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S E M I N O L E B O O S T E R S M AG A Z I N E

FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY

SPRING 2010

PASSING the TORCH OUR SPECIAL 16-PAGE SALUTE TO HALL OF FAME COACH BOBBY BOWDEN PLUS AN INSIDER LOOK AT THE 2010 COACHES AND RECRUITING CLASS

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BASKETBALL: Historic levels of success for men, women

BASEBALL: Brothers, sons carry on family tradition

PRESIDENT: Seminole alum Barron returns to take helm


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Unconquered magazine (USPS 18182) is published quarterly by Seminole Boosters, Inc., 225 University Center, Suite 5100, Tallahassee, Florida, 32306. (850) 644-3484, Fax: (850) 222-5929. POSTMASTER: send change of address to, Unconquered magazine, care of Seminole Boosters, 225 University Center, Suite 5100, Tallahassee, Florida, 32306. Periodicals Postage Paid at Tallahassee, FL, Volume 27, Issue 1. All advertising revenues directly support programs of the Seminole Boosters, Inc. For advertising rates, please contact the sales representatives listed below. © 2009, Seminole Boosters, Inc. All rights reserved. Opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Florida State University faculty, staff or administration. Overview Unconquered magazine celebrates Seminole athletics and the indomitable spirit of its student-athletes who overcome adversity, the passion of its coaches and educators who help students reach beyond their limits, and the devotion of donors who redefine the boundaries of generosity by giving scholarships that change lives and who make donations that build first-class athletic facilities. By sharing their stories of transformational experiences — on the athletic playing field, in the classroom and in life — Unconquered magazine encourages the growth of responsible world citizenship and cross-cultural understanding. Each issue carries stories on what makes student-athletes great and how they were shaped by their experience at FSU, features on Seminole Nation sports legends and profiles of donors who make contributions.

2009–2010 EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

STEVE BROWN

BRIAN SWAIN

SCOTT ROIX

BRUCE HARRELL

BOB CATON

RUSS MORCOM

MORRIS MILLER

LEE HINKLE

RANDY SPETMAN

ANDY MILLER

GENE READY

Philip Griffitts

JOE BECKHAM

Chairman

Past Chairman

Chairman-Elect

Booster Attorney

Secretary

Treasurer

VP for University Relations

Immediate Past Chair

Athletic Director

Seminole Boosters President

Contact Send correspondence to Derril Bleakley, at the address shown above, or by e-mail to dbleakley@fsu.edu. Telephone: (850) 645-7330. Magazine Staff Publishers: Andy Miller, Jerry Kutz Managing editor: Derril Bleakley Design, layout, production, pre-press: Rowland Publishing, Inc.

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At-Large Member

Photo editors: Derril Bleakley, Rowland Publishing, Inc.

Chairman, Athletics Committee

Featured photographers: Mike Olivella, Ross Obley Contributing photographers: FSU Photo Lab, Russell Grace, FSU Sports Info Staff writers: Charlie Barnes, Him Henry, Jerry Kutz Contributing writers: Rob Wilson, Don Yaeger, John Lata Copy editors: Jerry Kutz, Rowland Publishing, Inc. Magazine Intern: Chelsea Brint

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Photo purchasing information: Mike Olivella photos: www.seminoles.com Ross Obley photos: www.seminoles.com Russell Grace photos: www.russellgraceimages.com

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Derril Bleakley Managing Editor, Advertising, Student Boosters Director

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Seminole Boosters, Inc. EXECUTIVE STAFF Andy Miller President and CEO Charlie Barnes Executive Director Senior Vice President Joel Padgett Senior Vice President Gift Planning Director Tom Carlson Senior Vice President Jerry Kutz Vice President of Marketing and Communications Drew Weatherford Director Cindee Lundeen, PhD Director

Rachel Catalano Special Events, Executive Assistant to Andy Miller Sarah Reed Executive Assistant, Coaches Clubs Director Mary Bailey Executive Assistant to Jerry Kutz, Stewardship

ASSISTANTS TO EXECUTIVE STAFF AND DIRECTORS Mary Pat Desloge Senior Executive Assistant to Andy Miller

Jeff Chamlis Gift Entry Mickey Clickner Data Entry Lauren Cloer Data Entry

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DONOR RECORDS

Marcia Etheridge Executive Assistant to Tom Carlson, Charlie Barnes

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2009–2010 BOARD OF DIRECTORS

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President of The Florida State University

FSU VARSITY CLUB Betsy Hosey Director

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Recruit a ’Nole to join Seminole Boosters or buy season tickets and receive a 9 x 12 personalized photo

Message from Coach and Christian Ponder

Receive Your 9 x 12 Personalized Photo

Coach Jimbo Fisher and QB Christian Ponder have a special message for you. Please visit www.myseminolesunite.com fill in your name and information and start the interactive football experience.

Send your fellow Nole who should become a Seminole Booster or season ticket holder a special video message from Coach Jimbo Fisher and QB Christian Ponder and you’ll receive a $29.99 coupon to the FSU Photo Store for your effort.

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CO N T E N T S

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Booster Life 5 Board of Directors 14 Booster Life 20 Football Season Tickets 70 Fan Photos 72 Welcome New Members Columnists 8 Jerry kutz honors Bowden, Celebrates Fisher 18 Don yaeger Faith is Central 60 Jerry kutz Makes the Ask

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Report 11 Golden Noles 20 Reasons to Buy Season Tickets 22 Planned Giving 38 Football Recruiting 50 Endowments 52 Meet Eric Barron, President of FSU 56 Annual Fundraising Report 66 Jimbo Fisher Tour 68 Student Boosters 72 Compliance 74 Quarterly Report Features 24 MEN’S AND WOMEN’S BASkETBALL Teams reach NCAA tournament.

30 SEMINOLE BASEBALL A family affair.

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36 FIShER ERA BEGINS The coming of Jimbo.

42 FOOTBALL Meet FSU’s 2010 offensive and defensive coaching staff

54 SEMINOLE PRODUCTIONS

PhOTOS By FSU SPORTS INFO & MIkE OLIVELLA

58 VOLUNTEERISM

Special Feature CELEBRATING COACh BOBBy BOWDEN Paying tribute to a true legend. (Special insert after page 33)

On the cover: A historic moment: Gator Bowl post-game locker room. Bobby Bowden thanked his team and then said, “Let me introduce you to the next head coach at Florida State.” Photo by Glenn Beil, Tallahassee Democrat.

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Football

Program C

In Transition

A Matter of Time By Jerry Kutz

ompetition is a wonderful thing and college football is both — competitive and wonderful. The game takes the measure of two teams and, with rule changes demanding that no game end in a tie, only one team can prevail. The victor must have a better game plan, better conditioning, better players and/or better coaches. For many years, Florida State had the best of all of it and enjoyed unprecedented success. But no one can stop the hands of time. So we now find ourselves in an inevitable period of transition, a period we anticipated, prepared for … and now embrace. At Florida State University, two-thirds of our alumni have one thing in common: They attended FSU while Bobby Bowden was our beloved head coach. Bobby Bowden became the history and the tradition of our university and became our most visible spokesman. He changed everything and he made it great. So it is OK, Seminole fans, to honor Bowden — as we do in this issue — while at the same time celebrating the dawn of the Jimbo Fisher era. Thanks to the success of the Bowden era and visionary leaders, Florida State was prepared for the day when we would need to attract a young and energetic head coach to succeed our hero. And Jimbo Fisher is that guy. Sure, I have conflicting emotions. I had hoped for a fairy tale finish and a seamless transition. Perhaps you did, too. I love Coach Bowden and yet I am thrilled by the energy Jimbo Fisher and his staff are bringing to our football program and the hope he creates in our fan base.

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Jimbo is the one guy any Bowden fan would want to step into Bowden’s shoes and take hold of the FSU football program. He’s the perfect guy for a number of reasons, not the least of which is he is a good coach. But first let’s examine the intangibles, the feel-good stuff. Fisher is an over-the-top, passionate, paint-your-face-and-cheer-loud, Florida State Seminoles fan. Just like you. He loves this place and has since the days he wore a FSU ball cap while quarterbacking Salem College. He loves the

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collegiate gothic architectural style of our campus. He knows and loves our history and traditions. He loves what football means to this town. In fact, he could have been head coach at a number of schools two years ago and then again last year. But he turned them down. Because there is nowhere else he wanted to be. Let that sink in... Fisher came here as offensive coordinator because of Bobby Bowden. And he’s been patiently waiting for this chance for


Football

Photos by Mike Olivella and Seminole Boosters

(Opposite) Fisher enjoys a laugh with his hero upon whose legacy — and example — he will build his program. (Above) Fisher with ACC official Jack Childress. (Right) Addressing the offense during the game versus Wake Forest.

three years, always saying the right things when baited by the media or by fans. He turned down head coaching offers and high pay to be with Bowden. He, like many of us, idolizes Bowden. Bobby is our hero and he’s Jimbo’s hero too. Jimbo has looked up to Bowden forever. These last three years were just a bonus. He started his football career as a kid in West Virginia admiring Bowden. Later, when playing quarterback for Terry Bowden, he learned the Bowden offense and had the opportunity to travel to Tallahassee to study film with the man himself. As Fisher walked into the Gator Bowl, a few steps behind his champion, he wept. What a way to honor the great legacy and traditions of Bowden. A hand-picked disciple will carry out the mission. Jimbo is a man who represents everything that is great and that we love about Bowden. He’s a man of great faith and with high regard to principles, able to put life into proper perspective. He’s a family man. He adores his wife Candi and their two sons, Trey and Ethan.

And who did he learn a lot of this from? Exactly. His hero Bobby Bowden. And very notably, Fisher is also a damn good football coach. He understands the game and how it has changed. He understands how culture, and therefore the modern student-athlete, has changed.

So it is OK, Seminole fans, to honor Bowden — as we do in this issue — while at the same time celebrating the dawn of the Jimbo Fisher era. And having served 14 years in the competitive Southeastern Conference, including a national-championship stint with Nick Saban, he understands exactly what it takes to achieve success. Some people questioned the transition plan put in place a few years ago, but that plan may prove to be ingenious as it gave Fisher a running head start on understand-

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ing all of the Seminoles’ current strengths and weaknesses before having to take the reins. It also allowed him to begin to fix some of the issues on the offensive side of the ball where we have seen dramatic improvement the past two years. Coach Bowden is loved and will always be loved. He will also always be busy doing the things he has always been called to do: reaching out to people and sharing his faith. He is busy traveling the country speaking at college campuses, Fellowship of Christian Athletes events, business conventions, motivational concerts and churches. He is happy spreading the gospel and evangelizing and, come fall, he will be Jimbo’s and FSU’s greatest fan. Let’s continue to build on the Bowden legacy by lining up behind his successor Jimbo Fisher. Let’s let Jimbo know we are with him, believe in him and trust him. And that we are excited about all the possibilities the future holds. Let’s start making new great memories. Let’s take Doak back. Let’s cheer loud and play hard. Go Noles! SB

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T

he University Center Club is the premier private club serving Florida State University, Tallahassee and friends of the community. Since its establishment in 1996, the Club has offered Members and guests outstanding cuisine while enjoying spectacular views of downtown Tallahassee and Doak Campbell Stadium. The Club features à la carte dining in the Osceola Grill and six exquisitely appointed private meeting/dining rooms along with an 8,000 square foot ballroom. When you combine this magnificent facility with our expert staff you have Tallahassee’s Premier Private Club!

To learn more about membership, game day benefits, or hosting an event, please contact our Membership team today! Melinda Baker can be reached at (850) 644-6522 or melinda.baker@ourclub.com Cherrie Barbree can be reached at (850) 644-9089 or cherrie.barbree@ourclub.com 10

University Doak Campbell Stadium | Tallahassee, SP R IN G 201Center 0 U|NCONQU E R E D M AGA ZINE SEMINO LE-BOFL OST32306 ERS .CO|M(850) 644-8528 | www.UniversityCenterClub.com


Community Outreach

Road To The Golden Nole Service in the community makes a difference By JOHN LAtA, PH.D.

PhOTO By FSU STUDENT SERVICES

FOr tHe LASt 15 yeArS, Seminole student-athletes,

FSU football player Shawn Powell participates in reading and mentoring programs at local elementary schools.

along with coaches and staff, have convened at the annual Golden Nole Awards Banquet to recognize teams and individuals for community service involvement, leadership and athletic excellence. There are many awards presented, including the ACC Top Six for Service and the Athletic Director’s Cup for Service Awards. According to Randy Spetman, FSU Athletics Director, “The Golden Nole is an extraordinary event where we get to honor those student athletes and teams that have gone above and beyond in serving our community. The selfless efforts of these individuals illustrate the tremendous positive character we have within our student-athletes. We like to take this opportunity as staff, coaches and supporters to thank all the student-athletes who give their free time to make this a great program.” Each FSU head coach selects one student-athlete to receive the Golden Nole Award, which is presented to the person who best represents the qualities of athletic and academic excellence, leadership, service and being a role model. It’s a difficult process for the coach to select just one, but that’s a great problem to have. Yashiva Edwards, assistant director of Student Service feels that, “Although each sports team hosts their own awards banquet, the Golden Nole is different in that the entire athletics department has the opportunity to be a part of the recognition. Their friends from all of our 19 sports get to share this moment with them and that makes it more memorable.” The ACC Top Six for Service recipients are selected throughout the year for something unique that distinguishes them as top performers in Florida State University’s community service program. These select student-athletes made significant contributions to the community and are positive ambassadors for FSU. Three males and three females, all from different sports teams, are chosen.

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Community Outreach

2009 winners (left to right): Shawn Erickson (Men’s Swimming) Sara Young (Women’s Golf) Melanie Cabassol (Women’s Diving) Javier Cruz (Men’s Cross Country) Keyla Smith (Women’s Track)

(Top)The Golden Nole Banquet held in the Oglesby Student Union at FSU. (Middle) The women’s golf team, with Athletic Director Randy Spetman, received the Athletic Director’s Cup for service in 2009. (Bottom) FSU sprinter Charles Clark was awarded the Golden Nole, representing track & field’s service efforts.

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These six individuals amassed more than 300 hours of service as a group and though they participated in many events, they were definite favorites at the many local elementary schools the studentathletes visit on a daily basis. The Athletic Director’s Cup for Service Award is given each year to the one team that has performed the most community service hours per person. Women’s Golf won it last year for an amazing eighth time in a row, averaging more than 42 hours of service per person! This year however, Women’s Volleyball is giving them a run for their money. The FSU Athletics Department’s commitment of service to others is the foundation for a balanced student-athlete lifestyle and an opportunity to develop a lifelong commitment to volunteerism. Each year our student-athletes are challenged to provide service to our community and to individuals in need. Each year they answer that challenge by devoting thousands of hours of service to individuals, schools and organizations in Tallahassee and the surrounding area. For the 2009-2010 school year, the “We Can Make a Difference” community service initiative was implemented, challenging our student-athletes to complete at least 5,000 hours of service. More than 3,800 hours of community service are complete and this number will surely increase between now and April 12, 2010, the time of the Golden Nole Awards Banquet.

PhOTOS By RyALS LEE, FSU SPORTS INFO, FSU STUDENT SERVICES

Maurice Harris (Football)


Community Outreach

FSU student athletes volunteer at over 200 local charities and schools.

On any day of the week you can find many FSU student-athletes giving back to the community. Whether it’s mentoring at a local elementary school, setting up clothing or food drives, participating as a “buddy” with the Miracle League of Tallahassee or doing their part to “Keep Tallahassee Beautiful,” Seminole student-athletes are making a difference. Spetman had this to add: “Developing student athletes as ‘the whole person’ is extremely important to the athletics department at FSU, and that is why we are very proud of their participation in service to the community. Across all our sports, from freshmen to seniors, they donate thousands of hours of time in a wide array of activities, including reading, motivational speaking, cleanup and hospital visits, just to name a few. We are confident they will continue their efforts as they leave the university and become active members of the community. Their actions do not go unnoticed, and they do make a difference!” SB

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Booster Life

Booster Life 14

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Booster Life

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Booster Life

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Booster Life

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Opinion

FAITH IS A CENTERPIECE By DON yAeGer

T

here are a number of ties that bind the coaches in Florida State’s most highprofile sports: passion, energy … faith. The latter is a link not often discussed and one that wasn’t planned by those that hired them, but any conversation with FSU’s head baseball, men’s and women’s basketball and football coaches — both past and present — could just as easily slip into a recitation of scripture as it could game planning. Success and spirituality, of course, are well-known threads of the fabric of former Florida State Coach Bobby Bowden as they are with newly-named Head Coach Jimbo Fisher. “Faith is the most important thing in my life,” Fisher said. “You have to have a higher power to be able to (understand) things, and those strong beliefs are able to carry you through the tough times and also keep you grounded during the high times.” Nowhere in the United States is religious expression as diverse as in the southern states. It’s called the Bible Belt for good reason — the area is home to super congregations and to small storefront churches. Faith too is a common denominator among several FSU head coaches: Jimbo Fisher in football, Leonard Hamilton and Sue Semrau in basketball and Mike Martin in baseball. They empower and encourage student-athletes through their actions and challenge them to make good decisions. “(Many of my peers at FSU have faith) because they’ve had a good upbringing and been exposed to the Lord at a young age,” Fisher said. “But they understand — as all coaches do — that their sport is not the centerpiece of their life, and that God and their family are higher powers. It’s a reflection on the character of the coaches at our university, but it has been at most of the universities where I’ve been. “Whatever your faith is, we are in a part of the country where faith is so strong and God and family values are so important.” Seminole coaches and players over the years have participated in events sponsored by the Fellowship of Christian Athletes, the largest Christian sports

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organization in America. More than 1.4 million athletes and coaches from youth to professional levels have participated in annual events sponsored by the FCA. Semrau, the all-time winningest coach in FSU women’s basketball history, has often said she wants to inspire others by setting a good example — on and off the court. The 2008-09 season was one of the most successful in her 12-year career as the Seminoles reached the NCAA Tournament for a school-record fifth consecutive time and achieved the highest national rankings in program history at the time — No. 11 in the Associated Press and No. 12 in USA Today/ ESPN. Semrau and FSU carried that success into the 2009-10 season and were well on their way to a sixth straight NCAA Tournament appearance. By mid-February the No. 10 Seminoles had been ranked in the top-25 for a school-record 29 consecutive polls.

“Faith is the most important thing in my life. You have to have a higher power to be able to (understand) things, and those strong beliefs are able to carry you through the tough times and also keep you grounded during the high times.” JIMBO FISHER

An accomplished public speaker, Semrau is a very popular guest speaker in the community as well as with alumni groups from around the state of Florida. She serves on the board of directors for the Women’s Basketball Coaches Association and is also active as a volunteer with various ministries like the FCA. Her devotion is published on the FCA Web site: “It was through the influence of FCA

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Passion, Energy and Faith

PhOTOS By MIkE OLIVELLA AND ROSS OBLEy

Columnist DON yAeGer shares the number of ties that bind four FSU coaches

Sue Semrau (above) is an active volunteer with many ministries including Fellowship of Christian Athletes. Hamilton (right) has never lost sight of his No. 1 priority: the student-athlete. His number one goal is to help prepare his players for the challenges they will encounter in life. Education is key to that preparation. So is sharing his belief in God.

