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S E M I N O L E B O O S T E R S M AG A Z I N E

June 2011

FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY

NCAA

Perfect

Repeat For the Second Straight Year ’Noles Qualify All 19 Teams for NCAA Postseason

Also Inside

>> fsu student athletes: no. 1 Nationally for community service >> Jimbo fisher: “you make the helmet”


SunTrust is proud to be the official bank of Seminole Athletics. For your team to win, everyone must work together toward a common goal. Same goes for your financial success. Whether it’s day-to-day banking, or helping you establish a solid game plan for your financial future, SunTrust representatives are teammates you can rely on. To learn more, stop by your local branch, call 800.SUNTRUST or visit suntrust.com.

SunTrust Bank, Member FDIC. Š 2010 SunTrust Banks, Inc. SunTrust and Live Solid. Bank Solid. are federally registered service marks of SunTrust Banks, Inc.


PROUD SUPPORTER OF THE FSU ROAD WARRIORS 31300 US Hwy 90 West, I-10 Exit 192, 1.5 miles West on Hwy 90 Tallahassee, FL 32343 888-696-5513 S|EMINO www.tallahasseeRVs.com LE-BO OST ERS .CO M UNCO NQUERED MAGAZ I NE

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GetJoin In… Renew the …GVolunteer! ame:

Call: (850) 644-3484 Visit: Seminole-Boosters.com

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Unconquered magazine (USPS 18182) is published quarterly by Seminole Boosters, Inc., 225 University Center, Suite 5100, Tallahassee, Florida, 32306. (850) 644-3484, Fax: (850) 222-5929. POSTMASTER: send change of address to, Unconquered magazine, care of Seminole Boosters, Florida State University Center, Suite C-5100, 5th Floor, Tallahassee, Florida, 32306. Periodicals Postage Paid at Tallahassee, FL, Volume 28, Issue 2. All advertising revenues directly support programs of the Seminole Boosters, Inc. For advertising rates, please contact the sales representatives listed below. © 2011, Seminole Boosters, Inc. All rights reserved. Opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Florida State University faculty, staff or administration. Overview Unconquered magazine celebrates Seminole athletics and the indomitable spirit of its student-athletes who overcome adversity, the passion of its coaches and educators who help students reach beyond their limits, and the devotion of donors who redefine the boundaries of generosity by giving scholarships that change lives and who make donations that build first-class athletic facilities. By sharing their stories of transformational experiences — on the athletic playing field, in the classroom and in life — Unconquered magazine encourages the growth of responsible world citizenship and cross-cultural understanding. Each issue carries stories on what makes student-athletes great and how they were shaped by their experience at FSU, features on Seminole community sports legends and profiles of donors who make contributions.

2011 EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

Brian Swain

Ken Willis

Mike Harrell

Gene Ready

Steve Brown

Bob Caton

Morris Miller

TOM JENNINGS

RANDY SPETMAN

ANDY MILLER

Philip Griffitts

Bruce Harrell

Lori Mattice

Dr. Pamela Perrewe

Chairman

Past Chairman

Chairman-Elect

Booster Attorney

Secretary

VP for University Advancement

Treasurer

Immediate Past Chair

Athletic Director

Seminole Boosters President

Contact Send correspondence to Kirstin Rayborn, at the address shown above, or by e-mail to krayborn@fsu.edu. Telephone: (850) 645-7330. Magazine Staff Publishers: Andy Miller, Jerry Kutz Managing editor: Kirstin Rayborn

At-Large Member

At-Large Member

At-Large Member

Faculty Representative

Design, layout, production, pre-press: Rowland Publishing, Inc. Photo editors: Derril Beech, Rowland Publishing, Inc. Featured photographers: Mike Olivella, Ross Obley, Contributing photographers: FSU Photo Lab, FSU Sports Info Columnists: Charlie Barnes, Jim Crosby, Jerry Kutz Contributing writers: Forrest Connelly, John Lata, Bill Lickson, Daniel Mitchell, Joel Padgett, Caryn Savitz, Nikki Ticknor, Rob Wilson Copy editors: Jerry Kutz, Rowland Publishing, Inc. Photo purchasing information: Mike Olivella photos: www.seminoles.com

2010–2011 BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Ross Obley photos: www.seminoles.com

Seminole Boosters, Inc. EXECUTIVE STAFF Andy Miller President and CEO Charlie Barnes Executive Director Senior Vice President Joel Padgett Senior Vice President Gift Planning Director Tom Carlson Senior Vice President Jerry Kutz Vice President of Marketing and Communications Cindee Lundeen, PhD Director

Rachel Catalano Student Boosters, Special Events, Executive Assistant to Andy Miller

FSU VARSITY CLUB

Sarah Reed Executive Assistant, Coaches Clubs Director

DONOR RECORDS

Mary Bailey Executive Assistant to Jerry Kutz, Stewardship Kari Terezakis Executive Assistant to Tom Carlson, Charlie Barnes, Joel Padgett

Billy Sexton Director

Patti Barber Receptionist, Office Assistant

Eric Carr Director

Barbara Mason Financial Assistant

Sanford Lovingood Controller

Amy Hanstein Accounting Assistant

Matt Behnke, CPA Chief Financial Officer

PROGRAM DIRECTORS

Max Zahn Northeast FL Representative Kristin Tubeck Tampa Representative ASSISTANTS TO EXECUTIVE STAFF AND DIRECTORS Mary Pat Desloge Senior Executive Assistant to Andy Miller

Maria Fuller Skybox and Parking Director Farrah Miller Information Technology Director, Webmaster, Internship Coordinator Michael Espada Ticket Sales Manager Kirstin Rayborn Marketing Director

Seminole Boosters, Inc.

Betsy Hosey Director

Jennifer Terrell Director Matt Lanahan Office Assistant Jeff Chamlis Gift Entry Jason Liskooka Data Entry Abbie King Data Entry Dominique Gordon Data Entry Brandon Mand Gift Entry UNCONQUERED MAGAZINE Derril Beech Outgoing Editor Kirstin Rayborn Managing Editor & Advertising FSU TRADEMARK LICENSING Sherri Dye Director of Licensing Garrett O’Connor Assistant Licensing Director

Rick Astor Kathy Atkins-Gunter, PC Jorge Azor Byron Bailey Doug Bailey Tom Barron, PC Mark Bates Joe Beckham Flecia Braswell Steve Brown, PC Jim Byrd Bob Camp, PC Joe Camps, PC Bob Carnes Bill Carraway, PC Jimmy Carter, PC Ken Cashin, PC Bob Caton, PC Raymond Cottrell, PC Dave Cowens, PC Clif Curry Craig Dewhurst Carl Domino, PC

Wade Durham Frank Fain, PC Ron Farrell Michael Feiler Lon Fellenz Mike Fields, PC Philip Griffitts Todd Haag Andy Haggard, PC Kim Hammond, PC Bill Harkins Bruce Harrell Michael Harrell Ed Hart Ed Haskell, PC Sherm Henderson, PC Charlie Hill, PC Jeff Hill Roger Hobbs Ron Hobbs, PC Cassandra Jenkins Bill Kalfas Jim Kirk, PC

Chris Kraft, PC Lawton Langford, PC George Langford, PC Greg Lawrence Brett Lindquist Douglas Mannheimer, PC Lori Mattice Linda McGee Andy Miller Morris Miller Michael Miller David Mobley DeVoe Moore Russ Morcom, PC Julie Moss John Olson, PC Bill Parker, PC Sean Pittman Frank Pope, PC Theo Proctor, PC Gene Ready John Rice Christian Scherf

Jon Shebel Barry Smith Bob Smith Lomax Smith, PC Randall Spetman Kathy Stahl Brian Swain Donn Szaro Nylah Thompson Glenda Thornton Gary Thurston Nada Usina Oscar Vicente Cumi Walsingham Gary Walsingham, PC Derek Whitis Ash Williams Ken Willis PC denotes Past Chairman

FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF TRUSTEES Avi Assidon Allan Bense Edward E. “Ed” Burr Susie Busch-Transou, Vice Chair Joseph L. Camps, Jr. Emily Fleming Duda Joseph Gruters

William Andrew Haggard, Chair Mark Hillis James E. Kinsey, Jr. Sandra Lewis Margaret A. Rolando Brent Sembler

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“We are proud of our scholar athletes who excel in the classroom and on the playing field.”

Eric J. Barron

President of The Florida State University

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Program Update

By JERRY KUTZ

(Above and on the cover) The Student-Athletic Advisory Committee provides leadership for FSU’s nineteen teams. (Front left to right) Luke Loucks, EJ Manuel, Lonnie Pryor, Nikki Ticknor, Brooks Koepka, Stephanie Neville, Deividas Dulkys (Back left to right) Trevor Andrews, Danny Nguyen, Anderson Reed, Ashley Stager, Ines Jaurena, Ashley Calhoun, Brittany Selts, Gen King, Kim Williams, James Ramsey, Chelsi McDonald. Photo by Mike Olivella.

Has Any Program Ever Done It Before?

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lorida State’s athletic teams may have accomplished something the past two years that no collegiate program has ever achieved in the history of the NCAA — and it should be a great source of pride for every Seminole Booster member. When Lonnie Alameda’s softball team won the ACC Championship tournament and clinched an automatic bid in the NCAA Regional, it meant that all 19 of FSU men’s and women’s sports had made NCAA post-season play. That sent the FSU sports information department and the NCAA scrambling, taking a deep dive into the record books, to see if any athletic program has ever had all its teams make NCAA post-season play two years in a row. Nineteen for nineteen in anything is great. Nineteen for nineteen in fierce NCAA competition two years in a row is rare, if not unprecedented. To fully appreciate this accomplishment — a sign of a well-balanced program — you have to appreciate how hard it is for one sport to qualify for NCAA post-season play, let alone EVERY team to qualify. Of the 300-plus Division I programs that

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compete for NCAA post-season bids, only two schools — FSU and Texas A&M — placed every one of their teams in NCAA postseason play during the 2009-10 competition year. FSU repeated in 2010-11. Texas A&M did not, which begs the question: Has any program ever been 19-for-19 two years in a row? It’s obviously tough to do. One bad recruiting class, one academic failure or, simply, one injury to a key player — like Chris Singleton late in the basketball season — on any of FSU’s 19 teams could have ended the streak. But FSU managed to overcome adversities other programs couldn’t and now finds itself in what is believed to be a rarefied space in collegiate history. And luck is not the reason FSU finds itself in this place. FSU’s perfect attendance record in NCAA play indicates the program is well balanced and healthy. Most athletic directors would tell you this success indicates the resources necessary to recruit, train, tutor, doctor and coach each student-athlete are being made available to all 19 of the men’s and women’s programs. And that the program is placing the proper emphasis on the success of each and every team.

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It is reflected in the academic achievements of the 500 student-athletes, whose average GPA the past two years has been a 2.94. Only Duke has as many student-athletes on the ACC Honor Roll. That’s a function of a healthy academic support program. No program in the nation logs more hours of community outreach than FSU’s student-athletes commit, and yet these same student-athletes are achieving unprecedented success in their field of competition as evidenced by this remarkable two-year run which has driven FSU into the top five of the Learfield Director’s Cup for comprehensive excellence. As a Seminole Booster member, a person whose annual contributions help to fund all 19 programs, you should take great pride in this accomplishment. Thanks in part to your contribution, every one of FSU’s 19 men’s and women’s sports is afforded the full complement of scholarships the NCAA allows. You can also take pride in knowing your donation helps build state-of the-art facilities that attract the best and brightest student-athletes and coaches and enables them to train and compete at peak performance levels.


CO N T E N T S

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Booster Life 5 Board of Directors 16 Booster Life 70 NCAA Compliance / Welcome New Members Columnists 8 Best Year Ever? 46 You Make the Helmet

46 40

Report 6 Seminoles Make History 12 Community Outreach: Aspiring to Inspire 20 Football Spring Wrap-Up 26 Randy Spetman Q & A 34 Seminole Golf Facility 42 Football Mini-Packs 49 Social Media 50 Volunteer Campaign 52 Jimbo Fisher Camp 54 FSU Camps 56 Booster Membership 64 Student Athletes Q & A 68 True Seminole 74 Sports Update: Baseball Seniors Given Degrees on the Field 76 Quarterly Report Features 28 BASEBALL Behind the Scenes with Chip Baker

32 SOFTBALL Coach Lonni Alameda

36 FORMER STUDENT-ATHLETES RETURN TO FSU FOR STUDIES

Seminoles.com

By Forrest Conoly

40 FOOTBALL PLAYER PROFILE

photos by fsu sports info, Ross Obley & mike olivella

EJ Manuel

58 SEMINOLE Basketball NCAA Success

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62 DONOR Jim Steiner

66 donor Cassandra Jenkins

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Correction from February 2011 Issue: The Chick-Fil-A Bowl photos seen on pages 36–39 were taken by FSU photographer Ross Obley.

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Charlie Barnes

Could 2011 be the Seminoles’

Best Year Ever? Depends on Your Perspective

We Can Be Better, Stronger Than We Ever Were By Charlie Barnes, vice president Photos by FSU Sports info, mike olivella & ross obley

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 he theme selected for this issue of Unconquered is “The Year in Review.” Our fans aren’t really looking back right now; they’re much more excited about looking forward.

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Charlie Barnes

We’re excited because the years to come may bring the best The Seminoles’ record after eight games was an incredible 6-2. times ever for Seminole football. The best times ever. We’ll talk They had defeated three of the biggest names in college ball in a about why in a little bit. five-game stretch. FSU was celebrated as America’s college footIn looking back it’s always useful to remember the importance ball “Road Warriors” in every television sports broadcast. of perspective. Let me give you an example. Do you remember — And that is the way we remember that iconic year of glory. or have you ever heard of — the five game series in 1981 that Bobby Those heroic 1981 players and coaches deserve to be remembered Bowden christened the “Octoberfest”? that way. But that is not the end of the story. The three remaining Our 1981 schedule was one of the most brutal ever faced by any games of the season were played in November, against Miami, college football team. The magnificent senior defense that took Southern Mississippi and Florida. us to the Orange Bowl in 1980 was gone. The Seminoles returned The team was spent, emotionally and physically. We lost all only three starters on each side of the ball. three games. For all the triumphs of October, the Seminoles finA long-departed Athletics Director had constructed the schedished 1981 unranked. The Seminole team that had been national ule ten years earlier. It was designed to bring in revenue, with little media darlings in October faded into obscurity by the end of thought given to the fate of the players who would have to underNovember. It was one of only three years out of Bobby Bowden’s take the job. thirty-four that the Seminoles did not get invited to a bowl game. In addition to the traditional rivalry games against Miami At the football awards banquet, quarterback Rick Stockstill adand Florida, the Seminoles dressed his team and the hunwould confront in one sixdreds of Seminole fans who week span, five consecutive were there to support their away games against Nebrasplayers. Today, Stockstill is the ka, Ohio State, Notre Dame, championship Head Coach of Pittsburgh and LSU. the Middle Tennessee State Coach Bowden was candid Blue Raiders. In 2006 he was about the fact that he had not the Sunbelt Conference and intended to stay at Florida ESPN.com Coach of the Year. State more than a few years. But on the night of that foot“When I got here in 1976, I reball banquet, Stockstill would member looking at that 1981 not keep his emotions in schedule and thinking, ‘I woncheck. He spoke for all the exder who’s going to be coachhausted players and coaches. ing here then?’ ” “I’m sorry,” he said, his voice But Bowden was still here choked with tears. “I’m sorry in 1981, and he prepared for for six-and-five.” the suicidal run by giving it a Perspective. clever name, the Octoberfest, Let’s look back at the 2010 Christian Ponder becomes the first FSU QB to be drafted in the first and used it to promote the imseason, keeping perspective round. Ponder was the first pick for the Minnesota Vikings. age of Florida State as a team in mind. If you were inclined that would travel anywhere, to gamble, how much of your anytime and play anyone. net worth would you have lost Florida State’s unofficial football historian Jimmy Joanos wrote if someone had come to you last August and offered you this bet: that “the series of events of October, 1981 shocked the college “I’ll bet you that the 2010 Seminoles will lose three ACC games, football world.” And so it did. After losing at Nebraska, the SemiBUT we will dominate both Miami and Florida and we will humnoles travelled to Columbus where they defeated the 7th-ranked ble the SEC’s best rushing defense in the most watched Chick-filOhio State Buckeyes. A week later in South Bend, FSU defeated A (Peach) Bowl in history.” Would you have taken that bet? Notre Dame. And now our fans are exuberant. We are confident in Jimbo A week after that the Tribe was in Pittsburgh to take on Dan Fisher and his staff, and our optimism is fired by their extraordiMarino and the 13th ranked Pitt Panthers. It was a loss, but the nary recruiting success. Ten wins plus victories over old ghosts ’Noles didn’t have time to dwell on missed opportunities. They have fueled talk that a new Dynasty is underway. had to prepare for their final Octoberfest match against the LSU But let’s put 2010 into perspective of The Dynasty. That historic Tigers. FSU hammered the Tigers 38-14 on Homecoming night fourteen year run may never be matched by any other college footin Baton Rouge. ball team. Every Dynasty team won at least 10 games. Our 2010 team

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Charlie Barnes

“Do you remember when the Florida Gators did not win a game in Doak for nearly twenty years?” (Left) Defensive end Peter Boulware puts the heat on Gator quarterback Danny Wuerffel. (Right) The defense of the 2010 team continue the tradition. Terrance Parks and Kendall Smith tackle UF’s Frankie Hammond.

We are a larger, better, more mature fan base than we were … our football program is in sync with cultural and technological changes … our fan base is much more engaged now than in the past. also won 10 games, but we played fourteen. None of the Dynasty teams played that many games in one season. In 2010 we lost to three ACC opponents. There were only two ACC losses in total during the entire Dynasty run. The Seminoles finished every season ranked in the nation’s Top Four, with the exception of the Dynasty’s final year when we finished ranked #5 after the 2000-01 Orange Bowl. For all their success and promise, our 2010 Seminoles finished #16 in one poll and #17 in the other. It is not displeasing that in both polls Florida fell into the ambiguous dustpan of “others receiving votes.” Placed into perspective, the original Dynasty looks even more impressive. That span from 1987-2000 was a wonderful ride, wind whipping through our hair. At that speed our fans only glimpsed the upturned faces of less fortunate teams as we flew

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past. We complained that we were weary of a monotonous series of BCS bowl games in the same places. I mean, after all, how many more great meals can you consume in New Orleans? How many more good golf courses can you find in Phoenix? Miami again? Please; been there, done that. We became jaded. We yawned. We groused about the idea of losing to any ACC team (“Well! That’s not supposed to happen!”). Our fans didn’t bother to show up early in New Orleans for the 1999 National Championship game. Tens of thousands of Seminoles stayed camped out in casino hotels along the Gulf coast. On game day, Virginia Tech fans were stunned to see an endless caravan of limousines curl down the ramps into the French Quarter, disgorging half a Super Dome full of loud and happy FSU Seminoles.

