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Unconquered magazine (USPS 18182) is published quarterly by Seminole Boosters, Inc., 225 University Center, Suite 5100, Tallahassee, Florida, 32306. (850) 644-3484, Fax: (850) 222-5929. POSTMASTER: send change of address to, Unconquered magazine, care of Seminole Boosters, Florida State University Center, Suite C-5100, 5th Floor, Tallahassee, Florida, 32306. Periodicals Postage Paid at Tallahassee, FL, Volume 27, Issue 4. All advertising revenues directly support programs of the Seminole Boosters, Inc. For advertising rates, please contact the sales representatives listed below. © 2010, Seminole Boosters, Inc. All rights reserved. Opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Florida State University faculty, staff or administration. Overview Unconquered magazine celebrates Seminole athletics and the indomitable spirit of its student-athletes who overcome adversity, the passion of its coaches and educators who help students reach beyond their limits, and the devotion of donors who redefine the boundaries of generosity by giving scholarships that change lives and who make donations that build first-class athletic facilities. By sharing their stories of transformational experiences — on the athletic playing field, in the classroom and in life — Unconquered magazine encourages the growth of responsible world citizenship and cross-cultural understanding. Each issue carries stories on what makes student-athletes great and how they were shaped by their experience at FSU, features on Seminole community sports legends and profiles of donors who make contributions.

2010 EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

Brian Swain

Ken Willis

Mike Harrell

Gene Ready

Steve Brown

Bob Caton

Morris Miller

TOM JENNINGS

RANDY SPETMAN

ANDY MILLER

Bruce Harrell

Lori Mattice

JOE BECKHAM

Chairman

Past Chairman

Chairman-Elect

Booster Attorney

Secretary

VP for University Advancement

Treasurer

Immediate Past Chair

Athletic Director

Seminole Boosters President

Contact Send correspondence to Derril Beech, at the address shown above, or by e-mail to dbleakley@fsu.edu. Telephone: (850) 645-7330. Magazine Staff Publishers: Andy Miller, Jerry Kutz

Philip Griffitts

Managing editor: Derril Beech

At-Large Member

At-Large Member

At-Large Member

Faculty Representative

Design, layout, production, pre-press: Rowland Publishing, Inc. Photo editors: Derril Beech, Rowland Publishing, Inc. Featured photographers: Mike Olivella, Ross Obley, Russell Grace Contributing photographers: FSU Photo Lab, FSU Sports Info Columnists: Charlie Barnes, Jim Crosby, Jerry Kutz Contributing writers: Rob Wilson, FSU Sports Information Copy editors: Jerry Kutz, Rowland Publishing, Inc. Photo purchasing information: Mike Olivella photos: www.seminoles.com Ross Obley photos: www.seminoles.com Russell Grace photos: www.russellgraceimages.com

Seminole Boosters, Inc. EXECUTIVE STAFF Andy Miller President and CEO Charlie Barnes Executive Director Senior Vice President Joel Padgett Senior Vice President Gift Planning Director Tom Carlson Senior Vice President Jerry Kutz Vice President of Marketing and Communications Cindee Lundeen, PhD Director Billy Sexton Director

Rachel Catalano Special Events, Executive Assistant to Andy Miller Sarah Reed Executive Assistant, Coaches Clubs Director Mary Bailey Executive Assistant to Jerry Kutz, Stewardship Kari Terezakis Executive Assistant to Tom Carlson, Charlie Barnes Matthew Zagaeski Assistant Information Technology Director

Eric Carr Director

Patti Barber Receptionist, Office Assistant

Sanford Lovingood Controller

Barbara Mason Financial Assistant

Matt Behnke CFO Max Zahn Northeast FL Representative Kristin Tubeck Tampa Representative ASSISTANTS TO EXECUTIVE STAFF AND DIRECTORS Mary Pat Desloge Senior Executive Assistant to Andy Miller

FSU VARSITY CLUB Betsy Hosey Director DONOR RECORDS Jennifer Terrell Director Bridget Edwards Office Assistant Jeff Chamlis Gift Entry Jason Liskooka Data Entry Abbie King Data Entry Dominique Gordon Data Entry Brandon Mand Gift Entry UNCONQUERED MAGAZINE

PROGRAM DIRECTORS

Derril Beech Managing Editor, Advertising, Student Boosters Director

Maria Fuller Skybox and Parking Director

FSU TRADEMARK LICENSING

Farrah Miller Information Technology Director, Webmaster, Internship Coordinator Michael Espada Ticket Sales Manager

Sherri Dye Director of Licensing Garrett O’Connor Assistant Licensing Director

Seminole Boosters, Inc. 2010–2011 BOARD OF DIRECTORS Rick Astor Kathy Atkins-Gunter, PC Jorge Azor Byron Bailey Doug Bailey Tom Barron, PC Mark Bates Joe Beckham Flecia Braswell Steve Brown Jim Byrd Bob Camp, PC Joe Camps, PC Bob Carnes Bill Carraway, PC Jimmy Carter, PC Ken Cashin, PC Bob Caton Raymond Cottrell, PC Dave Cowens, PC Clif Curry Craig Dewhurst Carl Domino, PC

Wade Durham Frank Fain, PC Ron Farrell Michael Feiler Lon Fellenz Mike Fields, PC Philip Griffitts Todd Haag Andy Haggard, PC Kim Hammond, PC Bill Harkins Bruce Harrell Michael Harrell Ed Hart Ed Haskell, PC Arielle Haynes Sherm Henderson, PC Charlie Hill, PC Jeff Hill Lee Hinkle Roger Hobbs Ron Hobbs, PC Cassandra Jenkins

Bill Kalfas Jim Kirk, PC Chris Kraft, PC Lawton Langford, PC George Langford, PC Greg Lawrence Brett Lindquist Douglas Mannheimer, PC Lori Mattice Linda McGee Andy Miller Morris Miller Michael Miller David Mobley DeVoe Moore Russ Morcom Julie Moss John Olson, PC Bill Parker, PC Sean Pittman Frank Pope, PC Theo Proctor, PC Gene Ready

John Rice Christian Scherf Jon Shebel Barry Smith Bob Smith Lomax Smith, PC Randall Spetman Kathy Stahl Brian Swain Donn Szaro Nylah Thompson Glenda Thornton Gary Thurston Nada Usina Oscar Vicente Cumi Walsingham Gary Walsingham, PC Derek Whitis Ash Williams Ken Willis PC denotes Past Chairman

FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF TRUSTEES Derrick Brooks

Mark Hillis

Dustin R. Daniels

James E. Kinsey, Jr.

Emily Fleming Duda

Leslie Pantín, Jr.

David B. Ford

Margaret A. “Peggy” Rolando

Manny Garcia

Brent W. Sembler

William “Andy” Haggard,

Susie Busch-Transou

Chair

Eric C. Walker

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“We are proud of our scholar athletes who excel in the classroom and on the playing field.”

Eric J. Barron

President of The Florida State University

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Booster Life 5 Board of Directors 11 Booster Life 16 Memorial Gift 68 True Seminole 70 Welcome New Members Columnists 8 Lessons of History 18 Baseball Big Leagues

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Report 14 Academic Update: Golden Noles Gala 24 Fisher’s First Game 30 ACC Championship Info 40 College Town Concept 53 Seminole Sports TV Magazine 54 Basketball Preview 62 Booster Renewals 64 Marching Chiefs Spirit Groups 66 Soccer Season Information 67 Volleyball Update 74 Gift Planning 76 RV Road Warriors 78 Quarterly Report Features 20 BOOSTERS BOARD OF DIRECTORS Langford Award

26 SEMINOLE FOOTBALL Strength, Speed, Nutrition

34 MAJOR CONTRIBUTOR DeVoe and Shirley Moore

photos by fsu sports info & mike olivella

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On the cover: DeVoe Moore Photo by Mike Olivella

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Charlie Barnes

Lessons of History Encourage Optimism for Seminoles

By Charlie Barnes, vice president

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here’s a wonderful book by historians Will and Ariel Durant called “The Lessons of History.” It’s a small book, barely 100 pages, but it is the summary of the basic mechanics of human civilization. Married for 68 years, the Durants spent their lifetime together studying and writing about the world’s great civilizations in exhaustive detail. Their work was published in 11 massive volumes across four decades, 1935 to 1975. Both died in 1981. “The Lessons of History” was published in 1968, the same year the Durants were awarded the Pulitzer Prize. They are unsmiling in their book jacket photo; perhaps not inappropriate considering the general tone of this work. I have the sense that they heaved a great sigh and threw up their hands at the unending follies of mankind. The Durants seemed to be resigned to the truth that innate forces of biology are what drive civilizations. After this column is published, I may set it aside and revisit it in two years, or three or four, as our football program regains its former exalted status and fulfills our fondest hopes. The message that the Durants seem to offer us is that people really haven’t changed in two-and-a-half millennia, and much of what has already happened among humans is a fair predictor of what will happen in the future. We’ll see if that applies to our Seminoles. If the Durants are right, then we Seminoles can benefit from lessons we find inherent in the realities of big time college athletics. Even if some of us are

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uncomfortable with those realities, 2010 is an opportunity for us to begin to apply the lessons we have learned and to strengthen our entire athletic program.

Lesson #1 is that Florida State is a football school.

I was astonished and immensely pleased when Florida State finished 5th in the Directors’ Cup, which evaluates all college athletic programs on a point basis. This achievement is even more amazing than you think. The standings are based on points awarded for high national finishes in 20 sports — 10 men’s and 10 women’s — and you get to choose which sports you want to count. The finishers ahead of us were Stanford, Florida, Virginia and UCLA. The reason Florida State’s rank is so astonishing is that we only have 19 sports in total! Stanford University, the nation’s No. 1 ranked program, has a $200 millionplus athletic endowment fund. Florida State has a $40.7 million athletic endowment fund. Stanford’s 31 varsity sports include women’s lightweight rowing. A national championship in any sport is given as much weight as a national championship in football. The time from 1981 through 1986 was a sort of upscale purgatory for Seminole football. We had winning seasons and did not lose a single bowl game. But for six straight years we failed to beat Florida or Auburn, and beat Miami only twice. During that run, Seminole Boosters appealed to our fans and donors by

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aggressively promoting the achievements of our overall athletic program, and there was much to praise — we five National Championships during a four-year span in the early 1980’s; our basketball team did well in Metro League play and our baseball team was a featured regular in the College World Series. But a mounting series of losses to our nearest and most bitter football rivals could not be offset by extolling the achievements of our other sports programs. Our Booster contributions and our ticket sales depended on the emotional infrastructure of football. Winning in any sport is good, but football is where our fans’ identities lie. At a football school, the damage from just a few mediocre seasons in a row can be extensive. Alumni, fans and donors who want to win look to the athletics leadership for a willingness to right the ship. The truth is that all sports at Florida State depend not just on excellent coaching and steady Athletic Department leadership, they also depend very much on the funding necessary to sustain excellence. The primary sources of that money involve football, and when football is in decline all other sports suffer in proportion.

Lesson #2 is that winning matters.

There are only a handful of schools with the realistic chance to win a BCS National Championship. Florida State is one of those few. We have the weather, we have the means to compete and we have access to the best high school players in the country.


Charlie Barnes

Most head coaches are hired with the expectation that they will have winning seasons, go to an occasional bowl and perhaps challenge for a conference title. At Florida State, our goal is to win a national championship. Every year. Coach Bowden stated it clearly in the 1990s. Jimbo Fisher’s constant goal is to go all the way, to challenge for the BCS title; he has no illusions about the expectations of the fans and administration. If we intend to compete successfully at the Division I level, then Florida State has to do better than almost anyone else. Why? Because Miami is on its way back and Florida is already there. And because last year South Florida beat us in our own house. Our recent experience is a stark reminder that even with non-losing seasons, tens of thousands of season tickets and contributions to support the entire athletic program evaporate when the fans feel that winning is no longer the first priority of coaches or administrators. Average isn’t acceptable to our fans, alumni and donors who have to live with Hurricanes and Gators and other ambitious programs nearby.

Coach Bowden was candid over the course of his career about his own designs on leaving. He has said that he originally intended to stay at FSU only a few seasons. He said he probably would have taken the job at LSU in 1979 had his team not beaten the Tigers in Baton Rouge. He made no secret of seeking the Alabama job in 1986. Also, during his FSU tenure he was actively recruited by several NFL teams. Some coaches do come to love their universities; Coach Bowden certainly came to love FSU and still does. Joe Paterno, Steve Spurrier, Bear Bryant, Vince Dooley, Tom

Lesson #3 is the knowledge that, to professional coaches this is just business.

Osborne, Mack Brown … all developed emotional ties to the programs with which they are most closely identified. But in the end, coaches come and go. There’s too much at stake; too much money on the table, too many fans and alumni who depend on responsible leadership for Florida State to allow sentiment to overwhelm decisions.

At schools where winning is the priority, coaches are hired to win. Where excellence is demanded, the smart head coach or athletics director knows that other considerations are best kept at arm’s length until winning is established. It’s apparent that we have a great coaching staff at FSU, but don’t expect the assistant coaches to stick around. Ambitious, aggressive assistants want to get better jobs as coordinators, and coordinators want to become head coaches. Evidence of the quality of our coaching staff will be found in the jobs they take after they leave Florida State. It’s the business they’re in; the color of their shirts may change many times. I think Jimbo is a bona-fide big-time winner and nothing would please me more than for him to finish his career at Florida State, but it’s unrealistic to expect that he will be here for 34 years. Coaching is his profession, and it will take him where it will.

You’ve got to pay to play, as the saying goes. It’s no accident that the national champions of recent years have been football programs with huge budgets.

Lesson #4 is that winning is expensive.

You’ve got to pay to play, as the saying goes. It’s no accident that the national champions of recent years have been football programs with huge budgets. The best players gravitate toward the best coaches with the best facilities and the widest national exposure. Florida State has a tremendous advantage because we are located close to large numbers of great players. We have a great history and still enjoy a substantial national reputation. Jimbo Fisher has been very straightforward about what it takes to produce

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a championship program. He has hired nutritionists, strength and conditioning coaches and more. With permission from the athletics director he says he has financed it with the difference between his salary and Coach Bowden’s. As we move forward and Florida State continues to win, that formula will become unworkable. We are trying to raise funds now to build a $15 million covered practice facility, and even more money will be needed to keep pace with our rivals. For excellence to be sustained indefinitely, a high quality number of recruits must be maintained and proven, professional position coaches must be in place to evaluate and develop the talent. Never underestimate the importance of your contributions to Seminole Boosters and your involvement as volunteers and participation in Booster activities. Support from the Seminole Boosters organization is one of the enduring constants that makes winning possible. Your membership in Seminole Boosters, at any level of giving, is a substantial gain for Florida State and the Seminoles. Despite their misgivings about human nature, Will and Ariel Durant do offer us an optimistic conclusion. While Human Nature hasn’t changed, the fabric of civilization has been enriched by layer upon layer of philosophers and accumulated wisdom across the centuries. They write, “History is not merely a warning reminder of man’s follies, but is also an encouraging remembrance of generative souls. Be grateful for this inexhaustible legacy … .” As for us Seminoles, if we are unhappy about the state into which our program fell in the final years of the last decade, we can take heart in knowing that all of the wonderful achievements of the dynasty years, all of Coach Bowden’s good works on the field and off, as well as the great coaches before him are permanently woven into our history, and those strengthening fibers allow us to welcome these best of times to come with optimism. Let us, as they say, be grateful for our inexhaustible legacy. There is much to be learned from all that. SB

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he University Center Club is the premier private club serving Florida State University, Tallahassee and friends of the community. Since its establishment in 1996, the Club has offered Members and guests outstanding cuisine while enjoying spectacular views of downtown Tallahassee and Doak Campbell Stadium. The Club features à la carte dining in the Osceola Grill and six exquisitely appointed private meeting/dining rooms along with an 8,000 square foot ballroom. When you combine this magnificent facility with our expert staff you have Tallahassee’s Premier Private Club!