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Season Tickets

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Season Tickets

Be there for Seminole Football History in the Making SEVEN HOME GAMES ON THE SCHEDULE AND GREAT SEATS ARE STILL AVAILABLE BY FSU SPORTS INFORMATION

PHOTOS BY FSU PHOTO LAB AND FSU SPORTS INFO

F

lorida State will kickoff the 2010 football season under first-year coach Jimbo Fisher against Samford on Sept. 4, the first of seven home games on the Seminoles’ ambitious schedule. Home dates with Samford, Brigham Young, Wake Forest, Boston College, North Carolina, Clemson and Florida highlight the schedule. Florida State will also travel to Oklahoma on Sept. 11 and will play a Thursday night ESPN game at NC State on Oct. 28. “We have a great home schedule for the fans and there is no question it will rank among the most challenging in the country,” said FSU Director of Athletics Randy Spetman. “We do have three of our first four at home, but the first away game will be at Oklahoma. We try to minimize

Come to Tallahassee this fall and watch Jimbo Fisher and the Seminoles live! Tickets on sale now!

the consecutive home football weekends because we have a lot of fans who travel some distance to our games and in that respect we have just two back-to-back (home game) dates with BYU and Wake Forest in September and North Carolina and Clemson in November.” Seven of Florida State’s opponents participated in bowl games last season, including the Sooners, who will host the Seminoles for the first time since 1976. It marks only the second on-campus meeting between the schools, which have met four times in bowl games. Oklahoma, which leads the all-time series 4-1, will play in Tallahassee in 2011. The Seminoles will also host BYU for the first time in 2010 and will try and extend their winning streak against the Cougars to four games. FSU was a 54-28 winner over the seventh-ranked Cougars in Provo, Utah, last season. Fisher’s inaugural schedule begins with Samford, where he not only starred at quarterback as the 1987 Division III

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National Player of the Year but launched his coaching career in 1988. “The ironic thing about it is the first college game I ever played, I played against Samford,” said Fisher. “The last college game I played, I played for them. And the first game I coached, I coached for them. Now my first job as a head coach, I get to coach against them.” Coastal Division foe Virginia returns to the schedule for the first time since 2006, replacing defending ACC champion Georgia Tech. The 2010 ACC Championship game moves to Charlotte, N.C., and will be played Dec. 4 at Bank of America Stadium. Season tickets are on sale through the ticket office by calling (888) FSU-NOLE or (850) 644-1830 and can also be purchased online at seminoles.com. Season tickets are $321 each, with family zone ($231) and young alumni ($208) packages available. All season tickets can be purchased on a payment plan, requiring 10% of the total cost up front with monthly payments through July. SB

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Planned Giving

The

MONK Never a “large” donor, Mike Meehan’s passion for FSU, and his legacy, was major. BY JOEL PADGETT

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It was almost kickoff. Pam Stevens, his long time girlfriend, knew the drill. He painted his game face, carefully selected his lucky clothes and secluded himself in his room for the next four hours. With the door firmly closed behind him, there were to be no phone calls, no knocks on the door and no casual conversation when his Seminoles took the field. This was game time for Mike Meehan.

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PHOTOS COURTESY THE MEEHAN FAMILY

GENEROUS


Planned Giving

Meehan family and friends in Jacksonville, Fla., for FSU vs. Colorado in 2008. (Left to right) Summer Wainwright, Mark Wainwright, Mike Meehan, Pam Stevens, Cindy Meehan, Michael Iafanti, Matt Meehan, Patti Phillips and Shawn Phillips.

Normally very reserved, Mike’s passion overflowed during Florida State games as he became very vocal about great plays, bad plays and the “occasional” bad call by a referee. Perhaps it was being a student during the pre-Bowden years of 1972-76 that chiseled Mike into an ardent fan of the garnet and gold. Perhaps it was the camaraderie that developed with his roommates, Mark Wainwright and Mark McLow, all from Jacksonville. Whatever it was, Mike became a Seminole Booster donor and bought football season tickets with his buddies. Other than family and work, Seminole football was his passion. Although never what you would term a “large” donor, Mike made most home games and went with his buddies to as many away games as possible. His friends called him the Monk, not because he was bald, portly, or wore a brown robe, scapular and hooded cowl, but because Mike was a painfully private person. Like a monk, though, he was most defined by his incredible and humble generosity. His Seminole family always took a back seat to the very most important thing to Mike — his family. His parents were from very modest means, so when Mike started to become a successful insurance manager with Liberty Mutual, he always made sure that he took care of parents and brothers. Never solicited, he would surprise them with new cars and condos and all the family, including nieces and nephews, were treated to family cruises.

But Mike’s generosity extended beyond his family to everyone whose life he touched. It is the first thing that anyone mentions about him. They were not always big gifts, but thoughtful gifts, like keeping up his neighbor’s yard until the neighbor had recovered from an illness. That unsolicited generosity is what brought Mike into my life several years ago. He e-mailed and said that he was thinking about making an estate gift. It was clear right away that Mike was a numbers guy. It showed in his understanding

We had long talks about the Seminole Boosters Scholarship endowment fund. He was curious about how and with whom we invested, and the amount that we needed to endow all of our scholarships. He researched other universities’ endowments and the rate that our costs were increasing. He understood how critical that endowment was to our long term success. of investments, tax consequences and advantages, as well as his unsurpassed memory of players’ names and stats, team stats and game scores. We had a very long talk that day, and I learned that doctors would not clear him to return to work after his third bout with an aggressive cancer. He never let his family know the severity of his disease. Mike had bounced back before, and anticipated that he would soon be back again. He was more

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concerned with his mother, who was also suffering from a serious illness. Mike and I became good phone and e-mail friends over the next year as we sorted out his gifting options with his attorney. He chose assets that would not be taxed to give to his family. They were his priority and he made sure that all of them would be taken care of. He chose to gift Seminole Boosters, Inc. a retirement plan that would be heavily taxed if he were to make family members beneficiaries. We had long talks about the Seminole Boosters Scholarship endowment fund. He was curious about how and with whom we invested, and the amount that we needed to endow all of our scholarships. He researched other universities’ endowments and the rate that our costs were increasing. He understood how critical that endowment was to our long term success. Mike truly understood the need. He was a numbers guy, you know. Unlike any other donor I have had, Mike would never accept an invitation to anything, never wanted anything. And when I visited Jacksonville and wanted to see him, he would refuse, telling me to spend my time on someone else. The Monk had spoken. Mike’s mother battled her disease until it took her last January. Friends say that Mike survived his cancer for so long because of his determination not to let his mother lose another son. Less than six months after his mother lost her battle, Mike lost his. We will have Mike’s remaining immediate family on the field during the 2010 football season to recognize Mike’s generosity. As a member of his Seminole family, cheer loud that day to let them know how special he was to us. The Monk would not like all the fuss but he knew that we would do it and hoped he would inspire others to do as he had done. We all miss him. SB

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FSU women’s basketball coasts through regular season, reaches NCAA Tournament BY JIM HENRY


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PHOTOS BY ROSS OBLEY

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et’s just go ahead and say it. Sue Semrau, in her 13th season in Tallahassee, has built the Florida State women’s basketball program into one with a solid pedigree, one that deserves mention with Atlantic Coast Conference heavyweights Duke, North Carolina and Maryland. The Seminoles won 26 games heading into the NCAA Tournament and reached as high as No. 6 in the national polls. They shared the Atlantic Coast Conference regular-season title. They won eight consecutive games to end the regular season, winning by an average margin of 10 points. And were playing, quite frankly, as well as any team not named Connecticut. “We want to do a lot more and I think that’s how you build programs,” Semrau said. FSU scaled near unprecedented heights in 2009-10. The Seminoles led the ACC in scoring offense as well as field goal percentage offense and three-point percentage. Their 40.3 percent success rate in treys was nearly 6 percent better than second-place North Carolina State and was third-best in the nation. Naturally, FSU had hopes of winning the program’s first ACC Tournament title. But those dreams were dashed in the quarterfinals by Boston College, in large part due to star senior forward Jacinta Monroe’s unfortunate injury. She sprained her right ankle less than four minutes into the game and didn’t return. Even so, the ACC tourney ending did little to diminish FSU’s overall success. The Seminoles hosted first and second round NCAA Tournament games in March. They received a program-best No. 3 seed last year, but after winning the opener against No. 14 seeded North Carolina A&T in Duluth, Ga., FSU was upset by No. 6 seeded Arizona State in the second round. FSU opened the 2009-10 season on a mission, winning its first 11, punctuated by a 101-point effort against Stetson. The Seminoles’ lone defeats during the regular

season were to DePaul, Miami, top-ranked Connecticut and Duke. After finishing with a second-straight share of the ACC regular season title, a pair of Seminoles garnered all-league honors — Monroe was named to the first team and junior guard Courtney Ward to the second team. Monroe, a Fort Lauderdale native, was the face of the program. She became the first Seminole to earn first team honors since Roneeka Hodges was tabbed first team in 2005. She averaged a team-high 13.4 points, 7.6 rebounds and 2.1 blocks per game heading into the NCAA Tournament. There’s more. Plenty more. Monroe also ranked ninth in scoring (13.4) in ACC games and second in rebounding (8.2 rpg). Her 51.1 field-goal percentage in conference games ranked among the top five in the ACC. Additionally, she was named to the ACC All-Defense Team, marking the second consecutive year she earned the honor. An inside-outside threat from the post, Monroe also turned in her fourth-consecutive 60 block season as she swatted away 64 shots during the regular season for an average of 2.1 blocks per game. The 2.1 average ranked Monroe No. 27 among the country’s top shot blockers. Munroe had pushed her school career mark to 289 heading into the postseason, and needed 11 more to become the sixth player in ACC history to reach the 300-block plateau. Her supporting cast was just as impressive. Ward was a second-team selection after averaging 11.0 points and a league-best 5.6 assists per game. Ward ranked second on the team in scoring and among the top 15 in the league as the junior guard came on late in the season. The Montgomery, Ala., native dished out 169 assists in the regular season, the third-most in school history, and ranked 15th in the country with her 5.6 per game average. Redshirt freshman Chasity Clayton 28>> Senior Captain Alysha Harvin (top and above) helped lead FSU women’s basketball to their second shared ACC regular-season title. The team also hosted the regional round of the NCAA tournament.

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(Above) The men’s team was recognized during a football game for their NCAA tournament appearance in 2009. (Left) Junior guard Derwin Kitchen averaged nine points per came during the regular season.

FSU Basketball The new standard in the ACC BY JIM HENRY

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uke traditionally serves as the Atlantic Coast Conference’s measuring stick in men’s basketball. Well, Florida State certainly has found itself in elite company the past two seasons. The Seminoles and head coach Leonard Hamilton made their second consecutive appearance in the NCAA Tournament in 2009-2010. It’s an upward trend that FSU wants to embrace and continue. Over the past two years, in fact, only one team (Duke) has more conference wins than FSU’s 20. Likewise, Duke is the only other ACC team with a winning record on the road during that span —- the Seminoles and the Blue Devils are both 9-7 over the last two years. Interestingly, FSU wasn’t highly thought of entering the season.

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Pointing to their youth, the Seminoles were selected to finish seventh in the media’s preseason ACC poll. Hamilton knew better, especially since he returned the majority of his key players from a team that competed in the NCAA Tournament for the first time since 1998 and won 25 games, tied for second most in school history. It mattered little to Hamilton that FSU had just one scholarship senior on its roster, Ryan Reid. FSU, which has won 10 ACC games in each of the last two seasons, finished third in the ACC standings and earned the No. 3 seed in the ACC Tournament in Greensboro, N.C. The Seminoles were in nice company. FSU and Duke are the only two teams to earn opening-round tourney byes the last two years. FSU, which also eclipsed the 20-win

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plateau for the second consecutive season, appears to be closer now to earning the kind of respect and recognition it deserves on the court. The Seminoles were applauded for their regular-season success. Sophomores Solomon Alabi and Chris Singleton were named to the All-ACC Third Team and the ACC All-Defensive team and freshman Michael Snaer was named to the ACC All-Rookie team in balloting conducted by the Atlantic Coast Sports Media Association. It marked the fifth consecutive and seventh season in eight years that at least one Seminole has earned All-ACC honors under Hamilton. Singleton, a sophomore from Dunwoody, Ga., captured a prestigious individual honor, one that actually reflected


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STATS & FACTS WINNING WAYS With its 10-6 record in ACC play during the 2009-10 season, FSU has won more games in the last four seasons in ACC play (34) than it did in the first four years (23) of the Leonard Hamilton era at FSU. Under Hamilton, the Seminoles have annually won at least seven ACC games in a school record five consecutive seasons.

DEE-FENSE! DEE-FENSE!

PHOTOS BY MIKE OLIVELLA

FSU finished the regular season as the ACC leader in scoring defense (60.2 points per game). The average was the lowest in school history since the 3-point line and shot clock were instituted in college basketball in the 1980s. Three of the best scoring defense

teams in FSU history have come under head coach Leonard Hamilton.

SENIOR CELEBRATION Senior captain Ryan Reid played in 124 career games heading into the ACC and NCAA tournaments. Reid, of Lauderdale Lakes, was known for his physical toughness inside. He played on four consecutive FSU teams that appeared in postseason tournaments.

POLL WATCHING The Seminoles were ranked in four different Associated Press polls in 2009-2010 — No. 21 (Nov.30), No. 22 (Dec. 28), No. 18 (Jan. 4) and No. 25 (Jan. 11).

BY THE NUMBERS 7

FSU went 7-2 in ACC games decided by seven points or less.

12

The Seminoles out-rebounded 12 of their 16 ACC opponents.

66

FSU held 66 consecutive opponents under 50 percent shooting from the field and entered the ACC Tournament as the nation’s top-ranked field goal percentage defense team.

69.3

Points per game

.649

Free throw percentage

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Points per game for Solomon Alabi, FSU’s scoring leader this season

the Seminoles’ blue-collar approach, when he was named the conference’s Defensive Player of the Year. Singleton entered the postseason ranked first in the ACC in steals (2.3 spg), fifth in blocked shots (1.7 bpg) and 11th in rebounding (7.2 rpg). He was also looking to become only the fifth player to ACC history to finish in the top five in both steals and blocks in the same season. FSU put together an early seven-game win streak in December and early January to set the season’s tone. The Seminoles stayed around .500 in ACC play before a strong finish vaulted them near the top of the league standings. FSU ended the regular season with five victories in its last six games and placed behind Duke and Maryland in the league standings. The Seminoles were a sum of their parts. Eight different players had starts and nine averaged double digits in minutes played. Unlike a year ago, however, when guard Toney Douglas led the Seminoles in 28>>

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Jim Henry, from page 27

(Above) First team all-ACC post player Jacinta Monroe blocked 64 shots. (Left) Senior Captain Angel Gray.

Jim Henry, from page 25

became the fourth FSU player in the last five years to be named to the ACC AllFreshman team. Clayton started 12 of her 30 games played this season and finished the regular season fifth on the team in scoring (8.1 ppg) and second on the team in rebounding (5.3 rpg). The Alexandria, Va., native joined Cierra Bravard (2009), Jacinta Monroe (2007) and Britany Miller (2006) as Seminoles who have earned the honor in the last five years. In ACC games, the 6-0 forward ranked fourth among ACC freshmen in both scoring (8.5 ppg) and rebounding (5.7 rgp). After a blowout defeat by Duke in late January, Semrau said her team made the

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commitment to try to do something special this season. “That was the turning point from having a good season to the ability to have a great season,” Semrau said. “We were all stunned at how we played at Duke and for them to take that and really work through the feelings of it (was important). There’s a lot of teams that I’ve had in the past, teams that will not allow that pain to penetrate, to numb that pain and to go in and have the same issues you had during that game, but you just numbed it. Those kids really allowed that pain to be a change agent.” “So, we’re not the same as before. I think that did play out during the month of February and continues into the future.” SB

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scoring in 31 of 35 games, seven different players captured game highs during the regular season, led by Alabi and Singleton seven times apiece. Alabi finished the season as the Seminoles’ leading scorer, averaging 11.6 points with Singleton right behind at 10.4. The Seminoles’ powerful frontline also featured Reid, who averaged nearly seven points and five rebounds per game. FSU’s backcourt improved significantly over the season. Snaer’s insertion into the starting lineup in early February especially helped to ignite the Seminoles. Snaer, from Moreno Valley, Calif., averaged nearly 10 points per game during the season’s final month. Junior point guard Derwin Kitchen directed the team’s attack after starting just 17 games a year ago. Kitchen, of Jacksonville, had a career-high 29 points against Maryland in February. He also set FSU’s defensive tone on the perimeter with a career-high 41 steals during the season. Fellow guards Deividas Dulkys and Luke Loucks made key contributions, too. Duklys, a sophomore from Lithuania, paced FSU with 65 three-point field goals during the season, while Loucks, a sophomore from Clearwater, scored 65 points in his last eight regular-season games. FSU could point to another reason for its success — it was just as impressive on the road as it was at home. Over the past two years, only Duke has more conference wins than FSU’s 20. Likewise, Duke is the only other ACC team with a winning record on the road during that span — the Seminoles and the Blue Devils were both 9-7 over the last two years. SB


You Can’t Become a Football Overnight: A Book of Petersonisms By Jim Crosby

This year marks the 50th anniversary of Coach Pete’s rst year as Seminole football coach. To honor that anniversary Jim Crosby has written a book called: “You Can’t Become a Football Overnight.” It is full of photos, stories and colorful Peterson quotes reminiscent of those formative years in FSU football history. The book is lled with dozens of funny one liners, such as: “I’m the football around here and don’t you remember it.” “Pair up in threes and line up in circles.” FSU Head Coach from 1960-1970

On Sale Now for $19.95 plus $6.95 shipping and handling Available at Garnet and Gold Bookstore April 9

Or by making check payable to: Writeman Publishing, 3255 Thoreau Avenue, Tallahassee, FL 32311 • (850) 556-5960.

