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Unconquered A  Seminole  Boosters  Magazine

S EMINOLE B OO S TER S M AG A ZINE

DECEMBER 2011

Champs!

2011–12 BASKETBALL Fan Guide

DECEMBER 2011

Soccer, Cross Country and volleyball teams bring home acc hardware basketball fan guide: teams begin march toward the tournament


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ENJOY PRIVATE EVENTS, GAMES, TAILGATING, FRIENDS, TICKET AND PARKING PRIORITY & MORE!

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Unconquered magazine (USPS 18182) is published quarterly by Seminole Boosters, Inc., 225 University Center, Suite 5100, Tallahassee, Florida, 32306. (850) 644-3484, Fax: (850) 222-5929. POSTMASTER: send change of address to, Unconquered magazine, care of Seminole Boosters, Florida State University Center, Suite C-5100, 5th Floor, Tallahassee, Florida, 32306. Periodicals Postage Paid at Tallahassee, FL, Volume 28, Issue 4. All advertising revenues directly support programs of the Seminole Boosters, Inc. For advertising rates, please contact the sales representatives listed below. © 2011, Seminole Boosters, Inc. All rights reserved. Opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Florida State University faculty, staff or administration. Overview Unconquered magazine celebrates Seminole athletics and the indomitable spirit of its student-athletes who overcome adversity, the passion of its coaches and educators who help students reach beyond their limits, and the devotion of donors who redefine the boundaries of generosity by giving scholarships that change lives and who make donations that build first-class athletic facilities. By sharing their stories of transformational experiences — on the athletic playing field, in the classroom and in life — Unconquered magazine encourages the growth of responsible world citizenship and cross-cultural understanding. Each issue carries stories on what makes student-athletes great and how they were shaped by their experience at FSU, features on Seminole community sports legends and profiles of donors who make contributions.

2011 EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

Brian Swain

Bruce Harrell

CHRISTIAN SCHerF MIKE HARRELL Secretary

Treasurer

Steve Brown

Morris Miller

TOM JENNINGS

RANDY SPETMAN

ANDY MILLER

ANDY HAGGARD

GENE READY

Lori Mattice

Dr. Pamela Perrewe

Chairman

Booster Attorney

Chairman-Elect

VP for University Advancement

Athletic Director

Past Chair

Seminole Boosters President

Chairman of the Board of Trustees

Contact Send correspondence to Kirstin Rayborn, at the address shown above, or by email to krayborn@fsu.edu. Telephone: (850) 645-7330. Magazine Staff Publishers: Andy Miller, Jerry Kutz

GARY THURSTON

Managing editor: Kirstin Rayborn

At-Large Member

At-Large Member

At-Large Member

Faculty Representative

Design, layout, production, pre-press: Rowland Publishing, Inc. Photo editors: Rowland Publishing, Inc. Featured photographers: Mike Olivella, Ross Obley Contributing photographers: FSU Sports Info, David Barfield Columnists: Charlie Barnes, Jerry Kutz Contributing writers: Sherri Dye, Jim Crosby, Meghan Garant, John Lata, Brandon Mellor, Daniel Mitchell, Rob Wilson Copy editors: Jerry Kutz, Rowland Publishing, Inc. Photo purchasing information: Mike Olivella photos: www.seminoles.com Ross Obley photos: www.seminoles.com

2011–2012 BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Seminole Boosters, Inc. EXECUTIVE STAFF Andy Miller President and CEO Charlie Barnes Executive Director Senior Vice President Joel Padgett Senior Vice President Gift Planning Director Tom Carlson Senior Vice President Jerry Kutz Vice President of Marketing and Communications Cindee Lundeen, PhD Director Billy Sexton Director

ASSISTANTS TO EXECUTIVE STAFF AND DIRECTORS

Michael Espada Ticket Sales Manager

Mary Pat Desloge Senior Executive Assistant to Andy Miller

Kirstin Rayborn Marketing Director

Sarah Reed Executive Assistant, Coaches Clubs Director Mary Bailey Executive Assistant to Jerry Kutz, Stewardship Kari Terezakis Executive Assistant to Tom Carlson, Charlie Barnes, Joel Padgett

FSU VARSITY CLUB Betsy Hosey Director DONOR RECORDS Jennifer Terrell Director Matt Lanahan Data Entry Robert Brantley Office Entry Jeff Chamlis Gift Entry Abbie King Data Entry

Eric Carr Director

Patti Barber Receptionist, Office Assistant

Sanford Lovingood Controller

Barbara Mason Financial Assistant

Matt Behnke, CPA Chief Financial Officer

Amy Hanstein Accountant

UNCONQUERED MAGAZINE

Louie Garofalo Assistant Director of Data Management

Kirstin Rayborn Managing Editor & Advertising

Jason Liskooka Assistant Director of Data Management

Lizzy Piurowski Magazine Assistant

Kristi Purvis Special Events Director

FSU TRADEMARK LICENSING

Max Zahn Northeast FL Representative Kristin Tubeck Tampa Representative James Warren Ticket/Membership Account Representative

PROGRAM DIRECTORS Maria Fuller Skybox and Parking Director Farrah Miller Information Technology Director, Webmaster

Seminole Boosters, Inc.

Brandon Mand Gift Entry

Sherri Dye Director of Licensing Garrett O’Connor Assistant Licensing Director

Kathy Atkins-Gunter, PC Jorge Azor Byron Bailey Tom Barron, PC Mark Bates Flecia Braswell Steve Brown, PC Yvonne Brown Bob Camp, PC Joe Camps, PC Bob Carnes Bill Carraway, PC Jimmy Carter, PC Ken Cashin, PC Bob Caton, PC Raymond Cottrell, PC Dave Cowens, PC Ben Crump Clif Curry Craig Dewhurst Chris Diamantis Carl Domino, PC Al Dunlap

Wade Durham Frank Fain, PC Ron Farrell Lon Fellenz Mike Fields, PC Dan Grant Philip Griffitts Andy Haggard, PC Kim Hammond, PC Bruce Harrell Michael Harrell Sherm Henderson, PC Charlie Hill, PC Tim Hill Roger Hobbs Ron Hobbs, PC Bonnie Holub Cassandra Jenkins Tom Jennings Jim Kirk, PC Chris Kraft, PC Lawton Langford, PC George Langford, PC

Greg Lawrence Brett Lindquist Paul Lowenthal Douglas Mannheimer, PC Lori Mattice Linda McGee Andy Miller Morris Miller Michael Miller DeVoe Moore Russ Morcom, PC Laurel Moredock Mark O’Bryant John Olson, PC Andy Norman Bill Parker, PC Dr. Pamela Perrewe Sean Pittman Frank Pope, PC Theo Proctor, PC David Rancourt Gene Ready John Rice

Sam Rogers, Jr. Christian Scherf Jon Shebel Barry Smith Bob Smith Lomax Smith, PC Randy Spetman Kathy Stahl Brian Swain Nylah Thompson Gary Thurston Nikki Ticknor Nada Usina Oscar Vicente Gary Walsingham, PC Mike Walsingham Ash Williams Brian Williams Ken Willis PC denotes Past Chairman

FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF TRUSTEES Avi Assidon Allan Bense Edward E. “Ed” Burr Susie Busch-Transou, Vice Chair Joseph L. Camps, Jr. Emily Fleming Duda Joseph Gruters

William Andrew Haggard, Chair Mark Hillis James E. Kinsey, Jr. Sandra Lewis Margaret A. Rolando Brent Sembler

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“We are proud of our scholar athletes who excel in the classroom and on the playing field.”

Eric J. Barron

President of The Florida State University

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CO N T E N T S

22 photos by ross obley, MiKe Olivella And FSU Sports Info

Booster Life 5 Board of Directors 16 Booster Life 62 Booster Membership 64 Booster Life 78 NCAA Compliance / Welcome New Members Columnists 8 College Football’s Grip on “Southern Football” 50 Coming Into View as Pledges Continue to Grow 54 Seminole Clubs Keep the Fire Burning

12 Features 12  Player Feature Dustin Hopkins

22 ACC Champions NCAA Tournament Play

Report 18 Community Outreach: Welcome Back Picnic 2011 44 Planned Giving 46 Trademark Licensing 48 Jimbo Fisher Football Camps 58 Unique IPF Gifts 60 The George Langford Award 66 Athletic Update 68 Quarterly Report 72 Spring Schedules 74 Fan Story

76 Adam Corey Feature

68 Special Feature 2011 Seminole BASKETBALL fan guide An Insider’s Guide to the Exciting Season Ahead

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26 Men’s Schedule and Roster 27 Women’s Schedule and Roster 28 Men’s Preview 30 Women’s Preview 32 Cierra Brevard Q&A 35 Golden Girls 36 Bernard James Q&A 39 NCAA Women’s Tournament 40 Brooke Wyckoff Story 42 Road to the Finals

On the cover: Coach Mark Krikorian, Coach Karen Harvey and Coach Chris Poole Photo by: Mike Olivella

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Charlie Barnes

College Football’s

Grip on the Southern Soul Economic Reasons Why Universities Start Football Programs By Charlie Barnes, vice president Photos by Ross Obley

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he first American college football game took place in 1869 between Rutgers and Princeton. There was even a subsequent convention of those schools, plus fellow Ivy League types Columbia, Yale, Harvard — all the usual suspects — to codify the rules. Play was dominated by colleges in New England for much of the late 19th century.

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Charlie Barnes

However, buried within an obscure book written by an unrenowned politician, lies perhaps the most compelling evidence of the Southern origin of our most popular American game. Elected mayor of Richmond in 1904, Carlton McCarthy was only 14 years old when he joined Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia as an artilleryman in 1864. He published his book, “Detailed Minutiae of Soldier Life,” in 1882. Despite the fact that adding the modifier ‘Excruciatingly’ would enhance the accuracy of the title, it is a delightful read. Soldiers of every army and every era will smile at passages, including one that describes the time that McCarthy’s battery received three days rations and the men were ordered to immediately cook and eat them if possible so as to avoid the labor of carrying them. McCarthy describes the simple pleasures of a soldier’s camp life. “[He] played football, slept quietly, rose early, had a good appetite and was happy.” He played football. If McCarthy is to be taken at his word, Confederate soldiers played football as early as 1864–65, before the lads from Princeton got hold of it. Colleges in the war-devastated South could barely survive, much less entertain, the notion of organized football. And yet, McCarthy reveals what we all know in our hearts: Football is imbedded in the soul of  Southerners. The Civil War was as much a cultural conflict as an economic one. The industrial North was populated by descendents of English settlers and waves of new immigrants. Southerners were descended from the fierce Scots-Irish tribes that spilled down through Virginia, eastern Kentucky and Tennessee into the Carolinas, Georgia and Mississippi.

that Lee himself was a direct descendant of Robert the Bruce, the victor at Bannockburn in 1314. Southern football coaches are inheritors of this tradition, the Scots-Irish proclivity toward hero worship. Great victories are expected; failure can sometimes be interpreted as betrayal. Being the object of hero worship in this part of the country can be a harsh business. In 1980 a paper cut-out cartoon figure of Bobby Bowden was popular. It had the cut-out “Saint Bobby” halo, but the card explained that the halo could also be dropped down and used as a noose. Some historians view the American Civil War as a continuation of the earlier wars of Scottish independence vs. the “However, buried English. In that sense, Pickett’s within an obscure charge at Gettysburg was a rebook written by prise of the desperate Highland Charge at Culloden 120 years an unrenowned earlier, and with the same disaspolitician, lies trous results. perhaps the The leadership style of Union most compelling officers reflected the cool and evidence of the deliberate manner of their Southern origin of English heritage. Confederate our most popular officers were known for their American game” passionate and combative Scots-Irish roots. One expression of the cultural difference, and it’s a pretty striking example, can be seen in the names of the football stadiums, north and brigades and engaged in massive and south. Northern universities tend to and violent snowball battles. And after have chosen conservatively. Michigan the winter passed and before the next plays in Michigan Stadium. Notre Dame campaign, they played football. plays in Notre Dame Stadium. Nebraska James Webb’s book “Born Fighting” plays in Memorial Stadium. Ohio State describes the Celts as leader worshippers plays in Ohio Stadium. Minnesota played who are clannish and militaristic: “The at Memorial Stadium until the school sold two great defining characteristics of the the name to TCF Bank. Wisconsin plays Scots-Irish culture [were] loyalty to strong in Camp Randall Stadium, named after a leaders and an immediate fierceness when training camp for Union soldiers. invaded from the outside.” Now consider that Southern football It is no stretch to say that Southern powerhouses play in stadiums named patriots worshipped Robert E. Lee. They for their warrior heroes. Alabama plays in yearned to find hope in rumors sweepBryant-Denny Stadium. Auburn plays in ing through the South, Webb says, that Jordan-Hare. Tennessee plays in (Brigadier although Lee’s father was from cavalier General) Robert Neyland Stadium. aristocracy, his mother was Scottish and Scots-Irish were originally from the lowlands of Scotland, the northern counties of England and Ulster in Northern Ireland. These were the people who imprinted their culture on the Southern states, and that influence persists today. Union Army soldiers, far from home in a hostile land, engaged in the popular new sport of baseball. It was a pleasant way to pass the idle time in camp. Soldiers in the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia were markedly different. In winter quarters they organized themselves into military units of companies

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Charlie Barnes

Neyland served stints as Head Coach at Tennessee both before and after the war. Ole Miss plays in Vaught-Hemmingway. We play on Bobby Bowden Field and Georgia Tech plays in Bobby Dodd. LSU’s tiger mascot and Tiger Stadium are named in honor of two brigades of Confederate infantry, the Louisiana Tigers. Another book, less academic but enormously entertaining puts our Southern obsession with football more succinctly. Marlyn Schwartz’s delicious work “A Southern Bell Primer (Or Why Princess Margret Will Never be a Kappa Kappa Gamma)” breezily explains, “Ask Southerners what the most popular religions are in the South and they are quick to tell you — Baptist, Methodist and football. Southern women have a ready answer for this obsession with the gridiron. They say Southern men lost The War and they are determined not to lose anything ever again.” There may actually be something to that. One answer is offered by Malcom Gladwell, the brilliant researcher whose No. 1 best seller “Outliers” presents, indirectly, an explanation of why college football is loved so passionately throughout the South. What appears at first to be a series of disjointed chapters eventually reveals the theme that Gladwell weaves into his master thesis. And that thesis is: It matters a great deal where you are from. Gladwell says, “It makes a difference where and when we grew up. The culture we belong to and the legacies passed down by our forebears shape the patterns of our achievement in ways we cannot begin to imagine.” Twenty years ago, two researchers at the University of Michigan did extensive research on the so-called “culture of honor,” a mainstay of Southern psychology. “The ‘culture of honor’ hypothesis says it matters

where you’re from,” Gladwell explains. “Not just in terms of where you grew up or where your parents grew up, but in terms of where your great-grandparents and great-greatgrandparents grew up. “That is a strange and powerful fact,” Gladwell continues. “It’s just the beginning though, because upon closer examination, cultural legacies turn out to be even stranger and more powerful than that.” It doesn’t seem to matter if you’re black or white, male or female, of Irish descent

What evidence can we see that underscores the marriage of football and the Southern “culture of honor”? It turns out that there is some impressive evidence, but it is hidden in plain sight and so it is overlooked. Much is being heard these days from the anti-football types who never fail to press for the elimination of college football altogether. It’s too politically incorrect. People enjoy it too much. It is of no benefit to the educational mission. But those of us who make our living by raising money for Southern universities are keenly aware of the value of football. The emotional infrastructure surrounding the culture and tradition of college football links undergraduates with recent alumni as well as emeritus. Administrators and trustees desiring to raise money for their academic institutions realize that a great deal of support enters the halls of academe through the locker room door. You can remember not so long ago when the Universities of Central Florida and South Florida both initiated football programs. There was no equivocating about the reasons. Though both the Knights and the Bulls already had intercollegiate sports teams, they did not have the one sport that attracts more traditional students and is more likely to establish relationships with numbers of wealthy donors. These are hard economic times. State legislatures are unable to support higher education as comprehensively as before. Universities are increasingly expected to fund their own operations through private donations. Costs associated with intercollegiate athletics keep rising, and any school wishing to start a football program will also have to add women’s sports to satisfy NCAA gender equity requirements.

“It makes a difference where and when we grew up. The culture we belong to and the legacies passed down by our forebearers shape the patterns four achievement in ways we cannot begin to imagine.”

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—Malcom Gladwell, Best-Selling Author of “Outliers”

or Hispanic ancestry. According to the research, if you were raised Southern then you are Southern. You’re imbued with those cultural qualities regardless of your gender or race. Whether the median students in their study were from the hills of Appalachia or were the children of wealthy executives in Atlanta, researcher says the economics didn’t matter much either. What mattered was that they were from the South. “Cultural legacies are powerful forces. They have deep roots and long lives, [persisting] generation after generation, virtually intact even after the social and demographic conditions that spawned them have vanished.”

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Charlie Barnes

With money so tight, why do you think that colleges and universities are so eager to establish expensive varsity football programs? You might be surprised at how many are racing to do just that. We took note of the Central Florida Knights and the South Florida Bulls. Then, the FIU Golden Panthers and the Florida Atlantic Owls football programs emerged. As the need to raise money and create networks of caring and generous alumni increases, so does the demand for football. Were you aware that Stetson is starting football again after an absence of more than fifty years? Florida Tech in Melbourne wants to begin play, possibly in 2013. And Florida’s newest state university, Florida Gulf Coast in Ft. Myers, planned to take a football proposal to the board of trustees, although the issue appears uncertain at this time. University of West Florida President Judy Bense held a press conference,

complete with a facsimile Fighting Argos football helmet, to announce her commitment to bring a team to the Pensacola campus by 2015. Press coverage of the event reported this comment from UWF senior Melanie Bryant, “In the South, football is like a religion. Right now, UWF is not part of that religion. We need to be.” Have you ever heard of Ave Maria University? It’s one of our own, located in Naples. They are the Gyrenes, and they began playing a full intercollegiate football schedule this year. Remember Bill Curry, SEC Coach of the Year at Alabama as well as ACC Coach of the Year at Georgia Tech? He is now the first head coach of the Georgia State University Panthers. They began a full schedule of intercollegiate football last season. Here is the hidden-in-plain-sight evidence of college football’s grip on

the Southern soul. Beginning in 2010, 32  four-year colleges or universities either began playing football or have announced plans to add varsity football in 2011 or soon thereafter. Twenty of the 32 are in the South. If you are inclined to count West Virginia and Maryland as Southern states, the total is 22. The remaining 10 are scattered across the far reaches of the land, from George Fox University in Oregon to Presentation College in South Dakota to Misericordia University in Pennsylvania to Robert Morris University in Chicago. Recall Carlton McCarthy’s description of his fellow soldiers in 1864: “He played football … had a good appetite and was happy.” It is the fall, and we Seminoles are deep into football. We are Southerners. And so at this time of year, true to our character and culture, we watch football, have good appetites and we are happy. Go ’Noles. Get ’em Jimbo. SB

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Player Feature

Dustin Hopkins:

Focusing on Kicking Excellence By Jim crosby, Featured Writer PHOTOS BY Ross Obley

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hat a difference a week makes! Seminole kicker Dustin Hopkins can vouch for that as he reflects back one year. In one week in 2010 he went from the depths of depression to a euphoric celebration. A month after he turned 20 years old, Hopkins missed a 40-yard field goal attempt on the last play of the game and FSU lost by two points to North Carolina.

