIDS Foundation’s needle exchange program because of its special, humanistic approach to reducing the spread of HIV among people who use drugs. Today, she coordinates volunteer efforts and a peer education program for secondary exchangers, individuals who get sterile needles for people who are unable to visit the exchange site themselves.

“By introducing HIV testing to needle exchange, we honor our commitment under the harm-reduction model which requires that we meet clients where they are and encourage any positive change.”


GOAL 3:

10– 11

Ensure that all HIV-positive San Franciscans receive proper care Access to proper care is an important prevention strategy for HIV. Evidence shows that an HIV-positive person in care is much less likely to infect others. Care means a doctor who understands HIV. Care means regular check-ups. Care means effective treatment. For many, care means mental health and substance use services. On the heels of historic U.S. health care reform, we must work collaboratively with public officials to make care accessible and universal for people with HIV/AIDS. Simultaneously, we must extend the reach of programs and services connecting people to proper care in neighborhoods where HIV continues to be a problem, and ensure that no one slips through the cracks.

ALL

HIV+RECEIVE CARE

SAN FRANCISCANS Jason is a beneficiary of California’s AIDS Drug Assistance Program. He is training for his third AIDS/LifeCycle from SF to LA.


GOAL 3:

10– 11

Ensure that all HIV-positive San Franciscans receive proper care Access to proper care is an important prevention strategy for HIV. Evidence shows that an HIV-positive person in care is much less likely to infect others. Care means a doctor who understands HIV. Care means regular check-ups. Care means effective treatment. For many, care means mental health and substance use services. On the heels of historic U.S. health care reform, we must work collaboratively with public officials to make care accessible and universal for people with HIV/AIDS. Simultaneously, we must extend the reach of programs and services connecting people to proper care in neighborhoods where HIV continues to be a problem, and ensure that no one slips through the cracks.

ALL

HIV+RECEIVE CARE

SAN FRANCISCANS Jason is a beneficiary of California’s AIDS Drug Assistance Program. He is training for his third AIDS/LifeCycle from SF to LA.


AIDS Will End Through Your Support You walk. You run. You bike long distances. And some of you bike, run and swim. Year after year, the hallmark of all San Francisco AIDS Foundation fundraising events is the diverse community drawn together for a single purpose: to end HIV and AIDS. Regardless of age, gender, sexual orientation, HIV status or physical ability, participants stand shoulder to shoulder as equals in their refusal to accept HIV as inevitable. Last year was no different. Nearly 30,000 event participants raised record amounts of money to fund vital programs and public policy work. In doing so, they demonstrated strength and commitment far beyond their numbers and served as an example of what a community can accomplish.

By the time this book goes to print, the foundation’s 2010 event season will be in full swing. There will be triathlons, marathons, walkathons and cycling events. Participants will travel from across the country and around the globe. Many will characterize their experience as life-changing. Will you be among them? Register, donate, volunteer or learn more at sfaf.org/events.

12 – 13

Jason’s Story When Jason was diagnosed with full-blown AIDS in 2005, he went home and told his brother how he wanted to be buried. He was unemployed, uninsured and uncertain if and how he would live. He enrolled in the AIDS Drug Assistance Program (ADAP), a publicly funded program that provides medication to HIVpositive individuals for whom it would otherwise be inaccessible. In 2009, when ADAP was threatened by state budget cuts, San Francisco AIDS Foundation rallied to preserve it. Today, Jason is training for his third AIDS/LifeCycle, a seven-day, 545-mile ride from San Francisco to Los Angeles to raise money and awareness in the fight against HIV/AIDS. He credits ADAP and the work of organizations like San Francisco AIDS Foundation for giving him a future.

“ADAP has given me my life back and, in doing so, enables me to use the time I’ve been given to celebrate life to the fullest and help as many people I can.”

San Francisco AIDS Foundation / 2009 Annual Report


AIDS Will End Through Your Support You walk. You run. You bike long distances. And some of you bike, run and swim. Year after year, the hallmark of all San Francisco AIDS Foundation fundraising events is the diverse community drawn together for a single purpose: to end HIV and AIDS. Regardless of age, gender, sexual orientation, HIV status or physical ability, participants stand shoulder to shoulder as equals in their refusal to accept HIV as inevitable. Last year was no different. Nearly 30,000 event participants raised record amounts of money to fund vital programs and public policy work. In doing so, they demonstrated strength and commitment far beyond their numbers and served as an example of what a community can accomplish.

By the time this book goes to print, the foundation’s 2010 event season will be in full swing. There will be triathlons, marathons, walkathons and cycling events. Participants will travel from across the country and around the globe. Many will characterize their experience as life-changing. Will you be among them? Register, donate, volunteer or learn more at sfaf.org/events.