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So if the Dynasty established a near impossible standard, then why would we think that the future of Seminole football is going to be even better than that? Why do we believe that the best times ever are coming? One reason is that it’s not the 1990s anymore and we are a larger, better, more mature fan base than we were. Another is that our football program is in sync with cultural and technological changes. Seminole fans stay connected with their program through Facebook, Twitter and Seminoles.com and a wide range of fan websites, none of which existed fifteen years ago. Our fan base is much more engaged now than in the past. The Boosters and Athletic Department have created wonderful new initiatives. You say you can only come to three games this fall? We have a three-game package that includes Oklahoma and


Charlie Barnes

two others, or Miami and two others. Visit Seminoles.com. A firm of stadium architects has been retained to make Doak more comfortable and fan-friendly. And you’ve heard about “College Town.” That entire broad swath of old warehouses between the stadium and the Leon County Civic Center is being taken down to make way for a fabulous district of shops and restaurants, housing and entertainment and avenues for strolling with your family and friends. One of the first things we must do, and right away, is to reclaim Doak Campbell Stadium. Do you realize that through the 1990s our stadium averaged 102 percent of capacity in a given year? Do you remember when the Florida Gators did not win a game in Doak for nearly twenty years? We fans have got to make winning in our stadium as close to a sure thing as possible. It used to be that way. In the last six or seven years, thousands upon thousands of season ticket holders have dropped

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their tickets. The economy is responsible for a large measure of that. But Florida State graduates between 5,000 and 8,000 students every year. As we return to national prominence, the ticket demand should be higher and the atmosphere more attractive for those game weekends. Young alumni and their families want to stay connected with the game day experience they so enjoyed as undergraduates. We have a proven professional coaching staff and access to the best high school talent in America. We’re a football school with passionate fans who insist on excellence. We’re still a national TV fanfavorite. Our program is well funded and well led with integrity. To have once had success and then lose it is painful. But while success is wonderful, it’s not a very good teacher. We’ve learned the hard lessons, and those lessons will help make us great again. We can be better, stronger even than we were. SB

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Community Outreach

(Clockwise from top) Women’s Golf Receives the Director Cup for Service: Athletic Director Randy Spetman, Gen King, Mary Beth Ramsay and Coach Trey Jones; James Ramsey, baseball; Robin Ahrberg, softball, with Eunice Hernandez, athletic trainer; Women’s Basketball: Courtney Ward, Coach Sue Semrau and Christian Hunnicutt. (Opposite page) Florida State track and basketball standouts Kim Williams and Courtney Ward at the Special Olympics Gymnastics Event

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Community Outreach

aspiring to inspire 2011 Golden Nole Awards Banquet Recognizes Student-Athletes Who Go Above and Beyond

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By John Lata, Ph.D., Office of Student Services Photos by fsu sports info

or the 17th straight year, Seminole student-athletes, coaches and staff met at the Oglesby Union ballrooms to honor outgoing senior student-athletes, and to recognize teams and individuals for community service efforts, athletic excellence and leadership. The annual Golden Nole Awards Banquet, held April 18, was an opportunity for student-athletes to revel in the department’s many achievements and accolades received over the course of the entire year. And what a year it has been (so far)! The Golden Nole Awards are presented to the student-athletes who best exemplify what it means to be an all-around successful student-athlete at Florida State, and the winner is selected by their head coach. Many times it’s a difficult process to select just one, particularly if a given sport has had an especially good year (as most of our sports have had this year!). One of the premier awards presented during the evening’s festivities are the Atlantic Coast Conference Top Six for Service Awards. Six community service all-stars are selected, not solely based on total number of hours, but also on a myriad of attributes that make them stand out among their peers. Their willingness to give back is commendable, and hopefully inspires their teammates to make the same efforts going forward. This year the honorees were Charles Clark, Men’s Track & Field; Dustin Hopkins, Football; James Ramsey, Baseball; Amanda

Saxton, Women’s Volleyball; Ashley Stager, Softball; and Margo Zwerling, Women’s Track & Field. These six individuals each averaged more than 60 hours of service, and were involved in a variety of events such as Red Cross Noles and Super CPR day, as well as Relay for Life and Dance Marathon — causes important to all students at Florida State. Yashiva Edwards, Assistant Director of Student Service, said her favorite part of the event is the announcement of the Top Six winners. “It’s always a surprise to many and even for the individuals who actually win,” she said. “It’s a great honor to be awarded the Top Six for Service award, as evidenced when a number of student-athletes came

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up to me at the end of the banquet and asked what they had to do to win that award next year!” Two senior student-athletes were honored for overcoming great adversity to participate in athletics for Florida State University. The Doc Fauls Award, established in 1998, honors the former Head Athletic Trainer at FSU from 1954-1986. Don “Doc” Fauls had the opportunity to touch the lives of many, and consistently treated everyone in an honest, professional manner. He was always willing to take the time to help athletes through the physical and emotional pain that often came with participation in intercollegiate athletics. This year’s honorees were Robin Ahrberg of Women’s Softball, and Football student-athlete Ryan McMahon.

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Community Outreach

(Clockwise from top left) Florida State vtolleyball participated in Stomp Out Diabetes; FSU football sent representatives to both Read Across America and Literacy Week; Seminole volleyball and soccer players at the Tallahassee Fitness Festival.

“We are all blessed to be here at FSU and it gives us a sense of pride to be able to give back to our community.” — Amy Bond, Head Coach Women’s Golf The Athletic Director’s Cup for Service Award is given each year to the team that has performed the most community service hours per person. Women’s Golf won it once again, for an amazing 10th year in a row, averaging more than 64 hours of service per person. “The Director’s Cup for Service has always been an important award to our program. We are all blessed to be here at FSU and it gives us a sense of pride to be able to give back to our community,” said Head Coach Amy Bond. “The girls really enjoy getting out and helping others.” Bond was part of the first win 10 years ago as an assistant coach, before leaving and then coming back to continue the tradition as head coach. One team that barely missed winning

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the Directors Cup was Women’s Softball, which tripled the number of hours accumulated in the previous year, doing almost a thousand hours of service as a team. They were presented with the SemiGnome Award, for most improved program. “I was so proud of Softball for winning this year’s SemiGnome Award,” Edwards commented. “Although they were gunning for the Director’s Cup, they truly deserved to be honored this year. Coach Alameda and her ladies did an outstanding job giving back to the community this year. Nine hundred seventy four hours, that’s amazing!” Other student-athletes were honored during the evening for awards they received outside the athletic department. Three student-athletes who were identified as leaders on campus included Dustin Hopkins,

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Football — who received the Dean’s Cup award; Tiffany McCarty, Soccer — who received the JR Harding award; and Kimmi Williams, Women’s Track & Field — who received the Student Seminole award. We would be remiss if we did not honor four individuals recognized by the ACC April 13 as recipients of the WeaverJames-Corrigan Postgraduate Awards. Honorees were Christian Hunnicutt from Women’s Basketball, Federica Suess from the Women’s Tennis team, and two Men’s Track & Field performers, Charles Clark and Gonzalo Barroilhet. “This year’s Golden Nole banquet was by far one of the best, from the videos, to the music, to the food and attire,” said Student-Athlete Advisory Council President and baseball team member James Ramsey, who was emcee for the event. “I am confident that everyone thoroughly enjoyed the event. The award winners embody what Florida State seeks — on and off the playing fields — and they deserve to be recognized.” SB


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he University Center Club is the premier private club serving Florida State University, Tallahassee and friends of the community. Since its establishment in 1996, the Club has offered Members and guests outstanding cuisine while enjoying spectacular views of downtown Tallahassee and Doak Campbell Stadium. The Club features à la carte dining in the Osceola Grill and six exquisitely appointed private meeting/dining rooms along with an 8,000 square foot ballroom. When you combine this magnificent facility with our expert staff you have Tallahassee’s Premier Private Club!

To learn more about membership, game day benefits, or hosting an event, please contact our Membership team today! Melinda Baker can be reached at (850) 644-6522 or melinda.baker@ourclub.com Cherrie Barbree can be reached at (850) 644-9089 or cherrie.barbree@ourclub.com University Center | Doak Campbell Stadium | Tallahassee, FL 32306 | (850) 644-8528 | www.UniversityCenterClub.com S EMINO LE-BO OST ERS .CO M

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Booster Life

Spring Coaches Tour

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Photos by tarry kemp & Max oligario

Booster Life

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Booster Life

Best spring gam e atmosphere: Fl orida State. The of 53,818, which Seminoles had was the third m a record crowd ost nationally be The weekend fe hind Alabama an atured a downt d Nebraska. own block party country artist Ja with several ba ke Owen, and th nd s, including ere were firewor contest began Sa ks Friday. A barb turday morning ecue cookoff behind the gam greats played a e, and at halftim flag football gam e former FSU e. — Heather D inich, ESPN .COM

FSU Spring Weekend Rated ‘Best in the Country’

More Than 1000 Seminole Boosters Gathered at the Seminole Boosters Appreciation Party

Alex Lamm, Craig Dewhurst, Russ Vohris, Max Zahn and Bill Hagen with members of the men’s basketball team and women’s volleyball team

Carla Swain, Brian Swain, Nylah Thompson Daniel Grant, Kyleigh Grant, Jamie Mills

Carleen and Claude Thigpen

Bruce Harrell

Mikey Harrell Lacey Turner

James Dilworth

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Alphanso Carreker


Booster Life Jim and Martha Pitts Randy Spetman

Larry Buck

Joel Padgett

Spring Weekend

James Dilworth

Jorge Azor

Teri Cariota

Rachel Sutz Pienta

Kathy Dilworth

Jake owen and fireworks Photos by Ross Obley

Jake Owen

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Spring Recap

(Above and below right) FSU’s young and talented receiving corps will be a key to success in 2011. (Below left) Kicker Dustin Hopkins nails a 60-yard field goal in the spring game and will be a candidate for the Lou Groza kicker award.

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Spring Recap

Florida State Completes Second Spring Under Fisher Emerging Talent Provides Depth to Seminole Squad By Rob Wilson, Associate A.D. for Communications Photos by Ross Obley

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pring football practice is all about players like Avis Commack.

A highly recruited wide receiver from First Coast High in Jacksonville, injuries — including a broken leg — held Commack back from making an impact in his first three seasons with the Seminoles. Coaches used the 15 practices this spring to try him at cornerback, where he proved a quick study and emerged from the spring game as a player coaches could count on. Finding depth and emerging talent may have been the clearest success of the spring session. It is a credit to Jimbo Fisher and his veteran staff that they never allowed themselves to waste time worrying about who would be missing this spring — understandable given that they had holes that would have derailed most programs. After all, the defense would be without returning starters Jacobbi McDaniel (DT), Everett Dawkins (DT), Xavier Rhodes (CB) and Nick Moody (S) while the offense faced the potentially crippling absence of both starting offensive tackles, Andrew Datko and Zebrie Sanders, and running back Chris Thompson.

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Spring Recap

(Top) Big play specialist Bert Reed, a seasoned veteran, being defended by up-and-coming Safety Justin Bright. (Above) Quarterback Clint Trickett led the Garnet Offense. (Opposite page left) Defensive end Dan Hicks, number 58, looking more like his father Dan Footman. (Opposite page center and right photos) Former Seminoles Drew Weatherford and Peter Warrick both took part in the alumni game at halftime.

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Add to these challenges the personal hardship the second-year head coach is under and spring 2011 could have been a wash. Instead, it was a success and strengthened the program from the roots up. Players emerged where question marks existed just weeks ago and it became clear the entire program has found solid footing. Mark Stoops experimented with defensive personnel during spring, trying cornerback Lamarcus Joyner at safety and using young players along the defensive front with some proven players absent. The most obvious defensive concern heading into fall will be replacing departing starting linebackers Kendall Smith and Mister Alexander — the good news is coaches feel there is talent there. What did become clear over spring is that FSU defenders are well along the way in the all-important conversion from thinking through their assignments to reacting instinctively, which only comes from experience in a new system. And the fact that the system is in place made this spring much calmer than those of the last several years. Players, especially those on the defensive side of the ball, weren’t chewing on volumes of new material, and it was clear that the expectations of the coaches for precise and mistake-free execution have been cranked up. Remarkably, the spring story on offense was not that the Seminoles were technically breaking in a “new” starting quarterback for the first time since spring of 2007, only the second time since Drew Weatherford won the job in the spring of 2004. The fact that EJ Manuel was participating in his first spring drills was essentially a non-issue. It certainly helps that he’s already got two bowl wins under his belt, but it also speaks to how far Fisher and his staff have been able to develop the system. How many programs can lose a Top 15 draft pick at quarterback and not run scared into the next season? James Coley and the offensive coaches did face a big challenge during spring, trying to make drills as productive as


Spring Recap

“I think the whole weekend was great. We had a great turnout and had good fan support. A lot of old players came back, and there were guys that we haven’t seen back in years. They got to have a reunion and get around everybody. I think it was a great atmosphere and was a pleasure to be around.” — Jimbo Fisher, Head Coach possible without enough horses up front. But strides were made on this side as well, with the clear edict from the head coach to generate more big plays in 2011. And the transition of the program from one still learning new systems to one ready to make some plays is reflected in Fisher’s observations following spring drills. “We have got to make more big plays on offense and defense,” said Fisher. “We scored a little more than I expected in the spring game, but we’ll have to see if that was the offense or the defense. We are playing hard and we are making a play here and a play there, but we need to make more big plays. On defense, we need to create more turnovers. “We’ve got a good field goal kicker and we knew that. Our special teams have a chance to be very good. We need to take that next step and make plays all over the field,” he continued. “We did create good depth along the defensive front during

spring. I think we’ve got a chance to have some real good young players there, and we can rotate in and keep everyone fresh.” The coming out party for Commack and the rest of the Seminoles could not have been more spectacular as the annual Garnet and Gold game drew more than 53,000 fans, ranking third nationally behind only Alabama and Nebraska. The Block Party the night before rocked downtown Tallahassee with five different bands, including a headline performance by FSU alum Jake Owen. The Seminole Booster donor appreciation party drew more than 1,000 members, many of whom said it was the best event they’ve ever attended, and more than 100 FSU coaches, student-athletes and former players. The entire weekend drew rave reviews from Seminole fans far and wide, including Fisher himself. “I think the whole weekend was great,” said Fisher. “We had a great turnout and

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had good fan support. A lot of old players came back and there were guys that we haven’t seen back in years. They got to have a reunion and get around everybody. I think it was a great atmosphere and was a pleasure to be around.” One last challenge was that the Seminoles practiced on the FSU intramural fields all spring due to the work being done on the Al Dunlap practice fields, where more than 300 dump trucks full of soil were either hauled off or reconfigured. The huge undertaking included installing infrastructure for a future indoor football practice facility, leveling the football practice fields which had been on three different levels for — well — ever, and installing irrigation, substrate and turf that will turn the practice area into a surface just like the game fields. So next fall, Commack and his teammates will literally be breaking new ground when practice begins. SB

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Athletics Director Randy Spetman win another national championship and certainly to finish high in the rankings. Both tennis teams and both golf teams advanced to the NCAA postseason already, and baseball is currently ranked sixth in the country, so they would appear to be on their way as well. It’s hard to tell where we will end up, but we are optimistic.

Q: What will fans see different with the ACC’s new TV contracts? A: I’m not sure it will be a dramatic change for our fans in particular because almost all our football games have been televised over the last 10 years, but under the new contract, each ACC football game will now be televised in some fashion. In addition, the number of exposures on ESPNU have been reduced, which means more ACC games will move up onto the ESPN, ESPN2 and ESPN3 channels rather than being on that last tier. Raycom will still be televising games regionally, so the exposure will be greater for men’s and women’s basketball. Closer to home, our contract with Fox Sports Florida/Sun Sports is expiring. We are in negotiations with our cable provider for what amounts to our football tape delay, studio programming and sports outside of football and basketball.

Q: How do you feel about adding a sport for the first time since women’s soccer over 15 years ago? A: Our volleyball coach Chris Poole tells me the announcement we made about adding sand volleyball has created an incredible buzz in the volleyball world. It truly is exciting to begin a sport, and we feel we are getting the jump on the rest of the country since we’re starting before a lot of other programs. We are pleased with the hiring of Danalee Corso to coach sand volleyball and what the sport in general will mean for FSU. Sand volleyball is very appealing from a fan’s perspective. It is played in two-

Q: The spring game appeared to be a big success. A: It was an exceptional weekend requiring much work and effort from our staff in athletics as well as Seminole Boosters and our partner, IMG College. I spoke to Coach Fisher right after the spring game, and he was thrilled with the attendance and the excitement surrounding the game. I really do encourage our fans to make it a point to attend the event next year. Our sports marketing office put on a production at the block party downtown on Friday night that was as professional as anything you will see — and there were huge crowds.

Q&A

By rob wilson, fsu associate athletics director

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ow long did it take Auburn football fans or Texas Tech women’s basketball fans to begin talking about whether they could repeat as national champions? In my experience, probably about a day. If you’ve been in athletics long enough, you realize how quickly expectations are raised. Finishing in the Top Five in the nation for overall athletic success was remarkable last year, and I hope our fans appreciate that incredible performance by our coaches and student-athletes. Every sport we offer reached or scored in NCAA postseason competition in 2009–10. Texas A&M was the only other school in the country that had each sport reach the NCAAs and, with just 19 sports currently, it takes that kind of effort for our program to reach the Top 15 because they score 20 sports, starting us off a bit behind. We have had another outstanding year, and the chance to finish amongst the Top 10 is still a distinct possibility. Our men’s track and field program has a chance to

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woman teams and has three matches going at one time. It provides opportunities for high school players who may not have the height to be a candidate for a scholarship in traditional volleyball. It has been a challenge to find a location for five adjacent sand volleyball courts, but we have pretty much settled on a corner of the soccer practice fields near Mike Long Track. We will begin play in the spring next year.

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(Top left) The Morcom Aquatics Center; (Top right) The recently renovated Al and Judy Dunlap Practice Fields; (Bottom right) Coach Danalee Corso will lead the new sand volleyball team.

Morcom Aquatics Center Photo by Ray Stanyard

Saturday truly felt like a game day with tailgating in the parking lot and all the former players coming back. It just continued this remarkably positive energy surrounding football. Q: What is on your radar in terms of facilities? A: I would be remiss if I didn’t start out by saying that many of our facilities are absolutely top notch, thanks to the generosity of our Seminole Booster members. The Morcom Center, where the swimming and diving teams practice and compete, is as good as any facility in the nation. We are working on some issues with the air quality at golf, but the course and practice areas are outstanding. Our track gets a lot of use, but that facility has come such a long way — and the soccer and softball teams play in stadiums that nearly any program in the country would trade for. We are looking really hard at what we can do to improve the volleyball facility within Tully Gym. We are anxious to make some overdue changes at the Basketball Training Center and would like to do some major work within the Tucker Center if we can navigate that complicated issue. The football practice fields have been a huge and long overdue project that will make that facility really first class. Of course, we are actively fundraising for an

indoor practice facility and need to make that happen sooner rather than later. I am happy to say that a week or so after the baseball team gets back from the College World Series, just to put a little pressure on them, we are going to excavate the field at Howser Stadium and replace all the irrigation and substrate, and install new sod and infield dirt. Most fans probably don’t realize the imperfections on the field that Coach Martin and baseball have contended with over the last 10 years or so. Q: Anything to add? A: I appreciate the open-ended question and would say that I want our fans to know in what high esteem our program is held on a national level. Sometimes we all focus on what we consider problems and shortcoming in our programs, but I can tell you that I don’t go to a single meeting where I’m not proud to represent Florida State University. Constantly, very high-level colleagues who represent some of the finest programs in the country openly admire what we have accomplished and are in the process of accomplishing at Florida State. We have outstanding coaches who lead outstanding student-athletes, but without the support of Seminole Boosters and the university administration, we would not be in the enviable position we are in today.

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I want to thank each and every one of our Seminole Booster members whose annual contributions are a significant part of our athletic budget. The scholarships we provide our student-athletes and the successes we’ve talked about are due in large part to the resources our Seminole Booster member contributions fund. I can tell you our coaches and student-athletes are very aware of the role our Booster members play and are very appreciative of their contributions. SB

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Head Coach Mike Martin and Director of Baseball Operations Chip Baker have worked together for 27 seasons at Florida State.

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baseball feature By Jim Crosby Photos by ross obley

BUILDING BASEBALL’S SUCCESSES FROM BEHIND THE SCENES The Colonel Has Expanded More Than Just the Strikezone for the FSU Program

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n any successful program, there is a behind-the-scenes person whose work often goes unnoticed, but contributes greatly to that success. At Florida State, that person is Chip Baker. »

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baseball feature

(Above) Chip Baker addresses baseball parents on senior day. (Left) Baker’s work is never done as he handles all aspects of FSU baseball from travel to summer camps. (Bottom left) Chip with his wife Julie, a former Seminole All American softball pitcher, and daughter Katie.