To learn more about membership, game day benefits, or hosting an event, please contact our Membership team today! Melinda Baker can be reached at (850) 644-6522 or melinda.baker@ourclub.com Cherrie Barbree can be reached at (850) 644-9089 or cherrie.barbree@ourclub.com University Center | Doak Campbell Stadium | Tallahassee, FL 32306 | (850) 644-8528 | www.UniversityCenterClub.com 10

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Booster Life

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Academic

Update

Randy Spetman, Luke Loucks, Coach Leonard Hamilton and Andy Miller

Christian Hunnicutt and Coach Sue Semrau

Randy Spetman and Jeff Kottcamp Tory Haddad and Coach Loni Alameda

Keith Embree and Coach Dwayne Hultquist

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Lucas Stowers and Coach Dennis Nobles

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Randy Spetman, Erin Simmons and Coach Dennis Nobles


Sweat Study Florida State’s Annual Golden Torch Gala Honors Top Student Athletes

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By Chuck Walsh, FSU SPORTS INFORMATION

leven student-athletes were honored for perfect 4.0 grade point averages while the men’s track and field, men’s tennis and women’s soccer teams earned accolades for achieving the top overall team grade point averages in the past academic year at the 20th Annual Golden Torch Gala. Sponsored by Florida State’s Department of Athletics and the Seminole Boosters, the event was held at Miller Hall in the University Center. The Golden Torch Gala is a unique event that recognizes student-athletes outside of their uniform and playing arena. It brings distinction and honor to Florida State University and its student-athletes, many of whom achieve tremendous accolades in the classroom and on the playing field. These young men and women who proudly wear the garnet and gold build the image of Florida State as a superior academic and athletic institution. The Overall Male Golden Torch Award, which rewards a perfect 4.0 grade point averages, went to: Kyle Cobb (golf, political science), Daniel Parvin (football, civil engineering), Jeff Tacetta (football, marketing) and Lucas Stowers (track and field, exercise science). The Overall Female Torch Award winners were: Mary Fleming (track and field, economics), Elizabeth Gerrity (women’s cross country, communications), Jamie Kuhn (golf, advertising), Jessica Perry (women’s cross country, biology), Katie

Rybakova (tennis, English education) Erin Simmons (track and field, biological science), and Caroline Smith (swimming and diving, communications). The men’s tennis and track and field teams shared the honor of Team Golden Torch Award with an overall team grade point average of 3.07. Capping off a great season on the field, the women’s soccer team also scored in the classroom. With a team grade point average of 3.39, the nationally ranked soccer team took home the Women’s Team Golden Torch Award. Not only are the student athletes who are honored at the Golden Torch Gala

academically gifted, they are also all talented on their chosen athletic fields. All those honored at the gala helped each of the Seminoles’ 19 sports reach their respective NCAA tournament championships during the 2009-10 academic year and helped the Seminoles finish No. 5 in the nation in the all-sports ranking of the NACDA Director’s Cup, which measures the overall athletics success of every Division I team. The student-athletes on each team with the highest grade point averages received the individual Golden Torch Awards. The winners are as follows:

Team Student-Athlete GPA Major Baseball.......................................................James Ramsey.......................3.91 ......... Finance Men’s Basketball.......................................Luke Loucks............................3.28 ........ Management Men’s Cross Country...............................Matthew Huckaby...............3.83 ........ Exercise Science Football........................................................Dustin Hopkins.....................3.97 . ....... Communication/Media Men’s Golf..................................................Kyle Cobb................................4.00 . ...... Political Science Men’s Swimming and Diving................Hibai Iriondo..........................3.81 ......... Civil Engineering Men’s Tennis..............................................Keith Embree.........................3.75 ......... Sport Management Men’s Track and Field..............................Lucas Stowers.......................4.00 . ...... Exercise Science Women’s Basketball................................Christian Hunnicutt.............3.77 . ....... Communication Disorders Women’s Cross Country........................Mary Fleming........................4.00 . ...... Economics Elizabeth Gerrity . ................4.00......... Creative Writing Jessica Parry .........................4.00 . ...... Biology Women’s Golf............................................Jamie Kuhn ...........................4.00 . ...... Advertising Women’s Soccer.......................................Tifani Mullen..........................3.79 . ....... Communication Women’s Softball.....................................Victoria Haddad....................3.72 . ....... Exercise Science Women’s Swimming and Diving..........Caroline Smith .....................4.00 . ...... Communication Women’s Tennis........................................Ekaterina Rybakova..............4.00 . ...... Economics/Biological Science Women’s Track and Field.......................Mary Fleming........................4.00 . ...... Economics Erin Simmons........................4.00 . ...... Biological Sciences Women’s Volleyball.................................Taylor Wilson.........................3.90 ........ Interior Design Women’s Team....................................Soccer................................. 3.39 Men’s Team.........................................Tennis/Track and Field..... 3.07

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Donor Profile

Opportunity Makers Seminoles at Heart Make Gift to Florida State Athletics By Daniel Mitchell and photos courtesy smith family

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hen you travel from continent to continent running a company called Global TV Concepts, the world can seem like a mighty big place. But it’s the small-world connections that resonate with Lee Smith, who has made a lifetime’s worth of them since joining the Florida State family two decades ago. Smith, founder and CEO of Global TV Concepts, and wife Shelly have given generously to FSU — especially considering neither attended the school. Most recently,

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Lee Smith pledged 10 percent of his estate to Seminole Boosters through a will gift. The gesture is rooted in the personal relationships Lee and Shelly Smith have formed since their youngest daughter, Brenda, enrolled at Florida State in the late 1980s. One trip to Doak Campbell Stadium for a football game in 1989 hooked Lee for life. “That was it,” says Smith, a college football neophyte before relocating from New York to Boca Raton. “I loved it.” So did Shelly. As the New York City native

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admits, “City girls don’t get that experience.” Soon after, the Smiths signed on for the first of several cruises they’d take with Seminole coaches. They developed close friendships based not just on football but on shared experiences and values. A casual conversation on a beach in Haiti brought home, literally, these binding ties. Chatting with defensive ends coach Jim Gladden and his wife, Patty, Lee realized he and Patty had attended the same high school in Kirkwood, Mo. In fact, Lee’s best


Riddex pest control, to name just a few. While he travels less than in the past, when trips to China were common, Lee still hits the road often. Fortunately, many trips are to places like Provo, Utah, and Norman, Okla., to watch the Seminoles in action. Lee is never far from FSU football, as his office can attest. It’s stuffed with memorabilia such as jerseys signed by Heisman Trophy winners Charlie Ward and Chris Weinke, banner headlines heralding the ‘Noles’ 1993 and ’99 national titles and limited-edition lithographs of Bobby Bowden. Like most people, Lee’s favorite possessions are stored in the memory bank. The one that stands out most — Florida State’s astounding rally from a 28-point fourthquarter deficit to tie Florida, 31–31, in 1994. Lee admits he nearly gave up on the Seminoles before Danny Kanell and company rose from the dead. “I said to my wife, if we don’t move the ball on the next drive, I’m outta here,” he recalls with a laugh. “Then the comeback started.

That was unbelievable.” Smith remembers, somewhat less fondly, a flirtation with professional golf after graduation from the University of Missouri. Talented enough to shoot 61 and compete for prestigious amateur titles, Smith soon realized that pounding range balls for hours on end was “drudgery.” So he ventured into business and started a family, eventually settling in South Florida. Sending Brenda to Florida State proved pivotal in the Smiths’ lives. Brenda and husband Paul Kopman — whose grandfather was involved in building Burt Reynolds Hall — now have twin sons, Aidan and Remi, age 5. It appears their grandfather has taught the boys well. As Smith relates with a chuckle, “They always say, ‘We hate them stinkin’ Gators!’ ” SB Daniel Mitchell served as Managing Editor for the Osceola from 1995–2002. He’s now a full-time golf writer based in Jupiter, Fla.

Top: The Smiths pose with their scholarship endowment plaque named in honor of Jim and Patty Gladden. Above: Lee and Shelly’s grandsons, Aidan and Remi, with Mickey Andrews.

friend was the brother of Patty’s best friend. “We must have been in the same house no telling how many times,” Lee marvels. Shelly is especially fond of the Gladdens, calling them “the most wonderful people in the world.” “If Jim was never a coach,” she adds, “we would have been friends had we met anywhere. Football had nothing to do with it. Patty and Jim are just very special to us.” So special that the Smiths, through Seminole Boosters, endowed an athletic scholarship in the Gladdens’ honor. Lee and Shelly also enjoy tight bonds with former coaches Mickey Andrews and Billy Sexton, as well as their wives, whom they visit every chance they get. While Shelley is retired from the family business, much of Lee’s time is devoted to Global TV Concepts, an international powerhouse in product development, marketing and distribution. The company’s brands include Aeropedic, Big Top Cupcake and

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Feature

Florida State Alum, Former Seminole Stand-Out, and Seminole Booster Donor Buster Posey, Competes in the 2010 MLB World Series By jim crosby

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Another base hit for rookie catcher Buster Posey and the Giants fans show their appreciation with their own special cheer, a take-off on the movie “Ghostbusters.” It has been a whirlwind ride for the former Seminole catcher from the small town of Leesburg, Ga., (pop. 2,336). In a couple of years, Posey went from competing for a spot in the College World Series at Florida State University to the pressure of the National League pennant race in San Francisco. In typical low-key fashion Posey compared the two situations saying, “They were pretty similar actually, but obviously it’s a little more magnified at this level

Photos by ©2010 S.F. Giants

Buster Represents

“Who you gonna call?” “GO-BUSTER!”


Feature

The San Francisco Giants selected Posey as the fifth pick in the first round in 2009. The rookie catcher set the second-longest hitting streak by a rookie in San Francisco history.

because of the national attention we get.” After his mid-season call-up, Posey certainly received plenty of attention. Shortly after arriving on the major league scene, he embarked on a 21-game hitting streak that fell just one short of the Giants’ all-time record set by Willie McCovey. He admitted that he was very aware of the streak as it unfolded. “After about 14 or 15 games the press started talking about it,” he said. “Then it was every day. It’s hard not to think about it when the press asks about it after every game.” Relaxing in the Giants’ road locker room at Wrigley Field before a game with the Cubs, Posey allowed a brief reflection on the mega-attention he has received and how he has dealt with it. “It’s the same game I’ve been playing for a long time. I just try to have fun playing baseball. Regardless of how much attention you get, it’s the same game.” The foundation for his rapid rise was laid before the 2007 season at FSU, when the coaches asked him to switch to catcher from shortstop, where he had received AllAmerican honors as a freshman. Posey had never caught before but adjusted to the switch so well he made AllAmerican in his sophomore and junior seasons. He was also named National Player of the Year, winning just about every award he was eligible for, including the Dick Howser Trophy as college baseball’s best player. Mike Martin Jr., his hitting and catching coach, talked about Posey’s adaptability. “A lot of it has to do with mindset. When you are strong mentally and driven like

Posey was very aware of his hitting streak as it unfolded. “After about 14 or 15 games, the press started talking about it. Then, it was every day. It’s hard not to think about it when the press asks about it after every game.” Buster is, you sell out to something and that makes it easier to adjust.” His catching skills got the Giants’ attention and they selected him as the fifth pick in the first round. After he spent less than two full seasons in the minors, the Giants declared Posey ready, traded off their number one catcher and brought him up. It was amazing how quickly the veteran pitchers accepted the rookie catcher. Demp Posey, Buster’s Dad, said he thought the quick adjustment to catcher came about because he had done a lot of pitching and knew how pitchers think. Buster concurred, “Yeah it helped. If you are on the mound you are thinking a lot … what pitch you are going to throw next; how to pitch this guy. The same goes for the catcher.” Always a good hitter, Posey learned a lot of it in his own backyard, seven miles from the nearest town. Demp remembers going out and buying a batting cage for the boys. “Our outfield was up against a creek and when Buster, Jack and Jess got bigger I got tired of fishing balls out of the creek,” he explained. At the point Posey reached 90 hits in the majors, he had successfully hit to all fields with 30 each going to the three different outfield areas. He credits a lot of that development to instruction from Mike

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Martin Jr. as well as the short right field fence. “I’d definitely say that played into it,” Posey said in explaining how he learned to hit to the opposite field. “Anybody who has ever played at Dick Howser Stadium knows there is a short porch to right and if you are able to get the ball up in the air and go that way you could hit it out.” So, life is good in the major leagues for Buster Posey. But don’t expect the stardom to go to his head. You won’t see him “big league-ing” anyone on or off the field. “I told all my kids don’t show up anyone,” said Demp. “It just makes them play harder against you.” And as far as off the field goes, Demp says, “The thing that makes me most proud is that Buster still remembers and calls his grandparents on their birthdays. He’s doing those kinds of things not because he’s trying hard to do them, but because it’s something he wants to do. He’s not going to let baseball and everything that comes with it change him.” Wherever he goes, Posey makes a good impression and impacts the lives of those around him. A good example of his influence on a team and a program can be seen when you walk into the locker room at Dick Howser Stadium. The locker for Number 8, Buster Posey, is still set up just like it was the day he left Florida State University. SB

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Seminole Boosters:

Building Relationships for More Than 50 Years

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One of the keys to success is a diverse and active board of directors that provides guidance and advice to the Boosters management. By Jim Crosby

n 1951 a group of businessmen who loved football and Florida State University formed the first Seminole Boosters organization. These pioneers who paved the way could not have imagined the mega-success that the University enjoys today because of their actions. Functioning as the fundraising arm for the athletic program, the Seminole Boosters now manage more than $40 million in scholarship endowments. All of this has been achieved with leadership from a volunteer force that has taken the passion of that pioneer group to even greater heights. Consistent management has played a key role in keeping everyone on the same page. Andy Miller has been the chief executive

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officer for more than 35 years while Senior Vice President and Executive Director Charlie Barnes has been on board since 1978. One of the keys to success is a diverse and active board of directors that provides guidance and advice to the Boosters management. According to past Board Chairman Russ Morcom, the makeup of the board gives a clue to why the group has been a positive force in the growth of Seminole athletics. “If you look at the board at any given time there are developers, bankers, attorneys, etc. Solid businessmen with varied backgrounds,” Morcom says. That business experience has been particularly helpful in guiding the building programs of the athletic department.

