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PROGRAM BOOK

Relocated from Opryland in Nashville, TN

Creating Possibilities

The American Phytopathological Society


ANNUAL REVIEWS

The Essential Resource for Phytopathology and Plant Biology Research

American Phytopathological Society Members Save on All Annual Reviews Publications! Call: 800.523.8635 (US/CAN) • 650.493.4400 (WORLDWIDE) Fax: 650.424.0910 (WORLDWIDE) • Online: www.annualreviews.org Please mention priority code JAAPS10 when placing your order. Handling and applicable sales tax additional. Order via phone, fax, or online. Institutional pricing and site license options available. Contact Annual Reviews for details.

Annual Review of Phytopathology

Volume 48 • September 2010 • Online & In Print • http://phyto.annualreviews.org

Editor: Neal K. Van Alfen, University of California, Davis APS Price (Worldwide): $79.80 Regular Personal Price: $84.00 ISSN: 0066-4286 • ISBN: 978-0-8243-1348-7

The Annual Review of Phytopathology, in publication since 1963, covers the significant developments in the field of plant pathology, including plant disease diagnosis, pathogens, host-pathogen interactions, epidemiology and ecology, breeding for resistance and plant disease management, and includes a special section on the development of concepts.

Annual Review of Plant Biology

Volume 61 • June 2010 • Online & In Print • http://plant.annualreviews.org

Editor: Sabeeha Merchant, University of California, Los Angeles APS Price (Worldwide): $84.55 Regular Personal Price: $89 ISSN: 1543-5008 • ISBN: 978-0-8243-0661-8

The Annual Review of Plant Biology, in publication since 1950, covers the significant developments in the field of plant biology, including biochemistry and biosynthesis, genetics, genomics and molecular biology, cell differentiation, tissue, organ and whole plant events, acclimation and adaptation, and methods and model organisms. Access these and all Annual Reviews journals via your institution at www.annualreviews.org

ANNUAL REVIEWS • A Nonprofit Scientific Publisher • 40 Journals • Since 1932 TEL:

800.523.8635 (US/CAN) •

TEL:

650.493.4400 (WORLDWIDE) •

FAX:

650.424.0910 (WORLDWIDE) •

EMAIL:

service@annualreviews.org


Table of Contents Letter from John Sherwood . ..................................................3 Map APS-Designated Hotels in Charlotte..................................4 General Information...............................................................5 Program Sessions-at-a-Glance................................................................9 Meeting Highlights...............................................................11 Friday, August 6 Program Schedule............................................................13 Saturday, August 7 Program Schedule............................................................13 Highlights........................................................................14 Sunday, August 8 Program Schedule............................................................16 Highlights........................................................................17 Opening General Session and Awards..............................17 & Honors Ceremony Special Sessions – Sunday Afternoon................................18 Oral Technical Sessions – Sunday Afternoon....................20 Monday, August 9 Program Schedule............................................................23 Highlights........................................................................24 Plenary Session................................................................24 Special Sessions – Monday Morning................................25 Oral Technical Sessions – Monday Morning....................28 Tuesday, August 10 Program Schedule............................................................31 Highlights........................................................................32 Special Sessions – Tuesday Morning.................................32 Oral Technical Sessions – Tuesday Morning.....................34 Special Sessions – Tuesday Afternoon...............................38 Oral Technical Sessions – Tuesday Afternoon...................40 Flash-and-Dash Sessions – Tuesday Afternoon ................41 Wednesday, August 11 Program Schedule............................................................47 Highlights........................................................................47 Special Sessions – Wednesday Morning............................47 Oral Technical Sessions – Wednesday Morning................50

ADVERTISER’S INDEX AC Diagnostics ......................................................................2 Agdia Inc....................................................................... Cov IV American Peat Technology LLC............................................10 Annual Reviews...............................................................Cov II Bioreba AG/Eurofins STA Laboratory...................................15 Conviron.................................................................................8 EnviroLogix Inc............................................................ Cov III PhytoTechnology Laboratories.................... Program Tab Front PMN.......................................................................................7 About The American Phytopathological Society (APS) APS is the premier society dedicated to high-quality, innovative plant pathology research. APS is driven by a distinctive community of scientists, whose energy and commitment ensure the global advancement of this critical science. Members belong to receive cutting-edge scientific information and the best networking opportunities. Find out more at www.apsnet.org.

Relocation of 2010 APS Annual Meeting

Thank You! In May 2010, Opryland in Nashville, TN, sustained severe flood damage due to unprecedented rain in the area and the overflow of the Cumberland River. As a result, the 2010 APS Annual Meeting was relocated to Charlotte, NC. The American Phytopathological Society thanks everyone who has helped us make this transition. We’re looking forward to a great meeting here in Charlotte.

Posters Poster Schedule and Poster Titles by Category.......................53 Poster Titles and Authors.......................................................54 Recognition Annual Meeting Planning Committee...................................95 APS Elected/Appointed Officers and Representatives............96 Exhibition Exhibit Hall Floor Plan and Exhibitor Descriptions..............99 Author Index.......................................................................104

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Welcome to Charlotte

and the 2010 APS Annual Meeting

John Sherwood

As the 2010 Program Chair, I want to take this opportunity to thank everyone for your flexibility and patience as we worked to relocate the meeting from Opryland in Nashville, TN, to Charlotte, NC. In May 2010, the City of Nashville and the Gaylord Opryland Resort & Convention Center, the original site of the 2010 meeting, sustained severe damage due to unprecedented rain and subsequent flooding in the area. As a result, the meeting could no longer be held at Opryland and was quickly relocated to Charlotte, NC. The City of Charlotte has seen tremendous growth in recent years and I encourage you to enjoy the beautiful weather, barbecue, and outdoor spaces while you’re here. If you have an opportunity, please extend a “thank you” to the staff of APS who have made this transition appear seamless. In addition to enjoying Charlotte, I hope you enjoy the meeting. For those new to the APS annual meeting, I encourage you to participate by asking questions in the sessions, attending socials and networking events, and getting to know your fellow APS members and visitors to the meeting. The 2010 APS Annual Meeting theme, Creating Possibilities, is reflected in 27 Special Sessions, 15 Technical Sessions, and one outstanding Plenary Session that encourages us to look to the future, embrace societal changes, and create new possibilities. The meeting’s scientific sessions and networking opportunities offer unlimited opportunity for the exchange of ideas and discussion that keeps our science relevant and it is only through your involvement that APS stays vital. The APS annual meeting attendees, speakers, and exhibitors are recognized leaders from 122 organizations, 105 universities, and 33 countries worldwide. The APS Annual Meeting consistently promotes academic excellence in an environment that encourages us to learn from each other. It also provides the best opportunity for representatives from academia, industry, and government to come together and share the work they are doing throughout the year. Thus, the annual meeting provides the opportunity to bring together diverse skill sets and insights to accomplish great things and start new activities. There are several new features at this year’s meeting, including extended poster viewing hours until 10:00 p.m. on both Sunday and Monday and two new APS leadership educational opportunities. In addition, the Opening General Session & Awards Ceremony will kick off the meeting on Monday at 10:30 a.m. This session offers everyone a chance to get together, recognize individuals that have made significant contributions to plant pathology, and learn about the progress of your APS colleagues on projects underway and initiatives proposed for your society. It is also time to recognize members who have passed, and with great sadness, but also great pride, we will honor the late Nobel Laureate and revolutionary plant pathologist Norman Borlaug at the Opening General Session. Finally, thanks to the members of the Scientific Planning Board, the APS Annual Meeting Program Planning Committee, and APS Staff for their contributions and hard work over the past year. I hope you have a great time here in Charlotte making new friends, seeing old colleagues, and being involved in APS. Enjoy! John Sherwood APS 2010 Program Chair and President-Elect

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CHARLOTTE APS-Designated Hotels

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GENERAL INFORMATION Registration

Concession Service Available

A Concourse, Convention Center Full registration includes access to the Welcome Reception, Plenary Session, special sessions, technical sessions, posters, exhibits, and Tuesday’s Final Night Celebration.

A variety of beverages, snacks, and lunches will be available for purchase at the Charlotte Convention Center during the meeting.   Sunday, August 8 7:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Food Court

2010 Abstracts—Available Online and at Printing Stations in the Exhibit Hall Abstracts were printed as a supplement to Phytopathology but will not appear in printed form at the meeting. Searchable abstracts are available at http://meeting.apsnet.org and abstract printing stations are available in the Exhibit Hall and near the meeting rooms for your convenience.

Registration Hours Saturday, August 7 Sunday, August 8 Monday, August 9 Tuesday, August 10 Wednesday, August 11

2:00 – 6:00 p.m. 7:00 a.m. – 6:30 p.m. 7:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. 7:00 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. 7:00 – 11:00 a.m.

Exhibition Hours Exhibit Hall A Sunday, August 8 Monday, August 9 Tuesday, August 10

4:30 – 6:30 p.m. 9:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. 8:00 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.

APS PRESS Bookstore Hours Exhibit Hall A Sunday, August 8 Monday, August 9 Tuesday, August 10 Wednesday, August 11

4:30 – 6:30 p.m. 9:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. 8:00 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. 8:00 – 11:00 a.m.

Poster Viewing and Flash-and-Dash Hours Exhibit Hall A Sunday, August 8 12:00 – 3:00 p.m. Poster Set-Up 4:30 – 10:00 p.m. Poster Viewing Monday, August 9 3:30 – 10:00 p.m. 4:00 – 5:30 p.m. 5:30 – 7:00 p.m.

Poster Viewing Posters and Authors— odd-numbered poster authors present Posters and Authors— even-numbered poster authors present

Tuesday, August 10 3:30 – 5:30 p.m. 3:30 – 5:30 p.m.

Flash-and-Dash Sessions with Author Time Poster Viewing

Wednesday, August 11 7:00 – 9:00 a.m. Poster Take-Down

Monday, August 9 7:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Food Court  Exhibit Hall A

Tuesday, August 10 7:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. 8:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Food Court Exhibit Hall A

Wednesday, August 11 7:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Food Court

2010 Meeting Proceedings CD This fully searchable CD will provide a record of the proceedings at the annual meeting. Citable abstracts of all presentations are included. Presentations are presented in PDF format. CDs will be shipped approximately 6–8 weeks after the meeting.  CDs may be purchased during the meeting for $65 each at the APS PRESS Bookstore.  

Open Meeting Rooms APS has a small meeting room available for use throughout the meeting. To check availability and location and to reserve a meeting time, stop by the Registration Desk.

Media Members of the media seeking interviews onsite should stop by the Registration Desk and ask to contact APS staff member Michelle Bjerkness for assistance.

Photo Release Photographs will be taken at the APS Annual Meeting. By registering for this meeting, you agree to allow APS to use your photo in any of their publications or their website.

Getting Around Charlotte The easiest way to explore Charlotte is by light rail, by streetcar, or by foot. The light rail and streetcar stops are visible and well marked with signage. The Light Rail has stops at the Westin, Hilton, Epicentre, as well as other various stops making it easy and quick to travel throughout downtown Charlotte. Roundtrip tickets can be purchased for $3.00 at any of the Light Rail stations. Transportation schedules are available at the convention center information booth.

Dress The official dress of the meeting is business casual.

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Go Global! Share the APS Annual Meeting with the World Want to share the excitement of the 2010 APS Annual Meeting? Tweet using the hashtag #aps10 to join the conversation, upload videos to www.youtube.com/plantdisease, or visit the APS Facebook page to create discussions, share photos, make comments, and post videos.

award-winning images submitted at last year’s meeting. Visit the APS PRESS Bookstore to get your free cards and make a statement about your science! APS staff will be on hand to help you create or update your profile in APS Journals Online. It’s easy and it’s free!

See What’s New at the APS PRESS Bookstore!

Copies of your job/candidate postings can be included on the Job Board in the registration area. Those interested in connecting one-on-one should make sure to check out the Early Career Professionals Social, which includes a NEW Employer Networking Opportunity on Monday, August 9. See page 25 for details. A ticket is required for this event. Available year-round, the APSnet Job Center provides access to the most recent jobs and candidates in the field.

Visit the bookstore and browse the new compendia, including the all new third edition of Compendium of Wheat Diseases and Pests, the largest book in the Compendium Series. Check out the new teaching resources in virology, mycology, and bacteriology, including the new textbook and desk reference from Clarence Kado, who will be on hand Monday afternoon to sign his book in the APS PRESS Bookstore. Be sure to come early to get the new 2010 meeting t-shirt and two other limited edition tees that are sure to please. Have a book idea? Learn more about how you can publish your passion with APS PRESS.

APS Foundation

Meeting Facilities

APS Job Services

Contributions to the APS Foundation provide opportunities and support that will strengthen the plant pathology community for years to come. Make sure to take some time during the meeting to stop by the APS Foundation booth, near the registration area, to make your donation! All donors will receive a complimentary gift. New this year! Consider buying a Foundation raffle ticket during the meeting for a chance to win a new Apple iPad. Tickets are available at the booth or from any board member. Cost is $10 for one ticket or $25 for three tickets. The drawing will take place at 10:00 a.m. on Wednesday, August 11, at the Foundation booth. Winners do not need to be present to win. All proceeds will go to the APS Foundation Annual Giving Fund.

Create a Custom Research Alert in APS Journals Online During the Meeting and Receive a Free 10-Pack of the NEW APS PRESS Note Cards Set up a free profile and customize the online content from Plant Disease, Phytopathology, and MPMI to match your interests and receive a free gift of Art in Phytopathology Note Cards. This amazing collection of note cards is culled from

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Charlotte Convention Center 501 S. College Street Charlotte, NC 28202 Phone: 704.339.6000 Westin Charlotte 601 S. College Street Charlotte, NC 28202 Phone: 704.375.2600 Hilton Charlotte Center City 222 E. Third Street Charlotte, NC 28202 Phone: 704.377.1500 Hilton Garden Inn Charlotte Uptown 508 E. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. Charlotte, NC 28202 Phone: 704.347.5972 Hampton Inn Charlotte Uptown 530 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. Charlotte, NC 28202 Phone: 704.373.0917


Safety Tips Do not travel alone – stay in groups and travel in well-lit areas. Remove name badges when outside the hotel or Convention Center unless you are participating in a meeting event. • Do not give your room number out to anyone you do not know and avoid giving out your room number in conversations where strangers may hear you talking. • Bolt your hotel room door and only open it when you know who is on the other side. (Note: hotel personnel wear uniforms and have identification badges. If in doubt, call hotel security to verify an employee’s identity.) • Do not leave your door ajar if you are going down the hall for ice. Someone may enter when you are not looking. • Know where the stairs are located in case of a fire (do not use elevators). Also count the number of doors to the nearest exit in case you cannot see in a smoke-filled hallway. • Valuables, airline tickets, and money should be kept in a hotel safety deposit box or in a room safe, if available. Procedures in Case of a Fire • Try to leave the hotel as quickly as possible. If you cannot, stay in your room and call the operator or security to let them know you are in your room. • Put your hand on the room door to see if it is hot before opening it. If it is, do not open quickly. Open it just a crack to see what is on the other side and be prepared to slam it shut quickly if necessary.

• If you leave the room, take your room key with you! Shut your room door to keep smoke out. You may have to return if the exit is blocked. Remember the way back to your room as you go to the exit in case you need to return. • If necessary, drop to your knees to avoid smoke. Tie a wet towel around your nose and mouth to act as a smoke filter. Fold it into a triangle and put the corner in your mouth. • Do not take the elevator when you smell smoke or if you know that there is a fire in the building. Emergency Information Medical emergencies should be communicated to an APS staff member at the Registration Desk or an employee of the hotel where you are staying. In your hotel, phone the local emergency response team by dialing 0. At the Charlotte Convention Center, use any house phone and dial “0” during an emergency. An emergency medical technician (EMT) will be available during show hours at the Convention Center. Dialing “0” instead of 911 at the Convention Center is the quickest way to receive assistance. The hospital facility located closest to the meeting facilities is: Carolinas Medical Center 1000 Blythe Blvd. Charlotte, NC 28203 704.355.2000

Join Us in Celebrating PMN’s 10th Anniversary Thanks to Our Partners for Their Support! Industry Agdia AC Diagnostics American Peat Technology, LLC BASF Crop Protection Bayer CropScience BIOREBA Chase Horticultural Research, Inc. Decagon Devices Dimole, Inc. Dow AgroSciences Envirologix Monsanto Mosaic Pioneer Hi-Bred Simplot SipcamAdvan Springer Syngenta Crop Protection Valent U.S.A. Wolf Trax

Universities University of AlaskaFairbanks University of Arizona University of California at Davis Colorado State University University of Connecticut Cornell University University of Florida University of Georgia University of Idaho University of Illinois Iowa State University Kansas State University University of Kentucky Louisiana State University University of Maryland Michigan State University University of Minnesota Mississippi State University University of Missouri Montana State University

University of NebraskaLincoln New Mexico State University North Carolina State University North Dakota State University Ohio State University Oklahoma State University Oregon State University Penn State University Purdue University Rutgers University South Dakota State University University of Tennessee Texas A&M University Virginia Tech University Washington State University West Virginia University University of WisconsinMadison

Nonprofit Organizations American Phytopathological Society American Seed Trade Association American Society of Agronomy American Society for Horticultural Science Biopesticide Industry Alliance Canadian Phytopathological Society Canadian Society of Agronomy Council for Agricultural Science and Technology Crop Adviser Institute Crop Science Society of America CropLife America Entomological Society of America National Alliance of Independent Crop Consultants Plant Health Initiative Potash and Phosphate Institute Royal Netherlands Society of Plant Pathology Society of Nematologists United States Golf Association Green Section Weed Science Society of America

To learn about partnership, visit PMN’s booth in the APS PRESS Bookstore, or visit www.plantmanagementnetwork.org/partners.

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SCIENTIFIC Sessions At-a-Glance

Sessions are in the Charlotte Convention Center unless otherwise noted. Technical Sessions may be listed in more than one category. Biology of Pathogens

Diseases of Plants

Epidemiology/Ecology/ Environmental Biology

PROGRAM

Sunday 1:00 – 3:00 p.m.

1:00 – 3:45 p.m.

1:00 – 4:00 p.m.

Advances in Plant Virus Evolution • 217A TECHNICAL: Defense Responses/Biology of Pathogens • 207AB

TECHNICAL: Turfgrass/Pathogen Diversity • 208B

TECHNICAL: Turfgrass/Pathogen Diversity • 208B

MONDAY 8:30 – 11:00 a.m.

10th I. E. Melhus Graduate Student Symposium: Seed Pathology—Epidemiology, Management, and Phytosanitary Concerns (ends 10:45 a.m.) • 207CD

8:30 – 11:15 a.m.

Plant Pathogen Population Genetics: An Essential Tool for Crop Biosecurity • 203B

8:30 – 11:30 a.m.

TECHNICAL: Bacteriology/Pathogen Detection • 208B TECHNICAL: Virology/Diseases of Plants • 217BC

1:00 – 3:30 p.m.

Plenary Session: Looking to the Future: Possibilities and Challenges in Plant Pathology • The Westin Hotel–Grand Ballroom

TUESDAY 8:30 – 10:45 a.m. 8:30 – 11:30 a.m.

Plant Disease Epidemics and Food Security in Globally Changing Agricultures and Environments • 207AB Refining Systematics (Taxonomy, Nomenclature, Phylogenetics) for Better Resolution in the Population Biology and Evolution of the Oomycetes (ends 11:15 a.m.) • 207CD

TECHNICAL: Detection & Diagnosis • 208B

TECHNICAL: Mycology • 217BC 1:00 – 3:00 p.m.

Biology and Management of Rhizoctonia Diseases in Turfgrass Systems • 208A TECHNICAL: Disease Management—B • 208B Schroth Faces of the Future Virology • 217A

1:00 – 3:30 p.m.

1:00 – 4:00 p.m.

Assuring the Safety of Fresh Produce: Issues and Strategies • 207AB

Wednesday 8:30 – 10:00 a.m.

Integrated Microbial Bioinformatics • 207CD

8:30 – 11:15 a.m.

The Sophistication of Host-Pathogen Interactions Involving Necrotrophic Fungi • 217D

8:30 – 11:30 a.m.

Cryptic Foes: Gathering the Latest Advances on Pythium • 203B Virus Fishing with Chips: Plant Virus Microarrays and Next Generation Sequencing • 207AB TECHNICAL: Chemical Control • 217A

TECHNICAL: ‘Candidatus Liberibacter’/Epidemiology & Ecology • 217BC TECHNICAL: Epidemiology & Ecology/Plant Diseases • 208B


See daily schedule for flash-and-dash presentations. Molecular/Cellular/Plant-Microbe Interactions

Plant Disease Management

Professionalism/Outreach

The 2009 Tomato and Potato Late Blight Crisis: The Interaction of the Urban Home Garden and Commercial Agriculture—What Went Wrong and What We Learned • 217D Induced Resistance: Where Does This Fit in IPM Programs • 207CD Kasugamycin: The Risks and Benefits of Introducing a New Antibiotic • 203A TECHNICAL: Biological Control/Bacteriology • 217BC

TECHNICAL: Biological Control/Bacteriology • 217BC

The APS Public Policy Board: New Challenges for Phytopathologists (ends 4:15 p.m.) • 203B

TECHNICAL: Defense Responses/Biology of Pathogens • 207AB New Products and Services • 217A

Broad-Spectrum Resistance: Molecular Mechanisms Involved in Pathogen Reception and Resistance Signaling • 217D More Than Just Antibiotics: The Multiple Mechanisms Leading to Biological Control and Plant Growth Promotion • 208A Small Molecules in Phytopathology: From Determinants of Disease to Modulators of Defense (ends 11:45 a.m.) • 207AB TECHNICAL: Bacteriology/Pathogen Detection • 208B TECHNICAL: Virology/Diseases of Plants • 217BC

Nature’s Molecular Biologist: Xanthomonas and TAL Effector Function, Structure, and Diversity • 217A

Identifying Quantitative Resistance Using Modern Technologies—Challenges for Plant Breeding • 217D

TECHNICAL: Detection & Diagnosis • 208B

TECHNICAL: Fungicides/Host Responses • 203B

TECHNICAL: Fungicides/ Host Responses • 203B TECHNICAL: Virology/Virology & Nematology • 208A TECHNICAL: Molecular & Cellular Biology • 207CD

Prepare for Your Future: Career Opportunities After Graduate School: Part 2—Extension (ends 11:15 a.m.) • 203A

Restoring Forest Ecosystems Impacted by Invasive Pathogens • 203B TECHNICAL: Disease Management—A • 217BC Creating Possibilities for Sustainable Postharvest Disease Control Through Integrated Approaches to Both Pre- and Postharvest Fungicide Resistance Management • 203A Edible and Medicinal Mushrooms: Diversity, Commercial Production, and Disease Management in High-Volume Production Facilities • 217D

Biocontrol Beyond the Bench: Large-Scale, Successful Biocontrol • 208A

TECHNICAL: Chemical Control • 217A TECHNICAL: Epidemiology & Ecology/Plant Diseases • 208B

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Meeting

Highlights

New Day and Format! Opening General Session with Awards & Honors Ceremony Sunday, August 8, 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.; Westin–Grand Ballroom This is your official welcome to Charlotte! Get together with your friends and fellow scientists from around the world and help us recognize our colleagues with awards and honors for their important work throughout the year. Hear about the accomplishments and goals of our society straight from our leaders, honor those who have left our ranks in the past year, and learn about changes we’ve made to the annual meeting program and what to expect while you’re at the meeting. This session will also include a very special tribute to the late Nobel Laureate and pioneering plant pathologist Norman Borlaug. See page 17 for a list of this year’s awardees.