We decided to make a Planned Gift. “We wanted to give back to our Alma Mater. It was very simple. All we had to do was put Seminole Boosters in our will”. Please visit our website that shows the income and tax benefits for you and how your planned gift will benefit Florida State Athletics. www.seminole-boosters.com

Call Joel Padgett at (850) 644-3378 to learn more. S EMINO LE-BO OST ERS .CO M

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Baseball

SEMINOLE BASEBALL:

A Family Affair ike Martin looked at the running catch the outfielder made in practice and jokingly exclaimed, “Wow, nice catch. J. D. is learning to play the outfield.” “That’s not J. D., that’s Stephen,” said assistant coach Chip Baker, who had given the star player’s brother, still a freshman in high school, a Seminole uniform to wear while he shagged flies in the outfield. Stephen Drew never forgot that opportunity, and eventually he also started at Florida State. Both brothers ended up in the Major Leagues. That little scenario speaks volumes about the baseball family at Florida State. Ten percent of all

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the baseball players who have lettered at FSU are legacies. In addition to an amazing 37 brothers who have worn the Garnet and Gold, the family connection includes 18 fathers and sons, eight uncles and nephews, a couple of cousins and various others with family members who played or attended FSU. That says Seminole Baseball is one big happy family, and it’s a great recruiting tool. “It is impressive to me and says a lot about our program that so many parents not only entrust us with the first son but, because of the way he was treated, feel comfortable with having a second son come play for us,” said Jamey Shouppe, a 20-year veteran of

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BY JIM CROSBY


37 brothers and 18 fathers and sons have played baseball at FSU

Geoff Sprague • 1996–97

Gary Sprague • 1966

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Seminole Legacies BROTHERS Luis and Edwin Alicea Matt, Zach and Ben Diaz Matt and Michael Diblasi J. D., Tim and Stephen Drew Marc and Matt Dunbar Carl and Greg Gromek Bruce and Ken Huff Jeff and David Ledbetter Kevin and Matt Lynch

Mike and Stephen McGee John and Steve Nedeau Dave and Dick Nichols Jack and Randy Niles Buster and Jack Posey Mark and Matt Sauls Mack and Mike Scarce Chris and Nick Whidden Bryan and Scott Zech

FATHERS AND SONS Mike and Mike Martin Jr. Martin Woody and Matt Woodward Jim and Keith Lyttle Gary and Geoff Sprague Link and Lincoln Jarrett

Rod and Tony Delmonico Danny and Woody Litwhiler Randy and Tommy Oravetz Craig and James Ramsey

UNCLES AND NEPHEWS Ron and Kevin Cash Dave and Chris Hart David and Mike Smalley Dick and Ed Howser

COUSINS Karl and Ryan Jernigan

FATHER PLAYED ANOTHER SPORT AT FSU Jimmy and Tyler Everett

SONS OR NEPHEWS OF MAJOR LEAGUERS Jim Busby Steve Tebbetts Mike Yazstremski Terry Kennedy Ed Howser 32

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Bryan Zech • 2001–04

Bryan Zech’s brother, Scott Zech, lettered in 1994–97.

the coaching staff who is associate head coach and chief recruiter. He pitched for FSU and returned to the Seminole family to coach pitchers. “When you look at the Florida State Baseball program, you are looking at a family atmosphere not just on the team,” said Mike Martin, now in his 31st season as head coach. Martin, who has worn the Seminole uniform for 38 of the program’s 62 years, was also was a player and assistant coach. He explained that the family extends up into the stands where fans get to know those sitting around them as they root for the Seminoles. And he says another important part of the family are the “Animals of Section B” who keep the players fired up and feeling good about being a Seminole with their creative cheering and opponent harassment. Allen Zech is a parent who is well qualified to speak about the family experience. His sons, Scott (1994-97) and Bryan (200104) each played four full seasons here. “I wore out two cars traveling to those games,” said Zech, who made the 900mile round-trip from Palm Beach County to Tallahassee for eight-years. Zech brings up another aspect of the Seminole family. “We met a lot of the other players’ parents and traveled to road games. We are still good friends with many and have developed lifelong relationships, kind of like a fraternity.”


Baseball

Zach Diaz • 1996–99

Matt Diaz • 1998–99

Tony Delmonico • 2008 Rod Delmonico • Coach, 1984–89 & 2007–08

“When you look at the Florida State Baseball program, you are looking at a family atmosphere not just on the team.” Mike Martin, now in his 31st season as head coach.

J. D. Drew • 1995–97

PHOTOS BY FSU SPORTS INFO

Stephen Drew • 2002–04

The Seminoles start building family loyalty at a young age. Chip Baker recalls, “When I was coaching third base, I would look over behind the stands and watch the little kids playing ‘wall ball,’ tossing a ball up against the stands and catching it. Some of those same kids ended up as Seminole players.” Baker, currently baseball director of operations, reminded pitcher Bryan Henry of the ‘wall-ball days’ when he became a Seminole pitcher in 2005. After college, Henry, son of sportswriter Jim Henry, was drafted by the Diamondbacks and is currently working his way up through the minor leagues. There are lots of similar stories. Coach Martin recalled how the Tallahassee connection pays off. “Link Jarrett’s dad (Lincoln) played here (1962). I used to see them sitting in the stands. Link’s mother started bringing him to our baseball camp when he was 6 years old. Later, when Link got his chance to be a Seminole, he (hasn’t) looked back since.” Jarrett, a four year starter, was drafted by the Rockies, one of 160 players under Mike Martin selected in the Major League draft. Martin also remembers the night he stood outside the delivery room in a Tallahassee hospital and congratulated assistant coach Rod Delmonico on the birth of his baby boy. In 2008, Seminole shortstop Tony Delmonico helped lead FSU to the College World Series before being drafted by the Dodgers.

The Major League connection has enhanced the program’s reputation and enlarged the Seminole family over the years. Ten Seminole players were either the son or nephew of a major league player. Perhaps the proudest moment in Mike Martin’s career came when his son Mike Jr., a Seminole catcher for a couple of years, returned as an assistant coach and was assigned to develop hitters. Under Mike Jr.’s instruction, Seminole batters led the nation in hitting in 2008. In 2009 he was named ACC Assistant Coach of the Year. Classifying Seminole baseball as a Family Affair goes beyond Hall of Fame Coach Mike Martin and his coaching staff ’s 59 years together collectively. It even transcends 29 consecutive Regional appearances and 13 trips to the College World Series. When asked about the Seminole baseball experience Allen Zech said, “It was positive from the get-go. I felt comfortable with both my boys going there because of the Christian morals involved, as well as the good instruction they received and life values they were taught that go beyond baseball.” As far as this growing Seminole family is concerned, Mike Martin points out, “We ain’t done yet! We have a couple of brothers on the team — Mike and Stephen McGee.” Then with a wink and a sly smile he adds, “And we’ve got a couple of others out there in high school who have already given us a verbal commitment.” SB

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Passing the Torch On January 1, 2010, a defining moment in Florida State history occurred. After congratulating his team on their Gator Bowl victory over West Virginia, Bowden said, “Let me introduce you to the next head coach at Florida State.” During applause from the players and a hug with Bowden, Fisher said to his hero, “I love you.”

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The Fourth Fire THE COMING OF JIMBO By Charlie Barnes

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he moon shines with a light not its own. Its beaming is merely the sun, reflected from off-stage behind us. In the mid-19th Century our University, known then as the Seminary West of the Suwannee, was properly humble, but even then our little school harbored ambitious dreams. The symbol of the Seminary was a wise owl silhouetted against a full North Florida moon. By 1901 Florida State College envisioned a bright future for itself and its graduates. The young institution boasted all the trappings of traditional student life, including an intercollegiate football team (State of Florida Champions in 1904) and Greek-letter societies. The college administration crafted a new symbol: two burning flambeau within a garland wreath. The owl got to keep his perch atop the crossed torches. It’s been 100 years now, a full century since the institution recognized its own maturity by establishing an Alumni Association. It was a century ago that the third fiery flambeau was added to the University’s garnet and gold seal and the little owl took his leave. Within that long span we have seen the re-establishment of football (1947), its passage onto the national stage and into Bobby Bowden’s long Dynasty. We were naïve to think it might last forever. It’s trendy today to describe catalytic events as being “transformative.” But transformative is the right word for this time at the crossroads in Seminole football history. For the first time in almost two generations, we have a new Head Coach. Jimbo’s wait is over. It is time for the Fourth Fire to make its appearance. For nearly 160 years our University has continued advancing toward ever brighter lights. Long ago we nurtured ambitious dreams beneath the reflected glow of the sun. Then, two torches and soon afterward a third torch lighted the way for generation after generation of our students and alumni. Our University is paused at the next threshold. Seminole football has known ambition ever since the first pass spiraled beneath an October moon in 1947. It grew to maturity, and later to true greatness.

Now, suddenly, the fires of Florida State have a new tender. We have fresh fuel. Fans can feel the growing, glowing heat. This upcoming Garnet & Gold Game on April 10 will likely see the biggest crowd of any spring game in Seminole football history. There is fire. It’s been proposed that Jimbo Fisher light the ceremonial Unconquered flame the night before the game. This spring, under an April moon, join your fellow Seminoles at Doak Campbell Stadium. The time of the Fourth Fire is at hand. SB

Dear Boosters, Perhaps this is the Boosters’ Finest Hour. there at the Gator I wish every true blue Seminole could have been been greater victories, Bowl for perhaps our fans’ finest hour. There have ska win, the Choke at the two National Championships, the first Nebra response of our fan base Doak among others, but none compared to the on that day. availability of tickets, Considering the season record, the economy, the be there and pull for their the miserable weather, FSU fans found a way to Bowden. It was truly team and their beloved head football coach, Bobby by Seminole supporters, an inspiring scene, a capacity crowd dominated nt, highlighted by Coach many overcome with the emotion of the mome ing his cap into the sea Bowden running the length of the field and throw of Marching Chiefs. of the Seminole Spirit From my prospective it represented a resurgent me confidence in our that was lost over the last several years and gave l and thanks to those future. Thanks to all of you who made this day specia end of a glorious age of of you who were with us in spirit. This marks the s, the coaches and the fans unprecedented accomplishment. We, the player we should take a brief mohave accomplished something very special and back to work fully commitment to pat ourselves on the back and then go We will need all of you to ted to get behind Coach Fisher and his program. will be well worth it. make it happen. The effort to regain the Dynasty

Andy Miller President, Seminole Boosters, Inc.

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THE FISHER FAMILY Jimbo, Candi, Trey and Ethan on January 5, 2010 at the press conference where Fisher was announced head football coach.

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OneVoice,

Recruits

The Personnel-Minded Recruiter By Jim Henry

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hat’s the way it’s going to be at Florida State for the time being under first-year Head Coach Jimbo Fisher. While that is a departure from the regime of former coach Bobby Bowden, Fisher’s approach and presence has rejuvenated the Seminoles’ fan base. Let’s count the ways: » Renewal of booster membership is up 90 percent from this point in 2009 according to Seminole Boosters, Inc.

» »

The ticket office is reporting an 80 percent increase in new sales over the total from this time last year.

business casual, Fisher was naturally in great spirits and pleased with the day’s events. “A lot of guys in this group I think will have great careers at Florida State,” Fisher said. Later in the night (on Feb. 3) at the program’s second annual signing day party for more than 1,000 fans at the Tallahassee Car Museum, Fisher repeated that message and also introduced his staff, which includes five new assistants less than a month into their new positions. The high-energy event was streamed, free and live, on the Internet “War Party” events that were staged simultaneously throughout the state — and nation — including two others in Tallahassee.

Fisher is making sweeping changes, from increased support staff to increased competition among players to increased accountability across the board.

NEW CHAPTER Fisher, 44, is inheriting an FSU program From ESPN.com, February 3, 2010 coming off its worst four-year stretch (30-22) in more than 30 years. But that’s in the past. Bowden’s legacy as one of the greatest college coaches of all-time is secure, regard» And let’s not forget Fisher’s first recruiting class, less of his finish. one that secured a top-10 national recruiting Fisher represents a new chapter, and there’s no denying the ranking according to ESPN following National renewed enthusiasm surrounding the football program. National Signing Day on Feb. 3. Signing Day was another step forward. The Seminoles signed 24 players, including 14 on the defensive side, immediately addressMake no mistake: this was Jimbo’s class. He’s head coach, playing the most pressing needs. er personnel director and rush chairman. Though each of his as“Our past couple of recruiting classes have been okay, but it was sistant coaches played a role, Fisher signed off on all 24 players. more like the same ol’ deal,” said Brian Chambers, a frenzied reThat’s a 180-degree turn from Bowden, who let his assistant cruiting follower who admittedly spent his entire Wednesday in coaches handle the evaluations of all players aside from quarterfront of a computer and television keeping tabs on signing-day back. And in recent years, Bowden eventually turned that responupdates. sibility over to Fisher as well. “I feel like Jimbo brings that youth to recruiting, he and his staff “It never felt unnatural. No part of it never felt unnatural,” Fisher are more player-type coaches who know how to relate to these said of the recruiting process under his command for the first kids a lot better. Coach Bowden was great and I think what sold time as a head coach. (recruits) was the legend, that Coach Bowden was in the house While Bowden’s assistants usually joined him and met with the and they played for Coach Bowden. media on signing day, Fisher was a lone solider at the 60-minute “There’s definitely a different feel, a different atmosphere recruiting recap at the Moore Athletic Center in February. Dressed around FSU now.”

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OneMessage that team. You always didn’t have 11 superstars. I am sick and tired of it being offense, defense, offense, defense. I hate that. We aren’t going in the locker room like that, we aren’t going to be by positions, we are going to mix them up, travel on buses together. “They have to be a team.” Building that team takes a blueprint. And Fisher is the Seminoles’ master architect. Fisher plans to nearly double the number of support staff in various student-support areas, including academic, strength and medical. He has implemented strat-

egies for improved nutrition (no more honey-fried chicken for players) and increased attention to sports psychology in regard to mental preparation. Fisher has increased staff time to recruiting, punctuated by devoting the first two hours of every day to recruiting meetings and evaluations. (FSU already has eight non-binding verbal commitments in its Class of 2011). Fisher wants increased use of technology (game notes and video available on coaches’ IPods, for example) 82>> across the board.

PHOTOS BY ROSS OBLEY

It starts with Fisher, who exudes confidence and passion. Let’s not forget personality either. Fisher might micro-manage every aspect of his program, much like good friend Nick Saban does at Alabama, but Fisher’s also approachable, funny and sincere. He has a plan, too, which was reflected in a recruiting class heavy in athleticism and versatility. Fisher wanted football players. “It’s a team,” Fisher said. “It’s not the best 11 players, it’s the best team of players. All the good teams, you ever think about, everybody had a role on

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Recruits

2010 FSU RECRUITING CLASS HT.

WT.

POS.

NAME PREVIOUS SCHOOL

Christian Green Tampa, FL (Tampa Catholic)

6’ 2”

200

WR

Nigel Terrell Pelham, AL (Pelham)

6’ 2”

215

LB

Christian Jones Winter Park, FL (Lake Howell)

6’ 3”

225

LB

Telvin Smith Valdosta, GA (Lowndes County)

6’ 3”

205

LB

Tank Sessions Decatur, GA (Columbia)

6’ 5”

230

TE

Bjoern Werner Salisbury, CT (Salisbury School)

6’ 4”

264

DE

Kenny Shaw Orlando, FL (Dr. Phillips)

6’ 0 “

160

WR

Mike Harris Miami, FL (EL Camino CC/South Miami)

6’ 0”

185

CB

Damien Jacobs Houma, LA (H.L Bourgeois)

6‘ 3”

294

DT

Lamarcus Joyner Ft. Lauderdale, FL (St. Thomas Aquinas)

5’ 8”

175

CB

Darious Cummings Titusville, FL (Astronaut)

6’ 3”

267

DL

Cameron Erving Moultrie, GA (Colquitt County)

6’ 5”

290

DT

Terrence Brooks Dunnellon, FL (Dunnellon)

5’ 10”

180

CB

Holmes Onwukaife Cedar Park, TX (Cedar Park)

6’ 3”

230

LB

De’Joshua Johnson Pahokee, FL (Pahokee)

5’ 11”

150

WR

Will Tye Salisbury, CT (Salisbury School)

6’ 3”

230

TE

Greg Dent Belle Glade, FL (Glades Central)

6’ 0”

190

WR

Dan Foose Paramus, NJ (Paramus Catholic)

6’ 6”

295

OL

Chad Abram Lakeland, FL (Kathleen)

6’ 0”

190

S

Jarred Haggins Lakeland, FL (Lakeland)

6’ 0”

185

WR

Jeff Luc Port St. Lucie, FL (Treasure Coast)

6’ 1”

230

LB

Anthony McCloud Thomasville, GA (Itawamba CC, Thomas County)

6’ 3”

295

DT

Debrale Smiley Thomasville, GA (Itawamba CC, Thomas County)

6’ 0”

235

RB

Clint Trickett Tallahassee, FL (North Florida Christian)

6’ 2”

175

QB

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Seminoles Earn A Top 10 Class By FSU Sports Info (Seminoles.com)

F

lorida State football coach Jimbo Fisher’s first signing class will be one to remember. Less than 30 days after Fisher officially became the successor to Bobby Bowden, the Seminoles landed a consensus Top 10 class of need-based talent. The Seminoles signed 24 players, including 14 on the defensive side, immediately addressing the team’s most pressing needs. Four of those players — linebacker Jeff Luc, defensive tackle Anthony McCloud, running back Debrale Smiley and quarterback Clint Trickett — have been enrolled in school since the start of the semester. Of the three major recruiting services that rank players and signing classes, ESPN tabbed FSU’s 2010 class at No. 6 nationally. The Seminoles checked in at No. 10 with both Rivals and Scout.com. “Maybe we can move from 6 to 1,” Fisher said, as he talked about the class. “We’re not very far away from that.” Two players were rated as the best in the country at their respective positions: cornerback Lamarcus Joyner and middle linebacker Jeff Luc. Joyner is the fourth USA Today National Defensive Player of the Year to sign with the Seminoles in school history, joining Derrick Brooks, David Warren and Antonio Cromartie. Luc is a physically mature 230-pounder who relishes punishing ball carriers. “We may look back on Luc and Joyner and say they started the whole thing,” said Fisher, whose focus is on FSU’s swift return to national prominence. “They understand the importance of what they did [signing with the `Noles].” A handful of others, like outside linebacker Christian Jones and wide receiver Christian Green, were also among the most elite nationally. FSU signed five defensive linemen, five linebackers and four cornerbacks in an effort to jolt a unit that will have a new coordinator — Mark Stoops — and a new scheme. Offensively, the Seminoles turned their attention to replenishing the receiving corps and did so with five signees, as well as two tight ends. Fisher credited the persistence of the retooled coaching staff, which includes five new assistants less than a month into their new positions, with bringing the signing class together with a late surge. “We’ve put so much on recruiting, which is true, but now we’ve got to develop the players,” Fisher said. The Seminoles will conclude spring practice on April 10 at the annual Garnet and Gold scrimmage.

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Recruits

PHOTOS COURTESY RIVALS.COM

(Left) FSU recruit Jeff Luc. (Right) FSU recruit Lemarcus Joyner. “We may look back on Luc and Joyner and say they started the whole thing,” said Fisher, whose focus is on FSU’s swift return to national prominence. “They understand the importance of what they did [signing with the `Noles].”

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Football

Meet

Jimbo

(Top) Jimbo talking to players. (Left) Pre-game team speech before the Gator Bowl. (Above Left) Jimbo with wife Candi and sons, Ethan (4) and Trey (8).

I

“It is not a common man that I introduce you to today as our head football coach,” said Randy Spetman, Florida State University director of athletics. “A common man would not have the courage, patience and determination to follow the greatest college football coach in history. A common man would find it too challenging to accept the coach-in-waiting role and ignore openings at other topflight programs. A common man could not have rekindled the Seminoles’ spirit, excitement and vision so quickly.” A veteran of 22 seasons as a college assistant, including the last three as Florida State’s offensive coordinator, Fisher has hit the ground running. Fisher, known as one of the

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top offensive minds in college football, was the offensive coordinator for the 2003 National Champion LSU Tigers. He was named a finalist for the Frank Broyles Award as the nation’s top assistant coach in 2001. During his first two seasons at Florida State, the Seminoles offense has developed across the board. The Seminoles rushed for an average of 179.1 yards and scored an average of 33.4 points per game during the 2008 season. In two years with Fisher as offensive coordinator, the Seminoles rushed for more than 80 yards per game more and scored an average of nearly seven points per game more than prior to his arrival. SB

SEMINO LE-BO OST ERS .CO M

PHOTOS BY MIKE OLIVELLA AND ROSS OBLEY

On Jan. 5, 2010, Jimbo Fisher was introduced as head football coach at Florida State University.


Fisher’s #1 Picks

» Florida State was the most balanced team in all

of college football with a run to pass ratio of 1.2:1. The Seminoles rushed for an average of 179.1 yards per game and threw for an average of 192.8 yards per game.

» During his tenure at LSU, the Tigers won three

BCS Bowl games, including winning the national title at the 2004 Nokia Sugar Bowl, and earned two SEC Championships.