“What Chip Baker can get done in the course of a day literally never ceases to amaze me.” Mike Martin, Florida State baseball coach for 32 years, was talking about the director of baseball operations, who has worked with him for 27 seasons. Baker’s job entails working with just about every aspect of Seminole Baseball except recruiting. Baker, whose nickname as second in command is “the Colonel,” started out coaching catchers in 1985. He was hired along with Rod Delmonico after they worked the Martin Summer Camp. Baker previously was an assistant at Virginia Tech and Georgia Tech. Baker, who oversees the Advanced Baseball School, points out that the Summer

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Camp has worked with some notable stars beyond well-known Seminoles Buster Posey and J.D. Drew. “Among the 28 firstround picks we coached in the summer are Major Leaguers Chipper Jones, Alex Rodriguez, David Wright and B. J. Upton,” said Baker. Shortly after Baker joined the staff, Coach Martin moved to the dugout full time and put Baker in his former third base coaching slot. Baker thought he was going to lose that job after the first game. “Luis Alicea was at bat with slow-running catcher Ed Fulton on second and Steve Taddeo, who could run, on first. When Alicea hit a long fly ball to right field, Fulton tagged up, but Taddeo was off and running,” said Baker. “I waved


Fulton, but Taddeo, who was on his heels, didn’t slow up.” Much to Baker’s dismay, not only was Fulton out at home, the catcher put the tag on Taddeo as well, for a second out. Obviously, his third base coaching career had nowhere to go but up. A former college catcher himself, Baker excelled at developing catchers. Barry Blackwell (1985-88) says, “I was a football player who wound up playing baseball. Chip Baker took a football player and helped him achieve All-American status and play in two World Series. I promise you none of that would have taken place without his expertise and coaching.” In 2005 Baker created a record-selling video entitled “Expanding the Strike Zone.” He shared some of his secrets for getting extra strikes, sometimes on close or questionable pitches. “I just taught catchers how to condition umpires with the way they received the ball,” said Baker. “I had them catch the ball nearer the plate instead of letting it get deeper off the plate.” He also showed how to frame the pitch to get strike calls by the way the catcher turned his glove and held the ball longer. “You might not get a strikeout call, but if you get a strike with it somewhere in the count sometimes that can be huge,” the Colonel said. In 2003 Baker was bumped up to his current full-time administration position. His multi-varied tasks cover many important areas. One is team travel. He works six to eight months ahead to determine where the team will be going, how they are getting there and how they’ll be getting home. His work has a lasting impact as well. “There were just so many intangibles he provided both on and off the field. I could never repay him for all of them,” said Blackwell. As Mike Martin says, “Chip Baker is invaluable to our program.” SB

Chip Baker watches the game from the dugout while managing the FSU Batgirls.

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Softball feature

Alameda Plan

The

Recruiting To Win Championships By Jim Crosby Photos by FSU Sports Info & Ross Obley

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hen Coach Lonni Alameda met pitcher Sarah Hamilton at a recruiting camp, she was impressed and offered her a college scholarship.

“I liked her coaching style, but I sent her a letter saying I just couldn’t go that far from home,” said Hamilton, who played softball at Chiles High School in Tallahassee. At the time, that was bad news for Alameda because she was head coach at the University of Nevada Las Vegas. A couple of years later, the bad news turned good. In 2009 Alameda replaced the retiring JoAnne Graf at Florida

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State, where Hamilton was a sophomore hurler. During the next three years, Hamilton, pitching under Alameda’s direction, would break the all-time Seminole strikeout record. Alameda had stepped into a pressurized position. Her predecessor was a legend in college softball with a record 1,437 wins, but the new coach had a plan. “We really tried to teach the kids the fundamentals of the game, the ABC part, that is our style,” she said. It required some adjustments for the players. “Coach Alameda is into a lot of defensive work for pitchers. She considers pitchers as infielders. From the first week, we did the same drills the infielders did. I was taking ground balls at shortstop,” Hamilton said. She admitted it helped her become a better defensive pitcher. “We are also a big community service coaching staff,” said Alameda. “There is no professional level for softball, so it is our job to not only teach the game at a high level, but build resumes and do things that make them competitive in the real world.” Alameda quickly discovered a wealth of success stories at Florida State and determined to tap into these and learn how softball could capture some of the same winning principles. She talked with every head coach, taking careful note of how different strategies and approaches were used. She had coaches come in and talk with her team. “Coach Sue (Semrau) was very helpful. She is definitely a big, positive influence as a female sport coach and a female herself,” said Alameda. A good fit for the position, the personable softball coach was easily accepted. Baseball Coach Mike Martin said, “I’m impressed by her and her staff. I’m just proud she is our softball coach and that she is a Seminole.” With her winning personality, Alameda often throws some psychology into the mix. Hamilton remembers an Alameda psyche-job. “It was a regional game. If

(Above left) Coach Alameda talks to on-deck batter Maddie O’Brien. (Above) All-American senior pitcher, Sarah Hamilton. (Left) Alameda coaches second-baseman and leftfielder, Mallory Borden. (Opposite page left) Coach Alameda discusses the call with an ACC umpire. (Opposite page right) Alameda huddles with the team.

we lose the season is over,” she said. “I gave up a leadoff double in the 11th. They bunted her over to third. So with one out, Coach came out.” What Hamilton heard next was entirely unexpected. Coach Alameda told her to walk the next two batters. “My jaw dropped. I said ‘That’s funny; you’re trying to loosen me up, right?’ ” “No, we are walking the bases loaded,” said Alameda, who then turned and went to the dugout. It worked! With the bases loaded, Hamilton struck out the next two batters,

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her confidence level took a sizable leap and she went on to put up record career strikeout numbers. Now, Lonni Alameda is a fixture in Seminole Territory — and glad of it. “You see alumni who have been here for four years, and they don’t want to leave. I’m the same way because I’m coaching here and don’t have to leave it.” Then she added, “And I get paid for my hobby. That’s a really neat thing.” Looks like another legend is being created in Seminole Softball! SB

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S P OR T S U P D AT E : G OLF By Daniel Mitchell Photos by Ross Obley

Seminole Golf Facility Attracts Prospects and Pros

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t may not make Tallahassee the next Orlando, but Florida State’s golf facility has proven a powerful attraction for the school’s graduated golf stars.

Two former Seminoles-turned-professional golfers, Jonas Blixt and Matt Savage, have settled down in Tallahassee, thanks, in part, to the quality of FSU’s practice site. Opened in 2009, the center is packed with features and details that help pros — and current ’Noles — sharpen every aspect of their games. That’s exactly the way Trey Jones wants it. “When we’re recruiting, it’s not a fouryear deal,” says Jones, the men’s head coach who doubles as director of golf operations for the men and women. “We tell them Florida State is a lifetime. That’s part of the reason we built the facility the way we did. We want former players to come back and practice, interact with the current players and continue to be part of the program.” Still, players like Blixt, from the Nationwide Tour, and Savage, a regular on the NGA Hooters Tour, could easily

An inside look at Florida State’s 27,000 square foot clubhouse and practice greens.

choose another locale. Golf-pro hotbeds like Orlando, Jacksonville or Scottsdale, Ariz., for example. FSU’s state-of-the-art facility makes that unnecessary. Jones spearheaded construction with input from Seminole golf legend Hubert Green. Jones was able to round up A-list turf artists — including longtime Jack Nicklaus design associate John Copeland — to shape seven target greens, four chipping/putting areas and an assortment of practice bunkers. The result is a range rat’s paradise. “Players can use the whole 12 acres to hit balls,” Jones says. “The short-game area gives the men and women any shot possible.” The practice grounds are the newest upgrade to the golf teams’ shared home, the Dave Middleton Golf Complex at Don Veller Seminole Golf Course & Club. Built in 2001, the $7  million structure remains one of nation’s best, complete with men’s and women’s locker rooms, video analysis center, weight room, lounge, club-repair shop and Wi-Fi-equipped classrooms. The 27,000-square-foot clubhouse, which houses FSU’s Professional Golf Management program, has been featured by Golfweek and serves a number of purposes, according to Jones. “One is academics,” he says. “Having the study areas and Wi-Fi access makes it really convenient for them, along with

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the private locker rooms. We try to give them every resource we can so they’ll use it in the right way.” Indeed, Jones notes, it’s not enough just to offer a top-notch facility. “It’s more about what you do with it, and having student-athletes who want to use it and work hard.” Clearly Jones’ charges have done that. Since taking over in 2004, Jones has led the Seminoles to a school-record six consecutive NCAA Championship tournament appearances, highlighted by a third-place finish in 2010. Likewise, the FSU women have earned six straight NCAA invites. While the ’Noles’ impressive golf complex would seem to be an advantage in recruiting and developing talent, that’s not necessarily the case. Practically every major golf power has renovated or built sparkling new facilities in recent years — meaning that, like a good caddie, merely keeping up is top priority. “Athletic directors and boosters have really put an emphasis on their golf teams,” Jones relates. “Most donors play and enjoy golf and like to see their college teams have success. It’s a university that you love, a sport you love and you can build a course or practice area everyone can enjoy.” Even professionals. SB

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Fo r m e r s t u d e n t- at h l e t e s r e t u r n By forrest conoly Photos by Ross obley & mike olivella

Tamarick Vanover (left) and Terrell Buckley (right) are two of many former FSU players to return to earn degrees.

ACADEMICS CONQUERED Former Florida State Athletes Return to Campus to Complete Their Degree and Graduate

Forrest Conoly earned his bachelor’s degree in Social Science from FSU and earned his Masters in Sports Administration from Central Michigan University. He is currently a mental health consultant and does motivational speaking and part-time sports talk radio. His radio personality is the BIG CONTROVERSY and can be heard on 790 AM and 1500 AM. Forrest was an offensive tackle for the Seminoles from 1992-95.

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inutes before the 2011 spring game was about to begin, I was sitting in the office of Dr. Jason Pappas, Assistant Athletic Director at Florida State University for Student Athlete Academic Services. To my surprise, he wasn’t packing up his things and getting ready to go out to the stadium to watch the game — and the players he spends so much time assisting.

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The Academic Advising Office displays reminders of Florida State All-American Athletes.

I asked if he was ready to watch our ’Noles do their thing and he replied, “I don’t know if I will be able to do that.” Observing him, I was moved by what I saw. The athletic facility was filled with former players and alumni. Excitement was in the air and Pappas was working to help athletes get their academics together. What bewildered me was that he was also assisting former student-athletes — guys whose eligibility had expired years ago — attain the tools they needed to complete their degree requirements well after their playing days were over. It was then I realized FSU has a program to help former student-athletes complete their degree, even though they were no longer able to help FSU win. It made me proud once again to be a Nole, knowing that FSU cares about its student-athletes who average an impressive 2.94 grade point average.

When asked what it takes for a former student-athlete to get back into school, he answered swiftly and without thought: “A phone call.” “The program is willing to help everyone we can,” said Monk Bonasorte, Senior Associate Director of Athletics and a former All-American football player at Florida State. In a perfect world, FSU would offer every student-athlete who has not graduated the option to come back to complete their degree for free. But funds are limited, so FSU offers financial help only when there is a need. Assistance programs are in place, as well as a welcoming environment for former student-athletes to get all the necessary tools needed to re-establish themselves as students on campus or as part of an online program. Dozens of former players have come

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back to complete their degrees, including some of my friends, such as Derrick Alexander, Terrell Buckley, Mario Edwards, William Floyd, Talmon Gardner, Sean Jackson and Kendyl Pope. Walking onto the field before the game, I was greeted by former teammate Tamarick Vanover, who is currently back in school doing just what the guys mentioned above had done. Tamarick is working on his sociology degree while serving as a student assistant for receivers and returners. For those who may have forgotten, or who never knew, Tamarick’s freshman debut was probably the most celebrated among a number of great freshmen debuts. In 1992, when FSU was on its way to becoming a great program (You’re not great until you win a championship; so we were good — but not great.), we had a pretty good freshman class reporting.

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Academic support is extended to all former athletes who wish to complete their degree.

According to their high school hype, a lot of incoming guys could possibly help us win that elusive championship. The funny thing is, there’s always one freshman who makes the two-deep roster, but never really plays a prominent role. I guess Vanover didn’t know that. I remember seeing this slim, athleticlooking dude from Leon High School. I remember reading about his high school exploits and how great he was going to be. I thought, “Hey, he is pretty good in practice. He has some speed. Maybe he’ll get some garbage time, make a few special teams’ tackles. And like all true freshmen who don’t redshirt, he’ll get some serious playing time in a year or two once he gets used to the rigors of big-time college football.” Boy, was I wrong. By the third game of the season, I think everybody knew there was something

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special about this kid. Early in the game against North Carolina State, Charlie Ward threw a beautiful 60-yard pass. At the end of this rainbow throw, in full stride, was not one of the many seasoned receivers we had at the time, but that frosh, Vanover. By game’s end, his stat line read five receptions for 105 yards. The following week against Wake Forest, with the score tied at 7, he returned a kick 96 yards for a touchdown. Final stats: eight receptions for 94 yards and one kickoff return for 96 yards. For an encore, on the biggest stage of them all, he took the opening kickoff against Miami 94 yards for a touchdown. After you lose a Deion Sanders to the NFL you think, “Wow, what a player.” After you lose a Terrell Buckley, you think, “Man, lighting struck twice.” After you watched this freshman, Tamarick Vanover, you

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thought, “Wow, the football Gods must love Saint Bobby!” Like many great players before him, Vanover left school early to chase the dream of riches and an NFL career. When his playing days were over and he had accomplished what most dream of, he said there was one void in his life. “I want to accomplish a goal I set in high school of earning my college degree as well as create more options for myself in the job market,” Vanover said. Although he cherished the time he competed on the professional level, he advises underclassman considering the jump to weigh the pros and the cons and get their degree first. Along with working with the receivers and kick returners, Tamarick is pursuing his goal of being a sociologist. He said his love for people, and his interest in the study


Fo r m e r s t u d e n t- at h l e t e s r e t u r n

of the functionality of society, has made his academic transition a smooth one. Tamarick said the support he receives daily from Coach Terrell Buckley, Coach Lawrence Dawsey and his dear friend Shay Alexander have made the metamorphosis from athlete to student easy. “Terrell Buckley spearheaded my coming back to school,” Vanover said. And the two coaches have co-existed as that little voice in his ear providing him with the encouragement he needs to stick with it. “Under the wings of Coach Fisher I’ve learned the true meaning of being a fearless leader,” Vanover said. “While I have been through adversity, which does not compare to what Coach Fisher is dealing with now, he continues to amaze me with the way he handles his business. He has shown me that he has my back, and in return I want him to know that I will always have his.” As a fan or player, you know FSU stands for Florida State University. But you need to know that it also stands for Family State University. Programs like this prove that once you are in the family, you’re a part of a bond that cannot be broken. Throughout the world of college football many great players have made their mark early in their college career and left early to pursue their dream and ultimate goal of playing in the NFL. Many players who made that jump have been extremely successful and have enjoyed riches beyond imagination. But the common theme for a lot of those players is to fulfill the promise that most make to Mom and Dad — and that is to graduate. The question is: How many players take the time to come back and complete that goal? Why should I come back if I have made all this money? Why should I take the time to gain something that I should have attained years ago? What difference will it make in my life? The answer to all of these questions simply put is PURPOSE! The purpose we came to FSU is not just to be an athlete, but to be a STUDENTATHLETE! SB

Terrell Buckley (top and above) came back to FSU to earn his degree and has stayed on as strength coach and mentor.

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Player Feature By Kyle Tucker (757) 446-2374, kyle.tucker@pilotonline.com. The Virginian-Pilot © April 24, 2011. Photos by Mike Olivella and Ross Obley

Good  Man On Campus T

His teammates and coaches believe that EJ Manuel (above) will be a star — but they’d rather talk about what a good guy he is.

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he professor has given the same presentation for years. When freshman athletes arrive at Florida State that first summer, Mark Zeigler welcomes them with a speech that is equal parts pep talk and cautionary tale. He tells the Seminoles’ success stories, recounts the national championships and Heisman trophies and famous alumni who have become millionaire athletes. Then he covers the other side, “the ones who, quite frankly, didn’t make us proud,” Zeigler said. The ones who flunked out, got locked up or became ensnared by scandal — stories so disturbingly common in sports that they’re a cliché. Zeigler, who teaches courses in communication, doesn’t need to be an expert on body language to read the glazed-over looks. Most of the 18-year-old audience members can’t wait to bolt from the auditorium into their new lives in the Florida sunshine. So many distractions, so many potential pitfalls. If only Zeigler could get them to see the bigger picture. In July 2008, he wondered as he backed out of a parking space if anything had sunk in with this newest crop. Then came a startling clatter on the rear window. Zeigler turned to see a towering teenager leaning down. “My name is EJ,” Zeigler remembers hearing. “I was at your talk. I just wanted to let you know that I’ll never let you down.” That was his introduction to EJ Manuel, a Bayside High graduate who almost three years later is taking over as Florida State’s starting quarterback.


His teammates and coaches believe Manuel will be a star — but they’d rather talk about what a good guy he is. As the Seminoles wrapped up spring practice last Saturday, it was hard to find anyone in Tallahassee not gushing about Manuel. “When people think about a Florida State football player, if they think of EJ Manuel, I’ll be the happiest guy in the world,” coach Jimbo Fisher said. “I love everything about him.” Former FSU quarterback Charlie Ward, who has become Manuel’s mentor, won a Heisman trophy and a national championship in 1993 — then spent 12 years in the NBA. Despite those credentials, Ward says he is “really blessed and grateful that EJ has allowed me to be in his life.” Wide receiver Bert Reed described his quarterback as a walking, talking, touchdown-tossing billboard for all that’s right about college sports. “I can really, honestly say that with all my heart,” Reed said. “He really is everything you would want — even in a son.” So what’s all the fuss about? Beyond Manuel’s talents, his patience in waiting for playing time won many over. Others admire the way Manuel, who earned ACC All-Academic honors in 2009 and 2010, balances college life with the demands of big-time football. “Here’s what I love about EJ,” Zeigler said. “If something happened and he had a career-ending injury, there would be loss and sadness, but he’d get through it, probably go to grad school, and he would have a great life. He’s building his life in a bunch of different arenas. He just gets it.” The professor believes Manuel would make a good sports broadcaster or lawyer — or professor. Because what draws people to Manuel is what teammates call his “presence,” what Fisher refers to as “an aura.” “He’s dynamic,” said Zeigler, whose other students ­— even the sports-hating types — used to stand and cheer for Manuel in their class on rhetoric of didactic literature. “They’re genuinely happy to know him. When he walks into the room, everyone else in the room is buoyed, lifted up.”