Plenary Session Looking to the Future: Possibilities and Challenges in Plant Pathology Monday, August 9, 1:00 – 3:30 p.m.; Westin–Grand Ballroom The Plenary Session focuses on the 2010 Annual Meeting theme, Creating Possibilities, by featuring experts on issues facing agriculture and feeding the growing population. Speakers from outside plant pathology and agriculture will examine the issues of social media and their impact on our science, as well as the importance of global linkages. This session will focus primarily on the future of plant pathology and help us form ideas and realize possibilities for the future. See page 24 for speakers and presentation titles.

Final Night Celebration­—A Taste of North Carolina Tuesday, August 10, 6:30 – 10:00 p.m.; Convention Center, Crown Ballroom Experience Charlotte while interacting and mingling! Charlotte has something for everyone and so does the Final Night Celebration. Enjoy entertainment and food stations from the three regions of North Carolina. Dance the night away while enjoying live “shag” music and other popular grooves in the “Beach Region”. If dancing isn’t your thing, try your luck as you compete against new friends or old colleagues in the “NASCAR Region” where you will be able to race NASCAR replica cars! Exhausted from the meeting? Escape to the “Mountain Region” where you will experience the artistic side of North Carolina! Networking areas will be provided within the ballroom for conversation. New this year, the official APS “Passing of the Gavel” will kick off the celebration with President Barb Christ thanking Past President James Moyer for his four years of service and welcoming John Sherwood as APS President for 2010-2011. Ticket and drink ticket are included with full registration.

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Now Showing! A website of epic proportions… Nearly two years, more than 100,000 pages, and 20,000 images in the making…

APSnet—the Smart Site Join us for this star-studded Premier Showing in Hall A of the Charlotte Convention Center, located next to the APS PRESS Bookstore. Exclusive Screenings Available on: Sunday, August 8 4:30 – 6:30 p.m. Monday, August 9 9:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. Tuesday, August 10 8:00 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. Watch as we unveil the must-see hit of the summer! This highly anticipated premier is certain to be a crowd pleaser! Your red-carpet pass is included with your badge materials. Grab a colleague, enjoy complimentary popcorn and Junior Mints, and catch a captivating sneak preview of the new APSnet!

“★★★★!” “Thumbs way up!” “Absolutely superb!” “Exceeded my expectations”

The APS Annual Meeting Website is Moving n New address! Go to www.apsnet.org/meet to see our all new APS Annual Meeting website. This is a completely new address for the Annual Meeting – be sure to replace your bookmarks and favorites in your browser as the current URL will be phased out completely. n New format! All the information you need to stay up-to-date on what’s happening throughout the year is still there, but the new format makes it easier to find and easier to navigate. n New meeting! Visit the new website when you get home to see all the latest information on the 2011 APS Annual Meeting in Honolulu, Hawaii, as well as archives and photos from the 2010 meeting in Charlotte.

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www.apsnet.org/meet


Take Note! APS Journals Online Can Save You Time! Create a custom research alert in your APS Journals Online Profile at the 2010

set of 10 APS Note Cards. Stop by the Journals area inside of the APS PRESS Bookstore.

Retro method of keeping in touch with fellow researchers

Contemporary method of keeping in touch with fellow researchers

(Limit one set per person, while supplies last.)

POSTERS

APS Annual Meeting and receive a FREE

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Do you want the top plant pathologists in the world to see what you’re working on? Show us your research at the 2011 APS Annual Meeting! The American Phytopathological Society (APS) and the International Association for the Plant Protection Sciences (IAPPS) are joining forces August 6-10 in Honolulu for the 2011 APS-IPPC Joint Meeting.

Call for Papers Submissions will be accepted online February 1 – March 15, 2011

APS•IPPC

2011

POSTERS

2011 Call for Papers

Joint Meeting August 6–10 Honolulu, Hawaii

Visit www.apsnet.org/meet for more information.


DAILY MEETING SCHEDULE, HIGHLIGHTS, AND SESSIONS The annual meeting takes place at the Charlotte Convention Center unless otherwise noted.

FRIDAY

■ FRIDAY, AUGUST 6 8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. 1:00 – 6:00 p.m.

APS Council Meeting APS Leadership Forum, by invitation

Westin–Providence 1 218AB

■ SATURDAY, AUGUST 7

Leadership Opportunity: APS Leadership Institute Field Trip: Ornamental & Forestry Nursery APS Councilor’s Forum Meeting APS PRESS Board Meeting Workshop: Scientific Writing for APS Journals Workshop: Meet the Geek: Creating Podcasts and Using Syndicated Content Leadership Opportunity: Enhance Your Team Performance—Understand Your MBTI Postharvest Pathology Committee Discussion Session Workshop: Mixed Models for Data Analysis in Plant Pathology APS Advisory Committee on Plant Biosecurity Meeting Office of International Programs (OIP) Board Meeting Registration Committee Chair/Vice Chair Orientation Scientific Program Board (SPB)/Section Chairs Meeting Publications Board Meeting Program Planning Orientation Microbial Forensics Interest Group First Timers’ Orientation Awards and Honors Committee Meeting, by invitation PDMR Editors’ Meeting New Time! Committee Meetings • Biotechnology Committee • Collections and Germplasm Committee • Committee for Diversity and Equality • Diagnostics Committee • Emerging Diseases and Pathogens Committee • Integrated Plant Disease Management Committee • Pathogen Resistance Committee • Phyllosphere Microbiology Committee • Postharvest Pathology Committee • Regulatory Plant Pathology Committee • Tropical Plant Pathology Committee New Time! Committee Meetings • Biological Control Committee • Epidemiology Committee • Extension Committee • Host Resistance Committee • Industry Committee • Mycotoxicology Committee • Nematology Committee • Seed Pathology Committee • Soil Microbiology and Root Diseases Committee • Turfgrass Pathology Committee • Virology Committee

201AB

SATURDAY

8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. 8:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. 9:00 – 11:00 a.m. 12:00 – 3:00 p.m. 1:00 – 3:00 p.m. 1:00 – 4:00 p.m. 1:00 – 5:00 p.m. 1:00 – 5:00 p.m. 1:00 – 5:30 p.m. 1:30 – 3:00 p.m. 2:00 – 4:00 p.m. 2:00 – 6:00 p.m. 3:00 – 4:00 p.m. 3:00 – 4:00 p.m. 3:30 – 6:00 p.m. 4:00 – 5:00 p.m. 4:00 – 6:00 p.m. 4:30 – 5:30 p.m. 5:00 – 6:30 p.m. 5:00 – 6:30 p.m. 6:30 – 8:00 p.m. New times and scheduled days! Committee meetings now place on Saturday and take Sunday. Check carefully­ —don’t miss your meeting! 8:00 – 9:30 p.m.

205 204 212AB 216AB 202AB 209A 211AB 215 214 A Concourse 219AB 205 215 219AB 210A 213A 204 209B 216AB 205 201AB 212AB 211AB 214 210A 204 209B 202AB 215 219AB 218AB 210A 216AB 205 211AB 202AB 201AB 209B 204 212AB

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SATURDAY HIGHLIGHTS FIELD TRIP

SATURDAY

Ornamental & Forestry Nursery 8:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Sponsoring Committees: Diseases of Ornamental Plants; Forest Pathology Organizers: Cristi Palmer, IR-4 Project, Rutgers University, Princeton, NJ, U.S.A.; Margaret Mmbaga, Tennessee State University, McMinnville, TN, U.S.A. Greenhouse and nursery growers will showcase their operations and talk about their disease management programs and how they are integrating cultural, biological, and chemical controls. Visit long-standing operations and up-and-coming growers to hear how they’ve grown quality plant materials under foliar and root disease pressure during this difficult economic time. Preregistration required.

WORKSHOPS Scientific Writing for APS Journals 1:00 – 3:00 p.m.; 212AB Sponsoring Committees: Publications Board; Editorial Boards Organizers: Niklaus Grunwald, USDA ARS, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A.; Anthony Keinath, Clemson University, Charleston, SC, U.S.A. This workshop on publishing in APS journals will cover important aspects of preparing and submitting manuscripts to Plant Disease, Phytopathology, and MPMI. The workshop will provide an overview of the review and publication processes and provide guidelines for successful publishing. Participants will gain an understanding of the roles of editors-in-chief, senior editors, associate editors, and anonymous peer reviewers. Emphasis will be put on practical tips for scientific writing that will facilitate publication in APS journals. Topics such as proper formatting, authorship, plagiarism, reviewing, and appropriate subject matter for each journal will be addressed. The organizers and speakers are editors-in-chief with extensive experience in reviewing and publishing in APS journals. This workshop is geared toward graduate students and early career scientists. Preregistration required. Meet the Geek: Creating Podcasts and Using Syndicated Content 1:00 – 4:00 p.m.; 216AB Sponsoring Committee: Extension Organizer: Joseph LaForest, University of Georgia, Tifton, GA, U.S.A. This hands-on workshop will help attendees develop skills for specific internet tools used in the dissemination of information. The focus will be on creating podcasts and using syndicated content. Participants will learn to make a short (30 seconds – 1 minute) podcast using syndication services to deliver it to a variety of audiences. The session will support both Mac and PC users. Individuals are encouraged to bring laptops. Preregistration required.

14

Mixed Models for Data Analysis in Plant Pathology 1:00 – 5:30 p.m.; 211AB Sponsoring Committees: Epidemiology; Crop Loss Assessment and Risk Evaluation (CARE) Organizer: Larry Madden, Ohio State University, OARDC/ OSU, Wooster, OH, U.S.A. It is now common to use linear mixed models (LMMs) instead of traditional ANOVA to analyze data from designed experiments. LMMs formally handle experiments with both fixed (e.g., fungicide treatment) and random (e.g., block, location) effects and properly estimate test statistics and standard errors for all the effects of interest under a wide range of circumstances. Registrants will learn to use the MIXED and new GLIMMIX procedures of SAS to analyze data from common experimental designs in plant pathology. Material covered for the first time will include introductions on generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs), for analyzing discrete data; new graphical methods for assessing model fits; and multiple comparisons of means in the context of mixed models. This workshop will follow the tradition of the Epidemiology Committee’s workshops on “bringing statistical analysis to the masses.” All registrants must bring a laptop computer with version 9.2 of SAS installed. Preregistration required.

LEADERSHIP TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES APS Leadership Institute Early Career Professionals and Regular Members 8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.; 201AB Sponsoring Committee: APS Leadership Institute Ad-Hoc Committee Organizers: Rick Bostock, University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A.; Chris Smart, Cornell University, Geneva, NY, U.S.A. This first-of-its-kind APS Leadership Institute is designed to help individuals discover their unique leadership skills and begin to apply those skills to their professional, personal, and societal lives. This highly engaging workshop, facilitated by Teri Balser, University of Wisconsin-Madison, will cover the following areas—what and who are leaders, why leadership is critical to your career and profession, types of leaders, leadership and personalities, developing effective leaders, leaders and change, and leaders in professional organizations. Development of future leaders is critical to the success of any organization and is essential for the long term viability of volunteer-led nonprofit societies. While there is no expected service commitment following this program, a long-term goal is to develop future leaders within APS for those who are interested in such a role. The workshop is intended for a broad spectrum of participants including early, mid-, and senior career professionals as well as the volunteer leadership of APS. Preregistration required. Lunch included.


Enhance Your Team Performance—Understand Your MBTI Students and Post-Docs 1:00 – 5:00 p.m.; 202AB Sponsor: Monsanto Company Organizer: Emilio Oyarzabal, Monsanto Company, St Louis, MO, U.S.A.

ORIENTATION SESSIONS APS Committee Chair/Vice Chair Orientation 3:00 – 4:00 p.m.; 219AB Sponsoring Committee: APS Committee on Committees Organizer: Mike Boehm, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, U.S.A.

APS Program Planning Orientation 4:00 – 5:00 p.m.; 219AB Join the Annual Meeting Program Planning Committee to learn what steps are needed to host a special session in 2011 and beyond. This session will cover how to submit a session proposal and how the planning process works. First Timers’ Orientation 4:30 – 5:30 p.m.; 213A Organizer: John Sherwood, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A. As a first-time attendee, the array of scientific sessions and various networking opportunities may seem daunting. Plan to attend this special orientation session where APS leaders and seasoned meeting attendees will provide helpful hints and suggestions to help you make the most of your first meeting experience.

15

SATURDAY

Teamwork is critical to the success of organizations and companies, but as a young scientist you might not be aware of all of the dynamics at play in a team environment. This unique professional development opportunity will allow you to increase your self understanding and enhance your team performance. You’ll take the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) online prior to the training. Then during this highly interactive session, an expert in talent development from Monsanto will provide you with your results and explain your personality type and those of your colleagues. Team-building exercises throughout the session will focus on team communication, culture, leadership, change, problem solving/ conflict resolution, and stress. You’ll leave the training with a fresh perspective as well as the tools to positively impact your team experiences. The workshop is open to a mix of graduate students and post-docs and is offered through the generous sponsorship provided by Monsanto. Preregistration is required.

This important orientation session is a must-attend event for updates on current APS initiatives and committee procedures. APS Immediate Past President Jim Moyer, Senior Councilorat-Large Mike Boehm, and Intermediate Councilor-at-Large Carolee Bull will lead discussions highlighting recent APS initiatives, processes for taking action on committee issues, and procedural logistics for chairs and vice chairs. Packets with committee rosters and the Committee Annual Report Form will be provided for each chair. APS committee chairs not able to attend should have a replacement participate.


■ SUNDAY, AUGUST 8

SUNDAY

7:00 – 8:30 a.m. 7:00 – 9:00 a.m. 7:00 – 9:00 a.m. 7:00 a.m. – 6:30 p.m. 7:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. 8:00 – 8:30 a.m. 8:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

APS Auxiliary Meetings Board Breakfast APSnet Education Center Editorial Board Meeting Vegetable Extension & Research Plant Pathologists Breakfast, by invitation Registration Consession Service Available Moderator Orientation Exhibitor Set-Up

8:30 – 9:30 a.m. APS Phytopathology Senior Editors’ Meeting 8:30 – 9:30 a.m. APS Plant Disease Senior Editors’ Meeting 8:30 – 10:00 a.m. New Time! Committee Meetings • Bacteriology Committee • Chemical Control Committee • Crop Loss Assessment & Risk Evaluation (CARE) Committee • Diseases of Ornamental Plants Committee • Early Career Professionals Committee • Forest Pathology Committee • Genetics Committee • Graduate Student Committee • Molecular and Cellular Phytopathology Committee • Mycology Committee • Plant Pathogen and Disease Detection Committee • Teaching Committee 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Ornamental Discussion Group 9:30 – 10:00 a.m. APS Phytopathology Editorial Board Meeting 9:30 – 10:00 a.m. APS Plant Disease Editorial Board Meeting 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. New! General Session with Awards Ceremony 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. Lunch Break (Concession Service Available) 12:00 – 1:30 p.m. Journals Senior Editors’ Luncheon, by invitation 12:00 – 2:00 p.m. Division Officers’ Luncheon 12:00 – 3:00 p.m. Poster Set-Up 12:00 – 6:00 p.m. APS-OIP Silent Auction 12:15 – 3:00 p.m. PMN Oversight Committee Meeting, by invitation 12:30 – 4:00 p.m. Office of Electronic Communication (OEC) Board Meeting Special Sessions 1:00 – 3:00 p.m. • The 2009 Tomato and Potato Late Blight Crisis: The Interaction of the Urban Home Garden and Commercial Agriculture—What Went Wrong and What We Learned 1:00 – 3:45 p.m. • Induced Resistance: Where Does This Fit in IPM Programs? 1:00 – 3:45 p.m. • Kasugamycin: The Risks and Benefits of Introducing a New Antibiotic 1:00 – 4:00 p.m. • Advances in Plant Virus Evolution 1:00 – 4:15 p.m. • The APS Public Policy Board: New Challenges for Phytopathologists Oral Technical Sessions 1:00 – 4:00 p.m. • Biological Control/Bacteriology 1:00 – 4:00 p.m. • Defense Responses/Biology of Pathogens 1:00 – 4:00 p.m. • Turfgrass/Pathogen Diversity 3:00 – 4:00 p.m. Plant Health Progress Editorial Board Meeting, by invitation 4:00 – 4:45 p.m. New Time and Format! University Alumni Socials Cornell University Iowa State University Louisiana State University Michigan State University North Carolina State University Penn State Purdue University University of Arkansas

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214 205 213A A Concourse Food Court 218AB/219AB Exihibit Hall A 209B 210A 215 202B 202A 208B 216AB 209A 206A 211AB 212AB 201AB 210B 204 218AB 209B 210A Westin–Grand Ballroom Food Court 219AB 204 Exhibit Hall A A Concourse 205 215 217D

207CD 203A 217A 203B 217BC 207AB 208B 214 Ballroom AB


4:30 – 6:30 p.m. 4:30 – 6:30 p.m. 4:30 – 10:00 p.m. 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. 6:30 – 10:00 p.m.

University of Florida University of Georgia University of Kentucky University of Minnesota Washington State University APS PRESS Bookstore Welcome Reception with Exhibition and Posters Extended Hours! Poster Viewing Diagnostics Working Group Leadership Opportunity: Committee for Diversity and Equality Social with Mentoring Strategizing Session Industry & Extension Social, off site event

Exhibit Hall A Exhibit Hall A Exhibit Hall A 218AB 213D StikeCity

Vegetable Extension & Research Plant Pathologists’ Breakfast 7:00 – 9:00 a.m.; 213A Sponsored by the vegetable seed industry, this annual event promotes the sharing of information and ideas on seed health and diseases of interest to the vegetable industry. This event is by invitation only. Art in Phytopathology Showcase Find an early seat for the Opening General Session and enjoy this year’s Art in Phytopathology Showcase organized by the APS Graduate Student Committee. APS members were encouraged to submit artwork in any medium. The various contributions and award winners will be shown on screen prior to the start of the Opening General Session. Thank you to all contributors and congratulations to this year’s winners! The artwork will be posted on APSnet following the meeting.

NEW! Opening General Session and Awards & Honors Ceremony 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.; Westin–Grand Ballroom This is your official welcome to Charlotte! Connect with your friends and fellow scientists from around the world and help us recognize our colleagues with awards and honors for their important work throughout the year. Learn about the accomplishments and goals of our society straight from our leaders, honor those who have left our ranks in the past year, be introduced to the up-andcoming APS Foundation awardees and learn more about what to see and do during your time at the APS Annual Meeting. This session will also include a very special tribute to the late Nobel Laureate and pioneering plant pathologist Norman Borlaug. (Note: This replaces the traditional Tuesday awards ceremony.) APS is pleased to honor the following APS members during the 2010 APS Awards & Honors Ceremony. Awardees are recognized for their contributions and commitment to both the field of plant pathology and to APS. Biographies for the awardees will be available on APSnet following the meeting. Please share your congratulations with your colleagues throughout the meeting.

SUNDAY

SUNDAY HIGHLIGHTS Congratulations 2010 APS Awardees APS Fellows Peter J. Cotty, USDA-ARS Yigal Elad, ARO, Volcani Center Robert L. Gilbertson, University of California-Davis Raymond D. Martyn, Jr., Purdue University Sally Miller, The Ohio State University Timothy Murray, Washington State University Krishna V. Subbarao, University of California-Davis Frank F. White, Kansas State University Roger P. Wise, Iowa State University Excellence in Extension Award Gary G. Grove, Washington State University Excellence in Industry Award N. Beth Carroll, Syngenta Crop Protection Excellence in Teaching Award Scott Evan Gold, University of Georgia William Boright Hewitt and Maybelle Ellen Ball Hewitt Award Nian Wang, University of Florida Lee M. Hutchins Award Robert R. Martin, USDA-ARS Noel T. Keen Award for Research Excellence in Molecular Plant Pathology Gregory B. Martin, Cornell University Ruth Allen Award Rosemary Loria, Cornell University Syngenta Award Sarah J. Pethybridge, Botanical Resources, Australia

6th Annual APS-OIP Silent Auction 12:00 – 6:00 p.m.; A Concourse Help build international relations and take home unique cultural items! Support OIP’s Global Experience program by bidding on items from around the world. Bidding closes at 6:00 p.m.