Hopkins was a finalist for the 2011 Lou Groza Award won by FSU kickers Sebastian Janikowski (1998 & 1999) and Graham Gano (2008).

But Hopkins didn’t realize that miss would set the stage for a defining moment in his college career. His teammates and coaches refused to let him shoulder the blame for that defeat and took every opportunity to bolster his confidence. “I can’t tell you how much that helped me,” said Hopkins. One week later fate made a repeat appearance but with a different end result. With time expiring in a tie game, Hopkins was 55 yards away from the Clemson goal post. Without a thought of missing it, the native Texan firmly booted a no-doubter through the uprights. It was the longest walk-off game winning kick in Atlantic Coast Conference history.

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FSU enjoyed arguably the best kicker/punter (Shawn Powell) combination in the nation.

Former FSU kicker Bill Capece (1977–’80), who once kicked five field goals in a game against 3rd ranked Pittsburgh, says Hopkins possesses a quality the great kickers have. “When he has a rare miss, he has a short memory,” said Capece. Kicking field goals is as much a “mind game” as it is a “foot game.” It is pressurepacked. Said Hopkins, “Coach Fisher always says when pressure comes, habits surface. Developing good habits — mental and physical — and being able to repeat them is the key.” Those habits are formed in practice where Hopkins may kick as many as 70 balls during a game week. He works ceaselessly with long snapper Dax Dellenbach and holder Shawn Powell. They aim for making field goals become automatic during a game. Game conditions are different. It’s hard to simulate the atmosphere with its crowd noise, bands playing, TV cameras and other distractions. It takes great concentration to make a big kick. “I used to block out the crowd so completely I was even able to hear my foot hit the ball,” said Capece.

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Similarly, Hopkins does it by mentally rehearsing his cues. “I focus on keeping my hips square and my eyes on my spot,” he said. He told Seminoles.com, “The kicking game is something that should be consistent all the time, not something you are always questioning. Defense and offense fluctuate according to who you are playing, but special teams is something you can control.” The field goal unit makes even shaky attempts look perfect. Against Oklahoma, Hopkins made 53 and 46 yarders that looked almost automatic. Hopkins admits that on the first kick he got under the ball a “little too much and toed it through the uprights.” Then Powell explained the second field goal. “It was a high snap and I missed the spot a little bit. I just wanted to get it down quick and give Dustin a chance. He was the No. 1 kicker coming out of high school; he needs to be able to make those right.” At Crystal Lake High School in Houston, Texas, Hopkins was the top-rated kicker in the nation. Lots of colleges came

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calling, but he narrowed it down to two: Florida State and Notre Dame. “My heart was saying Florida State while my mind focused on Notre Dame,” he recalled. “When we went to Notre Dame on an official visit my Dad found a buffalo nickel with an Indian head on it in the airport lot. Then, as we waited on the coach at Notre Dame, we were seated under a mural of an Indian on a horse hunting buffalo.” The family light-heartedly took those as signs pointing toward Seminole Territory. Later, after talking with Irish Coach Charlie Weis, he decided to follow his heart to Florida State. Growing up in Texas, Hopkins knew little of the Seminole kicking history. Asked if he had seen video of the infamous wide right misses that cost FSU two big games, he said, “No, but I think it’s interesting that folks talk about those instead of FSU having two Lou Groza award winners for best kickers in football.” That’s the kind of focus that might add another Groza award to the Seminole trophy case. SB


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he University Center Club is the premier private club serving Florida State University, Tallahassee and friends of the community. Since its establishment in 1996, the Club has offered Members and guests outstanding cuisine while enjoying spectacular views of downtown Tallahassee and Doak Campbell Stadium. The Club features à la carte dining in the Osceola Grill and six exquisitely appointed private meeting/dining rooms along with an 8,000 square foot ballroom. When you combine this magnificent facility with our expert staff you have Tallahassee’s Premier Private Club!

To learn more about membership, game day benefits, or hosting an event, please contact our Membership team today! Melinda Baker can be reached at (850) 644-6522 or melinda.baker@ourclub.com Cherrie Barbree can be reached at (850) 644-9089 or cherrie.barbree@ourclub.com SE MINO LE-BO OST ERS .CO M

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University Center | Doak Campbell Stadium | Tallahassee, FL 32306 | (850) 644-8528 | www.UniversityCenterClub.com

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Booster Life

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Booster Life

Booster Life

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Community Outreach

Welcome Back Picnic 2011 By John lata, ph.d., office of student services PHOTOS BY FSU Sports Info

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he afternoon of Sunday, Sept. 25, was the FSU Athletic Department’s annual Welcome Back Picnic, held once again at the Seminole Reservation. The weather was perfect, and the turnout was very impressive as student-athletes from all sports had the opportunity to swim, kayak, canoe and play sand volleyball, to mention just a few of the activities. One of the highlights of the day was the great food provided by Piggy’s BBQ.

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Community Outreach

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Their competitive sides kicked in when it was time to sign up for some non-traditional competitions such as the water balloon toss.

The event was sponsored by the Student-Athlete Advisory Council (SAAC), which is comprised of at least two members of every athletic team at Florida State. SAAC hosts many events during the course of the year, but many members consider this their favorite. “This year’s Welcome Back Picnic was the best SAAC has ever put on … more athletes showed up than ever, more SAAC members got involved in the preparation and ran activities, and the weather was perfect,” said James Ramsey, SAAC president and baseball senior. When asked what she enjoyed most about the day, SAAC Vice President Margo Zwerling, a track and field senior and organizer of the Picnic Committee, said, “The picnic was a great success this year with an amazing turnout and participation. For the first time, we planned a water balloon toss, which all of the athletes seemed to really enjoy. It ended with a full-blown water balloon fight and lots of soaked friends! Big thanks to Rita’s Ices and Piggy’s BBQ for the delicious food!”

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Of course any event involving college students has to have music, and DJ X was a huge hit as he kept everyone entertained for the duration of the event. Valerie Flournoy, graduate assistant in Student Services and the administrator for the production of the picnic, said, “What was most interesting about this year’s picnic was the amount of interaction and competition between teams! Usually the interaction between teams is only social. However, this year the true Seminole spirit came out in competition. It was a treat to see 6-foot-10 guys throwing water balloons to each other versus 5-foot-6 women from the track team during the water balloon toss competition!” While not every student-athlete attended (some were competing), almost every team was represented and had a chance to spend some quality time with studentathletes from other teams. It was a little warm, as summer is finally winding down here in Tallahassee, but the student-athletes seemed to forget the heat as they got wrapped up in the many

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competitions and enjoyed just hanging out with their friends from other teams, as well as the many coaches and administrators in attendance. Rita’s Ices showed up midway through the afternoon and was a huge hit, helping everyone cool off between the many competitions. The event was an opportunity for the administration to make sure the studentathletes are aware that the Seminole Reservation is open to all students at FSU, free of charge, year round. Considering the picture perfect day we had, it’s a good bet that many will be visiting again soon. “It was a very successful event, and overall it was a great bonding experience for the Athletic Department,” said Flournoy. “We’re already looking forward to our next event and just hope it can be as successful as this one. Thanks to our SAAC leadership for their amazing efforts.” Ramsey concurred, adding, “SAAC is proud to call this event our own, where student-athletes get to meet other valuable members of our athletic department. We truly are 20 sports but one team.”. SB


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ACC Champions

FSU Sports Dives Deep Into NCAA Tournament Play By Brandon Mellor, Seminoles.com Senior Writer Photos By FSU Sports Info, RosS Obley And Mike Olivella

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t was another banner year for the women’s Olympic sports at Florida State. FSU’s cross country, soccer and volleyball teams each not only made it into postseason competition but they made noise in their respective end-of-season events.

Under the direction of Head Coach Karen Harvey, the women’s cross country team capped off its incredible 2011 season with a fourth-place finish in the NCAA Cross Country Championships on Nov. 21 after entering the season-ending event ranked No. 1 in the nation. The 27 points that separated the Seminoles from a national championship at meet’s end were the fewest for FSU in five consecutive trips to the NCAA event.

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For their efforts in the championship, graduate student Hannah Brooks and junior Amanda Winslow each earned All-American honors. In finishing 28th and 34th, respectively, Brooks and Winslow helped Florida State earn a spot on the podium for the fifth consecutive season. “Hannah and Winslow ran solid,” Harvey said after the race. “They’re AllAmericans and I’m happy they have that honor.”

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And Harvey knows something about earning accolades. The ‘Noles’ fifth-year coach earned her fifth-consecutive ACC and NCAA South Region Coach of the Year honors in 2011. Harvey took home those awards once again after her team won its fourth consecutive ACC Championship in late October, thanks to a remarkable six FSU finishers in the top 10. Florida State then followed up its conference domination by doing the same at the NCAA South Region meet two weeks later. Winslow, Brooks and junior Violah Lagat swept the first three spots in that race to claim the ‘Noles second-consecutive NCAA South Region championship. While the women’s cross country team was stellar from start to finish, FSU’s lone varsity soccer squad experienced an up-and-down first half of its 2011 campaign. Buoyed by the return of stars Tiffany McCarty and Jessica Price after both missed the entire 2010 season, the Seminoles were predicted to finish 2nd in the ACC and make it into the NCAA Tournament once again. But back-toback losses in mid-September ended a six-match winning streak and then another set of back-to-back in-conference defeats to Virginia and Maryland in early-October began to change the nation’s perception of the Seminoles. In need of a spark, FSU got what they needed three days after losing to the


ACC Champions

Terrapins with a 1-0 win, thanks to standout freshman Dagny Brynjarsdottir’s goal. “I still think this team can win a national championship,” FSU soccer coach Mark Krikorian said after that match, “We have to continue to put the ball in the net and see how far we can go.” Krikorian would see that his team could actually go as far as the College Cup. Following the win over the Eagles, Florida State closed out its regular season with two more wins and then exorcised its own demons by defeating Virginia for the first time in 21 tries to set up a leaguechampionship game showdown with Wake Forest. The ‘Noles would go on to defeat the Deacons, 3-1, on penalty kicks to capture the first conference championship in FSU soccer history while McCarty, Tori Huster and Ines Jaurena each earned All-ACC first-team honors and Brynjarsdottir and Jamia Fields both made the league’s all-freshmen team. FSU was then rewarded a No. 1-seed in the NCAA Tournament and made it count. After hosting Samford and defeating the Bulldogs, the Seminoles beat Portland and Louisville in Memphis, Tenn., to make it to the College Cup for the fifth time in school history and the first since 2007. Florida State would then drop its first game of soccer’s final four, 3-0, to eventual National Champion Stanford to conclude its season. The Seminoles’ season on the soccer pitch came to an end just a few days before the ‘Noles on the volleyball court made history. Two years after Chris Poole’s volleyball team had one of its finest seasons in school history en route to an Elite Eight appearance in Minneapolis, Minn., the 2011 version of his program re-wrote the expectations for the sport in Tallahassee. The Seminoles capped off an ACC Championshipearning regular season by doing exactly what they did two seasons ago: earn a spot in the Sweet 16 in Minnesota. FSU defeated Cincinnati in a thrilling five sets on Dec. 4 to secure an undefeated home record at Tully Gym and make it to the Sweet 16 for the second time in school history. FSU’s undefeated home record wasn’t the only streak that the team experienced during the year. The ‘Noles were one of the nation’s hottest teams from September to November with 16 consecutive victories before advancing to the round of 16 with an overall record of 26-6 behind the play of All-ACC Team selections Visnja Djurdjevic, Jekaterina Stepanova and Ashley Neff. Poole was named the ACC Coach of the Year and Sarah Wickstrom picked up all-freshman honors. SB

Cross Country, Soccer and Volleyball claimed ACC Championships on their way to NCAA Championship Play.

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Presented by:

Seminole IMG Sports Marketing

Men’s& Women’s

Basketball 26

Men’s Schedule and Roster

Women’s Schedule 27  and Roster

28 Men’s Preview 30 Women’s Preview Cierra Brevard Q&A 32  35 Golden Girls SEMINO LE-BO OST ERS .CO M

36 39 40

Bernard James Q&A NCAA Women’s Tournament Brooke Wyckoff Story

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2011-12 Men’s Roster

BASKETBALL BASKETBALL FAN FAN GUIDE GUIDE

No.

Name

Pos.

Hgt.

Wgt.

Class

Hometown/Last School

1

Xavier Gibson

F/C

6-11

248

Sr.

Dothan, Ala./Northview

3

Luke Loucks

G

6-5

201

Gr.

Clearwater, Fla./Clearwater

4

Deividas Dulkys

G

6-5

196

Sr.

Silute, Lithuania/Findlay College Prep (Nev.)

5

Bernard James

F

6-10

240

Sr.

Savannah, Ga./ Tallahassee Community College

10

Okaro White

F

6-11

204

So.

Clearwater, Fla./Clearwater

11

Kiel Turpin

C

7-0

225

Jr.

Normal, Ill./Lincoln College

12

Jeff Peterson

G

6-1

195

Gr.

Springfield, Mo./University of Arkansas

15

Terrance Shannon

F

6-8

240

Jr.

Forsyth, Ga./Mary Persons

20

Rafael Portuondo

G

5-11

165

Jr.

Miami, Fla./Miami Dade College

21

Michael Snaer

G

6-5

202

Jr.

Moreno Valley, Calif./Rancho Verde

24

Antwan Space

F

6-7

218

Fr.

DeSoto, Tex./DeSoto

30

Ian Miller

G

6-3

186

So.

Charlotte, N.C./United Faith Christian Academy

31

Terry Whisnant II

G

6-3

174

Fr.

Cherryville, N.C./Cherryville

33

Joey Moreau

G

6-2

179

Jr.

Bradenton, Fla./IMG Academy

50

Jon Kreft

C

7-0

262

Sr.

Parkland, Fla./Stoneman Douglas

Coaches Head Coach: Leonard Hamilton (Tennessee Martin, 1971) Associate Head Coach: Stan Jones (Memphis, 1984) Assistant Coaches: Corey Williams (Oklahoma State, 1992), Dennis Gates (Cal, 2001) Director of Basketball Operations: Jacob Ridenhour (Auburn, 1995)

men’s basketball

Ian Miller, Guard, So.

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2 0 1 1 –2 0 1 2 S c h ed u le

Oct. 31

Indiana University / Pa.

Jan. 14 J

North Carolina*

Nov. 7

Georgia Southwestern

an. 17

Maryland*

Nov. 11

Jacksonville

Jan. 21

at Duke*

Nov. 14

UCF

Jan.25

at WakeForest*

Nov. 16

Stetson

Feb. 1

Georgia Tech*

Nov. 20

South Alabama

Feb. 4

Virginia*

Feb. 8

at Boston College*

Feb. 11

Miami*

Feb. 16

Virginia Tech*

Feb. 18

at NC State*

Feb. 23

Duke*

Feb. 26

at Miami*

March 1

at Virginia*

March 4

Clemson

Nov. 24-26 Paradise Island / The Bahamas

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Strength and Conditioning Coach: Michael Bradley Video Coordinator: Kyle Cregan Trainer: Sam Lunt

Nov. 30

at Michigan State

Dec. 5

Charleston Southern

Dec. 11

UNC Greensboro

Dec. 18

Loyola Marymount

Dec. 22

at Florida

Dec. 30

Princeton

Jan. 4

Auburn

Jan. 7

at Clemson*

Jan. 10

at Virginia Tech*

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March 8-114 at ACC Tournament Phillips Arena


2011-12 WoMen’s Roster

No.

Player

Hgt

Pos

Yr

00

Chasity Clayton

6-0

F

R-Jr.

Panama City, Fla. (Edison in Alexandria, Va.)

3

Alexa Deluzio

5-11

G

R-Jr.

Orlando, Fla. (First Academy)

4

Emma Loucks

5-10

G

Fr.

Clearwater,Fl (Clearwater)

10

Leonor Rodriguez

5-11

G

Jr.

Canary Islands, Spain (Guaydil)

14

Tay’ler Mingo

5-7

G

So.

Akron, Ohio (Regina)

20

Kristi Mokube

6-2

F

Fr.

Phenix City, Ala. (Central)

22

Olivia Bresnahan

5-11

G

So.

Butler, Pa. (Butler)

31

Ebony Wells

6-2

F

Fr.

Grovetown, Ga. (Grovetown)

32

Lauren Coleman

6-0

F

So.

Lawrenceville, Ga. (Parkview)

33

Natasha Howard

6-3

F

So.

Toledo, Ohio (Morrison R. Waite)

34

Chelsea Davis

6-2

F

Jr.

Middletown, Del. (Middletown)

54

Cierra Bravard

6-4

F

Sr.

Sandusky, Ohio (Perkins)

Hometown (High School/Last School)

women’s basketball

2 0 1 1 –2 0 1 2 S c h ed u le

Nov. 5

Florida Southern (Ex.)