Manuel surprises people who expect something less endearing from the big man on campus. He gives them a wide, white smile that is somehow both confident — he believes he’s destined for greatness, make no mistake — and bashful all at once. Manuel stifled a giggle last week as he considered the magnitude of what’s happening to him. “It’s incredible. When you say, ‘EJ Manuel is the starting quarterback at Florida State,’ it’s like a dream come true,” he said. “I’ve met Charlie Ward. That’s crazy. I’ve met Chris Weinke. I’ve met Peter Warrick, Deion Sanders, all those people that you grow up watching on TV. But I’m part of that fraternity now. I’m part of that Seminole blood now. It’s just crazy.” And they couldn’t be happier he’s in the family. Bayside High coach Darnell Moore first got a glimpse of Manuel’s potential when he was an eighth-grader, after Moore’s longtime assistant, Bill Dudley, asked him to take a look at his grandson. Manuel was well on his way to the 6-foot, 5-inch, 235-pound frame he has today and already slinging pretty passes to his squeaky-voiced friends. If Moore squinted, he could see a star. “We sort of had a vision for him, a big picture,” Moore said, denoting what has become the theme of Manuel’s life, “and he had to remain extremely focused, even as a ninth-grader, if he wanted to paint that picture.” Manuel did, applying some impressive early brushstrokes to the canvas of his career. He threw for 5,879 yards at Bayside, second-most in South Hampton Roads history at the time, and saw his profile soar the summer before his senior year. Manuel was rated the nation’s No. 2 dualthreat quarterback by Rivals.com. Coaches from nearly every major college flocked to Virginia Beach. Manuel chose Florida State because he liked the new offensive coordinator, Fisher, who last year replaced legendary Bobby Bowden as head coach. Fisher’s pro-style offense, in which Manuel would handle snaps from under center the way S EMINO LE-BO OST ERS .CO M

“When people think about a Florida State football player, if they think of EJ Manuel, I’ll be the happiest guy in the world … I love everything about him.” — Jimbo Fisher quarterbacks must in the NFL, fit the bigpicture plan. “He crossed off schools that ran the spread offense, where he’d be in the shotgun all the time,” Moore said. What Manuel didn’t realize then was that his progression at Florida State wouldn’t be a breeze. He thought he’d worked hard, and shined up his skills enough that he could step in and play right away. Then they redshirted him in 2008, and by the time the 2009 season started, Christian Ponder already had seized the starting job. Ponder had two years of eligibility remaining. “Since I started playing football, I’d always been the guy,” said Manuel, who suffered some mental whiplash when his fasttracked career screeched to a halt. While he always said the right things publicly, always showed up to practice with a smile, he hurt inside. There were nights when he cried into the phone while his father, Eric, Sr., calmly tried to remind him of that bigger picture.

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Ticket Options

Economical Options Offered for Fall Football Seminole Fans Have Spoken and Florida State is Acting photos by nikki ritcher

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aybe you’re a Seminole fan who lives more than three hours from Tallahassee and can only make it to one game a month. Or maybe you just don’t want to commit $321 every year for a seven-game season ticket package. Either way, FSU has heard and created options with you in mind.

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Ticket Options

The Best of Both Worlds Option The popular option of savvy season ticket holders was born from a partnership FSU pioneered with StubHub just last year. This option gives season ticket holders the ability to very easily sell individual tickets to any games they cannot attend. So now FSU’s season ticket holders enjoy the biggest discounts (15 percent), best seat location and guaranteed right of renewal — in addition to what many are finding to be the most economical net price.

The transactions are fully supported by the ticket office, so it’s easy to use and worry free. And the print-at-home feature means buyers can simply print the tickets on their home or office printer, so season ticket holders don’t have to do anything once they’ve listed their tickets for sale.

Season Tickets Sept.

Sept.

Sept.

Oct.

2011

2011

2011

2011

Louisiana-Monroe

CHARLESTON SOUTHERN

OKLAHOMA

MARYLAND

Varsity Weekend/ Hall of Fame

Military Appreciation

Oct.

Nov.

Nov.

2011

2011

2011

NC STATE

MIAMI

Parent’s Weekend

VIRGINIA homecoming

more

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Ticket Options

Three-Game Package Options For those Seminole fans who don’t want to commit to seven games, FSU has created two, three-game season ticket packages for the 2011 season for $157 each (that’s a 5 percent discount over single game prices).

3 Game Pack

$157 Includes Oklahoma, NC State and Virginia

3 Game Pick-A-Plan

$157 Includes Miami (Plus Two) *Excludes Oklahoma

+2

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Ticket Options

Three-Game Pack Seat Location Florida State grants season ticket holders and Seminole Booster members first priority for the sideline seats (Priority 1 and 2). Once all of those requests are filled, the ticket office will assign remaining seats to three-game pack buyers. Generally, those seats will be located in the South end zone. However, if there are priority seats remaining, the ticket office will assign those seats to the three-game pack buyers who meet the minimum requirements of the ticket priority policy (see priority chart). Information on Ticket Options Florida State has never offered its fans so many options to get involved and to fill Doak Campbell than they are offering this year. But with so many options, you may want some help deciding which option best fits your needs. “We have an option for everyone who wants to see the Seminoles in action and we are happy to help people decide,” said Michael Espada, who heads FSU’s sales operation. SB

For more information, or the opportunity to see what seats are available, call the ticket office at 888-FSU-Nole.

You Can’t Become a Football Overnight: A Book of Petersonisms By Jim Crosby

This year marks the 50th anniversary of Coach Pete’s first year as Seminole football coach. To honor that anniversary Jim Crosby has written a book called: “You Can’t Become a Football Overnight.” It is full of photos, stories and colorful Peterson quotes reminiscent of those formative years in FSU football history. The book is filled with dozens of funny one liners, such as: “I’m the football around here and don’t you remember it.” “Pair up in threes and line up in circles.” FSU Head Coach from 1960-1970

Available at Garnet and Gold

Or by mailing a check to: Writeman Publishing, P.O. Box 3285 Thoreau Avenue, Tallahassee, FL 32311 Also available at www.writeman.com

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BOOSTER INSIDER  // BY JERRY KUTZ

YOU MAKE THE HELMET

W

photos by Mike Olivella & ross Obley

hile watching Florida State’s 3-D highlight video on a Friday afternoon in April with a group of Seminole Booster volunteers, I was struck by something Jimbo Fisher said during an impassioned halftime speech during the Seminoles 45–17 victory over Florida. Hoisting our iconic gold helmet with the garnet spears, he said: “You make the helmet. The helmet does not make you.”

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The player’s eyes were glued on that symbol of Seminole football tradition — which represents the wins, the losses and the people who have honored it — as he circled the locker room. “You make the helmet,” he repeated more passionately. “The helmet does not make you.” His point was simple. Florida State’s players cannot expect to win games just by slipping on that helmet any more than they could expect to jump tall buildings by wearing Superman’s cape. The players make the helmet by making plays, which is the result of discipline, work, sacrifice and toughness. The helmet — the symbol of FSU’s storied past — won’t do it for them. Fisher’s speech was one heckuva reminder for FSU’s players, many of whom came here expecting to enjoy the same kind of success. But it struck me that it’s a great reminder for our fans as well, many of who think that success just magically happens at Florida State. The truth is the same for Seminole fans as it is for those players: You make the helmet. The helmet does not make you. Your vocal participation at games makes the difference and therefore you make the helmet.

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You Are Part of Our

Game Plan Don & Aggie Steiner Atlanta, Ga. Custodes Lampadis Members, 2000

To succeed you must have a plan. Seminole Boosters has a short and long term game plan, and plans for unforeseen calamity. You, through your Booster membership, help us achieve our short term plan of annually funding our athletics department. Our long term plan is to fully fund our Athletic Scholarship Endowment. Essential to that success are donors’ gifts through wills or trusts for a specific amount or percentage, or through lifetime income gifts. JOIN THE CUSTODES LAMPADIS SOCIETY Joel Padgett, Director of Gift Planning (850)644-3378 jpadgett@admin.fsu.edu 48

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Your financial contribution to Seminole Boosters makes the difference and therefore you make the helmet. Your participation volunteering makes the difference and therefore you make helmet. The helmet does not make you. How many Seminole fans have you met who seldom come to games, who never make a financial commitment to fund the program, yet expect the Seminoles to win just because we are Florida State. That logic is about as naïve as the freshman football player who shows up at FSU thinking that once he slips on that gold helmet with the garnet spears he will magically morph into Deion Sanders. You make the helmet. The helmet does not make you. I’d seen Fisher’s speech a half-dozen times and liked the sentiment, but it didn’t really resonate with me in this regard as far as fans go until this particular viewing, which occurred right before I was to show our Seminole Ambassadors what a difference they could make as volunteer fundraisers. I’d prepared two charts for them, one showing what our projected growth in season tickets and Booster members would be with our traditional marketing efforts and another showing what it would be if we were able to add their help too. The traditional marketing line showed slow but gradual growth. The other line went up dramatically. And the difference, of course, was the volunteer Seminole Booster Ambassador’s efforts. The distance between the two lines was dramatic. Volunteers help will get us to sold out much, much more quickly. I thought the chart made a compelling case for how a volunteer could make a dramatic difference for the program they care so much about. Then, I took an even closer look at the image on the PowerPoint and saw it, the image of the iconic helmet Fisher had held high above his head when he said, “You make the helmet. The helmet does not make you.” No truer words have ever been spoken. SB


Social Media

’Noles Social Connection with Fans The Fastest Source for Seminole News, Scores and Contests

S

By Bill Lickson

eminoles all over the world are staying connected with FSU athletics, the Seminole Boosters and each other through social media. From Boosters pregame events, to scheduling individual tailgates, to pictures of grandchildren in FSU uniforms, there are many ways to stay connected and personalize the Seminoles.com Facebook experience. The FSU social media team, which also serves the needs of the Seminole Boosters, has exciting plans. In fact, some were rolled out immediately following the Spring Game to keep people fired up through the summer about the fall football season. So, if you’re not already a fan of the page, go to the Facebook.com/FSUSeminoles, “Like” the page — and then you’re connected. The Facebook page has grown dramatically — up over 100 percent since the Florida football game. “And we’re just getting started,” said Ryan Pensy, director of digital media for FSU athletics. “We have

a passionate social media team, and we’re excited about taking a great effort and making it even better for FSU fans.” Pensy’s team produce 85 live events per year and thousands of web-based video packages of FSU sporting events as well as the latest news. In addition to the live premium coverage of events, news updates are available through Facebook.com/FSUSeminoles and many videos are available at no cost through Seminoles.com/AllAccess. The Seminoles.com Facebook community is very engaged and makes decisions about the site, conversations and news

coverage. “Because we’re always asking questions and getting great suggestions through conversations on the page, we’ve decided to actively involve our Facebook fans in decisions.” Pensy said. “They let us know how often they want score updates through both Facebook and Twitter, and we structured our football signing day news posts based upon what the Seminole fans requested. “It’s really great to see and be a part of conversations through posts from military men and women who are serving our country,” he added. “Some have posted messages about how much they appreciate hearing FSU news while they are serving overseas.” Pensy’s team is hard at work creating many new social media experiences — including new ways for fans to get directly involved and share photos and videos. “So get ready for the latest FSU Athletics news, some great conversations and please share your favorite memories with other members of the Seminole family,” Pensy said. SB

« Follow the Seminoles » Facebook.com/FSUSeminoles

Seminoles.com

@Seminoles_com @SeminoleBooster

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A N N U A L M E M B E R S H I P / v olun t eer campai g n

2011 Seminole Ambassadors making a difference for Florida State.

Being Team Captain How You Can Make A Difference By Jerry Kutz, Vice President PHotos by seminole boosters

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id you ever feel the anxiety of “riding the pine� on a youth sports team? Were you ever forced to the sideline by injury or by a coach and yearned to get back into the game where you could do something to help your team? Have you ever sat in Doak Campbell Stadium and wished you could make a difference in the outcome of the sport you love?

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You know that feeling, don’t you? Well, good news Seminole fans, now you can make a difference. No, Jimbo Fisher is not going to issue you a helmet and pads for the upcoming season, but we do have an important position for you to play in the Seminole Boosters’ Ambassador’s Program — where you can get right in the middle of the action and truly make a difference. “I’ve never played a down, never put on a helmet, but I’ve always been a Seminole,” said Joe Johnson.  “I wanted to be more than just a fan. I wanted to be a bigger part of Florida State University, so when I heard about the Ambassador’s Program, I knew it was for me.”  The Seminole Ambassador’s Program — an action program for FSU fans — was launched on the morning of the spring game when more than 100 eager Seminole fans met in Florida State’s football team meeting room to review the game plan designed especially for them. And believe us when we say the Ambassador’s Program is just as much a “contact” sport as any other you’ve played. Rather than blocking and tackling, or grabbing a ball, the Ambassador team is asked to make contact with every FSU fan they know, share the Seminole story and ask them to join the Seminole Booster team. As simple as that sounds, you’d be amazed at how many people tell us the reason they have not become Boosters, or bought season tickets, is because no one has asked them yet. If that sounds like a challenge to you, then you’ve got what it takes to be a part of something meaningful and fun. And if you’re not the kind of person who is comfortable asking someone to join, you can be just as valuable to the team by simply referring friends to our sales team, who will explain all the details about Booster membership and ticket opportunities. Each Ambassador is assigned two fulltime “assistant coaches:” a Seminole Booster representative and a ticket account

representative. They are there to help each Ambassador help Florida State. Each time an Ambassador signs up a new member, they will receive credit towards experiential rewards you can’t buy, including autographed memorabilia, pregame sideline passes and much more. If an Ambassador provides our staff with a lead who joins the Boosters, the Ambassador will receive full credit as well. The Ambassador Program puts you right in the middle of the action, where you’ll get an inside look at the program — its financial challenges and opportunities — and you’ll get to meet the people who make it all happen.

I’m looking forward to doing any little part I can to be a piece of the future of the program,” he said. Drew Upchurch and his wife are longtime season ticket holders and Boosters and had been looking for a way to help the program grow. “I became a volunteer in order to become more involved,” said Upchurch. “I have always found it troubling that more young alumni do not give back to the athletic department financially. It is my goal to recruit as many young Boosters as possible with the intention of starting them on the path to a lifetime of giving.” In addition to the assistant coaches

“I’ve never played a down, never put on a helmet, but I’ve always been a Seminole … I wanted to be more than just a fan. I wanted to be a bigger part of Florida State University, so when I heard about the Ambassador’s Program, I knew it was for me.” — Joe Johnson, Volunteer The Ambassadors enjoyed an inside look at the program before the spring game, where they had the opportunity to see exactly where Booster membership money is spent. The tour of the Moore Athletic Center included the football locker room, strength and training room and academic areas as well as a walk on Bobby Bowden Field. Ambassadors will be encouraged to bring anyone they recruit on a similar tour this fall. “I am enjoying the ‘inside’ looks at the program given during the Booster tours of the facilities and appreciate continued efforts on this front,” said Chris White, who is very encouraged about the direction of the program. “It seems like a great tool to keep current Boosters, increase donations from current Boosters and recruit new Boosters. The Booster Member Appreciation Party the Friday before the spring game was nice as well. All these activities give the members a feeling they are important, even if they don’t donate $10,000 a year.

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assigned to help our Ambassadors, Seminole Boosters has created a personal website for each Ambassador where they can share their bio and explain why they want to help the program grow, and list each of the new Boosters they’ve signed up (optional). The personal sites also include all the information about Seminole Boosters anyone would need to make a decision, including links to Booster and ticket representatives. The perks are nice, most Ambassadors say, but the real prize they seek is building a program of pride. “We can not hope to compete at the highest levels athletically if we are not competitive financially,” Upchurch said. “The indoor practice facility, new player dorm, and College Town are not going to build themselves. The Booster Ambassador program has provided me everything I need to be able to recruit more Boosters.” SB

To become an Ambassador call 644-3484 or email sreed@admin.fsu.edu.

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fisher camps

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fisher camps

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fsu camps

Becoming Part of the Tradition camp

date

cost

Mike Martin Baseball School (rising 4th–2011 graduates)

June 12–17/July 17–22

$275 Day-campers; $395 Overnight

Seminole Advanced School (rising 9th–2011 graduates)

June 19–24/July 24–29

$375 Day-campers; $495 Overnight

Martin Super Skills Academy (2011–2013 grads)

June 26–July 1

$995

Baseball | www.mikemartincamps.com

The purpose of the Mike Martin Baseball Schools is to teach the fundamentals of baseball to various age levels, helping each participant better understand the game. Men’s Basketball | www.nolesbasketballcamp.com Basketball Camp (8 years old to rising 12th graders)

June 19–23 and July 10–14

$299 Commuter; $399 Overnight

At the Leonard Hamilton Basketball Camp our mission is to provide a fun, enthusiastic and safe atmosphere where campers of all ability levels feel comfortable improving in the sport of basketball. Women’s Basketball | www.seminolegirlsbasketballcamp.com Future Noles Day Camp (Grades 1–8, current school year)

June 6–9

$200 per camper

This camp is designed to introduce the beginner to the game of basketball and develop the skills of younger players. A FUN individual camp for KIDS ONLY. Elite Individual Camp (Grades 4–11, current school year)

June 17–19 and June 26–28

$250 per camper

June 24–26

$200 per camper

July 7, 14, 17, 21, 25

$30 a camper/session

An overnight, individual camp designed to take your game to the next level. Extreme Team Camp (Grades: Middle/High School Teams) An overnight camp for your TOTAL TEAM experience. volleyball | www.seminoles.com Morning Clinics all 10 am–noon (Grades 4–12)

Morning clinics to full camps at Tully Gymnasium offer a great place to hone your volleyball skills for all aspects of your game. Individual Camp (Grades 4–12)

July 7–8, July 14–15

$160 overnight; $120 commuter

Position Camp (Grades 6–12)

July 9 or July 16

$75 a camper/a session

Fine tune your ability to play a particular position for your team. Team Camps also available. Work with your school or club coach to contact us for more details at ath-volleyball@fsu.edu. Diving | www.seminoles.com Seminole Diving Academy (ages 10–18)

June 13–17, 20–24, 27–July 1

$550 Overnight; $375 Commuter

Are you looking for a fun place to become a better diver and learn from an Olympian this summer, or simply learn to dive? Then the Seminole Diving Academy is the place for you. football | www.jimbofisherfootballcamp.com Session I Kicking (rising 9th–12th graders) No overnight offered

June 13–14

$200 Kicking or Punting $300 Combo kick/punt $125 Snappers

Session II Youth Camp (8 years old-rising 8th graders)

June 15–17

$300 Overnight; $250 Day

Session III High School Camp (rising 9th–12th graders)

June 19–21

$330 Overnight; $250 Day

Session IV High School Camp (rising 9th–12th graders)

July 20–22

$330 Overnight; $250 Day

Each of our camps will be instructed by the Florida State Football staff, as well as some of the top high school football coaches in the nation.

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fsu camps

Get Your Children Involved

camp

date

cost

June 13–16

$399 Per camper

golf | www.seminolegolfcamps.com Seminole Day Camp 8 a.m.–5 p.m. (ages 8–18)

Seminole Day Camp is a great start for beginning or young golfers who have an interest in playing the game. Men’s and Women’s Golf Team members serve as camp counselors and all sessions take place at our state-of-the-art practice facility. Tournament Preparation Camp (ages 11–18)

June 18–22

$995 Overnight; $950 Commuter

Ready to take your game to the next level? The Tournament Prep Camp is for you! We have designed this camp for advanced golfers who have experience but want to elevate their game. Soccer | www.seminolesoccercamps.com Summer Day Academy 9 a.m.–noon (male and female ages 5–18)

June 6–9

$225

The Summer Day Academy is a weeklong program designed for the player wanting development of fundamental soccer skills. Team Residential Academy (female only ages 12–18)

July 16–19

$575

The most unique team camp in the country has a singular focus ... the team. Players will gain a better understanding of the roles and responsibilities within the structure of the team. Elite Residential Academy (male and female ages 11–18)

July 20–23

$595

The Elite Academy is for the serious soccer players. This intensive four-day camp brings some of the best talent from across the nation — and even internationally — to Tallahassee, all looking for the edge to get to the next level. softball | fsucamps@yahoo.com Tuesdays, 6–8 p.m. Softball Academy (open to all ages)

June 14, 21, July 5, 12, 19, 26, Aug. 2, 9

Pitching: $40/week; Hitting: $50/week

Florida State Softball will host various Tuesday softball academy dates that are open to all entrants. This camp will develop fundamental and advanced concepts of hitting and pitching. tennis | www.seminoletenniscamps.com Traditional Camp (ages 7–18)

June 5–9 and 12–16

$565 Overnight; $325 Commuter

June 19–23 and 26–30 July 10–14 and July 31–Aug. 4

$955 Overnight; $725 Commuter

Individual Camp is for a single athlete or a group of less than five. High Performance Camp (ages 9–18)

Are you interested in individual instruction, Dartfish Video Analysis, collegiate-style drilling and specialized fitness? Then Seminole High Performance Summer Camps is the place to be. Seminole High Performance tennis offers junior players of all levels and ages an opportunity to train with the best coaches and players in the country. track | www.seminoletrackcamp.com Seminole Track and Field Camp (average age 16)

July 13–16 and Dec. 17–30

$475 Overnight; $375 Commuter

A complete track and field camp, the Seminole Track and Field Camp is designed to meet the needs of the individual camper. The camp is divided into event areas: sprints, hurdles, jumps, throws and pole vault. Cross Country | www.seminoles.com, Cross Country page Individual Camp (ages 12–18)

July 6–10

$369

July 6–10

$319

Individual Camp is for a single athlete or a group of less than five. Team Camp (ages 12–18)

Team Camp is for 5 or more from the same group. Coach is free for five campers or more and two free coaches for 10 or more campers.