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SUNDAY

New Time and Format! University Alumni Socials 4:00 – 4:45 p.m.; Ballroom AB Reunite with fellow colleagues and network with other alumni! Each participating university will have a designated area to congregate and mingle. Following the alumni socials head to the Exhibit Hall so you can continue to mingle with your colleagues at the Welcome Reception! Participating universities will be listed in the program book. See the daily schedule for a list of participating universities. Welcome Reception with Exhibition and Posters 4:30 – 6:30 p.m.; Exhibit Hall A Kick off your 2010 APS Annual Meeting experience by attending the Welcome Reception! Network, visit the exhibits, and bid on APS-OIP Silent Auction items while enjoying light snacks and beverages. This reception is included in the registration fee. New Name! Committee for Diversity and Equality Social with Mentoring Strategizing Session 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.; 213D The Committee for Diversity and Equality has more than just a new name! This year our social is designed to help you meet colleagues from every point on the career ladder and walk away with a new bag of mentoring tricks. In addition to beverages, snacks, and social time, we will brainstorm successful strategies in 1) creating your own “old boys club”; 2) mentoring a diverse workforce; and 3) mentoring your supervisor to provide what you need to do your job. We want your success stories to be included. Join us and feel free to dress in traditional clothing from your home or your favorite country. Preregistration is required. Mentoring in the modern work environment. CAROLEE BULL, USDA, Salinas, CA, U.S.A. Create your own “old boys club” (breakout session). DAVID SERRANO, Broward College, Davie, FL, U.S.A. Diverse strategies for mentoring a diverse workforce (breakout session). DAN COLLINS, Southern University, Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A. The Tao of mentoring: How to mentor your supervisor (breakout session). SARAH WARE, Ball Horticultural, West Chicago, IL, U.S.A. Industry & Extension Social 6:30 – 10:00 p.m.; StrikeCity Located blocks from the Charlotte Convention Center Located in the popular entertainment venue the EpiCentre kid and offers participants the chance to bowl on state of the art, 21st century lanes or Wii bowl virtually using the high definition big screens! If bowling isn’t your sport, challenge a peer or industry representative in a game of pool or just sit back and watch from the sidelines while enjoying the dinner buffet, drinks, and the company of others! Prizes will also be given out throughout the night. Peregistration is required.

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SPECIAL SESSIONS – Sunday Afternoon Listed in alphabetical order by title. Indicates an APS Foundation Awardee

APS FOUNDATION

The 2009 Tomato and Potato Late Blight Crisis: The Interaction of the Urban Home Garden and Commercial Agriculture—What Went Wrong and What We Learned 1:00 – 3:00 p.m.; 217D Section: Plant Disease Management Organizers: Brian Olson, Dow AgroSciences, Geneva, NY, U.S.A.; Roger Kaiser, Valent BioSciences Corp., Libertyville, IL, U.S.A. Moderator: Roger Kaiser, Valent BioSciences Corp., Libertyville, IL, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committees: Industry; Extension In early July 2009, tomato plants infected with late blight were being sold by the “big box” stores up and down the East Coast, creating a late blight epidemic. This session will examine how the crisis began; the impact on commercial tomato growers; how regulators from different states reacted to the situation; how the nursery industry production system works with the “big box” retail stores; the science of the epidemic; and the APS Extension Committee’s task force report and recommendations on the crisis. 1:00 p.m. 1:15 p.m.

1:30 p.m.

1:45 p.m. 2:00 p.m.

2:15 p.m.

2:30 p.m.

1-S. Overview and impact for extension, grower, and gardener. M. MCGRATH (1). (1) Cornell University, Riverhead, NY, U.S.A. 2-S. Overview of the potted plant wholesale production business for the “big box” retail stores. B. D. OLSON (1). (1) Dow AgroSciences, Geneva, NY, U.S.A. 3-S. Perspective of the crisis from the state regulatory inspection service. S. KIM (1). (1) Plant Disease Diagnostic Lab., Pennsylvania Dept. of Agriculture, Harrisburg, PA, U.S.A. 4-S. Science of the epidemic. K. DEAHL (1). (1) USDA-ARS, Silver Spring, MD, U.S.A. 5-S. The 2009 potato and tomato late blight epidemics: Genealogical history, multiple sources, and migration events. J. B. RISTAINO (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A. 6-S. Policy meets practicality: Recommendations from an Extension Committee Task Force. M. A. DRAPER (1). (1) USDA NIFA, Washington, DC, U.S.A. Discussion

Advances in Plant Virus Evolution 1:00 – 4:00 p.m.; 217A Section: Biology of Pathogens Organizers: Rodolfo Acosta-Leal, Texas AgriLife Research, Texas A&M University, Amarillo, TX, U.S.A.; William Schneider, USDA ARS Foreign Disease Weed Science Research Unit, Fort Detrick, MD, U.S.A. Moderators: William Schneider, USDA ARS Foreign Disease Weed Science Research Unit, Fort Detrick, MD U.S.A.


Sponsoring Committee: Virology Financial Sponsors: American Society of Sugar Beet Technologists; Beet Sugar Development Foundation; Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation

1:00 p.m.

1:15 p.m. 1:45 p.m.

2:15 p.m.

2:30 p.m. 2:45 p.m. 3:00 p.m.

3:30 p.m.

7-S. The evolution of plant virus evolution: A historical overview. W. L. SCHNEIDER (1). (1) USDA-ARS FDWSRU, Fort Detrick, MD, U.S.A. 8-S. Population processes and plant virus evolution. R. FRENCH (1). (1) USDA, ARS, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, U.S.A. 9-S. Evolutionary and systems biology of plant RNA virus emergence. S. F. ELENA (1). (1) Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Plantas, Valencia, Spain 10-S. Evolution of natural populations of BNYVV to overcome host resistance. C. M. Rush (2), R. ACOSTA-LEAL (1). (1) Texas AgriLife Research, Texas A&M University, Amarillo, TX, U.S.A.; (2) Texas AgriLife Research, Texas A&M University, Bushland, TX, U.S.A. Break 10-S. Evolution of natural populations of BNYVV to overcome host resistance (continued from 2:15 p.m.). 11-S. How do geminiviruses evolve as quickly as RNA viruses? S. DUFFY (1). (1) Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ, U.S.A. 12-S. Advances in the understanding of viroid evolution. R. W. HAMMOND (1). (1) USDA, ARS, PSI, MPPL, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.

The APS Public Policy Board: New Challenges for Phytopathologists 1:00 – 4:15 p.m.; 203B Section: Professionalism/Outreach Organizer/Moderator: Jacque Fletcher, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committee: Public Policy Board This session will provide updates and opportunities for APS member input on high-priority APS public policy initiatives. These include strategies for the establishment of a National Plant Microbial Germplasm System, progress on the APS effort to shape the future of education in plant pathology, issues related to plant pathogen regulatory issues and permitting, and future initiatives in the genomics of plant-

1:00 p.m. 1:30 p.m. 2:00 p.m.

2:30 p.m. 2:45 p.m. 3:15 p.m.

3:45 p.m. 4:00 p.m.

13-S. Opportunities for plant pathology funding and regulatory policy priorities. K. EVERSOLE (1). (1) Eversole Associates, Bethesda, MD, U.S.A. 14-S. The National Plant Microbial Germplasm Collection. A. BENNETT (1). (1) University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A. 15-S. Looking ahead in genomics of plantassociated microbes. S. H. HULBERT (1), J. E. Leach (2). (1) Washington State University, Pullman, WA, U.S.A.; (2) Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, U.S.A. Break 16-S. Microbial-plant interactions: Human pathogens on plants. J. BARAK (1). (1) University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A. 17-S. Policy making up close: Reflections of the APS Office of Science & Technology Policy Fellow. M. PALM (1). (1) USDA APHIS PPPQ, Molecular Diagnostic Laboratory, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A. 18-S. EPA from the inside. F. P. WONG (1). (1) University of California, Riverside, CA, U.S.A. Reflections from the early career PPB intern. S. J. Vasquez (1). (1) University of California Cooperative Extension, Fresno, CA, U.S.A.

Induced Resistance: Where Does This Fit in IPM Programs? 1:00 – 3:45 p.m; 207CD Section: Plant Disease Management Organizer/Moderator: Barry Jacobsen, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committees: Biological Control; IPM This session will focus on host plant resistance induced by bacteria, fungi, and chemicals. 1:00 p.m. 1:30 p.m.

2:00 p.m.

2:30 p.m. 2:45 p.m.

19-S. Induced systemic resistance by biological control agents. P. BAKKER (1). (1) University of Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands 20-S. Seed or soil applied bacteria that induce resistance—Use in IPM programs. J. W. Kloeppner (1). (1) Auburn University, Auburn, AL, U.S.A. (B.J. Jacobsen will present for J.W. Kloeppner.) 21-S. Foliar applied Bacillus that induce resistance—Use in IPM Programs. B. J. JACOBSEN (1). (1) Montana State University, Bozeman, MT, U.S.A. Break 22-S. The role of Trichoderma in crop management systems. G. HARMAN (1), F. Mastouri (1). (1) Cornell University, Geneva, NY, U.S.A.

19

SUNDAY

As obligate parasites, viruses have evolved mechanisms to infect plants and undergo mutations and recombinations to adapt to new circumstances. A wide range of techniques and technologies have been used for developing an understanding of mechanisms of evolution in viruses with different genome organizations and replication strategies. A review of the current knowledge on processes associated with virus evolution and the influence of host plant, cropping methods, etc. on virus diversity and evolution is essential for sustainable crop improvement.

associated microbes. The session will finish with presentations by the APS-OSTP fellow and the Public Policy Board early career intern, both of whom will speak about their experiences and accomplishments working on public policy issues. A final discussion period will allow APS members to ask questions, provide input on the Public Policy Board activities, and volunteer to work on ongoing projects.


SUNDAY

3:15 p.m.

23-S. Chemical compounds that induce resistance—Use in IPM programs. A. H. TALLY (1). (1) Syngenta Crop Protection, Greensboro, NC, U.S.A.

Kasugamycin: The Risks and Benefits of Introducing a New Antibiotic 1:00 – 3:45 p.m.; 203A Section: Plant Disease Management Organizer: Alex Cochran, Syngenta Crop Protection, Greensboro, NC, U.S.A. Moderators: Alex Cochran, Syngenta Crop Protection, Greensboro, NC, U.S.A.; James Adaskaveg, University of California, Riverside, CA, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committees: Chemical Control; Public Policy Board; Pathogen Resistance; Bacteriology Financial Sponsor: Arysta LifeScience Effective bactericides are a critical tool in the management of plant diseases. Kasugamycin is a new and unique antibiotic being developed for use in U.S. agriculture. Benefits of this new antibiotic will be discussed. In addition, general concerns over potential risks of the use of all antibiotics in agriculture to human medicine will be reviewed. Topics to be discussed will be efficacy, impacts for food safety, EPA/FDA concerns, global regulatory concerns/hurdles, and reviewing current needs after a lengthy drought of antibiotic registrations. 1:00 p.m. 1:15 p.m.

1:30 p.m.

1:45 p.m. 2:15 p.m.

2:30 p.m. 2:45 p.m.

3:15 p.m.

20

24-S. Concerns about lateral transfer of genes for antibiotic resistance. P. MCMANIS (1). (1) University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A. 25-S. Rediscovery of kasugamycin for managing fire blight and other bacterial diseases of plants in the United States. J. ADASKAVEG (1), H. Forster (2), L. Wade (3). (1) University of California, Riverside, CA, U.S.A.; (2) University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A.; (3) Roseville, CA, U.S.A. 26-S. Kasugamycin—A novel antibiotic for North American agriculture. V. J. SPADAFORA (1), G. Orr (1), L. Wade (1), M. Wiglesworth (1). (1) Arysta LifeScience North America, LLC, Cary, NC, U.S.A. 27-S. EPA approaches for evaluating antibiotic uses in the context of FIFRA. L. ROSSI (1). (1) EPA, Crystal City, VA, U.S.A. 28-S. Kasumin: Field results for fire blight management and evaluation of the potential for resistance development in Erwinia amylovora. G. W. SUNDIN (1), G. C. McGhee (1). (1) Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, U.S.A. Break 29-S. Resistance management strategies for bacterial pathogens: What works? K. B. JOHNSON (1). (1) Dept. of Botany and Plant Pathology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A. Q & A Panel Discussion

ORAL TECHNICAL SESSIONS – Sunday Afternoon Listed in alphabetical order. Biological Control/Bacteriology 1:00 – 4:00 p.m.; 217BC Sections: Plant Disease Management; Molecular/Cellular/ Plant-Microbe Interactions Moderator: Pervaiz A. Abbasi, Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada, London, ON, Canada 1:00 p.m.

1:15 p.m.

1:30 p.m.

1:45 p.m.

2:00 p.m.

2:15 p.m.

2:30 p.m. 2:45 p.m.

3:00 p.m.

1-O. Biocontrol and functional properties of pseudomonads isolated from different ecological niches and diversity of phlD a key gene in the 2, 4-DAPG biosynthesis. J. JEGAN (1), V. R. Prabavathy (1), S. Nair (1). (1) M.S. Swaminathan Res. Foundation, Chennai, India 2-O. Bacillus subtilis, strain QST 713, Biofungicide II: Soil applications for disease control, yield improvement, and quality enhancement. P. J. WALGENBACH (1), D. Long (2), D. Sliva (3). (1) AgraQuest, Inc., Davis, CA, U.S.A.; (2) AgraQuest, Inc., Demarest, GA, U.S.A.; (3) AgraQuest, Inc., Santa Maria, CA, U.S.A. 3-O. Biological control of bacterial spot of tomato and capsicum caused by Xanthomonas campestris and Pseudomonas solanacearum by bacteriophages in the UAE. K. A. ELTARABILY (1), F. McKenna (2). (1) United Arab Emirates University, Al-Ain, UAE; (2) Natural Science Center Inc., Steele, AL, U.S.A. APS 4-O. Field evaluations of FOUNDATION Simplicillium lanosoniveum as a biological control agent for Phakopsora pachyrhizi. N. A. WARD (1), R. W. Schneider (1), C. L. Robertson (1). (1) Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A. 5-O. Improving scab suppression and tuber yield of potatoes with multiple repeated applications of low rates of fish emulsion to a commercial field. P. A. ABBASI (1). (1) Agriculture & AgriFood Canada, London, ON, Canada 6-O. Biological control of Macrophomina phaseolina on sunflower in Pakistan. H. ULLAH (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, University of Agriculture, Peshawar, Pakistan Break 7-O. Characterization of the occ gene cluster required for the production of antifungal compound occidiofungin in Burkholderia contaminans strain MS14. G. GU (1), K. Chen (1), L. Smith (1), S. Lu (1). (1) Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, U.S.A. 8-O. A virulence factor of phytoplasma inducing witches’-broom and dwarfism symptoms. A. Hoshi (1), S. Kakizawa (1), Y. Ishii (1), N. Kojima (1), K. Sugawara (1), Y. Okano (1), K. Maejima (1), K. Oshima (1), S. NAMBA (1).


3:15 p.m.

3:30 p.m.

Defense Responses/Biology of Pathogens 1:00 – 4:00 p.m.; 207AB Sections: Molecular/Cellular/Plant-Microbe Interactions; Biology of Pathogens Moderators: Pankaj Trivedi, Citrus Res. and Education Center, University of Florida/IFAS, Lake Alfred, FL, U.S.A. 1:00 p.m.

1:15 p.m.

1:30 p.m.

1:45 p.m.

2:00 p.m.

2:15 p.m.

12-O. GmFAD3 genes mediate developmental and defense-related physiology in soybean. A. SINGH (1), M. El-Habbak (1), S. Ghabrial (1), A. Kachroo (1). (1) University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, U.S.A. 13-O. Characterization of salicylate hydroxylase of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ and its role in plant defense suppression. P. TRIVEDI (1), N. Wang (1). (1) Citrus Res. and Education Center, University of Florida/IFAS, Lake Alfred, FL, U.S.A. 14-O. A role for WRKY proteins in the low 18:1-derived defense signaling pathway. Q. GAO (1), D. Navarre (2), A. Kachroo (1). (1) University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS, Washington State University, Prosser, WA, U.S.A. 15-O. Identification and application of the rice broad-spectrum blast resistance gene Pigm. Z. HE (1), Y. Deng (2). (1) Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, CAS, Shanghai, PRC Peoples Rep of China; (2) Shanghai, PRC Peoples Rep of China 16-O. Nonhost resistance response at the nucleosome level. L. HADWIGER (1). (1) Washington State University, Pullman, WA, U.S.A. 17-O. Oleate-regulated signaling and plant defense. P. Kachroo (1), A. Kachroo (1), M. K. MANDAL (1). (1) University of Kentucky, Dept. of Plant Pathology, Lexington, KY, U.S.A.

2:30 p.m. 2:45 p.m.

3:00 p.m.

3:15 p.m.

3:30 p.m.

3:45 p.m.

Break 18-O. Identification of the molecular make-up of the Potato virus Y strain PVYZ. C. KERLAN (1), O. Nikolaeva (1), X. Hu (1), T. Meacham (1), S. Gray (2), A. Karasev (1). (1) University of Idaho, Moscow, ID, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A. 19-O. Sequence analysis of Raspberry latent virus suggests a new genus of dicot infecting reoviruses. D. QUITO (1), R. R. Martin (2). (1) Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A.; (2) Horticultural Crops Res. Unit, USDA-ARS, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A. 20-O. Insights into common functional domains of tospovirus NSm proteins. W. Li (1), D. J. Lewandowski (2), M. E. Hilf (3), S. ADKINS (3). (1) University of Florida, Lake Alfred, FL, U.S.A.; (2) The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, U.S.A.; (3) USDA ARS USHRL, Ft. Pierce, FL, U.S.A. 21-O. Influence of Xylella fastidiosa on mineral content of infected host plants. L. DE LA FUENTE (1), L. C. Cruz (1), J. K. Parker (1), P. A. Cobine (1). (1) Auburn University, Auburn University, AL, U.S.A. 22-O. The Egestion-Salivation Hypothesis: Evidence for the role of vector saliva in the inoculation mechanism of Xylella fastidiosa. E. A. BACKUS (1), K. Andrews (2), J. M. Labavitch (3), C. Greve (3). (1) USDA ARS, Parlier, CA, U.S.A.; (2) Australian Dept. of Primary Industries, Attwood, Australia; (3) University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A.

Turfgrass/Pathogen Diversity 1:00 – 4:00 p.m.; 208B Sections: Diseases of Plants; Epidemiology/Ecology/Environmental Biology Moderators: Bimal S. Amaradasa, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, U.S.A.; Kirk D. Broders, School of Environmental Sciences, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada 1:00 p.m.

1:15 p.m.

1:30 p.m.

1:45 p.m.

23-O. First characterization of a new Exserohilum foliar disease on warm season turfgrasses. Y. JO (1). (1) Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, U.S.A. APS FOUNDATION 24-O. Effects of fertility and cultivation practices on large patch disease of zoysiagrass, caused by Rhizoctonia solani AG 2-2 LP. K. OBASA (1), R. St. John (1), D. Bremer (1), J. Fry (1), M. Kennelly (1). (1) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. 25-O. Effectiveness of early-season fungicide programs for the control of Sclerotinia homoeocarpa, the causal agent of dollar spot. C. WILSON (1), P. Koch (1), J. Kerns (1). (1) University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A. 26-O. Novel fungicide timings to target important turfgrass diseases in the upper Midwest. P. KOCH (1), J. Kerns (2). (1) University of

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SUNDAY

3:45 p.m.

(1) Laboratory of Plant Pathology, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Japan 9-O. Transposon mutagenesis of Pantoea ananatis: Isolation and characterization of a Tn5-induced mutant with reduced virulence to onion. A. M. Zaid (1), J. M. Bonasera (1), S. V. BEER (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A. 10-O. Towards understanding coronatinedependent suppression of innate immunity in Arabidopsis guard cells. N. OBULAREDDY (1), S. Panchal (1), M. Melotto (1). (1) University of Texas, Arlington, TX, U.S.A. APS FOUNDATION 11-O. In planta expression profiling reveals Ralstonia solanacearum physiology and the importance of sucrose metabolism during bacterial wilt of tomato. J. M. JACOBS (1), F. Meng (1), L. Babujee (1), C. Allen (1). (1) University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A.


SUNDAY

2:00 p.m.

2:15 p.m.

2:30 p.m. 2:45 p.m.

Wisconsin-Madison, Verona, WI, U.S.A.; (2) University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A. 27-O. Field efficacy of propiconazole on diverse Sclerotinia homoeocarpa population structures. J. T. POPKO (1), C. Ok (2), M. T. McGrath (3), G. Jung (2). (1) Dept. of Plant, Soil and Insect Science, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, Hadley, MA, U.S.A.; (2) Dept. of Plant, Soil and Insect Science, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, U.S.A.; (3) Dept. of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, Cornell University, Riverhead, NY, U.S.A. 28-O. UP-PCR analysis and UP-PCR crossblot hybridization for grouping of Rhizoctonia species isolated from turfgrass in Maryland and Virginia. B. S. AMARADASA (1), B. Horvath (2), D. K. Lakshman (3). (1) Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, U.S.A.; (2) University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, U.S.A.; (3) USDA-ARS, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A. Break 29-O. Discovering single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in an uncharacterized fungal genome using the software EagleView to evaluate 454 sequencing data. K. D. BRODERS (1), P. J. SanMiguel (2), R. P. Westerman (2), K. E. Woeste (3), G. J. Boland (1). (1) School of Environmental Sciences, University of Guelph, ON, Canada; (2) Dept. of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A.; (3) USDA Forest Service, Hardwood Tree Improvement and Regeneration Center, Dept. of Forestry and Natural Resources, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A.

3:00 p.m.

3:15 p.m.

3:30 p.m.

3:45 p.m.

30-O. Using microsatellite markers to assess diversity of Phytophthora sojae in Iowa. S. M. STEWART (1), A. E. Dorrance (2), A. E. Robertson (1). (1) Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A.; (2) OARDC, Wooster, OH, U.S.A. APS FOUNDATION 31-O. Intraspecific analysis of Phytophthora nicotianae from diverse hosts and geographic locations using mitochondrial and nuclear markers. M. A. MAMMELLA (1), L. Schena (2), M. D. Coffey (3), S. O. Cacciola (4), F. N. Martin (5). (1) Dipartimento Gestione dei Sistemi Agrari e Forestali, Università Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria, Italy; USDA-ARS, Salinas, CA, U.S.A.; (2) Dipartimento Gestione dei Sistemi Agrari e Forestali, Università Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria, Italy; (3) Dept. of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, University of California, Riverside, CA, U.S.A.; (4) Dipartimento di Chimica biologica, Chimica medica e Biologia molecolare, Università degli Studi di Catania, Italy; (5) USDA-ARS, Salinas, CA, U.S.A. 32-O Diversity of Phytophthora capsici from vegetable crops in Georgia. K. JACKSON (1), J. Yin (1), A. Csinos (1), H. Scherm (2), P. Ji (1). (1) University of Georgia, Tifton, GA, U.S.A.; (2) University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A. 33-O. Copper resistance in Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc) and X. alfalfae subsp. citrumelonis (Xac) and comparison with other xanthomonads. F. BEHLAU (1), B. I. Canteros (2), J. H. Graham (3), J. B. Jones (1). (1) University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A.; (2) INTAEEA, Bella Vista, Argentina; (3) University of Florida, Lake Alfred, FL, U.S.A.