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There are two misconceptions that many members of the general public seem to have about Seminole Boosters. Both concern money. First, many people who would like to be a Booster think they can’t afford it. But nothing could be farther from the truth. Morcom, who has been a Booster since the early 1980s says, “I was involved at the lowest level for many years. There’s a contribution level available for everyone,” he added. “Every dollar is appreciated.” The second misconception may be that it is all about the money. It really isn’t. Sean Pittman, a local attorney and board member who is a Seminole twice over, having both an undergraduate and a law degree from FSU, explains, “Being a Booster is about


much more than money. It is basically helping provide a quality of life for our student athletes so they can be more than athletes. It is being concerned with helping them with career development and enabling them to thrive in the classroom and beyond the playing field or court.” Pittman also feels that the Seminole Boosters help develop lifetime relationships with the university, not with just the student athletes but with the student population as a whole. “That’s what you are doing as a Booster. You are showing students that there is a place where they can give back to the university and stay involved even after graduation,” he says. In 2004, Seminole Boosters established a Student Booster program that enables students to gain greater involvement with the athletic program for a minimal donation. Most, but not all board members attended Florida State University. Board members are charged with finding and inviting other talented individuals who are willing to work hard for a great cause to become Boosters, regardless of whether they were FSU grads. Steve Brown is an example. Even though the Birmingham native did not attend Florida State, he did hear lots about it from friends. Perhaps because he lived in the same neighborhood as Bobby Bowden in Alabama he caught the Seminole fever. Later, when he moved to Wakulla County and met Executor Director Andy Miller, he became a Booster. Now, after 15 years as a Golden Chief and a term as chairman, Brown continues to work hard on Booster projects. He feels it is great that FSU has a relationship with some

Past Chairman of the Board 1952 to 2009 1952

Bob Lee Bannerman

1981

1953

Charles Rosenberg

1982 John Olson

Jim Carter

1954 Charles Rosenberg

1983 Lomax Smith

1955 Spencer Burress

1984 Tom Barron

1956 Payne Midyette, Sr.

1985 George Langford

1957 Albert Yates

1986 Bill Parker

1958 W. G. “Babe” Starry

1987 Mike Fields

1959

1988 Andy Haggard

W. G. “Babe” Starry

1960 Godfrey Smith

1989 Ken Cashin

1961

1990 Tommy Williams

W. G. “Babe” Starry

1962 Syde P. Deeb

1991 Frank Fain

1963

1992 Dennis Boyle

Bill Carraway

1964 Lou Hill

1993 Douglas Mannheimer

1965 Ed Haskell, Jr.

1994 Lawton Langford

1966 W. S. “Bill” Lee

1995 Carl Domino

1967 Frank Pope

1996 Jim Kirk

1968 Theo Proctor, Jr.

1997 Joe Camps

1969 Bill Dubey

1998 Sherman Henderson

1970 Doyle Pope

1999 Don Reinhard

1971 Herschel Williams

2000 Gary Walsingham

1972

2001 Raymond Cottrell

Kim Hammond

1973 Dave Cowens

2002 Ron Hobbs

1974

2003 Bob Fohl

Lou Hill

1975 Doyle Pope

2004 Chris Kraft

1976

George Langford

2005 Kathy Atkins-Gunter

1977

George Langford

2006 Russ Morcom

1978

Charlie Hill

2007 Russ Morcom

1979

Bob Camp

2008 Bob Caton

1980 Hurley Booth

Boosters of Influence

Student Boosters help develop lifetime relationships with the university, not just with the student athletes, but with the student population as a whole.

2009 Steve Brown

*Current Chairman — Brian Swain Since 1963, as a group, members of the Seminole Boosters Board of Directors have made contributions to the university exceeding $19 million. Since 1972, they have also pledged current and deferred gifts to Seminole Boosters in excess of $140 million.

people who “can make large contributions and a few who can make extremely large contributions.” And while the Boosters are thankful for and welcome all those generous contributions, Brown adds: “The backbone of our program is the $200 to $300 contributor who is an active fundraiser. It takes the same amount of time for somebody who gives $300 a year as one who gives $10,000.” It’s all a team effort that includes big and small donors bonding together and raising money for the athletic program. It is obvious that the unprecedented era of success Florida State University has enjoyed in athletics has been a team effort. It has occurred not just because of excellence

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in the athletic arena, but also because of the contributors and hard workers behind the scenes working as Seminole Boosters. For that success to continue, Steve Brown refers to the strategy university President Eric Barron proposed when he returned to Florida State. Brown recalls that Barron, a noted fundraiser in his own right, advised fundraisers to go out in the community and develop relationships. Then, as those relationships ripen, invite them to establish a relationship with the university. What better way to develop a mutually beneficial relationship than inviting them to join you as a member of the Seminole Boosters? SB

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George Langford

A

The

George Langford Award Presented by the Seminole Boosters’ Board of Directors, the George Langford Award recognizes leadership and lifetime achievement serving the best interests of Florida State University. Named for this esteemed civic leader, this award embodies his giving spirit and dynamic personality. This award is given annually at the Past Chairman’s Dinner. The recipient is recommended by the executive committee and approved by the board. It is given to the individual who has demonstrated extraordinary leadership in the area of philanthropy benefitting the athletic program and Florida State University. 22

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rchitectural icons and statuary enrich the remarkable beauty of our university campus. Among the most prominent of these is the bronze likeness of Francis Eppes, seated on a small bench in the landscaped apron around Westcott. The bronze figure is depicted gazing toward the town center of old Tallahassee. As the founder and first president of Florida State University, Eppes came under criticism for building the new school too far west, too far away from town. But Francis Eppes, who was three times elected mayor of Tallahassee, knew that the city and the university would grow together. And his vision came true. Eppes shared much with his grandfather, Thomas Jefferson, third president of the United States. Both men proved to be remarkable visionaries and both were driven by unquenchable intellectual vigor. Ten years after the end of his presidency, Jefferson founded the University of Virginia. Only 32 years later, in 1851, his grandson Francis Eppes established the Seminary West of the Suwannee, now Florida State University. George Langford is a worthy inheritor of this enduring connection between Jefferson’s University and the proud institution that has evolved from Francis Eppes’ Seminary. George grew up in Thomasville, not far from Tallahassee. While almost all members of his immediate family are alumni of Florida State, Langford earned his undergraduate and law degrees from the University of Virginia. Langford’s leadership in the Tallahassee community is unsurpassed. His achievements in business, his support for Seminole athletics and his commitment to enhancing the intellectual foundations of Florida State University mark him as a Renaissance Man worthy of comparison to Jefferson and Eppes. It is most fitting that the board of directors of Seminole Boosters recognize the man who served three terms as chairman of this board, who resurrected the Boosters organization and the Seminole Athletic Program from a dark passage in time, and whose demonstrated character and dedication inspires all of those who love Florida State University.


Bob Fohl, 2010 It’s hard to believe that Bob is gone. His infectious smile and imposing presence filled the room. Bob was the natural leader. He was a student government officer, fraternity favorite and a tight end on the Seminole football team. Bob was the All-American college kid you wanted your daughter to marry. One daughter did marry him; he and Linda danced together across life’s stage for twenty years and two days. At his memorial service, his graying Sigma Alpha Epsilon brothers sang a tribute to “Friends.” Bob’s greatest virtue was his unshakable dedication to principle. He guarded the integrity of the Boosters organization with a strong hand at a time when weakness would have led to compromise. Bob’s expertise and vision of the economic landscape allowed the Boosters to create a new financial platform upon which the long-term security of Seminole Athletics will depend. Bob Fohl’s passion was raising money to endow athletic scholarships. The scholarship held by successive starting Seminole tight ends now bears Bob’s name. It was on his watch as chairman in 2003 that new affinity contracts were negotiated, construction of major new athletics facilities was completed, and the architecture established for a new capital campaign to endow athletic scholarships. It is altogether fitting that Bob Fohl is recognized as the 2010 recipient of the George Langford Award.

Coyle E. Moore, 2010 Coyle Moore was here before Florida State was Florida State, and long before the low grassy plain south of Pensacola Street was laid out in grids and flanked by metal bleachers. For half a century, from before the stock market crash that ignited the Great Depression through the time of change and prosperity that followed World War II, and all through the social upheavals and dramatic changes that defined America in the 1960s and 1970s, Dr. Moore was an iconic presence among the shaded trees of the old campus. Following his retirement as Dean of the School of Social Work, Dr. Moore was a fixture at the weekly Coaches Luncheons and was never hesitant to present his signature question to Coach Bobby Bowden: “Exactly what is the ‘prevent defense’ supposed to prevent?!” As a professor at Florida State College for Women, he was a strong advocate of sports for all students. Following the establishment of Florida State University in 1947, Dr. Moore dedicated himself to creating a full range of competitive intercollegiate sports and was most especially involved in promoting the fledgling football program. He was a standing member of the university’s Athletic Committee for many years and took the lead in several initiatives to expand Doak Campbell Stadium. The Moore Athletic Center is named in recognition of his contributions, and in 1980 the Moore-Stone Award was established to honor non-athletes who do not otherwise qualify for the FSU Hall of Fame. The Moore Family Trust continues to provide the university with impressive, engraved bronze plaques recognizing the achievements of exceptional football teams. Dr. Coyle Moore is also this year’s recipient of the George Langford Award. S EMINO LE-BO OST ERS .CO M

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Jimbo Takes the Field! The new head coach’s first game in photos

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f o o t ball i n sid e r By Alexander Wahl Photos by MIKE OLIVELLA

Seminoles Transformed Head Coach Jimbo Fisher Has Revamped His Staff, Creating the Biggest Strength Staff in America

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he Seminole football players look different. When the team played BYU in September, they played hard and fast until the last play on that hot, humid summer day. They didn’t fatigue, they didn’t quit. Their bodies have been transformed into more efficient strength and speed machines, able to endure more for longer periods of time. It’s due to the revamped strength and conditioning program and innovative nutrition plan. They are noticeably bigger, faster and stronger. Although not quite as grand as the transformation of characters seen in the two Transformer movies, some gained upwards of 20 pounds of solid muscle throughout the off-season. Head Coach Jimbo Fisher has revamped his staff, creating the biggest strength staff in America, with nine people working full-time. Each of the nine skill coaches has a unique and vital role that specializes in nutrition, speed, flexibility or weightlifting. This is groundbreaking in that Florida State is one of the first collegiate programs to create such a dynamic program, and it is expected to be a trendsetter for other schools around the country. Vic Viloria, head strength and conditioning coach who came to FSU after SMU and LSU, believes it’s necessary to keep the staff size where it is. From his first day, with Fisher’s full support, Viloria and his staff got right to work on making changes off the field. Part One: Measure where we’re at. It began when the players walked in the door. They were immediately weighed and photographed because Viloria believes that before and after pictures are “the No. 1 tool” to show coaches and, more importantly, the athletes how far they have come.

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Players are required to eat 11 meals per week (14 per week for Freshmen) at the Figg Dining Room.

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The strength and conditioning coaches preached the importance of nutrition and speed development during offseason workouts. Speed was the sole focus twice a week in the summer. The goal: Build stronger, faster, more flexible and more powerful players going into the season. Part Two: Overhaul the menu. Speed and nutrition specialist, Erik Korem, who has trained Olympic athletes including gold medal winner Veronica Campbell Brown, made sure fresh produce, fruits and foods high in protein were readily available for the players. A new head chef was hired — and fried, fatty foods were left off the menu. This change helped trim body fat, which directly translates to better player performance on the field. Players are required to eat 11 meals per week (14 per week for freshmen) at the newly renovated Figg Dining Room under the watchful eye of Korem, who sticks by the popular saying “you are what you eat.” “The cells of your body are literally made up of what you eat. What you eat on Thursday affects how you play Saturday,” he explained. That’s why the road game menu has also changed. The team dinner on Friday nights has been made healthier and full of carbohydrates. The strength coaches, as well as Fisher, continue to monitor each player’s weight while in season. Korem in particular helped with the technical aspects of movement but maintained

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f o o t ball i n sid e r that it will take time to see improvements. “Everything doesn’t happen overnight,” he said. “To see any type of gains as far as speed, it takes four weeks.” Players who increased their 40-yard dash times were running back Debrale Smiley and defensive tackles Anthony McCloud and Jacobbi McDaniel. But while quantitative data can measure how much weight players have gained or time they knocked off their sprints, they don’t tell the whole story. “We want guys to become more flexible, to come out of breaks faster. That can’t be seen until the rubber meets the road,” Korem said. Part Three: Beef up weightlifting. The goal of the weightlifting program is to increase lean muscle mass while gaining strength. The strength coaches emphasized to the team that they were not there to improve their “mirror muscles.” Viloria’s program focuses on the back side of the body, from the ground up, meaning from

the heels to the posterior traps (neck). This helps each and every player have a good foundation and reduce joint injuries. The lifts used the most are power clean, squat, and bench press, all of which are implemented through the use of Olympic lifting techniques. Olympic lifting emphasizes heavy weight and bar speed. “The key to lifting weights correctly is to bring speed along with power. They’ve got to go hand in hand,” Viloria said. This creates a true, well-balanced athlete by improving strength, flexibility and durability. He also stressed that technique is more important than the amount of weight lifted because it is necessary to keep range of motion intact. The players have mandatory workouts during the season in which they continue to lift heavy to maintain. Muscle gain takes place only during the off-season. As much as the Florida State strength and conditioning coaches have helped team performance on the field, they are

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also an important aspect of personal development. Aside from coordinating the nutrition and weight programs, the staff acts as a support structure for the team. They focus on building character by holding every player accountable. That starts with shirts that are tucked in and shoelaces that are tied. With many reinforcing the message of dependability, it takes the pressure off Coach Fisher. That’s why it is important to maintain the best facilities and coaches at Florida State — and to keep the strength and conditioning staff a primary element of the program, as the largest and most complete in the country. This helps the athletes compete on the field. While the changes won’t happen overnight, they are right around the corner. Think of the changes as the quarters of a game. As Korem said, “We’re centering everything on the fourth quarter. We’ve got to win the fourth quarter.” The fourth quarter is upon us. SB

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College Football Post-Season

ACC Championship, presented by Dr Pepper Charlotte, N.C. — Bank of America Stadium

Ticket information will be available on Seminoles.com, Seminole-Boosters.com and TheACC.com

Friday, Dec. 3, 2010 ACC Night of Legends with FSU’s Peter Boulware This gala will embody the true spirit of ACC football and provide the opportunity to meet some of the biggest names in college football. Friday, Dec. 3, 2010 The ACC Pep Rally Party This gathering will feature entertainment, music and tons of ACC school spirit, as fans get ready to cheer on their favorite team. Saturday, Dec. 4, 2010 ACC FanFest The event will provide a large area of interactive games, team bands, team mascots, pep rallies, food and beverage, as well as autograph opportunities with some of the current ACC players receiving awards during the ACC Coaches and Awards Luncheon and some of the legends nominated to represent their ACC school. Saturday, Dec. 4, 2010 ACC Football Championship game Kickoff time to be determined. Visit www.accfootballcharlotte.com for game and travel information. — Information provided by theacc.com 30

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ACC Bowl Games

The FedEx Orange Bowl is the official home of the ACC champion, meaning that the winner of the ACC championship game will play in the FedEx Orange Bowl except when that team is playing in the national championship game. Orange Monday, Jan. 3, 8 p.m. Sun Life Stadium, Miami Gardens, Fla. ACC Champion vs. BCS At-Large ESPN Chick-fil-A Friday, Dec. 31, 7:30 p.m. Georgia Dome, Atlanta, Ga. ACC (No. 2 Overall) vs. SEC ESPN

OTHER BCS BOWLS Rose presented by Citi Saturday, Jan. 1, 1 p.m. Rose Bowl, Pasadena, Calif. BCS vs. BCS (Big 10 vs. Pac 10 if available) ABC

Tostitos Fiesta Saturday, Jan. 1, 8 p.m. University of Phoenix Stadium, Glendale, Ariz. BCS vs. BCS (Big 12 Champion if available) ESPN

Allstate Sugar Tuesday, Jan. 4, 8 p.m. Louisiana Superdome, New Orleans, La. BCS vs. BCS (SEC Champion if available) ESPN

Tostitos BCS National Championship Monday, Jan. 10, 8 p.m. University of Phoenix Stadium, Glendale, Ariz. BCS #1 vs. BCS #2 ESPN

Champs Sports Tuesday, Dec. 28, 6:30 p.m. Florida Citrus Bowl Stadium, Orlando, Fla. ACC (No. 3 Overall) vs. Big East ESPN Hyundai Sun Friday, Dec. 31, Noon Sun Bowl Stadium, El Paso, Texas ACC (3rd selection after BCS) vs. Pac 10 CBS Meineke Car Care Friday, Dec. 31, Noon Bank of America Stadium, Charlotte, N.C. ACC (4th selection after BCS) vs. Big East ESPN Franklin American Mortgage Music City Thursday, Dec. 30, 6:30 p.m. LP Field, Nashville, Tenn. ACC vs. SEC ESPN Advocare 100 Independence Monday, Dec. 27, 5 p.m. Independence Stadium, Shreveport, La. ACC vs. MWC ESPN2 EagleBank Wednesday, Dec. 29, 2:30 p.m. RFK Stadium, Washington, D.C. ACC vs. C-USA ESPN S EMINO LE-BO OST ERS .CO M

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This Christmas, deck the Save big now and score big in 2011 when you give the gift of FSU Football. Whether you’re playing Santa to your favorite Seminole or treating yourself, now is the time to buy or renew your 2011 season tickets.