» Played quarterback for Terry Bowden at Salem

College for two seasons (1984-85) and at Samford (Bobby Bowden’s alma mater) in 1987.

» Set the school record at Samford with 34 passing touchdowns and was named the Division III National Player of the Year in 1987.

» Played for the Chicago Bruisers of the Arena

JaMarcus Russell

(Raiders No. 1 overall pick in 2007)

Dewayne Bowe

(Chiefs No. 1 draft choice in 2007)

Craig Davis

(Chargers No. 1 draft choice in 2007)

Joseph Addai

(Colts No. 1 draft choice in 2006)

Michael Clayton

(Buccaneers No. 1 draft choice in 2004)

Fisher’s Quick Facts Years as a Collegiate Coach: 22 Born: Clarksburg, W. Va. Date of Birth: Oct. 9, 1965 Family: Married to Candi and has two children, Trey (8) and Ethan (4)

Coaching Stops: 2007– Florida State (offensive coordinator/quarterbacks coach) 2000–06 LSU (offensive coordinator/quarterbacks) 1999 Cincinnati (offensive coordinator/quarterbacks) 1993–98 Auburn (quarterbacks) 1991–92 Samford (offensive coordinator/quarterbacks) 1988–90 Samford (graduate assistant/quarterbacks)

Football League in 1988.

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2010 OFFENSIVE COACHING STAFF 3rd n o Seas

James Coley // Offensive Coordinator/Tight Ends Coach // Alma Mater: Florida State ’97 Coley’s Quick Facts

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»

Florida State graduate James Coley returned to his alma mater in 2008 to coach the Seminole tight ends and coordinate the extensive recruiting efforts by the Florida State coaching staff. The Florida State football program has reaped the benefits of his hard work as he has helped attract two nationally ranked recruiting classes to Tallahassee. Coley Graduated from Florida State University in 1997 and received his master’s in kinesiology in 2004 from LSU.

Years as a Collegiate Coach: 3 Hometown: Miami, Fla. Date of Birth: April 14, 1973 Family: Married to Kenia Gomez and has one daughter, Madison

Coaching Stops 2008– Florida State (tight ends/recruiting coordinator) 2007 Florida International (offensive coordinator) 2006 Miami Dolphins (offensive quality control) 2005 Miami Dolphins (offensive assistant) 2003–04 LSU (offensive graduate assistant) 2000–02 Norland High School (Miami, Fla.) — (assistant head coach/offensive coordinator/quarterbacks) 1997–2000 Miami Senior High School (quarterbacks)

3rd n o Seas

Lawrence Dawsey // Passing Game Coordinator/Wide Receivers Coach // Alma Mater: Florida State ’91

» »

» »

Dawsey’s Quick Facts Seminole All-American and NFL veteran Lawrence Dawsey returned to Florida State to coach the Seminole wide receivers in 2007. Dawsey adds National Championship coaching experience to the Florida State staff after helping LSU win the 2003 title as a graduate assistant on Nick Saban’s staff.

Years as a Collegiate Coach: 5 Hometown: Dothan, Ala. Date of Birth: Nov. 16, 1967 Family: Married to Chantal and has a son, Lawrence, Jr. and a stepdaughter, Dominique Arce

» Dawsey lettered at Florida State from 1987–90; the Seminoles

Coaching Stops

»

2004–06 USF (wide receivers)

finished in the top 4 of the final AP poll in each of those seasons.

Dawsey was named an AP All-American in 1990 as a senior when he led the Seminoles with 65 catches for 999 yards and seven touchdowns.

Dawsey enjoyed a seven-year career in the NFL with most of his career spent playing for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. He also played for the New York Giants (1996), the Miami Dolphins (1997) and the New Orleans Saints (1999).

2007–present Florida State (wide receivers) 2003 LSU (graduate assistant) 2002 Blake High School 2001 St. Louis Rams (training camp assistant) 1998 Tampa Catholic High School

Was named as the NFL Rookie of the Year by Sports Illustrated and to the All-Rookie Team by Pro Football Weekly in 1991.

1st n o e S as

Dameyune Craig // Quarterbacks // Alma Mater: Auburn ’02 Craig’s Quick Facts

»

Dameyune Craig enters his seventh season as a college coach following a two-year run at South Alabama, where he coached wide receivers.

» Craig is no stranger to Jimbo Fisher, who mentored him as the

»

quarterbacks coach at Auburn. Craig still holds numerous Auburn passing records, including completions (216) and passing yards (3,227) in a season. The two were reunited at LSU when Craig was an offensive graduate assistant on Nick Saban’s staff. He also spent one season with Saban as a Miami Dolphins assistant. As a pro quarterback, Craig signed as a free agent with the NFL’s Carolina Panthers. He also played for the Scottish Claymores in NFL Europe, where he passed for a single-game league record 611 yards.

Born: Prichard, Ala. Date of Birth: April 19, 1974 High School: Blount Family: Wife, Neke; sons, Devin Chanse and Drake Christian

Coaching Stops 2008–09 South Alabama (receivers coach) 2006–07 Tuskegee (quarterbacks) 2005 Miami Dolphins (assistant coach) 2004 Louisiana State (graduate assistant) 2003 Blount (Ala.) High School (assistant coach)

» At South Alabama, Craig was instrumental is cranking up a run-based, spread offense that put up prolific numbers during its seven-game inaugural season in 2009. » With the Seminoles, Craig is expected to assist Fisher in quarterback instruction with Christian Ponder and EJ Manuel, who are two exceptional student-athletes off the field. Craig earned Academic All-SEC honors as a senior in 1997.

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2010 OFFENSIVE COACHING STAFF 3rd n o Seas

Rick Trickett // Assistant Head Coach/Offensive Line // Alma Mater: Glenville State College ’72 Trickett’s #1 Picks

» » » »

» » » » » » » »

His nationally recognized ability to recruit and coach has helped the Seminoles develop one of the most rapidly improving offensive line units in the nation. The Seminoles ranked 23rd nationally in total offense in 2009.

Kendall Simmons

(Steelers No. 1 Draft Choice in 2001)

Victor Riley

(Chiefs No. 1 Draft Choice in 1998)

Willie Anderson

(Bengals No. 1 Draft Choice in 1996)

Wayne Gandy

(Rams No. 1 Draft Choice in 1994)

Trickett has coached six All-American offensive linemen in his storied career at some of the nation’s top schools.

Trickett’s Quick Facts

The Seminoles have increased their rushing yards per game average by more than 70 yards per game in the first two years since Trickett’s arrival prior to the 2007 season.

Hometown: Masontown, WV

Was nominated for the Frank Broyles Award in 2006 as the nation’s top assistant coach.

Years as a Collegiate Coach: 36 Date of Birth: March 23, 1948 Family: Married to Tara and has three sons, Travis, Chance and Clint (high school senior quarterback at North Florida Christian, signed National Letter of Intent with FSU)

Florida State’s offensive line has cut the number of quarterback sacks allowed in each of Trickett’s first two seasons as the Seminoles’ offensive line coach.

Coaching Stops

Working with the youngest offensive line personnel in the nation in his first two seasons at Florida State, the Seminoles have ranked among the ACC leaders in total, rushing and passing offense.

2001–06 West Virginia (assistant head coach/offensive line coach)

Three offensive linemen — guards Rodney Hudson and Andrew Datko and center Ryan McMahon — have all earned All-American honors while playing for Trickett. He has coached 15 players that have been named either first or second team freshmen All-Americans.

1993–98 Auburn (offensive line coach)

Coached four players drafted in the first round in a six-year span at Auburn.

1985 New Mexico (offensive line coach)

Trickett has coached more than 30 players who have gone on to play in the NFL. Received a master’s degree from Indiana University of Pennsylvania in 1975. Was an all-conference strong safety at Glenville.

2007– Florida State (assistant head coach/offensive line coach) 2000 LSU (assistant head coach/offensive line coach) 1999 Glenville State (head coach) 1989–92 Mississippi State (offensive line coach) 1986–88 Memphis (offensive line coach) 1982–85 Southern Mississippi (offensive line coach) 1980–81 Southern Illinois (offensive line coach) 1978–79 West Virginia (offensive line coach) 1976–77 West Virginia (defensive line coach)

Trickett is a U.S. Marine Corps veteran.

1974–75 Indiana, PA (linebackers coach) 1973 Glenville (linebackers coach)

1st n o Seas

Eddie Gran // Associate Head Coach/Running backs/Special Teams // Alma Mater: Cal Lutheran ’87 Gran’s Quick Facts

»

»

» » » » » »

Eddie Gran enters his 24th season of collegiate coaching in his first season at Florida State, where he will serve as assistant head coach, tutor the running backs and coordinate special teams, duties he held during his one-year stop at Tennessee in 2009. Gran has an impressive track record, especially in the area of developing backfield talent during a career which included a 15-year run as an assistant to Tommy Tuberville at Ole Miss and Auburn. He has sent seven running backs on to the NFL, including former Tigers Carnell Williams, Ronnie Brown, Rudi Johnson and Brandon Jacobs, and former Rebels Deuce McCallister and John Avery.

Hometown: Escondido, Calif. Date of Birth: July 21, 1965 High School: Orange Glen Family: Wife, Rosemary Scaife Gran; daughters, Hannah, Dillan, Sydney and Lucy Grace.

Coaching Stops 2009 Tennessee (running backs/special teams) 1999–2004 Auburn (running backs/special teams) 1994–98 Ole Miss (running backs) 1994 Idaho State (receivers) 1992–93 Cincinnati (receivers)

Tennessee’s Mario Hardesty (1,345 yards) in 2009 added his name to the lengthy list of 1,000yard rushers Gran has worked with over the course of his career. Hardesty did not have a fumble on 282 carries from scrimmage, which is the second most in Vols’ history.

1990–91 Miami (graduate assistant)

His tenure as a special teams coach included oversight of Auburn kicker John Vaughn, who was the SEC Special Teams Player of the Year in 2006.

1987–88 Cal Lutheran (receivers)

1989 East Carolina (graduate assistant) 1989 Southeast Missouri State (receivers)

Prior to joining the Tennessee staff, Gran spent 10 seasons on Tuberville’s Auburn staff, which was preceded by a five-year run at Ole Miss. Gran has spent the majority of his career recruiting Miami and greater South Florida as his primary territory, a duty he will continue with the Seminoles. He began his coaching career at his alma mater, Cal Lutheran, where he played four seasons as a wide receiver. Like FSU staff newcomers Mark Stoops and D.J. Eliot, Gran also served as an assistant at the University of Miami. Has been a member of coaching staffs which took their teams to 11 bowl games, including: Miami — Cotton (’91) and Orange (’92); Ole Miss — Music City (’97); Auburn — Citrus (’01), Peach (’01), Capital One (’03), Music City (’03), Sugar (’05), Capital One (’06), Cotton (’07) and Chick-fil-A (’07).

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2010 DEFENSIVE COACHING STAFF 1st n o e S as

Mark Stoops // Defensive Coordinator/Secondary // Alma Mater: Iowa ’89 Stoops’ Quick Facts

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» »

» » » » »

»

46

High School: Cardinal Mooney Family: wife, Chantel; son, William

Coaching Stops 2010–Present Florida State (defensive coordinator/secondary) 2004–09 Arizona (defensive coordinator/secondary) 2001–03 Miami (secondary) 2000 Houston (co-defensive coordinator) 1997–99 Wyoming (secondary) 1996 USF (secondary) 1992–95 Nordonia Hills High School (secondary/athletics director) 1990–91 Iowa (graduate assistant)

Stoops’ pass defenses have been especially proficient at takeaways. The 2001 Miami team established a single-season school record with 27 interceptions. The 1997 Wyoming secondary contributed significantly to its school-record 24 interceptions. Has been a member of coaching staffs participating in seven bowl games, including: Arizona — Holiday (’09) and Las Vegas (’08); Miami — Orange (’04), Fiesta (’03) and Rose (’02); Iowa— Holiday (’91) and Rose (’91). Played in the secondary at Iowa for legendary coach Hayden Frye, who also helped him launch his career as a graduate assistant.

Greg Hudson // Assistant Head Coach/Linebackers // Alma Mater: Notre Dame ’90 Hudson’s Quick Facts

»

»

»

Prior to his six-year run at Arizona, Stoops spent three seasons at the University of Miami as the secondary coach. His 2002 and 2003 units led the nation in pass defense, while the 2001 team — which won the national championship — led the nation in pass efficiency defense, scoring defense and turnover margin.

Date of Birth: July 9, 1967

Has helped develop some of the nation’s top defensive backs over the past decade, including: Arizona’s Antoine Cason and Michael Johnson; Miami’s Antrel Rolle, Sean Taylor, Edward Reed, Phillip Buchanon and Mike Rumph; as well as Wyoming’s Brian Lee.

»

»

The Wildcats ranked 25th nationally in total defense in 2009 and were among the top three Pac-10 units in five statistical categories.

Hometown: Youngstown, Ohio

Spent 2000 season as co-defensive coordinator at Houston after directing the Wyoming secondary for three seasons (1997-99). Also served as secondary coach at USF.

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»

Mark Stoops begins his 21st season of coaching as Florida State’s first-year defensive coordinator and secondary coach. Stoops spent the past six seasons at Arizona, where he served in the same capacity on his brother Mike’s staff. Another brother, Bob Stoops, is the head coach at Oklahoma.

Greg Hudson begins his 21st season of collegiate coaching as Florida State’s assistant head coach and linebackers coach after spending the past five seasons as defensive coordinator/ linebackers coach at East Carolina. His stops along the way include Minnesota, Cincinnati and Connecticut. A two-year letter winner at Notre Dame, where he played linebacker, Hudson was a product of legendary high school football powerhouse Cincinnati Moeller. During his tenure at East Carolina the Pirates set new standards for excellence, posting four consecutive winning seasons for the first time in 30 years and making four consecutive bowl appearances for the first time in school history. ECU also became the first team to win consecutive Conference USA championship games, pulling off the feat in 2008 and 2009.

Hometown: Cincinnati, Ohio Date of Birth: February 4, 1967 High School: Moeller Family: wife, Kelly; sons, Garrett and Jack; daughters, Kacey and Kayla.

Coaching Stops 2005–09 East Carolina (defensive coordinator/linebackers) 2001–04 Minnesota (linebackers/recruiting coordinator/ defensive coordinator) 1997–2000 Cincinnati (assistant head coach/linebackers) 1994–96 Connecticut (offensive line) 1993 Notre Dame (graduate assistant) 1990–92 University of Redlands (linebackers)

Hudson’s ECU defenses earned a reputation for turning over opponents, coming up with 145 takeaways in five seasons — an average of 29 per season — which ranks among the top 10 of all FBS programs in that stretch. The Pirates finished in the top 10 nationally in four defensive categories in 2009 — fumbles recovered (3rd, 17), red zone defense (7th, 0.71 percent), turnovers gained (4th, 34) and turnover margin (10th, +0.79). They also led CUSA in scoring defense (21.93) and turnover margin. In 2008, Hudson’s ECU defense led CUSA in total defense and scoring defense, despite losing several key players to injury. He earned national recognition for his work when the Pirates shut down No. 8 West Virginia’s spread offense, led by quarterback Pat White, in a 24-3 win. ECU also defeated eventual ACC champion Virginia Tech to open in the ’08 season. Hudson has coached on both sides of the football over the course of his career, which began at the University of Redlands (Calif.) with linebackers in 1990. He worked with the offensive line as a graduate assistant at Notre Dame before moving on to Connecticut as offensive line coach. He returned to defense and worked with linebackers at both Cincinnati and Minnesota.

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2010 DEFENSIVE COACHING STAFF 16th n o Seas

Odell Haggins // Position: Defensive Line Coach // Alma Mater: Florida State ’91 Haggins’ #1 Picks

» » » »

» » » » »

Coached Florida State’s defensive line in 1999 and helped the Seminoles win the National Championship that year.

Brodrick Bunkley

(Eagles No. 1 Draft Choice in 2006)

Travis Johnson

(Texans No. 1 Draft Choice in 2005)

Corey Simon

(Eagles No. 1 Draft Choice in 2000)

Andre Wadsworth

(Cardinals No. 1 Draft Choice in 1998)

Haggins’ Quick Facts Years as a Collegiate Coach: 15 Hometown: Bartow, Fla. Date of Birth: Feb. 27, 1967 Family: He and his wife Robin Kimbrough have a daughter, Amelia Grace

Coaching Stops 1996–Present Florida State (defensive tackles) 1994–95 Florida State (tight ends/offensive line)

Was an All-American noseguard with the Seminoles from 1986-89, a period of great prosperity for the Florida State football team. During his playing career the Seminoles had a 39-8-1 record (.823 winning percentage), won four consecutive bowl games and ranked no lower than fourth nationally over the final three years of his career. Was drafted by the San Francisco 49’ers in the 1990 NFL Draft, played in the Super Bowl in 1990 and was a member of the Buffalo Bills during the 1991 season. Earned his degree in criminology from Florida State.

D.J. Eliot // Defensive Ends // Alma Mater: Wyoming ’99 Eliot’s Quick Facts

»

»

»

Helped coach Florida State to the 1999 National Championship and was a player on the Buffalo Bills Super Bowl team in 1990.

Since 2000 he has coached eight defensive tackles that have been selected in the NFL Draft. In addition to his four first round draft selections, three players have been picked in the top five rounds of the NFL Draft: Andre Fluellen (third round), Darnell Dockett (third round), Jerry Johnson (fourth round) and Letroy Guion (fifth round).

»

»

He was recently named as one of the six best defensive line coaches in all of college football by Dennis Dodd of CBS Sports.

Has coached four first round NFL Draft Selections: Andre Wadsworth (1998), Corey Simon (2000), Travis Johnson (2005) and Broderick Bunkley (2006).

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»

Odell Haggins is in his 16th season as an assistant coach at Florida State and his 20th year as a member of the Florida State football program. He was a Seminole player from 1986–89.

D.J. Eliot, 33, the youngest member of the Florida State coaching staff, is entering his 13th season of collegiate coaching in his first year with the Seminoles. Eliot comes to FSU from Rice, where he spent three seasons as the recruiting coordinator and defensive line coach. Eliot played linebacker for three seasons at Wyoming before joining the Cowboys’ coaching staff, first as a student assistant, then a graduate assistant. He earned his undergraduate degree in Natural Science to go along with a Zoology minor. He is one of three new assistants who spent time on the coaching staff at the University of Miami, where he served as a graduate assistant working with defensive backs and special teams in 2002. Mark Stoops was the Hurricanes’ secondary coach. Eddie Gran also did a graduate assistant stint at Miami a decade earlier.

Born: Edmond, Okla. Date of Birth: August 14, 1976 High School: Edmond Memorial Family: wife, Miekel; son, Dawson; daughter, Drue

Coaching Stops 2007–09 Rice (recruiting coordinator/defensive line) 2006 Tulsa (linebackers) 2003–05 Texas State (defensive backs/linebackers) 2002 Miami (graduate assistant/defensive backs/special teams) 2000–01 Houston (graduate assistant/defensive backs/ special teams) 1998–99 Wyoming (student assistant/graduate assistant)

He earned his first full-time position at Texas State under David Bailiff, coaching defensive backs one season before a two-year stint with the linebackers. Texas State won the Division I-AA Southland Conference in 2005 and qualified for the postseason. Bailiff later hired Eliot to join his staff at Rice. Eliot’s coaching career also led to a season as the linebackers coach at Tulsa, where he was instrumental in developing CUSA Defensive Player of the Year Nick Bunting as well as standouts Nelson Coleman and Chris Chamberlin. At Rice, Eliot had oversight of the recruiting process, a challenge given the school’s stringent academic standards. He identified and helped develop two true freshmen defensive ends — Scott Solomon (63 tackles) and Cheta Ozougwu (61) — who led all CUSA linemen with 124 combined tackles to led all CUSA linemen. They combined for 21 tackles for loss and 11 sacks.