MONDAY BOOK SIGNING EVENT Save 20% on this new arrival! Monday, August 9 3:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. APS PRESS Bookstore (Exhibit Hall A)  

NEW

Clarence Kado

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If you have pre-ordered this title and wish to receive a signed copy at the meeting, visit the APS PRESS Bookstore during the signing and speak with Linda Gold at the check out counter.


■ MONDAY, AUGUST 9 213AB 204 A Concourse Food Court and Exhibit Hall A Exhibit Hall A 216AB 207CD 217A 217D 208A 203B

MONDAY

6:30 – 8:00 a.m. Extension Plant Pathologists Breakfast 7:00 – 11:00 a.m. Public Policy Board Meeting 7:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Registration 7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Concession Service Available 8:00 – 8:30 a.m. Coffee and Meeting with Exhibitors—Exhibiting in 2011 8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. USDA NIFA Plant Biosecurity Program Project Director Meeting Special Sessions 8:30 – 10:45 a.m. • 10th I. E. Melhus Graduate Student Symposium: Seed Pathology—Epidemiology, Management, and Phytosanitary Concerns 8:30 – 11:00 a.m. • New Products and Services 8:30 – 11:15 a.m. • Broad-Spectrum Resistance: Molecular Mechanisms Involved in Pathogen Reception and Resistance 8:30 – 11:15 a.m. • More Than Just Antibiotics: The Multiple Mechanisms Leading to Biological Control and Plant Growth Promotion 8:30 – 11:15 a.m. • Plant Pathogen Population Genetics: An Essential Tool for Crop Biosecurity 8:30 – 11:45 a.m. • Small Molecules in Phytopathology: From Determiants of Disease to Modulators of Defense Oral Technical Sessions 8:30 – 11:30 a.m. • Bacteriology/Pathogen Detection 8:30 – 11:30 a.m. • Virology/Diseases of Plants 9:00 – 11:00 a.m. Affiliates Meeting 9:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. APS PRESS Bookstore 9:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. Exhibits Open 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. APS Leadership Institute Ad-Hoc Committee Meeting 11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Lunch Break (Concession Service Available) 11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Past Presidents’ Luncheon, by invitation 11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Widely Prevalent Fungi Working Group 11:45 a.m. – 12:45 p.m. USDA-ARS Meeting 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. Graduate Student & Industry Lunch 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. Storkan Hanes McCaslin Research Foundation Luncheon, by invitation 1:00 – 3:30 p.m. New Time! Plenary Session 3:30 – 4:30 p.m. APS PRESS Book Signing Event for Plant Bacteriology 3:30 – 6:00 p.m. Office of Industry Relations (OIR) Board Meeting 3:30 – 10:00 p.m. Extended Time! Poster Viewing 4:00 – 5:30 p.m., odd-numbered poster authors present 5:30 – 7:00 p.m., even-numbered poster authors present 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Early Career Professional Social 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Graduate Student Social

207AB 208B 217BC 206A Exhibit Hall A Exhibit Hall A 205 Food Court 214 204 218AB/219AB 213ABC 213D Westin–Grand Ballroom Exhibit Hall A 205 Exhibit Hall A 213D 213A

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MONDAY HIGHLIGHTS Extension Plant Pathologists Breakfast 6:30 – 8:00 a.m.; 213AB This is your unique opportunity to visit with colleagues and industry representatives from a variety of companies. Ticket purchase required.

MONDAY

USDA NIFA Plant Biosecurity Program Project Director Meeting 8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.; 216AB Section: Professionalism/Outreach Organizers: Liang-Shiou Lin, USDA/NIFA, Washington, DC, U.S.A.; Gera Jochum, USDA/NIFA, Washington, DC, U.S.A. This is a meeting for project directors funded by the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) Plant Biosecurity Program to report on the progress made to date and to discuss program priorities. Global Phytophthora Network (GPN): A cyber infrastructure linking data, e-tools, and human capital to support the monitoring and management of Phytophthora. S. KANG, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, U.S.A. Development of sentinel plants for detection of high-risk pathogens. J. MEDFORD, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, U.S.A. Development of an integrated system to detect, monitor, and forecast the spread of Phytophthora infestans in the lower atmosphere. D. SCHMALE, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, U.S.A. Development of an integrated information and identification system for native and potentially invasive delphacid planthoppers. C. BARTLETT, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, U.S.A. Development and validation of a Universal Plant Virus Microarray for detection and identification of plant viruses. J. HAMMOND, USDA ARS, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A. The incursion of new wheat stem rust races into the United States: Preparation through research, education, and extension. S. ISARD, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, U.S.A. Development, implementation, and outreach for emerging technologies of plant pathogen detection. K. PERRY, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A. Development of prototype Pathogen Detection Lab-On-aChip (PADLOC) system for real-time on-field plant disease diagnostics. W. SHIM, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, U.S.A. Genome-enabled diagnosis of the wheat blast pathogen and identification of resistance resources. B. VALENT, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. Graduate Student & Industry Lunch 12:00 – 1:00 p.m.; 213ABC Students! Connect with industry representatives from a variety of companies by attending the APS Industry Committeesponsored luncheon. Network and learn about job opportu-

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nities available in the industry. Both graduate students and industry members need to register for the event. Preregistration and ticket are required for both graduate students and industry members.

Plenary Session—Looking to the Future:

Possibilities and Challenges in Plant Pathology 1:00 – 3:30 p.m.; Westin–Grand Ballroom The Plenary Session focuses on the 2010 Annual Meeting theme, Creating Possibilities, by featuring speakers focused on issues facing agriculture and feeding the growing population. Speakers from outside plant pathology and agriculture will help us examine the issues of social media and their impact on our science, as well as the importance of global linkages. This session will focus primarily on the future of plant pathology and help us form ideas and realize possibilities for the future. Presentations The ever-increasing importance of plant pathology Andre Drenth, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia Drenth’s presentation will address the following three questions: 1) How have plant patholgists fed the world and what have the contributions and impacts of plant science been? 2) What are the key challenges with regard to plant production which will enable agriculture to feed a growing world population in the future? 3) What role can plant pathology play in feeding the world? Drenth obtained an M.Sc. degree in plant breeding and a Ph.D. degree in plant pathology on late blight in potato jointly from Wageningen Agricultural University and Cornell University before moving to Brisbane, Australia. In 2006, he established the Tree Pathology Centre, which is focused on the control of diseases in tree crops. Drenth has managed many research projects in Australia and Southeast Asia and has published many papers, book chapters, and a book and is a well-cited author in a range of different areas of plant pathology. Unveiling the web and making the implicit explicit: How new technologies will do your networking for you and what you can do to take advantage Ian Mulvany, Mendley.com, London, United Kingdom Mulvany will examine some of the trends that are happening now in scientific journals, the internet, and related technologies. He will also discuss some of the potential benefits and potential pitfalls that could face us in this brave new world. Ian Mulvany is head of new product development for Mendeley.com, where he tries to build the tomorrow’s software for today’s researchers. Prior to this he managed Connotea and Nature Network; Nature Publishing Group’s key web applications. He spends much of his time examining the implications of emerging web technologies for the practice and communication of science, and is motivated by the idea that the “filter failure” problem can be overcome with the right tools.


Science and Diplomacy: Global Connections Kerri-Ann Jones, Assistant Secretary of State for Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs, Department of State, Washington, DC Jones will speak on the topic of importance of international networks for scientific communities and roles our professional society can play. Jones served previously as the director of the National Science Foundation’s Office of International Science and Engineering. Jones has also served as acting director and associate director for National Security and International Affairs in the White House Office of Science and Technology (OSTP).

Connections are critical for the growth of your career. This social provides the unique opportunity for early career professionals to meet other plant pathologists at a similar career stage. The APS Early Career Professionals Committee will kick off the social, providing an opportunity to learn about the committee initiatives and suggest ideas for future consideration. New Opportunity! For the first time, academic, government, and industry employers are also invited to join the social to network one-on-one with prospective employees. This relaxed setting will provide the perfect opportunity for recent graduates, post-docs, and those just starting in their career to mingle and hear firsthand from employers what skills and knowledge they are looking for in their current job openings. Refreshments and appetizers are included. This unique, first-of-itskind event is one you won’t want to miss. Preregistration is required. Graduate Student Social 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.; 213A Sponsoring Committee: Graduate Student Organizer: Heather A. Olson, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A. Graduate students—make plans to meet with your plant pathology colleagues in an informal and relaxed environment. The APS Office of Public Relations and Outreach will also be announcing the 2010 Video Contest winner during the social. Light snacks and beverages will be served. This event is limited to students only. Preregistration is required.

Listed in alphabetical order by title. Indicates an APS Foundation Awardee

APS FOUNDATION

10th I. E. Melhus Graduate Student Symposium: Seed Pathology—Epidemiology, Management, and Phytosanitary Concerns 8:30 – 10:45 a.m.; 207CD Section: Biology of Pathogens Organizers/Moderators: Lindsey du Toit, Washington State University, Mount Vernon, WA, U.S.A.; Gary Munkvold, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committee: Seed Pathology Financial Sponsors: ROGERS Brand Vegetable Seeds (Syngenta); BASF Corporation; Casiana (Nollie) M. Vera Cruz of International Rice Research Institute (personal donation); Eurofins STA Laboratories; Lindsey J. du Toit of Washington State University (personal donation) This 10th symposium will feature four presentations by graduate students on their thesis work highlighting research aimed at providing a better understanding of the epidemiology, management, and/or phytosanitary issues of plant diseases caused by seedborne pathogens. Student presentations cover areas of seed pathology research, including seed infection, seed transmission, host-pathogen interactions of seedborne pathogens, management and epidemiology of seedborne pathogens, and other basic and applied aspects of seedborne pathogens. 8:30 a.m.

APS FOUNDATION

30-S. Effect of the mechanism of infestation on the localization of Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli in naturally infested watermelon seeds. B. DUTTA (1). (1) University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A. APS 9:00 a.m. 31-S. Characterization of genes in FOUNDATION Fusarium verticillioides regulating colonization of maize kernels. R. L. HIRSCH (1), B. H. Bluhm (1). (1) University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A. APS 9:30 a.m. 32-S. Interactions between viruses FOUNDATION and Phomopsis infection in soybean and effects of integrated management strategies. J. SOTOARIAS (1), G. Munkvold (1). (1) Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A. APS 10:00 a.m. FOUNDATION 33-S. Quorum sensing affects virulence and seed-to-seedling transmission of Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli, the causal agent of bacterial fruit blotch. K. JOHNSON (1). (1) University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A.

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MONDAY

Early Career Professionals Social (with NEW Employer Networking Opportunity) 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.; 213D Sponsoring Committee: Early Career Professionals Organizers: Gilda Maria Rauscher, USDA-ARS, Salinas, CA, U.S.A.; Lyndon Porter, USDA-ARS, Prosser, WA, U.S.A.

SPECIAL SESSIONS – Monday Morning


MONDAY

Broad-Spectrum Resistance: Molecular Mechanisms Involved in Pathogen Reception and Resistance Signaling 8:30 – 11:15 a.m.; 217D Section: Molecular/Cellular/Plant-Microbe Interactions Organizers: Dennis Halterman, USDA ARS, Madison, WI, U.S.A.; Roger Wise, USDA ARS, Ames, IA, U.S.A. Moderator: Dennis Halterman, USDA ARS, Madison, WI, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committees: Molecular and Cellular Phytopathology; Host Resistance Relatively recent advances have been made in determining the molecular basis of broad-spectrum disease resistance in plants. Multiple levels of host responses to pathogen-derived molecules provide distinct sources and mechanisms of broadspectrum resistance. Pathogen recognition receptors perceive conserved microbial molecular patterns to elicit basal defense responses, while resistance genes recognize the presence of pathogen effectors that may be essential for virulence. In this session, we will explore the molecular interface between hosts and pathogens and specifically focus on traits that result in host resistance to a broad spectrum of pathogen strains or types. 8:30 a.m.

34-S. Pattern recognition receptors in plant innate immunity. C. J. RIDOUT (1). (1) John Innes Centre, Norwich, United Kingdom 9:00 a.m. 35-S. Dissecting QTL: The genes that contribute to disease resistance revealed. J. E. LEACH (1), R. M. Davidson (1), J. Snelling (1), M. Bruce (1), H. Leung (2), C. M. Vera Cruz (1). (1) Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, U.S.A.; (2) International Rice Research Institute, Manila, Philippines 9:30 a.m. 36-S. Genetical genomics of Ug99 stem rust infection identifies master regulators of defense in barley. M. Moscou (1), N. Lauter (2), B. Steffenson (3), R. WISE (2). (1) Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS/ Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A.; (3) University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, U.S.A. 10:00 a.m. Break 10:15 a.m. 37-S. Targeting conserved effectors and effector motifs for broad-spectrum resistance against oomycetes and fungi. B. M. TYLER (1), S. D. Kale (1), B. Gu (2), D. G. Capelluto (3), D. Dou (4), F. Arredondo (1), D. Deb (5), R. Anderson (5), V. Antigliani (1), I. Fudal (6), T. Rouxel (6), J. McDowell (5), C. Lawrence (1), W. Shan (2). (1) Virginia Tech, Virginia Bioinformatics Institute, Blacksburg, VA, U.S.A.; (2) Northwest A & F University, Yangling, PRC Peoples Rep of China; (3) Virginia Tech, Dept. of Biological Sciences, Blacksburg, VA, U.S.A.; (4) Dept. of Plant Pathology, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, PRC Peoples Rep of China; (5) Virginia Tech, Dept. of Plant Pathology, Physiology and Weed Science, Blacksburg, VA, U.S.A.; (6) INRA-Bioger, Versailles, France

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10:45 a.m. 38-S. The molecular basis of broad-spectrum powdery mildew resistance. R. PANSTRUGA (1), C. Consonni (1), M. Humphry (1), J. Lorek (1), K. Becker (1), P. Bednarek (1). (1) MaxPlanck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, Köln, Germany More Than Just Antibiotics: The Multiple Mechanisms Leading to Biological Control and Plant Growth Promotion 8:30 – 11:15 a.m.; 208A Section: Molecular/Cellular/Plant-Microbe Interactions Organizer: Brian McSpadden Gardener, The Ohio State University, OARDC, Wooster, OH, U.S.A. Moderator: Fulya Baysal Gurel, The Ohio State University, OARDC, Woooster, OH, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committees: Biological Control; Soil Microbiology Much early work went into the discovery of key mechanisms of biocontrol by bacteria, particularly antibiotics. However, it has become increasingly clear that multiple chemical signals produced by bacteria impact plant health. Also, genomic and ecological studies have shown that some of the most effective individual strains express multiple traits that lead to a robust plant-health-promoting phenotype. This session will cover recent research on the diverse mechanisms by which biocontrol bacteria are now known to promote crop health and suppress plant diseases. After discussing the individual mechanisms under study, the panel of speakers will convene to discuss how and why such mechanisms might be coordinated or integrated in natural systems. 8:30 a.m.

39-S. The multiple roles of auxin production and turnover in bacteria: Impact on plant health. J. LEVEAU (1). (1) University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A. 9:00 a.m. 40-S. Bacterial determinants of induced systemic resistance induced by Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6. S. HAN (1), A. J. Anderson (2), B. McSpadden Gardener (3), K. Yang (1), Y. Kim (1). (1) Chonnam National University, Gwangju, Korea; (2) Utah State University, Logan, UT, U.S.A.; (3) Ohio State University, Wooster, OH, U.S.A. 9:30 a.m. 41-S. Differential roles of lipopeptides in plant host defenses and pathogen suppression. M. ONGENA (1), G. Henry (1), P. Thonart (1). (1) University of Liege, Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech, Gembloux, Belgium 10:00 a.m. Break 10:15 a.m. 42-S. Bacterial signaling: Activation of secondary metabolites with multiple roles in biological control. L. S. PIERSON (1), E. A. Pierson (2). (1) Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, U.S.A.; (2) University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, U.S.A. 10:45 a.m. 43-S. Redefining the paradigm of biocontrol. B. MCSPADDEN GARDENER (1), S. Park (1), C. Chunxue (1), X. Rong (1). (1) The Ohio State University - OARDC, Wooster, OH, U.S.A.


New Products and Services 8:30 – 11:00 a.m.; 217A Section: Plant Disease Management Organizer/Moderator: Courtney Gallup, Dow AgroSciences, Davenport, IA, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committee: Industry The session provides a forum for highlighting new products and services that are in the pipeline or are now offered to growers and researchers to aid in managing or understanding plant diseases. 8:30 a.m. 8:45 a.m. 9:00 a.m.

9:30 a.m.

9:45 a.m. 10:00 a.m. 10:15 a.m.

10:30 a.m. 10:45 a.m.

Plant Pathogen Population Genetics: An Essential Tool for Crop Biosecurity 8:30 – 11:15 a.m.; 203B Section: Epidemiology/Ecology/Environmental Biology Organizers: Niklaus Grunwald and Erica Goss, USDA ARS, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A. Moderator: Erica Goss, USDA ARS, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committee: Genetics Plant pathogens have been recognized as threats to U.S. biosecurity in regard to agricultural crops and natural resources. Population genetics has played an important role in recent years in the detection and monitoring of emerging or reemerging pathogens, elucidating the source of global migrations of pathogens, and the assessment of future risk from pathogens. This session will highlight the contributions of population genetics to plant pathogen biosecurity. 8:30 a.m.

52-S. How can population genetics inform crop biosecurity efforts? N. J. GRUNWALD (1). (1) USDA ARS, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A.

53-S. Application of comparative genomics for the identification and monitoring of the highly virulent African race, Ug99, of Puccinia graminis. J. CROUCH (1), S. Sakthikumar (2), C. Cuomo (2), S. Stoxen (3), Z. A. Pretorious (4), L. J. Szabo (1). (1) Cereal Disease Laboratory, USDA-ARS, St. Paul, MN, U.S.A.; (2) Broad Institute, Cambridge, MA, U.S.A.; (3) University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, U.S.A.; (4) University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, Southwest Africa 9:30 a.m. 54-S. Inference of Phytophthora ramorum migration pathways. E. M. GOSS (1). (1) USDA ARS, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A. 10:00 a.m. Break 10:15 a.m. 55-S. The population genomics of mycotoxin diversity in Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus. I. CARBONE (1), B. W. Horn (2), G. G. Moore (1), R. A. Olarte (1), C. J. Worthington (1), J. T. Monacell (3), E. A. Stone (4). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; (2) National Peanut Research Laboratory, USDA, ARS, Dawson, GA, U.S.A.; (3) Dept. of Plant Pathology and Bioinformatics Research Center, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; (4) Dept. of Genetics and Bioinformatics Research Center, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A. 10:45 a.m. 56-S. A population genetics framework for understanding aggressiveness and toxigenicity of Fusarium head blight pathogens. T. WARD (1). (1) USDA ARS, Peoria, IL, U.S.A. Small Molecules in Phytopathology: From Determinants of Disease to Modulators of Defense 8:30 – 11:45 a.m.; 207AB Section: Molecular/Cellular/Plant-Microbe Interactions Organizers/Moderators: Srinivasa Rao Uppalapati, The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK, U.S.A.; Tom Mitchell, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committee: Molecular and Cellular Phytopathology This session will focus on host- and pathogen-derived small molecules that regulate microbial pathogenesis, disease development processes, and signaling networks involved in plant responses to a wide range of pathogens. The session will also address emerging paradigms, newly identified small molecules that could provide novel ways to control diseases by either priming plant immunity or interfering with effector secretion systems. 8:30 a.m.

57-S. Unraveling the site- and mode-of-action of protein host-selective toxins. L. M. CIUFFETTI (1), V. A. Manning (1), I. Pandelova (1), M. Figueroa Betts (1). (1) Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A.

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MONDAY

9:15 a.m.

44-S. IPM scope CAM. C. TURSKI (1). (1) Spectrum Technologies, Plainfield, IL., U.S.A. 45-S. Novel immunocapture PCR kits for detection of plant viruses. J. Q. XIA (1). (1) AC Diagnostics, Inc., Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A. 46-S. DNAble DNA amplification and detection test kits. T. MCFADD (1). (1) EnviroLogix, Inc., Portland, ME, U.S.A. 47-S. Actinovate AG. M. ROBERTS (1). (1) Natural Industries, Houston, TX, U.S.A. 48-S. Stratego Pro: A prothioconazole-trifloxystrobin fungicide in corn and soybeans. J. E. FAJARDO (1). (1) Bayer CropScience, Research Triangle Park, NC, U.S.A. 49-S. Luna: A new fungicide from Bayer CropScience. G. MUSSON (1). (1) Bayer CropScience, Research Triangle Park, NC, U.S.A. Break 50-S. METLOCKTM 3.7 FS Fungicide: A new seed treatment from Valent U.S.A. Corporation. K. ARTHUR (1). (1) Valent U.S.A. Corporation, Plano, TX, U.S.A. 51-S. Update on seed treatments from BASF. H. YPEMA (1). (1) BASF Corporation, Research Triangle Park, NC, U.S.A. Discussion

9:00 a.m.


9:00 a.m.

9:30 a.m.

MONDAY

10:00 a.m. 10:15 a.m.

10:45 a.m.

11:15 a.m.

58-S. Hijacking and manipulation of host responses by pathogen-derived hormone mimics: An update on functional role of coronatine in bacterial speck disease. R. UPPALAPATI (1), Y. Ishiga (1), T. Ishiga (1), T. Wangdi (1), C. Ryu (1), K. S. Mysore (1). (1) The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK, U.S.A. 59-S. Sclerotinia sclerotiorum via oxalic acid creates a reducing environment in the host which is required for pathogenic success. M. DICKMAN (1), M. Kabbage (1), B. Williams (1), H. Kim (1). (1) Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, U.S.A. Break 60-S. Azelaic acid: A new player in priming plant defense. J. T. GREENBERG (1), H. Jung (2), T. Tschaplinski (3). (1) University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, U.S.A.; (2) Dong-A University, Busan, Korea; (3) Oak Ridge National Lab, Oak Ridge, TN, U.S.A. 61-S. Networking by small-molecule hormones in plant immunity. A. LEON-REYES (1), D. Van der Does (1), A. Koornneef (1), S. C. Van Wees (1), C. M. Pieterse (1). (1) Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands 62-S. Small molecule inhibitors of type III secretion systems in Gram-negative plant and animal pathogens. H. B. FELISE (1), H. V. Nguyen (1), K. C. Barry (1), P. A. Bronstein (2), T. Kline (1), S. I. Miller (1). (1) University of Washington, Seattle, WA, U.S.A.; (2) USDA, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A.