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BOOSTER MEMBERSHIP // BY JERRY KUTZ

Who Funds Florida State Athletics? Most of the Money Comes from You, the Fans Photos by fsu sports info

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t was on the 14th hole of the Jimbo Fisher golf tour stop in Pensacola, when the reality began to sink in with my playing partner. “Wait, I thought the school paid for scholarships or just gave them to the players,” said my playing partner, who will not be named. “Are you telling me that scholarships are not free?” “No, they are not free,” I replied, and the conversation headed toward what Seminole Boosters is and why our members are so important to our teams’ successes. “The athletic department pays exactly the same amount for tuition — including out-of-state tuition — books, fees, housing and meal plans as any one else would pay. And it’s Seminole Boosters who pay those costs, which amount to more than $9 million each year.” “I think I’m a pretty intelligent person, and I never realized that,” my partner said. “Are you a Seminole Booster member?” I asked. “Yes,” he replied. “I am a member of the Seminole Club of Pensacola, so that makes me a member of Seminole Boosters, right?”

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“Not exactly,” I replied, realizing I was encountering a second common misconception. Those membership dues are used by the local club to run their operations and activities, which serve the important purpose of keeping Seminole fires burning in local areas. But only a fraction of local dues are contributed to Seminole Boosters, Inc. to fund FSU athletic operations. My playing partner isn’t the only one confused. We’ve found a significant percentage of local club members aren’t Seminole Booster members and therefore don’t receive this magazine or any of the other communications that would inform them of the basic facts of Seminole sports. Facilities aren’t free either Just a day before my golf round, while giving a tour of the athletic center to a criminology school donor, I mentioned that no state or university funds can be used to build athletic facilities. “Then who pays for them?” he asked. “Our Seminole Booster members pay for them ultimately, either with annual membership dues to Seminole Boosters,

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Inc. or with major contributions,” I replied. “I never knew that,” he said. “I thought the school built the facilities or that the program made so much money from bowls and television that they could build the facilities themselves.” “Nope,” I replied. “The school uses its funds to build academic buildings only, and the money generated from bowls and television is split equally among the 12 ACC schools. That money is not enough to cover the cost of 19 men’s and women’s sports and scholarships for almost 500 student-athletes. The athletic department looks to Seminole Boosters to transfer about $10 million per year to help balance the operating budget. Funds generated through memberships address some facility needs, but significant construction projects require a capital campaign as well.” “I am an avid Seminole fan. Why didn’t I know that?” he asked. “Because it’s not readily available through the media,” I replied. “If you were a Seminole Booster member you would receive Unconquered magazine and other communication which address these issues.”


Importance of Sharing Our Story Once these Seminole fans, who are thrilled with the direction of the program, heard what Seminole Boosters does and what membership donations are used for, they were eager to join and to learn more about the business realities of college athletics. These two stories are real and illustrate the importance of sharing our story. We know awareness is very high among current and past Seminole Booster members, but is very low among nonmembers. Experience tells us that once fans are made aware of FSU’s needs and how Seminole Booster membership solves those needs, they are more than willing to contribute. But how do we make the 450,000 people who have attended FSU aware of the need? Of all the tactical methods available to us — telemarketing, direct mail, email, social media, broadcast media — the one delivery system that works best is you. You know who your Seminole friends and family members are, and you know how to reach them. They will listen when you share this information and act on what you tell them, because people give to people for causes they believe in. Become an ambassador for Florida State and help us tell these stories. The next time you are with one of your Seminole friends, ask if they know who pays for scholarship costs or for the facilities that attract the best and

brightest players and coaches. Take the opportunity to ask them to join the Boosters, even if it’s just at the $60 per year level, so they can start receiving this magazine and other information that will make them more aware of what’s going on with their Seminoles. Benefit to You Not only does helping your friends become a part of the Seminole story, your help is vital to making your team stronger as there is strength in numbers. Seminole Boosters currently raises $13 million from 13,000 members. After scholarship costs are paid, it leaves less than $4 million for facilities or other projects that help our teams win. The typical Southeastern Conference program generates $28 million from members — or about $18 million after scholarships. Think about that number. Those programs have nearly $14 million more discretionary money to provide resources to help their team win. A daunting number isn’t it? We will close that gap as our members, fueled by the success of Jimbo Fisher and our athletic programs, increase their level of participation. We can also close that gap by growing our base of members. And we can close it immediately if each of our members shares our story with a friend. There is power in numbers and you — our Seminole Booster members — hold the power to share our story and help our teams succeed. SB

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Graduating senior student-athletes

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B A S K E T B A L L F eat u r e By daniel mitchell Photos by Ross obley & Mike Olivella

HOT STREAK Florida State Basketball Enjoying Unprecedented NCAA Success

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here’s no disputing that Florida State’s men’s and women’s basketball programs are enjoying a run of simultaneous success unprecedented in Seminole history. As far as Tom Carlson is concerned, there’s no question why they’re winning, either.

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It’s all about the coaches “Leonard Hamilton and Sue Semrau have both done a magnificent job,” says Carlson, senior vice president of Seminole Boosters and a former hoops coach himself. “They’re team builders. They build unity and togetherness.” Carlson knows whereof he speaks. As an assistant under Pat Kennedy from 1986–97, he helped guide the Seminoles to five NCAA Tournament appearances, including three in a row from 1991–93. Hamilton’s men’s squad has matched those three successive NCAA bids, his 2010–11 edition reaching the Sweet 16. Semrau’s women’s clubs have an even longer streak going; they’ve made the NCAA tourney field every season since 2004–05, a run of seven straight, which is a school record for men or women. Carlson has a keen appreciation for what the pair have accomplished — especially how they’ve done it. And he sees even brighter days ahead for both programs. ALL ABOUT THE TEAM While Kennedy’s best teams — led by future NBA players Charlie Ward, Sam Cassell, Doug Edwards and Bob Sura — were known for offensive prowess, Hamilton’s boast a reputation for stifling defense. The Seminoles have led the nation in opponent field goal percentage the past two seasons and routinely rank among the Atlantic Coast Conference’s defensive leaders. Tough defense is a key ingredient to winning in the ACC, which Hamilton’s ’Noles have done at a school-record pace of late. Their 31–17 league mark the past three seasons owes much to unrelenting intensity. “Being the No. 1 defensive team in the country two years in a row is amazing,” Carlson marvels. “They have a mentality of playing at the highest level defensively, and that comes from the head coach.”

The Florida State women’s program under head coach Sue Semrau has reached the NCAA tournament for seven straight years.

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“Sue’s strength is building a team with camaraderie, fellowship, togetherness. They’re always seemingly a very happy team and very together. She’s a phenomenal coach in bringing a team where they want to play as a unit and be a team.” — Tom Carlson, Senior Vice President of Seminole Boosters The women’s cohesiveness has been evident in their ability to pull out close victories; Semrau’s teams are 12–2 in games decided by six points or less over the past two seasons. It’s an art Semrau has honed in compiling a 258–174 record in 14 seasons at FSU, making her the school’s winningest basketball coach ever. “Sue’s strength is building a team with camaraderie, fellowship, togetherness,” Carlson says. “They’re always seemingly a very happy team and very together. She’s a phenomenal coach in bringing a

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team where they want to play as a unit and be a team.” LURING TALENT TO TALLAHASSEE Teamwork is important, no doubt, but every coach knows talent is the essential building block. As recruiters, Hamilton and Semrau have few peers. After taking over as head coach in 2002, Hamilton quickly signed two players who would greatly impact his early teams. Junior college transfer Tim Pickett simply carried the Seminoles

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for two seasons, while underrated prep prospect Al Thornton matured into a first-round NBA pick. Hamilton didn’t stop there. Each of his nine recruiting classes has ranked among the nation’s top 25. His most recent haul features three top-100 national prospects and a promising juco center. Semrau’s recruiting bona fides are even more impressive. She inked the nation’s No. 8 class in just her second season at FSU (1998–99) and continued luring talent to Tallahassee. More than a dozen of


Semrau’s signees have earned All-ACC accolades, including Natasha Howard, the highest ranked prospect in program history at No. 2 nationally (2010). “She’s been able to recruit with the big boys,” Carlson says before correcting himself. “Make that the big girls.” Carlson credits both coaches’ gregarious nature, integrity, work ethic and coaching staffs. He also believes their insistence on signing solid citizens has an impact. “Having a happy team and solid young men and women helps recruiting,” Carlson says. FUTURE ON SOLID FOUNDATION If success breeds success, it’s fair to expect even better things from the men’s and women’s basketball programs in the years to come. Both coaches have cemented solid foundations. Hamilton’s 2011–12 ’Noles will welcome back nine regulars from a team that came within seconds of reaching the Elite Eight. Semrau’s club is equally loaded. Howard is one of eight freshmen and sophomores returning from a team that went 24–8 en route to the NCAA’s second round. Of course, winning also builds expectations. It’s a double-edged sword, to be sure, but it certainly beats the alternative. Agrees Carlson, “I think everybody likes a high expectation.” SB

Life Settlement: the alternative exit strategy for life insurance

800.760.7723 | AtlanticCoastSettlements.com S EMINO LE-BO OST ERS .CO M

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(Above) Jim Steiner and Coach Bowden playing golf during the Bowden Tour. (Left) Three Generations of ‘Noles Michael Steiner, Jim holding grandson Milo James Steiner and Jamie Steiner.

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D o n o r feat u r e By DANIEL MITCHELL Photos courtesy the Steiner Family

Jim Steiner: One of FSU’s Most Valuable Supporters P

lenty of people offered to do favors for Bobby Bowden during his 34 seasons as Florida State’s head football coach. Precious few, however, extended the same courtesies to Bowden’s assistants.

Jim Steiner was among those few. His generous hosting of Bowden’s entire staff and their families for a yearly get-together in Destin led to a lasting friendship with the legendary coach. And it spoke volumes about one of Florida State’s most valuable supporters. “The fact that he was trying to do things for the staff, who seldom get recognized, made it meaningful to (wife) Ann and me,” says Bowden, with whom Steiner remains a close friend and business associate. “Those trips gave us all a great chance to be together when we could relax a little bit.” It’s no surprise Steiner took a big-picture view of FSU’s football program. From an early age, he’s had an uncanny knack for envisioning grand possibilities where others saw limited potential. Growing up in the Fort Walton Beach area of Northwest Florida, Steiner forged a bond with fellow surfer George “Doodle” Harris. The two teamed up on a successful beach service business and surf shop. Steiner was 14 at the time. The venture later was sold to Vic Anderson, a Florida State grad who made then-16-year-old Steiner his partner. The pair would also turn an old fishing vessel

into a nightclub called Pandora’s Wreck, which proved immensely popular with the locals. Despite his early achievements, Steiner decided to pursue an education at his father’s behest. “My dad taught me that you can make and lose fortunes,” Steiner says, “but you never lose knowledge. I had made some money, and he encouraged me to go back to school.” After receiving his two-year degree from Pensacola Junior College in 1971, Steiner headed for Tallahassee and Florida State’s top-rated hospitality management program. He earned his degree in 1975 and put it to good use, starting and selling a Tallahassee restaurant chain called Subway (no relation to the now-famous international brand). From there it was on to a fast-track career with Holiday Inn, which ended when Steiner got a call from friend Steve Abbott pitching a real estate venture. The rest, as they say, is history. Their company, Abbott Realty, became a West Florida juggernaut thanks in part to Steiner’s talent for spotting prime development opportunities in the once-sleepy region. The principals eventually sold most of their holdings, freeing Steiner to pursue passions, including Seminole sports. His Panhandle upbringing stirred Steiner to action. “I grew up in this area and it was pretty much all about Alabama, Auburn and Florida, not so much Florida State,” Steiner says. He was motivated by “wanting to establish that parity that Florida State deserves, to be able to, as an alumni, to make

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it better for future alumni.” He’s certainly done that. Steiner’s contributions to Florida State’s football and baseball programs have helped them maintain national stature, while his gifts to basketball and golf aided their rise to prominence. He’s heavily involved on the academic side, too, earning Alumnus of the Year honors from the College of Business in the 1990s and entering the Westcott Legacy Society for his estate gifts. Steiner has done countless good deeds that receive no formal recognition. For instance, he’s guided many FSU coaches and former players into investments and other business opportunities. Besides Bowden, Steiner considers FSU basketball coach Leonard Hamilton and baseball skipper Mike Martin close friends. Then there are Bowden’s former assistants, including Brad Scott, Mark Richt, Chuck Amato and Billy Sexton, whom Steiner got to know on the annual Destin excursion. “I would bring coaches and their families over for a week and put them all up,” Steiner recalls. “We’d set up fishing trips, golf, massages, dinner, games for the families … Not only was it fun, I had a young family, too, and my kids became close with a lot of the coaches’ kids.” Steiner’s sons, Michael and Jamie, went on to graduate from FSU; Jamie served as a trainer for the football team from 19992001. Clearly, those yearly spring outings had an impact. “It was about more than helping Florida State,” Steiner says. “It was about the people.” SB

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Player Profile

by Caryn Savitz Photo by FSU Sports Info

I was really in to soccer. I played club soccer, Olympic development and all of that. So I really love soccer. I had a couple of knee surgeries in high school, so my doctors said “you’re not going to be able to continue a career in soccer” so that’s when I made the switch fully to track. What has it meant to you to be a part of Florida State Athletics? AL: It’s been really important to me. It’s becoming a part of Florida State track and field because of the prestige of this program and how much track and field has accomplished. Florida State in general a big-time Division I university. I know from my area, it was one of the most prestigious schools. From my graduating class it was me and one other kid who got athletic scholarships to Division I programs, so that’s huge. Across all of the sports Florida State represents is great, I’m never ashamed to say that I’m a Seminole.

Allyn Laughlin Hometown: Amridge, Pa. Year: Senior Major: Sport Management Birthday: Nov. 12, 1987 Events: Throws

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 inishing up her master’s degree in sport management this spring, Allyn Laughlin was fortunate enough to get five years out of her athletic scholarship. As one of only two athletes from her high school graduating class to receive an athletic scholarship to a Division I college, Allyn has made the most out of her time at Florida State. Despite having to receive various surgeries during her career, Allyn has been able to overcome these injuries and earn multiple ACC honors. An outstanding leader, Allyn knows track and field is more than just your individual event; it’s about winning for your team. If you could play any other sport, what would it be? AL: I would definitely play soccer; I played soccer all throughout high school. Up until high school, actually, before I really got in to track

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How do the facilities here compare to others you’ve seen across the country? AL: The facilities here are really good. I’ve was lucky enough to be here, since I’m a fifth year, for what used to be our track facility to what our track facility is now. Our upgrade is just amazing. Our training room on site is great, our new locker rooms and team rooms; I haven’t seen many other facilities that compare. As far as the other sports, I’ve actually been able to tour a bunch of the other facilities and I think it’s just incredible. For track and field, this place is topnotch. What have you learned about yourself during your time at Florida State? AL: I think that I’ve learned about my leadership skills and my ability to be on a team. A lot of people think that track and field is an individual sport, but you learn that it’s much more about a team, your teammates, your coaches and your community, even. On the whole what being a Seminole is and Seminole pride, it’s much more than just your individual event or your individual sport. What’s been your most memorable meet? AL: My most memorable meet was two years ago at nationals. I was sixth place at NCAA; it was a great season for me. I’d just come back from my first back surgery. I had my surgery prior to the season; I’d taken the indoor season off to start recovering and rehabbing. I just came back really strong. We put a lot of time and effort in and rehabbing and working. I ended up PRing (personal record) at the ACC meet leading up to nationals, and then again at the regional meet. Finally again, I threw my season’s PR and my alltime PR at the national meet. So to have such a

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great season after something like a back surgery that can put a lot of people out. If you could do another event, which would you want to do? AL: Although I’m obviously not built for it, I think pole vaulting would be awesome. It’s one of the cooler events to watch and it just seems like it would be a lot of fun. There are other throws I’ve done in the past that I’d like to do that I don’t currently do anymore. If I could choose any though, it would be pole vaulting. How has your scholarship helped you to achieve your goals? AL: My scholarship has been so important to me. First of all, I’m from up north, so there’s no way I would have ended up in Florida or at Florida State if it wasn’t for my scholarship. I’ve gone far enough to even get five years in. I’m going to be finishing up my masters at the end of this year. Hopefully after that I’ll be able to get into a career that I love. I’ll have the skills from more than just being in the classroom and the degree work, but all of the networking and the connections you make at Florida State is just huge. I know the people I’ve met here in the athletic department are definitely going to help me get a career in the field that I love. What do you want to do in the future? AL: I’d really love to coach track and field at the collegiate level. Or possibly just work in collegiate athletics at student services. What sort of legacy do you think you’ve left for the younger girls on the team? AL: I’d like to think hopefully I’ve left an example of overcoming some things. Like I said, I’ve had a couple of back surgeries and other medical things I’ve had to deal with during my five years here. I hope that leaves an example. And just hard work, that hard work can help you accomplish anything, that and a little bit of leadership. You want to be everyone’s friends, but there are times where you really just have to lay it on the line. Maybe not be everyone’s best friend but be a leader, prove what’s important. What does a track-free day consist of for you? AL: I’m a little bit of a homebody. I like to spend a lot of time at home. I have two dogs, so I spend a lot of time at the dog park with them. I have a Great Dane and a German Shepard, so they’re big dogs. I just got engaged over Thanksgiving, so I love spending time with my fiancé. We’re getting married in a little over a year. So once I’m done graduating I’m going to focus on planning the wedding.


by Caryn Savitz Photo by FSU Sports Info

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 he first member of his family to go to college, Charles Clark says becoming a Seminole was the best decision he has ever made. Clark, who has been called “Superman” since he was in high school, has left an impression on the Florida State track team — and the Tallahassee community as well. An active member of the Alpha Kappa Psi fraternity and many other campus organizations, Clark strives to make his community better. A spring 2011 graduate, Clark is undoubtedly a Seminole who has left his mark in the record books for more than just his running.

places. I was running anchor. We were down. Coach was like: “Charles, don’t run it hard, we just want to finish and make it to nationals.” That’s not going to work for me. I got the baton, anchoring it, bringing it home. So we come to fifth, to fourth, to third. At the finish line I’m beginning to pass the guy at second and then catching up to the guy at first. I was about 30 meters behind. I caught him, and that was probably the most memorable moment in my college career. Just having the fans and my family supporting me; it was a great moment

Do you have a favorite former Florida State athlete? CC: Deion Sanders. I say Deion because they say he was the man around campus back in the day, from the football field, to just running the campus. He was that star athlete that everyone admired and wanted to be like. I’d say I’ve been a little bit of a Deion since I’ve been here, with me being involved with the community and fraternity life. Just being known for my singing and my running. I’m a small-time, Prime Time — I’ve got a little bit of Deion in me.