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Football

Fisher Issues Challenge To Fans For Spring Game

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GARNET AND GOLD SPRING GAME WEEKEND Saturday events include: FSU track and field, softball, women’s tennis, a car show and BBQ cook-off on Langford Green, the spring scrimmage and a post-game fireworks show. There will be a Friday and Monday golf tournament as well as a Friday night Seminole Getdown on Adams Street featuring the band ELI.

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irst-year Florida State football Coach Jimbo Fisher isn’t shy when it comes to issuing challenges, and that extends beyond the lofty expectations he’s placing on the Seminoles in preparation for the 2010 football season. As Fisher closed the books on his inaugural signing day class — a 24-player haul rated among the 10 best nationally — he immediately raised his expectations for a fan base already abuzz with new-found optimism. “We tell our players, ‘Let’s take Doak back,’” Fisher said. “To take Doak back, we need you. We need to fill the stadium up. We’re going to do our part and you’re going to be proud of the group that’s out there. Let’s do it together. … “The spring game has never been a big deal around here as much as it has in some other places. I don’t like to read that this stadium has 80,000, 60,000 and 70,000 at their spring game. Why can’t we? Why can’t we come support them?” Florida State fans will have a chance to show their support for Fisher’s football Seminoles at the annual Garnet & Gold game, which puts a cap on spring practice and is set for Saturday, April 10 at 5 p.m. inside Doak Campbell Stadium. Fisher has already promised a genuine game between two evenly-matched squads; a departure from the hard-to-follow, controlled-scrimmage setting which has prevailed in recent seasons. Perpetuating a

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competitive environment is just one of his goals in an effort to put the Seminoles back among the nation’s elite. “I know you want kids to work hard and do the right things,” Fisher said. “When they see you support them, they do that.” Early indications would suggest that the Seminoles are building significant momentum off the field as well. Season ticket sales and renewals are on a steep ascent since FSU scored its Gator Bowl victory over West Virginia. The membership drive by Seminole Boosters Inc. is also producing impressive results. The Garnet & Gold game will provide FSU fans a first glimpse of Fisher’s reshaped football Seminoles, as well as a variety of ancillary activities surrounding the game. The day will begin with a club lacrosse match between Florida State and rival Florida, beginning at 1 p.m. inside the stadium. Outside, on the lawn at Langford Green, the second annual Best of Tallahassee BBQ competition will be held throughout the day. An antique car show and post-game fireworks display round out the scheduled events. A volunteer donation of $5 at entry will be earmarked for athletic scholarships at Florida State. All surrounding events and parking are free. Fans will have the opportunity to join Seminole Boosters and can also purchase season tickets at the event. SB

PHOTOS BY MIKE OLIVELLA AND ROSS OBLEY

Full day of activities will surround April 10 game at Doak Campbell Stadium. By FSU Sports Info


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Giving

Endowments:

The Impact, The Future Keep your cash, secure tax benefits and help FSU By Jim Henry

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hile endowment appeals have succeeded for several collegiate athletics programs nationally, including Florida State, a steady flow of capital needs combined with a challenging economy has prompted schools to shift more of their focus to seeking will and estate gifts. Many athletics programs across the country, for example, have ramped up their gift and estate-planning appeals. It has happened in the Atlantic Coast Conference and, more recently, here at FSU. North Carolina, which started its scholarship endowment in 1968, is focusing on estate gifts. Virginia Tech, meanwhile, is even suggesting to donors how much of their estates they should leave to the sports program. FSU boosters Gary and Cumi Walsingham understand that strong endowments allow Seminole Boosters, Inc., to fund initiatives that will have a lasting impact on a student-athletes’ education and the quality of the athletics program and university. Gary Walsingham, 67, a successful Panama City Beach businessman and community leader, also understands the advantages of estate gifts and how they help ensure the future success of FSU. That’s why he has elected to donate funds

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through this effective plan. A $2 million donor and former chairman of the board, the good-natured Walsingham jokes he has mixed emotions about showing his love for the Seminoles from beyond the grave. “When I die I’d rather see the (Seminole) flag at half-mast rather than being raised because FSU was fixing to receive some money,” Walsingham said with a laugh. “I don’t want them celebrating because I kicked the bucket.” Of course, passing the bucket, so to speak, is a way for schools such as FSU to rely on steady endowment earnings to pay for many of its expenses. And, in a way, celebrate. Walsingham, also an active member of the Alumni Association, stressed that an estate gift is a generous act that helps plan for the future of FSU athletics. He pointed to the gift’s benefits. Depending on the size of one’s estate and the amount of the person’s charitable bequest, the donor would avoid estate taxes on the bequest itself and can place the remainder of the estate in a lower tax bracket. Better yet, it also allows donors to keep their cash handy. “I didn’t have the cash to take out of my business to give a million dollars,” said

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Walsingham, whose family was in the retail business for 54 years before he came out of a “six-week retirement” to purchase Ripley’s Believe It or Not Museum and 4D Moving Theater in Panama City Beach. “But I could do it through estate planning

(Above) Former Seminole Booster Chairman Gary Walsingham. (Opposite, left to right) Cumi and Gary Walsingham, Cumi at Booster board meeting, Gary with Coach Bowden.


Giving

without it really affecting my business. There’s no doubt about it — people just don’t have as much disposable income now as they did with the recent economy. This is a way for people to give back to Florida State and it doesn’t hurt them financially at the time they pledge the money. “If you have any kind of estate at all, you can secure tax benefits by leaving money to the school.” Long established universities and booster clubs can point to generations of gift giving. FSU continues to build its program on the strength of family and continuity — two important qualities that contribute greatly to the success of student-athletes and the Seminole community. “We were behind the curve,” Walsingham said in reference to estate-planning. “We didn’t get on that bandwagon until the last few years really.” There’s no denying Walsingham’s love for FSU. He arrived in 1960 with every intention to play baseball, but “I got out there and they had more baseball players than they knew what to do with. It didn’t take me long to figure out I was never going to play, so I didn’t hang around there long.” The Walsinghams never left FSU, however. Wife Cumi and their two grown children are avid Seminole fans. Season ticketholders, they have missed just one home football game in more than 20 years, making the two-hour drive from Panama City Beach with family and friends in their motor home. Gary and Cumi intently watch games from their skybox suite above Doak Campbell Stadium, not wanting to miss a play.

A dear friend of recently retired FSU football coach Bobby Bowden — the pair’s golfing stories go back to Bowden’s first Seminole Booster Golf Tour — Walsingham said Bowden has left an amazing legacy that transformed the Seminoles into one of the nation’s most successful programs ever. Walsingham is also just as excited about the future under newly-appointed head coach Jimbo Fisher. “You can’t look back. You always have to look forward,” he said.

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“It’s like in business. I look around and see what people are doing best, my competition, to look and see how I can improve what they are doing and incorporate it into my plan.” Seminole Boosters, Inc., has a plan, too, one that incorporates a campaign for estate endowments to help in athletics’ development and planning. For more information on Seminole Boosters Gift Planning opportunities, please contact Joel Padgett at jpadgett@ admin.fsu.edu or call (850) 644-3484. SB

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Feature

Dr. Barron returns to his alma mater to serve as its 14th president. He leaves the National Center for Atmospheric Research after serving as director since 2008.

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Feature

eric Barron

TAKeS oFFice FSU Alumnus and highly visible scientist is ardent supporter of academic excellence By BroWninG BrooKS, FlORIDA stAtE UNIVERsIty OFFICE OF COMMUNICAtIONs

PhOtO By FsU PhOtO lAB

e

ric J. Barron has taken office as 14th president of the Florida State University, succeeding T.K. Wetherell, who served the university from 2003–2010. “I am extremely gratified and honored to return to my alma mater and serve as its next president,” Barron said after his Dec. 8 selection by the Board of Trustees. “This is an outstanding university that is poised to become one of the finest in the world, and I look forward to helping it reach that goal.” Barron, 58, earned a bachelor’s degree in geology from FSU as an honors student in 1973. He holds masters and doctoral degrees from the University of Miami, both in oceanography. He had been director of the highly prominent national laboratory, the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colo., since 2008. In an interview that appeared Feb. 3 in the prestigious journal Nature, Barron said he sees the major challenges of his new role as “to promote quality and student success in a constrained budget environment. Florida State University is functioning very well,” he said, “ … but we ought to be able to do a much better job with philanthropy.” Prior to taking the position at NCAR, Barron was dean of the newly formed Jackson School of Geosciences at the University of Texas at Austin. From 1986 to 2006, Barron was at Pennsylvania State

University, where he was professor of geosciences, director of the Earth System Science Center, director of the EMS Environment Institute and finally dean of the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences. Barron is a Fellow in the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Geophysical Union, the American Meteorological Society and the Geological Society of America. He has received many national awards as a scholar, researcher and distinguished lecturer, has published extensively and has been editor or a member of the editorial boards of a dozen academic journals. He has testified before Congress and has chaired numerous committees in service to the federal government, such as the NASA Senior Review for the Earth Sciences in 2005. He has chaired committees and panels of the National Research Council since 1987 and currently chairs “An Ocean Infrastructure for U.S. Ocean Research in 2030.” A highly visible scientist, Barron stressed his commitment to the full spectrum of academic disciplines, saying he is “an ardent supporter and advocate for the full spectrum of excellence in the arts and humanities, sciences, law, business and medicine.” A native of Lafayette, Ind., Barron has two grown children. He said he and his wife, Molly, are “a partnership” and that she will be an active participant in supporting Florida State University while he is president. SB

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Feature

Seminole Productions teams-up with

Seminole Boosters By Tim Fordyce

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From the FSU Walk to the exciting action on the field, the halftime speech, the trophy presentation and even Coach Bowden’s final post-game press conference, Seminole Productions had every angle of the memorable event covered. However, such indepth coverage of Florida State University’s renowned athletic programs is nothing new for Seminole Productions. Under the direction of Mark Rodin and the Florida State University College of Communication & Information, this talented team of producers, videographers and editors has been producing award-winning videos for nearly 25 years. Seminole Productions’ achievements have also been recognized nationally and internationally, winning more than 60 awards for their creative work produced for the FSU Athletic Department, other departments within the university and many non-profit and government-related entities. While the outstanding work of Seminole Productions has received wide acclaim, it is most often recognized by Seminole fans for it’s creatively produced videos, seen during home football, basketball and baseball games. The team’s work also appears often on FSU Athletic Department-related Web sites, and on coaches’ shows that air regularly on many local, state and national television outlets. The entire Seminole Productions team was honored to be on hand in Jacksonville and proud to play an important role in preserving the victorious end to the Bobby Bowden era for generations of Seminole fans to come. They look forward to sharing in many future successes, as Seminole Athletics and the Seminole Boosters begin an exciting new decade. To learn more about the professional services available through Seminole Productions, please contact Tim Fordyce, Project Development/Producer at tfordyce@fsu.edu, or (850) 284.5260. SB

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Photos courtesy seminole productions

old, wet weather couldn’t dampen true Seminoles’ spirits as Head Coach Bobby Bowden led the FSU walk into Jacksonville’s Gator Bowl. And every step of the way, the Seminole Productions video team was there, capturing all the sights, sounds and emotion of the legendary coach’s farewell 33-21 victory over the West Virginia Mountaineers.


Feature

Seminole Productions’ services are available outside the university (for any Non Profit & Government-related video projects)

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Annual Report

Growing the Endowment

The athletic scholarship endowment currently has $43.8 million and would need $185 million to fully endow scholarships at current costs. By mATT BeHnKe, ChIEF FINANCIAl OFFICER

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Annual Report

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eminole Boosters, Inc., is the fundraising arm for Seminole Athletics. Our primary areas of fundraising are: Annual Funds - These funds are unrestricted and are currently used to fund athletic department operations (including scholarships) and the costs of fundraising. These donations are associated with ticket priority and parking privileges. Restricted Funds - These funds are restricted by donors and must be used for specific sports and purposes. Facility Donations – These funds are used to construct athletic facilities and to pay the associated debt service. Endowment Donations - These funds are invested and are to be used to fund athletic scholarships. Many schools in the ACC rely on investment earnings within their athletic scholarship endowment to pay for scholarships. We have been very fortunate that our annual funds have been sufficient to pay for athletic scholarships. The resulting

impact is that we have reinvested our endowment earnings in an effort to aggressively grow our endowment. This is necessary because while most schools in the ACC were established centuries ago, The Florida State University was established in 1947 and the athletic scholarship endowment was not established until 1988. Our Endowment Committee is comprised of members of the National Board of Directors as well as professionals within the investment arena. Our committee meets quarterly to review investment performance, discuss current trends with our investment consultant, interview existing managers — and it is continually reevaluating our asset allocation to best manage the Endowment Fund. As of Dec. 31, 2009, our Endowment Fund totaled $43,816,253 and was comprised of the following: • Invested Assets - $27,694,095 • Real Estate Holdings - $14,245,311 • Short-term Cash Holdings - $1,876,847

In the coming months, we will be redesigning our annual report. As part of that redesign, we will provide a report on our Endowment Fund — its holdings and its returns for the fiscal year. Your donations to Seminole Boosters are vital to the success of our athletic programs. Most of your donations are immediately put to work in one form or another to operate the Department of Athletics or to meet debt service requirements. However, your endowment contributions are different. They are immediately invested in order to close the gap between where we are today and where we aim to be. In order to fully fund scholarships from our Endowment Fund, we would need approximately $185 million. The National Board of Directors has placed an emphasis on growing our endowment because we must chart the course for the future of Seminole Athletics. We need to bridge that gap. Endowment gifts provide a legacy for the future of Seminole Athletics, a legacy that we all look forward to enjoying immensely. SB

UniVerSiTy ENDOWMENT CHART rank 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

institution harvard University yale University stanford University Princeton University University of texas system Massachusetts Institute of technology University of Michigan Northwestern University Columbia University texas A&M system University of Chicago University of Pennsylvania University of Notre Dame University of California Duke University Emory University Cornell University Washington University Rice University University of Virginia

2008 endowment

1 year % change

$36,556,284,000 $22,869,700,000 $17,200,000,000 $16,349,329,000 $16,111,184,000 $10,068,800,000 $7,571,904,000 $7,243,948,000 $7,146,806,000 $6,659,352,000 $6,632,311,000 $6,233,281,000 $6,225,688,000 $6,217,340,000 $6,123,743,000 $5,472,528,000 $5,385,482,000 $5,350,470,000 $4,610,164,000 $4,572,613,000

+5.5% +1.5% +.2% +3.6% +3.2% +.9% +6.8% +11.4% 0% +1% +6.9% -6.1% 4.2% -3.4% +3.6% -1.6% +2.6% -3.9% -1.3% +4.6%

Info provided by Inside Higher Ed and a NACUBO/TIAA-CREF survey

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Volunteer

(Clockwise from top) Seminole Booster volunteers Jason Navarro, Gene Deckerho and Garrick Wright; Tony Petruzzi with Gene Deckerho; Rob Flohr with sons Andrew and Alex. Booster volunteers like James Warren (page 61), Tony Petruzzi, Rob Flohr and Brian and Cortney Williams (page 61) have managed to sign up hundreds of new donors and season ticket holders through their personal networks.

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Volunteer

THEY’RE SEMINOLE FANS,

JUSTLIKEYOU Every Seminole fan has a friend who cheers for the Noles … By Jerry KUTZ

PhOtOs COURtEsy VOlUNtEERs

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here is this one guy in Panama City Beach, Fla. — who goes by the nickname Jamnolfin on Warchant.com — who wanted to help Florida State win. He couldn’t increase his Seminole Booster annual contribution, so he decided to invest some time asking his fellow message board posters to join Seminole Boosters and help fund FSU athletics. The results have been staggering. There is this other guy — a financial analyst in Tampa — who was inspired by the first guy’s results and started asking his friends too. And there was a third guy in Atlanta, Ga. — a member of the Seminole Boosters Inner Council — who, like the second guy, was inspired by the first guy’s success. He formulated a simple plan to recruit five new Boosters from his list of

Seminole friends… and wound up with surprising results. I use the brown paper bag word “guy” because the three men view themselves as “ordinary Joes” just trying to do what they can to help the Seminoles beat the Gators one year sooner. In reality, they are neither ordinary nor just guys, as the men are blessed with wives equally committed to the Seminole cause. Jamnolfin has what posters call “thread cred.” In other words, James and Connie Warren are trusted people within the Warchant.com message board world. And well they should be. The two volunteers spent countless hours trying to help people understand FSU’s basic financial need — explaining how donations fund the athletics program — and helping them with ticket and parking questions.

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“I think the fact that I was one of them instead of a Seminole Booster fundraiser gave me their trust,” Warren said. “My small campaign to draw in new Boosters took off and I found I had a knack at it and here we are. “I’ve been a season ticket holder for 23 years, so I kind of knew the ropes. I met (Seminole Booster Vice President) Tom Carlson and he told me some of the hard facts and I said I could probably get a few new Boosters. Never in my wildest dreams did I think I could get as many as I did.” Warren said the questions fans asked were generally pretty basic. They just don’t realize that total revenue from tickets, bowls, television, etc. is not enough to cover the cost of athletics. Warren said he had to explain that there is a $10-12 million annual shortfall that

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Volunteer

Garrick Wright, Kirk Luchman, Tony Petruzzi and Jeff Spencer

“They just wanted to know exactly where their money goes. There’s a lot of people that don’t know that housing, scholarships, facilities are all paid for by Seminole Boosters.” James Warren, Seminole Booster Volunteer Seminole Boosters covers with membership donations. “They just wanted to know exactly where their money goes,” Warren said. “There’s a lot of people that don’t know that housing, scholarships, facilities are all paid for by Seminole Boosters.” Warren said there are a number of other misconceptions. “Some think the annual price for Boosters is due all at once. That lower level Boosters don’t really make a difference. That the school only cares about upper level Boosters and the thinking that if I can’t attend games what’s the point of donating?Fans just want to get involved and a lot of them just didn’t realize exactly what the Boosters do and how easy it is to contribute and that’s where I could help,” he explained.