9:00 a.m.

9:15 a.m.

9:30 a.m.

9:45 a.m. 10:00 a.m. 10:15 a.m.

ORAL TECHNICAL SESSIONS – Monday Morning Listed in alphabetical order by title. Bacteriology/Pathogen Detection 8:30 – 11:30 a.m.; 208B Sections: Molecular/Cellular/Plant-Microbe Interactions; Diseases of Plants Moderators: Premila Achar, Kennesaw State University, Kennesaw, GA, U.S.A.; Neha Jalan, Microbiology and Cell Science Dept., CREC, University of Florida, Lake Alfred, FL, U.S.A. 8:30 a.m.

8:45 a.m.

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34-O. Characterization of the HrpG and HrpX regulons of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri. Y. GUO (1), N. Wang (2). (1) University of Florida, Lake Alfred, FL, U.S.A.; (2) Citrus Res. and Education Center, University of Florida, Lake Alfred, FL, U.S.A. 35-O. Comparative genomic analysis of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri str. Aw 12879 and Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri str. 5208 (Miami). N. JALAN (1), N. Wang (1). (1) Microbiology and Cell Science Dept., CREC, University of Florida, Lake Alfred, FL, U.S.A.

10:30 a.m.

10:45 a.m.

36-O. RPG1-B-derived resistance to AvrB expressing Pseudomonas syringae requires RIN4like proteins in soybean. D. SELOTE (1), A. Kachroo (1). (1) University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, U.S.A. 37-O. Defense-related enzymes and gene expression after resistance induction by rhizobacteria and silicon against Ralstonia solanacearum in tomato. H. K. MULAT (1). (1) Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz University of Hannover, Hannover, Germany 38-O. The virulence mechanisms of Xylella fastidiosa in xylem fluid from resistant and susceptible grapevines. X. SHI (1, 5), Z. Liang (2), J. Bi (3), J. G. Morse (4), N.C. Toscano (4) D. A. Cooksey (5), H.C. Hoch (1), T. J. Burr (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology and PlantMicrobe Biology, NYSAES, Cornell University, Geneva, NY, U.S.A.; (2) Horticulture Dept., Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A.; (3) University of California Cooperative Extension, Salinas, CA, U.S.A.; (4) Dept. of Entomology, University of California, Riverside, CA, U.S.A.; (5) Plant Pathology Dept. and Microbiology Dept., University of California, Riverside, CA, U.S.A. 39-O. Death of epithelial cells in loblolly pine roots. C. H. WALKINSHAW (1). (1) Columbus, GA, U.S.A. Break 40-O. PCR detection and identification of Phymatotrichopsis omnivore. M. ARIF (1), S. M. Marek (1), F. M. Ochoa Corona (1), C. Young (2), C. D. Garzon (1). (1) Dept. of Entomology and Plant Pathology, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, U.S.A.; (2) The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK, U.S.A. 41-O. Development of a multiplex assay for genus and species-specific detection of Phytophthora based on differences in mitochondrial gene order. G. BILODEAU (1), F. N. Martin (1), M. D. Coffey (2), C. L. Blomquist (3). (1) USDA-ARS, Salinas, CA, U.S.A.; (2) Dept. of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, University of California Riverside, Riverside, CA, U.S.A.; (3) California Dept. of Food and Agriculture, Plant Pest Diagnostics Branch, Sacramento, CA, U.S.A. 42-O. Development of a biological sensor for powdery mildew (Erysiphales) infections via monitoring of the proboscis extension reflex in honeybees. A. M. SUTHERLAND (1), R. M. Wingo (2), K. J. McCabe (3), W. D. Gubler (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A.; (2) Chemical Diagnostics and Engineering, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, U.S.A.; (3) Bioscience Division B, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, U.S.A.


11:00 a.m. 43-O. Evaluation of a new method for collection and detection of plant pathogens within their vector. J. A. PRICE (1), A. Simmons (1), J. Bass (1), C. M. Rush (1). (1) Texas AgriLife Research, Amarillo, TX, U.S.A. 11:15 a.m. 44-O. Detection and quantification of the sugar beet cyst nematode, Heterodera schachtii, through qPCR. G. RAUSCHER (1), K. Richardson (1). (1) USDA ARS, Salinas, CA, U.S.A. Virology/Diseases of Plants 8:30 – 11:30 a.m.; 217BC Sections: Molecular/Cellular/Plant-Microbe Interactions; Diseases of Plants Moderator: Scott Gold, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A. 8:30 a.m.

9:00 a.m.

9:15 a.m.

9:45 a.m.

10:00 a.m. 10:15 a.m.

10:30 a.m.

10:45 a.m.

11:00 a.m.

11:15 a.m.

49-O. Development of infectious full-length cDNA clone of Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 3. S. JARUGULA (1), S. Gowda (2), W. O. Dawson (2), R. A. Naidu (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, Washington State University, IAREC, Prosser, WA, U.S.A.; (2) Citrus Res. and Education Center, University of Florida, Lake Alfred, FL, U.S.A. 50-O. GFP is efficiently expressed by Wheat streak mosaic virus using a range of Tritimovirus NIa cleavage sites and forms dense aggregates in cereal hosts. S. TATINENI (1), R. French (1). (1) USDA, ARS, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, U.S.A. Break 51-O. Rose rosette and redbud yellow ringspot are caused by two new emaraviruses. A. G. LANEY (1), R. Gergerich (1), K. Keller (2), R. Martin (2), I. Tzanetakis (1). (1) University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A.; (2) USDAARS, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A. 52-O. Development of ELISA and qPCR for Squash vein yellowing virus detection. C. WEBSTER (1), W. Li (2), C. Kousik (3), S. Adkins (1). (1) USDA ARS, Ft. Pierce, FL, U.S.A.; (2) University of Florida, Lake Alfred, FL, U.S.A.; (3) USDA-ARS, Charleston, SC, U.S.A. 53-O. Biological and molecular characterization of a cucumber isolate of Melon necrotic spot virus from Ohio. D. LEWANDOWSKI (1). (1) The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, U.S.A. 54-O. Seasonal dynamics of black leaf mold (Pseudocercospora fuligena) on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) grown under protected cultivation in Thailand. Z. MERSHA (1), B. Hau (2). (1) University of Florida, Tropical Res. and Education Centre, Homestead, FL, U.S.A.; (2) Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Hannover, Germany 55-O. Effects of extracts of some plants on the wet rot of Amaranthus cruentus L. induced by Choanephora cucurbitarum and on the performance of the crop. A. N. AWURUM (1). (1) Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umdike, Umuahia, Abia State, Nigeria

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MONDAY

8:45 a.m.

45-O. The role of Turnip crinkle virus capsid protein in viral systemic movement in Arabidopsis. F. QU (1), M. Cao (1), X. Ye (2), K. Willie (3), J. Lin (1), A. Simon (4), M. Redinbaugh (3), T. Morris (2). (1) OARDC Plant Pathology, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH, U.S.A.; (2) School of Biological Sciences, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, U.S.A.; (3) USDA ARS, Wooster, OH, U.S.A.; (4) University of Maryland, College Park, MD, U.S.A. 46-O. Role of photoreceptors in R proteinmediated resistance to Turnip crinkle virus. R. JEONG (1), A. Chandra-Shekara (2), A. Kachroo (1), P. Kachroo (1). (1) University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, U.S.A.; (2) Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN, U.S.A. 47-O. Metagenomic analysis of mycoviruses in grapevines. M. ALRWAHNIH (1), S. Daubert (1), A. Rowhani (1). (1) University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A. 48-O. Changes in flavonoid biosynthetic pathway genes and anthocyanins due to virus infection in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) leaves. L. R. GUTHA (1), L. F. Casassa (1), J. F. Harbertson (1), R. A. Naidu (1). (1) Washington State University, Prosser, WA, U.S.A.

9:30 a.m.


MONDAY BOOK SIGNING EVENT Meet Clarence Kado Author of Plant Bacteriology

Clarence Kado

NEW

Monday, August 9 3:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

APS PRESS Bookstore located in the Exhibit Hall A

SAVE 20% and receive a personally signed copy of this exciting new arrival from APS PRESS.

If you have pre-ordered this title and wish to receive a signed copy at the meeting, visit the APS PRESS Bookstore during the signing and speak with Linda Gold at the check out counter.

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■ TUESDAY, AUGUST 10 214 218AB 205 215 Food Court and Exhibit Hall A A Concourse 213A Exhibit Hall A Exhibit Hall A 217D 217A 207AB 203A 207CD

208B 203B 217BC 208A 214 Food Court and Exhibit Hall A 205 209AB/210AB 208A 203B 217A 203A 217D 207AB 217BC 208B 207CD 204 217BC 208B 208A 207CD 203B 217A Exhibit Hall A 206B Exhibit Hall A Crown Ballroom

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TUESDAY

7:00 – 8:30 a.m. Sustaining Associates’ Breakfast, by invitation 7:00 – 9:00 a.m. Department Heads’ Breakfast 7:00 – 10:00 a.m. Scientific Programs Board (SPB) Meeting 7:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Foundation Board Meeting, by invitation 7:00 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. Concession Service Available 7:00 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. Registration 7:30 – 9:00 a.m. Small Fruit Diseases Workers Discussion 8:00 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. APS PRESS Bookstore 8:00 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. Exhibits Open Special Sessions 8:30 – 10:45 a.m. • Identifying Quantitative Resistance Using Modern Technologies—Challenges for Plant Breeding 8:30 – 10:45 a.m. • Nature’s Molecular Biologist: Xanthomonas and TAL Effector Function, Structure, and Diversity 8:30 – 10:45 a.m. • Plant Disease Epidemics and Food Security in Globally Changing Agricultures and Environments 8:30 – 11:15 a.m. • Prepare for Your Future: Career Opportunities After Graduate School: Part 2—Extension 8:30 – 11:15 a.m. • Refining Systematics (Taxonomy, Nomenclature, Phylogenetics) for Better Resolution in the Population Biology and Evolution of the Oomycetes Oral Technical Sessions 8:30 – 11:30 a.m. • Detection & Diagnosis 8:30 – 11:30 a.m. • Fungicides/Host Responses 8:30 – 11:30 a.m. • Mycology 8:30 – 11:30 a.m. • Virology/Virology & Nematology 11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Phytopathology News Advisory Committee Meeting 11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Lunch Break, (Concession Service Available) 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. Widely Prevalent Bacteria Committee Meeting, by invitation 1:00 – 3:00 p.m. 2011 Meeting Program Planning Committee Meeting Special Sessions 1:00 – 3:00 p.m. • Biology and Management of Rhizoctonia Diseases in Turfgrass Systems 1:00 – 3:00 p.m. • Restoring Forest Ecosystems Impacted by Invasive Pathogens 1:00 – 3:00 p.m. • Schroth Faces of the Future in Virology 1:00 – 3:30 p.m. • Creating Possibilities for Sustainable Postharvest Disease Control Through Integrated Approaches to Both Pre- and Postharvest Fungicide Resistance Management 1:00 – 3:30 p.m. • Edible and Medicinal Mushrooms: Diversity, Commercial Production, and Disease Management in High-Volume Production Facilities 1:00 – 4:00 p.m. • Assuring the Safety of Fresh Produce: Issues and Strategies Oral Technical Sessions 1:00 – 3:00 p.m. • Disease Management – A 1:00 – 3:00 p.m. • Disease Management – B 1:00 – 3:00 p.m. • Molecular & Cellular Biology 1:30 – 4:00 p.m. Office of Public Relations & Outreach (OPRO) Board Meeting 3:30 – 5:30 p.m. Flash-and-Dash Poster Sessions with Author Time • Biology of Pathogens • Diseases of Plants • Epidemiology/Ecology/Environmental Biology • Molecular/Cellular/Plant-Microbe Interactions – Session 1 • Molecular/Cellular/Plant-Microbe Interactions – Session 2 • Plant Disease Management 3:30 – 5:30 p.m. Poster Viewing 4:00 – 5:00 p.m. APS Visioning Forum Meeting, by invitation 5:30 – 10:00 p.m. Exhibit Take-Down 6:30 – 10:00 p.m. Final Night Celebration—A Taste of North Carolina


TUESDAY HIGHLIGHTS Department Heads’ Breakfast 7:00 – 9:00 a.m.; 218AB Heads of plant pathology or related departments are invited to get together and discuss issues affecting universities around the country. Ticket purchase required.

TUESDAY

New Time! Flash-and-Dash Poster Sessions with Author Time 3:30 – 5:30 p.m.; See schedule for room assignments Flash-and-Dash poster authors who submit an abstract for their contributed presentation as a poster will have the opportunity to present their individual poster in the form of a five-minute, three-slide talk. Poster viewing and author time will take place immediately following the session in the same room as the presentation. Final Night Celebration 6:30 – 10:00 p.m.; Crown Ballroom Enjoy food, beverages, and entertainment customary to the American South while connecting with new contacts and old colleagues! Networking areas will be provided within the ballroom for conversation, as well as live music and entertainment throughout the night. New this year, the official APS “Passing of the Gavel” will kick off the celebration with President Barb Christ thanking Past President James Moyer for his four years of service and welcoming John Sherwood as APS president for 2010–2011. Ticket is included with full registration.

SPECIAL SESSIONS – Tuesday Morning Listed in alphabetical order by title. Indicates an APS Foundation Awardee

APS FOUNDATION

Identifying Quantitative Resistance Using Modern Technologies—Challenges for Plant Breeding 8:30 – 10:45 a.m.; 217D Section: Plant Disease Management Organizers: Kimberly Webb, USDA-ARS, Fort Collins, CO, U.S.A.; Alemu Mengistu, USDA-ARS, Jackson, TN, U.S.A.; Zhi-Yuan Chen, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A. Moderators: Kimberly Webb, USDA-ARS, Fort Collins, CO, U.S.A.; Alemu Mengistu, USDA-ARS, Jackson, TN, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committees: Host Resistance; Molecular and Cellular Phytopathology This session will apply current technologies for identification of multitrait, broad-spectrum resistance for use in today’s public and private breeding programs. Discussion on how effective the use of quantitative trait loci (QTL), DNA expression profiles, and proteomics have been in devolving new public and private breeding programs and their utility in incorporating novel sources of disease resistance into traditional breeding programs. 8:30 a.m.

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63-S. Bioinformatic strategies for predicting candidate genes under disease resistance QTL. R. M. DAVIDSON (1), P. A. Reeves (2), P.

M. Manosalva (3), J. E. Leach (4). (1) Dept. of Plant Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, U.S.A.; (2) USDA, National Center for Genetic Resources Preservation, Fort Collins, CO, U.S.A.; (3) Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A.; (4) Dept. of Bioagricultural Sciences and Pest Management, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, U.S.A. 9:00 a.m. 64-S. QTL use for development of host resistance and putting it to use—Industry perspective. G. TABOR (1). (1) Pioneer Hi-Bred, Johnston, IA, U.S.A. 9:30 a.m. 65-S. Proteomics in identifying potential markers for developing broad-spectrum resistance. Z. CHEN (1), S. Park (1), C. Zhang (2). (1) Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A.; (2) Ames, IA, U.S.A. 10:00 a.m. 66-S. Using network biology to identify quantitative genetic variation altering signaling in both plant host and generalist pathogens. D. J. KLIEBENSTEIN (1). (1) University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A. Nature’s Molecular Biologist: Xanthomonas and TAL Effector Function, Structure, and Diversity 8:30 – 10:45 a.m.; 217A Section: Molecular/Cellular/Plant-Microbe Interactions Organizers: Frank White, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.; Adam Bogdanove, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A. Moderator: Frank White, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committee: Bacteriology This session will discuss the structure, function, and diversity of TAL effector proteins of Xanthomonas. Targets of these type III-secreted transcription factors in a wide range of host species will also be presented with a focus on the biological consequences of TAL effector-mediated host transcriptional reprogramming for disease and disease resistance. Insights into TAL effector specificity and applications of TAL effectors in research and biotechnology will be presented and discussed. 8:30 a.m.

9:00 a.m.

9:30 a.m.

67-S. Nature’s molecular biologist: Xanthomonas and the AvrBs3-related family of transcription activation-like (TAL) type III effectors. F. WHITE (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. 68-S. Diversity of S and R genes in rice targeted by the TAL effector genes of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. B. YANG (1). (1) Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A. 69-S. TAL effector-driven host gene expression shapes Xanthomonas interactions with crop plants. A. J. BOGDANOVE (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A.


10:00 a.m. 70-S. Exploiting TAL effector diversity for biotechnology. T. LAHAYE (1). (1) LudwigMaximilians-University Munich, Martinsried, Germany Plant Disease Epidemics and Food Security in Globally Changing Agricultures and Environments 8:30 – 10:45 a.m.; 207AB Section: Epidemiology/Ecology/Environmental Biology Organizer: Serge Savary, IRRI, Manila, Philippines Moderator: David Gent, USDA ARS NFSPRC, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committees: Crop Loss Assessment and Risk Evaluation; Epidemiology

8:30 a.m.

71-S. Food security and plant disease epidemics: Modeling potential epidemics on rice, potato, and wheat. S. SAVARY (1), E. Duveiller (2), G. Forbes (3), L. Willocquet (1), R. Hijmans (4). (1) IRRI, Manila, Philippines; (2) CIMMYT, Mexico, Mexico; (3) International Potato Center (CIP), Lima, Peru; (4) University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A. 9:00 a.m. 72-S. Estimates of global crop losses. E. OERKE (1). (1) University of Bonn, INRES - Phytomedicine, Bonn, Germany 9:30 a.m. 73-S. Seeking impact on food security of the poor through phytopathological science. R. J. NELSON (1). (1) Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A. 10:00 a.m. 74-S. The role of pest risk analysis and quarantine measures in food security. P. H. BERGER (1), C. Devorshak (2). (1) Center for Plant Health Science & Technology, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; (2) Center for Plant Health Science & Technology, Plant Epidemiology & Risk Analysis Laboratory, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.

This session will be the second in the series started during the 2009 APS Annual Meeting exploring career opportunities in various sectors of plant pathology. This year, the session will inform graduate students about career possibilities in extension plant pathology. The session will explore the spectrum of careers available at both the masters and doctorate levels of education. Invited speakers will share personal experiences, as well as provide insight on how to obtain and develop a successful career in extension services. 8:30 a.m.

75-S. Is extension right for you? J. L. BECKERMAN (1). (1) Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A. 8:45 a.m. 76-S. Extension jobs from MS to PhD: Acquiring the skills and developing the resume to get the job you want. B. J. JACOBSEN (1). (1) Montana State University, Bozeman, MT, U.S.A. 9:15 a.m. 77-S. A year in the life of a diagnostician. G. E. RUHL (1). (1) Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A. 9:30 a.m. 78-S. Starting an extension specialist career from the ground up. L. J. DU TOIT (1). (1) Washington State University, Mount Vernon, WA, U.S.A. 10:00 a.m. Break 10:15 a.m. 79-S. A year in the life of a county extension agent. T. C. STEBBINS (1). (1) University of Tennessee, Chattanooga, TN, U.S.A. 10:30 a.m. Discussion: Speaker panel Q&A

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TUESDAY

The past few months have seen extraordinary constraints and pressures on global food markets, with dramatic regional and local consequences on food security and societal stability. Although the situation has eased some, the primary causes for such instability remain unresolved. This special session will focus on research that is underway or should be undertaken to address food security in major human food staples, such as rice, wheat, maize, potato, sorghum, and cassava. Presentations will be given that provide timely information on (i) the importance of plant diseases on global crop productivity; (ii) approaches to prioritizing research efforts; (iii) assessments of constraints and opportunities for new technologies; and (iv) research progress that is contributing to greater food security. Global change due to climate, credit availability, and diminishing natural resources will be presented in context of their measured or predicted impact on food security. Speakers will include experts from world agricultural organizations in the eastern and western hemispheres, and a specialized FAO economist also will be sought.

Prepare for Your Future: Career Opportunities After Graduate School: Part 2—Extension 8:30 – 11:15 a.m.; 203A Section: Professionalism/Outreach Organizers: Heather Olson, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; Kestrel Lannon, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; Alan Chambers, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A.; Patricia Wallace, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A. Moderator: Kestrel Lannon, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committees: Graduate Student; Extension


TUESDAY

Refining Systematics (Taxonomy, Nomenclature, Phylogenetics) for Better Resolution in the Population Biology and Evolution of the Oomycetes 8:30 – 11:15 a.m.; 207CD Section: Biology of Pathogens Organizers: Z. Gloria Abad, USDA-APHIS-PPQ-PHPRIPPS-Molecular Diagnostics Laboratory, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.; Kelly Ivors, North Carolina State University, Mills River, NC, U.S.A. Moderator: Kelly Ivors, North Carolina State University, Mills River, NC, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committees: Mycology; Forest Pathology Financial Sponsor: Widely Prevalent Plant Pathogenic Fungi List Project Although Phytophthora, Pythium, and the downy mildews are among the most studied organisms in systematics, there is still a great deal of confusion in recognizing valid species and new genera. Poorly annotated sequences exist in GenBank, making it impossible to identify some of the clusters for extypes or neotypes and consequently, the proper identity of an isolate. Examples of these complexes include Phytophthora capsici, Phytophthora citricola, Phytophthora drechsleri, Phytophthora megasperma, Pythium irregulare, prov. genus name Phytopythium vexans, and Pythium helicoides. Although morphological and molecular characterization is used for describing new species, some have recently been found invalid. Establishing proper nomenclature provides a solid foundation for research tied to the species and for associated regulatory and disease control decisions. Experts in systematics, evolution, and population genetics will participate in this session, hopefully stimulating collaboration for addressing these major challenges in oomycete systematics. 8:30 a.m.

9:00 a.m.

9:30 a.m.

9:45 a.m.