Jan. 5

Clemson*

Nov. 11

1 vs. USF

Jan. 8

at Virginia Tech*

Nov. 12

1 vs. Minnesota

Jan. 13

at Duke*

Nov. 13

1 vs. Arkansas

Jan. 15

Miami*

Nov. 17

at Florida

Jan. 19

at Boston College*

Nov. 21

Georgia State

Jan. 22

Georgia Tech*

Nov. 25

Louisville

Jan. 27

at NC State*

Nov. 27 Nebraska

Jan. 29

at Virginia*

Nov. 30 2 at Ohio State

Feb. 5

Virginia Tech*

Dec. 4

Feb. 9

at Wake Forest*

Dec. 10 at Akron

Feb. 12

Duke*

Dec. 19 3 Alabama A&M

Feb. 15

North Carolina*

Dec. 22 at Vanderbilt

Feb. 19

at Miami*

Dec. 28 Yale

Feb. 23

at Clemson*

Dec. 30

at UCF

Feb. 26

Virginia*

Jan. 2

Maryland*

Mar. 1-4 4 ACC Tournament

Charlotte

Chasity Clayton Forward, R-Jr

Coaches Head Coach: Sue Semrau (15th season) Assistant Coach: Brooke Wyckoff (1st season) Assistant Coach: Lance White (9th season) Assistant Coach: Angie Johnson (15th season)

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Graduate Assistant: Rene Haynes Graduate Assistant: Ke’Sha Blanton (2nd season) Video Coordinator: Tyler Cleverly (5th season)

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Alexa Deluzio Guard, R-Jr

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Making Another

March Run Seminoles Seek Fourth Consecutive NCAA Appearance...and More

I

t was so close, they could taste it. This past March, the Florida State men’s basketball team was just minutes away from a trip to the Elite Eight of the NCAA Tournament. The Seminoles had earned big wins over Texas A&M and Notre Dame in Chicago in the days prior and had the year’s Cinderella squad, VCU, on the ropes in overtime. But as FSU players painfully learned, 7.9 seconds is an eternity in sports. The Commodores wound up coming from behind to earn the win and end FSU’s 2010-11 campaign. The loss stung, but Seminoles Coach Leonard Hamilton says now that it was a true learning experience for his team as it enters a new season. “I think they responded in an appropriate manner from the loss to VCU,” Hamilton said. “I think that it was a very bitter taste in their mouth as to how we performed in that game. Not necessarily that we didn’t play well, we just left a very empty feeling in all of our minds that we could have played better. There were a lot of things that we self-inflicted and then we played a VCU team that played extremely well. They played extremely well and the issues we had were not in one particular player, it was just us as a team making a few mistakes here and a few mistakes there.

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“We came away knowing that we came close and we have to come up with a way to make sure that we don’t allow ourselves to feel that we could have done better.” For FSU, improving on last year’s performance and building off a current streak of three consecutive NCAA Tournament appearances means dealing with the loss of key players Derwin Kitchen and NBA first-round selection Chris Singleton. Together, Kitchen and Singleton registered the top two scoring averages on the team last year at 10.4 and 13.1 points per game, respectively. They both played more minutes on average than any other member of the team and Singleton was one of the top defensive players in the entire nation. Despite their absence on this year’s roster, Hamilton is pleased with what the ‘Noles have returning. “I think we have an experienced group returning, six seniors (and) five juniors that we expect to get tremendous leadership from,” Hamilton said. “I thought that we made progress last year in a lot of different areas and the area where we made the most improvement was just understanding what we had to do to play at the highest level.” Hamilton will rely on that bevy of upperclassmen to keep the Seminoles at

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the 22-win clip that the program has averaged the last six seasons. Luke Loucks, Deividas Dulkys and Xavier Gibson are the longest-tenured Seminoles while fellow seniors Bernard James and Jon Kreft are back for their second and final seasons in the garnet and gold. Hamilton and his coaching staff also added Iowa transfer Jeff Peterson, who has one final year of eligibility as a graduate student. Junior-college transfer Kiel Turpin — all 6-foot-11 of him — joins a junior class that features standout guard Michael Snaer and ever improving forward Terrance Shannon. Loucks and Peterson form an interesting duo at the point guard spot, the position that Kitchen vacated when he graduated. Rising sophomore Ian Miller could be in the mix when it comes to manning the point position for the ‘Noles. Miller could also factor into the shooting guard rotation where Snaer has averaged 8.8 points per game over the course of his career. Florida State also signed highly touted freshman guard Terry Whisnant II, who brought instant offense with him from North Carolina to Tallahassee. The Seminoles may miss Singleton at forward but James is on the verge of becoming a household name throughout the college basketball world after tuning


By Brandon Mellor Photos by Ross Obley

himself into a pivotal player in his first season at FSU last year. The forward rotation is bolstered by Shannon, rising star Okaro White and talented freshman Antwan Space. Gibson can play the forward and center positions along with Turpin and Kreft. “It is very difficult to single out any one particular player because they all have displayed tremendous attitude,” Hamilton said. “They have all been in and out of the office and you always see their cars parked in the parking lot, and as you’re leaving they’re around all the time in the gym working on their game. You know that Bernard’s attitude is a reflection of the entire team. That’s what we are excited about.” And it’s this grouping of players that has FSU fans everywhere excited about what the immediate future holds. Florida State made it to the Sweet 16 last year for the first time since 1993, not solely because of Kitchen and Singleton but because of depth and talent across the board — most of which is returning for another run. This time around, the Seminoles know what it will take to close out those final 7.9 seconds. “I think that what we learned from that is that it’s the little things when it gets down to those final 16 teams. Everyone is capable of winning the final four,” Hamilton said. “It’s the team that does all the things the best, the longest and the hardest that comes out on top.” SB

(Counter Clockwise from Top Right) Deividas Dulkys, Xavier Gibson, Ian Miller, Luke Loucks and Team Huddle

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W o M EN ’ S P R E V I E W

New Crop Aims to Fill Void,

Dance in & March Again

T

Fsu Chasing Eighth Straight Ncaa Tournament Appearance

he numbers are staggering. Seven consecutive NCAA Tournament appearances and seven consecutive openinground wins. Three straight seasons of at least 20 wins or more. Two regular season ACC co-championships in the past three years. A perennial top- 15 team. Perhaps the most appropriate number when talking about the 2011-12 Florida State women’s basketball team, though, is 98 — as in the number of wins that former players Courtney Ward and Christian Hunnicutt helped earn during their fantastic four-year careers before graduating. Ward, the program’s all-time 3-point leader, and Hunnicutt, last year’s ACC Defensive Player of the Year, tied the school record for most wins during a women’s basketball career. If this year’s ‘Noles want

30

to make it eight consecutive trips to the Big Dance, hit the 20-win plateau once again, push for ACC glory and remain one of the top teams in the nation, they must now do so without two proven winners. “They were vital roles to our success, not only last year but for their four years here,” said Head Coach Sue Semrau, who is now in her 15th season in Tallahassee. “Experience is a hard thing to replace. The nice thing about our team this year is that even though we lost those two we return a huge core of players who now are one year more experienced, one year stronger and one year more skilled.” Semrau’s confidence in her team stems from the foundation that has been built over the last 15 years. Before Ward and Hunnicutt, it was Jacinta Monroe, Alysha Harvin and Angel Gray. Before that terrific trio it was the dynamic duo of Mara Freshour and Tanae Davis-Cain. And the list goes on and on. Now, it’s time for a new crop of Seminoles to step up and fill the void left from those who have graduated before them. Semrau thinks that two sophomores in particular are up for the task.

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“I am excited about the growth in the players that we have,” Semrau said. “Obviously we knew there would come a day when Courtney and Christian would graduate and move on. So we went out and recruited Olivia Bresnahan and Tay’ler Mingo. It was always part of the plan that they would learn as understudies. The same thing was true for Courtney when she got here. She had to wait her turn to shine and she did.” Charged with helping polish Mingo, Bresnahan, Leonor Rodgriguez and freshmen Kristi Mokube and Ebony Wells, are a group of experienced veterans. And no current player knows more about what it takes to meet the lofty expectations that Semrau’s program yearly warrants than the team’s lone senior, Cierra Bravard. An All-ACC First Team selection and honorable mention All-American as a junior, Bravard cemented her place as one of the top players in the nation last year. Bravard’s transition into a go-to player last season and unquestioned leader this year isn’t by chance. The Sandusky, Ohio, native put in the necessary work to make that happen and because of her tireless work ethic, Bravard’s senior season has a strong possibility of being her best. “She has gotten committed and stayed committed,” Semrau said. “The thing


By Brandon Mellor Photos By David Barfield and Ross Obley

about Cierra is that once she took that first step in, then she was all in. She is a player that in her time already has dropped 45 pounds and has kept it off. She has continued to become a better athlete every year as well as a better basketball player.” In addition to her dominating presence in the paint during games, Semrau credits Bravard’s full effort in practice with helping bring out the best in her fellow post players. “They can see it in pick-up,” Semrau said about forwards Chelsea Davis, Natasha Howard, Lauren Coleman, Wells and Mokube. They turn around and say, ‘I don’t want to guard her.’ It’s a great thing to be with them in individual workouts and practice and say, ‘Well you are guarding her.’ It makes them better. I think it has been interesting to watch Chelsea’s growth underneath Cierra. It has been fantastic.” While Davis continues to benefit from Bravard’s tutelage, Howard will be asked to take the next step in her development. Howard came to Tallahassee last season as the most hyped and anticipated recruit in the history of women’s basketball at Florida State, and she didn’t disappoint. She started every game as a true freshman and earned freshman All-American and All-ACC Freshman Team honors.

“I’m excited about the growth in the players we have.”

- Head Coach Sue Semrau

But for everything good that Howard did on the court, there was always a feeling that she had so much room for improvement. It’s a scary thought for anyone that will have to play against the Seminoles the next three years — especially considering the fact that she has used her first offseason in the program to hit the weight room and the practice courts at the Basketball Training Center. “Her strength is at a completely different point,” Semrau said. “I think that is huge. She has better balance now. She turned the ball over a little more than we wanted her to last year because she didn’t have great balance at that speed. Now her balance at that speed has improved and her ball handling has improved. Her potential is unlimited.” Howard and Bravard will generate the most buzz this season but redshirt juniors

SEMINO LE-BO OST ERS .CO M

Alexa Deluzio and Chasity Clayton will be asked to take on the most important roles of their basketball-playing lives. Deluzio, a sharp-shooting guard with the ability to take defenders off the dribble, and Clayton, FSU’s top overall athlete, are expected to team with Bravard in creating a playmaking, leadership-providing core that every championship contender must have. “Now everybody steps into a different role this season,” Semrau said. “Cierra has done her work all summer, ‘Lex’ has done her work all summer and ‘Chas’ has done her work all summer. Those are three kids that have the credibility to lead. I think that’s really the most vital part of it. You don’t want to follow someone that hasn’t put in the work and those three have put in the work. “I think this team is in great shape because of them.” SB

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B r e va r d Q & A

Cierra Brevard

Q&A

O

n the heels of a junior season that saw her earn honorable mention All-American and All-ACC First Team honors, a lot is expected out of Florida State women’s basketball star Cierra Bravard in 2011-12. Bravard, who helped lead the Seminoles to the NCAA Tournament for the seventh consecutive year last season, is the only returning senior on the roster and will be expected to help ease the loss of standouts Christian Hunnicutt and Courtney Ward. It’s a challenge Bravard is prepared to undertake. The Sandusky, Ohio, native has improved steadily since she stepped foot on campus as a highly touted but wide-eyed freshman in 2008. She has seen her minutes, scoring and rebounding averages rise over three consecutive years. In what is her final season in the garnet and gold, it’s Bravard’s work ethic that

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has her poised for yet another increase in production and, in turn, a trip for the Seminoles deep into March once again. Q: Talk about your development as a player. What is the biggest difference for you now as opposed to four years ago? A: The biggest difference for me is being able to push through when things are tough. Another thing for me personally is that I can better recognize my potential now. In high school, it’s not hard to be a great player, but when you get to this level everybody is that good. It’s up to the few people that are going to do the extra work and spend extra hours in the gym to take the next step. Q: What caused you to take that next step? A: When I first got here, I didn’t know what

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it was going to take to stand out. I didn’t do extra conditioning, I didn’t do extra weight lifting and I didn’t do extra running. Two summers ago I changed that mentality and I think you can tell the difference. My work ethic now means I am willing to do the work when nobody else is around. Q: When did you develop that strong work ethic? A: I didn’t expect it to be as hard as it was. I expected the game to come naturally. It’s definitely something that I have developed since coming here. Q: What is your role going to be like now that Hunnicut and Ward are gone? A: I think everybody has a different leadership role. For me, it’s just being out there and being an example for the younger players. I have done this now for


By Brandon Mellor Photos by Ross Obley

Cierra Brevard has transformed herself into a better athlete and basketball player since arriving and has also earned preseason All American Honors.

three full years so there are a lot of things that Ebony [Wells] and Kristi [Mokube] are experiencing now that are so hard that I went through too. It’s on me to be a positive example and encourage them by telling them, ‘I’ve been there, you’ll get through it.’ I just have to be positive and take on that role of game-in and gameout being the example and the player that they can lean on and rely on. Q: What do you and your teammates need to do to replace Hunnicutt and Ward? A: Courtney is one of the best 3-point shooters ever at FSU and Christian was one of the best defenders. What they did I think a lot of people on this team are capable of doing, but it’s going to take a lot

more of a team effort than it did last year. It will be different, but we are all ready. Everybody is buying in to whatever we have to do to get back to where we want to be. Q: What have you see out of Natasha Howard? A: Coming in as good of a player as she was, your first year really humbles you. For me, I didn’t know what to expect and I am sure she felt the same way. I think a lot of people underestimated her and others overestimated her, but she stayed steady. She’s not negative about anything and she is always willing to give more and do more to get better. That kind of goes for all the younger players. They are so willing to take whatever it is we are dishing out to do what we need to do to be successful. SB

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James Q&A

Bernard James

Q&A A

year ago, the buzz around Florida State men’s basketball player Bernard James was that he was a military man, a former staff sergeant in the United States

Air Force. A year later, the buzz around James is that he’s college basketball’s next big thing. In his first season as a Seminole, James averaged 8.6 points per game while showing signs of improvement over the course of the season. While his

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role and importance to FSU gradually increased, the main knock on the 6-foot-10, 240-pounder was that he was still raw and still in need of time to hone his skills on the basketball court after getting such a late start in the sport. Now 26 years old and on the verge of his second and final season with the ‘Noles, James has spent the offseason focusing on that very thing. And the Seminoles’ 2011-12 opponents are about to witness firsthand the results of his hard work.

S EMINO LE-BO OST ERS .CO M


By Brandon Mellor

Photos By Ross Obley and Mike Olivella

Q: From a basketball standpoint, what has changed for you in the last year? A: I am a completely different player. Down to the core I still do the same things, but my efficiency has picked up and my skill level has increased a lot. Because I picked up basketball so late I wasn’t that skilled. But I have been picking things up very quickly and I have been soaking up the coaching like a sponge. I think it’s going to show. Q: What was the main thing that you needed to improve upon above all else? A: The whole thing for me last year was my left hand. The television commentators figured it out but the opponents never did for some reason. If anybody would have cut off my left hand last year I would have been pretty useless — at least on offense. Not too many people figured that out, luckily. My theme of this summer was “right hand.” Everything that I could do on the basketball court with my left hand last year I can now do with my right hand comfortably. I felt like that was huge for me because after having a year of experience and a year of game film to watch, people would have figured it out. I also have been working on free throws. I am aiming for the 65 to 70-percent range this year. That’s around what I have been shooting this offseason. Those were the two main things for me to focus on. Q: Do you feel added pressure to step up and not only perform well but lead your teammates now that Chris Singleton and Derwin Kitchen are gone? A: Towards the end of the year in the few games where Chris was hurt, I felt like a lot of responsibility fell on me. I knew for sure that with him and Derwin gone I was going to have to take on a much bigger role this year. That was my motivation this summer to just be the best player I can be for my teammates and not let them down. I have been working hard to help take over for those guys and to help make the team better. Q: What should FSU men’s basketball fans expect to see this season? A: Even though we lost two great players in Derwin and Chris, I actually feel like we are going to be better this year. We have worked a lot this offseason. I feel like everybody is hungry. Getting to the Sweet 16 and then losing by one possession, we know we were supposed to be in the Elite Eight but we let it slip away. We won’t repeat that same mistake this coming year. SB

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N C AA W O M EN ’ S TO U R NA M ENT

NCAA Tournament Home Court Advantage Semrau Asking FSU Fans to Help Push Team to Next Level

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hen it comes to postseason play, any available advantage that a team can gain is a good thing. For the Florida State women’s basketball program, that added advantage is you. For the second time in three years, Tallahassee and the Donald L. Tucker Center will serve as a host site for the opening two rounds of the NCAA Women’s Basketball Tournament in March. That means the Seminoles will get to enter the Big Dance in front of the same fans that saw them play well enough to get there in the first place. Two seasons ago, the ’Noles had the benefit of opening postseason play in their own gym, and the results spoke for themselves. FSU defeated Louisiana Tech 75–61 and then won a thriller against St. John’s 74–71 at the Tucker Center before using that momentum to eventually make it all

the way to the Elite Eight in Dayton, Ohio. “I think season after season we have seen the growth in our attendance and it’s been exciting to watch that,” said Sue Semrau, FSU women’s basketball coach. “We would not have been able to do what we did two years ago in the postseason if it had not been for our crowd. The two close games that we had, and beating St. John’s inevitably at the buzzer with a home crowd was huge. To be able to host again is huge. Just like the fans expect us to go to the postseason, we are expecting FSU fans to come out and support and push us on to the next level.” That support will be for a roster of talented student-athletes at FSU, including senior Cierra Bravard. The Seminoles’ top player said there is no better way to cap off her career than having one last chance to play in front of the FSU faithful.

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BASKETBALL BASKETBALL FAN GUIDE FAN GUIDE

By Brandon Mellor Photo by David Barfield

“For me, getting a chance to play in the postseason at home in my last year is exciting,” Bravard said. “We love playing on our home floor in front of our great fans. It’s extremely important for us to get that chance because it gives everyone an opportunity to take part in a great atmosphere. We need everybody we can get because we are trying to do things around here we have never done before.” And what exactly are the “things” that FSU is planning on doing? “Win a national championship,” Bravard said. “I think any Division I school you go to, that’s their top goal. I think certain schools are capable of winning a championship because they have the right players and coaches, and I think we have those pieces. It’s just a matter of putting it all together and going for it.” With your help this March, they just may get that chance. SB

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BASKETBALL BASKETBALL FAN FAN GUIDE GUIDE

B r o o k e W y ck o ff

Brooke Wyckoff:

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Star Player Joins Coaching Staff

bsolutely not!” That was the standard answer Brooke Wyckoff always gave as a player when asked if she wanted to coach after her playing days were finished. Guess what? She was wrong! After 20 years of playing basketball at every level without missing a year, she has become a college coach at her alma mater — Florida State University. And that makes sense. “She’s a perfect fit. Very family oriented. Warm, but demanding. She blended in immediately,” said Sue Semrau, who enters her 15th season as Florida State’s all-time winningest women’s basketball coach.