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“Your loyalty to FSU is not a t-shirt hanging in your closet, its your devotion, love and willingness to make sure we succeed, on and off the field, in and out of the classroom. When you join Seminole Boosters, donate to capitol campaigns or help endow scholarships, you are not a fan of FSU, you are FSU! It’s contagious among the people that have a deep love for this university.” One by one, people responded to Jamie. Some didn’t realize that the athletics department does not make enough money to fund itself and that it depends on Seminole Booster members for more than $10 million in annual funds. They also didn’t know that scholarships are not free and that the annual cost, more than $9 million, is paid for by memberships. They

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thought the athletics department was rolling in money or was funded by the university or by state dollars. They just didn’t know that by state law athletic facilities can only be built with private dollars and not state dollars. Jamie fielded lots of questions from fans about tickets and parking and how they can be improved with Booster membership. If he or Connie received a question they weren’t sure how to answer, Jamie would forward them to the Booster office staff for help. The bottom line is that Jamie and Connie Warren have helped hundreds and hundreds of people — more than 500 in all — become Seminole Booster members and season ticket holders. The impact of their effort is in the hundreds of thousands of dollars already and the new Booster members keep rolling in. So do new volunteers, who are inspired by their results. “I have been telling all my friends how much FSU needs us and it’s time for everyone to be a Booster at whatever level they can give,” said Rob Flohr, a Warren disciple in Tampa. “I have even told them that if they are not Boosters,


PhOtOs COURtEsy VOlUNtEERs

Volunteer

for as little as $60 a year, I won’t be able to share tickets with them. It’s time for all Seminoles to ‘Get with the Program.’” Flohr said his friends just needed a little nudge. “FSU is not ‘top of mind’ for most like it is for crazy people like me, so I am doing the nudging,” he said. People give to people for causes they believe in, so it makes perfectly good sense that the most powerful marketing tool is a committed volunteer. Bryan and Cortney Williams heard the story about the Warrens and decided they would give it a try, too. What they created was a blueprint any volunteer can follow. They started with their address book and selected 52 friends with FSU ties. Next, they sent an e-mail with information about the Booster mission to their friends and asked if they would join at some level. Eight of their friends responded that they were already Boosters and another 14 said they would join that day. They had already surpassed their goal of five new members but were inspired to make phone calls to see what the others were thinking. They found themselves answering the same questions the Warrens were getting about FSU’s true financial needs and the benefits of membership. Suddenly, they had doubled their goal and realized that the remainder of their friends who had not responded were probably operating under the misconception that FSU simply did not need their support. By the time they had finished calling their list, 35 of the 44 non-Booster friends had pledged. Each of us “guys” has a social network filled with Seminole fans who may be operating under the same misconceptions. If you would be willing to reach out to your networks, the Seminole Booster office will be happy to assist you. Contact Derril Bleakley (dbleakley@fsu.edu) or Mary Bailey (mbailey@admin.fsu.edu) at (850) 644-3484. SB

(Top) Brian and Cortney Williams (Above) James and Connie Warren

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Volunteer

Giving Back So FSU Can Move Forward The little things you can do to make a difference at FSU

I remember the first moment I set foot on the Florida State campus. That was many years ago and the campus looked very different. As alumni return to visit, and some have not been back for a long time, I’m sure they relive that same feeling I had on the first day, the day we knew we had made the right decision. That was 1990 for me and I remember the first year of games at Doak Campbell Stadium, Dick Howser, the Civic Center and other FSU venues as the time of my life. I was in college; I was a SEMINOLE and loved every minute of it. Today there is change! World class facilities, Rhodes Scholars, new classrooms, the world’s largest and highest powered magnet laboratory and world class instructors.

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FSU is a leader. Everywhere you look, the campus has grown to accommodate the demand of not only elite student-athletes in all sports but a general student body with an average high school GPA approaching a 4.0. Back in my day, my responsibilities were to make the rent, get the grades and graduate. I was unaware of the many needs this University has to operate annually. As a graduate I knew I had an obligation to give back to FSU and I wanted to do that, but I simply didn’t know how — and, more importantly, why! I am very proud to call Tallahassee my home. I came to FSU, graduated and immediately became a resident of this great city. The community is like no other. There’s a unique closeness you feel to your neighbors, the fans and the university.

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After I established myself in my profession, it was time to help FSU athletics beyond annual giving. Now more than ever FSU looks to outside funding to operate all 19 varsity sports. State funds are unavailable to athletics programs so FSU looks to its alumni, Boosters and many local and national companies to provide the money to run the programs we cheer for. I wanted to volunteer my time so I met with Boosters Vice President Jerry Kutz to discuss how I could become more involved. The Booster staff explained the current situation to me, including immediate financial needs and the future need to raise money to balance the athletics budget. As a businessman, and a fan, that news was tough to swallow.

PhOtOs COURtEsy FsU PhOtO lAB (FOOtBAll stADIUM) AND RAy stANyARD (tROPhy CAsEs IN AtRIUM)

By Tony PeTrUZZi, VOlUNtEER CAMPAIGN ChAIRMAN AND INNER COUNCIl MEMBER


I wanted to write this article in hopes that other Seminoles who read it would relate to my story and learn what makes our athletics department function. I’ll admit that I didn’t understand the department’s funding — revenue, expenses or even who signs the checks. Private funding is the heartbeat of athletic scholarships and facilities. Whether it is renovating an older venue or building a new one, the university must look to private donations and, many times, to volunteers to help raise the money. You may have the desire to help our university. All you have to do now is act. Imagine Doak Campbell stadium with its miles of grey bleachers sitting empty, except for you. You stand up spontaneously about every minute, throw both hands in the air and exhale an exhausting “Woooooo!” But you’re alone. Well, the popular fan display called “The Wave” only creates excitement when all 83,000 fans are in it together. It’s the same concept as Booster membership and volunteering: We need everyone’s help. More than 350 men and women studentathletes receive some form of scholarship aid funded by your annual donations to Seminole Boosters and they are counting on you each and every year. Their scholarships cost more than $9 million annually (tuition, housing, books and meals) and are not paid for by the State of Florida but rather your Seminole Booster donations. My request is simple. If you are a NOLE, give back. All I’m asking you to do beyond your annual gift is to bring the Seminole Boosters one new donor in 2010. If you’re not a Booster, call (850) 644-3484 today and learn how to become a member and a volunteer. Visit us at: www.seminole-boosters.com. After you finish reading this issue of UNCONQURED give this publication to a fan or co-worker and ask them to join us in our march. All it takes is one! Finally, I want to thank Coach Bobby Bowden! You have done more for this university than just win football games. You have taken every athlete of yours and instilled in them the virtues of faith, family and education. It carried over to the fans and students too! SB

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Who we are...What Your Seminole Booster annual membership finances Florida State

Q: Who are we? Q: What do we do? Q: Why would you A: We are avid Seminoles who A: We provide the winning edge want to join? help FSU succeed! for FSU coaches and student-athletes A: It feels good and you get Seminole Boosters is a not-for-profit organization comprised of more than 15,000 loyal members who make tax-deductible annual gifts to

fund Florida State University Athlet ics. Ticket, bowl and television revenues are not enough to cover the cost of college athletics and like many other schools, FSU looks to its boosters to supplement that athletic budget. More than 90 cents of -ev ery dollar contributed by our mem

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and make FSU sports more fun for our members. We use membership gifts, which range from $60 to more than $12,000 per year, to fund: • Scholarships for more than 350 student-athletes (more than $9 million per year); • State-of-the-art athletic facilities and equipment • Coaches salaries and operational budgets • Fan-friendly experiences including:

bers goes directly to funding athletic scholarships and other budgetary needs.

parking & tailgating opportunities, high-tech video boards, concessions, cheerleaders, Osceola and Renegade, the Marching Chiefs, the spring coaches’ tour and much more.

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benefits. Your membership will make a profound difference for our studentathletes and coaches both on the field and off and will make you feel more a part of your program. You will also enjoy an array of meaningful member benefits: • Ticket priority • Parking priority • Exclusive invitations to member events • Subscription to Unconquered Magazine & Florida State Times • Weekly news & events e-mails • Distinctive Booster license plate • Tax deduction


we do...Why join? Athletics and makes meaningful benefits available to you Receive ticket priority with “No Bump” provisions

“Without your

All donors who maintain the appropriate membership level for their number of season tickets are guaranteed the

contributions to Seminole Boosters,

right to renew seats and cannot be bumped from them by any other Booster.

FSU would not be recognized worldwide for excellence on and off the field”. Christian Ponder FSU Quarterback

• The Legacy Golden Chief pays the average annual cost of one scholarship ($25,000) and receives all the benefits of a Platinum Golden Chief status plus the added recognition of a scholarship donor.

Join the Team behind the Teams (850) 644-3484 www.seminole-boosters.com S EMINO LE-BO OST ERS .CO M

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Spring Tour

2010 Jimbo Fisher Coaches Tour & Legends Golf Tournament

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he beginning of the Jimbo Fisher era of Seminole Football also marks the launch of a reorganized Coaches Tour sponsored by Seminole Boosters. For 34 years, Coach Bowden was the key figure in a rigorous spring schedule of Booster golf tournaments and speaking engagements. The events, held in April and May, were successful in boosting enthusiasm and contributions. Because of the Seminole Boosters’ increased financial responsibilities in support of Seminole Athletics, the focus of the new Jimbo Fisher Tour is designed to emphasize the recruitment of new Boosters, boost the sale of season tickets

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and maximize income from the events, with the profits being shared by Seminole Boosters and local clubs. The involvement of Coach Fisher, who wants to help expand membership and raise funds, is important to the Boosters’ fundraising initiatives. The structure of the Tour is expected to evolve as more effective ways of employing his unique style become apparent. The Boosters have plans for a 20-city tour in April and May, beginning immediately after the Spring Garnet & Gold Game on April 10. Seminole Boosters President Andy Miller has invited Seminole Clubs and area Seminole Booster organizing committees to become partners and participate in the events. Please check the Seminole Boosters Web site (Seminole-Boosters.com) for details on the events in each city. SB

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Spring Tour

Tour Schedule 1 orange park • Monday, April 12 2 pensacola • Thursday, April 15 3 panama city • Friday, April 16 4 atlanta • Monday, April 19 5 Melbourne • Friday, April 23 6 Miami • Saturday, April 24 7 tampa • Friday, April 30 8 orlando • Saturday, May 1 9 Jacksonville • Monday, May 3 J ocala • Tuesday, May 4 K ft. lauderdale • Friday, May 7 L West palm Beach • Saturday, May 8 M pinellas county • Friday, May 14 N ft. Myers • Saturday, May 15 O sarasota/Bradenton • Monday, May 17 P polk/highlands counties • Friday, May 21 Q Wakulla • Saturday, May 22 R destin • Thursday, May 27

Visit www.seminolebooster.com for contact information and event locations.

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Student Boosters

QBs represent FSU, Student Boosters during spring recruiting By Arielle Haynes,

Seminole Student Boosters President

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ll year long, FSU Football coaches travel across the country to visit, evaluate, and meet the friends, family and guidance counselors of the best high school football players in the nation. They present Florida State to each player and assure them that this is the place where they want to be for the next four years. Sounds simple. But every other program is doing and saying the same things. From December to Feb.  1, the coaches and players of Florida State University hosted a select group of players that turned out to be the sixth best recruiting class in the nation, according to ESPN. Quarterbacks and Seminole Student Booster board members E.J. Manuel and Christian Ponder played pivotal roles in the success of the 2010 recruiting class. “It means a lot to me to get to know the new guys that come in,” Ponder said. “I want to make sure that they feel at home and that I show them that Florida State University is the best place for them.” Ponder is one of many players who host the prospective student-athletes on campus visits. He shows the recruit what life is like as an FSU student-athlete. On Feb. 3, the National Signing Day “War Party,” hosted by Seminole Athletics Marketing and Seminole Boosters, spotlighted the 2010 recruiting class by streaming the event live over the Internet for all Seminole fans to see. Manuel took phone calls from many Booster donors who called during the program to pledge financial support for the athletics program. “The Boosters do so much for us athletes and it is important to show them our appreciation, even if it is just by answering their phone calls, taking their pledges and saying, ‘Thank you,’” said Manuel. “I’m sure many of the recruits watched online and saw how much fan support we have.” There’s a buzz in the air regarding spring football practice and much excitement surrounds this year’s spring scrimmage on April 10. A new chapter has opened, a new era is on the horizon. The players feel it, the coaches know it, the fans need it. Be there in 2010. SB

True Seminole Update 2010 True Seminole Game Day Tees are coming soon. This year’s t-shirt theme came from head Coach Jimbo Fisher — “Take Doak Back.” Shirts will be available through the following retailers: Bill’s Bookstore, FSU Bookstore, Seminole.com fan store and Garnet & Gold. Remember, a portion of the proceeds comes back to FSU to fund an athletic scholarship.

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Student Boosters

“WE ARE FLORIDA STATE” By arielle HayneS, SEMINOlE STUDENT BOOSTERS PRESIDENT

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ensational tweets about Florida State are the talk of town, or should I say the nation, these days. Former FSU recruiting coordinator and now offensive coordinator James Coley makes a point to let the whole world know that “WE ARE FLORIDA STATE.” Recently named as the No. 1 recruiter in the Atlantic Coast Conference, Coley is making great strides for this university’s football program. A graduate of the 1999 class, Coley never dreamed that he would come back to his alma mater as a coach. After coaching high school football and earning his Master’s Degree as a graduate assistant at Louisiana State University, Coley quickly climbed the ladder. He became an assistant coach for the Miami Dolphins and then Florida International University before he landed the job at FSU coaching tight ends. Coley even turned down an NFL offer to remain at FSU with newly-named Head Coach Jimbo Fisher. The future is bright for Coach Coley. Coaches with his zeal, his passion and his love for the game are what fans desire. If you want a coach who puts his heart on the line every time he calls a play, who develops the players as athletes as well as

men and who glows with that South Florida “swag,” then you want a coach like James Coley. Often referring to himself as 007, Coley’s smooth ways have won the commitment of dozens of recruits to this fine university. With his tweets gaining national exposure, and becoming all the rave in newspapers such as USA TODAY, Coach Coley brings positive press and healthy attention to Florida State. Recent tweets: “BIG spear diplomacy … we carry a SPEAR, u run from ONE,” and “Welcome to The Florida State University, Welcome to the SEMINOLE Way Of Life!” Coley has inspired college coaches to enter his twitter world. Urban Meyer has even tried to come up with tweets to rival Coley’s. Recruiting is in a new day and age and the technology that is in our hands allows the entire world to know just what’s running through our minds. With a relentless attitude, warrior-like if you will, James Coley will continue to use technology to sing the praises of our university. He is currently letting us know “that this is OUR world, CLAIM it SEMINOLES!!!” SB

Follow Coach Coley today and stay connected with the top recruiter in the ACC. Twitter.com/CoachColey

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Fan Photos

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TOMAHAWK

Compliance

From the Office of Athletics Compliance With the 2009 early signing period and 2010 February signing period (National Signing Day for Football) for all our teams behind us, our coaching staffs will be begin to turn their attention to the recruiting of prospective student-athletes for 2011-12. During this past year, we were asked two common questions about recruiting from our fans, boosters and alumni. We hope this helps you better understand your role in the recruiting process in the areas of Representative of Athletics Interest and the definition of a pre-existing relationship with a potential prospective student-athlete. If you have any further compliance questions, please contact us at (850) 644-42702 “Remember To Ask Before You Act”

Who is a Representative of Florida State Athletics Interest? You are a Representative of Florida State Athletics Interest (also known as a “Booster”) if ANY of the following applies: • Y  ou are the parent or legal guardian of an enrolled student-athlete • Y  ou are a former student athlete of Florida State University • Y  ou are or have ever been a season ticket holder • Y  ou are or have been a member of any athletic booster club affiliated with Florida State (Seminole Boosters, Alumni Association, Varsity Club, Sport Fan Club) • Y  ou have made any form of financial contribution to Florida State University Athletics • Y  ou have participated in promoting the Seminole collegiate athletics program • Y  ou have assisted or have been requested to assist in the recruitment of prospects • Y  ou currently employ or have previously provided or helped arrange employment for enrolled student-athletes

WELCOME NEW MEMBERS (as of October 19, 2009)

PLATINUM GOLD CHIEF Jeffrey & Agnes Stoops

GOLDEN CHIEF

Andrew Gutierrez Bill Sawyer Charles Minter Family David and Lisa Skelton David and Mary Bellamy Eric and Andrea Friall Gene McGee

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Four Part Test

Is there a pre-existing relationship? • D  id the relationship between the athlete (or the athlete’s parents) and the individual providing the benefit(s) develop as a result of the athlete’s participation in athletics or notoriety related thereto? • D  id the relationship between the athlete (or the athlete’s parents) and the individual providing the benefit(s) predate the athlete’s status as a prospective student-athlete? • D  id the relationship between the athlete (or the athlete’s parents) and the individual providing the benefit(s) predate the athlete’s status achieved as a result of his or her athletic ability and reputation? • W  as the pattern of benefits provided by the individual to the athlete (or the athlete’s parents) prior to the athlete attaining notoriety as a skilled athlete similar in nature to those provided after attaining such stature? If you answered NO to question 1, and YES to questions 2, 3, and 4, then there is an established relationship with the athlete. However, if you answered differently for any of the four questions, then by NCAA rules, there is NO pre-existing relationship and thus it is impermissible for you to provide and preferential treatment, benefits, or services to the athlete.

Jon Grinsell Mildred & A. J. Brickler T & L Farms The Slumans Tobin & Reyes Tommy Castle W. David Ellrich, Jr. Waters & Associates

SILVER CHIEF

Christopher M. Jackovich David H. Coldwell & Associates, Inc. Dr. Jerry & Cay Ford George Phillips Glenn Hunter John and Shana Thomas Mark Nelson Robert A. Dees Tim and Susan Burke

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Andrew M. Slutsky Barry R. Carlson Brad Herold Brandon J. Ray Brett Schaefer Brian and Kimberly Rowland Brian Cunningham Chad Polumbo Christopher Bishop Clifford Tompkins Daniel and Samia Akel David & Linda Grier David Randolph Astor David Rowland - Seaboard Distribution, Inc. Don Harbaugh Embassy Suites Brier Creek Raleigh NC Frank Winterling Gail Marcum Garrett and Rachel Chumney Gregory J. Cryan Gregory Morris Harry Sargeant James E. Bryce Jeffrey Henley John Adams John M. Tolar Kent & Shannon Lipham Leo Thomas, III Lindsey Phillips Lori Lee Lori Scherf Melaney McCary Michael L. Porter Michael Novotny Nicholas Warren Richard & Diane Stewart Rick & Shari Ferritto Robert and Dianne Ashmore Robert and Elizabeth Johnson Ryan B. Gudaitis Sarah Reilly Shane Davis Shawn J. Meade Thomas Guillot W.G. and Tiffiny Spoor Walter Wood William T. Cotterall

WARRIOR

Alex Smith Anthony and Yvette Calobrisi Benjamin and Bethany White Bradley and Tina Hollinger Brenda Rubin Brian C. Schoepflin Brian Chambers Bryan James Cade Herring Candice Stoutamire Carter Hastings Cedell Garland Christopher A. Macak Christopher and Theresa Hughes Colonel (R) Bryan Rogers Constance Eichler Corey Corrado Craig Nutting Cynthia C. Christopher Daniel & Leslie Phillips Daniel Rubin Darren & Kelly Howard Dennis Erickson, Jr. Edward A. Enos Ernie Jaworski Garrett & Megan Harbison James A. Skillings James and Harriett Hurley Jason Lee John and Pamela Hatch John Keitzer John Sinclair Jonathan & Megan Croft Josef Plum, M.D. Justin W. Rider Kelly & Tammy Porter Lauren S. Walker LT Seth A. Hirschkowitz Mark Melancon Mark S. Beckworth Mark V. Bonnin Maxwell and Malissa Counts Maxwell Mandell Michael Collins Michael J. Bosco Michael Richards Mike Orange Nat Fogle Nathaniel A. Turner, J.D. Paul & Karen Blonigen Philip T. Blair Raymond Egan Roger E. Chapin Ryan Nardozzi Sandra & James Dafoe Shannon and Lisa Neel Sivaroj Limvipuwat Steven & Karen Kemp