Ticket Payment Plan To make your 2011 season tickets even more affordable, the FSU Ticket Office is already taking orders. With an initial deposit of 10% of the total cost, you can spread out the cost over monthly installments for as little as $40 per season ticket from November through July (a $2 charge will be billed directly to your credit card). For example, a current season ticket holder renewing 4 season tickets would make a down payment of $130 and have 8 monthly payments of approximately $146. Seminole Ticket Marketplace Sell your unused tickets, hassle-free, and recover your cost. StubHub is the official host of the FSU online ticket marketplace. Savings On Single Game Tickets Get a discount of 5% off of single-game prices for any additional tickets you order when buying season tickets. You can also order away-game tickets with your renewal this year, spreading the costs of the additional tickets over the same months as your season tickets.

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(888) FSU-NOLE (850) 644-1830

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halls in garnet & gold. It’s Almost Like Getting One Game Free! As a season-ticket holder, you save 14% off the price of a single-game ticket. If you buy 2 season tickets, you save $88 off the single-game price, almost getting one game free!

2011 Season Tickets $321 Includes one ticket to each of FSU’s 7 home games, including Miami and Oklahoma:

CHARLESTON SOUTHERN OKLAHOMA MIAMI MARYLAND VIRGINIA NC STATE LOUISIANAMONROE

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DeVoe and Shirley Moore sit in frontof the newly-named DeVoe L. Moore University Center.

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M A J OR C ONTR I B U TOR By Gerald Ensley, TALLAHASSEE DEMOCRAT SENIOR WRITER {published by the Tallahassee Democrat on April 11, 2010}

Big-Time Believer

H

e’s Tallahassee’s Man of La Mancha, tilting at windmills real and imagined. He writes newspaper columns that rage against government spending and taxes. He gallops headlong into battles with bureaucrats over permitting and environmental issues. He crusades against governmental regulations he believes no longer let men and women lift themselves up by their own bootstraps. Yet DeVoe Moore is not some bedraggled Don Quixote on a burro. He’s a rich-asCroesus land baron astride a million-dollar 1931 Dusenberg. He’s a man who’s given to Florida State University and to charity and individuals. He’s a man who created the Tallahassee Auto Museum to display his collection of 140 classic automobiles and other Americana, including Buffalo Bill’s rifle, Abraham Lincoln’s hearse and Evel Knievel’s motorcycle. How vast is his empire? Hard to say. The list he carries of properties bought and sold locally over the years, annotated with codes only he understands, numbers 64

parcels — and does not include several of the 21 current properties listed on property appraisers’ records in Leon, Gadsden and Lowndes (Ga.) counties. Nationally, he’s owned such properties as a Circuit City store in Ohio, drug stores in Michigan, Utah and Connecticut, a surgical center in Nashville and an auto center in Orlando. Locally, he’s owned an airport industrial park, the controversial Fallschase development, a Wal-Mart shopping center and Buckhead Brewery. He continues to own several self-storage warehouse complexes, the Cross Creek golf course, the former Trailways Bus Station, big parcels in Gadsden County and Valdosta, Ga., the Tallahassee Auto Museum and the 200 acres surrounding the museum on which he still expects to build a giant outdoor mall. How rich is he? Moore claims to have never put a pencil to it. Now in his 71st year, Moore is still trim (5foot 11-inches, 180 pounds) and handsome. He is mannerly and direct with a pleasant Southern drawl. The father of two daughters and

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grandfather of six children, he’s been married to the same woman for 46 years and a devout Methodist since he was a boy. He’s never smoked and rarely drinks. He gets up every morning at 4 a.m. and works 16hour days. He is known to the general public by a reputation that is equal parts American Dream and irascible ol’ cuss. He’s the rich guy with all the cars — and the guy who bulldozes down trees. He’s the guy who wanted to bring minor league baseball to Tallahassee — and the guy who is always battling local officials. He’s made a fortune — yet he always seems to be chasing more. “You can ask of any successful individual, ‘What makes them tick?’ and the answer is always that they’re self-motivated,” said Lou Bauerle, a retired Orlando-area businessman who’s known Moore 40 years. “DeVoe has never seen a challenge he did not want to take on.” Humble beginnings DeVoe Lavonne Moore was born in Spring Creek, N.C. and spent his early years in Greenville, Tenn., where his father farmed

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tobacco, corn and wheat. The middle of five children, his mother, Uloia, gave him a first name she saw on a calendar. “I’ve never regretted the name,” Moore said. “If someone says ‘DeVoe,’ you look around.” His father died when he was 5, killed in a fire at a tobacco warehouse where he worked as a night watchman. When Moore was 10, he suffered thirddegree burns on his left leg as he and his brother tried to cook up some blackberry wine. The injury nearly cost him his leg, kept him out of sports and forced him out of the Army on a medical discharge less than three months after he enlisted. The leg still gives him pain 60 years later. His mother remarried, and the family moved to Tampa, where Moore graduated

Shelbyville, Tenn., that trained farriers — people who shoe horses. Moore enrolled in the program, came back to Tallahassee and started earning $100 a day shoeing horses while continuing to attend FSU part time. Two years later, he recognized another opportunity: remanufacturing clutches and brakes for big trucks, a service not offered in Tallahassee. Moore cleared $18,000 that first year by repeatedly turning “$25 of parts into $250” and decided to drop out of college without finishing his degree. The nation lost an FBI agent; Tallahassee gained an entrepreneur. “I had no idea he had such ambition,” said wife Shirley, who served as his bookkeeper for 30 years. “He was always coming up with new ideas.”

He claims to have never lost money on a land deal — while also insisting he has no “money lust.” “I don’t go into things to make this or that amount of money. But I do go into them not to lose money,” Moore said. “Basically, everything I’ve done, I’ve gone out and tried to find something no one else was doing. That’s given me an edge.” In 1998, he struck a deal with the major league Tampa Bay Rays to transfer their Class AA minor league team to Tallahassee, where they would play in a 6,500-seat stadium he would build at the I-10 interchange. In 2008, he opened his 95,000-square-foot museum on the site and announced plans to build a $250 million outdoor mall. The baseball deal died when the county refused to permit the stadium because part

DeVoe Moore is not some bedraggled Don Quixote on a burro. He’s a rich-as-Croesus land baron astride a million-dollar 1931 Dusenberg. He’s a man who’s given to Florida State University and to charity and individuals. from Chamberlain High. After his brief stint in the Army, he attended Andrew Junior College in Cuthbert, Ga. One summer in Tampa, a woman from his church invited him over to meet her niece from Tallahassee, Shirley McEwan. She was attracted by his gentlemanly manners — “You could see he cared for people” — and the fact he didn’t smoke. They dated five years and were married in 1964. Legend holds Moore came to Tallahassee in 1962 with $250 in his pocket and built an empire. The truth is he came to Tallahassee to attend FSU, was majoring in criminology and had his sights set on becoming an FBI agent. He took a job at an auto parts store earning $35 a week — and it was then that fate began tickling his inner Horatio Alger. A friend told him about a program in

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An entrepreneur The clutch and brake business (which he owned for 25 years) led to his buying and expanding an airport industrial park. A newly arrived FSU professor looking for a place to store his household goods inspired him to become one of the first developers in Tallahassee to build self-storage complexes. The storage complexes led to office buildings. The office buildings led to land purchases “from Orlando to Salt Lake City.” The land deals led to a golf course and strip malls, one of which he used to open his first auto museum. A dozen other deals led to his buying the 200 acres around the I-10 and Mahan Drive interchange, where he built his new auto museum and the 6,000-square-foot “log cabin” where he and Shirley live.

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of it would have been in a wetland. The mall went on the shelf when the economy went south — and state and local officials calculated he would have to pay $25 million in impact fees. Though he eventually negotiated down the impact fees to $5 million and still intends to build The Pinnacle at Cross Creek when the economy rebounds, the experience evokes one of his standard rants against government. Moore contends development fees are used for projects unrelated to the developer paying the fees, fund extravagant pensions for government employees and provide a barrier to new business. He believes fervently in the economic tenet that what’s good for the businessman is good for society — and government should do


M A J OR C ONTR I B U TOR everything it can to encourage private business. “If government served private business as well as they serve themselves, then we’d have a healthy government,” he said. “If we’re going to survive, government has got to stop hamstringing private business.” Not that Moore doesn’t battle back — often with panache. When local officials would not give him a permit for the baseball stadium he bought 25 water buffalo and allowed them to graze in the wetland. The water buffalo trampled the area, making it “degraded” and thus qualified for building (though by then the baseball team had decided to stay in Orlando). When his bid to build a state office building on land for which he paid taxes met competition from a group that planned to build in

“I love what I do and I’ll do it as long as I can. Retirement is not in my vocabulary.” DeVoe Moore

tax-free Innovation Park, Moore bulldozed trees on his property as a protest (and neither group got the building). County and city records show only 14 environmental and building complaints lodged against him over the past 20 years. All were corrected or dismissed, save a current dispute over whether he was allowed to cut down some pine trees near his museum. But he frequently tangles with officials over matters — such as digging a drainage pond too deep or the location of a sidewalk — that are not part of the complaint record. And he admits to occasionally starting a project before a permit is in hand, because “I don’t wait to jump through all the hoops when I think something is right.” “If the government said you can go to this line, DeVoe goes to that line — and

(L to R): Seminole Boosters, Inc. President Andy Miller, Florida State University President Eric Barron and DeVoe Moore.

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one inch over,” said former Leon County Commissioner Gary Yordon. “He’s not trying to beat the ordinances. He just has a very fundamental constitutional issue about government’s place in life.” Plenty of dust-ups Moore’s personality does not endear him to all. He has a reputation for being a boss not given to saying “please,” “thank you” or offering praise. Though his wife “gets on him all the time” about his gruffness to employees, Moore makes no apologies. And several of his employees have been with him for decades. “Anytime you start buddying up with an employee you lose credibility and productivity,” he said. He has a reputation for being tight with a buck. He haggles with sub-contractors and laborers over their bills. He once won $400

Moore’s admirers say complaints are the price of success. They say the good he does in the community — from establishing the auto museum to giving millions to FSU, his church and prison programs — outweighs any complaints. “Every hard-nosed businessman I know has a list of people who think he has not done them right, but what DeVoe has done for this community is substantial,” said Andy Miller. in a golf trip betting pool and refused to buy a round of drinks for the other golfers. He is infamous for dodging the lunch check. On the other hand, he’ll spend whatever it takes to prevail in battles against local government. “He’ll spend a dime to make a nickel if he feels he’s right,” said Tallahassee businessman Van Johnson. Both attitudes fit his hard-nosed negotiating style. Yordon recalled how Moore elicited a better share of concession profits from the

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Tampa Bay Rays by negotiating with what Moore calls his John Wayne philosophy: “Talk low, talk slow or don’t talk at all.” Moore is famous for driving down the price of cars and land he buys with feigned disinterest for months — leading desperate sellers to drop their prices. As he is fond of saying about every deal: “I gave the fellow what he wanted.” “If you have a product you’re offering for $10 and I offer you $8 and you wind up taking it, did I shortchange you?” Moore said.

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“If you couldn’t afford (to sell it for $8), you shouldn’t have done it.” Not slowing down Moore’s admirers say complaints are the price of success. They say the good he does in the community — from establishing the auto museum to giving millions to FSU, his church and prison programs — outweighs any complaints. “Every hard-nosed businessman I know has a list of people who think he


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“I consider him a Paul Revere, sounding the warning of big government and the overregulation of individuals and free enterprise.”

DeVoe Moore stands with Seminole Boosters, Inc. Vice President Tom Carlson.

Pace Allen, Tallahassee

has not done them right,” said Andy Miller, president of the Seminole Boosters. “(But) what DeVoe has done for this community is substantial.” Moore’s development has slowed in recent years — which he attributes to tightening government regulations as much as the slumping economy. He said 2009 was the first year he did not “make new money,” by which he means he did not build something that would generate future income. He has taken up writing guest columns for this newspaper in which he skewers local government about growth management policies, the city utility system, the county’s proposed four-day work week, government tax policies and attitudes toward private business. The columns are popular with those who share his skepticism of government. “I really think he looks for the truth,” said Pace Allen, a Tallahassee attorney and Tea Party organizer. “I consider him a Paul Revere, sounding the warning of big government and the over-regulation of individuals and free enterprise.” Moore enjoys writing the columns, in which he invests much research. But he is eager to get back to developing. If some suggest he is mellowing in his eighth decade, he promises he is not slowing down. “I love what I do and I’ll do it as long as I can,” he said. “Retirement is not in my vocabulary.” SB

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College Town

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he South Side is coming alive. In the blocks between Gaines Street and West Madison Street, Woodward Avenue and Collier Street is the proposed site of CollegeTown, an entertainment district that is programmed for sophisticated three-to five-storied buildings surrounded by tree-lined, cobblestone streets. Playing host to the neighborhood area, the planned community would offer best-in-breed restaurants, gathering places, entertainment, shopping and loft-style apartment options that would be clean, safe and vibrant. CollegeTown is envisioned as a center where education, business and people come together in a lively and imaginative environment while linking downtown Tallahassee through Gaines Street to Florida State University’s campus. “The impact of CollegeTown as the first development on the south side of campus will be far-reaching as it serves as a catalyst for the University and other partners to follow suit,” says Mark Bertolami, Director of Facilities Planning and Space Management. FSU Parking Garage Six Adding new parking spaces throughout various levels, FSU Parking Garage Six is being considered for a location on Walker Street between Pensacola and St. Augustine Street. With a safe area for street crossing and streamlining with the current Seminole Express bus route, this garage could serve as a tremendous asset for both student and football weekend parking. Offering design and architecture that is reflective of the historic brick facades throughout the rest of the campus, the parking garage is based on the University’s master plan, in which the University is looking at liner building concepts that could include student housing, retail and student services and possibly a green space roof and terrace over the garage. Central Park With 14 acres of green space centered in the future heart of the southern side of campus, the former intramural fields now offer a potential site plan of Central Park. Creating a canopy tree-

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trimmed area with lush landscaping, an interactive water fountain feature, pedestrian-scale lighting and courtyard sidewalks, the proposed Central Park area could offer recreational activities such as a band shell amphitheatre for performances, a farmer’s market, various art shows and such, which would ultimately create a campus community gathering locale. FSU at Madison Street The northern side of Madison Street is in the early stages of planning for University expansion but is not limited to repurposing or the addition of new facilities. With schools such as Visual Arts, Dance and Theater needing a greater amount of studio space and the Dedman School of Hospitality seeking to offer more student internship opportunities locally, there are various ways being reviewed to expand education facilities south. The Southern Gate Entrance Being a symbol of FSU’s proud heritage, Westcott Fountain is known as the iconic entrance to the University on College Avenue. As the University expands south, plans are being considered for a picturesque Southern Gate entrance that greets those entering the campus from Gaines Street and Woodward Avenue, between the proposed Central Park and CollegeTown. The Southern Gate entrance would help develop the boundaries of the University while taking an opportunity to create another symbolic entrance that in line with the architectural patterns and designs of the campus. Embracing the entrepreneurial spirit required in today’s economic climate, the University is creating ways to drive cultural and economic opportunities. By partnering with groups such as Seminole Boosters, Inc. and Hunter & Harp Holdings, LLC, additional housing, food, entertainment, campus facilities and academic opportunities are being developed to enhance student living and educational experiences with stronger assets. As the City of Tallahassee continues with its plans to transform Gaines Street, the University’s growth to the south is imminent. >>

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BOOSTER INSIDER // BY ROB WILSON

It’s Showtime!