It is fitting that Wyckoff, who was here when Coach Semrau arrived in 1997, has come back to continue the story. She became the cornerstone of the Seminole rebuilding program (1997–2001) with 1,350 career points, 804 rebounds and 209 blocks. Sharing those tough initial years together enabled Semrau and Wyckoff to establish a bond beyond the player/ coach relationship. “We had kind of a unique relationship, and after college we stayed close friends. She has always been my role model,” said Wyckoff. “She has been the person in my life I have emulated and learned the most from.”

There’s more irony. “I never really had a desire to play professional basketball,” said Wyckoff, who embarked on a nineyear pro career after being selected in the second round of the WNBA draft by the Orlando Miracle in 2001. “I never had a desire to go overseas either,” said Wyckoff, who finished her pro career in Europe. Using what she learned at Florida State, she played professionally far longer than she could have imagined. “I certainly don’t think I had the ability to play as long as I did in terms of basketball skill alone,” said Wyckoff. “The reason I was able to play that long was because of the things learned here that mostly came from Sue. Things like being a good teammate, sharing and giving back.” After doing all the things she never anticipated doing, Wyckoff has come back to help FSU. Since she left, the Seminoles have now advanced to the NCAA tournament for seven consecutive years. Said Semrau, “With her background playing in the WNBA and overseas, Brooke can really speak for how Seminole basketball can prepare you for the next level and what to expect at that level.” When assistant coach Cori Close left to take over the head coaching position at UCLA, Florida State was flooded with

From FSU Hall of Fame Player to Assistant Coach.

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Photos By FSU Sports Info, Mike Olivella And David Barfield

By Jim Crosby

applications. Coach Sue knew Wyckoff had finished playing and was working as an assistant high school coach in Cincinnati. Since Wyckoff had made the move to coaching it was kind of a no-brainer for her return to Seminole territory. Still, she was surprised when the offer came. “I figured if I am going to coach, Florida State is obviously so big time it’s not gonna be me who gets the job,” she said. After all, jumping from high school to the prestigious ACC is quite a leap. Hiring her presents lots of positives for Florida State. Recruiting is the lifeblood of college sports. If you have even one down year recruiting it will impact the won-lost column; switch too many of those W’s to the L column and nobody is happy. Wyckoff has a unique story to tell recruits. The part about her nine years in the WNBA usually gets their attention although there are no guarantees, as she has discovered in her short time back. “It is always a puzzle as to how to reach a kid,” she remarked. “Some could care less that I played here or in the pros. Others listen more closely because of that.” It has made an impression on the team. “Early in the pre-season she would get on the court and defend the players. When she was blocking Cierra (Bravard’s) shot she gained their respect,” said Semrau. Bravard is the 6-4 senior forward and preseason All-American who will play a big role in the Seminole’s season. So the new challenge begins for Coach Brooke Wyckoff. Since she has been equal to all the other tasks basketball has thrown her way, odds are she will succeed in her new role. It didn’t take long for the Seminole Hall of Famer, whose jersey was retired in 2006, to realize, “Wow this is the perfect thing for me. It is absolutely what I need to be doing.” As Sue Semrau puts it, “Brooke Wyckoff is a rising star in the coaching world.” SB

“The reason I was able to play that long was because of the things learned here that mostly came from Sue. Things like being a good teammate, sharing and giving back.” — Brooke Wyckoff, Women’s Basketball Coach

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BASKETBALL BASKETBALL FAN FAN GUIDE GUIDE

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Photos By Mike Olivella, Ross Obley and FSU Sports Info


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planned giving By JOEL PADGETT

The “Ultimate Gift” Donor — Not Who You Think

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eople poke fun at me, saying I only deal with “rich old people” and that my job has to be really tough right now. But my experience and recent studies reveal surprising truths, dispelling the notions of my hecklers.

I like to refer to a gift that a donor leaves to us through their estate as their “ultimate gift.” The majority of our donors who make estate gifts would never be able to consider an outright major gift during their lifetime. But they are financially able to make gifts from their estate, which becomes their ultimate gift. Generally they are not our largest annual donors. They are, by nature our most loyal donors. They have a true love for Florida State athletics and understand its mission and needs. All have made annual gifts for years, some even for decades. Many have been volunteers, and all have spent a great deal of their time with and watching their Seminoles. More than 90% of ultimate gifts are simple bequests. You might remember my columns in the old Report to Boosters, where I would detail the design and benefits of NIMCRUTS, CRUTS,

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CRATS and a host of other sophisticated charitable trusts. Although each has its place and is a valuable estate planning tool for some, the simple truth of the matter is that most people who make an estate gift do it with a single paragraph in their will. So you think that the only people making their estate plans are those living on Golden Pond? It may surprise you that more than 50% of our charitable bequests come from donors between the ages of 40 and 60 — with a growing number in their 30s. Now, if you are in college, that age group may seem old, but you should not laugh that I spend all my time with “old people.” Size does NOT matter. Some donors, when making their estate gift, have apologized to me about the amount they are leaving. The fact is that the national average of a charitable bequest is about $40,000. We understand that every “ultimate gift” we receive is a gift of love and it is greatly appreciated, regardless of size. When we recognize the members of our Custodes Lampadis Society, we recognize the fact that they made a gift, never mentioning the size of their gift. Often, a smaller gift represents


We understand that every “ultimate gift” we receive is a gift of love and it is greatly appreciated, regardless of size.

a larger percent of that person’s estate than does a larger gift from another donor. No matter what name you put on it — recession, downturn or volatile market, the economy is not fun right now. It has been devastating to some, painful to others. But for all, it has been a time of heightened financial anxiety. Yet surprisingly, over the last four years, I have seen an upturn in people completing and making inquiries about will gifts. I had attributed the phenomenon to the economy precipitating some deep-seated psychological condition that made everyone face their own mortality. However, the answer is much simpler than it seems. In a recent study, it was found that tough economic circumstances breed conservative financial behavior, and that conservative behavior goes hand in hand with certain types of gifts, including bequests. In these times, loyal donors are able to provide a significant long term commitment to us while staying inside their fiscal restraints. Because bequests require no capital outlay, they are gifts that work in uncertain economic times. During the boom times, I always suggested to

our donors making bequests as a percentage of their estate instead of a specific monetary amount in order to protect them from fluctuations in the economy. More donors are now heeding that suggestion. The current economy has also created more charitable gifts of other kinds, for understandably different reasons. Donors who are 70 and aabove are looking for charitable gift annuities to give them a reliable stream of income. (Ah ha, so yes, I do work with “old people” who are closer to my age every year.) Other donors with multiple properties are gifting their additional properties with more frequency, as the market has made it hard for them to sell. Similarly, donors unable to sell their home are now more likely to give a life estate in a residence and receive a nice tax deduction. So please don’t laugh at or cry for me. We have the most loyal donors in the world, regardless of their age. And, in spite of the economy, they are still highly motivated. If you ever have any questions or comments, or just want to talk, contact me at jpadgett@ fsu.edu or (850) 644-3378. SB

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Trademark Licensing

Always the Season for ’Nole Pride By Sherri Dye, Florida State University Trademark Licensing Director

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lorida State fans are especially lucky when it comes to decorating and fashion. Our school colors blend well with many themes, making them perfect to decorate any Seminole home or office whether for March Madness or Valentine’s Day. The rich jewel tone of garnet and the stunning metallic gold provide a classic elegant look and a festive atmosphere for entertaining and celebrating. Seminole hosts have a wide variety of officially licensed products to choose from that create a fun and spirit-filled occasion.

Serve it up Seminole style Make sure to serve your guests from colorful party platters and serving pieces that show your team pride! With March Madness just around the corner, Seminole fans will love to see these great items at your game-watching parties. Stir things up a bit with light-up party cubes that glow when added to drinks. Having a more casual gather-

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ing? Make things easy on yourself with some of the great disposable products you normally use for tailgating. A tailgating cooler packed with BBQ utensils, insulated tumblers, chef apron, bottle opener and other related items is sure to be a most appreciated and useful gift on Valentine’s Day for the ’Nole man in your life..

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Decorate yourself You have the house or office all decorated and you’re ready to entertain; now it’s time to decorate yourself or your loved one on Valentine’s Day! Never has there been a better time for choices in Seminole jewelry or apparel. Women saw a little sparkle this year with various licensees using rhinestones and foil inks to make their designs really shine. Game day dresses exploded on the collegiate scene in the past few seasons as well as sheer tees, tank tops and yoga wear. Speaking of game day, what Seminole cutie wouldn’t want to pair those sweet little dresses with her very own Seminole cowboy boots? Not stopping at game day, licensees are also delivering more options for workday attire, workout attire and lounge wear for your day off. There are also specialty items for fishermen, golfers, hunters and winter sports enthusiasts. Vintage-inspired graphics and retro marks have been hugely popular across all demographics and continue to be among the top selling looks. Little ones can start life out right in their Seminole onesie and booties, and then grow all the way through every size imaginable until they are ready to start classes at FSU! With winter upon us, it’s time to think sweatshirts and sweaters; or if you live in Florida, a long sleeve t-shirt! Snuggle up in something cozy and watch some basketball, or head out to the retail marketplace and get started on your Valentine’s Day shopping! Sweatshirts make great gifts for just about everyone on your list. One of our favorite gift ideas is to pair a college sweatshirt with a cap and game tickets. Perfect for any Nole fan on your list! The choices are endless, so grab that list and head out to the stores, or grab a seat and shop online. SB


Trademark Licensing

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FSU Gifts for her! Team jewelry A Rhinestone t-shirt B FSU signature perfume Purse Sunglasses C Yoga wear Cowboy boots E

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C E D FSU Gifts for him!

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Hoodie sweatshirt D NCAA Football 2012 video game Golf bag and accessories Coaches polo Football helmet Tailgating cooler full of grilling accessories FSU signature cologne F Watch

H FSU Gifts for the kids!

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Pillow pet plush animal G Super hero costume H Cheerleader dress/football jersey The latest “gotta have it” cap or knit hat NCAA Football 2012 video game (unless you can convince dad to share) Tailgate Toss game

J don’t forget your pet!

FSU Gifts for anyone!

Barware Woven blanket Vintage graphic t-shirt Insulated tumblers Garden gnome I Phone case Knit scarf

Collar Leash Bowl T-shirt Toys J

We’re now on Facebook! “LIKE” us at Florida State University Trademark Licensing to see all the latest products as they come out.

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BOOSTER INSIDER BY JERRY KUTZ, VICE PRESIDENT

Coming Into View T

he indoor practice facility: It’s been called the missing piece in Florida State University’s facility master plan by Seminole Booster President Andy Miller. It’s been billed by Athletic Director Randy Spetman as a safe haven for student-athletes to train without interruption from severe heat or violent electrical storms. And it’s been promoted by Head Football Coach Jimbo Fisher as a recruiting tool that will help attract elite athletes who want to work year-round to become champions. Even FSU President Eric Barron has weighed in, saying the indoor facility will help student–athletes with time management, thus graduation rates. So when will the university break ground on the facility? “When the money is raised,” said Seminole Booster Executive Director Charlie Barnes, who is in charge of the indoor practice facility fundraising campaign. “The state of Florida prohibits state funds, or university funds, from being used to build athletic facilities, so we must raise the money privately.” On Oct. 15, 2011, the Boosters launched the public phase of the “Winning Edge

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Campaign” to raise the money necessary to build the facility. “We are off to a good start in terms of pledges but we have a long way to go, particularly in terms of cash gifts,” said Barnes. “We need each and every one of our Seminole fans who cherish excellence to make a contribution toward the funding of this project.”

Why this facility now?

FSU won two national championships in the 1990s, and set an NCAA record for consistency with 14 straight, top-four rankings without an indoor practice facility. So longtime fans and former players are asking: Why do the Seminoles need an indoor practice facility now? Jimbo Fisher fields that question by pointing to new NCAA rules that prohibit any kind of workout — formal or informal — from occurring on campus if there is lightning within 10 miles. “We’ll still go out and practice in the rain because you are going to be in situations where you have to handle the rain,” Fisher

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said. “But it’s the threat of lightning that forces us off the practice field and causes all kinds of problems with time management for our players. It has a domino effect on their schedule when you delay a practice. Suddenly, you have to alter dinner, study halls, tutors and class schedules that they have to maintain. “It’s not like the old days in the 1980s and ’90s where we could practice until the lightning hit and then moved the drill over a little and continued. Those days are over. We are not allowed to practice if there is any lightning in the area, or even let our players work out on their own.” Fisher said lightning frequently affects practices and offseason workouts. “We get lightning delays virtually every day here in Tallahassee, which they call the ‘lightning capital of the world,’ ” Fisher said. “It can be perfectly sunny, beautiful, and if there is lightning anywhere within 10 miles you have to leave the field. It is an NCAA rule.” The regulations not only require them to leave the field, they must also wait

Rendering by Ellerbe Becket

As Pledges Continue to Grow


The Winning Edge Campaign   Leadership Team  • Larry Strom – Chairman • Al Dunlap • Daniel Grant • Andy Haggard • Mike Harrell • Dan Hendrix • Jim Hewitt • Coyle E. Moore Family Trust     (Doug Mannheimer) • Andy Miller • DeVoe Moore • Old School Society, LLC (Lance Barton/ Adam Corey/ Scott Roix) • Jim Owens • Brian Philpot • David Rancourt • Harry Sargeant • Jim Smith • Guy Spearman • Brian Swain • Nylah Thompson • Gary Thurston • Jesse Vance • Gary Walsingham

30 minutes after the threat passes before they can return, so even a minimal threat has a significant impact on the studentathlete’s schedule of study halls, tutors, classes and meals for the rest of the day. “In the summer, when Strength Coach Vic (Viloria) is running those guys, if the players decide they want to do 7 on 7 passing drills on their own, half the time they can’t,” Fisher said. “Their day and night class schedule, study halls, tutors and meal times are set, so if one of those afternoon showers hits from 3 to 6 and if there is a lightning warning, it is illegal for them to go out. So they don’t practice. “The amount of time you lose in preparation, not just in the fall, but in your year-round development is unbelievable.” Fisher said the facility will help FSU’s student-athletes reach their potential by enabling them to train harder on days when 90 degree-plus temperatures sap energy and limit development. The facility will provide a more optimum environment for training no matter what the temperature is outside, which will give serious student-athletes a reason to choose Florida State to advance their careers.

Gifts of any amount are encouraged and will be recognized. FSUIPF.COM

The elite programs FSU recruits and competes against either have facilities or are planning them. As a result of the new regulations and more-intense, year-round training regimens, the elite programs in the country already have a facility or are planning to build one. ACC foes Georgia Tech, Duke and Virginia Tech already have facilities while Virginia, like FSU, is in the process of raising money to build one. The SEC programs FSU recruits against that have a facility include Auburn, Alabama, Arkansas, Tennessee and LSU. Georgia Tech is planning a facility.

Boosters need to fund facility

While the investment in a facility is great, the payoff for FSU’s Boosters and fans will be in attracting elite coaches and players who create a great game-day atmosphere in all sports. “We want our elite coaches to recruit elite athletes, and our job is to provide them with elite facilities where they can push themselves to achieve their dreams,” said Booster President Miller. “We have a big

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investment in football, in our stadium, in our coaches and in our elite athletes, and we need for them to have all the tools they need to compete against the best programs in the nation. The margin for error is razor thin in this competitive arena and victory often comes down to execution.” The “Winning Edge” fundraising campaign for the Elite Athlete Indoor Training Facility welcomes gifts of all sizes, with naming opportunities starting with a single commemorative brick for gifts of $1,000 or more payable over three to five years. There are naming opportunities for every gift level. SB

To give to the Elite Athlete Indoor Training Facility: Visit: www.fsuipf.com Or contact: Seminole Boosters, Inc. 225 University Center C Suite C5100 Tallahassee, FL 32306 Phone: (866) 469-2553

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Join your Seminole friends and family at Booster Life events Your Seminole Booster membership funds athletics, provides priority member benefits and is your entre to Booster Life events

Create a lifetime of memories

Membership has its benefits

common interest -- make that a passion -- for everything Seminole.

Life event invitations, you will receive a long list of other benefits for your tax-deductible contribution (see chart), which funds the following: • Scholarships • Facilities • Coaches salaries and operational budgets • Fan-friendly amenities like: Parking and tailgating opportunities, high-tech video boards, concessions, cheerleaders, the Marching Chiefs, Osceola and Renegade, the spring coaches’ tour and many other Booster Life events.

Your friends and family like to gather to enjoy a

In addition to board-rattling dunks and jarring hits, we Seminoles like our tailgating parties and travelling to road trips with our Seminole flags flying. These shared experiences create a lifetime of memories that can be enhanced with Seminole Booster membership. You’ll receive priority seating in football and basketball, tailgating opportunities, VIP Booster Life event invitations, where you will meet coaches and players, and behind-the-scenes tours of facilities.

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In addition to priority tickets, parking and Booster

Join Seminole Boosters and start enjoying the Booster Life with your friends and family.

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Receive ticket priority with “No Bump” provisions All donors who maintain the appropriate membership level for their number of season tickets are guaranteed the right to renew seats and cannot be bumped from them by any other Booster. Your Tax Deductible Gift Provides You All These Benefits:

Booster Benefits

• The Legacy Golden Chief pays the average annual cost of one scholarship ($25,000) and receives all the benefits of a Platinum Golden Chief status plus the added recognition of a scholarship donor.

RENEW or JOIN ONLINE

www.seminole-boosters.com 866-701-0948 SEMINO LE-BO OST ERS .CO M

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BOOSTER INSIDER BY JERRY KUTZ, VICE PRESIDENT

Seminole Clubs Keep the Fires Burning to Fuel the Village

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n cavemen times, the role of Fire Tender was sacred and entrusted only to a society of women handpicked at a young age, carefully trained and required to never marry so that their total life focus could be the preservation of the primary source of light and heat and means of cooking brontosaurus burgers.