Steven Potts Tessa Bradford-Ward Thomas D. Carey Thomas Owen Thomas R. Kunish Timothy Saccucci Tolar Marcus Griffin Valerie N. Gardner William and Tiffany Cox William Ebeling William Givens William Stark

Steven Hall Tammie Stansberry Tammy Thompson Thomas F. Fey Timothy Jefferson Tony Keeler Vic Miller Vicki Soto Victor Bero William J. Fisher William M. Johns Willie Burgess

RENEGADE

BRAVE

Adam Swanson Alan & Erin Bratic Alan Wilson Amanda and Grant Gibson Andrew & Dorothy Urbanic Anthony J. Moreno Barak N. Zadok Bobbie W. Williams Brandon Bowden Brandon Miller Brandon Tolle Brian Merman Britt Willingham Bryan C. Waterhouse C. Shawn West Chris Albarado Chris Jones Christopher Kearney Christopher R. Hill Christopher Thomson Colby A. Giles Cox Radio, Inc. Daniel & Amy Hillman Darryn Dierickx David F. Helton David Hannah David Wesley David Westendick Dennis J. Crow Donald T. Post Dwayne Ottley Edwin Collins Elizabeth Davenport Fay Robinson Feehrer Family Franklin L. Parker Gerald P. Reardon Gregory A. Riccardi Ira and Sharon Silver James A. Garcia James A. Hallowell James L. Culpepper Jamil and Tishawna Dawson Jarin Whigham Jeffery W. Askins Jennifer Garcia Jeremy & Jennifer Jacobs Jeremy York John & Mina DeChristopher John M. Martinez Jorge Aldecoa Jorge Perez Joshua Root Kate Golden Katherine Raegan Miller Keith Foley Kerin South Kevin D. Burton Kevin Hobby Kimberlee J. Hamilton Lin Vinson Luis Miranda Matthew Maloney Matthew Nilles Matthew Reznik Michael Hopkins Michael Richardson Michael Walton Michelle Halderman Ms. Mary Bebe Fearnside Nicole Mutters Pamela Barr Paul and Kristen Wilson Paul Wainikainen Peter D. Metzger Revell Electric & Automated Access Systems Robert & Mary Cintron Robert & Nancy Durocher Robert Catlin Rodney J. Fisher Rosemary S. Bunn Ross Hilaman Roy Apple Sandra L. Holt Santosh Hari Sawyer Blackburn Scott Perry Shannon L. Haire Shawn Sweeten Sherman Clouden Stephen & Kelly Enriquez Stephen G. Miller, Jr. Steve E. Fishman

Aaron Toombs Adam and Crystal Gomez Alan F. Byrnes Alexandra Lindholm Andrew Miesch Annette Ladle Anthony Granato Ashley Briggs Bob & Nancy Brown Bob & Natalie Rawley Brent M. Pease Brett L. Ross Brian F. Adkins Brian Lee Bruno Selmo Cecile Bailey Rider Charles and Desiree Bowen Christi Emmons Christopher Jennings Christopher Patrick King Christopher Patterson Curtis Trexler Darryl Forrest David & Robin Novak Don Dooley Donna L. Melgaard Douglas L. White Dr. Archibald A. McNeill, III Ed Loturn Erika Carlson Faithy Harris-Dowdell Felicia Robinson Gary Hicks Gena T. Causer George W. Arnau Herman E. Clark J. Gary Hamilton James Chute James Mosrie Jeff B. Jackson Jeff Flamm Jeffrey & Laura Barber Jennifer Clayton Jennifer Evans Jim Richardson John Antoon, II John F. Ormsby John H. Lenker John McClow John Sheridan Jonathan C. Sajeski Joseph and Linda Folladori Joseph Bowens Jose-Trelles Herrera Joshua Rogers Katherine L. Hendry Kenneth J. Williams Kenny Williams Kirk Vanzee Krista Kutash Kristopher McLane Leslie Hanley Linda F. Kaufman Lloyd F. Sweet, Jr. Luther McClellan Lynda Dickens Maffett Elizabeth Clare Marc and Christine Castelo Marc and Ericka Peterman Mark Mathiason Mark Nugent Mark Smith Mary Seldomridge Matthew R. Patania Matthew Tonuzi Michael & Meghan Hilleboe Michael & Michele Wolfert Michael Fitzsimmons Michael Lefevre Michael Medwin Michelle Brooks Miguel A. Giraud Jr. Mike Cutcliff Mike Dasher Mike Vivas Mitchell White Neill Davis Nicole C. Velasco Patrick Quirk Perry D. Long Philip Swartz Phillip Bolin Raleigh W. Brown Ramon Nieves

Raul E. Loys Richard L. Runyan Robert & Deborah Reynolds II Robert Franz Robert Pumphrey Robert Stafford Rodney Thompson Roger D. Howard, Jr. Royce Burt Russell & Christine Bergstrom Ryan A. Frederick Ryan and Amy Maloney Sara Nam Sarah A. Jarvis Scott Thomas Seth and Shannon Schreiber Shawn Sackman Stephanie Samergedes Stephen Juaire Steve Neill, Jr. Steven Foust Stuart Schwartzreich Thomas M. Bendle Thomas R. Young, IV Tom & Nancy Dolan Trevor Harkness Valerie and Anthony D’andrea Victor Rivers Vince Celentano Wendell Williams Willis J. Collier

IRON ARROW

A Community Property Aaron S. Kirsch Adam S. Turk Adrienne Daniels Alan Ashby Alan Nestico Alison L. Furrevig Amy Alexander Andrea Cottrell Andrew G. Elder Andrew Pitts Andrew Watts Ann Mooney Anthony Zangrilli Antonio White Ashley Love Bette B. Harrison Bill & Laura Bales Brandi Stuart Brendan D. Mattingly Brent Buford Brett A. Davison Brian Arent Brian Gnage Brian J. Collins Brian Parker Brian Williams Brittnee T. Newman Bruce A Schultz Bruce McKinney Bryan Waronker Caroline M. Winters Casey Terrell Catherine Rollo Ceja Friedman Celina Cavanagh Charles Masters Charles W. “Wes” Singletary, Jr. Chloe Campbell Chris Caravello Chris Casey Chris Sanders Chris Starkey Christian T. Robinson Christopher Coe Christopher Larkin Christopher M. Golfin Christopher Reilly Chuck Gilbert Chuck Newcomer Clay Bruce Clinton Swigart Colby S. Redfield Connie Gregory Cory N. Hodgerson Craig Feeny Cynthia D. Cozzo Dale W. See Dana Rozelle Daniel Villazon Darby C. Miller David & Tanya Chernow David & William Mims, Sr. David Kuhn Deborah and Richard Betourne Deborah L. Shannon Dennis Bailey Dennis Dye Donald & Nancy Sharkus Douglas Burton Douglas Rozelle Dr. & Mrs. Gary Christensen Dr. Hal C. Burke Drew Stringer Duane O. Gilmore

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Edward H. Routh Eric Reading Eric S. Quick Erin E. Fletcher Ernest L. Reddick Ersley Johnson, Jr. Ethan Linker F. Patrick Casey Fontella D. Mitchell Frank Fawthrop Fred E. Signs Fred Fluty Gina F. Mann Gregory McBurney Guy Minshall Harris G. King Henry Hodde Holly Morcom Isadore F. Rommes Jr. Jack Teschel Jacob Shokes James & Carol Olson, II James D. Watford James Fitch James Harless James L. Moody James L. Perdomo James McGale James Waters Janine Overcash Jason A. Donath Jason and Carmen Hendrix Jason Ennis Jason L. Decker Jay Ferrin Jay Peeper Jean and John Hogan Jean M. Nuamah Jeanne M. Murray Jeff King Jeff Knafelc Jeff LaConte Jeffrey A. Widelitz Jeffrey Hartley Jeffrey J. Otto Jennifer Chatraw Jennifer Iacino Jennifer Menendez Jennifer Thornton Jessica Reo Jim Barboni Jimmy Paulk Jody Hatcher Joe Blaylock Joel Trick John A. Psomas John Adams John L. Geoghagan John M. Geary Jon Daugherty Jon Lynn JONATHAN RANDOLPH Jordan Harris Jorge Vinat, III Jose L. Gill Joseph and Jenny Palumbo Joseph C. Romack Joseph Miracle Joshua & Elexis Brewer Joy Beech Judith Tankel Julia Owens-Voyles Justin Wiley Kaleb Post Kate Thomas Katherine Vosmik Kathryn and Robert Hawkanson Kathryn Parker Kathy W. Evans Kathy Widner Kaylynn R. Monroe Kenneth L. Stivers Kent Rogers Kevin and Michelle Collins Kevin Ferm Kim McAfee Kirk Veazey Kirk Wands Kristy Carter Lance Earl Larry Newkirk, Jr. Laura Bookout Leah Johnson LeAnne G. Carlin Linda G. Rooks Linda G. Seidl Lindsay Pitt Lisa A. Bisgard Lorraine Walter Lorri Webb LTC. & Mrs. Philip A. Sargent Lynne Oakes Marc Blackburn Mark A. Doerr Mark Sherman Mark T. Olson Martha Jane Harris Mary Bosco

Mathew E. Hauer Matt Hatchadorian Matthew Duran Matthew J. Giddings Matthew Ward Michael & Tina Kercher Michael Bridges Michael Delgado Michael Frias Michael J. Wille Michael K. Bellon Michael Smith Michael Smith Michael Stacy Mike Merchel Mike Penta Mr. & Mrs. Harry B. Watkins,III Mr. Robert D. Muggleston Nanci King Nancie L. Howley Nancy and Robert Mackey Neal P. Holland Nelson W. Rogers Nicholas Bourgeois Nicholas Farber Nick & Ellen Gieschen Nick and Amy Volonakis Nickolas Hinton Nicole C. Schneider Page Woodall Patricia T. Stelges Patrick Love Patti Gee Paul and Kristina Loechelt Paul Hall Paul McAlister Paul Ort Paul R. Adams, Jr. Rachel C. Strouse Randal & Carolyn Ray Randall English Raquel Bailey Ray & Sharon Jenks Raymond F. Bianchi Reg Shrigley Rhett Brymer Rhonda Wynds Richard McCarthy Rick Steinke Robbie Ledbetter Robert & Julie Leverock Robert A. Castille Robert A. Humphrey Robert and Robin Stuyverson Robert F. Holland Robert Griffin Robert M. Gamin Robert Mesaros Robert P. Romig Robert S. Kan Jr. Robin Campbell Robin Smith Rosemary Oliver Russell & Linda Woodall Ryan Matthews Sandra L. Chamochumbi Scott M. Aborn Sean Beckett Sean Breslin Sean Farrell Sean Xenakis Shannon A. Powers Shannon N. Falzone Sonja Salas Stephanie & Shane White Stephanie Gagner Stephen Frouge Stephen M. Suber, Jr. Steve Cutright Steven J. Suknaic Tammy Franz-Cain Tammy Sturgis Terrance Comerford Thomas & Debra Savage Thomas & Jana Pennekamp Thomas Campbell Thomas W. Mund Tim Muth Timothy Telfer Tom Merritt Tom Roam Tony & Sherry Bruening Trevor B. Mask Trevor Boozer Tyler Spayd Vanessa G. Brun Victor Goodloe Wade Kuzmick Warren B. Yardley Wayne A. Kulich Wendi Kirwin Wesley and April Watson William and Jane Bachtler William F. Smith, Ph.D. William J. Arnold Zachary Salas

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2010 Quarterly Report

FSU aT h l e T I c S QUARTERLY REPORT

TEAM ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

INDIVIDUAL ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

COMPREHENSIVE ATHLETIC EXCELLENCE

11 of FSU’s teams earned a GPA of 3.0 or better

14 student-athletes earned a place on the President’s List with 4.0 GPA

15 of FSU’s teams earned a GPA of 2.5 or better

102 student-athletes were named to the Dean’s List (3.5-3.999) and 238 student-athletes earned a 3.0 or higher GPA (49% of our athletic population)

All 19 of FSU’s sports teams are expected to make NCAA post-season play, which is unprecedented in FSU sports history, and a rare feat for any college sports program

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Quarterly Report 2010

to be in class, in the weight room and on the field practicing every day. He‘s asked for support and we will provide it. I think it will make people proud of Florida State. We had to get through the academic misconduct and we worked through it and I think it’s behind us. Things are really fresh, we have a new outlook on where we are going.

Athletics Director Randy Spetman

PHOTOS BY MIKE OLIVELLA, ROSS OBLEY AND FSU SPORTS INFO

Q&A

Q: Jimbo often talks about the team — support staff, administrators and everyone involved in the program’s success. A: We are all in it together. He needs our help to provide him with the resources to be successful. He has gone out and found good people in his coaches who can help these young men develop socially, mentally and physically. In the academic community we need to continue to provide them great support to be successful in the classroom. Our No. 1 goal is to graduate these young men so they can be successful. They all aren’t going to get to play professional football and even if they do it’s not necessarily a long-term career. So we need to make sure we give them the education to be successful. I think Florida State has done a good job of that over the years.

By Jim Henry

Q: Talk about the excitement surrounding National Signing Day on Feb. 3 and that evening’s third annual Signing Day party. A: It was a great, great experience when you saw over a 1,000 people there (at the FSU “War Party”). From the time you walked into the Tallahassee Antique Car Museum you could just feel the energy. We are going in the right direction. I think Coach Fisher did a tremendous job with his staff and gathering up a great group of recruits. Like he said over and over, they are not only great athletes but they are people with character and they will represent our program well. I am really excited about the future and where we are going. I think his young staff is really energized and they get along really well. The players see that right away and that makes the players perform better. We will see more of this during spring football. And spring football will also be time to work out the kinks since the staff hasn’t worked together. From what I see in Jimbo’s organization, the kinks will be out before they get on the field for practice. It’s going to be a fun time at Florida State. And great compliments to Coach (Bobby) Bowden. He started all of this. Q: Obviously, Jimbo has his own style and he often speaks of the plan regarding his staff and the program’s goals.

A: He showed (his style) in gathering his staff, but they all have great expertise in recruiting (Florida), which is where we get a majority of our athletes. His staff is as good as anywhere else in the United States. Q: Talk about the renewed interest in football and how it’s impacting other important areas in the athletics department. A: It was disappointing to see our attendance in the stadium (last year). I know it’s a stretch but with our schedule next year I don’t know why we couldn’t have a sellout for every (home) game. And we should. We are going that way right now. We are putting a lot of energy in touching people who have been in our program and left. We’ve figured out how to get back to them and provide them some excitement, to offer them a great experience. The health of our program is having a full stadium. Q: During your travels, what issues are Florida State fans raising? A: Winning. Great credit goes to Coach Bowden and Jimbo last year. The year before we had a lot of off-the-field distractions and this past season we didn’t have any. And that comes from a new culture and expectations and they laid it down. I think that makes people very proud of our program. And Jimbo talked a lot about that. He expects them

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Q: Can you update fans on facility plans and progress? A: This month we are focusing on the new indoor tennis facility. It’s going to have six courts in it. We are actually building it in two phases. It won’t have all the amenities we want to have. We want to be able to host a match with 500 seats. We are at $4 million (but) we need $7 million to get to that level, so we will continue to raise funds. It will be the only indoor facility in northern Florida. I think we can get a tremendous amount of use from it. We also need an indoor practice facility. It gets labeled for football because it’s going to have a football field in it, but softball can practice in it, baseball will be able to go in there, they can run track. It’s going to be multi-purpose. Intramural teams can play there at night, so the university can use it. The band can practice in there in inclement weather. On game day, we can turn it into the biggest covered tailgate on campus. You can walk right across the field and be in the stadium. It’s an expensive enterprise, but I hope people understand that we need it. It’s just that today’s economy is making it a little more difficult to get there. It’s going to be close to the $25 million range to build something like that. Q: There seems to be renewed interest and enthusiasm regarding FSU. A: It couldn’t be a better time to be here. You walk around the campus and see the energy of the students and how the faculty is involved. We are a premier research institution university. The enthusiasm is here and it’s building. SB

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2010 Quarterly Report

Florida State was ranked #6 in comprehensive sports excellence FSU’s Brianna Barry named 2009 ACC Scholar-Athlete of the Year

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ormer Florida State volleyball star Brianna Barry has been named the 2009 ACC Volleyball Scholar-Athlete of the Year. Barry, who graduated in December with a degree in Sports Management after four remarkable years as a Seminole volleyball player, was also named to the ACC All-Academic Team for the fourth year in a row. She was joined on the squad by teammate Stephanie Neville, who made the team for the first time in her career. To qualify for selection to the ACC AllAcademic Team, student-athletes must have earned a 3.0 grade-point average during the fall semester and have maintained a 3.0 GPA for their careers. “First off, wow!” said Barry, who earned a 3.42 grade-point average in the fall and finished with a cumulative grade-point average of 3.5. “Being named the ACC Volleyball Scholar-Athlete of the Year is truly an amazing honor and I am very grateful and humbled to have been chosen. “I always wanted to make an impact on the court and in the classroom and I want to thank Florida State University for all the support that has been given to me the past four years.”

SOFTBALL

Florida State softball is accustomed to success. The Seminoles’ 2010 season isn’t expected to be any different.

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n fact Atlantic Coast Conference head coaches voted the Seminoles and Georgia Tech to share the league title. The Yellow Jackets are the defending conference champions and FSU was last year’s runner-up.

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“It’s a great honor to be predicted to finish so well,” FSU head coach Lonni Alameda said. Alameda is looking forward to building on the success from her inaugural season in 2009, when she replaced legendary head coach JoAnne Graf and guided the Seminoles to a 44-16 record and a program-best 17-4 mark in the ACC. Those accomplishments landed the program its first home NCAA regional since 2004. Alameda returned an experienced team, featuring five seniors and nine juniors. Included in those numbers are star pitchers Sarah Hamilton and Terese Gober, three-time team captain Carly Wynn and infield staples Ashley Stager and Kristie McConn. FSU also added a pair of experienced transfers in Tory Haddad (Ohio State) and Jen Lapicki (Tennessee). On the flip side, the Seminoles also welcomed five freshmen, including 2009 Georgia High School Player of the Year Morgan Bullock. FSU was expected to be tested, boasting a difficult schedule that featured four teams — Georgia Tech, North Carolina, Florida and Florida — that entered the season ranked in the top 25 nationally. After dropping its season opener 2-1 to Southern Miss, the Seminoles rebounded to win their next 11 games and entered conference play in mid-March against North Carolina at 21-2. Not surprisingly, Hamilton and Gober helped set the tone. Hamilton, a Tallahassee product from Chiles High School, was the 2009 ACC Pitcher of the Year and a third-team AllAmerican as a sophomore. Hamilton opened the 2010 season on the Amateur Softball Association’s Top 50 “Watch List” for the 9th Annual USA Softball National Collegiate Player of the Year Award. She is one of just four ACC players to be placed on the list.

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Gober, a senior from McDonough, Ga., enters her final season at FSU after earning a team-best 24 wins last season and SecondTeam All-ACC selection. Sophomore outfielder Shayla Jackson was one of many players who got off to a nice start at the plate, hitting safely in 20 of FSU’s first 23 games. Jackson, from Pembroke Pines, Fla., also put together a 15-game hit streak and led the Seminoles with a .418 average. She had company, too. Wynn, a Sharpsburg, Ga., native back for her final season after a six home run, 34 RBI junior campaign was at .408. FSU entered conference play with an impressive team batting average of .342. The Seminoles’ defense was expected to be anchored by a solid, experienced infield. Senior Ashley Stager (Trinity, Fla.) started all 60 games in 2009, junior Kristie McConn (Broken Arrow, Okla.) started 59 and fellow juniors Mallory Burden (Jacksonville) and Brittany Joseph (Laurel, Del.) combined to start 102 games. Youth was also being served. Four true freshmen, paced by starting third baseman Tiffani Brown (Havana, Fla.) played in five games on opening weekend and continued to produce during the season’s opening month.