E

ver wondered what it’s like for FSU’s football managers to pack up a whole team and send them on the road? Have you ever wanted to be inside the huddle at a basketball game or go through a baseball practice? Are you curious about all the things going on around Seminole athletics that you can’t get to? Well, have we got the show for you! Seminole Sports Magazine has been a fixture on Sun Sports since the network began. The magazine style (think 60 Minutes or Real Sports) features nothing but stories about Florida State athletics, athletes, coaches and history. Airing each Saturday at 11:30 a.m., the show is hosted by long-time FSU athletic staff member Rob Wilson who introduces at least three new feature stories every week. The show also highlights Seminole coaches with a one-on-one segment and brings fans the latest news from each of the sports. “We are so pleased to have this format to be able to get the good news about Florida State athletics out to such a large audience,” said Wilson. “Sun Sports and FSU have been paired together since the network went on the air, and our show has

stood the test of time in terms of providing the audience what they want to know about FSU.” One of the truly unique aspects of Seminole Sports Magazine is the fact that FSU students work on many of the stories that you will see on the air and a considerable number of them will appear on camera during the year. “We really provide the TV Production students at Florida State a tremendous opportunity,” said D.D. Garbarino, senior producer and director of Seminole Productions. “We rely on the students to put together broadcast quality pieces, and they have produced outstanding work in the past. It is a real draw for our students that they can graduate from FSU and already have produced, filmed, written or hosted pieces that have been broadcast. “It is gratifying to provide the educational component to the students.” SSM is taped in a state-of-the-art television studio located inside the Moore Athletic Center and just a few paces away from where the football team conducts team meetings. The studio itself is a fully functioning broadcast quality facility with computer operated lighting and sound. Even

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more impressive is the broadcast center on the other side of the studio’s glass wall that features a dizzying array of video monitors, buttons, knobs and microphones that would intimidate an airline pilot. FSU students work behind the scenes and alongside FSU professionals at the editing controls. All the video board content played during FSU football, basketball and baseball games actually originates from inside the Moore Center and is linked via fiber optics to the site. The control room scene is not unlike the brief glimpses viewers get during some TV broadcasts that show the behind-the-scenes dance that is television production. “We are able to produce a program or video spot that is network quality, which is an ambitious undertaking in terms of the technology,” said Mark Rodin who is director of Seminole Productions. “We are proud of the fact that our students can work with the same technology and in the same environment that they would if they were to go to work right away at say, ESPN. Because of that fact, we have a great history of successful students from the program.” Rodin’s assessment might even be a bit modest as Seminole Productions has won 78 national and international awards since 2002. Three times the FSU crew has won the best video board productions in direct competition with teams from the NFL, MLB, NHL, MLB teams, as well as schools all across the nation. Florida State won back-to-back honors for best overall in-game presentation among all colleges and universities. The award-winning staff is already planning features for inside looks at both basketball programs as well as soccer during the month of November and December. Viewers will get to know football Head Coach Jimbo Fisher and his family better, and the program will bring you the stars of the previous week’s competition right to your home every Saturday. So if you can’t be on your couch for the show every Saturday, make sure you set the recorder or catch one of several replays each week on Sun Sports. If you miss a show, you will miss a lot. SB

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DEIVIDAS DULKYS

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B A S KE T B ALL P RE V IE W By Rob Wilson

Thunder Road T

 here was a time when FSU basketball fans would have been satisfied with just getting the call to the big dance, but 20 or more wins in four of the last five seasons and back-to-back NCAA appearances have raised the goals and expectations of the program.

FSU will enter this season boasting a roster with both experience and size, which really is another testament to the overall strength of the program. Most schools would be scrambling to replace a pair of NBA players, but the bigger task for the Seminoles may be finding which new lineup will suit them best. FSU returns six of its top eight scorers and rebounders from last year’s 22-10 team, but it is the return of the best defensive player in the ACC that is perhaps the strongest reason for optimism. Junior forward Chris Singleton (10.2 points per game, 7.0 rebounds per game) spent all summer working out against the best players in the country, and basketball insiders will tell you that his stock is jumping off the charts. Coaches may need to lean on their talented star to be more involved in the FSU offense, but it seems clear that defense, which is where FSU has hung its hat under coach Leonard Hamilton, will be strong again this year. Also returning to the starting five are seasoned point guard Derwin Kitchen (8.1 ppg, 4.9 rpg) and talented shooting guard Michael Snaer (8.8 ppg, 2.7 rpg), who is in just his second season at FSU. Xavier Gibson (5.5 ppg, 2.8 rpg) played in all 32 games last year and started three. He will be counted on to counter both the offensive and particularly defensive losses FSU suffered with the departure of NBA draft picks Solomon Alabi and Ryan Reid. Also ready to supply help on the front line is sophomore forward Terrence Shannon (1.7 ppg, 1.1 rpg) who showed no reluctance to mix it up last year. He should be fully recovered from a high school knee injury that clearly limited him in his rookie season. >>

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MICHAEL SNAER

LUKE LOUCKS

CHRIS SINGLETON

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B A S KE T B ALL P RE V IE W men’s basketball 2010–2011 Schedule

11/12

UNF

11/14

UNC Greensboro (A)

11/16

Gardner-Webb

11/18

FIU (A)

11/23

Mercer

11/28

Florida

11/30

Ohio State ACC-Big10

12/5

Hartford

12/12

Clemson ACC

12/15

Stetson

12/18

Loyola Marymount (A)

12/23

Hawaii

1/3

Auburn (A)

1/8

Virginia Tech (A)

1/12

Duke ACC

1/15

NC State ACC

1/19

Miami (A)

1/22

Boston College ACC

1/29

Clemson (A)

2/1

Wake Forest ACC

2/6

UNC (A)

2/10

Georgia Tech (A)

2/12

Virginia ACC

2/19

Wake Forest (A)

2/23

Maryland (A)

2/26

Miami ACC

3/2

North Carolina ACC

3/6

NC State (A)

3/10

ACC Tournament

3/15

NCAA Tournament

Hamilton should have a lively preseason camp with 22-game starter Deividas Dulkys (8.7 ppg, 2.3rpg) and long-range bomber Luke Loucks (4.4 ppg, 2.5 rpg) ready to take over starting roles. Both are experienced players who know how to win in the ACC. As for the four newcomers, they will certainly give coaches the option of a big lineup to go to again this year. Forward Bernard James, at 6 feet 10 inches, was a second team JUCO All-American who will get a long look in the preseason. Okaro White, 6 feet 8 inches, averaged nearly 10 rebounds a game at Clearwater High and 7-foot junior center Jon Kreft will be able to contribute as well. Ian Miller is the only one who will have to look up to these guys as the 6-foot-3-inch freshman brings a reputation as a terrific ball-handler to the class. If the flexibility to go with a front line of 7-0, 7-0, 6-11 or a even a three-guard option is not reason enough for excitement,

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the Seminoles’ recent history should be. A third place finish (10-6) last year in the ACC could have been even better, and that came on the heels (no pun intended) of an ACC Championship game appearance the year before. In fact, Florida State is the ACC’s fourth winningest program over the last five years trailing only Duke, North Carolina and Maryland. Seminole fans will have a chance to see great basketball right here in Tallahassee this year with a home schedule that features Florida (Nov. 28), Ohio State (Nov. 30), Duke (Jan. 12) and North Carolina on March 2, as well as ACC foes Clemson, NC State, Wake Forest, Virginia and Miami. Florida State has a chance to do something the program has not done since the early ’90s and that is to make three straight trips to the NCAA Tournament. And if the Seminoles can get there, they will be determined to make it a longer stay. SB

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B A S KE T B ALL P RE V IE W By Rob Wilson

Warriors Return

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 ou could forgive the Florida State women’s basketball team if they wanted to bask in every last second of last year’s accomplishments. After all, the Seminoles cemented their position as NCAA Tournament regulars with a school-record sixth consecutive trip to the big dance. They put together their best-ever ACC season with a 12-2 record and tied for first place over the regular season for the second year in a row. FSU drove far into the NCAA Tournament beating Louisiana Tech, St. Johns and Mississippi State to come to an Elite 8 showdown for a trip to the Final Four.

Coach Semrau: “We’ve got a lot of versatility, a lot of length, a really fast, athletic team. I think you’re going to see a lot of fun stuff out of our team this year.” Unfortunately, the NCAA bracket placed a UConn squad that might as well have been the L.A. Lakers between the Seminoles and the Final Four. The season ended for FSU with a remarkable 29-6 record and their highest finish (9th) in the history of the program. So did Head Coach Sue Semrau and her staff rest on their laurels? Hardly. In fact, the staff is installing a brand new offense designed to push the Seminoles over that last hurdle and into national championship contention. “We look at what we have now and we ask, ‘How can we make the next step? What can we do to continue to be a better team with the ingredients that we have?’ ” Semrau said. “You’re going to see a lot of different things offensively out of this year. We’ve got a lot of versatility, a lot of length, a really fast, athletic team. I think you’re going to see a >>

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COURTNEY WARD

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CHRISTIAN HUNNICUTT

lot of fun stuff out of our team this year.� Meeting challenges is not something that Semrau and her program shy away from, and the 2010–11 season is certainly a chance to take that next step. Starters Courtney Ward (10.7 points per game, 5.7 rebounds per game) and Cierra Bravard (7.1 ppg, 4.5 rpg) return to the starting lineup and are joined by three other key returnees who averaged more than 20 points per game between them. Ward will be the clear scoring threat on the outside and will be in charge of the Seminoles out on the floor. She started all 35 games last year and finished third on the team in scoring. Bravard will provide the inside muscle with her ability to score and rebound in traffic.

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Alexa Deluzio hit more than 40 percent from behind the three-point line last year and averaged 8.3 points per game. Coaches will look to her to shoot defenses out of a packed in zone. Chasity Clayton managed a solid 8 points and 5.3 rebounds per game while starting 17 games last year, so she is practically a returning starter. And guard Christian Hunnicutt (4.5 ppg, 2.7 rpg) averaged 20 minutes per game and played in all 35 games. They give FSU a trio of solid players vying to fill the holes left by three outstanding players. The WNBA draft took Jacinta Monroe and her 13.2 ppg and 7.3 rpg, but coaches may miss the countless shots she altered on the defensive end even more. Alysha Harvin (11.0 ppg, 3.5 rpg) provided an on-court

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CHASTITY CLAYTON


B A S KE T B ALL P RE V IE W women’s basketball 2 0 1 0 –2 0 1 1 S chedule 10/24

UAB

11/12

Alabama State

11/15

Auburn (A)

11/18

Colorado State

11/21

Vanderbilt

11/26

Alabama (A)

11/27

Arizona (A)

12/1

Michigan State ACC-Big10

12/4

Western Carolina

12/12

Jacksonville State

12/15

Central Florida

12/18

Yale (A)

12/21

Connecticut (A)

12/28

Florida

12/30

Stetson

1/2

Missouri (A)

1/6

Virginia Tech (A)

1/9

Virginia ACC

1/14

Duke ACC

1/20

Clemson (A)

1/24

Miami ACC

1/27

Boston College (A)

1/30

NC State (A)

2/2

North Carolina ACC

2/7

Virginia (A)

2/11

Georgia Tech ACC

2/17

Wake Forest (A)

2/20

Maryland ACC

2/24

Miami (A)

2/27

Clemson ACC

toughness that the staff will be searching for in preseason along with Angel Gray’s long-range jumper. Semrau’s tireless work in building her Seminole program has provided the ultimate payoff in that she will have extremely talented newcomers ready to make their mark this season. Forward Natasha Howard, a 6-foot3-inch native of Toledo, Ohio, was one of the top five high school players in the country. She brings great athleticism and basketball skills to the program and is expected to contribute immediately. Sixfoot forward Lauren Coleman from Lawrenceville, Ga., will also provide good size in the freshman class. FSU coaches plucked two freshman guards from Ohio and Pennsylvania to round out the recruiting class. Tay’ler Mingo (5 feet 7 inches) from South Euclid, Ohio, and Olivia Bresnahan (5 feet 11 inches) from Fenelton, Penn., were attracted by

the success of the Florida State program. A schedule worthy of a Top 10 program awaits the Seminoles with non-conference home dates with Vanderbilt, Florida and Michigan State along with a neutral site match-up against Alabama. FSU will play Duke and North Carolina at home after playing the two powerhouses on the road last year. Virginia, Miami, Georgia Tech, Maryland and Clemson will travel to the Tucker Center this year. “It’s an exciting time because we have some momentum that we built last year,” Semrau said. “ I know that our upperclassmen coming back are very hungry to continue the type of run that we’ve been able to make the past couple of years.” The FSU women came within a Huskie’s whisker of the Final Four last year, and it is clear that the Seminoles are on track to push back into the nation’s elite again in 2010–11. SB

Semrau’s tireless work in building her Seminole program has provided the ultimate payoff in that she will have extremely talented newcomers ready to make their mark this season. S EMINO LE-BO OST ERS .CO M

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BOOSTER INSIDER // BY JERRY KUTZ

FANS: WE HEAR YOU I was looking at one of our Seminole Boosters brochures the other day and saw the words on the front cover in an entirely different light. Who are we? What do we do? Why join?