If you could participate in an event other than sprinting what would it be? CC: I would not want to do pole vault, that’s scary. I would say I would do the javelin. It seems like fun. It probably wouldn’t go far, but I’d still have fun with it.

If you could play any other sport, other than running track, what would it be? CC: It would be between basketball or football. I’d say football though. I’d be a safety or receiver; I’m pretty quick. Bobby Bowden wanted me back in the day; I could have brought home a championship. What has it meant to you to be a part of Florida State Athletics? CC: It’s the best decision I’ve made. It’s a huge mark in my life. I can’t see myself going anywhere else. Being a Seminole, it’s truly being a part of a family. You get to be somewhere where people really care about you and not just what you can do. It’s not just about what you can do for the school; it’s how the school can help you out in your endeavors. I love Florida State. What have you learned about yourself in the last four years? CC: I’ve learned that you can do so much with little time. People don’t believe you can do things in the time span that you’re here. From me being a track guy a lot of people didn’t think I could win a national title, but being here we’ve conquered national titles. It’s pretty cool. I’ve been here for the 2007 and 2008 titles; I’ve been here for the two big ones after 2006. What has been the most memorable meet for you? CC: My favorite meet? Regionals 2008. I was running the 4x1 race. We were behind by five

Player Profile

How did you get your nickname “Superman”? CC: I got it my sophomore year in high school. My teammates gave me the name Clark Kent and then one day decided they would call me Superman. Although if it’s between Dwight Howard and Shaquille O’Neal, I’d have to say Shaquille O’Neal is the real Superman, from his days back with the Magic. But at the end of the day, I’m the real Superman. How has your scholarship helped you to achieve your goals and dreams? CC: It gives me hope that I don’t have to be a superstar athlete in order to be successful, I have my degree. With that, academics won’t be my fallback; track and field will be my fallback. With this degree, it’s power. Its power to teach, to inspire, to mentor, to give kids hopes that you can do it. From being a person that struggled with the SAT and ACT that you can make it on the Dean’s List, you can get honor roll, you can make it on the ACC list. You can do so much with your life. What’s it like being the first person in your family to attend college? CC: It really hasn’t hit me yet, it’s slowly getting to me, though. I did something to make my family proud. I inspired my cousins to complete college, and from that comes a lot of other good stuff. I proved that I’m not just an athlete. My family has a lot of athletes but what are you going to do after you run? What kind of mark are you going to leave? With this degree, it means so much. A lot of people may take it for granted, but I’m going to do something with it. Where do you see yourself in the future? CC: I definitely want to open up a youth and

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Charles Clark

Hometown: Virginia Beach, Va. Year: Senior Major: Sport Management Birthday: Aug. 10, 1987 Events: Sprints, 4x100 relay, 4x400 relay

development center for elite athletes and professional athletes, that also mentors kids. I’m the kind of person who wants to give back to the community and give back to the kids. I’m not the future, the kids are. How will you help the future?

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planned giving By JOEL PADGETT Photos courtesy FSU Photo Lab

Part of the Solution

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assandra Jenkins parents were outspoken advocates during some of the darkest day of the civil rights movement. In spite of violence, harrassment and frequent intimidation, they strongly believed they had an obligation to be “part of the solution.” In that era of turbulence and violence in the Deep South, it was with trepidation that a petite fourth grade honor student prepared to attend the “white school.” It was early in the integration process in the mid-’60s, when the state and local school systems offered the “freedom of choice” option. Her father, one of the first two AfricanAmerican professors  hired by  Pensacola Junior College, wanted his three daughters to see if they could receive better academic

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courses and teachers in the “white schools.” Cassandra Jenkins’ experiences at secondary schools molded her beliefs and attitude. She made it a point to keep all of her black friends as she made friends with many white youngsters — from the very wealthy to the very poor. Some of the kids were cruel to her but, just as her father had taught, not all white people are like that. Cassandra learned that one white girl’s parents taught her that

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if a black person touched her, she would turn black. The girl was terrified of turning black, so Cassandra did as most kids would do — chased her around school trying to touch her. She finally did, and after the girl found that she did not have chameleon skin, she figured that a lot of what she had been taught about race was not correct, and they became best friends. One of Cassandra’s teachers would give a gold star each week to her student who had the best grade. Each week Cassandra would somehow always be a couple of points shy of getting the star. Each week, she would take her papers home for her Dad to verify that her answers marked as wrong were correct. The teacher would correct Cassandra’s papers, but always too late for her to be recognized as the best in the class. Cassandra had some great white teachers and had to remind herself that not all white people were like the one who did not want a black student to be first in her class.   The three Jenkins sisters all played sports in school, although there were not the opportunities for girls that now exist. Playing team sports gave all girls, both black and white, a sense of connection and camaraderie, because they had to depend on each other in order to win. When all the parents would take turns carting the teams to games, it gave the girls an opportunity to see each other in a different light. As time passed, Cassandra and her teammates would seek each other out to sit with and to see after school. Looking back, Cassandra feels strongly that athletics helped bridge the huge divide between blacks and whites during those tense times.   Before the TV series CSI, there was Quincy, M.E., starring Jack Klugman. Cassandra was spellbound by his ability to solve crime and resolved early in her secondary schooling that she wanted to follow her TV hero into crime fighting.  Having personally witnessed inappropriate police actions in Pensacola, she also wanted to develop better police training, and be, as President John F. Kennedy said, “a part of the solution.” Knowing FSU had one of the


best criminology programs in the country, Tallahassee was her first and only choice, even though she had offers from schools such as Harvard and Notre Dame.   Like everything she ever undertook, Cassandra threw all of her energy into the university. She excelled in the classroom, graduating Magna Cum Laude in Criminology and Sociology and later earning a master’s degree. In 1976, she read an article in the Flambeau about a new thing called Lady Seminole Boosters. She was finishing her freshman year, and FSU was beginning to offer the opportunity for women to receive scholarships and compete in intercollegiate sports. She understood the value of athletics in her life and wanted to help. Cassandra didn’t have much money, but she had time and invested it with Barbara Palmer, who had just been hired as FSU’s Director of Women’s Athletics. She helped promote support for women’s athletics, and got to know what would become a lifetime of young women who would compete as Seminoles. Many were the first in their family to attend college and could never have done so without their scholarship.   Last year, the governor and cabinet appointed Cassandra as one of Florida’s three Parole Commissioners, after a distinguished career in Florida’s justice system. Over a decade spent at the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, she helped develop the nation’s first Missing Children Information Clearinghouse and the state’s Hate Crime Reporting Program. She was later part of the management team that developed the Department of Juvenile Justice, where she spent more than another decade. She is known for her tireless work in many organizations as the advocate for children without a voice, abused or otherwise.  Her passion for being part of the solution has led Cassandra to immerse herself in many causes that brought her awards from many organizations. Her efforts  on behalf of Florida State include board membership in the Black Alumni Association, where she won their outstanding alumni award, a long stint on

the FSU Alumni Association’s National Board of Directors and as a valued member of  the Seminole Booster’s National Board the past six years. Cassandra has continued her commitment to supporting women’s athletics with both her time and resources. It’s no wonder the university awarded her the coveted Circle of Gold award for superlative service.

And what’s important to know about Cassandra Jenkins is that her passion goes far deeper than simply filling quotas. “In my professional life, I see boys and girls who are in bad situations. One avenue to escape those conditions is to use their athletic skills to get an education and become a success in life,” Jenkins said about why she’s so committed to the Seminole

“Over the years, many of our women or minority student-athletes have told me, ‘Miss Cassandra, it brings a smile to our face when we see someone who looks like us support us. It’s good that all people support us, but you give us a role model for giving back.’ ”  Some of her black and women friends have asked Cassandra how they could join the Booster board. She told them to “get to the table,” they have to give to the organization in their time, talents and resources, which is true for any Seminole fan interested in a leadership position. She reminds them, firmly but gently, that if they believe in something and want to make a difference, they have to be a part of the solution. Cassandra practices what she preaches, giving unselfishly of her time — she’s been an annual Booster since college and gives to several Coach’s Clubs for women’s sports. Most importantly, she wants to continue to make a difference after she is gone with an estate gift and is a member of the Booster’s Custodes Lampadis Society.   “She’s been talking to  us for a while about doing a scholarship gift for women’s basketball, and she has been like a little dog that won’t let go of your pants leg — never mean, tail always wagging, but relentless,” a donor said recently, adding that he was in a hurry to get the gift done before he ran into Cassandra again. Tenacity has been her trademark on the Seminole Booster board, where she is a constant advocate for diversity and a voice for distinguished Booster donors who are women and/or people of color.

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Booster mission. “Over the years, many of our women or minority student-athletes have told me, ‘Miss Cassandra, it brings a smile to our face when we see someone who looks like us support us. It’s good that all people support us, but you give us a role model for giving back.’ ” Cassandra wants each one of those kids to follow her in being a part of the solution. SB

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True Semino

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By Nikki Ticknor Photos By Mike Olivella

Front

Back

2011 True Seminole shirts will be available August 1st at the following locations: online at Seminoles. com, Florida State Bookstore, Bill’s Bookstore and Garnet and Gold.

ole

“It’s our toughness off the field — and on the field.” “It’s our effort all the time — every time.” “It’s our focus and our discipline.” “It’s our tradition and Seminole pride.” “It’s our turn to make them fear the spear.” “Because it’s not their time.” “This is our time.”

This is OUR Time! These sound bites from the 2011 TRUE Seminole video by star athletes E.J. Manuel, Dustin Hopkins, Lonnie Pryor, Bert Reed, Greg Reed, Nigel Bradham, Brandon Jenkins and Xavier Rhodes speak to the spirit of Florida State University. This year’s TRUE Seminole Campaign slogan is an anthem reaching out to all Florida State fans: “THIS IS OUR TIME.” Inspired by the powerful words of Coach Jimbo Fisher and his players, the slogan is the center of the 2011–2012 TRUE Seminole campaign. Every Florida State athlete, alumni and student should be speaking these words — because they are more than just TRUE Seminole words, they are “OUR” words. With the 2011-2012 athletic seasons approaching, FSU fans must unite with Seminole pride, to lead Florida State on the warpath to victory! Florida State Athletes and Seminole Student Boosters encourage all FSU fans to share the values of Tradition, Respect, Excellence and Unity — all of which describe the acronym TRUE. If you are a TRUE Seminole, you already know: Now go out and tell the nation, “This is our time.” The Sept. 17 Oklahoma game has been deemed the Official TRUE Seminole Football Game, endorsed by the university and the Athletics Department. Before our ’Noles step on the field to battle the Sooners, TRUE Seminole week will fuel FSU spirit with an array of events, including the TRUE Seminole Block Party on Friday, Sept. 16 and the TRUE Seminole Tailgate on game day. All Florida State fans are encouraged to flood the stadium, wearing the 2011 TRUE Seminole “THIS IS OUR TIME” T-shirt. The TRUE Seminole campaign raises $4 for every T-shirt sold, which goes towards an endowment fund supporting athletic and service scholarships. Coach Fisher’s speech, at the 2010 Chick-fil-A Bowl, reminded players why they chose Florida State University. His words can be understood on and off of the field: “You have prepared for success, you have planned for success, now you gotta’ understand how to go get success.” Fuel Florida State University success. Fundraising aside, the TRUE Seminole campaign is more than just a T-shirt. It is the message that Seminoles will come together as one, unified in excellence and defined by tradition. Through tradition we remember our past, through respect we honor our legacy, through excellence we are humble to see the excellence in others and through unity we are one, unwavering and unconquered. Support your team, your athletes, your students and the success of your Florida State University by purchasing the TRUE Seminole T-shirt this fall.

» This is OUR time. » This is YOUR time. » This is FSU’s time. » Are you with us? S EMINO LE-BO OST ERS .CO M

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Compliance

Employing Student-Athletes

I

t’s finally summertime for our Florida State University student-athletes. Many are using this time to not only train for next year’s competitive seasons but also build their career resumes with practical work experience. In 2003, NCAA rules changed, allowing more flexibility for collegiate studentathletes to be employed throughout the academic year (including summers) and be paid for their work, without requiring that compensation count against the maximum financial aid they were permitted to receive. The FSU Compliance Team wants to take this opportunity to better educate you on NCAA rules regarding student-athlete employment. As a Florida State Seminole Booster, NCAA rules allow you to hire a student-athlete (e.g., work for your company, babysit, lawn maintenance). However, even when an activity is permissible, there are usually some caveats and this is no exception! Please note NCAA Bylaw 12.4.1, which states compensation may be paid to a student-athlete (a) only for work actually performed; and (b) at a rate commensurate with the going rate in that locality for similar services. In addition, the student-athlete may not be used to promote or advertise a business, products or services. Finally, they must be treated in the same manner as any other employee. If you would like to hire a student-athlete, whether you fall under the NCAA’s definition of a booster or not, please contact Bret Cowley with the FSU Compliance Team at bcowley@fsu.edu or by phone at (850) 644-4390. It is critically important for the office to document and monitor all student-athlete employment opportunities to ensure each student’s eligibility is protected. Cowley will provide you with the documentation that needs to be completed and go over the basic compliance ground rules. We greatly appreciate your continued support and assistance in compliance efforts. Thanks and Go ‘Noles!

WELCOME NEW MEMBERS (from January 22, 2011–April 28, 2011)

PLATINUM GOLDEN CHIEF CHTCO, LLC Michael & Lynne Gallina

GOLDEN CHIEF

Allison Notaras Dr. Farhat Khairallah Jason D. Beaver Michael J. Eubank Phil & Wendy Scuderi Rick Brawner Robin Lanigan Smith Capital LLC Southlake Family Practice, P.A. The Crisi Family Todd & Jeri Hunter

SILVER CHIEF

Deryck A. Harmer Dr. Stephen & Landra Draper Joe Paradise Michelle W. Touchstone Mike Garvie Randy & Marty Smith Robin & Dan Russell Ronald & Marisol Sylvester

TOMAHAWK

A. Davis Ali Brosokas Andrew Schellenberg April K. Salter Barbara Brooks Brian Cole Brian M. Boulerice Capital City Pain Management Casi Stubbs Christiaan Webb

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Craig Skinner Cynthia S. Emmons Dana L. Spinello Daniel Alvarez Darryl L. Smith David L. Brechtel Deirdre Mann Denver J. Stutler, Jr. Derek R. Fink Diana Prindle-Pearce Don A. Zeppenfeld Donald R. Harris, Jr. Douglas Capps Ellen Mosher Eric L. Heard Eric Polanik Faith Jones Frederick Fernandes Gregory L. Jaap Harry Harrell J.D. Bowers Jason Ash Jason Granger Jason Marshall Jeffrey Cape Jeffrey Keeman Jeffrey Worman Jeremy E. Owens Joe Lucas John & Janie Johnston Jon Alderman Joseph R. Hernandez Joshua Bellew Justin Vanderveen Karen M. Kees Kaylyn R. Crawford Kevin & Peggy Goff Laura D. Moore-Lawrence Mark Cooper Marvin Williams Matthew Lefeber Melissa Mills Michael Bennes

UNCONQU E R E D M AGA ZINE

Michael J. Cain Mike Parker Mitch Schumacher Nick Dowgul Octavio Alvarez Patrick Ryan Richard E. Brown Scott J. Schiller Scott L. Reimer Sean P. Harmon Sergeant Patrick & Amanda Parke Stephen & Lona Voigt Steven A. Coleman Thomas E. Swain Tim Norris Timothy M. Cregan Tyler Thimmes & Ashley Seale Van Ness R. Butler, Jr. & Jonnye Butler Vicki Gunnewig William Huszagh William J. Endres

WARRIOR

Adam Cooley Advanced Furniture Solutions Allen Music Amy Rodman Andrew D. Adams Andrew Poole Andy Gonzalez Anne-Mari Eriksen Ari Strulson Aubrey E. Easterlin, III Becky Black Benjamin W. Dusek Bill & Cindy Pace Bill Campman Blair Bertoglio Bradford F. Beauchamp Brian A. Menendez Brian Hoagland Bryan Taylor C. B. Campbell Chase Summers Chris McCasland Chris Williamson Christopher G. Gibson

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Christopher P. Westbrook Christopher Pinto Christopher S. Deason Clark Wood Cory Brown Cory Schreckengost Crystall Brookman D. Christopher Griggs Daniel J. Steuck David & Samantha Smith David A. Peters David & Elizabeth Ledbetter David D. Heffner Dawn & Michael Kane Dennis Burchill Derek J. Snow Dominic Kirsch Douglas C. Wheeler, Jr. Douglas Marohn Evan Schaffer Frank Stevens Gary R. Fogleman Gregory Orff Henri Crockett Hollye A. Edwards James A. Wilson James Hansler James M. Hess, III Jan B. Foster Jareal Gilmore Jason Cochran Jay Johnson Jeff Greenberg Jeff J. Ricke Jeff Rogers Jeffrey Kahn Jeffrey Webster Jeremy L. Duguid Jeremy Pollock Jerry Ingalls Jhon Smith Jim & Kathy Flautt John G. Howell John P. Hearn Jon Sayer Jonathan “Steve” Dreaden Joshua L. Weand Joshua M. Jenkins Keith & Dawn McConnell Ken Ulich Kenneth & Jane Whritenour Kenneth E. Palmer Kevin & Gretchen Bradley Kyle Olson Kyle Rogers Lee Rogers Louis J. Matthews, III Luis Izquierdo Margaret C. Spencer Maria A. Nodora Marilyn A. Maphis Marilyn La Fave Mark A. Palazzolo Mark Aron Mark L. Nelson Matthew Spaunburgh Michael Eckel Michael Johnson Michael Turner Mike Bryan Mike, Lisa & Alex Douglas Mikhaila L. Aleksy Norma L. Corisdeo Patrick Varnes Peter Lazzari Peter S. Bondjuk Rachel Crabtree Ralph Sturms Randall Lenci Randy Evangelides Randy Filer Raymond McDermott Renee Pellicer Rob Kenison Robert & Teri Henry Robert & Rebecca Pearce Robert & Rosalyn Ingram Robert Potomski Robert Shultz Roger Luca Ryan Rivas Sal Liistro Sarah Waddle Scott A. Capazola Scott Wiggins Sean Blewitt Sean Guerrero Sheila Mead Stephen Mandel


Teresa Baldree Thomas Harp Thomas P. Sconiers Tim Munn Timothy J. & Houman Rassa Green Todd Wollett Travis M. Goodstein Zac Davidson

RENEGADE

Amber McLain Andrew Buynak, Jr. Andrew J. Poore Andrew Stimpson Andy George Arthur Jennings Ashley S. Edwards Bayne B. Eason, Jr. Beth Ebersole Bob Kerce Brad Albertson Brad & Mary Hollingsworth Brent Patrick Brian E. Pelham Brian Kirchhefer Brian Verbic Brian White Bruce Ravan Carmen L. Reese Carol Matulonis Caroline M. Smith Charles M. Rebhan, Jr. Charles W. Onken Charlie Fultz Chase Cody Klingensmith Chase Z. Daly Chris & Elizibeth Thompson Chris Mills Christopher & Kristen Bates Christopher M. Caiaccio Clay Burdeshaw Curtis K. Brown Cynthia Scallan Cynthnia Miller Daniel Jimenez Daniel Perez Daryl Barowicz David Easterwood David Grande David N. Kaufman David O. Champion Debra Grande Derek Lester Don Crowley Don Messer Donald Fendlason Donnie Tanner Dwan Ross Elizabeth & Regina Rohe Eric D. Hinebaugh Frank J. Maggio, Jr. Frank Longobardo Gary Guzzo & Associates George B. Barwick George French Gerald Peters Gina Albanese Heather Smith Henry Betsey Huie R. Lee J. Craig Anthony James C. Boggs James O. Savino James R. Cunningham Jane S. Krblich Jason C. Pappas Jason Degroff Jason Harrison Jason Warner Jeff & Kelly Harris Jennifer Johnson Jeremy Guthrie Jerri & Gregory Wingo Jesse & Donna Garcia Jessica L. Denny Jill & Ryan Flees Jim & Linda Sims Jimmy Webster, Jr. JoAnn Raulerson Joe Ellsworth Joel & Coleen Hutchison Joel Comerford John C. Harris, Jr. John E. Appleton, III John R. Hampton Jon R. Corder Jon Yeatman Joseph J. Joseph