TENNIS

Florida State’s tennis program represents consistency and exciting potential.

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he men’s team, under head coach Dwayne Hultquist, opened the 2010 season ranked No. 13 in the first Campbells/ITA men’s college tennis rankings. The Seminoles finished ranked at No. 13 in 2009. This is the fifth season in a row the Seminoles have started the season in the top 20. The Seminoles were the second-highest ranked team in the ACC, behind only No. 2 Virginia.

PHOTOS BY MIKE OLIVELLA, ROSS OBLEY AND FSU SPORTS INFO

VOLLEYBALL


Quarterly Report 2010

The ACC had 10 teams represented in the initial poll, and 19 of FSU’s 26 opponents were ranked, highlighted by 13 in the top 30. The women’s team, meanwhile, opened with its highest preseason ranking at No. 15. The Seminoles, directed by head coach Jennifer Hyde, made an immediate impression in January, when they advanced to the ITA National Indoor Championships for the first time in school history. Likewise, the ACC will continue to be one of the strongest leagues in the nation on the women’s side as it held five of the top 15 nationally-ranked schools on the list. No. 1 Duke, No. 7 Miami, No. 10 Georgia Tech and No. 14 Clemson held the other top spots. Both FSU’s men’s and women’s teams featured plenty of proven talent. Nationally ranked men’s players included junior Clint Bowles (Tampa, Fla.) at No. 23, senior Jean-Yves Aubone (Miami, Fla.) at 27 and senior Vahid Mirzadeh (Wellington, Fla.) at No. 111. Bowles won the singles Wilson/ITA Southeast Regional Championship during the fall season to advance to the ITA National Indoor Championships. Aubone was last year’s ACC Player of the Year. In doubles, Mirzadeh and freshman Connor Smith (Tampa, Fla.) opened the season at No. 31, the only Seminoles represented in doubles. The duo finished the fall season winning four of their five matches. The first time the duo competed with one another was at the Wilson/ITA Southeast Regional Championships, where they advanced to the finals. Leading the way for the Lady Seminoles are senior Lauren McCreless (Ogden, Utah) at No. 23, with No. 34 Noemie Scharle (Luxenberg), No. 62 Francesca Segarelli (Rome, Italy) and No. 115 Amy Sargeant (Walsall, England) earning spots on the singles list. The doubles teams of McCreless and Jessica Sucupira and Sargeant and Segarelli were expected to also play key roles.

DIRECTORS’ CUP: FSU EARNS HIGHEST RANKING EVER … #6 By Jim Henry

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andy Spetman envisions a time when Florida State annually earns top-10 status in the prestigious Learfield Sports Directors’ Cup. Potential rule changes to the award’s scoring system may help the Seminoles and other similar-sized Division I athletics programs accomplish that goal. “We are re-looking and studying the scoring system to see if we need to spread it out a little bit, to make it an even playing field,” said Spetman, FSU’s director of athletics. The Directors Cup is given annually by the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics to the colleges and universities with the most success in collegiate athletics. The University of North Carolina won the award for best Division I collegiate athletics program in its inaugural year in 1993-94. Since then, Stanford University has won it 15 consecutive years. FSU enjoyed one of its highest rankings in program history at No. 6 in the final fall Division I standings released in January. Final winter rankings are released April 29, and three spring rankings culminate with the winner being announced in July. FSU placed 15th in the final standings in 2009, third-best in the ACC behind No. 2 North Carolina and No. 8 Virginia. Points for the NACDA Directors’ Cup are based on order of finish in various NCAA sponsored championships. In Division I, for instance, 20 sports are counted in the standings — the top 10 men’s and the top 10 women’s. The scoring system favors large, successful athletics programs such as

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Stanford, which offers 34 varsity sports (18 female, 15 male, one coed). FSU, meanwhile, offers 19 varsity sports. “It will be difficult for us to hang on to our ranking throughout the year because we don’t even have 20 sports to select from,” Spetman explained. “We would have to win a large number of national championships in a given year to win it. It’s difficult to guess numberswise in scoring, but my strategic goal is to be in the top-10. Everyone would think it would be No. 1, but I look at the reality of it. I think we can get in the top-10 and stay in the top-10. I think our program is very close to that.” The final fall standings featured nine NCAA championships — cross country (men and women), field hockey (women), football (men/BCS and FCS), soccer (men and women), volleyball (women) and water polo (men). The Seminoles scored 295 points, 13 behind No. 4 North Carolina and 75 behind leader Stanford. FSU earned points in cross country (men and women), football, soccer and volleyball. Stanford, for the sake of comparison, earned points in seven of nine sports. Spetman credited FSU coaches, players and support staff for the program’s strong showing. He also shared another program goal: a cumulative grade-point average of 3.0 or better from FSU athletics teams. He said the cumulative GPA last fall was a high water mark of 2.92. “We continue to improve and it’s achievable,” Spetman said. “A lot of good things are happening here.”

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2010 Quarterly Report

SWIMMING AND DIVING

Strong finishes — including some that were surprising — helped Florida State’s swimming and diving teams make their marks on the conference and national levels.

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he FSU men’s team captured third place in February’s Atlantic Coast Conference Swimming Championships behind Virginia and North Carolina. Andy Hodgson (Blackpool, England) paced the Seminoles with his second straight 200 back conference title (1:42.90), while Rob Holderness (Butleigh Somerset, England) captured the 200 breast and reset his school record (1:55.41). The women’s team also matched the men by finishing third behind the Cavaliers and Tar Heels. Highlights included Charlotte Broadbent and Stephanie Sarandos setting new school records and the Seminoles earning four more All-ACC honors. Broadbent, a sophomore from Derbyshire, England, finished the 1650 free in 16:16.44, more than 20 seconds faster than the previous time mark of 16:36.90, which was set by freshman Marissa Harrington earlier in the season. In the 200 back, Sarandos (Waukesha, Wis) reset her previous career and school record twice on her way to a third place finish (1:54.14). Both men’s and women’s diving teams fueled the Seminoles’ success at the conference meet. In the men’s three-meter platform event, junior Mike Neubacher (Windermere, Fla.) earned a third-place finish with a score of 381.15. On the women’s side Aleia Monden (Mililani, Hawaii) earned the first All-ACC honors of her career with a second place finish. Monden’s score of 306.05 was a new personal

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record and her silver medal was the highest award earned by a Seminole woman in this year’s championships. In addition to Monden and Neubacher’s honors, Terry Horner won gold in the men’s three-meter and silver in the men’s one-meter, Landon Marzullo took third in the men’s one meter. Katherine Adham won bronze in the women’s one-meter, and Katie Sirounis earned bronze in the women’s three-meter. FSU’s quality depth was also on display, both in the pool and on the diving board. Top-five finishes for the men included junior Robby Hayes (100 free/44.22/fourth place); Danny Nguyen (200 fly/1:46.97/fifth place); the men’s 400 free relay team of Matt Shead, Hodgson, Mark Weber and Hayes (2:57.21/fourth place); and Landon Marzullo (diving/fifth place). Top-five finishes for the women included Marissa Harrington (1650/16:16.65/fourth place); C.J. Hendry (200 fly/1:59.06/fifth place); and the women’s 400 free relay team of Holly Mills, Hendry, Stevi Steinhauer and Jacelyn Phillips (3:19.90/fourth place). At the USA Diving Winter Nationals, Horner placed seventh in the men’s platform final with 845.45 points, while Jaq Schroeder also placed seventh on the women’s side with 567.15. While the teams were unable to stay in Columbus through the conclusion of the men’s and women’s one-meter dive due to academic obligations, Marzullo led the way with a firstplace finish in the preliminary round.

GOLF

To say that Florida State’s golf program is in capable hands is an understatement.

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SU’s men’s golf coach Trey Jones was named Golf Digest’s Mid-Season National Coach of the Year in January. Jones earned the award after a fall season that saw the Seminoles post two victories and three top-five finishes. The Seminoles’ women’s team, meanwhile, welcomed a familiar name in Kate Golden, a 14-year LPGA professional who was named the team’s interim head coach on Feb. 25 by

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FSU Director of Athletics Randy Spetman. Golden competed in more than 30 LPGA major championships, won the 2001 LPGA State Farm Classic and earned more than $1 million during the 2003 season. Both teams have turned in quality performances early in the spring season schedule. The men’s team won its third tournament of the year on Sunday, March 14, when the Seminoles slipped past South Carolina to win the Seminole Intercollegiate tournament championship at SouthWood Golf Course in Tallahassee. Seth Lauer (Huntington, Ind.), FSU’s senior captain, shared low-stroke honors at 1-under, 212 after 54 holes, and lost after four playoff holes. Sophomore Wesley Graham (Port Orange, Fla.) fired a final-round 68 that tied him for the low round of the day and was worth a share of third place. FSU will play in the ACC Championships in late April and is gearing towards its fifth consecutive NCAA appearance. The Seminoles played in a school record seven consecutive NCAA Tournaments from 1977 through 1983. Junior Marcarena Silva (Santiago, Chile) has paced the women’s team early this season. She has earned three top-10 finishes in six events this year to push her career total to five top-10 finishes. Freshman Jessica Negron (Ocala, Fla.) posted at consecutive tournaments where she was the team’s second-ranking golfer behind Marcarena. The Lady Seminoles will compete in the ACC Tournament April 16-18 in Greensboro, N.C.

TRACK & FIELD

Florida State needs a larger trophy case for track and field.

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he 13th-ranked men’s team continued its Atlantic Coast Conference streak by capturing its eighth consecutive, ninth overall, ACC Indoor Championships title in February. It could be said the Seminoles sprinted to victory. In an amazing display, FSU dominated the 200-meters with top three finishes from

PHOTOS BY MIKE OLIVELLA, ROSS OBLEY AND FSU SPORTS INFO

Both teams opened their 2010 seasons quickly. With a 5-2 victory over No. 51 Rice to end spring break, the men’s team, ranked 19th, improved to 10-2. The No. 15 Lady Seminoles (6-6) closed out their spring break with a nice 6-1 victory over No. 35 Pepperdine.


The Perfect Gift Your graduate will be recognized with their personalized message engraved on a 4” x 8” brick on the Legacy Walkway. This beautiful walkway surrounds University Charles Clark, Maurice Mitchell and Brandon Byram. Clark clocked an impressive time of 20.67 that was noted as the senior’s first NCAA automatic qualification and it led the NCAA as the fastest performance of the season. Following in second place with a personal record was Mitchell, who earned an NCAA provisional time with 20.87, the fifth best performance in the NCAA this season. Byram, who already owns an NCAA automatic time, took third place with a time of 21.04. The trio scored 24 of FSU’s 107-point meet total. The Lady Seminoles placed third at the ACC Indoor Championships, with Kim Williams leading the way. The junior broke the ACC record in the triple jump with a new mark of 14.23m/46-08.25. Eleven Seminoles advanced into the 2010 NCAA Indoor Championships in Fayetteville, Ark., in March. Clark and Williams both entered the two-day meet as the top athletes in their respective events. Williams (Kingston, Jamaica) was sensational, becoming only the fifth woman in NCAA history to win back-to-back indoor triple jump crowns. She earned her fourth career national title and her seventh All-American honor in her two-and-a-half year career. Pilar McShine (Port-of-Spain, Trinidad & Tobago) earned her third All-American honor and second straight in the mile run as she claimed third place in a time of 4:37.20. Maurice Mitchell (Kansas City) made it two-for-two in All-American honors as the junior placed seventh in the 60m dash in a time of 6.67, just a hundredth of a second slower than his prelim time. Mitchell also claimed All-American honors with a fifth-place finish in the 200m dash. Andrew Bachelor (Pompano Beach) cleared seven feet in the high jump for the third time this season and finished in a tie for 15th place. The Lady Seminoles finished in the top10 for the third consecutive season while the men’s team placed in the top-20 for the 12th consecutive national meet. SB

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Don Yaeger, from page 18

that I came to know the Lord,” Semrau said. “What a privilege it is to now train with people who love God and stand on His Word.” Martin, an FSU graduate and one of just four baseball coaches in the history of the NCAA to win 1,500 games at the Division I level, has also delivered keynote addresses at several state and national meetings, including gatherings of the Florida High School Coaches Association, Atlanta Braves instructional clinics and Seminole Booster clubs throughout the Southeast. He too is in demand as a speaker at churches and is active in national and local FCA activities. “I’m proud of my work with FCA and honored when I get a chance to share what my faith means to me,” Martin said. “It is interesting that so many coaches here share that and I don’t think there’s a reason for it other than maybe that the environment here in the (athletic) department is encouraging.” Despite his success on the basketball

court — the Seminoles were positioned to make their second consecutive NCAA Tournament appearance this season — Hamilton has never lost sight of his No. 1 priority: the student-athlete. His number one goal is to help prepare his players for the challenges they will encounter in life. Education is key to that preparation. So is sharing his belief in God. Hamilton accomplishes his goal. In his 10 seasons at the University of Miami, for example, 28 of Hamilton’s 31 seniors received their degrees. In six seasons at FSU, Hamilton has helped 20 of 23 seniors earn their degrees, including Tim Pickett, a 2004 NBA second round draft selection of the New Orleans Hornets, and Toney Douglas, a 2009 NBA first-round draft selection. His players have said Hamilton’s openness regarding his faith has been evident in his leadership. On that front, Bowden was legendary. The veteran coach often said his faith helped him better understand his place

in life. Bowden’s approach deeply influenced former Seminole offensive coordinator Mark Richt, who, like his mentor,

“I love Coach Bowden and am eternally grateful to him for giving me my first job in coaching and most importantly leading me to the Lord.” Mark Richt, former Seminole offensive coordinator

has made his private faith a matter of public record. “I love Coach Bowden and am eternally grateful to him for giving me my first job in coaching and most importantly leading me to the Lord,” Richt said in his spiritual testimony. Since becoming the football coach at Georgia in 2001, Richt, too, has taken his team to churches in the preseason. A devotional service is conducted the night before each game, and a prayer service on game day. Both are voluntary. “At most of the schools I’ve been, they’ve really put God at the top of the list,” Fisher related. “But you’ve just got so many more high-profile coaches here — maybe more than any other place — where Coach Bowden was the winningest football coach, Coach Martin is the third-winningest baseball coach, Coach Hamilton has had such great tradition and Sue (Semrau) is doing such a great job. “What really brings faith to the forefront is people always listen to winners more. When you can send the message that God is No. 1 and you’re being successful, you’re sending a powerful message.” SB

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ROAD SCHOLARS One of the many benefits you will receive when you join Seminole Boosters is a distinctive license tag. But the greatest benefit is knowing that your tax-deductible gift provides over 350 scholarships for our student-athletes who proudly wear the garnet and gold. Your gift does make a difference. Join the Team behind the Teams

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Jim Henry, from page 41

Take a breath, because there’s more. Outdoor afternoon fourth-quarter drills on the artificial turf practice field have replaced the 5 a.m. indoor mat drills. Quarterback Christian Ponder said the exercises and drills are more conducive to football, and a lot more running and conditioning is involved. And, as an animated Fisher mentioned, he’s eliminating offensive and defensive divisions on the team, meaning the locker room will no longer be divided by offense and defense or by position. There will no longer be an offensive and defensive team bus. “Guys are really working hard and getting better,” Ponder said. “You can see the changes right before your eyes, and that’s exciting to see...It’s a lot different. And it’s a lot different in the sense of it being better.”

“You’re not going to get every player in Florida, but you’ve got to establish your boundaries and get your share of the bigtime players. We all know they’re here.” Two Floridians were rated as the best in the country at their respective positions: cornerback Lamarcus Joyner and middle linebacker Jeff Luc.

IMPRESSIVE FINISH Better results on the field, of course, begin with the building blocks that recruiting provides. Less than 30 days after Fisher officially became the successor to Bowden, the Seminoles landed a consensus Top 10 class. Of the three major recruiting services which rank players and signing classes, ESPN tabbed FSU’s 2010 class at No. 6 nationally. The Seminoles checked in at No. 10 with both Rivals and Scout.com. “It (rankings) says you are out recruiting the right guys or what people think are the right guys and who you are evaluating to be the right guy,” Fisher said. “To get those guys you better be competitive. I think if we get better and hopefully we can win a few more games and get up there, maybe we can move from six to one, we can move up there and get that. “I don’t think we are that far away.” The Seminoles did very well in Florida, landing four of the state’s top nine players and eight of the top 50, according to Rivals. Thirteen of the 24 signees are from the Sunshine State. “You have to establish yourself in Florida,” Fisher said.

around them to help them get

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“We’ve put so much on recruiting, which is true, but now we’ve got to develop the players. We have to develop the players, mentally, physically, spiritually. Every way you can develop them — put every support system better in everything we do.” jimbo fisher

Joyner is the fourth USA Today National Defensive Player of the Year to sign with the Seminoles in school history, joining Derrick Brooks, David Warren and Antonio Cromartie. Luc, already enrolled at FSU, is a physically mature 230-pounder who relishes punishing ball carriers. “We may look back on Luc and Joyner and say they started the whole thing,” Fisher said.” They understand the importance of what they did (signing with the ‘Noles). Luc and Joyner, they OK’ d it for everybody to make sure you look at Florida State, which allows you to get in the door and allows you to see what Jeff and Lamarcus saw in your staff.” Of course, FSU also swung and missed, too. Fisher said it happens. It’s recruiting. The biggest misses came on the defensive line, with Calvin Smith (New Mexico), Corey Lemonier (Auburn) and J.R. Ferguson (LSU) choosing other schools. FSU signed five defensive linemen, five linebackers and four cornerbacks in an effort to revive a unit that will have a new

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coordinator — Mark Stoops — and a new scheme. Offensively, the Seminoles turned their attention to replenishing the receiving corps and did so with five signees, as well as two tight ends. “We’ve put so much on recruiting, which is true, but now we’ve got to develop the players,” Fisher said. “We have to develop the players, mentally, physically, spiritually. Every way you can develop them — put every support system around them to help them get better in everything we do. “There’s an old saying, ‘Your actions speak so loud I can’t hear what you are saying.’ Don’t just recruit me, show me you are going to recruit me. I think our staff really did a good job of really putting in the time and let the kids see the difference.” NEW STAFF JELLS Fisher credited his retooled staff for the Seminoles’ impressive finish. Defensive coordinator Mark Stoops, for example, arrived 30 minutes late to his first staff meeting due to his travel schedule but he didn’t miss a beat. “The way we jelled as a staff immediately was a big key,” Fisher said. “I’ve never been around quite like that on a staff where everybody jumped right in like we had been on staff two, three years together. We kind of fed off each other.” The excitement building doesn’t stop with the arrival of another celebrated class of players. Seminole Boosters, Inc. is enjoying an increase in monetary gifts. Football ticket renewals, bolstered by an early push, are up compared to this time a year ago. That’s despite the fact that FSU last season finished 19th nationally — and first in the ACC — with an average home attendance of 74,345. Although Fisher didn’t want to set a timetable on how quickly FSU can reemerge as a national contender, he believes it will happen sooner than later. “I think people underestimate how good some of our young players are. I really do,” Fisher said. One voice, one message. SB


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