If you possess a really vivid imagination, you might see how this could be a metaphor for FSU’s national network of Seminole Clubs — our “modern day Fire Tenders” — who bear the responsibility of keeping the Seminole fire burning in villages spread out across the country. With FSU’s funding from the state cut by more than $100 million in the past five years, the burden of funding both academic and athletic programs falls squarely on the shoulders of our alumni and friends in villages near and far. Thankfully, the men and women who become club leaders aren’t required to take a vow of celibacy but their roles are

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no less important in preserving the source of light, heat and needs of the university’s athletic and academic mission. Seminole Boosters appreciates the dedication required to create events for local alumni and friends which ultimately fosters the university’s mission of fundraising for academic and athletic needs. Fifteen Seminole Clubs participated in the Annual Spring Coaches’ Tour, which features rounds of golf and social events with FSU Head Coach Jimbo Fisher and/ or his assistant coaches and former legendary Seminole players. In addition to drawing the village closer to the light and warmth of the Seminole

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flame for one day, the clubs use a portion of the profits to fund their donation to Seminole Boosters, to give partial scholarships to local area students and to pay their club’s operational expenses. The clubs also assist Seminole Boosters in recruiting new members and season ticket holders through a multitude of events, calling parties and one-onone networking. Polk County took a direct tact toward reaching higher Seminole Boosters, Inc. membership goals. Brian Swain, the current chairman of Seminole Boosters, Inc., and a member of the local club, asked the club leadership to make it a requirement that local Seminole Club members also join the national Seminole Boosters, even if it is at the lowest membership level ($60). While the clubs share a common mission of helping FSU, no two clubs tend the fire the same. We thought we’d share a couple of unique success stories from clubs who tailored events specifically to their area.


The Miami Seminole Club traditionally hosts a golf tournament and banquet but their leadership decided to break from tradition and try an idea that Seminole Boosters, Inc., fundraiser Cindee Lundeen recommended: a casino night. “We talked about alternative ways to draw in a broad cross-section of the alumni in our area,” said Club President Ben Biard. “We pulled together our higher end Seminole Booster donors and our younger members to garner opinions and all seemed to have a positive feeling about it.” Thus emerged an entire new plan for the 2011 Coaches’ Tour Event in Dade County: sponsors dinner, Former Players Cocktail Party (sponsored by Lee and Shelly Smith), and the main event, FSU Casino Night. The evening’s events were held appropriately enough at the EPIC Hotel on Biscayne Bay and featured FSU Offensive Coordinator James Coley, a Miami native, along with a veritable Who’s Who of former FSU players living in the Miami area. Former FSU Quarterback Danny Kanell signed on to be the evening’s host and star interviewer. Seminole Booster South Florida directors Lundeen and Former FSU Coach Billy Sexton were also on hand to meet, greet and spread the Seminole Booster message to Dade County Seminoles.

The Miami Club hired a professional casino night company, Casino Party Nights Florida, Inc., that acquires authentic gaming tables and professional dealers for entertainment and fundraising purposes, creating an atmosphere of Las Vegas appeal. The all-inclusive admission price included a lavish buffet, all-inclusive beverage bar and an advance of gaming chips to play blackjack, craps, poker or roulette. Gaming play continued for three hours with Seminoles enjoying the Vegas feel and camaraderie. Winners exchanged their chips for raffle tickets to try to win prizes that included cruises and vacation packages, ticket packages to FSU games, a skybox to a Marlins baseball game, autographed memorabilia, art and much more. “At the conclusion of Casino Night, raffle tickets are placed in the bucket or buckets for prizes you wanted,” Biard said. “Former FSU linebacker Henri Crockett won one of them.” Crockett then committed to the Seminole Boosters that night as a 10-year Golden Chief Annual Fund Member, topping off the evening on a high note. Those present in the crowd of more than 200 Seminoles included Miami residents and FSU Board of Trustee members (Chairman) Andy Haggard and Les Pantin.

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Clubs throughout the nation held Thursday Night Under the Lights events for the FSU vs. Boston College game.

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FSU fans enjoy Booster Life events with their local Seminole Clubs. Visit Seminole-Boosters.com to find your local Seminole Club.

So what was the best part? “I have been in Miami for five years, three years as an officer and working on the golf tournaments and I have never been to a Seminole golf event that had the energy, or the turnout, or the VIPs this event had,” Biard said. “Our members, from the most senior to recent graduates, were able to interact with these VIPs and former players,” he added. “People were just sitting around the Black Jack table, standing at the bar or in line for food, talking to each other. A friend of mine was standing at the bar talking to Stanford Samuels about the hit he put on Roscoe Parrish in the monsoon game in Tallahassee. Now how many times does a random recent graduate get to talk to a player about the thunderous hit he put on a Hurricane? It was like that all throughout the night. No one wanted to leave, including the players. It was non-stop …. ” Lundeen recalls a particularly special moment as the highlight of the evening. “When Coach Billy Sexton introduced the former players in attendance and looked across the line-up of fine, accomplished men, he got quite emotional,” Lundeen said. “We all did. It was an EPIC moment for FSU and a pat on the back to the Miami Club.” “The former players’ support and participation made a good event a great one,” said Biard, who started early reaching out to area former players and was quite successful in lining up

Henri Crockett, Zack Crockett, Marvin Jones, Jesus Hernandez, Stanford Samuels, Snoop Minnis, Danny Kanell, John Wyche, Richie Andrews, Tony Bryant, Derrick Gibson, Willie Jones, Pat Cicalese, Enzo Armella, Marlin Green, Kevin Prophete, Talman Gardner and Wayne Messam. The club plans to host an even more grand Casino Night in the Spring of 2012. In other South Florida areas, hybrid tour events emerged. The Palm Beach County Seminole Club and the Seminole Club of Broward County continued their traditional golf tournaments and luncheons but added a new piece, the Downtown Seminole Rally, which offered “something for everyone.” Food and beverages, raffles, silent auctions, live Seminole Pep Bands, coaches, FSU former players, Seminole Booster VIPs, photo and membership opportunities and incredible DVD highlights on large projection screens were all part of the Seminole fun-filled evenings. Seminoles Nick Coniglio (E.R. Bradley’s Saloon in West Palm Beach) and Christian and Lori Scherf (B Ocean) served as the respective chairs of the host committees for the area Clubs. “The overwhelming response to these events proves the Seminole Spirit is alive in South Florida and willing to support the Seminoles all the way!” said Scherf. The new format was effective, seizing the attention of more than 400 Seminole fans in addition to the 300-plus area golf-

ers looking to network and mingle with a broad range of old friends and new. Old school still works Many of the clubs decided not to mess with success and went old school, hosting a golf tournament in the morning and a dinner in the evening and did quite well. The Jacksonville Seminole Club had one of the most successful stops on the Spring Tour with a field of 128 players that was sold out two weeks before the event and boasted more than 375 for dinner. “Golf was perfect; maybe the best ever with Jimbo riding the course, meeting the whole field,” Max Zahn, the area fundraising director who attributes online registration and a sponsor party at Latitude 30 for their success. “We had a full house for the banquet and one of the highlights was an interview with Coach Fisher and Monk Bonasorte, a former FSU All American who is now an assistant athletic director.” The Club donated more than $16,000 of proceeds to the Boosters to fund their Platinum Chief ($12,000) membership, plus $1,000 each to men’s basketball, women’s basketball, women’s volleyball and the Marching Chiefs. More than 15 volunteers helped with the golf and banquet events, with Chris Mueller receiving special credit for running the banquet again. Jacksonville always hosts a separate Mike Martin Pro-Am Golf event to benefit 82>>

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Unique IPF Gifts

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o sooner had the FSUIPF.com website gone live, than the first donation came in from Joshua Capps, Alexandria, Va. “I was surprised and honored to be the first FSU fan or alumnus to make a donation toward what I consider an extremely important campaign,” said Capps. “I’ve been looking forward to the day it would go public, so once I received a copy of my Seminole Boosters magazine and read that I could donate, I felt I could do my part to help FSU obtain ‘The Winning Edge.’”

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Rendering by Ellerbe Becket

Building Facilities One


Unique IPF Gifts

“ ... My love for FSU grew even stronger, and I said to myself that when I became financially stable that I’d do my part to help the university grow.” — Joshua Capps, Alexandria, Va.

Indoor Practice Facility Gift Recognition Opportunities Are Available. Contact Seminole Boosters at 850-644-3484.

Gift At A Time By Jerry Kutz

Capps did not attend FSU. In fact, he never stepped foot on campus until 2002. The Washington Redskins fan fell in love with FSU in 1987 at the age of 12 while watching the ’Noles on national television. While the ’Noles lost a heartbreaker to Miami, they gained a lifelong fan. “It was always my dream to be able to attend FSU however, because of family circumstances, college was out of the plans,” said Capps. “My  first experience

at Doak Campbell Stadium was against Notre Dame in 2002. Even though we lost the game I was in awe of the campus, stadium and game atmosphere. My love for FSU grew even stronger, and  I said to myself that when I became financially stable that I’d do my part to help the university grow.” Capps became a Seminole Booster member in 2007 and “gives back to a university I love every chance I get.” Three

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times a year, Capps and his girlfriend — Christie Lum — make the trip to Tallahassee from Herndon, Va., where he works as an operations specialist for a market research company. They attend numerous road games as well. “Some may ask why I give to a university I did not attend,” Capps said. “Simply put, I just love all that is FSU and want to be a part of helping the university grow into the future.” SB

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George Langford

A

The

George Langford Award Presented by the Seminole Boosters’ Board of Directors, the George Langford Award recognizes leadership and lifetime achievement serving the best interests of Florida State University. Named for this esteemed civic leader, this award embodies his giving spirit and dynamic personality. This award is given annually at the Past Chairman’s Dinner. The recipient is recommended by the executive committee and approved by the board. It is given to the individual who has demonstrated extraordinary leadership in the area of philanthropy benefitting the athletic program and Florida State University. 60

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rchitectural icons and statuary enrich the remarkable beauty of our university campus. Among the most prominent of these is the bronze likeness of Francis Eppes, seated on a small bench in the landscaped apron around Westcott. The bronze figure is depicted gazing toward the town center of old Tallahassee. As the founder and first president of Florida State University, Eppes came under criticism for building the new school too far west, too far away from town. But Francis Eppes, who was three times elected mayor of Tallahassee, knew that the city and the university would grow together. And his vision came true. Eppes shared much with his grandfather, Thomas Jefferson, third president of the United States. Both men proved to be remarkable visionaries and both were driven by unquenchable intellectual vigor. Ten years after the end of his presidency, Jefferson founded the University of Virginia. Only 32 years later, in 1851, his grandson Francis Eppes established the Seminary West of the Suwannee, now Florida State University. George Langford is a worthy inheritor of this enduring connection between Jefferson’s University and the proud institution that has evolved from Francis Eppes’ Seminary. George grew up in Thomasville, not far from Tallahassee. While almost all members of his immediate family are alumni of Florida State, Langford earned his undergraduate and law degrees from the University of Virginia. Langford’s leadership in the Tallahassee community is unsurpassed. His achievements in business, his support for Seminole athletics and his commitment to enhancing the intellectual foundations of Florida State University mark him as a Renaissance Man worthy of comparison to Jefferson and Eppes. It is most fitting that the board of directors of Seminole Boosters recognize the man who served three terms as chairman of this board, who resurrected the Boosters organization and the Seminole Athletic Program from a dark passage in time, and whose demonstrated character and dedication inspires all of those who love Florida State University.


Dennis Boyle, 2011 The popular wisdom is that indispensible men inevitably pass out of our lives. This philosophy holds that those leaders can and will be replaced. The lingering power of Dennis Boyle’s strength of character and distinctive mark on Seminole Athletics disproves this theory. The contributions of some lives once ended cannot be duplicated. The influence of some leaders once gone cannot be recreated. How often, just in the two years since his passing, have University academic and athletic leaders asked aloud how things might be different, better, if only Dennis Boyle was present to offer counsel. Dennis and Robin Boyle were a golden couple, Seminole royalty. They funded the Boyle Scholarship in FSU’s Department of Communications. Dennis led the Seminole Boosters as Chairman of the Board in 1992, and continually demonstrated his loyalty and generosity to his alma mater. In addition to his contribution of athletic scholarships and gifts toward construction of new facilities, Dennis became an original member of the Miccos, the most elite circle of major donors within Florida State University. Those community and University authorities who sought Dennis’ involvement knew his great strength was the ability to move events forward. Friends depended on the warmth of his love and loyalty; contemporaries found confidence in his guiding hand. Dennis Boyle was in every sense a true leader of leaders. Because we wish to keep the treasured memory close, Dennis Boyle is recognized as a 2011 recipient of the George Langford Award.

David Coburn, 2011 The well known quotation that a leader is best when people barely know that he exists may be the most proper inscription to honor David Coburn’s unselfish and masterfully crafted record of achievements. The balance of the quotation says of a good leader, “When his work is done, his aim fulfilled, [people] will say, ‘We did this ourselves’.” David Coburn’s body of work, taken altogether across three decades of service, constitutes an extraordinary skein of loyalty, integrity and expertise that has benefitted the people of Florida and dramatically enhanced the strength of his alma mater. During his varied service as Staff Director and Chief of Staff in the Florida Senate and Florida House of Representatives, David at all times encouraged others forward into the spotlight, seeking no credit or honor for himself. David Coburn’s influence and remarkable abilities have been known and sought by every major political leader in Florida for 30 years. His steady hand, exceptional judgment and poise under fire have earned him the lasting respect of generations of his peers. Though he has never sought recognition, it is appropriate that one of the rarest and most prestigious of recognitions has sought him. In 2011, Florida State University presented David Coburn with the James D. Westcott Distinguished Service Medal. It honors the person “whose life and work exemplify the values of Vires, Artes, Mores,” the physical, mental and moral strengths which FSU seeks to nurture. It is well known that the magnificent University Center, along with other University initiatives, could never have achieved reality if not for the guidance and skillful political diplomacy of David Coburn. It is altogether fitting that David Coburn is recognized as a 2011 recipient of the George Langford Award. SE MINO LE-BO OST ERS .CO M

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Real People

Booster Life:

A Real Connection By Cindee Lundeen, Ph.D.

“May I speak to a real person please?”

We’ve all said, it and it can be quite frustrating. New communication technologies are changing the way we manage our social lives. Texting, Twitter, Facebook, the Web, email, instant messaging and automated answering have made for an increasingly isolated society as many personal and face-toface interactions have gone missing from daily life. We can now work, learn, shop, join, view and even conduct our social lives via technology: diminishing the ordinary connectivity of people.

So what does that real connection look like in today’s wireless world?

At Florida State, it looks like Seminole Boosters, an organization that offers real connections to real people in their

Alden Scherf

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everyday lives. As the athletic fundraising arm of Florida State University, relationship-building is key to successful fundraising and creating a Booster Life for Seminoles everywhere. By gathering our members and Seminoles across the country based on a common interest and passion for Florida State athletics, real people can connect with real people.

How do Seminole Boosters keep it real?

The true beauty of Booster Life is the plethora of connection opportunities on campus and across the real world for people of all ages. When people join Seminole Boosters they traditionally think about benefits like ticket and parking priority. And while those benefits remain, our benefits package has grown to include a cadre of Booster Life events designed to help you stay in touch with the school you love, even if you are unable to make it to many home games. Seminole Boosters signature events include the national Football Signing Day Party, Coaches Tours, the Spring Game Event and Plant the Spear Kick-off events throughout the state of Florida and in many other states via our Seminole Clubs. Other events include the Spring and Fall Game Weekend Donor Appreciation Parties, Seminole Booster Cruise, Smoky Mountain Golf Event, Destin Golf and Game Watching Event, Let Us Play Women’s Athletic Event, Champions Beyond the Game Event, Monday Jimbo Fisher Luncheon, Wednesday Night

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Jimbo Radio Show, Downtown Getdowns, as well as many couture events for all sports and Booster interests.

So how do we get to real people?

Sports and the spirit of competition are topics of everyday conversations across the globe. Most people agree that watching a sporting competition on television just can’t compare to the excitement of being a part of it in person. This draws people to games and events to live the experience in person. We experience the emotional highs and lows of competition — the adversity and the ecstasy — together. Across cultures, athletic competitions and events bring people together, promote mutual understandings, conversations and responses, and provide opportunities for communicating face-to-face with real people. Here are examples for our Boosters younger and older, long term and new, that will help answer this question. Steve Poirier of Clearwater, Fla., has been involved with Seminole Boosters for 35 years. When asked about his Booster Life, Steve offers,  “My weekends in Tallahassee are the best because of the atmosphere and pageantry.  I frequently tell people that my best friends are the ones that I went to school with at FSU.  We stay connected during football season and then throughout the year. I enjoy the fellowship … it is a fabulous time.  For that, I say thank you.” Our Seminole Boosters near and far enjoy sharing events and festivities with family and friends. FSU alumnus Daniel Grant of Tallahassee now shares his Seminole pride and passion with his young daughter, Kyleigh. “I never fully realized what a tight knit family Seminole Boosters are until my family and I got involved,” Grant said. “Being able to meet people from around the country has been so rewarding to me and my family. When it’s easier to send a text message or email, it’s refreshing to be able to spend time with others that share my love for all that is FSU.”


Real People

The stories continue. A new Golden Chief, Doug Porter from West Palm Beach, recently wrote to thank us for experiencing the “Best Football Weekend Ever” with his brother, Todd, and son, Colton. FSU alums Dorothy and Richard Kurras celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary at a Seminole Booster event in Fort Lauderdale among 200 fellow Seminoles during our 2011 Kick-off Event. Bryan and Karen Cohen of Tequesta, Fla. joined the Boosters in 2008 and have made Seminole Boosters a family affair by bringing their young daughters to Tallahassee to share some family history. “My wife and I met in Tallahassee while attending FSU, and we both have cultivated such great interactions with the school and all its programs. Becoming involved with the Boosters was a great way to give back to the university and open up familiar and new connections to others as well.” Former FSU athlete Kolby Jones (’03) makes it a point to stay connected through Seminole Boosters despite a recent move to West Des Moines, Iowa, and travels back to Tallahassee as often as possible for game days. “The Seminole Boosters have done a great job of keeping me connected not only to Florida State athletics, but also to my other classmates, teammates and Seminole friends,” Jones said. “Although I am now thousands of miles away from Tallahassee, the Boosters help me stay connected with all that is going on at FSU. My father came down to a football game a year ago and the Boosters did a phenomenal job of showing him what 82>>

Fans of Florida State Athletics have found a real connection through Booster Life.