Joseph P. Banach Justin G. Smith Katherine E. Mackes Kevin Hall Kevin McCarter Larry Brown Larry Evans Larry Osteen Lisa Womack Lori M. Robinson Mark Rathel Martin & Angela Sipple Mary Shiver Matt McNalley Matt Musi Matthew Parker Matthew R. Oliver Matthew R. Werner Matthew Smith Matthew Z. Cunningham Melissa F. Weiler Michael A. Garofalo & Shannon R. Garofalo Michael Blackburn Michael R. Kempter Molly & Jamie Shakar Nicholas F. Zappitelli Nicole M. Mariani Nikolaus Ritter Pam Klavon Paul G. Faircloth, III Phillip T. Poneleit Preston Bryan Raashon Jones Rafael B. Diaz Richard Lawson Rick White Robert C. Shashy Robert Dolan Robert J. Myers Robert Mcgill Robert Parramore Robert Vice Robert Walker Ronald Ard Ronald D. Hayward Russell J. Stoewe III Ryan T. Whiteman Seminole Boosters, Inc. Sheraton Hall Sherri L. Plenge Stacey Black Stephen Mccoy Stephen Michels Stephen Tumbleston Steve Good Steve Petrie Steve Steinbach Steven Dicostanzo Stewart Tharp Suzanne W. Branch Terry Lowe Theresa Giroux Thomas Richardson Timi Godin Todd Siever Travis Peterson Walter Vickers Wes Price Weston K. Wilkes Whitcomb B. Whitman William H. Lewis William Reber William Rhey William T. Spivey Zachary Barnes Zane B. Barfield

BRAVE

Abigail C. Sanvi Adam L. Adair Anthony Finotti Bill Peebles Carol J. Klauer Chad Hamlin Chondi B. Imani Chris Berkeley Christopher M. Howard Courtney Block Damian M. Ozark Daniel & Caroline Scheer Daniel Scallan Dean L. Porter Doug Knowles Elizabeth Mcghee Frances Mackinnon Gregory S. Bushn Jeff Sutton Jeff Swanson

Jeffrey E. Tillman Jessica A. Francis Joe Contreras John & Anissa Klisch John Bachmann John Coombs Jon C. Comottor Jose M. Freundt Judd D. Enfinger Karen Sharp Kasian C. Tomyn Kevin Bonnett Kevin Trinh Kim Sloat Kristen Meehan Lauren Spisso Lee Carroll Leonard & Judith Darsey Linda Pham Marcus Gray Mary Anderson Ziegler Matthew C. Bernhard Matthew Tate Michael Giraud Michael Guill Michelle L. Hudson Mitchell Fortner Morgan N. Bender Mr. Michael Robb Mrs. Ruth T. Sliger Ms. Melanie McCullough Nicholas G. Matthews Peter Montoleone Rae Erin Faircloth-Sykes Richard A. Clark Sagen Augustin Scott Rzeznik Sharon S. Joca Spencer Ingram Stephen Putnam Tia Gaffney

IRON ARROW

AEO on the GO, LLC Amy M. Spuck Andrew J. Simpson Andrew L. Cumbee Andrew Meyers Andrew Moskowitz Andrew S. Fiske Andy Parker Anthony Farruggia Art & Nancy Leary Barbara Becton Benjamin C. Early Betty Jo Allen Beverly & Jeremy Clark Beverly Stuart Blair Minnix Bobby & Natalie Quigley Bradley K. Bosenberg Brannon S. Boggus Brantley Tillman Bret Waldrep Brian M. Hoag Brian McGrane Brittany F. Bruce Brittney L. Brock Brooke M. Benzio Burl & Nancy White Calvin A. Davis Cameron Norris Candice M. Melton Carey L. DeMoustes Carlin Merritt Cathy M. Wogamon Cathy Upchurch Chad Lynch Charles S. Elul Chelsea Hair Chris & Sarah Turner Christopher M. Muth Christy J. Parzik Clint Lavender Connie Nodae D. Blake Rehberg Dan Morden Daniel F. Stanislawek Daniel Lundquist Daniel Mazza Daniel Spiess David & Rachel Pienta David E. Johnson David M. Baryza David Stokely David T. Slutak Debbie Waliga-Barry Deedra M. Hinton Demetrio B. Bob

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Diane Gaines Diane H. Cutler Donald Gustavson Donald P. Pagach Drew Greminger Eliot S. Rosenberg Elvin & Jennifer Paulette Emil Marrero & Drenee Marrero Eric Eyerly Erick Valdes Erin M. Brady Fallon Warren Francis Chute Frederick Sellers Geoff Nichols Glenn G. Tindall Graig Mansfield Greg Jacobs Greg Olsen Gregg H. Brown Gregg S. Hunsberger Gregory R. Hough, II Gregory R. Sheaffer Gregory S. Allen Gregory Streitman Heather D. Smith Herman T. Klinger, III Hugh D. Rosser Jacqueline L. Justice Jacqueline W. Henderson Jake Albert Jake Barmster James Bedgood James C. Daddio James E. Nugent, IV James L. Burmeister James M. Husbands James M. Seigler James P. Wenrich Jane Manyo Janet C. Booth Janis Bond Jason Cooper Jason D. Berry Jason Hayes Jason Woodside Jay Oakes Jeff Stitely Jeff Watson Jennifer M. Thomas Jeremiah K. Nutt Jeremy Gibson Jeremy O’Guinn Jeremy Olloqui Jerry P. Holland Jerry Prescott Jesse H. Dodd, III Jesse Rivers Jessica Bolton JoAnne McKay Joe Prevatt John & Jody Maxwell John & Gina Lee John Cortes John F. Husbands John Pitts John W. Briggs John W. Donaldson John W. Wis John Wilcox Jon Epstein Jonathan R. Marks Jorge A. Calienes Joseph Johnson Joseph Marks Joshua R. Johnson Joshua Wright Justin Musslewhite K. Frances Harrell Katie Zahn Katrina A. Ugarte Katy Zamesnik Kendel R. Smith, Jr. Kenneth & Phoebe Solek Kevin Brennan Kisan Patel Kyle Manners L. Scott Blum Lee & Damaris Cobb Leihernst Lamarre Leslie D. Phaup, III & Christine W. Phaup Lisa Wheeler LuVar Fowlkes Mark & Amy Miller Mark S. Roberts Mark Sardo Mark Stouffer Martin G. Vanderplas Martin Jaffee

Matt Alibrizio Matthew C. Guidry Matthew E. Miller Matthew J. Ferguson Matthew R. Lord Matthew T. Sluizer Melissa Craige Michael & Peggy Rafferty Michael Kelly Michael N. Billiris Michael T. Bernstein Micheal Adams Michele A. Bone Mickey Pickler Mike Carter Mike Moore Morgan W. Norton Mr. Son Vo Mr. Tyrone A. Adras Nathan Clayton Navarro R. Moore Ned Waters Nicole Clute Otto & Lee Knowles Patrick Dyer Patrick T. Harvey Paul Harris Pedro Hernandez Pete & Kathlene Wilkinson Philip C. Miller Philip M. Stillman, Jr. Randall & Monica Merchant Raymond A. White Rhett A. Rowell Rich Wilson Richard & Barbara Erdmann Robert Campbell Robert J. Brecht Robert M. Waters Robert T. Edwards, Jr. Ronald W. Morris Ronda Bond Ross Brannon Ryan F. Ward Ryan J. Davoile Ryan J. Scarnecchia Ryan M. Ottens Ryan Mason Ryne S. Davis Samantha Baker Samuel A. Cole Samuel E. Goff Sara Ferguson Scott J. Uricchio Sean Sullivan Shane L. Munson Shawn Faulconer Shawn Hunt Stan & Martha Henslee Stefano J. Bordoli, M.D. Stephania Feltz Steven B. Schmidt Steven Brown Steven D. Beres, Esq. Sue Parkerson Sylvia Fountain Tania M. Griffin Tanner Akos Tara J. Lehan The Adams Family Timothy Bogardus Todd Bradley Todd Gustavson Tommy L. Mckee Troy Miller Tyler Morgan Vicki & Karl Syfrett W. Grady Huie Warren Carrancejie Wayne & Kathy Munson Will Wilson William Rodriguez Windy A. Kemp Zachariah DeVeau Zachary Baryza

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WELCOME NEW SEASON TICKET HOLDERS (As Of April 28, 2011) Robert Mcgill Brian J. Stevens Randall Merrill Douglas Stevens Thomas Mills Keith Steverson Brooke Macy Evan Christian Stewart Joshua Madden Kyle Stewart David Mahon Michael Stewart Christopher J. Maier Tim Stewart Andrew Maines Andrew Stimpson Wayne R. & Lynda W. Makin Shane Stitik Michael Maloney David Stokes Stephen Mandel Cathy Stoll P. Manfre David Stoms Marilyn Maphis Johnny Stotts Jorge Marante Bruce Strampe Mark Marchione Cayla Stratton Jonathan Mari Marta Strawser Jared Marini Greg Streitman Jonathan Marks Frances Strickland Emil Marrero Roger Strickland Jeremy Martin Nadia Strucko Mark Martin Stephen Stuart Mike Martinez Casi Stubbs Derek Massey Lynn Sturges William Mathers Denver Stutler Michelle Mattern Sean Sullivan Carol Matulonis Chase Summers Kevin Maxwell Christian P. Summers Theresa Mazza Steve & Joyce Sunday Brian McAdams David Sutton Dora McCarthy Tom Swain Keith McConnell D. Truett Swanson Raymond McDermott Jennifer Sweeney Ciawanda McDonald Judy Sweet Bernard J. Mcfadden Ronald Sylvester James E. McFatter Donnie Tanner Elizabeth McGhee Justin Tarin Michael & Doris McHugh Sean Tacie Tommy L. McKee Michael Takac Luther McKnight Zachary Talbott Michael McLaughlin Brittany Tampellini Scott M. McLemore Terri Tankel Matt McNalley Brenda E. Tanner Aleathea McRoberts Christopher Taylor Kevin McBride Connie Taylor Chris McCasland John Taylor Stephen McCoy John Taylor Patrick McDonnell Jonathan Taylor Ronald McGrier Melisa Taylor Tinsley McGruder Jennie Teal Hill Ned Waters

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Patrick McHugh Sherwood Tella Patti Aupperlee David Mckay Mark Templeton Andrew Adams Amber McLain Steven Templeton Drew Adams Steve McLaren Christina Tenhoeve Eric Adams Ossie McMahan Michael Terranova Helen Adams John McMillan Rachael Terrin Randall Adams Shauna McMurry Anthony Terry Aeo On The Go LLC William McNeil Gina Albanese Christopher McWilliams Dale Thomas Sheila Mead Deborah Thomas Jonathan Medley Erin Thomas Stephen Medley Amanda Thompson Don Messer Jake Thompson Bernie Meyer Lawrence W. Thompson Amanda Meyers Linda Thompson Stephen Michels Matthew Thompson Joshua Mick Tommy G. Thompson Charles & Meredith Middleton Ty W. Thompson Danielle Milia Sheri Thomson Charles D. Millard Matthew Tillery Johnny Millender Brantley Tillman Chris Miller Kevan Tjon Christopher Miller Greg Tober Cynthnia Miller Chris Toll Lee Miller Chance Tompkins Matthew Miller Clifford Tompkins Patrice L. Miller Adrienne Tooley Philip Miller Penny Tower Shannon Miller William Town Chris Mills Terry Treesh Linda Mills Bobby Tucker Michael Mills Jonathan Tugwell Jason Milsapp Travis Tunis Richard Minichino Frank Turner Luis Miranda Kristi Turner James Mitchell Michael Turner Darlene & Guanard Mitchem Sarah & Chris Turner Nicki Mohr Peter E. L. Tyndall Ken Moler Katie Uanino Kerri Moler Katrina Ugarte Melinda Mollette Kenneth Ulich Etta Money Mikhaila Underwood James Montague & Jimmy Granger Phyllis S. Underwood Joseph Montalto Mark Unger Peter Montoleone Scott Uricchio Brian J. Moogan Randy Van Syoc Mike Moore

UNCONQU E R E D M AGA ZINE

Daren Van Aulen Dan Morden John Van Matre Brian Morgan Matthew Van Name Elizabeth Morgenstern Daniel Van Sickle Al Morris Michelle Vandenbosch Robert Morris Heather Vanderford Tommy E. Morrison Justin Vanderveen Marcella Morton Eric Vandezilder Kirk Moser Timothy Vause Melissa Mills Mosher Michael Vazquez Kyle W. Mosley Brian Verbic James A. Mosrie Walter Vickers Julie Moss Genesis Villanueva Sean Moulder Rich Vimpeny Larry Mowrey Brandt Vinson Daniel Moxley Son Vo Timothy Moyer Anthony Voisard Mike Mullen Keith Volkmann Timothy Mullins John Webb Tim Munn Chris Westbrook Chad Murdock David Williams Daniel Murphy Chad Woddail Dawn Murphy Nick & Lisa Waddell Raymond Murphy Sam Wainhaus Matt Musi Brad Waldrop Allen Music Robert Walker Clayton & Nancy Mynard Sandra Walker Bill Narozanick James Wallace John Robert Nash, Jr. Charles Walsingham Paul Neal Adria Ward William M Neal Travis M. Ward Andrew Neeves Jason Thomas Warner Erin Nehrbas Brad Warren Mr. Mark Nelson Jason Waters Alan Nestico Robert Waters Susan Nette Monica Watford Frank Newcomb Barbara Watt Kimberly Newmans Andrew Watts Jason Newton Joshua Weand Tony Nichols Christiaan Webb Steve Nicklaus Jeffrey Webster Nancy Nielsen Jimmy Webster Maria Angelica Nodora Matthew Wehler Sheree Noles Scott Weinmann Scott Noonan Christina Welty Tim Norris Justin Wendel North Florida Financial Bill A. & Sally Wendt Jeremiah Nutt Matthew Werner Clarke P. O’Connor Susan Wesler Ryan O’Hara Mike Westbrook Courtney O’Brien Brian Westrick

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Bridgid O’Connor Ashley Wheeler Kevin O’Sullivan Doug Wheeler Mark Olson Jamey Whitaker Erik Odegard Brian White Benjamin Odom Gregory A. White Stephen Ogborn Marcus Whiteis Calvin Ogburn Kenneth Whritenour Matthew Oliver Tori Wiggins Emily Oppel Dana Wiley Gregory Orff Weston Wilkes Larry Osborne Brian Williams Larry Osteen C. Henry Williams Ryan Ottens Cathy Williams Larry Otwell Christopher J. Williams Christopher Owen Gregory Williams Brandon T. Owens Jordan Williams Scott Patrick Owens Lyle Williams Michael Padlock Marvin Williams Ryan Newman Page Philip Williams Mark Palazzolo Robin Williams Ken Palmer Sheila Williams Ryan Pamplin Steven Williams Calvin Pancheri Vincent Williams Robert Pancheri Chris Williamson Joseph M. Pankowski Jr. Joseph Williamson Jason Pappas Michael Willie Michael Pappas Keith H. Willing David Scott Parker Brent Willis Mike Parker Daryl Willis Robert Parramore Kenneth M. Willis James Parsons Rodney Willis Blake Partridge Sally W. Willis Rahul Patel Amber Wilson Patrick Boland Richard Wilson Brent Patrick Will & Justine R. Wilson Nicole Payne Adam Wimpee D. H. Pearce Ronald Winn Amber Peebles Michael Winter Brian Pelham Bill Winters Renee & Jason Pellicer John Wis Frank Pendleton Chris Wise Kevin R. Peranton David M. Wiesenfeld Cassidy Perdue Brian Withers Daniel Perez Lisa Womack Daniel Perez Clark & Leslie Wood Brian Perry Jason Woodside Stephanie Peters Christina Worley Valarie Peters Jeffrey Worman Erin Peterson Chris Worsley Jarrod Peterson John G. Wright Matthew Peterson

Josh Wright Travis Peterson Trisha Wright Linda Pham Vanessa Wyatt William D. Phillips Jr. Sean Wyckoff Mary Phillips Brian Yates Scott Phillips Jon Yeatman Jarrad Pilgrim James Robert York Tony Pimpinella George Young Chris Pinto Scott & Michele Young Sonia Pisano Julie Youngblood Justin Pittman Peter Yungel Melvin Pittman Matthew Zaideman Sean Pittman Michael Zangrilli Sherri Plenge Karen Zann Po’boys Creole Cafe John A. Zarle Eric Polanik John Zells Jeremy Pollock Michael Zens Chad Polumbo Don Zeppenfeld Phillip T. Poneleit Chelsea Ziembko Andrew Poole Jana Manuel Jenelle H. Poppell Blake Medica Andrew Porter Nikolaus Ritter Tanya Porter Matthew Sica Tyler Porter Martin G. Van Der Plas Ernesto D. Portuondo William Wren Ricky Potter Michael E. Pou Matrell Powell Patrick Powell Rick H. Powell Premier Beverage Howard Price Wes Price Rosemary Prince Kerri Pritchard Jessie Pugh Alexis Quick Ryan Roth Joyce & Gilles Racicot Ronald E. Ragans Neil Ragland Emir A. “Butch” Rahman Michael & Nadine Raines Brian Ramirez Bryan Rapp Houman Rassa Mark Rathel Joann Raulerson Bruce Ravan Jami Ray Sean Reardon William Reber Lewis Reddick Carmen Reese Michael Reichert Scott Reimer Reliaquest LLC Kristina Reynolds William Rhey Jason Rhine Renee Riccard Thomas J. Richardson Jeff & Barbara Ricke James Rickel Pinckney K. Ridley IV Tony Rine Michael Risley Michael S. Rittberg David A. Ritzel Ryan Rivas Hallie Robeck Aaron Roberts Casey M. Roberts John Roberts Mark S. Roberts Aaron Robertson Lee Robinson Lori Robinson Wes Blalock


Randall Bland Michael R. Blasewitz Courtney Block Matthew Bloemer Matthew Boerger James Boggs Amy Bogner Shawn Boland Peter Bondjuk James Bone Jason Bonner David Boole Trevor Boozer Sam Boukerrou Brian Boulerice Charlyn Bowen Sharkey Bowers Thelma Bowers Michael Bowes Ryan Boyajian Carol Boyer Gretchen Bradley Rick Bradshaw Andrew Brady Katherine Brainerd Robert Braknis Suzanne Branch Jake Braunsdorf Mr. Rick Brawner Timothy Breacham David & Tiffany Brechtel Jan Brennan Mark Bresee Jeffrey Bretana David Brick Jeremy Brick Jason Brienen Brett Briggs Scott Brimer Justin Brogdon Phyllis A. Brookins Barbara Brooks Angela Broome Aaron Brown Cory Brown Curtis Brown Kerri Brown Richard E. Brown Steven & Kathy Brown Tyler Brown Kyle Brownett Frank Bryan Mike Bryan Stefan Bryan Brett Bryant Robert Bryson Benjamin A. Buemi Eric Burch Dennis T. Burchill III Monica M. Burke James Burks Gary Bussell Brian Bustamante Kris Butler Vanness R. Butler Andrew Buynak Hope Byer-Everd Capital City Pain Managment CCI Edwin Collins Benjamin Caballo Chris Caiaccio Michael J. Cain Joe Cala Chris Caldwell Holly Caldwell Sara Cameron C. B. Campbell Sheree Campbell Bill Campman Chris Canepa Robbie Cannon Kevin Cantfil Scott Capazola Jeffrey Cape Robert Caperton Capital Eye Consultants Douglas Capps Raymond Carlini Karen Carman Patrick Carrin Chris Case Michael Casey Andrew Chadick Jeffrey Chambers Larry Chambers David O. Champion Lisa Chason Alexi Cheverez William Chiodo Ian Chomat Nicole Christensen Justin Christofoli

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New Seminole Boosters and season ticket holders Michael Takac and Eleanor Davina with children Brendan, Elena and Kevin Brown. Donald Ray Harris Jr. Jason Harrison Lauri Haase Dave Haehnlein Sean Haggerty William Haire Jr. Brent Haley Frank Hall Jason Hall Kevin Hall Nicholas Hall John Hampton Eric Handelsman James E. Hansler Michael Hardee Bobby Hardie Andrea Hardin Jeremy Hardin Roderick Harding Brian Hargraves Trevor Harkness Sean P. Harmon William Harnish Thomas Harp Brandy Harrell Kenneth Harrell Daniel Harrington John C. Harris Jr. Jeff & Kelly Harris Jordan Harris Quincy Harris Lori Harrison Deborah Hartley Keith Hartman James Haslett Erin Hassey

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S P O R T S U P D AT E : b a s e b a l l By Rob Wilson Photos by Ross Obley

Cap and Gown on the Mound: A Unique Graduation Ceremony

T

he idea was one that, frankly, seems like it should have emerged years ago. But it took a call from a player’s mom to make a Saturday game in May unforgettable for eight senior Seminole baseball players, their families and a riveted Howser Stadium crowd.