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80-S. Pythium, Pythiogeton, and prov. name Phytopythium: The current status for the species in the genera. A. W. DE COCK (1), G. P. Robideau (2), K. Bala (2), M. D. Coffey (3), Z. G. Abad (4), C. A. Lévesque (2). (1) CBSKNAW Fungal Biodiversity Centre, Utrecht, Netherlands; (2) Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Ottawa, Canada; (3) Dept. of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, University of California, Riverside, CA, U.S.A.; (4) USDA-APHIS-PPQ-PHP-RIPPS-Molecular Diagnostics Laboratory, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A. 81-S. How to avoid misidentifying your isolates: The value of the Morphological/Phylogenetic Key of Phytophthora extypes and neotypes. Z. ABAD (1), M. D. Coffey (2). (1) USDAAPHIS-Molecular Diagnostics Laboratory, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A. (2) World Phytophthora Genetic Resource Collection, University of California, Riverside, CA, U.S.A. 82-S. The Phytophthora Database: Current status and future directions. S. KANG (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, Penn State, University Park, PA, U.S.A. 83-S. The Oomycetes Database: The initiative for an international web-based informatics

10:00 a.m. 10:15 a.m.

10:30 a.m. 10:45 a.m.

11:00 a.m.

platform. F. N. MARTIN (1). (1) USDA-ARS, Salinas, CA, U.S.A. Break 84-S. Mitochondrial genomics of oomycetes, tools for phylogenetics, and development of molecular markers. F. N. MARTIN (1). (1) USDA-ARS, Salinas, CA, U.S.A. 85-S. Population genetic insights into emergence of oomycete pathogens. N. J. GRUNWALD (1). (1) USDA ARS, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A. 86-S. Aquatic habitats—A reservoir for population diversity in the genus Phytophthora. J. HWANG (1), S. N. Jeffers (1), S. W. Oak (2). (1) Clemson University, Clemson, SC, U.S.A.; (2) USDA Forest Service, Southern Region-FHP, Asheville, NC, U.S.A. 87-S. Ecological adaptations in Phytophthora. Understanding their role in forest ecosystems. Y. BALCI (1), D. Skaltsas (1), C. Qiugley (1). (1) University of Maryland, College Park, MD, U.S.A.

ORAL TECHNICAL SESSIONS – Tuesday Morning Listed in alphabetical order by title. Detection & Diagnosis 8:30 – 11:30 a.m.; 208B Sections: Molecular/Cellular/Plant-Microbe Interactions; Diseases of Plants Moderator: John Q. Xia, AC Diagnostics, Inc., Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A. 8:30 a.m.

8:45 a.m.

9:00 a.m.

9:15 a.m.

9:30 a.m.

56-O. Macroarray detection of fungal turfgrass pathogens. E. N. NJAMBERE (1), B. Clarke (1), N. Zhang (1). (1) Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ, U.S.A. APS 57-O. A tag-array minisequencingFOUNDATION based system for detecting and genetic fingerprinting Wheat streak mosaic virus: Implications for plant pathogen forensics. T. BROWN (1), U. Melcher (1), J. Fletcher (1). (1) Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, U.S.A. 58-O. Developing a taxonomic identification system based on microsatellites of Phytophthora species. J. M. DEL CASTILLO (1), A. J. Bernal (1), S. Restrepo (1). (1) Univ De Los Andes, Bogota, Colombia 59-O. Development of a high-throughput and fast system for testing transgenic resistance constructs derived from Grapevine fanleaf virus. J. E. OLIVER (1), M. Fuchs (1). (1) Cornell University, Geneva, NY, U.S.A. 60-O. A multiplex TaqMan assay for detection and differentiation of Leptosphaeria maculans and L. biglobosa, causal agents of canola blackleg. W. Leonard (1), X. LI (1), D. S. Smith (1),


9:45 a.m.

10:00 a.m. 10:15 a.m.

10:30 a.m.

11:00 a.m.

11:15 a.m.

Fungicides/Host Responses 8:30 – 11:30 a.m.; 203B Sections: Plant Disease Management; Molecular/Cellular/ Plant-Microbe Interactions Moderators: Markus Frank, BASF S.E., Limburgerhof, Germany; Yinong Yang, Dept. of Plant Pathology and Huck Institutes of Life Sciences, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, U.S.A.

8:30 a.m.

8:45 a.m.

9:00 a.m.

9:15 a.m.

9:30 a.m.

9:45 a.m.

10:00 a.m. 10: 15 a.m.

10:30 a.m.

10:45 a.m.

11:00 a.m.

67-O. Resistance to DMI fungicides in Venturia inaequalis from Pennsylvania. E. E. PFEUFER (1), J. W. Travis (1), H. K. Ngugi (1). (1) Penn State University, Biglerville, PA, U.S.A. 68-O. Stability and fitness of pyraclostrobinand boscalid-resistant phenotypes in field isolates of Botrytis cinerea from apple. Y. KIM (1), C. Xiao (1). (1) Washington State University, TFREC, Wenatchee, WA, U.S.A. 69-O. Molecular characterization of boscalid resistance in field isolates of Botrytis cinerea from apple in Washington State. Y. YIN (1), Y. Kim (1), C. Xiao (1). (1) Washington State University, TFREC, Wenatchee, WA, U.S.A. 70-O. Efficacy of phosphonate treatments against sudden oak death in tanoaks. D. SCHMIDT (1), M. Garbelotto (1). (1) University of California, Berkeley, CA, U.S.A. 71-O. Mutations in the target protein of succinate-dehydrogenase inhibitors (SDHI) conferring changes in fungicide sensitivity. M. FRANK (1), A. Glaettli (1), S. Schlehuber (1), G. Stammler (1). (1) BASF S.E., Limburgerhof, Germany 72-O. Sensitivity of Didymella bryoniae to DMI and carboxamide fungicides. A. THOMAS (1), K. L. Stevenson (1), D. B. Langston (1). (1) University of Georgia, Tifton, GA, U.S.A. Break 73-O. Alteration of cytokinin biosynthesis by Ustilago maydis: Impacts on pathogenesis. E. N. MORRISON (1), R. Emery (1), B. J. Saville (1). (1) Trent University, Peterborough, ON, Canada 74-O. Antagonistic role of ethylene and abscisic acid in mediating rice sheath blight resistance. J. Zhang (1), D. Park (2), Y. YANG (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology and Huck Institute of Life Sciences, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, U.S.A.; (2) National Yeongnam Agricultural Res. Institute, Rural Development Administration, Milyang, Korea 75-O. Ethylene biosynthesis and its effect on rice resistance to fungal infection. E. E. HELLIWELL (1), Q. Wang (2), Y. Yang (2). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology and Huck Institutes of Life Sciences, Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA, U.S.A.; (2) Dept. of Plant Pathology and Huck Institutes of Life Sciences, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, U.S.A. 76-O. Factors contributing to abscisic acidmediated predisposition to disease caused by Phytophthora capsici. M. F. PYE (1), T. V. Roubtsova (1), M. V. DiLeo (2), J. D. MacDonald (1), R. M. Bostock (1). (1) University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A.; (2) Ithaca, NY, U.S.A.

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TUESDAY

10:45 a.m.

J. Nie (1), T. Dumonceaux (2). (1) Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Charlottetown, PE, Canada; (2) Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Saskatoon, SK, Canada 61-O. Field detection of Phytophthora ramorum DNA within thirty minutes. R. C. BOHANNON (1), P. Russell (1). (1) Agdia Inc., Elkhart, IN, U.S.A. Break 62-O. Potential viral threats to Miscanthus x giganteus and switchgrass production for bioenergy in the United States. B. O. AGINDOTAN (1), M. O. Ahonsi (2), M. E. Gray (2), C. A. Bradley (2). (1) University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, U.S.A.; (2) Energy Biosciences Institute, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, U.S.A. 63-O. Genetically diverse isolates of Grapevine virus A are present in Washington vineyards. T. MEKURIA (1), R. A. Naidu (2). (1) Washington State University, IAREC, Prosser, WA, U.S.A.; (2) Washington State University, Irrigated Agriculture Res. and Extension Center, Prosser, WA, U.S.A. 64-O. Development and application of a singletube immunocapture real-time PCR technology for sensitive detection of a panel of viruses in crop plants. K. LING (1), C. Feng (2), J. Q. Xia (3). (1) USDA ARS, Charleston, SC, U.S.A.; (2) University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A.; (3) AC Diagnostics, Inc., Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A. 65-O. Interception, identification, and molecular characterization of three Potato virus S isolates infecting potato germplasm introduced from South America. J. A. ABAD (1), Y. Lin (2), C. J. Maroon-Lango (1), C. Loschinkohl (1), M. R. Smither (1), H. R. Pappu (2). (1) USDA APHIS PPQ PHP Plant Germplasm Quarantine Program, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.; (2) Plant Pathology Dept., Washington State University, Pullman, WA, U.S.A. 66-O. Sensitive and cost-effective immunocapture RT-PCR for routinely viral detection in large number of plant samples. J. Q. XIA (1), K. Ling (2). (1) AC Diagnostics, Inc., Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS, U.S. Vegetable Laboratory, Charleston, SC, U.S.A.


11:15 am.

77-O. Saccharin-induced systemic acquired resistance in soybean. P. SRIVASTAVA (1), S. George (1), J. J. Marois (1), D. L. Wright (2), D. R. Walker (3). (1) IFAS, University of Florida, Quincy, FL, U.S.A.; (2) Quincy, FL, U.S.A.; (3) USDA-ARS, Urbana, IL, U.S.A.

Mycology 8:30 – 11:30 a.m.; 217BC Section: Biology of Pathogens Moderators: Amanda J. Gevens, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A.; Rebecca Sweany, Louisiana State University Ag Center, Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A.

TUESDAY

8:30 a.m.

78-O. Mating between Aspergillus flavus cryptic species I and II. K. E. DAMANN (1), C. DeRobertis (1), R. Sweany (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology & Crop Physiology, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A. 8:45 a.m. 79-O. A comparison of soil and corn kernel Aspergillus flavus populations: Evidence for niche specialization. R. R. SWEANY (1), K. E. Damann (1). (1) Louisiana State University Ag Center, Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A. 9:00 a.m. 80-O. Phylogenetic relations within Aspergillus parasiticus imply host adaptation and global transport of aflatoxin-producing fungi. N. GARBER (1), L. C. Grubisha (2), A. OrtegaBeltran (1), C. Probst (1), P. J. Cotty (2). (1) University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, U.S.A. APS 81-O. Relationships between in 9:15 a.m. FOUNDATION vivo and in vitro aflatoxin production: Reliable prediction of fungal ability to contaminate maize with aflatoxins. C. PROBST (1), P. J. Cotty (2). (1) University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, U.S.A.; (2) University of Arizona, USDA-ARS, Tucson, AZ, U.S.A. 9:30 a.m. 82-O. Spinach seed a source of Verticillium dahliae in lettuce in coastal California. Z. K. ATALLAH (1), K. Maruthachalam (1), K. V. Subbarao (1). (1) University of California-Davis, Salinas, CA, U.S.A. 9:45 a.m. 83-O. Species limits and evolution in Verticillium, a group of vascular wilt-pathogens of global importance. P. INDERBITZIN (1), R. M. Bostock (1), R. M. Davis (1), K. V. Subbarao (1). (1) University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A. 10:00 a.m. Break 10:15 a.m. 84-O. Gene encoding a c-type cyclin in Mycosphaerella graminicola is involved in melanin biosynthesis, stress response, and pathogenicity. Y. CHOI (1), S. B. Goodwin (1). (1) USDAARS, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A. 10:30 a.m. 85-O. Sequenced restriction-associated DNA (RAD) markers for SNP discovery in the genus

36

Colletotrichum. J. CROUCH (1), P. Oudemans (2), J. Polashock (3). (1) USDA ARS, Cereal Disease Lab, St. Paul, MN, U.S.A.; (2) Rutgers University, Chatsworth, NJ, U.S.A.; (3) USDA ARS, Chatsworth, NJ, U.S.A. 10:45 a.m. 86-O. Identification and characterization of cucurbit powdery mildew in Florida. A. J. GEVENS (1), G. S. Maia (2). (1) University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A.; (2) University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A. 11:00 a.m. 87-O. In vitro assessment of Sclerotinia homoeocarpa resistance to fungicides and plant growth regulators. C. Ok (1), J. T. Popko (1), K. Campbell-Nelson (1), G. JUNG (1). (1) University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, U.S.A. 11:15 a.m. 88-O. Genetic diversity of anastomosis group 3 of Rhizoctonia solani isolates from potato in Iran by PCR-RFLP. F. EGHBALIAN (1), H. Zamanizadeh (1), B. Morid (2), S. Hajmansoor (3). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, Science and Res. Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran; (2) Dept. of Plant Protection, Takestan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran; (3) Science and Res. Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran Virology/Virology & Nematology 8:30 – 11:30 a.m.; 208A Sections: Molecular/Cellular/Plant-Microbe Interactions Moderators: Andreas Westphal, Julius Kühn-Institut., Federal Research Centre for Cultivated Plants, Münster, Germany; ; John Carr, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom 8:30 a.m.

8:45 a.m.

9:00 a.m.

89-O. Disruption of the salicylate and jasmonate signaling pathways by the Cucumber mosaic virus 2b RNA silencing suppressor. M. G. Lewsey (1), A. M. Murphy (1), D. MacLean (2), N. Dalchau (3), J. Westwood (1), K. Macaulay (1), M. H. Bennett (4), M. Moulin (1), D. E. Hanke (1), G. Powell (4), A. G. Smith (1), H. Ziebell (5), J. CARR (1). (1) University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom; (2) Sainsbury Laboratory, Norwich, United Kingdom; (3) Microsoft Res., Cambridge, United Kingdom; (4) Imperial College, London, United Kingdom; (5) Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A. 90-O. Exploration of further sequence data for unknown regions of Ambrossia asymptomatic virus 1. N. SOKHANDAN BASHIR (1), U. Melcher (2). (1) The University of Tabriz, Tabriz, Iran; (2) Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, U.S.A. 91-O. Subcellular localization of the replicase proteins encoded by a member of the family Betaflexiviridae. S. W. Prosser (1), C. Li (1), B. MENG (1). (1) Dept. of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada


9:15 a.m.

9:30 a.m.

9:45 a.m.

10:30 a.m. 10:45 a.m.

11:00 a.m.

11:15 a.m.

Do You Want to Be Revolutionary? If you are looking for exceptional experiences that have the potential to enhance both the science of plant pathology as well as your personal leadership and networking skills you should consider engaging with APS as a volunteer. It’s important work and relies on a breadth of member involvement. With several options to choose from, it’s easy to become involved in APS. A variety of possibilities are listed throughout the program book, follow your interests and stop in at any of the committee meetings to learn how you can become involved. Your expertise and enthusiasm is needed. Be part of the most active, talented, and engaged group of member leaders—volunteer with APS! _____________________________________

TUESDAY

10:00 a.m. 10:15 a.m.

92-O. Mutational analysis of the putative pipo of Soybean mosaic virus with emphasis on symptom expression and virus accumulation. R. Wen (1), B. He (1), M. R. HAJIMORAD (1). (1) University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, U.S.A. APS 93-O. Profiling host-specific and FOUNDATION virus-derived small RNAs in a woody perennial plant species infected with an ampelovirus. O. J. ALABI (1), Y. Zheng (2), G. Jagadeeswaran (3), R. Sunkar (3), R. A. Naidu (4). (1) Washington State University, Prosser, WA, U.S.A.; (2) Institute of Developmental Biology and Molecular Medicine and School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, PRC Peoples Rep of China; (3) Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, U.S.A.; (4) Dept. of Plant Pathology, Irrigated Agriculture Res. and Extension Center, Washington State University, Prosser, WA, U.S.A. 94-O. Assessing relationships among isolates of Wheat streak mosaic virus using single nucleotide polymorphisms. S. ROGERS (1), U. Melcher (1), R. Allen (2), J. Fletcher (1). (1) Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, U.S.A.; (2) Oklahoma State University, Tulsa, OK, U.S.A. Break 95-O. Tomato spotted wilt virus (Bunyaviridae, Tospovirus) infection alters feeding behavior of its vector Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande). C. A. STAFFORD (1), G. P. Walker (2), D. E. Ullman (1). (1) University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A.; (2) University of California, Riverside, CA, U.S.A. 96-O. WITHDRAWN Phytopathology 100:S58 97-O. Management of the root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita on tomato in Egypt. M. M. ABD-ELGAWAD (1), S. S. Kabeil (2). (1) National Res. Center, Dokki, Egypt; (2) Mubarak City for Scientific Res. and Technology Applications, Alexandria, Egypt 98-O. Population density development of Heterodera schachtii under susceptible, resistant, and tolerant sugar beet cultivars. A. WESTPHAL (1), M. Daub (2). (1) Julius KühnInstitut, Federal Res. Centre for Cultivated Plants, Münster, Germany; (2) Julius KühnInstitut, Federal Res. Centre for Cutlvated Plants, Elsdorf, Germany 99-O. Nematode and bacterial associates of the invasive brown garden snail: Helix aspersa. K. SANCHEZ (1), C. Pagan (1), S. A. Nadler (1), E. P. Caswell-Chen (1). (1) University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A.

Special thanks to the more than 900 APS members who volunteer every year to develop program content, review manuscripts, initiate outreach activities, increase plant pathology funding, keep members informed, and make things happen for APS. Your efforts help advance the science and community of plant pathology. _____________________________________

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SPECIAL SESSIONS – Tuesday Afternoon Listed in alphabetical order by title.

TUESDAY

Assuring the Safety of Fresh Produce: Issues and Strategies 1:00 – 4:00 p.m.; 207AB Section: Epidemiology/Ecology/Environmental Biology Organizers/Moderators: Jeri Barak, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A.; Jacque Fletcher, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committees: APS Food Safety Interest Group; Public Policy Board Building upon a 2007 APS Symposium on Human Pathogens on Plants, this session will address a breadth of practical issues to assist plant pathologists embarking on the study of human pathogens in fresh produce and to inform APS members on the progress of the APS Public Policy Board (PPB) on their work to establish a national, interagency initiative to target new funding streams for research. Speakers from FDA and from USDA food safety programs will identify agency priorities and opportunities. Other presentations will focus on navigating the regulatory requirements for human pathogen research, safe and responsible handling of human pathogens, and growers’ perceptions and practices with respect to assuring the safety of their products. A final speaker will provide an update on the PPB food safety initiative. 1:00 p.m. 1:30 p.m.

2:00 p.m. 2:30 p.m.

3:00 p.m.

3:30 p.m.

88-S. Genes, genomes, and microbes: Food safety research as a plant pathologist. J. BARAK (1). (1) University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A. 89-S. Assessing vegetable producers’ beliefs regarding food safety issues. M. LEWIS IVEY (1), J. T. LeJeune (2), S. A. Miller (2). (1) Ohio State University, Wooster, OH, U.S.A.; (2) Ohio State University, OARDC, Wooster, OH, U.S.A. 90-S. Seed industry challenges. R. L. DUNKLE (1). (1) American Seed Trade Association, Alexandria, VA, U.S.A. 91-S. Ground zero: Food safety research and extension in California’s Salinas Valley. S. T. KOIKE (1). (1) University of California Cooperative Extension, Salinas, CA, U.S.A. 92-S. Collaboration, cooperation, and engagement across agencies. L. L. SKELTON (1). (1) FDA, CFSAN, Office of Food Safety, Produce Safety Staff, College Park, MD, U.S.A. 93-S. The APS produce safety interagency initiative. J. FLETCHER (1). (1) Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, U.S.A.

Biology and Management of Rhizoctonia Diseases in Turfgrass Systems 1:00 – 3:00 p.m.; 208A Section: Diseases of Plants Organizer/Moderator: James Kerns, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committee: Turfgrass Pathology Rhizoctonia diseases have a long history in the culture of turfgrasses. Recently, our understanding of the known

38

Rhizoctonia species as well as of the new, emerging Rhizoctonia-like diseases has necessitated research to develop an organizational concept that remains faithful to the older taxonomic categories while recognizing newer developments in molecular systematics. This session will include an overview of past and current Rhizoctonia systematics and research updates on new and diverse Rhizoctonia diseases on cool- and warmseason turfgrasses. 1:00 p.m.

1:30 p.m.

2:00 p.m.

2:30 p.m.

94-S. New Rhizoctonia-like pathogens associated with diseases of warm-season turfgrasses. P. F. HARMON (1), S. Kammerer (1). (1) University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A. 95-S. The biology of brown ring patch disease on cool-season turfgrasses. F. P. WONG (1), C. Chen (1), K. A. de la Cerda (1), G. W. Douhan (1), L. Stowell (2). (1) University of California, Riverside, CA, U.S.A.; (2) PACE Turf LLC, San Diego, CA, U.S.A. 96-S. Management of leaf and sheath spot of ultradwarf bermudagrasses. B. MARTIN (1). (1) Pee Dee Res & Ed Center, Clemson University, Florence, SC, U.S.A. 97-S. Rhizoctonia species causing turfgrass disease in the transition zone: Identification, host resistance and management. B. J. HORVATH (1), D. S. McCall (2), B. S. Amaradasa (3), M. A. Cutulle (4), V. R. Sykes (1). (1) University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, U.S.A.; (2) Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, U.S.A.; (3) Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, TN, U.S.A.; (4) Virginia Tech, Ellicott City, MD, U.S.A.

Creating Possibilities for Sustainable Postharvest Disease Control Through Integrated Approaches to Both Pre- and Postharvest Fungicide Resistance Management 1:00 – 3:30 p.m.; 203A Section: Plant Disease Management Organizer: Chang-Lin Xiao, Washington State University, Wenatchee, WA, U.S.A. Moderators: Chang-Lin Xiao, Washington State University, Wenatchee, WA, U.S.A.; Eric Tedford, Syngenta Crop Protection, Greensboro, NC, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committees: Postharvest Pathology; Pathogen Resistance Financial Sponsors: PACE Intl.; Janssen PMP; Syngenta Crop Protection Several new pre- and postharvest fungicides have recently entered the market. This session will focus on the key drivers for the development of fungicide resistance in the pre- and postharvest crop production systems and establish the views on pre- and postharvest integrated approaches to the sustainable management of fungicide resistance in postharvest pathogens as seen by the fungicide-resistance research community and the companies that are developing these new products. A dynamic panel of speakers has been identified to address this exciting topic. The collaborative output from this session is anticipated to help establish a standard foundation for resistance management recommendations for newly introduced pre- and


postharvest fungicides that are used for postharvest disease control. 1:00 p.m.