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Booster Life

Booster Life

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Booster Life

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AT H L E T I C S U P D AT E : S A N D V O L L E Y B A L L

A Natural Fit

FSU Setting Itself for Success in Emerging Sport

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ot that long ago Florida State baseball fans could spend the time between innings watching students play sand volleyball on courts just on the other side of the left field fence. Well, thanks to the phenomenal popularity of beach volleyball as an Olympic sport and the success of the professional game on television, sand volleyball is coming to Florida State University as our 20th NCAA sport this spring. And it’s expected to be an immediate hit on the campus.

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Photo by FSU Sports Info

By Rob Wilson, Associate athletic director for communications


AT H L E T I C S U P D AT E : S A N D V O L L E Y B A L L

(Back row: L to R) Taylor Irvin; Brittany Tiegs; Jace Pardon; Eve Lewis; Mallory Kiley; Amanda Saxton; Coach Corso (Front row: L to R) Jessica McGregor; Aurora Newgard; Stephanie Pellitteri; Caitlin Haworth

Florida State does seem to have a natural tie to the NCAA’s newest sport. Gabrielle Reece played indoor court volleyball for the Seminoles in the 1980s and became one of professional beach volleyball’s most popular and influential athletes. The beautiful climate in Tallahassee and the abundance of outstanding female athletes in the state also will give the program a leg up. As will the fact that FSU is diving right in along with what is expected to be 16 other schools to compete in 2012, with the very first season of NCAA sand volleyball scheduled for 2013. Thirty other schools have plans to add the sport over the next couple of years and most believe that the sport will take off quickly. When 40 institutions in NCAA Division I and II have sponsored varsity programs for two years, the NCAA will sponsor an NCAA Championship. One of the reasons for the optimism surrounding the new sport on the NCAA level is the fact that scholarship opportunities will be provided to an under-served population of athletes. And, from a fan’s perspective, the game has a fantastic structure. Sand volleyball will be scored as a team and will feature two-person tandems playing on five courts all at the same time. The game differs greatly from indoor court volleyball. While most schools believe many court players will also compete in sand volleyball, the two-person tandems demand an outstanding overall athlete with versatility and athleticism. Each of the five two-person matches will be best of three sets, with rally scoring to 21 used for the first two games and, if a third is needed, it would

go to 15. Each match is worth one point so the team winner would be best of the five matches. Florida State hired experienced beach volleyball player and coach Danalee Corso as its first-ever sand volleyball coach. Corso is well known throughout the beach volleyball circuit after enjoying a highly successful professional career domestically and internationally. A native of Honolulu, Hawaii, she spent 13 seasons excelling in several professional tours, including the Women’s Professional Volleyball Association, Fédération Internationale de Volleyball (FIVB), USA Volleyball, Beach Volleyball America and The Association of Volleyball Professionals. “With sand volleyball being a new emergent sport for the NCAA, I wanted to be a part of a university that believes in the sport’s potential,” Corso said when she took the job. “FSU is setting itself up for success and I wanted to be part of that momentum. With the popularity of sand volleyball at the Olympics, around the world and at the junior level, I am certain it will be a great addition to the NCAA. I am also confident that sand volleyball’s inclusion by the NCAA will help grow indoor volleyball by bringing new marketing opportunities and exposure, which is great news for women’s sports in general.” In 2004, Corso received a Brazilian Pro Beach Coaching Accreditation and helped coach the United States National Beach Volleyball Team from 2004-07 with a specific focus on the tandem of Rachel Wacholder and Tyra Turner. She also coached 2008 Summer Games Olympian Nicole Branagh, as well as professionals Makare Wilson, Michelle

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More and Suzanne Stonebarger. She owns the very successful Aloha Ball Club — a full-service beach volleyball school — and coached the Costa Rica Women’s National Beach Team in 2009-10. Corso is building a roster that will grow to the NCAA limit of 12 to 15 members once the program is established. The sport will be limited to six full scholarships by NCAA rule, and will offer opportunities to outstanding female high school athletes whose talents may not have been ideal for indoor court volleyball but would make them outstanding sand players. Florida State’s season opens in March and eventually NCAA schools will play as many as 16 matches in a season. The American Volleyball Coaches Association (AVCA) will conduct a national championship tournament this next year and is eyeing FSU’s brand new courts adjacent to Mike Long Track as a potential site for events this year and in the future. Sand volleyball has rocketed in popularity over the last eight years. The United States swept the men’s and women’s Olympic beach gold medals in 2008. Misty May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh have become celebrities after winning their second consecutive Olympic gold medal at the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing, while Phil Dalhausser (Ormond Beach, Fla.) and Todd Rogers captured the 2008 Olympic Games gold medal. The U.S. has won at least one gold medal in Olympic beach volleyball at each summer game since it was initiated in 1996. “We can’t wait to get started,” admitted Corso. “It is a truly unique opportunity to be a part of the sport as it begins on the collegiate level.” SB

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florida state university athletics

Quarterly Report

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Q U A R T E R LY R E P O R T 2011

Visit Seminoles.com to find out when you can catch the FSU swimmers in action.

Chasing Championships Photos by Mike Olivella and Ross OBley

swimming & diving Diving into ACC Race

There’s a buzz at the Morcom Aquatics Center this season as the Seminoles look to improve on last year’s third place ACC finishes. With an outstanding core of leadership from senior captains Michael Aitken, Mike Neubacher, Lisi Rowland, Tori Richmond and junior Jamie Barrett, in addition to many talented veterans and an eager group of freshmen and transfers, Florida State has the tools to build yet another successful season. During the summer, the Seminoles built a great deal of momentum for the 2011–12 season. A total of 14 Seminoles qualified for Olympic Trials, 13 competed in national competitions and one displayed his talents on the world stage. Although he competed for half of the season last year, senior Mateo De Angulo is looking to make a statement in the ACC this year. Over the summer, De Angulo participated in the World Championships in Shanghai, China, and recorded his fastest 800 free time en route to becoming Colombia’s fastest distance swimmer ever. He now holds the Colombian national records in the 400, 800 and 1,500 free events. He will also compete in the Pan-American Games in Guadalajara, Mexico, this year. Looking to make her fourth-consecutive NCAA appearance is senior Stephanie Sarandos. Sarandos

is the school record holder in the 100 and 200 backstroke and is coming off of a bronze medal performance at last year’s ACC Championships. Also aiming for the NCAA spotlight is senior Charlotte Broadbent. The school record holder in the 500 and 1,650 freestyle events qualified for the NCAA Championships during her sophomore season and is looking to make it to that mark once again. The FSU diving program continues to be a successful juggernaut. All of the returning divers scored points at last year’s ACC Championships. Eight divers will be featured on the boards this season, including two that were featured on the ACC podium — Rowland and sophomore Katrina Young. Rowland scored a bronze medal on the 3-meter springboard and Young took the bronze on the platform. Neubacher earned an AllAmerican honorable mention on the platform events at the NCAA Championships. The Noles added gems in junior Ariel Rittenhouse, who was an Olympian in 2008 and competed in the 3-meter synchronized event, and freshman Ford McLiney, who took 10th place on the platform at the AT&T National Diving Championships this summer. The ball has already begun to roll for the Noles as the women’s team has posted a record of 2-0, with triumphs over Miami and Florida Gulf Coast. Both teams have competed in the All-Florida Invite, where they placed second behind the University of Florida.

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2011 Q U A R T E R LY R E P O R T

TRACK & FIELD PREVIEWS Racing Towards Excellence

The FSU men’s track & field team has been a fixture at or near the top of the NCAA Championship standings — indoor and outdoor — for the past seven seasons. That doesn’t figure to change much in 2011, despite the absence of some key performers from last season’s outdoor championship runner-up finish. Once again the ‘Noles figure to be strong in the sprints, led by All-American and reigning NCAA 200-meter champion Maurice Mitchell, who also contributed a leg to FSU’s gold medal 4x100 relay team. Mitchell is joined by relay veterans Kemar Hyman and David Ambler, along with a handful of newcomers, under the guidance of Ken Harnden, who has been promoted to director of Sprints, Hurdles and Relays, for both the men’s and women’s program. In addition to the sprints, the ‘Noles also return NCAA Championship scorer Michael Putman (shot put and discus), and should get a big lift from the healthy re-emergence of decathlete Gonzalo Barroilhet. If the Seminoles can muster some points from Brandon O’Connor (400), jumpers Phillip Young and Paul Madzivire, pole vaulter Andrew Lahaye and the distance corps, led by Michael Fout — all of whom have some NCAA experience — they could once again be in the mix. There are a few more uncertainties on the women’s side. Hannah Brooks returns after an All-American finish in the 1,500 last season and should have some fellow cross country standouts providing potential points as well. Sprinters Marecia Pemberton, Stephanie Simpson and Amy Harris, a potential scorer in the long jump, were a part of FSU’s 2011 All-American 4x100 relay team. There are holes to fill, but fortunately ample time for development before the indoor and outdoor seasons get underway. SB

The ’Noles are looking towards another Championship run

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2 0 1 2 F S U S pr i ng S ports sched u les

Baseball 02/17-19/12 vs. Hofstra Tallahassee, Fla. 02/21/12 vs. Jacksonville Tallahassee, Fla. 4:00 p.m. ET 02/24-26/12 vs. Florida International Tallahassee, Fla. 02/29/12 at Philadelphia Phillies Clearwater, Fla. 1:05 p.m. ET 03/02-04/12 vs. Maine Tallahassee, Fla. 03/06-07/12 at UCF Orlando, Fla. 03/09-11/12 at Duke Durham, N.C. 03/13/12 at Florida Gainesville, Fla. 7:00 p.m. ET 03/16-18/12 vs. Virginia Tallahassee, Fla. 03/20-21/12 vs. Stetson Tallahassee, Fla. 03/23-25/12 at Wake Forest Winston-Salem, N.C. 03/27/12 vs. Florida Baseball Grounds / Jacksonville, Fla. 7:00 p.m. ET

04/18/12 vs. North Georgia Tallahassee, Fla. 6:00 p.m. ET 04/20-22/12 vs. Miami Tallahassee, Fla. 04/27-29/12 vs. Rhode Island Tallahassee, Fla.

03/30/12-04/01/12 vs. Virginia Tech Tallahassee, Fla.

05/01/12 at Jacksonville Jacksonville, Fla. 6:00 p.m. ET

04/03-04/12 vs. Florida Gulf Coast Tallahassee, Fla.

05/04-06/12 vs. Maryland Tallahassee, Fla. 6:00 p.m. ET

04/06-08/12 at Georgia Tech Atlanta, Ga.

05/08-09/12 at Stetson DeLand, Fla.

04/10/12 vs. Florida Tallahassee, Fla. 1:00 p.m. ET

05/11-13/12 at Clemson Clemson, S.C.

04/13-15/12 at Boston College Chestnut Hill, Mass.

05/17-19/12 vs. North Carolina State Tallahassee, Fla.

Men’s Tennis 01/14/12 vs. North Florida Tallahassee, Fla. 10:00 a.m. ET

03/04/12 at Miami Coral Gables, Fla. 2:00 p.m. ET

01/16/12 vs. Troy Tallahassee, Fla. 10:00 a.m. ET

03/10/12 at Texas Austin, Texas 1:00 p.m. ET

01/16/12 vs. Florida A&M Tallahassee, Fla. 4:00 p.m. ET

03/15/12 vs. UNC-Wilmington Tallahassee, Fla. 4:00 p.m. ET

01/21/12 Seminole Quad vs. Furman Tallahassee, Fla. 9:00 a.m. ET   01/21/12 Seminole Quad vs. South Alabama Tallahassee, Fla. 4:00 p.m. ET 01/22/12 Seminole Quad vs. UAB Tallahassee, Fla. 12:00 p.m. ET 01/28/12 National Indoors Kickoff Weekend vs. Rice Waco, Texas All Day

03/17/12 vs. Clemson Tallahassee, Fla. 12:00 p.m. ET 03/20/12 vs. Oklahoma Tallahassee, Fla. 4:00 p.m. ET 03/23/12 vs. Wake Forest Tallahassee, Fla. 4:00 p.m. ET 03/25/12 vs. North Carolina State Tallahassee, Fla. 12:00 p.m. ET 03/30/12 at Maryland College Park, Md. 2:30 p.m. ET

01/29/12 National Indoors Kickoff Weekend Baylor / New Mexico State Waco, Texas AllDay

04/06/12 vs. Duke Tallahassee, Fla. 3:00 p.m. ET

02/04/12 vs. USF Tallahassee, Fla. 1:00 p.m. ET

04/08/12 vs. North Carolina Tallahassee, Fla. 12:00 p.m. ET

02/11/12 at Florida Gainesville, Fla. 1:00 p.m. ET 02/15/12 at Boston College Longmeadow, Mass. 6:00 p.m. ET 02/25/12 vs. Georgia Tech Tallahassee, Fla. 12:00 p.m. ET

04/13/12 at Virginia Charlottesville, Va. 3:00 p.m. ET 04/15/12 at Virginia Tech Blacksburg, Va. 1:00 p.m. ET 04/19-22/12 ACC Championships Cary, NC All Day

Women’s Tennis 01/21/12 vs. Central Florida Tallahassee, Fla. 1:00 p.m. ET

03/10/12 at Clemson Greenville, S.C. 11:00 a.m. ET

01/27-29/12 vs. National Team Indoor Championships Tallahassee, Fla. All Day

03/17/12 vs. Georgia Tech Tallahassee, Fla. 12:00 p.m. ET

02/10-11/12 Team Indoor Championships Charlottesville, Va. All Day 02/12/12 at Auburn Auburn, Ala. 11:00 a.m. CT   02/13/12 Team Indoor Championships Charlottesville, Va. All Day

03/21/12 vs. Texas Christian Tallahassee, Fla. TBA 03/24/12 at North Carolina State Raleigh, N.C. 12:00 p.m. ET 03/25/12 at Wake Forest Winston-Salem, N.C. 12:00 p.m. ET 03/30/12 vs. Maryland Tallahassee, Fla. 3:30 p.m. ET 04/01/12 vs. Boston College Tallahassee, Fla. 12:00 p.m. ET

02/24/12 vs. South Florida Tallahassee, Fla. 3:30 p.m. ET

04/06/12 at North Carolina Chapel Hill, N.C TBA

02/26/12 vs. Miami Tallahassee, Fla. 11:00 a.m. ET

04/07/12 at Duke Durham, N.C. 11:00 a.m. ET

02/29/12 at Florida Gainesville, Fla. 4:00 p.m. ET

04/13/12 vs. Virginia Tech Tallahassee, Fla. 12:00 p.m. ET

03/07/12 at Pepperdine Malibu, Calif. 12:00 p.m. PT

04/15/12 vs. Virginia Tallahassee, Fla. 12:00 p.m. ET

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04/19-22/12 ACC Championships Cary, N.C All Day 05/09-12/12 NCAA Championships TBA All Day 05/22-27/12 NCAA Championships Singles/Doubles TBA All Day


Women’s Golf 02/13-15/12 Northrup Grumman Regional Challenge Palos Verdes Golf Club/Palos Verdes, Cal. ALL DAY 02/26-28/12 AllState Sugar Bowl Intercollegiate English Turn Golf and Country Club / New Orleans, La. ALL DAY 03/16-18/12 Gator Invitational University of Florida Golf Course / Gainesville, Fla. ALL DAY 03/30/12-04/01/12 Liz Murphey Collegiate Classic University of Georgia Golf Course / Athens, Ga. ALL DAY 04/06-08/12 Bryan National Collegiate Bryan Park Players’ Course / Greensboro, N.C. ALL DAY 04/13-15/12 ACC Championship Sedgefield Country Club / Greensboro, N.C. ALL DAY 05/10-12/12 NCAA Regional Championships University Park, Pa. / Columbus, Ohio / Erie, Colo. ALL DAY 05/22-25/12 NCAA Championship Finals Vanderbilt Legends Club / Framklin, Tenn. ALL DAY

men’s Golf 02/11-12/12 Gator Invitational University of Florida Golf Course / Gainesville, Fla. All Day 03/04-06/12 USF Invitational Lake Jovita Country Club / Dade City, Fla. ALL DAY 03/09-11/12 Seminole Intercollegiate SouthWood Country Club / Tallahassee, Fla. ALL DAY 03/23-25/12 Florida Atlantic Intercollegiate Boca Raton, Fla. ALL DAY 04/07-08/12 Gary Koch Intercollegiate Old Memorial Golf Course / Tampa, Fla. ALL DAY 04/20-22/12 ACC Championship Old North State Club / Uwharrie Point, N.C. ALL DAY 05/17-19/12 NCAA Regional Championships Greensboro, N.C. (UNC Greensboro)/Athens, Ga. (Georgia) ALL DAY05/18/12 NCAA Regional Championships Norman, Okla. (Oklahoma) / Stanford, Calif. (Stanford) ALL DAY 05/29/12-06/03/12 NCAA Championship Finals Riveria Country Club / Los Angeles, Calif. ALL DAY

Women’s Sand Volleyball 03/04/12 at UAB Birmingham, Ala. TBA 03/05/12 Clash of the Collegians at Tulane New Orleans, La. TBA 03/08-09/12 Clash of the Collegians Winter Haven, Fla. All Day 03/13/12 USC Tournament vs. Tulane Tallahassee, Fla. TBA 03/16-18/12 USC Tournament Los Angeles, Calif. All Day 03/24-25/12 FSU Home Tournament Tallahassee, Fla. All Day 03/31/12-04/01/12 UNF Tournament Jacksonville, Fla. All Day 04/06/12 Siesta Key Tournament at Stetson Deland, Calif. TBA 04/14/12 Siesta Key Tournament Siesta Key, Fla. TBA 04/21/12 USA Volleyball National Championships vs. UAB Tallahassee, Fla. TBA 04/27-29/12 USA Volleyball National Championships Gulf Shores, Ala. All Day

Swimming & Diving Photo by FSU Sports Info, Mike Olivella and Ross Obley

01/13/12 vs. Florida Atlantic Tallahassee, Fla. 3:00 p.m. ET 01/14/12 at Georgia Tech / North Carolina State Atlanta, Ga. 11:00 a.m. ET 02/15-18/12 ACC Women’s Championships (M&W Diving) Christiansburg, Va. All Day 02/22-25/12 ACC Men’s Championships Christiansburg, Va. All Day 03/04/12 Auburn Invite Auburn, Ala. All Day 03/12-14/12 NCAA Diving Zone Qualifer Auburn, Ala. All Day 03/18-20/12 Women’s NCAA Championships Auburn, Ala. All Day 03/22-24/12 Men’s NCAA Championships Federal Way, Wa. All Day Seminole Softball Schedule was not finalized at the time of print. Please visit Seminole.com for details.