Student-athletes at FSU sacrifice a great deal to compete in their sports. Most have never had a spring break, or enjoyed the holidays with family or been able to race home for a quick weekend visit. And many of them miss monumental events. About the same time the rest of the general human science majors were receiving their diplomas at the May graduation in the Tucker Center, complete with all the traditional pomp and circumstance, senior outfielder Robby Stahl and seven of his graduating teammates were shuffling through the lobby brunch at the Airport Hilton in Miami. A win over the rival Hurricanes the night before only added to the pressure of Game Two, that loomed just a few hours away. Robby’s mother, Kathy, thought it was a shame the baseball players would not be a part of the ceremonies and made a call to FSU’s academic services to see if anything could be done. The wheels started turning immediately and rolled all the way across campus where an enthusiastic President Eric Barron could not have agreed more. So on Saturday, May 7, just prior to the game against Central Florida, Dr. Barron donned full academic regalia, walked to the first base line and looked into an eager dugout filled with the FSU team. He gracefully lined up eight diplomas and, sparing none of the traditions of the ceremony and in front of a delighted crowd, the president conferred degrees on Daniel Bennett (Criminology), Tyler Everett (Finance), Rafael Lopez (double major Interdisciplinary

(Clockwise from top) Seniors Daniel Bennett, Stuart Tapley, Tyler Everett, Rafael Lopez, Robby Stahl, Robby Scott, Jack Posey and Mike McGee prepare to have their degrees conferred by President Barron in front of their Seminole family; The players put a new spin on the traditional cap and gown; President Barron confers degrees on the eight seniors on the field during a pregame ceremony; Although an unconventional graduation none of the pomp and circumstance was missing; Seniors and their families had the opportunity to take pre-ceremony pictures with President Barron. Shown here is the Everett family.

Social Science and Political Science), Mike McGee (double major in Political Science and Economics), Jack Posey (Interdisciplinary Social Science), Robby Scott (Sociology), Robby Stahl (General Human Sciences) and Stuart Tapley (Finance), all of whom had represented Florida State University well in Miami by winning two-of-three against the ’Canes. SB

“I saw all the parents, and grandparents, three generations all get their pictures taken with the graduates. Cap and gown, baseball uniform underneath the gown, that was just fun. I love this baseball team, they’re good students, they work hard, and they play well. So Molly and I have really enjoyed watching as many games as we can, so to go out on the field and stand there with those seniors was just great.” — President Eric Barron “I’m just very proud of each and every one of our players, but to see them graduate on the field, with their caps on, switching the tassels, it was just a big moment for me. This is what baseball at Florida State has always been about: it’s academics first and baseball second. These young men are a credit to their families and this great institution.” — Head Coach Mike Martin “I didn’t expect all that, because they told us a while ago that we were going to have something. But they had him (President Barron) out there, we moved the tassels over, so it was official and really neat. I’m really happy that we got to do that. It’s awesome and it really was a great thing. I really enjoyed it and hopefully they’ll start doing this ceremony every year, because it means a lot to the seniors and it just means a lot to get recognized.” — Senior Mike McGee “Nine guys to share the experience with, you couldn’t ask for anything better. And with President Barron talking about how good we were in academics as well as on the field, it just shows you how dedicated we are in the classroom.” — Senior Pitcher Daniel Bennett

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florida state university athletics

Quarterly Report Track Team Competes for Another National Championship

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Q U A R T E R LY R E P O R T 2011

(Above) Senior Katherine Adham landed on the All-ACC Academic Team for the 3rd time. (Right) Senior Mike Neubacher earned his first career top 16 finish at the NCAA Championships.

Excellence in the Classroom and in the Water Swimming & Diving

photos by fsu sports info, Ross Obley & Mike olivella

14 On All-ACC Academic Team

A record 14 Florida State swimmers and divers were named to the 2011 All-ACC Academic team by Atlantic Coast Conference Commissioner John Swofford. The Seminoles tied both North Carolina and Virginia for the most student-athletes to earn a spot on the team. “I’m excited about putting 14 kids on the All-ACC Academic Team,” Head Coach Neil Harper said. “All of these swimmers and divers competed great throughout the year, but also demonstrated that they can get it done in the classroom. We pride ourselves on

working hard in both the classroom and the pool, and I’m excited for this group to be recognized for their hard work.” To be eligible for All-ACC Academic Team consideration, a student-athlete must have earned a 3.0 grade point average for the previous semester and maintained a 3.0 cumulative average during his or her academic career. For the second consecutive year, the Seminole women landed eighth on the All-ACC Academic team. Senior Katherine Adham; juniors Lisi Rowland, Jessica Sabotin and Stephanie Sarandos; sophomore Kristine Polley; and freshmen Kelsey Goodman, Julia Henkel and Tiffany Oliver all made the squad. Adham was one of five women to earn a spot

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on the team for the third time. Polley, Rowland, Sabotin and Sarandos have all made the team twice. The eight total selections place FSU third behind Virginia and North Carolina, which both had nine. The Seminole men placed a record six student-athletes on the All-ACC Academic team. Junior Mike Neubacher; sophomores Nick Klein, Brad Morrison and Mark Weber; and freshmen Tom Neubacher and Tyler Sell all made the squad. This is the second consecutive year Klein has made the team, while Mike Neubacher is one of 16 All-ACC winners to earn a spot on the squad. The Seminoles were second to only Virginia Tech, which earned nine selections.

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2011 Q U A R T E R LY R E P O R T

Michael Putman, Amy Harris, Kim Williams and Ngoni Makusha led the Seminole Track and Field team on another NCAA Championship run.

track and field

Making Another Championship Run The Florida State track and field teams — under head coach Bob Braman’s watch — have once again experienced a terrific outdoor season. With the NCAA Championships set to begin on June 8 in Des Moines, Iowa, both men’s and women’s squads have positioned themselves to compete for a national title. After seeing their Atlantic Coast Conference Indoor Championships streak come to an end earlier this year, the men’s team was focused on not permitting the same fate to befall them at the annual league outdoor championships. In action at Wade Wallace Stadium in Durham, N.C., the Seminole men rode the performances of thrower Michael Putman, do-it-all athlete Ngoni Makusha and the team of sprinters to their staggering seventh consecutive ACC Outdoor Track & Field Championship. While Putman and sprinter Maurice Mitchell earned men’s MVP honors in the field and track events, respectively, it was Makusha who arguably stole the show. The junior, known as one of the world’s best jumpers, not only won a title in the triple jump and long jump but also ran away with a conference crown in the 100-meter dash. Makusha unleashed a personal record time of 9.97 in the race, which is the nation’s best non-wind-aided mark this year. Makusha was one of seven FSU men to earn league titles and was one of three Florida State student-athletes to achieve more than one title, joining Mitchell (200-meter dash, 400-meter relay) and Ciaran O’Lionaird (1500-meter run and 5000-meter run). As for the women, the Seminoles earned a more than respectable runner-up finish at the ACC Outdoor Championships, trailing only heavy favorite Clemson on the final podium. Paced by senior Kim Williams, who earned her fourth consecutive ACC title in the triple jump, the ‘Noles had four total individual championships over the course of the three-day event.

Vahid Mirzadeh

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Q U A R T E R LY R E P O R T 2011

Women’s Tennis ‘Noles Ranked No. 12

Connor Smith

Men’s Tennis

‘Noles Make 9th Consecutive NCAA Appearance The No. 47 Florida State men’s tennis team was selected to the 2011 Division I Tennis Championships for the ninth consecutive year, and for the third time in his career, senior Vahid Mirzadeh, from Wellington, will compete in the tournament. “We are really excited to be in the individual tournament,” said teammate Connor Smith, a sophomore from Tampa. “It’s a great opportunity and we have been working hard every day. Hopefully, we can get out there and make a run.” “It’s a good honor to be making the individuals in singles and doubles with Connor,” said Mirzadeh. “I’m looking forward to the opportunity.” The team has had Mirzadeh ranked all season long, including a careerhigh No. 21. Mirzadeh was named to the All-ACC team, is currently ranked No. 25 in the nation and received an at-large selection in singles. In doubles play, he and Smith received an at-large selection after being ranked by the ITA as the No. 13 duo in the nation. Mirzadeh competed in doubles with former Seminole Jean-Yves Aubone in the 2009 championship and in the singles draw last year. Mirzadeh and Smith were named as doubles alternatives last year but did not play. “We’re excited about making the tournament and getting in the postseason,” said Head Coach Dwayne Hultquist. “We know we’ve got a tough go ahead of us.” Check with www.seminoles.com for tournament results.

Coming off an impressive showing at the Atlantic Coast Conference Championship by making their second ACC Championship title match appearance and fourth consecutive semifinal appearance, the No. 12 ranked Florida State women’s tennis team (15-8, 10-5 ACC) made their fifth straight appearance in the NCAA Championships in May. “We knew it was a possibility that we wouldn’t host even though we had earned our way into the Top 16 in the rankings,” said Head Coach Jennifer Hyde. “Our region and the southeastern portion of the country are so strong, with many teams who are also inside the Top 16 and capable of hosting.” I think this team believes, probably more now than ever, that we can beat anyone we step on court with,” said Hyde before the championship event. “We might have struggled with that belief earlier in the season, but I think having come from being ranked as low as No. 37 in the nation … to within a point of winning an ACC Championship (a few weeks later) … this team feels like they are capable of anything. And now we have an even greater cause after being denied the right to host. We will be ready to get to Texas and get this NCAA Championship started.” Overall, this marks the Seminole’s 15th alltime NCAA appearance. Florida State looked to utilize No. 31 Katie Rybakova from Coral Springs and No. 51 Noemie Scharle of Colmar-Berg, Luxembourg. If successful in rolling past the Jaguars, FSU will make its fifth all-time appearance in the second round of the tournament. A league record-tying nine Atlantic Coast Conference teams, including seven of the 16 national seeds, will participate in the 2011 NCAA Women’s Tennis Championship. The Seminoles’ tough schedule this season will prepare the squad to face elite competition in the tournament. In total, FSU has defeated 11 opponents currently ranked by the ITA including No. 3 Duke (twice), No. 4 North Carolina, No. 11 Virginia (twice), No. 16 Georgia Tech, No. 33 Maryland, No. 46 Boston College, No. 50 Princeton, No. 55 Georgia State, No. 58 Virginia Tech, No. 59 Wake Forest (twice) and No. 64 Florida International.

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Katie Rybakova (top) is currently ranked No. 31 and teammate Noemie Scharle No. 51.

“This gives us a little extra fire in our bellies and a little chip on our shoulders for not being selected to host these first two rounds of the NCAA Championships,” Hyde said. “This team has more than earned that right, but obviously there was a different plan for us. As we sit back and take a more objective look at the big picture, we see that this is the path we are on now, and the matches in front of us will be dealt with one day at a time.” Seminole fans can see the team on Facebook on the Florida State women’s tennis fan page and Twitter @FSU_WTennis. SB

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EJ MANUEL, from page 41

It helped that Ward had heard about Manuel’s potential and reached out that first year. Ward explained that even he couldn’t get on the field until his redshirt junior season. “I told him, ‘You can do everything you need to in two years,’” Ward said. “He’s had to be patient. In our day and time, that’s a lost art, especially in college sports where everyone wants it now, now, now.” Manuel said he never considered transferring — “I believed God had a plan for me here and I’d see it in his time” — and his teammates say they never knew he was frustrated. He celebrated with Ponder after the guy keeping him on the bench tossed a touchdown pass. Manuel gets a lot of respect from the other players, Reed said, for the way he handled the waiting game.

Fisher reassured Manuel, too, telling him that while someone with his talent could’ve played immediately in a simplistic offense, Manuel was being prepped to run a complex scheme that would ultimately help him get to the next level. Reminded again of the bigger picture, Manuel prepared every week for the last two seasons as if he was going to play. “A lot of people sit around and talk and complain about not getting what they deserve, and then when they get a chance, they’re not ready,” Ward said. “That was always my message to him: Be ready.” That paid off when Ponder suffered significant injuries in 2009 and 2010, forcing Manuel into action in key moments. He started six games over the past two years, including a surprise nod in last season’s ACC championship game against Virginia Tech. Manuel played well in that game, a Seminoles loss, and led FSU to victories over West Virginia in the 2010 Gator Bowl and South Carolina in the Chick-fil-A Bowl six months ago. Manuel has completed 67.3 percent of his passes, thrown for 1,678 yards, rushed for 366 yards and accounted for nine touchdowns, inspiring confidence in what lies ahead. “I’ve played in some big games,” he said. “I played against Florida. They beat us badly, but when they were the No. 1 team in the country, I was a freshman playing in The Swamp. That’s stuff you need to get used to. We’ll go there this season and it

NEW SEASON TICKET HOLDERS from page 73 Larry Hatcher Richard Hawthorne Marvin & Marie Hayag Jordan Hayes Kenneth Hayes Phillip Hayes Ryan Hayes Shirley Hays Dennis Head John P. Hearn Russell Hearn Michael Heim Jessica Henry Robert & Teri Henry Jon Hernan Joseph R. Hernandez

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won’t faze me at all.” That big picture is coming into focus. With Ponder gone, Manuel seized the starting job this spring. Having tweaked his throwing motion to improve accuracy and power, and to alleviate shoulder problems that required surgery last spring, Manuel has reportedly been throwing darts. Members of Florida State’s highly regarded secondary marvel that Manuel forces them to make an exceptional play just to get their hands on a pass. The consensus: He’s ready. “He trusted me,” Fisher said. “There’s not many guys mature enough to do that. The way he handled it demonstrates that he can think long term. I told him: If you start a 100-meter dash and you’re ahead after the first 10 meters, what’s that mean? Nothing. At the halfway point? Nothing. “He’s starting the home stretch and that’s where he’s going to pull away.” Along with “be ready,” Ward had another, bolder piece of advice — not unrelated to the first tenet in his mind — for Manuel: Don’t get a girlfriend. “Girls only ever got me in trouble,” he said. “And they take away time you could be spending in the film room, making yourself a better player.” So Manuel, a handsome, 21-year-old budding star on a college campus teeming with young ladies, remains single. He said he doesn’t drink alcohol either, and teammates confirm that Manuel sips water during nights out on the town.

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“Alcohol isn’t going to get me where I want to be,” he said. “You need to take care of your body, because your body is going to get you where you want to be. You just don’t want to block your blessing by doing something that you really shouldn’t be.”

Kevin Jackson William Rodriguez Kathleen Jacob Tracie Rodriguez-Pitre Jeremy Jacobs Branden Roe Martin Jaffee Bryan Rogers Paul & Diane Jamesson Jeff Rogers James Jarmolowski Jeff Rogers Tim D. Jarrell Kyle Rogers Jason Marshall Lee Rogers Joshua Jenkins Jamie Rogerson Robert Jensen Tom Rogerson

Manuel, it seems, has always been thinking about the bigger picture. He keeps it in mind when he’s in public and when he’s on social networks. While many of his contemporaries litter their Facebook or Twitter pages with profanity and unflattering revelations, Manuel’s are squeaky clean. His recent tweets include: God’s good. Can’t stand seeing a man not open the door for a woman. My dad’s my best friend. When Manuel sees trash on a teammate’s page, he gently encourages him to clean it up. “By no means am I perfect, but I represent a lot of people, and I want to represent them the right way,” he said. “People are watching you, and they’ll make a judgment about you from what you say. Perception is really everything.” Which begs the question: Is Manuel too good to be true? A cynic could trot out countless cases of athletes who convinced the world they were wholesome characters, role models, only to yank the rug out from under their fans when a seedier side finally became public. Count Zeigler, the FSU professor, among the skeptics. “Athletes today are the worst,” he said. “And I’ve had a couple guys like that, kids who portrayed themselves as King Christian, the real deal. Then you get them in class and they’re worthless. “But that’s not this guy. I’m sure he’ll

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make a mistake in his life, but I have a hard time thinking he’ll ever let anyone down.” Similarly, Manuel is realistic about his immediate football future. He knows he’ll make mistakes — Ward reminded him that he threw 17 interceptions his first season as the starter — but in the end, he hopes to live up to the hype and hope. Manuel had a rough day in Florida State’s spring game last weekend. Playing behind a line depleted by injuries, he was sacked six times and was under duress on many of his 36 passes. Manuel completed only 17 of them, although one was a long touchdown, and threw two interceptions. Yet, Fisher came away impressed. With his team down 19-17 with 35 seconds left, Manuel in rapid succession completed passes of 18, 41 and 9 yards — the last going to a receiver who was stopped just short of the goal line as time expired. “That’s what great players do. They can play bad all day ... but they get the ball at the end of the game and they find a way to make a play,” Fisher said. “Even when he knows he’s against a stacked deck, it doesn’t matter to him. We’re in great hands.” How good, then, can Manuel be? In what seemed like a competition to see who could fawn over the guy the most, Ward saved the best for last. “He could win a Heisman,” he said. If that doesn’t work out, there’s always mayor of Tallahassee. SB

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Certified Pre-Owned BMW

capital-bmw.com 850-241-1385

The Ultimate Driving Machine®

PRISTINE CONDITION, AMAZING PROTECTION PLAN, GREAT VALUE. AND OH YEAH, IT’S A BMW. Sure, every Certified Pre-Owned BMW is rigorously inspected, backed by an up to 6 year/100,000 mile Protection Plan and is one of the smartest buys on the road today. But first, it’s a legendary BMW- a drive like no other. So before you consider a new car from a lesser brand, stop by Capital BMW and experience all the joys of a Certified Pre-Owned BMW.

850.241.1385 The Better Way To Buy

capital-bmw.com

3701 W. Tennessee St. Tallahassee, FL 32304

*Protection Plan provides coverage for two years or 50,000 miles (whichever comes first) from the date of the expiration of the 4-year/50,000-mile BMW New Vehicle Limited Warranty. Roadside Assistance provides coverage for two years (unlimited miles) from the date of the expiration of the 4-year/unlimited-miles New Vehicle Roadside Assistance Plan. See Capital BMW for details and vehicle availablity. For more information, call 1-800-334-4BMW or visit bmwusa.com. ©2010 BMW of North America, LLC. The BMW name, model names and logo are registered trademarks


2011 Unconquered Summer Edition