1:30 p.m.

2:00 p.m.

2:30 p.m.

Edible and Medicinal Mushrooms: Diversity, Commercial Production, and Disease Management in High-Volume Production Facilities 1:00 – 3:30 p.m.; 217D Section: Plant Disease Management Organizers: Mo-Mei Chen, University of California, Berkeley, CA, U.S.A.; Barry Pryor, University of Arizona, Tuscon, AZ, U.S.A. Moderators: Barry Pryor, University of Arizona, Tuscon, AZ, U.S.A.; Mo-Mei Chen, University of California, Berkeley, CA, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committees: Mycology; Forest Pathology; Extension This special session will provide an overview on the diversity of edible and medicinal mushrooms and on the state-of-the-art in the commercial production of gourmet and specialty fungi, highlighting the economic impact of this emerging agricultural product. Additional emphasis will be on modern disease management strategies employed in large-scale production facilities. 1:00 p.m.

103-S. Global expansion in gourmet and medicinal mushroom cultivation and use. M. WACH (1). (1) Sylvan Inc., Kittanning, PA, U.S.A.

2:00 p.m. 2:30 p.m. 3:00 p.m.

104-S. Disease management in commercial mushroom facilities: Controlling the fungus’ fungus. D. BEYER (1). (1) The Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA, U.S.A. 105-S. Selection and maintenance of commercial mushroom strains. C. SMITH (1). (1) Lambert Spawn Company, Coatesville, PA, U.S.A. 106-S. Developing mushroom cultivation curricula at the university. M. DAVIS (1). (1) University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A. 107-S. Certifying mushrooms organic to the USDA National Organic Program Standard. T. ELLOR (1). (1) Phillips Mushroom Farms, Kennett Square, PA, U.S.A.

Restoring Forest Ecosystems Impacted by Invasive Pathogens 1:00 - 3:00 p.m.; 203B Section: Plant Disease Management Organizers: William L. MacDonald, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, U.S.A.; Pauline C. Spaine, USDA Forest Service, Athens, GA, U.S.A. Moderator: Pauline C. Spaine, USDA Forest Service, Athens, GA, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committee: Forest Pathology Numerous North American forest ecosystems have been severely impacted by nonnative invasive pathogens. Although the long-term damage that has resulted is recalcitrant to recovery, progress is being made to restore some impacted ecosystems. Several examples of restorations that are ongoing will be presented. 1:00 p.m.

1:30 p.m.

2:00 p.m.

2:30 p.m.

108-S. Can whitebark pine be saved? E. M. GOHEEN (1), J. Schwandt (2). (1) USDA Forest Service, Forest Health Protection, Central Point, OR, U.S.A.; (2) USDA Forest Service, Forest Health Protection, Couer d’ Alene, ID, U.S.A. 109-S. Management of Port-Orford-cedar (Chamaecyparis lawsoniana) in the presence of the nonnative pathogen Phytophthora lateralis. R. A. SNIEZKO (1), D. J. Goheen (2). (1) USDA Forest Service, Cottage Grove, OR, U.S.A.; (2) USDA Forest Service, Central Point, OR, U.S.A. 110-S. Restoring a fallen giant—The American chestnut. W. L. MACDONALD (1), R. B. Mann (2). (1) West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, U.S.A.; (2) The American Chestnut Foundation, Mount Sterling, KY, U.S.A. 111-S. Sudden oak death and the future of California coastal forests. D. RIZZO (1), M. Garbelotto (2). (1) University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A.; (2) University of California, Berkeley, CA, U.S.A.

39

TUESDAY

3:00 p.m.

98-S. Resistance mechanisms in postharvest fungicides. U. GISI (1), H. Sierotzki (2). (1) University of Basel and Syngenta Crop Protection, Stein, Switzerland; (2) Syngenta Crop Protection, Stein, Switzerland 99-S. Postharvest resistance management: An integration of strategies encompassing the pathogen, fungicide properties, and epidemiological principles. H. Forster (1), J. ADASKAVEG (1). (1) University of California, Riverside, CA, U.S.A. 100-S. Management of fungicide resistance in postharvest pathogens of pome fruits: Integrated approaches from orchard to storage. C. XIAO (1), Y. Kim (1), Y. Yin (1). (1) Washington State University, TFREC, Wenatchee, WA, U.S.A. 101-S. Resistance management strategies for new postharvest fungicides—Pace International perspective. P. G. SANDERSON (1), D. Bylemans (2). (1) Pace International, LLC, East Wenatchee, WA, U.S.A.; (2) Janssen Pharmaceutica N.V., Beerse, Belgium 102-S. Resistance management strategies for new postharvest fungicides—Syngenta perspective. A. COCHRAN (1), E. Tedford (1), D. McKenzie (2). (1) Syngenta Crop Protection, Greensboro, NC, U.S.A.; (2) Syngenta AG, Basel, Switzerland

1:30 p.m.


Schroth Faces of the Future in Virology 1:00 – 3:00 p.m.; 217A Section: Diseases of Plants Organizer/Moderator: Lyndon Porter, USDA-ARS, Prosser, WA, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committees: Early Career Professionals; Virology This session is designed to acknowledge the “up-and-comers” in the virology discipline of plant pathology. The speakers will present their current research and speculate on the future direction of their discipline in this special session. 1:00 p.m.

1:30 p.m.

TUESDAY

2:00 p.m.

2:30 p.m.

112-S. How many viruses make a disease? The Gordian knot of small fruit virology. I. TZANETAKIS (1). (1) University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A. APS 113-S. Molecular mechanisms of FOUNDATION Tomato spotted wilt virus–Frankliniella occidentalis interactions. A. WHITFIELD (1). (1) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. APS 114-S. Maize chlorotic dwarf virus: FOUNDATION Gene function and leafhopper transmission. L. STEWART (1). (1) USDA-ARS, Corn and Soybean Research Unit, Wooster, OH, U.S.A. APS 115-S. Lessons learned and experiFOUNDATION ences gained from lab- and field-based research on plant viruses infecting perennial crops. O. J. ALABI (1). (1) Washington State University, Prosser, WA, U.S.A.

Listed in alphabetical order by title. Disease Management – A 1:00 – 3:00 p.m.; 217BC Section: Plant Disease Management Moderator: Rick D. Peters, Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada, Charlottetown, PE, Canada

1:15 p.m.

1:30 p.m.

40

2:00 p.m.

APS FOUNDATION

ORAL TECHNICAL SESSIONS – Tuesday Afternoon

1:00 p.m.

1:45 p.m.

100-O. Spatial heterogeneity of leaf wetness duration in winter wheat canopy and its influence on plant disease epidemiology. A. Mahtour (1), M. El Jarroudi (1), F. Giraud (2), P. Delfosse (3), L. Huber (4), L. Hoffmann (3), B. TYCHON (1). (1) Arlon, Belgium; (2) Martillac, France; (3) Belvaux, Luxembourg; (4) Grignon, France 101-O. Assessment of the night weather parameters and their use in forecasting model of leaf rust. M. EL JARROUDI (1), F. Giraud (2), P. Delfosse (3), L. Hoffmann (3), H. Maraite (4), B. Tychon (5). (1) University of Liege, Arlon, Belgium; (2) Martillac, France; (3) Belvaux, Luxembourg; (4) Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium; (5) Arlon, Belgium 102-O. Evaluation of leaf removal timing and method and gibberellic acid for grape bunch rot management. B. HED (1), H. K. Ngugi (2),

2:15 p.m.

2:30 p.m.

2:45 p.m.

J. W. Travis (2). (1) Lake Erie Regional Grape Research & Extention Ctr., North East, PA, U.S.A.; (2) Penn State Fruit Res. and Extension Center, Biglerville, PA, U.S.A. 103-O. A comprehensive management strategy for Sclerotinia rot of carrots. R. D. PETERS (1), K. R. Sanderson (1). (1) Agriculture & AgriFood Canada, Charlottetown, PE, Canada 104-O. Commercial extracts of the brown seaweed Ascophyllum nodosum and silicon reduce plant death due to Fusarium solani and increase yields of cucurbits. G. E. Brust (1), R. E. ROSS (2), J. Jayaraj (3). (1) University of Maryland, Upper Marlboro, MD, U.S.A.; (2) Acadian Sea Plants LLC, Monroe, NC, U.S.A.; (3) The University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad 105-O. Impact of bispyribac-sodium on annual bluegrass control and brown patch severity in tall fescue. M. A. CUTULLE (1), B. J. Horvath (2), J. Derr (3), A. Nichols (3), D. McCall (4. (1) Virginia Tech, Ellicott City, MD, U.S.A.; (2) University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, U.S.A.; (3) Virginia Tech, Virginia Beach, VA, U.S.A.; (4) Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, U.S.A. 106-O. Disease management in strawberry production: The Philippine experience. L. M. VILLANUEVA (1). (1) Benguet State University, La Trinidad, Benguet, Philippines 107-O. A breakthrough in the field of agriculture. K. VADIVEL (1). (1) Annamalai University, Chidambaram, India

Disease Management – B 1:00 – 3:00 p.m.; 208B Section: Diseases of Plants Moderators: Michelle M. Moyer, Cornell University NYSAES, Geneva, NY, U.S.A.; Mohammad Babadoost, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, U.S.A. 1:00 p.m.

1:15 p.m.

1:30 p.m.

1:45 p.m.

108-O. Probability modeling of pecan scab using weather variables as inputs. A. F. PAYNE (1), D. L. Smith (1). (1) Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, U.S.A. 109-O. Seasonal ascospore release by Erysiphe necator and impact upon epidemic severity of grape powdery mildew. M. M. MOYER (1), D. M. Gadoury (1), W. F. Wilcox (1), R. C. Seem (1). (1) Cornell University NYSAES, Geneva, NY, U.S.A. 110-O. Etiology of branch dieback of olive trees (Olea europaea L.) in California. J. R. URBEZTORRES (1), F. Peduto (1), W. D. Gubler (1). (1) University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A. APS 111-O. Assessment of Strawberry mild FOUNDATION yellow edge virus infection in different ecotypes of the Chilean native strawberry Fragaria chiloensis (L.) Duch. P. F. ROJAS (1), C. Sandoval (1), P. D. Caligari (1), R. R. Martin (2). (1) APS FOUNDATION


2:00 p.m.

2:15 p.m.

2:30 p.m.

Molecular & Cellular Biology 1:00 – 3:00 p.m.; 207CD Section: Molecular/Cellular/Plant-Microbe Interactions Moderators: Deanna L. Funnell-Harris, USDA ARS, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, U.S.A.; Manuel D. Ospina-Giraldo, Lafayette College, Easton, PA, U.S.A. 1:00 p.m.

1:15 p.m.

1:30 p.m.

116-O. WITHDRAWN Phytopathology 100:S127 117-O. Survey of small RNA during the suppression of soybean defense responses by Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinae avrB. O. RADWAN (1), B. Calla (1), L. Vodkin (1), M. Hudson (1), S. J. Clough (2). (1) University of Illinois, Dept. of Crop Science, Urbana, IL, U.S.A.; (2) University of Illinois, Dept. of Crop Science and USDA, Urbana, IL, U.S.A. 118-O. Molecular approaches for unraveling phytopathogenic fungi—Macrophomina phaseolina in cluster bean. A. CHAUDHURY (1). (1) Dept. of Bio & Nano Technology, Giuru Jambheshwar University of Science & Technology, Hisar, Haryana, India 119-O. The gene FvNoxR of Fusarium verticillioides is required for its female fertility, normal hyphal ROS localization, and full virulence on maize. L. GUO (1), G. A. Kuldau (1). (1) Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, U.S.A.

1:45 p.m.

2:00 p.m.

2:15 p.m.

2:30 p.m.

120-O. Dynamics and single nucleotide polymorphisms of rice blast resistance alleles at the Pik locus. Q. PAN (1). (1) South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, PRC Peoples Rep of China 121-O. Alteration in lignin biosynthesis restricts growth of Fusarium species in brown midrib sorghum. D. L. FUNNELL-HARRIS (1), J. F. Pedersen (1), S. E. Sattler (1). (1) USDA ARS, Lincoln, NE, U.S.A. 122-O. Use of lesioned mutants to characterize the genetic network underlying control of the maize hypersensitive response. P. BALINTKURTI (1), C. Weil (2), S. Chintamanani (3), R. Dhawan (4), A. Negeri (4), A. Garg (3), B. Venkata (3), J. Green (5), J. Harnsomburana (5), J. Palmer (2), V. Chaikam (2), C. Shyu (5), G. Johal (3). (1) USDA-ARS, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; (2) Dept. of Agronomy, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A.; (3) Dept. of Botany and Plant Pathology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A.; (4) Dept. of Plant Pathology, NCSU, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; (5) Informatics Inst., University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO, U.S.A. 123-O. Gene regulation during asexual development in the oomycete Phytophthora infestans. Q. XIANG (1), H. Judelson (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, University of California, Riverside, CA, U.S.A.

FLASH-AND-DASH SESSIONS – Tuesday Afternoon Listed in alphabetical order by title. Biology of Pathogens 3:30 – 5:30 p.m.; 217BC Moderator: Amy Charkowski, Dept. Plant Pathology, University Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A. 3:30 p.m.

3:35 p.m.

210-P. Exploring lineage-specific chromosomes in F. oxysporum species complex. L. MA (1), S. Zhou (2), L. R. Gale (3), A. Breakspear (3), A. Chakrabarti (4), D. Gardiner (5), W. Jonkers (3), K. Kazan (5), J. Manners (5), P. Dodds (6), D. Schwartz (2), J. White (1), M. Koehrsen (1), Q. Zeng (1), J. Galagan (1), C. Cuomo (1), J. Ellis (6), C. Kistler (3). (1) Broad Institute, Cambridge, MA, U.S.A.; (2) Madison, WI, U.S.A.; (3) St. Paul, MN, U.S.A.; (4) Canberra, Australia; (5) Brisbane, Australia; (6) Black Mountain, Australia 167-P. The σ factor rpoN is required by Brenneria rubrifaciens for HR elicitation in tobacco and virulence on walnut plants. A. MCCLEAN (1). (1) CPGRU USDA-ARS, Davis, CA, U.S.A.

41

TUESDAY

2:45 p.m.

Universidad de Talca, Talca, Chile; (2) USDAARS, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A. 112-O. Powdery scab effect on potato Solanum tuberosum and S. phureja. E. Gilchrist (1), J. Soler (2), J. G. MORALES (1), S. Reynaldi (1). (1) Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Departamento Ciencias Agronómicas, Medellin, Colombia; (2) Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Medellin, Colombia 113-O. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation is an efficient tool for insertional mutagenesis of the vascular wilt fungus, V. dahliae. K. MARUTHACHALAM (1), S. Kang (2), S. J. Klosterman (3), K. V. Subbarao (4). (1) University of California, Salinas, CA, U.S.A.; (2) Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, U.S.A.; (3) USDA ARS, Salinas, CA, U.S.A.; (4) University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A. 114-O. Application of intragenic technology for development of disease-resistant potato. G. P. PONCIANO (1), C. M. Rommens (2), D. R. Rockhold (1), K. F. McCue (1), M. C. Whalen (3), W. R. Belknap (1). (1) USDA ARS, Albany, CA, U.S.A.; (2) J. R. Simplot Company, Simplot Plant Sciences, Boise, ID, U.S.A.; (3) Pacific West Area USDA-ARS, Albany, CA, U.S.A. 115-O. Downy mildew of basil in Illinois. M. BABADOOST (1). (1) University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, U.S.A.


3:40 p.m.

3:45 p.m.

3:50 p.m.

TUESDAY

3:55 p.m.

4:00 p.m.

4:05 p.m.

4:10 p.m.

4:15 p.m.

4:20 p.m.

42

198-P. Effect of solar radiation on disease severity of soybean rust. H. M. YOUNG (1), D. F. Narvaez (2), J. J. Marois (3), D. L. Wright (3). (1) University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A.; (2) Monsanto, St. Louis, MO, U.S.A.; (3) University of Florida, Quincy, FL, U.S.A. APS 161-P. Visualization of Clavibacter FOUNDATION michiganensis subsp. michiganensis infection of tomato seedlings using a bioluminescent strain. X. XU (1), G. Rajashekara (1), S. A. Miller (1). (1) Ohio State University, OARDC, Wooster, OH, U.S.A. 200-P. Characterization of the cytochrome b gene from three stone fruit infecting Monilinia species. J. HILY (1), S. Singer (1), K. Cox (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, Cornell University, Geneva, NY, U.S.A. 234-P. The effect of new aphid vectors on the evolution of Soybean dwarf virus. B. TIAN (1), W. L. Schneider (2), F. E. Gildow (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA, U.S.A.; (2) Agricultural Res. Service, United States Dept. of Agriculture, Fort Detrick, MD, U.S.A. 174-P. Organization and structure of two stable Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus prophage lysogens that become lytic in plant infections. S. ZHANG (1). (1) University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A. 181-P. Exploring the diversity of Phytophthora and related genera in aquatic environments in Maryland, U.S.A. D. SKALTSAS (1). (1) University of Maryland, College Park, MD, U.S.A. 208-P. Insights into sexual reproduction in Aspergillus flavus from variation in experimental crosses and natural populations. R. A. OLARTE (1), B. W. Horn (2), J. T. Monacell (3), E. A. Stone (4), I. Carbone (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; (2) National Peanut Res. Laboratory, Agricultural Res. Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Dawson, GA, U.S.A.; (3) Bioinformatics Res. Center, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; (4) Dept. of Genetics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A. 176-P. Incidence of Candidatus Liberibacter americanus and Ca. L. asiaticus in orange jasmine and citrus trees in urban areas in Sao Paulo State, Brazil. S. LOPES (1), G. F. Frare (2), L. E. Camargo (2), N. A. Wulff (3), D. C. Teixeira (3), R. B. Bassanezi (3), A. C. Beattie (4), A. J. Ayres (3). (1) FUNDECITRUS, Araraquara, Brazil; (2) Piracicaba, Brazil; (3) Araraquara, Brazil; (4) Sydney, Australia 186-P. Description of two putative new species of Pythium isolated from soybean and corn in Ohio. M. L. ELLIS (1), K. D. Broders (2), P. A. Paul (1), A. E. Dorrance (1). (1) Ohio State University, OARDC, Wooster, OH, U.S.A.; (2)

4:25 p.m.

4:30 p.m.

University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada 209-P. Identifying heterokaryon incompatibility loci in Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus using array-comparative genome hybridization (aCGH). J. T. MONACELL (1), B. W. Horn (2), R. Singh (3), E. A. Stone (4), I. Carbone (3). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology and Bioinformatics Res. Center, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; (2) National Peanut Res. Laboratory, USDA, ARS, Dawson, GA, U.S.A.; (3) Dept. of Plant Pathology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; (4) Dept. of Genetics and Bioinformatics Res. Center, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A. Poster time with authors

Diseases of Plants 3:30 –5:30 p.m.; 208B Moderator: Janna L. Beckerman, Botany & Plant Pathology Dept., Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A. 3:30 p.m.

3:35 p.m.

3:40 p.m.

3:45 p.m.

3:50 p.m.

3:55 p.m.

387-P. Enhancing Guam’s agriculture professionals’ knowledge of ecological disease management. Z. MERSHA (1), R. W. Brown (1), R. L. Schlub (1). (1) UOG Cooperative Extension, University of Guam, Mangilao, Guam APS 249-P. Determining the effects of FOUNDATION foliar and heading diseases on soft red winter wheat (Triticum aestivum) yield in Wisconsin. K. LACKERMANN (1), J. Gaska (1), M. Martinka (1), S. Conley (1), P. Esker (1). (1) University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A. 380-P. Late blight resistance assessing of a segregating population of diploid potatoes (Solanum phureja). J. G. MORALES (1), B. Franco (2), C. E. Ñústez (3), J. M. Cotes (2). (1) Universidad Nacional de Colombia sede Medellín, Depto. Ciencias Agronómicas, Medellin, Colombia; (2) Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Medellín, Colombia; (3) Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá D.C., Colombia 310-P. Detecting Sugarcane yellow leaf virus in asymptomatic sugarcane leaves with hyperspectral remote sensing and associated leaf pigment changes. M. P. GRISHAM (1), R. M. Johnson (1), P. V. Zimba (2). (1) USDA ARS, Houma, LA, U.S.A.; (2) Texas A&M, Corpus Christi, TX, U.S.A. 268-P. Effects of environment and cultivar on charcoal rot development in soybeans. M. DOUBLEDEE (1), J. Rupe (1), C. Rothrock (1), S. Bajwa (1), A. Steger (1), R. Holland (1). (1) University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A. 304-P. PCR detection of aflatoxin-producing strains of Aspergillus spp. from corn and red flour beetle. S. DOBHAL (1), D. Blazheva (2), M.


4:00 p.m.

4:05 p.m.

4:15 p.m.

4:20 p.m.

4:25 p.m.

4:30 p.m.

Epidemiology/Ecology/Environmental Biology 3:30 – 5:30 p.m.; 208A Moderator: Paul Esker, Plant Pathology Dept., University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A.

3:30 p.m.

3:35 p.m.

3:40 p.m.

3:45 p.m.

3:50 p.m. 3:55 p.m.

4:00 p.m.

4:05 p.m.

4:10 p.m.

4:15 p.m.