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Fan Story

Florida State Looks Good to Me

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itting on a folding stool in an empty parking lot while slurping down Dr. Pepper and soaking up the warm October sun has to be some kind of paradise. I can just barely make out the deep bass of the music coming from the car stereo over the laughter echoing across the pavement. The stadium and the surrounding tailgating lots have long since been cleared out, but in our little corner of asphalt we manage to keep the party going. My war paint is a little smudged, and the dazzling fedora perched atop my head has started to sag. A glance to my right finds my younger brother washing down a barbeque sandwich with soda; to my left, I see my mom and her friends talking to the kicker’s father. And I have to wonder how I managed to get so lucky. Usually my Saturday afternoons are filled with editing articles for my school’s paper or listening to music as a few of my

friends and I dance spastically around the room. However, Florida State has an away game close to home, so I’m allowed to get a taste of what the future might hold. Ever since I was a little kid, Florida State has always seemed like the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. My mom went there, her three best friends went there, and my aunt and her husband went there. Getting in would be a dream come true. So getting to join in on the tailgating fun just gets me one step closer to educational gratification, in more ways than one. Besides getting a feel for the school’s general atmosphere, I get to see the weekly pilgrimage that college football supporters make to support their teams. On the ride to the football game, we’ve passed cars filled with everything from Virginia to Florida State to Virginia Tech fans. Each campus-bound car is adorned with flags and bumper stickers — and magnets abound. I like to imagine the reasons for each passenger’s trip, each notion more outrageous than the last. Yet however outrageous the stories of those

Meghan Garant — High school sophomore at Westfield HS in Chantilly, Va., age 15 Christine O’Rourke Garant, Meghan’s mother is a Booster and elementary school teacher in Virginia.

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Fan Story

The Garant family, Boosters from Virginia, made sure the ’Noles knew they had support at Wake.

passengers might be, their fictional lives are nothing compared to the characters we run into at the games. From parents toting toddlers to families of the players, I’ve seen them all. Besides, we always attract this sort of crowd. How could we not? With all of the feathers and glitter we’re adorned with, we look like chickens that decided to take a trip to the craft store. My parents and the group they usually come with scream, “We got spirit” — sometimes more literally than figuratively. If the team gets in a few good plays, it’s not uncommon to see mass amounts of throat lozenges lying around the next day. Every now and then, we get the occasional photo shoot; I’ve even been in a picture with the SuperNoles. I’ve been in the odd newspaper once or twice, but the best photos are taken by other fans. Most of the photos I’ve been in have been taken by another fan, following a comment on our outfits. We never relinquish our headdresses, but that rarely bothers anyone. More often than not, these snapshots take place during the game. Even as a proud supporter of Florida State, I still don’t fully understand football. My experiences in high school mainly consist of talking to friends while the game plays on in the background. However, my family has been trying to educate me. I might not understand why,

but I have figured out when to stand up and shout, when to start up the war chant and when to stay quiet. Through these cheers (and by checking the scoreboard after each play) I can often sense how the game is going. When the cheering gets louder, it usually means we’re winning. I say usually since I’ve never seen us cheer for a loss. I’ve also noticed a pattern. The more we win by, the harder we party afterwards. If we win by a lot, the music becomes almost deafening, and we become generally amicable people, if a little hubristic. I’d like to say that even our losing is pretty gracious. Today the game ended

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about two-and-a-half hours ago with a loss, and we still have the music turned up nice and loud. Granted, we’re the only ones left, the rest of our lot having cleared out right after the game. Still, it’s nice to know we can keep a good time going. Yeah, I might be a little inexperienced in the tailgating department, and even college sports in general. But I will say that, despite my sophomoric outlook on things, Florida State still looks like a pretty good place to be.

Meghan Garant

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A D A M C O R E Y F ea t u re By Daniel Mitchell

Sold on the Seminoles

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dam Corey’s timing couldn’t have been better. Envious of his fellow Washington, D.C., interns who were students at big-time college football schools, Corey enrolled at Florida State in 1999 — the very year Bobby Bowden’s Seminoles claimed their second national title.

Suffice it to say, Corey was hooked. He remains that way today as a Golden Chief and generous donor to Seminole Boosters, an organization he worked for from 2002 until 2008. (Corey’s so committed to the cause, the No. 1 item on his bucket list is to “donate at least a million dollars to the Seminole Boosters.”) His role as vice president of fundraising for the Tampa Bay area shaped Corey’s view of the non-sports side of college athletics.

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Adam can often be found at Old School with a contingency of other dedicated Noles.

“I gained an appreciation for the impact that Seminole Boosters has had on the university,” says Corey, now a Tallahassee-based lobbyist for Gunster law firm. “When you give money for scholarships, 450 kids receive a benefit in some way, shape or form from your gift. “You know for a fact that your money is going to good use.” Specifically, Corey lauds the athletics department’s life-skills program, which prepares student-athletes to tackle everything from financial management to media relations to dining etiquette. “I think it’s a wonderful program, enabling us to produce athletes that are the whole package, whether they go into sports or business,” Corey notes. “They’re well equipped to take on any challenge or opportunity. Those are the types of programs that are invaluable, a necessity. “I want my cash to influence a person’s self-improvement.” Corey’s own life has been one of upward mobility. The Ft. Lauderdale native attended Florida Gulf Coast University before

heading to D.C. From there it was on to Florida State — he’d “fallen in love” with Tallahassee on an American Legion Boys State trip in high school — where he graduated in 2001. He was hired by Seminole Boosters the following year. Corey departed in 2008 for a VP post with International Oil Trading Company in Boca Raton. He returned to Tallahassee earlier this year to serve as a government affairs consultant for Gunster, one of Florida’s leading law firms for business. He’s also co-owner of the popular Crepevine Restaurant. The capital city has been good to Corey, now 31. In July, Tallahassee Magazine named him one of the town’s top singles. During a charitable event he called “nervewracking,” Corey was “auctioned” for $2,500, with the proceeds going to his chosen charity — Seminole Boosters, of course. “My friends bid me up,” Corey confides with a laugh. Many of those friends were made during his college days. As a member of Phi Delta Theta fraternity, Corey became a diehard Seminole football

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fan, as much for the camaraderie as the thrill of the sport. “In those days students had to wait in line for tickets to the big games,” he recalls. “We’d camp out for three days, sleeping in tents, eating hot dogs. Those were some of my most enjoyable experiences. “I met my best friends to this day at Florida State, through the fraternity and participating in sporting events.” While Corey’s college days aren’t that far in the rearview mirror, the FSU athletics department has gone full-speed ahead since 2001 — new facilities, new coaches, national titles and unprecedented success in multiple sports. Like most alums, Corey loves what he sees. That’s especially true for football, where second-year Head Coach Jimbo Fisher has the ’Noles pointed back toward national prominence, a perch they enjoyed when Corey first came on board. “I’m absolutely thrilled with the new regime,” Corey says. “I think Coach Fisher has tremendous passion and determination, and the fruits of that are shining through.” SB

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Compliance

NCAA Compliance: Ask Before You Act

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or our holiday edition, the Florida State University Athletics Compliance Team would like to thank you for the opportunity to help educate the Seminole family. We realize that forging relationships is important as we look to maintain institutional control in an ever changing world. We will keep this month’s article light by touching on some holiday reminders and introducing you to our Compliance Team. You may be interested in hosting a single student-athlete or an entire team for a meal. Provided that the necessary compliance form is completed prior to the meal, it is permissible under NCAA rules for a Booster to provide a student-athlete or an entire team with an occasional meal, provided that it is held in your home or on FSU’s campus. However, please remember that it is not permissible to provide our student-athletes with any gifts, benefits or services — regardless of the value — in addition to the meal. Please note also that as a Booster it is permissible for you to make a donation to a high school athletics program in the local community in which you reside, provided you do it independently of the university, the funds are distributed through the proper channels at the high school and the funds are not earmarked for a specific prospective student-athlete. Please contact the Compliance Team if you would like to host an occasional meal or if you have any questions regarding the above. The Florida State Compliance Team has completed its first year under new Associate Athletics Director for Compliance Vanessa Fuchs. A Florida native, Fuchs graduated from FSU and is a former women’s basketball student-athlete for the ’Noles. Prior to returning to Tallahassee, Fuchs worked at the NCAA national office for 8 years and, prior to that, at the ACC office in Greensboro. Jim Curry is our newest team member. He is “transferring” to us from the University of Maryland and will be immediately eligible to start work in our office later this month. He will be our assistant athletics director for Compliance. Jim worked in compliance at Coastal Carolina University prior to

his tenure at Maryland. His wealth of experience from other institutions will be invaluable. Jim will be responsible for our compliance policies and procedures and will work closely with financial aid. Jennifer Santiago is no stranger to Athletics either. Santiago worked at Georgia State as the assistant athletics director for Student-Athlete Development before working as the assistant athletics director for Admissions and Initial-Eligibility here at FSU. A Villanova and University of Pennsylvania grad, Jennifer is our eligibility expert, overseeing our studentathletes’ admissions process as well as NCAA initial and continuing eligibility certifications. Bret Cowley has the longest FSU tenure, having started his career in compliance here at FSU in 2006 while working on his Master’s degree. His experience and knowledge of our university has made him a significant resource. After finishing his degree, he joined the staff full time as a Compliance assistant and in 2011 was named director of Compliance. Bret is responsible for overseeing playing and practice seasons and awards/benefits/expenses. Alex Dominato traveled the farthest to join our staff. A native of Canada, he arrived from Syracuse, a Big East and future ACC school, in the fall of 2010 and worked diligently on our staff as a compliance coordinator and then director of Compliance. He also has a pretty good sense of humor — well, for a compliance guy anyway! Alex is our office’s point person for all personnel and recruiting matters, as well as our educational programming. Do not hesitate to contact us at (850) 644-4272 or via email at athcompliance@admin.fsu.edu when you have questions. Also, for more quick tips and compliance-related issues, please follow us on Twitter (@FSUCompliance) and “like us” on Facebook. We are here to serve not only student-athletes, staff and coaches but also YOU, so please use us as a resource. Our team looks forward to engaging with you! HAPPY HOLIDAYS & GO NOLES!

WELCOME NEW MEMBERS (from August 13, 2011–October 18, 2011))

PLATINUM GOLDEN CHIEF

Ray Berry Florida State IMG Sports Network Naples Seminole Club

GOLDEN CHIEF

Richard & Holly Baugh Dan & Karen Forey Dennis Prescott Garrett A. Schanck Hal Valdes Lyle McAlister Marilyn Cox, M.D. Mr. & Mrs. Jeff Rosenthal Robert Rust Alltrust Insurance Clear Channel/WTLY WPGX Fox 28 Digital Domain Media Group, Inc. First American Title Insurance Company Red Leonard Associates, Inc. Chuck Mansfield Robert Edwards

SILVER CHIEF

Amber R. Tynan, CFRE Brandan Schultz Erin Scott Jackson Edwards

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James Tharp Jennifer Jankowski Green Jordan A. Ruben Rae Benton Ryan Hadley Silah-Walden Brooklyn Water Bagel Franchise Co. Bowin Law Group Naples Seminole Club

TOMAHAWK

Andrew Gonzalez Bo Bryan Bob Bankston Buddy Smith Dan Empson Darla Mayo David & Nancy Cintron David G. Karins Donnie Coker Frank Williams Gregory & Gwendolyn Guidry Henry Schuitema James Cleckler James Hart James J. Dekleva Jenni McKnight Jim Coppens, II John & Karen Wolfe John Haynie Jon-Michael Sima Justice W.A. Chechey Kelley & Mark Helquist

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Kim M. Faustin Kyle P. McKeon Leonard Grunthal Lisa Lendoiro Maggie Mestre Mark E. Bornstein Michael D. Lister Michael Moore Michael Ruskin Mike Violi Pamela W. Ollis Philip J. Detlefs Ron Pierce Ron Shackleton Stan & Cathy Rogaski Susan Blanck Vincent & Laura Marchetti William & Robin Bethune Annett Bus Lines Premier Beverage Aruki Services, LLC The Jarczynski Family Tracy Stitt

WARRIOR

Adam Schultz Amber L. Wilson Anthony M. Faircloth Anthony Violi Austin Gray Beverly Fink Brad Lattin Chad W. Stultz

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Charles M. Long, Jr. Chris Acosta Chris Miller Christopher Lowery Craig Stone Dale A. Brill Dan Calton Darin Singleton David Durden Debra Walker Dennis Rudd Don Brown Donna G. Sewell Donny H. Harrelson Eric and Kimberly Prutsman Eric E. Bader Erica Sewell Fred Nonnemacher Frederick Mercurio Gary Davis James Schweinsberg Jennie Starling Jessica Brick John B. Middleton John Bringardner John McMillian John Williams Jon Yeatman Joshua Mick Justin A. McDougall Kim Karshner Luis Gutierrez Marc Anders Mark Davenport Markeith Daniels Marvin R. Brown Marvin Wagner Mary Kay Violi

Mason Riles, Jr. Matthew G. Darden Michael Brent Riffe Mike Gaby Molly A. Snouffer Neil & Carolyn Ross P J. Tripodi Pamela Goodfriend Paul Benevente Phillip Watts Regan A. Whiteford Ricardo Calzada Richard Bazinet Rick Townsley Robert Eggleston Robert Jensen Robert McDaniel Robert S. Jesionek Ron Digiacomo Ron, Bryan, & Susan Borland Ryan L. Glenn Ryan P. Magura Ryan Palmquest Sagar Amin Sandra M. Joseph Scott Snapp Scott W. Albert Shannon McMillian Stephen K. Walker Steven L. Newell Steven R. Eggleston Steven Walker Teresa Lausell Tony Violi Trey Spencer Ursula & Elisha Parris Vivian K. Crim William Glover


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RENEGADE

Andrew Swain Ann Snowden Anne L. Nyman Annie E. Sifrit Anthony M. Regitano Ashton Thibodeau Berita Pope Blaine Pickern Bo Rosser Brian A. Youtzy Brian Currie Brittany Garcia Bruce W. May Bryan Hudson Bryan Young Cara Solimine Carol Weissert Carrie-Ann Fredericks Charlene Payne Charles Allen Charles Brick Cheyenne E. Overby Chip Humeston Ciara Heaps Colleen R. Dean Daniel C. Penn Danielle Milia David & Tammy Whalen David Anderson David Haines David Singer David Smith David Treffer David White Doug McCrea Elizabeth Strickland Eric Ridgeway Erick S. Kuleski, Jr. Erin B. Posey Eve Lominac Gary A. Fineout, Jr. Gary Beaver Gene Sanders Gerald Loiacono Gregory Young James Mennie Jan C. Reed Jason Jordan Jason Noe Jeffrey A. Burnam Jenilee Hallam Jennifer M. Bird Jewel Cummings Jo B. Stevens John C. Hotaling Judy A. McGraw Julian Pace Kacie E. Bunch Katharine C. Mahoney Katherine McGovern Kevin Gray Kyle Stewart Liz Williamson Marc N. Dickman Marc Ruderman Mark Haggerty Michael B. Poole Michael K. Brady Michael Long Michael Miles Michael T. Heller Michelle Hager Mike Keesee Mitchell Johnson Nathan & Jessica Riley Owen Dundee Patricia J. Zielinski Patti F. Beesting Paul & Peggy Beleckas Paul Dilella Paul Peterson Penelope Thomas Rachael Moul Richard D. Martin, Jr. Ron Skipper

Ronald Smith Ryan S. Kellemen Sabina O’Laughlin Sean D. Perry Sean P. Kelley Sheila Smith Skip & Cathy Thomas Spencer A. Reinhardt Stephanie Carpenter Susan B. Heiskell Susan Bonsignore Timothy L. Harvey Timothy Saccucci Tom & Veronica Jennings Tom Wilson Walker Clemmons Walter Simmons William R. Solberber Winchip Construction, Inc. Old Fort Restaurant Martin County Seminole Club Jim & Michayla Mitchell Mr. & Mrs. J. Robert Darnell Bonnie Holub & Associates

BRAVE

Andrew T. Cihlar Angela C. Parra Anthony Roca Bill Shea Bradley F. White Chad Fox Chris Lydick Christie Buff Clayton & Betsy Jones Courtney D. Moore Donald Risavy, Jr. Dustin Brock Edna Ranck Ernest Recker Fabian Stern Geoffrey Gentile Glen Kaplan James & Patricia Cannan James Jordan James Yates Jeff Sloggett JoEllen S. Rogers John O’Halloran Josh Ware Julia B. Rogers Katherine Lee Kelly Lowrey Kimberly Mitchell Lee S. Cardwell Les and Anna Ruskin Mamadou Thiam Miranda & Cory Thompson Nathan Hodges Nathan Riley Paul Giannotti Raquel & Eric Anderson Stephen G. Craig Steve Hyatt Steve M. Sherman Terri Bridy Tim Rachford Victor Colon Wes Dulin Wesley & Lara Williams David A. Villarreal Katherine R. Turner Michael Sage Sarah Kehayias Nick Kish Cynthia & Robert Busher Advanced Filing Systems

IRON ARROW

Dr. John Fernandez Jessica M. Cook Kristin Gandy Kyli J. Ringeman Laurie & Patrick Conteh Fred R. Lewter Greg & Helen Sisk Roberto Arauz Sam Aaron Mobley Alan Hannah Alexa Tersteegen