I got to thinking about who we are and what we do. While we are the fundraising organization of the athletic department, charged with raising money to fund athletic scholarships, build facilities and supplement the athletic budget, we are more than fundraisers. Our staff is just like you. We are FSU alumni and Seminole fans who go to football games, enjoy a tailgate, cheer for our teams and live and die with their performances. We, like you, experience Florida State sports on the visceral level. Like you, we have friends who share the experience with us, who express their wants and needs for our program. And, like you, we want our program to become the very best it can become. What do we do? We work to make our program the best

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it can be. Sometimes, that is asking for money. But frequently it is simply listening to what our donors, and fans in general, are saying about FSU and how we can make it a better place. In addition to conversations with our friends and donors, the Internet message boards have been filled with public conversation about the loss of nearly 20,000 season ticket holders and what it will take to draw people back to Doak Campbell Stadium and Seminole Boosters again. They are good conversations that beg attention. Our donors want the stadium packed again. They want 83,000 Seminole fans attending every home game, cheering their team to victory. And they want all fans to become Seminole Booster members so that the coaches and players have all the resources needed to compete at the highest possible level. While there’s a diversity of ideas about

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how to arrive at the end result, there’s one common thread. Many of our fans say, “Just win baby.” They believe that if Jimbo Fisher builds a consistently-winning program, the fans will come. While that may well be true, we’d be remiss if we didn’t listen to other viewpoints as well. There’s a long list of suggestions, all well intended and deserving of our attention. Fans unanimously do not want noon or 3:30 p.m. games in September. They would prefer at least two or three weeks between home games. They like the threegame packages, with one game in September, one in October and one in November. They want very cheap seat prices for those games where the opponent does not bring enough fans. Some would like to see FSU limit home games to six and take the seventh home game to another city. They would like to see Seminole Boosters revise parking policies, better utilizing the


lots closer to the stadium. They like the Spirit Shuttle and do not like parking garages. They would like to see more energy in the pregame build-up using the Warboard and heart-pounding music, culminating in Osceola throwing the spear. They want the Chiefs to be better integrated into the game, playing less in the pregame and more during the game. They would like to see a portion of the Chiefs travel to away games as a spirit band. They want the Warboard to show replays in full screen; to show more replays and to feature updates from around the country. They want the stadium announcer to provide more updates of games in action. They want wider, more-comfortable seats and better access to those seats (elevators and handrails). Sixty-six percent of the people who did not renew season tickets over the past few years said that they did not renew because of discomfort. They felt the seats, particularly along the sidelines, were much too narrow. They like the new cooling zones installed this year and would like more of the same with more flat screen televisions to watch the game while cooling down. They would like FSU to build a club seating section where they could have wider chairback seats, attentive concession waiters and access to the University Center Club, which features an elevator and an air-conditioned club to relax, eat, drink and watch the game on television. They would like the gate and parking lot attendants and game day traffic control personnel to be more helpful. All of these things are being discussed and/or addressed. As you probably know, focus groups are being asked; fans are being surveyed; so that we can quantify and validate exactly what FSU fans want and need. FSU has some input to the Atlantic Coast Conference schedule but, ultimately, it’s at the mercy of what the schedule makers can put together after taking all conference schools’ needs into consideration. Then television dictates the starting times of those games. Again, FSU only has so much influence and needs to exert all of it to stay away from as many early kicks in September as possible. Most of everything else is within our control and will be addressed.

Our donors want the stadium packed again. They want 83,000 Seminole fans attending every home game, cheering their team to victory. And they want all fans to become Seminole Booster members so that the coaches and players have all the resources needed to compete at the highest possible level. We’re currently looking into creating a club seating section in the upper end zone, right below the University Center Club, that would provide access to the club and all of its amenities as well as comfortable outdoor seating with service. Those seats could be online by August 2011. We’re also planning to survey our ticket holders in Priority I and II about their wants and needs. Our understanding is most would like for us to widen the seats to make it more comfortable. If we do that, it will require a reseating of sorts for ticket holders. As you add a couple inches to each seat it adds up and people naturally will have to move. The question is: How far would the majority of our fans be willing to

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move in order to get a wider seat? There are great conversations going on this football season and while some of them are a bit contentious, the good news is everyone is talking and everyone wants what’s best for Florida State. It’s very encouraging to see FSU fans imploring each other to come to games, to bring friends and to join the Boosters. That’s where the magic will occur — when FSU fans take personal responsibility for recruiting someone to come to the game and buy a ticket and to join the Seminole Boosters for only $60 per year or $5 per month. That’s the most powerful marketing tool we have — you, our donors. SB

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BOOSTER INSIDER // BY MIKE PATE

ng: ht so g fi y ersit Univ e t a t S f FSU orida he Fl iefs o . t h f C o g e n show e tun archi to th -time he M f t l g a n e r h u a S rch, ta “We h, ma er los c v r e a n m We rch, to ma the field g n i o w. wn eg er slo We’r march, do v e n po too r tem irlers u w o t h e t Wi eatur so great. and f s e t t hows arch, e ajor our s m e r k a u O rch, m m lp to h, ma ld e c r h l a l m e A the fi arch, tate.” So m ght down ida S r ri o l F f iefs o ng Ch i h c r a The M

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Every new member of Florida State’s Marching Chiefs used to learn this song. It was a message to those new members that to be a Chief you had to be talented, competent and confident in your ability to reach the level of quality that was expected as a member of FSU’s marching band. A lot of time and effort goes into putting the 450 members of the Marching Chiefs on the field for a performance. For every new season, that process starts on the day prospective members arrive for the marching band version of the football team’s pre-season camp. The staff and leadership team start arriving two weeks before classes begin. They are followed by the “rookies,” who will be trying out for Chiefs for the first time. After a couple of days, the upperclassmen arrive and rehearsals will be in full swing. Preseason practice for the Marching Chiefs is a long series of rehearsals that start at 7:30 in the morning and don’t end until 9 at night. And for those of you who don’t spend much time in Tallahassee, mid-August is a heat stroke waiting to happen. Those 13½ hour days start on one


begin a grueling schedule that starts with an 8:30 a.m. rehearsal that will last about two hours. Next they move to the “skull session” at the baseball stadium which begins two hours before kickoff and lasts one hour. An hour before game time the band lines up to march to the stadium. From there the performances begin. They will perform in the stands and on the field for the next five to six hours, depending on the length of the game. Each game ends with a performance of the stirring “Hymn to the Garnet and the Gold.” And at the end of the playing of the hymn you will hear the cheer of the Marching Chiefs as they yell in unison, “Marching Chiefs All the Damn Time.” This year the Chiefs made one out of town trip to Miami. They left Tallahassee on Friday morning, arrived in Miami in the afternoon and spent much of their weekend in rehearsals and performances. They drove back to Tallahassee on Sunday. Getting the Chiefs to an out of town game is no small feat. The trip required nine 56-passenger busses, 140 hotel rooms, security and meal allowances to cover

Saturday and don’t end until the following Saturday. Making the Chiefs requires students to achieve performance scores that are based on playing and marching ability. In 2010 there were 525 students trying out for the 450 spots in the Chiefs. The day following the final cuts, preparation began in earnest as practice for the Chiefs pre-game performances started to take shape. Once classes start, rehearsals begin to follow a “normal” schedule. Normal for the Chiefs means rehearsals every day, Monday through Friday, from 4 until 6 in the hot, humid Tallahassee afternoon. Monday through Wednesday the rehearsals begin with an hour of practice on the music to be played in the upcoming performance. The last hour is devoted to learning the drill sequences that are part of almost every piece of music in every show. Thursday and Friday are devoted to “cleanup” of the performance from both a musical and marching perspective. When game day arrives, the Chiefs

the almost 500 members of the traveling group. The total cost is almost $100,000. Being a Marching Chief requires dedication from the students. Only about 25 percent of the students are music majors and no students are required to be members of the Chiefs. By class, the Chiefs have about 35 percent freshmen, 30 percent sophomores, 20 percent juniors and 15 percent seniors. On the field you will see 68 trumpets, 44 trombones, 44 French horns, 30 baritones, 32 sousaphones, 55 saxophones, 53 clarinets, 42 flutes, 28 members of the drum line, 24 flags and 20 majorettes. The money to keep the Chiefs going comes almost exclusively from the Athletic Department, supported by Seminole Boosters. Support from the Athletic Department, Seminole Boosters and the College of Music — along with dedicated students who survive long, hot sweaty days and nights of practice — lead to performances on the field that make FSU fans extraordinarily proud of the “World Renowned, Florida State University Marching Chiefs.” SB

You Can’t Become a Football Overnight: A Book of Petersonisms By Jim Crosby This year marks the 50th anniversary of Coach Pete’s rst year as Seminole football coach. To honor that anniversary Jim Crosby has written a book called: “You Can’t Become a Football Overnight.” It is full of photos, stories and colorful Peterson quotes reminiscent of those formative years in FSU football history. The book is lled with dozens of funny one liners, such as: “I’m the football around here and don’t you remember it.” “Pair up in threes and line up in circles.”

On Sale Now for $19.95

FSU Head Coach from 1960-1970

plus $6.95 shipping and handling

Available at Garnet and Gold

Or by making check payable to: Writeman Enterprises, 3285 Thoreau Avenue, Tallahassee, FL 32311 • (850) 556-5960. • Also available at writeman.com

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S P O R T S U P D AT E : S O C C E R Honors & Awards MAC Hermann Trophy Watch List Tiffany McCarty Toni Pressley Lowe’s Senior CLASS Award Watch List Amanda DaCosta Soccer America Preseason All-American Toni Pressley (Defender) WSU Invitational All-Tournament Team Amanda DaCosta Tori Huster Kassey Kallman Toni Pressley Kelsey Wys TopDrawerSoccer Top 100 Women 9) Tiffany McCarty 14) Amanda DaCosta 41) Toni Pressley 64) Jessica Price 73) Ines Jaurena

Burning to Play Again

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he Seminole soccer team is on its way to making its eleventh consecutive NCAA tournament appearance. An all-star cast, led by senior captain Amanda DaCosta and juniors Tori Huster and Janice Cayman, currently sits in first place in the ACC with a 4-1 conference record. The Noles are currently ranked in the top 10 in all three major polls, with the highest being No. 6 in SoccerTimes. com, No. 7 in Soccer America and No. 10 in NSCAA/Hendrickcars.com polls. The Seminoles lead the ACC with eight shutouts on the season and have held 10 teams to one goal or less. Through the first twelve games the team has outscored opponents 28-7. Coach Mark Krikorian notched a career milestone — his 100th victory at Florida State — with the win over Wake Forest in mid-October. During that week senior Rachel Lim won the ACC player of the week. Redshirt freshman goalkeeper Kelsey Wys was named by CollegeSoccer360 as one of 14 National Primetime Players the first week of October. Overall, Krikorian is 101-24-12 at Florida State, including an outstanding 58-6-2 record at home (as of 10/6/10). Moving up the record books is senior captain Amanda DaCosta, who is third all-time in assists with 23 and is tied with former players Mami Yamaguchi and Amber Tollefson for the 10 game-winning assists in her career. Junior Tori Huster leads the Seminoles with 16 points on the season, followed by seniors Janice Cayman with 13 and DaCosta with nine. Florida State is currently on a six-game winning streak, the longest since 2006. So far this season, 11 players have scored a goal and sixteen different players have registered a point. Coach Krikorian said of the regular season, “I thought our kids battled very hard and certainly created enough opportunities to score goals and have a chance to make it deep in the tournament.” The ACC tournament will be held Nov. 3–7 in Cary, N.C. Check Seminoles.com for results.

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TopDrawerSoccer Top 100 Freshmen 21) Kassey Kallman 28) Kelsey Wys


S P O R T S U P D AT E : V O L L E Y B A L L

The Perfect Setup

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lorida State volleyball continues in 2010 with another best-ever start to the season. The Seminoles ranked in the top 25 for the 24th consecutive week in the American Volleyball Coaches Association Poll (AVCA) National Poll (as of Oct. 18), continuing to show dominance within a schedule that initially showed the 14th-highest Ratings Percentage Index in the country. The Seminoles (13-4, 5-2) have faced a challenging slate, and FSU owns four Top 50 RPI victories against No. 20 Oklahoma (W, 3-1), at No. 29 Miami (W, 3-1), at No. 45 Kentucky (W, 3-2) and versus No. 48 Virginia Tech (W, 3-2). FSU also carried a 19-match winning streak in ACC play that was recently snapped in a close, five-set loss to North Carolina. FSU has not been short of exceptional individual performances in 2010. Through 17 matches, five different players have combined to record 16 double-doubles, already eclipsing last season’s total of 15.

Junior outside hitter Visnja Djurdjevic has already garnered eight double-doubles this year, while fellow junior Jekaterina Stepanova has amassed four, setter Duygu Duzceler has two, and Patricia Figueiredo and Sareea Freeman have one apiece. Senior libero Jenna Romanelli is ready to approach a personal milestone, sitting just 64 digs shy of becoming the 10th player in school history to record 1,000 career digs. She is also just 50 digs short of surpassing former Seminole Joan Morris (1983–86) for the 10th spot on FSU’s career digs list. “We knew this season would be a transition with losing five seniors, but the girls have stepped up and stayed competitive. Two of the three losses we had were very close matches and we have found a way to win in most of our matches this season,” said Head Coach Chris Poole. Fun Fact: A new FSU volleyball attendance record was set on Sept. 22 as 1,322 fans topped the capacity at Tully Gym in Tallahassee.

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True Seminole 68

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Are you TRUE? TRUE Seminole Nike shirts are the official Florida State Game Day shirt. They generate scholarship money every year for FSU athletics. Buy your shirt before the end of the year or buy one this holiday season for the Seminole fan in your life. Proceeds from the shirt fund an athletic scholarship endowment. Without fundraising efforts like the TRUE Seminole campaign, Seminole Athletics would not be able to fund the full cost of scholarships for all its student-athletes. TRUE Seminole shirts are sold exclusively at Bill’s Bookstore, FSU Bookstore, Garnet & Gold and Seminoles.com. Head Coach Jimbo Fisher said of the campaign, “The most important thing is raising money for scholarships now and for our future.” The campaign promotes “a movement to stand behind the team and represent the school as one unified body of people.” www.TRUEseminole.com S EMINO LE-BO OST ERS .CO M

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Compliance

Florida State University Compliance Team: Help Us Help You! One of the primary roles of the Florida State University Athletics Compliance Office (also known as “The Compliance Team”) is to educate our Seminole student-athletes, department staff and representatives of athletics interests (“Boosters”) about NCAA rules. We are always looking for fresh ideas and new ways we can educate the Florida State family. Over the course of the 2010–11 academic year, the compliance team has established goals to increase the focus on proactive educational programming. Some of our current educational initiatives specific to Florida State Boosters include a Booster brochure, a Booster Tip of the Week (posted during home football games) and The Interpreter, a monthly newsletter dedicated to education and current NCAA issues. Through all of our educational efforts, we try to emphasize that making smart decisions within the NCAA rules is the best way to ensure that the integrity and tradition of Florida State athletics is upheld. Like you, we are here to bolster the success of Seminole studentathletes both on and off the field. If you have ideas concerning possible educational initiatives or functions you would like the Florida State Compliance Team to be involved with, our office welcomes your input. We can be contacted at (850) 644-4272. Help us to better educate you! We greatly appreciate your continued support and assistance in our compliance efforts. Thanks in advance for your ideas and Go Noles!

FLORIDA STATE COMPLIANCE TEAM Vanessa Fuchs Associate Athletics Director for Compliance Jody Smith Assistant Athletics Director for Compliance Jennifer Santiago Assistant Athletics Director for Admissions and Initial Eligibility Bret Cowley Compliance Coordinator Alex Dominato Compliance Coordinator Anne Marie Rossi Graduate Assistant Trever Wright Graduate Assistant

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WELCOME NEW MEMBERS (from June 5–October 4, 2010)

PLATINUM GOLDEN CHIEF Kevin Hawkins Ryan & Jenny Dempster (Powers)

GOLDEN CHIEF

Bruce & Dawne Roberts Cameron Holt Dan & Mary Fountain Eddie Allen Galati Yacht Sales George Cavallaro Hobkirk Enterprise Towing & Recovery Lohman Hall of Famers Lyle Williams Nation Safe Drivers Rand Sports & Entertainment Insurance Scarpa Family U.S. Foods, Inc.