12 – 13

Jason’s Story When Jason was diagnosed with full-blown AIDS in 2005, he went home and told his brother how he wanted to be buried. He was unemployed, uninsured and uncertain if and how he would live. He enrolled in the AIDS Drug Assistance Program (ADAP), a publicly funded program that provides medication to HIVpositive individuals for whom it would otherwise be inaccessible. In 2009, when ADAP was threatened by state budget cuts, San Francisco AIDS Foundation rallied to preserve it. Today, Jason is training for his third AIDS/LifeCycle, a seven-day, 545-mile ride from San Francisco to Los Angeles to raise money and awareness in the fight against HIV/AIDS. He credits ADAP and the work of organizations like San Francisco AIDS Foundation for giving him a future.

“ADAP has given me my life back and, in doing so, enables me to use the time I’ve been given to celebrate life to the fullest and help as many people I can.”

San Francisco AIDS Foundation / 2009 Annual Report


14– 15

San Francisco AIDS Foundation Statement of Activities and Changes in Net Assets

San Francisco AIDS Foundation Statement of financial position

Years Ended June 30, 2009 and June 30, 2008

Years Ended June 30, 2009 and June 30, 2008

2009 PUBLIC AND GOVERNMENT SUPPORT: Government grants

2009

2008

2008

ASSETS: $

7,475,1 4 7

$

7,340,392

Contributions and grants:

Cash

$

Investments

Individuals Corporations and foundations Donated goods and services Special events Total Public and Government Support

2,332,755

2,97 1,928

383,5 18

543,608

357,373

281,077

10,435, 574

12,027,507

20,984,367

23,164,512

2,391,600

$

2,521,505

8,1 2 2, 1 1 8

7,728,827

Accounts receivable

812,525

2,033,995

Contributions receivable, net

389,8 1 7

404,893 499,286

Prepaid expenses

431,1 2 9

Security deposits and other assets

259,480

244,023

Property and equipment, net

962,698

1,329,100

13,369,367

14,761,629

1,188,380

1,347,379 883,057

Total Assets REVENUES AND GAINS: Net realized and unrealized loss on investments

LIABILITIES:

(1,181,996)

(626,869)

30 1,603

597,667

Service revenues

273,000

261,372

Accrued payroll and related liabilities

804,440

Other

205,7 8 1

327,024

Grants payable

256,058

561,500

Refundable advances

226,675

2 1 5,675

Capital lease obligations

1 74,863

175,108

2,650,416

3, 1 82,7 19

9,997,487

11,040,966

Investment income

Total Support and Revenues

20,582,755

23,723,706

Accounts payable and accrued expenses

Total Liabilities

EXPENSES: Program services

14,138,602

15,548,297

Fund development

5,469,368

6,034,799

NET ASSETS:

Support services

1,834,744

1,965,7 1 5

Unrestricted

Total Expenses Change in Net Assets

NET ASSETS (BEGINNING OF YEAR)

NET ASSETS (END OF YEAR)

San Francisco AIDS Foundation / 2009 Annual Report

$

21,442,714

23,548,8 1 1

(859,959)

1 74,895

11,578,910

11,404,015

10,718,951

$

11,578,910

Temporarily restricted

301,835

1 1 8, 3 1 5

Permanently restricted

419,629

4 1 9,629

10,718,951

1 1,578,910

Total Net Assets

TOTAL LIABILITIES & NET ASSETS

$

13,369,367

$

14,761,629


14– 15

San Francisco AIDS Foundation Statement of Activities and Changes in Net Assets

San Francisco AIDS Foundation Statement of financial position

Years Ended June 30, 2009 and June 30, 2008

Years Ended June 30, 2009 and June 30, 2008

2009 PUBLIC AND GOVERNMENT SUPPORT: Government grants

2009

2008

2008

ASSETS: $

7,475,1 4 7

$

7,340,392

Contributions and grants:

Cash

$

Investments

Individuals Corporations and foundations Donated goods and services Special events Total Public and Government Support

2,332,755

2,97 1,928

383,5 18

543,608

357,373

281,077

10,435, 574

12,027,507

20,984,367

23,164,512

2,391,600

$

2,521,505

8,1 2 2, 1 1 8

7,728,827

Accounts receivable

812,525

2,033,995

Contributions receivable, net

389,8 1 7

404,893 499,286

Prepaid expenses

431,1 2 9

Security deposits and other assets

259,480

244,023

Property and equipment, net

962,698

1,329,100

13,369,367

14,761,629

1,188,380

1,347,379 883,057

Total Assets REVENUES AND GAINS: Net realized and unrealized loss on investments

LIABILITIES:

(1,181,996)

(626,869)

30 1,603

597,667

Service revenues

273,000

261,372

Accrued payroll and related liabilities

804,440

Other

205,7 8 1

327,024

Grants payable

256,058

561,500

Refundable advances

226,675

2 1 5,675

Capital lease obligations

1 74,863

175,108

2,650,416

3, 1 82,7 19

9,997,487

11,040,966

Investment income

Total Support and Revenues

20,582,755

23,723,706

Accounts payable and accrued expenses

Total Liabilities

EXPENSES: Program services

14,138,602

15,548,297

Fund development

5,469,368

6,034,799

NET ASSETS:

Support services

1,834,744

1,965,7 1 5

Unrestricted

Total Expenses Change in Net Assets

NET ASSETS (BEGINNING OF YEAR)

NET ASSETS (END OF YEAR)

San Francisco AIDS Foundation / 2009 Annual Report

$

21,442,714

23,548,8 1 1

(859,959)

1 74,895

11,578,910

11,404,015

10,718,951

$

11,578,910

Temporarily restricted

301,835

1 1 8, 3 1 5

Permanently restricted

419,629

4 1 9,629

10,718,951

1 1,578,910

Total Net Assets

TOTAL LIABILITIES & NET ASSETS

$

13,369,367

$

14,761,629


San Francisco AIDS Foundation at a glance Year Ended June 30, 2009

Leadership Executive Team

Sources of Revenue: Private Giving and Other Non-Government Sources 63.7%

36.3%

$

Government Grants Total

13,107,608 7,475, 1 4 7

$

20,582,755

Judith Auerbach Vice President, Science & Public Policy Barbara Kimport Chief Executive Officer (Interim) James Loduca Vice President, Marketing & Communications Marty Low Chief Financial Officer Bob Rybicki Vice President, Programs & Services

Expense Allocation by Function: Program Services 65.9%

25.5%

8.6%

$

14,138,602

Board of Directors

Fund Development

5,469,368

Dan Bernal

Support Services

1,834,74 4

Denise Bradby Carol Brosgart, MD

Total

$

21,442,7 14

Jonathan Deason Christopher Esposito David Galullo Michael Kidd Tom Perrault Mike Richey

Expenditures by Program Area:

Lorna Thornton, MD (Chair) Housing Services

22.8% 37.3%

20.3% 10.8% 8.8%

San Francisco AIDS Foundation / 2009 Annual Report

$

3,216,843

HIV Prevention and Community Level Intervention

5,279,6 14

Client Services and Treatment Education

2,869, 135

Global Treatment Access

1,250,2 4 1

Public Policy

1,522,769

Total

$

14,138,602

About Established in 1982, San Francisco AIDS Foundation works to ensure that the HIV epidemic ends in the city where it began. By combining innovative, evidence-based programs for HIV prevention and care with bold policy initiatives focused on issues ranging from harm reduction to total health and wellness, the foundation is making sustainable progress against HIV among populations most vulnerable to the disease. San Francisco AIDS Foundation refuses to accept that HIV transmission is inevitable.

Principal Photography: Sven Wiederhold

Design: Mission Minded, www.Mission-Minded.com


San Francisco AIDS Foundation at a glance Year Ended June 30, 2009

Leadership Executive Team

Sources of Revenue: Private Giving and Other Non-Government Sources 63.7%

36.3%

$

Government Grants Total

13,107,608 7,475, 1 4 7

$

20,582,755

Judith Auerbach Vice President, Science & Public Policy Barbara Kimport Chief Executive Officer (Interim) James Loduca Vice President, Marketing & Communications Marty Low Chief Financial Officer Bob Rybicki Vice President, Programs & Services

Expense Allocation by Function: Program Services 65.9%

25.5%

8.6%

$

14,138,602

Board of Directors

Fund Development

5,469,368

Dan Bernal

Support Services

1,834,74 4

Denise Bradby Carol Brosgart, MD

Total

$

21,442,7 14

Jonathan Deason Christopher Esposito David Galullo Michael Kidd Tom Perrault Mike Richey

Expenditures by Program Area:

Lorna Thornton, MD (Chair) Housing Services

22.8% 37.3%

20.3% 10.8% 8.8%

San Francisco AIDS Foundation / 2009 Annual Report

$

3,216,843

HIV Prevention and Community Level Intervention

5,279,6 14

Client Services and Treatment Education

2,869, 135

Global Treatment Access

1,250,2 4 1

Public Policy

1,522,769

Total

$

14,138,602

About Established in 1982, San Francisco AIDS Foundation works to ensure that the HIV epidemic ends in the city where it began. By combining innovative, evidence-based programs for HIV prevention and care with bold policy initiatives focused on issues ranging from harm reduction to total health and wellness, the foundation is making sustainable progress against HIV among populations most vulnerable to the disease. San Francisco AIDS Foundation refuses to accept that HIV transmission is inevitable.

Principal Photography: Sven Wiederhold

Design: Mission Minded, www.Mission-Minded.com


CONTACT San Francisco AIDS Foundation 995 Market Street, Suite 200 San Francisco, CA 94103 415.487.3000 Get the latest on news and events: Sign-up at sfaf.org Email us at feedback@sfaf.org Follow us on facebook.com/SFAIDSFoundation

Annual Report 2009 San Francisco AIDS Foundation  

AIDS ENDS HERE