Alexander L. Terry Alexandria K. Costanzo Alicia J. Norton Allison & Tim Kinney Alvaro E. Mendez Amy M. Djerf Andrea Gallagher Andrew D. Blinco Andrew Taplin Angel Balnco Angeline Bryan-Hoercher Anna Dunton Anne L. Hendry April L. Johnson Ashley A. Shepple Aubrey & Ashley Gorday Barron Elleby Benjamin Boyd Beverly Daniels Brandon Choate Brent Kahrs Brent W. Losee Bret Lewis Brian Bean Brian Kaahrs Britain M. Dwyre Brittany Udell Byron Peyster Cameron D. Todd Cara Becker Carley Grebing Carol J. Balistreri Carson B. McKendree Chad Lund Chad Peace Chateau Mangaroo Chris Johnson Christa Peterson Christopher D. Melvin Christopher E. Ells Christopher Jones Christopher R. Mead Christopher W. Maggart Cindy & Richard Jackson Claudine L. Wetzel Cleveland Holladay Colin J. O’Hara Craig & Paula Towle Craig Beckford Cristina Hevia Cristina S. Diez Dan & Bonnie Davis Danielle Prajer Dara K. Baer David Chambless David Overholt David Peeples David Schlotterbeck Deane Hart Debie Leonard Donald Harvey Dustin Miller Dustin R. Garvin Elizabeth A. Hogan Eric & Leslie Aleman Eric Louttit Eric Nagel Eric Pulliam Fernando Carretie Forrest Misler Frances S. Willis Frank Samu Gabriel Del Rio Garrick Soja Grace Henriquez Grant C. Mehlich Gregory & Laurin Skrabonja Gregory Griffing Haley Byfield Hanna R. Maki-Jokela Harley E. Shine Heather & Dan Provost Hugh Byers Ivy Danforth J. Charles Ingram J. Curtis Graham Jacob Merrett James A. Wasley James D. Clement James DeTuccio James F. Bullion, Jr. James P. Guarasci

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James V. Mullins Jason Nickerson Jay Bedford Jeanne Y. Savelle Jeff T. Pignato Jeffrey Bretana Jeffrey Claughston Jeffrey Clogston Jeffrey J. Nagel Jennifer Maxwell Culbertson Jennifer Parvin Jeremy Lambert Jeremy McKinney Jeremy R. Blinn Jerome Bradley Jessica Bouwsma Jessica L. Baratta Jim Howard, Jr. Jim Knippel Joel Valdes John E. Epps John Eustace John Garea John H. Maconi John M. Frazier, Jr. John R. Basher John Recchiuti John Toner John V. Barnacastle John W. Wilkens, II Jonathon Dugosh Joni C. Scott-Weideman Joseph Farnella Joshua C. Sackett Juanita Hurst Julie Dunbar Junior Ortiz Justin Cole Justin D. Kelly Katharyn Van Petten Katherine J. Mahoney Katie Keranen Kelly A. Kirby Kelly Green Ken & Glorian Weatherly Kendall D. Wade Kendell T. Wherry Kevin Lawrence Kevin Scarborough Kimberly Ayers Kimberly Smiley Kris Suchdeve Kristen & Aaron Dever Kristi Thomaston Kristine & William Lewis Kurtis Gregg Kyle Masters Laura & Andre Armendariz Laura DiPietro Lauren E. Analetto Lauren Watson Lawrence J. Burchette Lawrence Nunez Leah A. Sibbitt Lee Daniels Lee Hendrix Leslie & Donald Jennewein Leslie L. Whitmore Linda L. Wagman Lisa Silva Luis Icaza Lynn V. Pierce Marc Beaver Margaret E. Sheffield Maria A. Santoro Mark Clayton Mark W. Humbaugh Mary Hoffman Matthew Eustace Matthew Janicki Matthew M. Murphy Matthew S. Loftis Melba & John Ballard Melissa & Greg Hyche Michael & Laura Thomas Michael Bynum Michael Caradonna Michael J. Magnan Michael J. McManus Michele C. Keltner Michelle Barrett Mike Bowden

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WELCOME NEW SEASON TICKET HOLDERS (from August 13, 2011–October 18, 2011) Cynthia Hyder Andrew Fay Falyn Morris Barbara Greeson Raymond Feran Lindsey Bursevich Nicole Zimmerman Lloyd Louchez Katelyn Aiello Kelli Vinson Stroud Matthew Lefeber Jonathan Cole Sierra Scofield Michael Bowman Kimberly Breesmen Pietro Rocchetti Nelisa Dasilva Kyle Wilson Michael Brent Riffe Jonathan Pettry Adam Sorbe David Brick Jeffrey Levine Joshua Sino Cruz Ted Kimelman Jon Levine Nick Sorbe James Ryan Andrew Checca Dan H. Daniels Michael Risley Steven Yokley David Durden Michelle Gardner Stan Brown Chris Kersey Daniel Gidaro Jennifer Blair Dustin Ellis Mark Faimalie Ricky Dyke Lawrence Nunez David Singer Richard Bazinet Sheila Smith Ron Borland Bryan Hudson Michael Long Steven Eggleston Mike Gaby Rick Townsley Robert Eggleston Jason Noe David Treffer Dennis Rudd Mark Anders Jason Silah Susan Blanck Matt Darden Craig Stone Frank Williams Jessica Brick Robert Mcdaniel P.J. Tripodi David White Beverly Fink Steven Walker Debra Walker Buddy Smith Steven K Walker Katherine Lee Justin McDougall John Williams James Schweinsberg Blue Bell Creameries Shannon McMillian John McMillian Marvin Wagner Danielle Milia Donny H. Harrelson Matt Hastings Daniel Spencer Darlene Wilkins Ben Bellegard Daniel Murphy Dave Woodrich Denis Derylo Jesus Seanez Mallory Jones David Zies Tj Rogerson Tracy Estes

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John Estes Chad Maluske Eric Gruber Andy Galbraith Jonathan Juhl Atif Sayeedi Scott Gorka Scott Albert Po’Boys Creole Cafe Jonathan Medley You Fit Inc. James St. Louis Jeff Alter Rick Schefter Ali Brosokas Patrick Ryan Mike Garvie Todd Wollett Michael Eckel Seminole Club of Naples Mark Cooper Eric Polanik Daniel Lundquist Adam Cooley Chris Mccasland Jeff Greenberg CB Campbell Mike Moore Kyle Olson Sal Liistro Jason Marshall Mark Aron Matthew Parker Tim Munn Justin C. Maynard Eric Vandezilder Matthew Pare Thomas Herzog Everett & Maria Bieber Chad Batten Chad Brown Jeremy Leiting Jim Y. Driggers Anthony Moseley Brandon Begin Aaron Colwell Evan Klein Ann Snowden Thomas Holmes Lauren Murad Courtney Smith Amber Ryder Jeffrey Pomeranz Vin Marchetti Thomas Williams Nan Mincy Andrew Decarlo Spencer Reinhardt Jessica Van Voorhis Chelsea Petroe Lee & Jennifer Gonzalez Daniel Aven Kasey Oshita David Boole Brian Basinger Adam Abrams Peter Checca Brett Posey Elliott Flynn Jaycee Brown Kyle Mckeon Kevin Malfa Mitchell Jermyn Rachel Sides Casey Dowell Amanda Cabassa Luke Barnhill Tiffany Beuzelin Houman Rassa Ashley Policastri Brian Gilbert Cassie Lewis Tyler Wainright Tyler Everett Franklin Benjamin Olivia A. Spivey Benjamin Grasel Anthony Kelly Andres Baltodano Daniel Penn Kyle Kulas Michael Copeland

U NCONQU E R E D M AGA ZINE

Chad Corbitt Kevin Reed Sara E. Crim Christine Gorman Stephen Park Titus Nixon Jacob Horner Michael Firestone Kelly Ozburn Austin Chinick George Jacobbe Benjamin Flieger Patrick Callihan William Zayas Ryan Magura Joseph Greco David Zangrilli Adam Choby Nora Mulkearns Emily Breck Marshall Naimo, Jr. Ciara Heaps Robert Rosario Eric Ridgeway Stephen Lush Trey Spencer Paul Houchens Joshua B. Anderson Joshua Donham Michael Poole Thomas Daugustinis Kenneth Gubert Dain Wilkerson Charles Anderson Winchip Construction, Inc Connie Taylor John Michael Jansky Lee Miller Earvin Jenkins Alan Nestico Vanessa Martin Karen Marie Kelly Keith Tolbert Christina Gantley Rachel Catalano Giancarlo Cangelosi April Weathers Gina Whitworth Chris Ford Christopher M. Spencer Aaron Gavila Roberto Pando Matthew Wahila Doug Knight Claudia Teyssandier Dale Brill Evan Goldberg Don Brown David Anderson Amber Tynan Glen Fink Gary Sapp James Broun Michael Ruskin Rich Heitmeyer Karen Harley Brian J. Stevens Daniel M. Olson Gary Fineout Paul Giannotti Logan Di Liello Mark Molloy Aaron Robinson Robin & Dan Russell Greg Streitman Robert Boscovich Nathan Brewer Stacie Spears Ron Pierce Ronald Stefanick Chris Keith Phyllis Rodgers Anna E. Owens David & Mary Bellamy Michael K. Brady Daren Van Aulen Neil Ross Jason Pappas Corey & Cathy Neal John Dockstader Peter T. Sayre, Jr. Julian Pace

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Frederick Mercurio Richard M. Eagen Todd & Jeri Hunter Eddie Allen Jeff Mowry Timothy L. Harvey Jeffrey Burnam James Dekleva Jeff & Laurie Rosenthal Eric & Nina Blay Emir A. “Butch” Rahman Henri Crockett Brian W. McLanahan William J. & Susan Dawkins Paul Neal Paula J. Cleckler Clayton & Nancy Mynard John Behrens Charles Dailey Gordon L. Mize Randall Lenci Jerry Graff Chris Case Joshua Shaw Benjamin Stewart Robert Pancheri Leann Brown Shawn Kelly Steve Grove Gregg Engel Shelby Brown Jackie Arneth Anita Johal Geraldine Kelly Robyn Kinney Thomas Caplan J. Cohn Patrick Oday Linda Kerns Patsy Newton Irvin Richardson Chris Lipton Raymond Gauthier Tegan Smith Evan Glass Tatum Smith Grant Brown Daniel A. Perez Brian Zimmerman Dominick Ryals John Taylor Robert Karr Kristen Lanzarotta Misty Randall Joe Checca Jason Krouth Brian Hargraves Leon Frager Anthony Voisard

David Woodrich Peter LaBrasca Andrew Silviano Steve Mclaren David Epstein Brad Negen Natalie Joiner Rick Brooks Steven Susce Paul Jensen Sheila Sperla Alyssa Bell Byron Bowers Tamma Wright Mike Barr Sean McGuire Aaron Reninger Matthew Skelly Brady Bosarge Debora Polit-Trujillo Nicolas Noland Matthew Peterson Ben Krouth Cesar Reynoso Mark Larsen John Peloza James Lanier Richard Scott Hanson Walker Jack Wollett Meagan Baumann Chris Kelly Jason Justice Daniel Mims Ashley Alli Gary Williams Ray Foster Kenny R. Moore Kreg Jones Chris Alford Brian Erwin Cara McSurely Kelly Sesti Kristin Posey Alex Hammerschmidt Rob Travis Daniel Harrington Alex White Steve Mason Robert Sherlock Karen Shandor Ryan Schmidt Christina Pancheri Walter Sturgis Louis Pereira Tim Barry Brian Corlew Melissa Hanafin Lori Loney

Kevin Maloney and Courtney Smith new season ticket holders.


Ernest Lamb Brittany Hales Dylan Albergo Cory Danielson Derek Vazquez Brandon Roseland Lydia Davis Alex Becerra Marcus Whiteis D. Simson Shauna Mcmurry Michael Bernstein Les Balter David Copeland Brian Hickey Robert Signorello Peter Chepurko Taylor Rogerson Kevin Green Gary Donoher Anthony Groppe Jason DeFranco Damian Silver Robert Gasper Thomas Lynn Aleksey Disov Glen Fair Calvin Pancheri Erin Peterson Tonja Johnson Christopher Gomez J. David McQuiston Lynn Seeger Heath Lucy Lawanda King-Butler Craig Weiss Patrick Kelly Jordan Ruben Thomas Leahy Jamie Rogerson Louis Macias Rachael Moul Katelyn Oropeza Jamie Vogter

Tom Rogerson Matthew Cole John Guarino Lauren Searcy Jennifer Bird Angie Harrell Michael Aull Jason Henderson Brad Mullins Meagan Poston Mark Nicholls Marie Jones Rachel Somers Sean Rengasawmy Lisa Alcorn Thomas Chapman Joy Lucey Thomas Picinic Ginette Harrell John Gregory Mary Katherine Hoffman Whitney J. Brew Merinda Powell Derrick Singleton Jackie Villagio Blaine Fillichio Ryan Law Lance Perlman Darla Mayo Priscilla Pesce Sara Lliteras Brittany Udell Kristen Cook Priscilla Suarez Larry Marshall Connor Simmons Vinny Mousseau Morgan Harvey Kristina Pekarek Don Harrington Jordan M. Evans Shelby Berson Nic Ross Alyssa Linton

Antonio Clements Joseph Acierno Lindsay Schneider Manisha Patel Matthew Harper Cameron Kearns Robert Slowey Brendon Ducham Carolina Gonzalez Judy Mcgraw William Orourke Burt Hill Daniel Swatek Misty Randall Lawrence Schroeder Matthew Wollett Michael Krouth Debra Krouth Sylvia Everett Jill Kendrick Merrick Salisbury Shawn T. Lowdermilk Dustin Huff Abbey & John Stewart Garrett Schanck Nina Krishack Stephanie Lizotte Bassett Events Eric Prutsman Michael Britt Mark Schoenfeld Joshua Dimercurio Stephen Mcpherson Adam B. Cohen Andres Alvarez Luke Cataldo Jefferson Guetzloe Jenilee Hallam Kyle Jordan Lisa Madden Kristin Tetsworth Easton Walter Katelin Henry Geoffrey Varraux

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Nick Degiorgio Michelle Boughan Garrett Prus Jeffrey Galuzzo Taylor Pope Ashley Burke Ashley Scott Adam Yeager Martha Cummings Michael Zens Brandon Witkowski Robert Rust Howard Price Teresa Mazza Chris Daniels Zachary Eicholtz Tony Pimpinella Aaron Coffin Mike Bell Jacob Lampert Adam Hensley David Rush Alexandra Evans Kendall Stoll Tiffanie Lafond Kristopher Bales Susan Howell Melinda Helsel Preston Robinson Corey Burk Hayley Spivey Michael Nackashi Brian Jackson Ryan Plummer Daniel Tarlini Sean Hoffman Jacob Merrett Emily Zambetti Julianna Madden Southwest Georgia Farm Credit Samantha Speight Joie Torsiello Shay Nale Tara Ettinger

UNCO NQUERED MAGAZ I NE

Chevas Valdez Phillip Watts Lauren Bush Janet Mock Sam Mitchell Mitch Hobbs David Cintron Taylor Metzger Kirk Cunningham Brooke Frasure Joel Decastro Mason Riles Jose Llorens Gregg Reid Katie Cook Pearce Yarbrough Ryan Mastro Nick Powell James Yates Jose Cisneros Kevin Kessler Danielle Gianfilippo Laura Stillwell Jordan Peters Kyle Bellows Brandon Ford Denise Portell Michael Clark Nina Flores Daniel Durham Justin Miller Alexander Scott Wade Wilson Avery Durant Caroline Lacamera Jennifer Toomy Paul Govoni Katharine Mahoney Carlos Hagler Alysha Korak Mike Buzzell Cynthia Trujillo

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Booster Membership, from page 63

Seminole Athletics was all about and making him feel a part of my life at FSU as well as the entire community.” Now a Golden Chief with his law firm partner, Ricardo Reyes, David Tobin of Boca Raton couldn’t begin to measure his excitement in passing on his FSU passion to his high school senior daughter, Shaina. Seeing the campus through her eyes prompted David to write, “I just wanted to thank you for taking such good care of Shaina. She thoroughly enjoyed the tour and is now crazy about one day becoming an FSU student. Of course, I would love for her to become a Seminole and have a built-in excuse to visit her on game weekends!” Many Boosters are not alumni but have come to love the Booster Life. Leann Moore grew up in a football house divided. Her own college didn’t have a football team so as an adult, she hadn’t secured a loyalty to any one school … until she met her fiancé, FSU alum and Booster, Frank Jones. Frank’s dedication was infectious,

Seminole Clubs, from page 56

and now he and Leanne participate in Booster events across the state as well as in Tallahassee. “Our affiliation with Seminole friends started with a common interest,” Leann said. “However, we found through talking with fellow Seminoles, we had much more in common, shared many experiences and knew many of the same people. These people have become our lifelong friends that we share life with.” These stories and countless others make us proud of what we do in connecting real people in a real way through supporting our program in athletics. Life as a Seminole Booster involves both a contribution and personal reciprocity among the individual members, whether or not they settled in the same geographical area. Without a doubt, Booster Life is a fellowship, something for everyone, something to belong to and people to belong with. Don’t miss another minute! Make a real connection and join Seminole Boosters. Real people are waiting for you! SB

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DEC E M B E R 2 01 1

U NCONQU E R E D M AGA ZINE

SEMINO LE-BO OST ERS .CO M

Seminole Baseball with all the proceeds going to the Bull Pen Club. That’s how they keep the fires burning in Jacksonville. With fighter jets flying overhead, the Pensacola Club also had a sold out tournament at the Naval Air Station golf course and then welcomed a huge crowd for their reception/dinner, reports Ole ’Nole Jim Miller. Another consistently enthusiastic and successful member of the tour is Panama City, under the leadership of Janice Hanks. Offensive Line Coach Rick Trickett, always a popular choice for the Bay County faithful, was joined by former players Tay Cody, Jarad Moon, Cory Brookings, Matt Henshaw and Mark Graham, who all live in the area. Hanks said they’ve always enjoyed a favorable response to the tour and are usually blessed with good weather — which always helps. First year’s a charm in Naples The Seminole Club of Naples, in its first year, hit the ground running with a golf and luncheon featuring defensive coordinator Mark Stoops and former FSU players Keith Jones and William Floyd, who are both media personalities. “The club has brought a new excitement to the area, evidenced by more than 200 people attending the luncheon,” said Kristin Tubeck, regional annual fund director for Seminole Boosters, Inc. The club became a Platinum Chief ($12,000) and Silver Chief ($3,000) member, remarkable in its first year. Working closely with Tubeck and the Seminole Boosters, Inc., the Seminole Club of Naples has nearly doubled the number of national Booster members in Collier County. Each of these events accomplished the singular goal of attracting the villagers to the warmth and light of the flame where Jimbo Fisher and the Boosters were able to talk about the Boosters’ needs, share mutual goals and aspirations and ask for funding, which is what sustains the Seminole program. So, you see, it’s not really such a reach to call the clubs modern day Fire Tenders, as they really do play an important role in the sustenance of our Seminole village. SB


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Unconquered December 2011