SILVER CHIEF

Brett Harbison Clifford Lamb and Associates Jay Osier Mark Unger Martin Phillips Mike & Tammi Swearington Mike Smalley Milthorpe Sports Peter B. Heebner Rance Kay Steve & Suzy Karr Terry McCarthy

TOMAHAWK

Alan T. Winslette Bob Bankston Brett E. Clark Buddy & Susan Cribb Cary Cohrs Chris Speck Corey & Cathy Neal Daryl and Kelly Burnett Dawn & George Feiss Dewayne Roberts Dr. Jason Oberste, MD Duane & Jennifer Giddens Eric & Dr. Sherry Colvin Gene & Pam Rhodes Grant Coldwell James Rollins Jeff Medley Jimmy Strickland John Fitch John Roberts John Tugwell John & Maurie Johnson Jonathan E. Walker Kevin A. Dover Layman Law Firm, P.L. Michele L. Bobel-Gallant Michelle Leitner Mr. Clay P. Cibula Phillip Hill Randall W. Shaw Rebekah A. Montgomery Rob Doll Robert & Cynthia Stoltz Robert Milton Seth Ditty Shawn Wolfe Terri G. Tankel The Marchetti Family Tom Martineau Vincent Ferreira Wayne R. Johnson, II William B. Muirhead

WARRIOR

Allen Russell Andrew W. Russo Apartment Seekers Blane Greer Brad Smith Brian and Julie Otte Brian Posey Bryan Wiggins Carrie Anderson Cathy Howze


Christine A. McGlade Coquina Investments Craig Fortson Cynthia Henderson Daniel & Katrina Moriarty Daniel Robinson David A. Brown David and Melanie Desmond David J. Siegel Denny C. Weaver, Jr. Derrick & Lisa Rivera Drew Adams Drew Brown Eric Serrahn Ernesto D. Portuondo Ernie S. Hallare Gary Raymond Gerald & Laura Bryant Ginger Bowden Madden Gregory R. Schaberg Hayden Moye Herb & Heather Carver Homer Jackson Jarrad O. Pilgrim Jennifer M. Ramos Jeremy L. Pelchar Jeremy Nelson Jerry Coombs Jocelyn Kelly Joe Drain Joe Ostaszewski Joe Pogo’s Window Cleaning John A. Acosta John & Jessica Harper John & Laurise Thomas John P. Aldrich Jonathan Pitts Josef Rill Julianne & Josef Rill Julie Blankfield Karen Harwell Kayvon Besharat Kenn & Laura Swearingen Kenneth Batten Kieran Larkin Kim Ellison Kim Medley Kimberly & Brian House King & Ruthie Pickett Kirk Anderson Kirk B. Reams Lane B. Williams Larry Seymour Lauren A. Held Lester F. Hamrick, Sr. Lisa Stuenkel Loyd & Donna Hawkins Luke D. Beatty Luke Kabat Matthew Davenport Michael & Carol Cromer Michael D. Moriarty Michael D. Wilburn Michael W. Cummins Mike & Sherrie Lynch Mike Miller Murray R. Cornelius, Sr. Neil A. Fleckenstein Nelson Andrews Nicholas P. Bonanno Patrick C. Sullivan, USMC Patrick Murray Paul Davis Randy Nunn & Melinda Daniel Richard Barnes Richard Sovacool Rick L. Bradshaw Robert Z. Elliott Roberta Lord Rodger E. McDowell, Jr. Roy L. Donaldson Sabrina Griffin Shaun Anderson Shawna M. Baca Shireen S. Sackreiter T.J. & Ashley McNitt Terry & Paula Ellis Terry D. Case Terry Washington Toby Miller William A. Jensen

RENEGADE

Alexander D. Johnson Amy Stanton

Andrew A. Harris Andrew & Heather Diakos Anthony J. Majewski Anthony J. Saker Art Centurion Ben & Amanda Hannah Bill Salyer Bradley M. Kurit Brandon Begin Brandon Hammock Brian Bolden Brian Hayes Brian Skipper Bryan & Casandra Pallone Caleb Smith Captain Ryan & Meagan Leonard Carime A. Aldana Carl Bryan Carl Nash Casey Crangle Chad Woddail Charles Finley Charles J. Pellicer Charles M. Gargano Chris Lee Chris Tracy Christopher & Julia Mulligan Christopher R. Still Christopher T. Wilson Chrsitopher J. Chaney Citrus County Seminole Club Colby Wolfe Colleen O’Neill & Stephen Custred Corey D. Noonan Dan Mowrey Daniel Bowser Danny R. Engle Darryl & Amy Lister David & Mallory Forte David & Patricia Schulz David Bailey David Diaz David R. Chandler Earl B. Rabess, Jr. Eduardo Serrano Elita Lerner Emma R. Colquitt Erica Wiborg Fastsigns Forest Green Garrett Roy Gary & Natasha Raulerson Greg Garde Gregory H. Gostomski & Julia Hansen Harry Reiter Henry J. Graham, Esq. Hildy Sastre Jacob D. Fischer James M. Hayes Jean Glenn Jeff Odom Jeff Williams Jeffrey K. Stokes Jenny Chang Jessica R. Halnon Jessie Beck Joe Long John & Kelly Ferguson John & Joanie Heighes John M. Coffaro Jonathan & Danielle Kosberg Jonathan Howse Joseph A. Sublousky Joseph & Mary Ann Perdue Joseph F. Johnston Julie Moss Keith Volkmann Kelly M. Porter Kelly Mutters Kelsey M. Valentich Kennieth Allen Kevin Darrenkamp Kevin Moore Larry Otwell Laura J. Woods Lawrence Thompson Lieutenant Russell Hearn Linda Joseph Lisa & Elroy Caldwell Livingston Hessam Lonnie Kent Lorin Klein Lou Chaump Louis Okonkwo M. Lance Tomlin Mark Bosler

Mark W. Salisbury Mark Z. Willman Marty Hebrank Matt Thompson Matthew J. Cade Matthew O. Potter Miami Lakes Sporting Goods Michael & Jeannie Cunnion Michael Cruz Michael G. Lawrence, Jr. Michael Kelly Michele A. Ramirez Michelle L. Bautista Michelle R. Reilly Mr. David M. Warfel Mr. Nevin Miller Orlando J. Perez-Martinez Otis Caldwell Panther Creek Sod Farms Patricia D. Dedicos Peter W. Mettler Reginald D. Wilkerson, Jr. Richard Gettelfinger Rick & Jen Stull Robert & Ardis Selman Robert Eagles Robert Gandy Robert Harrison Johnson Robert Williams Ron & Joan Czarniak Russell Bennett Scott & Karen Carstens Sean & Tiffany Cox Shan DiGuglielmo Shei Unger Stephan Sumby Stephen C. Powers Stephen R. Chappell Steve Hubrich & Christina Catani Steven Brown Steven E. Lewis Steven J. Hunter Steven J. Mudder Steven J. Silvers Suzanne Fulkerson Thomas & Jennifer Morris Thomas B. Pirtle Thomas J. Emmerling Thomas M. Fennel Thomas R. Josie, III Tony McDowell Trevor Chamberlain Troy & Amy Johnson Vivian A. Eubanks Walter Dickson William Whitegon

BRAVE

Aaron Klien Adam & Karen Fell Alan M. Foster Allison E. Stribling Andrea D. McPherson Andy Lewis Bill & Karen Glidewell Bill & Mary Meloy Brandon T. Owens Brett Breen Brian D. Weinstein Brian Laney Brian Metcalfe Brittany A. Woehler Burt & Kathleen Bagley Carlos Dinkins Carlos H. Gomez Carlton Patrick Carmella Bugbee Casey E. Fulmer Chad Batten Charles Coyle Charles Millard Cheryl Talbert Christopher M. Bosler Clay & Kimberly Bowker Constance Conner Crista Jimenez Dana B. Cohen Daniel and Jennifer Cilar Danielle M. Fleck David & Lisa Meier David Buscemi David Shaffer Dennis P. McDonald Donal O’connor Douglas R. Stickley

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Dr. Thomas Fullman Drew Longenecker Elkin Parrales Eric Dale Quinton Fran Berry G. Buzz Guckenberger Garfield Archer Gerald K. Mitchell Gerry Hurst Grady Maxwell Heather A. Shore Howard Louis Jacobi Jaime M. Maurice James & Amanda Clements James & Cindy Ewoldt James R. Douglass, III James Ramsey James W. Ballas James Williams Jana Goodman Janet Jean & Matthew Smith Jason D. Gibson Jason M. Lonas Jason Roye Jeff Chitty Jeff Graham Jeff Spiro, Sr. Jeffrey B. Chester Jenna M. Stevens Jennifer Dawson Jennifer L. Fitzgerald Jerry Sexton Jessica A. Nilsson Jessica Bush Joe Pisarich, II John H. Henderson, III John Hartman Joseph Feheley Joyce S. Bennett Judge Robert G. Faircloth Justin Goldfarb Keith R. Moran Ken Mulick Kenneth Westerman Kevin Brick Kristie McDowell Kristin N. Fuhrmann Kristopher McLane Kyle W. Mosley Lani Titus Lila & Marc Hagen Lois Koons Mabel Jean Morrison Mabel Perez Margaret Schwartz Mark Bresee Mark McLaren Martin A. Zobel, Jr. Matt Storelli Megan Flack Melanie Bremer Michael & Courtney Cribbs Michael Goins Michael Tatak Michelle L. McCool Mike Ayotte Mitchell Scharf Nicole Santander Patricia A. Shaar Patrick A. White Paul Simmonds Peter J. Austin Phillip H. Parsons Reggie and Alvildia Williams Richard M. Rodriguez Rick Caudill Robby Cassingham Robert Kennedy Sam Parry Scott Johnston Seth Masson Stephen M. Ripley Stephen Maneker Steve Hudson Steven M. Davis Stuart & Taylor Owens Sylvia Cobo Thomas & Mari Whittelsey Thomas Bliss Thomas Muller Thomas S. Brady Victoria Peck Wanda and Keith Prentice Wesley J. MacDonald 72>>

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NEW MEMBERS from page 71

IRON ARROW

A.J. Bacon, Sr. Adam Bass Adam D. George Adrienne Hall Advanced Marketing Training, Inc. Alan Freeman Alan Northrup Alex Gianquinto Alexsandra R. Watson Alfred Fedele Alicia Naff Allison Day Alvaro L. Sanchez Amanda Gotthelf Amanda Womble Andrew A. Parks Andrew E. McGraw Andrew More Anna Whiddon Anne Gregory Anne Ward Anthony Fontanazza Anthony Moseley Anthony’s Italian Restaurant Antron Lewis Arthur Speedy Ashley Jones Ashley King Aubrey & Charlotte Morris Barron L. Barton Barry Shapiro Benjamin J. Arculeo Billy & Mary Ann Turk Blane Cox Blondell Crawford Bob R. Willson Bonnie Higginbotham Bonnie Lou Cates Brad McLane Brad Voegeli Branden Roe Brandon & Jillian Elleby Brandon Lynn Brant Peterson Brett A. Cole Brian D. Green Brian Ellis Brian Lyver Brian P. Battaglia Brian Riggin Brian Taylor Bridget A. Rutledge Brittney C. Theis Bruce Dillenbeck Bryan M. Graves Bryan P. McCallum Burton Hardy Caesar A. Costero Caitlin Heffner Carlos & Kristen Gabino Catherine Simms Cecily Buck Chad Brown Chad Parnell Chanta G. Combs Charlene W. Stanford Charles Amison Charles Irvin Charles Pappy Charles S. Dorman Charles E. Van Middlesworth Charlotte Bocchino Chester Palmer Chris Klein Chris Larocca Chris Pare Chris Seagreaves Christina Natale Christine A. Kochulinski Christine Pramschufer Christopher LoBianco Christopher R. Ciraulo Chuck White Clara M. McKay Colby C. Perez Corey Nicolosi Cori Thompson Cris Revell Cynthia E. Biddle Dallas Elgin

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Daniel & Molly Levy Daniel Champagne Daniel G. Price Daniel Hudnall Daniel Newbold Danielle Davenport Danielle McCreary Danny & Nancy Whipple Darin Lee Johnson Darius Tate David A. Rickey David & Lisa Mills David Burgiel David C. Neal David Drahos David Hammock David Higgins David M Monetti David Miller David Rogers, Jr. Dean Dingee Debbie C. Downey Dennis D. Barfield, II Diane B. Cudia Diane F. Antolino Don Potter Donald Partain Douglas E. Dort Dustin Owen Ed & Jennifer Lee Ed Reisinger Edward McClain Elizabeth S. Rodriguez Elizabeth Wicks Ellen Jacobs Emily G. Timbol Eric Deming Eric M. Bowman Eric Pete Erica D. Poag Erik K. Andersen Erik W. Goss Erik S. Santiago Erin Daly Erin Dupree Evan Power Frank & Shelley Adamski Frank S. Hughes Fred A. V. Miller Gabe & Cynthia Imperato Gary & Shana Smith Gary & Wendy Arnold Gary D. Pave Gary Harness Gary Lawrence Gene Knobbe George T. Scarlett Gordon Sweeney Grant Hogg Gregory Harter Gregory J. Leljedal Guy Barber Guy Bellair Harmoni Dossie Harry Guss Harvey Thompson Hayden Dempsey Heather Gray Henry & Ilze Haire Hope Simmons Howard Charles Copen Jack A. Collier Jackie Gerstenfeld Jacob Hutkins Jaime Melendez James D. Zimmerman James H. Horton, IV James J. Richards James Osteen James R. Henderson James Ziegler Jamie & Billie Sullivan Jan Tully Jane Ciraulo Jane T. Crawford Jane Tillman Janet & Lyle Munce Janice Butler Janis Sikes & Cindy Marvin Jarrett Clark Jason & Christina Moore Jason Blake

UNCONQU E R E D M AGA ZINE

Jason Dillaberry Jason King Jason Stallings Javier Pena Jay Carter Jeff Butler Jeff Bys Jeff Knight Jeff Metcalfe Jeff Mowry Jeff Nemerowsky Jeffrey Rearick Jennifer Comiskey Jennifer L. Long Jerad & Mandie Yates Jeremy Leiting Jerome Dorsey Jessica Bergman Jill Thomas Jim Abril Jody & Lori Skelton Joe Sanchez Joey Peters John & Tricia Knox John J. Mesisca John Lindgren John M. Livergood John S. Hett John Santander John Sutusky Jonathan Bakowski Jonathan D. Russell Joseph Marino Joshua G. Shore Josie C. Doty Joy & Doug Giordano Joyce Fleno Julie French Justin Tarin Kacy Gilbert Kaitlin Julia Kaitlin Woods Karan & Terry Denson Kareem M. Hennawy Karen Gotthelf Kari Janzen Karl Fabel Kathryn G. Nyman Kathryn Wilson Katie Smith Katy San Emeterio Keith Green Keith M. Driggers Keith Tolbert Keith W. Rudd Kevin Canney Kevin D. Marshall Kristi Martin Kristopher Mathis Kurt B. Schafer Kyle G. Coffey Kyle N. McDaniel Kyle West L.D. Derbonne Larry Carter Latarsha Williams Laura K. Sherrier Lauren Anderson Lauren Bloom Lee Boyd Leigh Samons Linda Arsenault Lisa A. Laster Lisa Rackley Logan Di Liello Louise & Scott Stottlemyer Lowell Palmer Lt. Cara Shuttleworth Malin & Harriet Marsh Marc Garfinkel Marcus Thompson Marguerite L. Watz Maria E. Valenti Marianne E. Hall Marie Stuhlmuller Mariela Castillo Marko J. White Marsha Edwards Matrell Powell Matt Kincannon Matt Lowenberg Matthew Gille

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Matthew J. Britten Megan Huntington Megan Waldock Melissa B. Berbusse Melissa R. Duvall Melody K. Booth Miami Springs Police Micah S. Anderson Michael & Debbie Pahl Michael A. Stroud Michael & Logan McLeod Michael & Mary Wiggins Michael & Stephanie Nagel Michael Burke Michael Calamaro Michael D. Reid Michael Dalva Michael Norton Michael Pantages Michele Bemis Michelle & Bruce Hearon Michelle Gardner Michelle Moge Michelle Pimienta Mike Larocca Mike Williams Monica Miles Mr. Ravon Taylor, III Mr. Rey Mrs. Helen C. Erskin Mrs. Katheryn Goodbread Munir M. Shatat Myra Ware Nancy J. McCarthy Nancy V. Cross Natalia A. Menendez Natalie D. Moore Natalie E. Tait Neal Lewis Nicholas A. Rogers Nicholas C. Morrell Nicole C. Rahn Nicole Lopez Norm & Sandy Hughes Olivia S. Putnal Patrick & Amanda Chapman Patrick Hall Pedro Munilla Phil Chase Pietro R. Scudieri Rachael M. Woody Rachel Morgan Randy & Susan Parker Richard A. Sherman, Jr. Richard & Connie Schoonover Richard B. Weiss Richard J. Erickson Richard P. Benson Rob Roy Robert & Ellen Rugel Robert B. Gertzman Robert Bradford Robert J. Poleo Robert L. Curry Robert Pearson Robin Bellan Rodreyous K. Kelley Ron Geiger Ronald W. Vaught Rosemarie Durant Rudi Easterling Ryan K. Nygren Ryan Smith Samantha M. Hughson Sandra Green Sandra Kolapo Sarah Stephenson Sari E. Meyers Scott Loder Scott R. Porter Scott W. Drorbaugh Sean J. Smith Sean Murphy Seth Swindle Shannon L. Maribona Shannon Reynolds Shawn Elliott Sheena M. Ohrman Shelley S. Swee Shepherd M. Smith Sheri Herron Sheri Post

Stephanie G. Vasquez Stephen Jenkins Stephen Mace Steve Gilliam Steven & Lisa Graham Steven & Michelle Floyd Stokely Gittens Susan Snyder Sylvia A. Walker Tanya E. Anim Taraneh Maloney Ted R. Cadwallader Terry W. McCool Thomas & Laura Nolan Thomas D. Depatie Thomas DuPree Thomas Haugen Thomas J. Breslin Thomas Pirro Thomas Smith Thompson C. Maner, Jr. Tiffany Solomon Timmy Meeks Timothy Bradley Timothy J. Cannon Timothy Logue Timothy W. Johnson Tina Gantley Tom & Brenda Robinson Tom E. Hamm, Jr. Tom Ferguson Tommie Bradley Tony Nasrallah Tracy Taylor Travis A. Gardner Travis McCarter Trevor S. Benson Tyler M. Spooner Tyler Parsons Vanessa Wyatt Wayne & Julie Ewald Wayne Berkley William & Randee Head William Carmona William F. Herman William H. Watson, Jr. William Pecora William Russell William Stamps William W. Gerstman Wyatt Eddy


Think our numbers are impressive? Just wait ‘til you meet our bankers.

www.ccbg.com

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seminole legacies

Where’s Fuzzy? By Joel Padgett

If You Met Him at a Game, You Wouldn’t Know the Level of His Success and Wisdom

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H

e may be the fellow sitting beside you at the game, exhorting his Noles and dressed in his lucky clothes from the ’99 National Championship game. He may be your neighbor, or the guy that tailgates beside you with the great family and Bubba Burgers. But you will never know because he, like some of our donors, wishes to remain anonymous. He has a great story to tell about wealth, children and philanthropy but when I asked him to let me share it, he agreed under the condition that I referred to him as Fuzzy Zipperbaum. His wife is also a Nole, so I will refer to them as Fuzzy and Wuzzy. The Zipperbaums are in their early 40s and have two young sons. Fuzzy and Wuzzy had great parents, but of modest means, so both had to pay their way through college. Fuzzy’s Mom worked retail and his Dad was a career military NCO. He and his brother were raised in Florida in what he describes as a lower middle class family. Fuzzy played a lot of sports and became an FSU fan as a boy. “I remember batting balls all afternoon in my driveway while listening on my portable radio to the scratchy AM broadcasts of all the great FSU games during the era when we were playing the likes of Ohio State, Michigan and Pitt,” he recalls. Fuzzy knew that his parents could not afford college, so he worked as a hotel bellman and saved money for his first year. He worked any kind of job in Tallahassee, including installing fence posts and telephone solicitation. He knew that he wanted to move to the Tampa area when he graduated, so he applied for “every position he could find” and was fortunate to land a job at a well known financial firm making cold calls. After earning his way out of the trenches, he was given more responsibilities and his career blossomed. In the financial industry, Fuzzy deals with many very successful people. He has read all of the studies, and seen from his own experience how second and third generation children with new-found wealth tend to squander it all. As Fuzzy and Wuzzy

were fortunate to begin building wealth, they wanted to avoid some of the pitfalls and insure that their children understood the value of education, hard work and helping others. Here is what they do. You don’t know the Zipperbaums’ true names, nor would you know they are millionaires from their trappings. When Fuzzy and I got to know each other, we found that we had a book in common. It is one that he lives by, and one I have given to many people. “The Millionaire Next Door” is a study of who the millionaires in America really are and how they got there. It is an easy, fascinating read. For instance, most millionaires never bought a suit for more than $300, a watch for more than $50, don’t have an ostentatious house, and their preferred vehicle is a Ford F150. More important than what they have though, the book is about them, how they got their wealth, their marriage, kids and philanthropy. The Zipperbaums take their two boys to meet disadvantaged kids to give them some of their toys and clothes. They also have the boys play with those kids to learn that friends can come from all walks of life and to respect others regardless of their station in life. The Zipperbaums want to make sure that their children earn those things that they want, so they understand that nothing in life comes free. When the boys want something, like a new game or a trip, the Zipperbaum household requires that they earn points first. Points are earned by doing extra chores, a special project, extra reading or math problems. No wonder the Zipperbaum children test four grades ahead of their age. But the challenge comes with how to handle their children as they grow older and inherit or are gifted money. How much do you leave or give? When do you do it? How much or how little do you do? Fuzzy and Wuzzy worked out a plan that provides enough for their boys to receive a basic education and modest transportation, but not quite enough for extras. They will have to pay for those with summer jobs. The

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Zipperbaums, although passionate Seminoles, will not require their sons to attend FSU. They can attend any college in the state, save the two unmentionables. If they choose to attend either of those schools, their college fund will go to charity. Really. The boys do not know that after they graduate, they will receive a cash gift from their parents to get them started in life. They will get another gift at age 25 and 31, in equal amounts. But the biggest gift the Zipperbaums believe they will give their sons is teaching them the principles of how to live life. They know that if the boys learn those principles, they will use the money they receive wisely to succeed in life and pursue their dreams. But what about “the end”? Whether it comes tomorrow for the Zipperbaums, or 40 years from now, they have structured their estate so the boys will not receive everything. They want to give them a hand up, not a hand out. They will be able to take care of their boys very well, and have plenty left over to give to the things that have been an important part of their lives. One of those “things” they have provided for is Florida State athletics with an estate gift to Seminole Boosters, Inc. Fuzzy and Wuzzy appreciate the value of athletics, how scholarships provide an education that can change a young person’s life. And now, with their estate plan in place, the Zipperbaums can continue to enjoy their children and Florida State sports knowing they have taken care of all the people important to their lives. SB Everyone has a different thought process on how to handle their children and how to distribute their wealth. I wanted to tell you Fuzzy’s story because he tries to follow his own advice and follow a lot of the principles discovered in “The Millionaire Next Door.” More importantly, I wanted to share his story because he HAS a plan. Regardless of your age, your sex, whether or not you are married or have children, you need to have a PLAN in place. It is easy and inexpensive to do, and we can help you by providing a will kit, or assisting with finding an attorney. Please let us know how we can help. Joel Padgett is the Director of Gift Planning with Seminole Boosters, Inc. He can be reached at jpadgett@admin.fsu.edu or (850)644-3484.

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Seminole Road Warriors Putting Sports in Perspective

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eminole Boosters, keep your eye on the final road game as the Road Warriors head to Maryland — as they have for every Florida State away football game — to capture the spirit of FSU football. This concept is a joint collaboration between the FSU Athletics Department digital media staff, the Seminole Boosters, Seminole ISP Sports Network and Camping World of Tallahassee. The goal behind this endeavor is to provide the same multimedia coverage for each away football game on Seminoles.com that the digital media staff is able to provide at home games. Fans can watch video and read reports both online or via the Seminole Mobile Application. “We honestly went into this not knowing if anybody would care about our road trips,” said Ryan Pensy, director of digital media. “It was amazing to run into so many people who are following our trips.” There is also a very exciting social media element involved for fans of Florida State Athletics. You can follow the Seminoles.com Road Warriors on a dedicated blog on Seminoles.com. You can also follow their travels on the official Facebook page of the Florida State Seminoles (Seminoles.com/facebook) and on twitter (Seminoles. com/twitter). For the Seminole Boosters, this is a new way to connect with supporters both in Tallahassee and across the country. “There’s a grassroots piece to this that makes every Seminole fan feel involved,” said Jerry Kutz, vice president of the Seminole Boosters. “We’ve got to interact and have conversations with them. We used to do that at events and through direct mail, but now with social media we can actually have an ongoing dialogue with a broad range of supporters. That’s what the Road Warriors allowed us to do. People followed our progress and felt like they were with us.” Continue to follow the Seminoles.com Road Warriors on Seminoles.com. SB

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florida state university athletics

Quarterly Report 78

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Q U A R T E R LY R E P O R T SWIM & DIVE

Seminoles In with a Splash The Florida State swimming and diving team has had a tremendous start to the 2010–11 season. The Seminole women started 3-0 in dual meet action while the men started 2-0. The Garnet and Gold began the season with a pair of second-place finishes at the State of Florida Invite. For the women, it has been a great start for the freshman class. Both Julia Henkel and Tiffany Oliver have proven in their first season that they have the talent to compete with the best in the ACC. The highlight for the men came at the State of Florida Invite, where sophomore Mark Weber won the 50 free with a great season opening time of 20.57. Weber’s mark is tops in the ACC this season. Another bright spot for the men is senior Rob Holderness, who began the season in Dehli, India, competing in the Commonwealth Games. Holderness finished sixth in the 200 breast and earned NCAA automatic qualifying times in both the 100 and 200 breaststroke. Holderness’ time in the 200 is the fastest to date in the NCAA. Florida State also has a new addition to the Morcom Aquatic Center that made its debut on Oct. 23. The new scoreboard not only adds to the dual-meet atmosphere, it helps make Morcom one of the great swimming facilities in the country. Follow the Noles this season on Seminoles.com.

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FOOTBALL

Q&A with Ryan McMahon Originally published Oct. 19, 2010 By Caryn Savitz, Seminoles.com

Florida State fifth-year senior center Ryan McMahon is as reliable as a high-end Swiss watch. Despite playing one of the most physically demanding positions on the field, McMahon has logged 45 consecutive starts for offensive line coach Rick Trickett, oftentimes playing with the kind of pain that would keep some off the field. As the Seminoles’ Iron Man, McMahon is on pace to become the program’s all-time leader in games played and started. It’s a source of great pride for the Savannah, Ga., native, who made the transition from defensive tackle to center five years ago and has never looked back. A graduate with a degree in finance, McMahon goes about his job dutifully each day, allowing his actions to speak louder than his words. Q: What have you learned about yourself in the last four years? RM: You can always do a lot more work than you think you can do. At practice, if you think you’re tired, your body can do a lot more than you think it can. Q: You’ve played in every game of your career. What keeps you going? RM: Go out there and do what I’m coached. If I’m not injured I just keep going as hard as I can. Q: How was the transition moving from defense to offense? RM: It was a pretty quick one. Coach Trickett came in after my redshirt season and moved me straight to center that spring. Coach helped me a lot — staying on me, making sure I did everything right. Q: Were you recruited for defense or for offense? RM: I came here as defense and was recruited mostly defense; I never played center before I got here. Q: What’s the difference with this Florida State team? What positive changes have been made in the offseason? RM: The new coaching staff has really emphasized that, instead of having offense and defense and special teams, we play as a team. Everybody’s together. Even the locker room has been changed up. You’re not necessarily sitting next to an offensive lineman. You could be sitting next to a linebacker. You feel more chemistry. It’s brought everybody together. Q: What can we expect from the team for the rest of the season? RM: We’re just going to go out there and give it our all every play. We want to have 11 guys playing together

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every play, and we’ve got to prepare for the week. We’ve got to prepare for the game that whole week before. Q: Being a senior, is it a little nostalgic every time you step onto the field? RM: No, I don’t really think about it that way. I’m just going out there trying to win games and play to the best of my ability. Q: How has Coach Trickett helped to improve you as a player? RM: He stays on you every day and every day you’ve got to go to practice and give it your all. You have to bring your A-game every day. He pays attention to every little detail. If you’re not doing a little thing right, that could lead to a bigger mistake. So he stays on little details and keeps you focused. Q: Which game are you most looking forward to this season? RM: Whatever the next game is. I’m taking it game by game. Q: Being a senior, you are a leader. How do you lead by example with the younger guys? RM: I tell them that when it gets hot and you’re tired out there at practice, don’t make mental errors. Keep pretending like it’s the game and you’re going to keep doing the right technique. Push through even when you’re hot and tired. Q: What does a rare football-free day consist of for you? RM: Some of the linemen and I will go fishing. Q: What are your plans after graduation? RM: My goal has always been to go to the NFL, so I’ll be working on that.

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Q U A R T E R LY R E P O R T

CROSS COUNTRY

Running Up the Ranks The Florida State men’s and women’s cross country TEAMS have experienced a tremendous amount of success so far this season. Both find themselves ranked nationally in the Top 10 and both rank No. 1 in the South Region. The men’s team under head coach Bob Braman earned a No. 8 national ranking at the end of October, matching the highest the Seminoles have ever been in the polls. The only other time FSU ranked this high was in November of 2006. As for head coach Karen Harvey’s women’s squad, the defending national runner-ups rank No. 3 in the nation and earned a first-place finish at Pre-Nationals in mid-October. The men’s team took third place in the Pre-Nationals. So far this season, the women’s team has been paced by senior team captains Pilar McShine and Pasca Cheruiyot. But the veterans are not the only ones who have made their marks. Sophomore Amanda Winslow finished seventh overall at Pre-Nationals and helped propel her team to the top spot in what is the biggest event so far this season. For her efforts, Winslow was named the ACC Performer of the Week after the event. On the men’s side, veterans Ciaran O’Loinaird, Justin Harbor, Mike Fout and Matt Leeder have guided the ’Noles this season. Harbor earned ACC Performer of the Week honors in early October.

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