517-P. Effects of crop and environmental variables on sugarcane brown rust epidemics in Louisiana. W. BARRERA (1). (1) Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A. 460-P. Effects of water vapor, liquid water, and their interaction on the germination of urediniospores of Phakopsora pachyrhizi. M. R. BONDE (1). (1) USDA ARS, Frederick, MD, U.S.A. 512-P. The relationship between endophytic Bacillus cereus and Bacillus cereus causing foodborne illness. R. MELNICK (1). (1) Penn State University, University Park, PA, U.S.A. 466-P. Genetic structure of Phytophthora infestans population in eastern North America, 2002–2009. C. HU (1), F. G. Perez (2), R. Donahoo (3), A. McLeod (4), K. L. Myers (4), K. L. Ivors (5), P. D. Roberts (3), W. E. Fry (4), K. L. Deah (2), J. B. Ristaino (6). (1) North North Carolina State University, Mills River, NC, U.S.A.; (6) Dept. of Plant Pathology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A. 475-P. WITHDRAWN Phytopathology 100:S10 455-P. Climate change and potato late blight suppression. J. P. Comstock (1), D. W. Wolfe (1), L. Joseph (1), A. T. Degaetano (1), W. E. FRY (1). (1) Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A. 519-P. A Cucumber mosaic virus mutant that induces resistance to its aphid vector in tobacco. H. ZIEBELL (1), A. Murphy (2), M. G. Lewsey (2), J. H. Westwood (2), K. L. Perry (1), M. Stevens (3), J. P. Carr (2). (1) Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A.; (2) Cambridge University, Cambridge, United Kingdom; (3) Broom’s Barn Applied Crop Sciences, Bury St. Edmunds, United Kingdom 518-P. Screening of St. Augustinegrass (Stenotaphrum secundatum) germplasm for brown patch and large patch resistance. N. C. FLOR (1), P. F. Harmon (1), L. E. Datnoff (2), R. N. Raid (3). (1) University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A.; (2) Dept. of Plant Pathology & Crop Physiology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A.; (3) University of Florida, Belle Glade, FL, U.S.A. APS 510-P. DNA pyrosequencing to FOUNDATION determine the influence of fallow period on soil microbial communities in the Bolivian highlands. L. GOMEZ (1), A. Jumpponen (1), M. A. Gonzales (2), J. Cusicanqui (3), C. Valdivia (4), P. Motavalli (4), M. Herman (1), K. A. Garrett (1). (1) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.; (2) Fundacion PROINPA, La Paz, Bolivia; (3) Universidad Mayor de San Andres, La Paz, Bolivia; (4) University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, U.S.A. 431-P. Influence of crop rotation on persistence of the atoxigenic strain Aspergillus flavus AF36 in Arizona. R. JAIME-GARCIA (1), P. J. Cotty (2).

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4:10 p.m

Arif (1), P. Garrido (1), F. M. Ochoa-Corona (1), G. Opit (1), C. Garzon. (1), (1) Oklahoma State University, Dept. of Entomology and Plant Pathology, Stillwater, OK, U.S.A.; (2) University of Food Technologies, Dept. of Organic Chemistry and Microbiology, Plovdiv, Bulgaria 331-P. Alternative method for rapid processing, shipping, and testing of a large number of psyllids for the presence of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter’ spp. K. L. MANJUNATH (1), C. Ramadugu (2), J. Drake (1), H. A. Arevalo (3), S. E. Halbert (4), P. A. Stansly (3), R. Lee (1). (1) USDA ARS National Clonal Germplasm Repository for Citrus and Dates, Riverside, CA, U.S.A.; (2) Dept. of Botany and Plant Sciences, University of California, Riverside, CA, U.S.A.; (3) University of Florida SWFREC, Immokalee, FL, U.S.A.; (4) Florida Division of Plant Industry, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A. 344-P. Identification and characterization of Fusarium oxysporum, the causal agent of koa wilt in Hawaii. A. SHIRAISHI (1), J. Uchida (1). (1) University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI, U.S.A. 286-P. Description of two genotypes of Phytomonas associated to oil palm diseases in Peru: Marchites Sorpresiva and a new disease manifestation-Marchites Lenta. M. J. TALLEDO ALBUJAR (1), S. S. Morales Ruiz (2), E. Trinidad Chipana (3), J. Arevalo Zelada (2), A. Trelles Di Lucca (3), Y. Montoya Piedra (1). 1) Bio Links S.A., Lima, Peru; (2) Institute of Tropical Medicine “Alexander von Humboldt” Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Peru; (3) Palmas del Espino SA, Uchiza, Peru 356-P. Association of multiple virus infections with apple disease in western Colorado. R. POKHAREL (1), R. Mock (2), R. Li (2), G. Kinard (2), H. Larsen (1). (1) Colorado State University, Grand Junction, CO, U.S.A.; (2) Beltsville, MD, U.S.A. APS 388-P. Molecular analysis of turfFOUNDATION grass rusts reveals the widespread distribution of Puccinia coronata as a pathogen of Kentucky bluegrass. L. A. BEIRN (1), B. B. Clarke (1), J. Crouch (1). (1) Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, U.S.A. 332-P. Novel detection of Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 using magnetic capture hybridization and real-time PCR. Y. HA (1), T. P. Denny (1), M. A. Schell (1). (1) University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A. Poster time with authors


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TUESDAY

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(1) University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, U.S.A.; (2) USDA ARS/University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, U.S.A. 489-P. Guangdong (China) and Florida (U.S.) populations of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ distinguished by a genomic locus with short tandem repeats. J. CHEN (1), X. Deng (2), X. Sun (3), D. Jones (3), M. Irey (4), E. Civerolo (5). (1) USDA ARS PWA, Parlier, CA, U.S.A.; (2) South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, PRC Peoples Rep of China; (3) Division of Plant Industry, Dept. of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A.; (4) US Sugar Corp./S. Gardens Citrus, Clewiston, FL, U.S.A.; (5) USDA-ARS, Parlier, CA, U.S.A. 504-P. Comparison of bacterial communities from inside and outside of Rhizoctonia bare patches in wheat. C. Yin (1), S. H. Hulbert (1), K. L. Schroeder (2), O. Mavrodi (1), D. Mavrodi (1), A. Dhingra (3), T. C. PAULITZ (2). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS, Root Disease and Biological Control Res. Unit, Pulllman, WA, U.S.A.; (3) Dept. of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, U.S.A. Poster time with authors

Molecular/Cellular/Plant-Microbe Interactions—Session 1 3:30 – 5:30 p.m.; 207CD Moderator: Martin B. Dickman, Inst. for Plant Genomics and Biotech, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, U.S.A. 3:30 p.m.

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543-P. Characterization of extracytoplasmic function sigma factors in plant pathogenesis by Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a. P. BASU THAKUR (1). (1) Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, U.S.A. 542-P. Environmental regulation of stomatebased defense against bacterial infection in Arabidopsis. R. CHITRAKAR (1), M. Melotto (1). (1) University of Texas, Arlington, TX, U.S.A. 534-P. Expression profiling of host response of citrus to ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ infection. V. ARITUA (1), N. Wang (1). (1) Citrus Res. and Education Center, University of Florida, Lake Alfred, FL, U.S.A. 539-P. Proteomics analysis of Ralstonia solanacearum identifies candidate proteins that contribute to pathogenicity on tomato plants at low temperatures. A. BOCSANCZY (1), U. C. Achenbach (2), D. J. Norman (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, University of Florida, IFASMREC, Apopka, FL, U.S.A.; (2) Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology and Biotechnology of Plants (IMBIO), Bonn, Germany

3:50 p.m.

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541-P. Involvement of chloroplast localized reactive oxygen species in promoting host and nonhost bacterial pathogens induced cell death. Y. ISHIGA (1), T. Ishiga (1), T. Wangdi (1), C. Ryu (1), K. S. Mysore (1), S. R. Uppalapati (1). (1) The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK, U.S.A. APS FOUNDATION 544-P. Comparative in planta microarray analysis modifies the regulatory model for the type three secretion system in Ralstonia solanacearum. J. M. JACOBS (1), F. Meng (1), L. Babujee (1), A. Milling (1), C. Allen (1). (1) University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A. 563-P. Characterization of plant cell walldegrading enzymes produced by Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii, the causal agent of Stewart’s wilt of corn. M. MOHAMMADI (1), L. Burbank (1), C. M. Roper (1). (1) University of California, Riverside, CA, U.S.A. APS 521-P. Cuticle plays an important FOUNDATION role in basal as well as induced defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Y. XIA (1), Q. Gao (1), K. Yu (1), A. Kachroo (1), P. Kachroo (1). (1) University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, U.S.A. 549-P. A flgB mutation in Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. glycines confers reduced bacterial pustule disease of soybean. D. ATHINUWAT (1), T. J. Burr (1), S. Prathuangwong (2). (1) Cornell University, Geneva, NY, U.S.A.; (2) Kasetsart University, Bangkok, Thailand 674-P. TMV inclusion bodies: Their formation and relationship to virus accumulation. X. YANG (1), R. S. Nelson (1), S. Bhat (1). (1) The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK, U.S.A. 669-P. Role of Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) genes in seed transmission in soybean. S. JOSSEY (1), L.L. Domier (2). (1) University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL, U.S.A. 677-P. Identification of molecular markers associated with resistance to TSWV through genetic mapping. H. QIN (1), Y. Li (2), Y. Guo (3), G. He (4), C. Chen (5), A. Culbreath (6), S. J. Knapp (3), D. R. Cook (7), C. C. Holbrook (8), M. Wang (9). (1) USDA-ARS, Crop Protection and Management Res. Unit, Tifton, GA, U.S.A.; (2) Dept. of Plant Pathology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A.; (3) Center for Applied Genetic Technologies, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A.; (4) Center for Plant Biotechnology, Tuskegee University, Tuskegee, AL, U.S.A.; (5) USDAARS, National Peanut Res. Laboratory, Dawson, GA, U.S.A.; (6) Dept. of Plant Pathology, University of Georgia, Tifton, GA, U.S.A.; (7) Dept. of Plant Pathology, University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A.; (8) USDA-ARS,


4:30 p.m.

Crop Genetics and Breeding Res. Unit, Tifton, GA, U.S.A.; (9) USDA-ARS, Plant Genetic Resources Conservation Unit, Griffin, GA, U.S.A. Poster time with authors

4:10 p.m.

Molecular/Cellular/Plant-Microbe Interactions—Session 2 3:30 – 5:30 p.m.; 203B Moderator: Lingyun Hao, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A. 3:30 p.m.

3:35 p.m.

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Plant Disease Management 3:30 – 5:30 p.m.; 217A Moderator: James W. Buck, University of Georgia, Griffin, GA, U.S.A. 3:30 p.m.

3:35 p.m.

694-P. Field efficacy of Bacillus subtilis MBI 600 (IntegralR) for managing rice sheath blight caused by Rhizoctonia solani. V. KRISHNA KUMAR (1), M. Reddy (1), J. W. Kloepper (1), K. S. Lawrence (1), S. Krishnam Raju (2), D. Groth (3), M. Miller (1). (1) Auburn University, Auburn, AL, U.S.A.; (2) Andhra Pradesh Rice Res. Institute, Acharya NG Ranga Agricultural University, Maruteru, India; (3) Rice Res. Station, Louisiana State University Ag Center, Rayne, LA, U.S.A. 748-P. Bactericidal activities of antimicrobial molecules against huanglongbing-associated ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ in the diseased periwinkle. M. Zhang (1), Y. Duan (2), C. A. POWELL (3). (1) University of Florida, Ft. Pierce, FL, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS-USHRL, Fort Pierce, FL, U.S.A.; (3) IRREC-IFAS University of Florida, Fort Pierce, FL, U.S.A.

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TUESDAY

3:45 p.m.

586-P. Gene expressions of effectors in downy mildew of lima bean pathogen, Phytophthora phaseoli. S. G. KUNJETI (1), N. M. Donofrio (1), A. G. Marsh (1), B. C. Meyers (1), T. A. Evans (1). (1) University of Delaware, Newark, DE, U.S.A. 600-P. Analysis of transgenic American chestnut. A. E. NEWHOUSE (1), A. B. Zhang (1), L. Northern (1), C. A. Maynard (1), W. A. Powell (1). (1) SUNY-ESF, Syracuse, NY, U.S.A. 597-P. Fungal gene expression patterns during infection of field pea roots by F. graminearum and F. avenaceum. R. S. GOSWAMI (1), K. Chittem (1). (1) North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, U.S.A. 630-P. Demethylation inhibitor (DMI) fungicide resistance mechanism in Sclerotinia homoeocarpa causing dollar spot in turfgrasses. B. MA (1), L. P. Tredway (1). (1) North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A. 606-P. A Medicago truncatula resistance to rust (rer) mutant displays enhanced resistance to Phakopsora pachyrhizi but not to necrotrophic fungal pathogens. Y. ISHIGA (1), S. Mittal (1), S. R. Uppalapati (1), V. Doraiswamy (1), H. Schultheiss (2), K. S. Mysore (1). (1) The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK, U.S.A.; (2) BASF Plant Sci. GmbH, Limburgerhof, Germany 569-P. One step construction of Agrobacterium recombination-ready plasmids (OSCAR), an efficient and robust tool for ATMT gene deletion construction in fungi. Z. Paz (1), S. E. GOLD (1), D. L. Andrews (1), S. J. Klosterman (2), M. D. García-Pedrajas (3), L. Baeza-Montañez (3). (1) University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS, Salinas, CA, U.S.A.; (3) Laboratorio de Micologia Estacion Experimental La Mayora, CSIC, Algarrobo-Costa, Malaga, Spain 605-P. Recombinant antibody-mediated multiple disease tolerance in canola. S. S. VERMA (1), W. Yajima (1), M. H. Rahman (1), S. Shah (2), Y. Liang (1), N. N. Kav (1). (1) University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada; (2) Alberta Innovates, Vegreville, AB, Canada 579-P. Characterization of EDS1 as a component of Vitis defense responses to Erysiphe necator. F. GAO (1), X. Shu (2), M. B. Ali (2), S. Howard (2), N. Li (2), P. Winterhagen (2),

W. Qiu (2), W. Gassmann (1). (1) University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, U.S.A.; (2) Missouri State University, Mountain Grove, MO, U.S.A. 567-P. Comparison of transient expression vectors for production of recombinant proteins in plants. K. H. SHAH (1), H. Bohlmann (1). (1) Institute of Plant Protection, Dept. of Applied Plant Sciences and Plant Biotechnology, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna, Austria 593-P. Biochemical and microscopical study of Phytophthora infestans process of infection on Physalis peruviana. C. A. ANTOLÍNEZ (1), G. Danies (1), G. Peña (1), Á. M. Vargas (1), A. J. Bernal (1), S. Restrepo (1). (1) Univ. De Los Andes, Bogota, Colombia 625-P. Morphological and cytological modifications of Gibberella zeae germlings induced by mating pheromones and affinityselected peptides. N. W. GROSS (1), J. E. Scholez (1), F. J. Schmidt (2), J. T. English (1). (1) Division of Plant Sciences, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, U.S.A.; (2) Dept. of Biochemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, U.S.A. 657-P. Trafficking of soybean cyst nematodesecreted CLE proteins in plant cells. J. WANG (1), T. Hewezi (2), T. J. Baum (2), E. L. Davis (3), X. Wang (4), M. G. Mitchum (1). (1) University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, U.S.A.; (2) Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A.; (3) North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; (4) Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A. Poster time with authors


3:40 p.m. 3:45 p.m.

3:55 p.m.

If your friends refuse to eat with you because you insist on pointing out the diseases in the salad, you’re probably a plant pathologist. TUESDAY

And if you’re a plant pathologist, you belong with APS! Thank you for being a part of The American Phytopathological Society, a worldwide community of plant science specialists. Membership in APS offers opportunities to connect with prominent scientists, explore new techniques, access important resources, and create successful collaborations. Regardless of your specialization or career stage, if you prefer to pay more attention to the diseased leaves instead of croutons or the tangy dressing, you belong here.

What makes plant pathologists unique? Do you like to diagnose your ailing houseplants? Or perform unusual online searches? Stop by the bookstore to share your own experiences, and pick up a bumper sticker to share your passion with others.

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Share your passion.

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831-P. Suppression of sheath blight of rice by cow urine. R. JEYARAMAN (1). (1) Annamalai University, Annamalainagar, Tamil Nadu, India 704-P. Trichoderma asperellum T109 effect over Spongospora subterranea in potato field. E. GILCHRIST (1), J. Pérez (2), H. A. Vargas (2), S. Reynaldi (1). (1) Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Departamento Ciencias Agronómicas, Medellin, Antioquia, Colombia; (2) Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Medellin, Colombia 770-P. WITHDRAWN Phytopathology 100:S136 717-P. A screening strategy of bacterial biocontrol agents towards Ralstonia wilt of ginger. W. Yang (1), J. GUO (1). (1) Nanjing, PRC Peoples Rep of China 722-P. The irony of silicon: Accumulation in a nonaccumulator induced by TRSV. W. L. ZELLNER (1), J. Frantz (2), S. M. Leisner (1). (1) University of Toledo, Toledo, OH, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS, Toledo, OH, U.S.A. 856-P. Time spray strategies for Septoria leaf blotch disease progress on winter wheat: The use of forecasting model. M. El Jarroudi (1), F. Giraud (2), P. Delfosse (3), L. Hoffmann (3), H. Maraite (4), B. TYCHON (5). (1) University of Liege, Arlon, Belgium; (2) Martillac, France; (3) Belvaux, Luxembourg; (4) Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium; (5) Arlon, Belgium 711-P. Biological control of seven woody invasive plant species with the fungal pathogen Chondrosterium purpureum. A. R. POST (1), C. A. Judge (2), D. Little (3), J. C. Neal (3), M. Benson (3). (1) Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, U.S.A.; (2) BASF Corporation, Dewitt, MI, U.S.A.; (3) North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A. 688-P. Synergistic effects between Regalia® and other fungicides in controlling cucumber powdery mildew and lettuce downy mildew. H. SU (1). (1) Marrone Bio Innovations, Inc., Davis, CA, U.S.A. 825-P. Synergistic agents to reduce fungicide resistance and health risks. N. I. KHAN (1), J. A. Trogolo (1). (1) Agion-Technology Inc., Wakefield, MA, U.S.A. 743-P. Status of dodine resistance and possibilities for renewed use against Venturia inaequalis populations in the northeastern U.S. K. COX (1), S. Villani (1), G. Jacon (2). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, Cornell University, Geneva, NY, U.S.A.; (2) Groupe Agriphar, Ougree, Belgium Poster time with authors


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 11 7:00 – 9:00 a.m. 7:00 – 9:00 a.m. 7:00 – 10:00 a.m. 7:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. 7:00 – 1:00 p.m. 8:00 – 10:00 a.m. 8:00 – 11:00 a.m. 8:30 – 10:00 a.m. 8:30 – 11:15 a.m. 8:30 – 11:15 a.m. 8:30 – 11:15 a.m. 8:30 – 11:15 a.m. 8:30 – 11:30 a.m. 8:30 – 11:30 a.m. 8:30 – 11:30 a.m. 12:30 – 4:30 p.m.

Exhibitor Take-Down Poster Take-Down APS Council Meeting Registration Concession Service Available Office of International Programs Board Meeting APS PRESS Bookstore Special Sessions • Integrated Microbial Bioinformatics • Biocontrol Beyond the Bench: Large-Scale, Successful Biocontrol • Cryptic Foes: Gathering the Latest Advances on Pythium • The Sophistication of Host-Pathogen Interactions Involving Necrotrophic Fungi • Virus Fishing with Chips: Plant Virus Microarrays and Next-Generation Sequencing Oral Technical Sessions • ‘Candidatus Liberibacter’/Epidemiology & Ecology • Chemical Control • Epidemiology and Ecology/Plant Diseases Workshop: An Introduction to Statistics Using R (“R for Dummies”)

Ehibit Hall A Exhibit Hall A 204 A Concourse Food Court 205 Exhibit Hall A 207CD 208A 203B 217D 207AB 217BC 217A 208B 202AB

WEDNESDAY HIGHLIGHTS An Introduction to Statistics Using R (“R for Dummies”) 12:30 – 4:30 p.m.; 202AB Section: Epidemiology/Ecology/Environmental Biology Organizers: Karen Garrett, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.; Paul Esker, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committees: Epidemiology; Crop Loss Assessment and Risk Evaluation (CARE) Have you been avoiding attending one of the statistical workshops over the years because you felt that the topic was over your head? Do you feel you need to shake off that rust when it comes to statistics? If so, this is the statistical workshop for you! R (www.r-project.org) is a programming package for statistical computing and graphics and has become extremely popular, especially since it is free. In this workshop, we will introduce R and illustrate some of the tools that are available for using R, including graphical and statistical. The focus of this workshop will be at an INTRODUCTORY LEVEL and should be understandable to all who are interested in learning more about statistics and statistical computing. This session will follow the tradition of the Epidemiology Committee’s workshops on bringing statistical analysis to the masses. All registrants will need to have a laptop with R installed. Preregistration is required.

SPECIAL SESSIONS – Wednesday Morning Listed in alphabetical order by title. Indicates an APS Foundation Awardee

APS FOUNDATION

Biocontrol Beyond the Bench: Large-Scale, Successful Biocontrol 8:30 – 11:15 a.m.; 208A Section: Plant Disease Management Organizer/Moderator: Mark Weaver, USDA ARS, Stoneville, MS, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committees: Biological Control; Biotechnology This session will bring together researchers who have successfully translated research findings into applications with a positive impact for society through the biocontrol of plant diseases and invasive weeds. Together, we hope to compile some of the lessons learned and to direct ongoing research around some of the pitfalls on the path between bench science and successful, applied biological control. 8:30 p.m.

116-S. Challenges and successes of registering microbial biopesticides. M. BRAVERMAN (1), D. Kunkel (1). (1) IR-4 Project, Rutgers University, Princeton, NJ, U.S.A. 9:00 a.m. 117-S. Bringing a broad-spectrum bioherbicide to market. A. WATSON (1). (1) McGill University, Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, QC, Canada 9:30 a.m. 118-S. Understanding your customer and delivering a quality product. B. FOSTER (1). (1) BioWorks, Victor, NY, U.S.A. 10:00 a.m. Break 10:15 a.m. 119-S. Lockdown: Collego bioherbicide gets a second act. K. CARTWRIGHT (1), D. Boyette (2), M. Roberts (3). (1) ARI, Inc., Fayetteville,

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WORKSHOP


AR, U.S.A.; (2) Southern Weed Science Research Unit, Stoneville, MS, U.S.A.; (3) Natural Industries, Houston, TX, U.S.A. 10:45 a.m. 120-S. Working together: Partnering with grower organizations from development through distribution to make aflatoxin biocontrol a reality in the U.S./Africa. P. J. COTTY (1), R. Bandyopadhyay (2). (1) USDA/ARS, Dept. of Plant Pathology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, U.S.A.; (2) IITA, Ibadan, Nigeria Cryptic Foes: Gathering the Latest Advances on Pythium 8:30 – 11:15 a.m.; 203B Section: Diseases of Plants Organizers: Carla Garzon, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, U.S.A.; Jerry Weiland, USDA-ARS Horticultural Crops Research Lab, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A. Moderator: Jerry Weiland, USDA-ARS Horticultural Crops Research Lab, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committees: Soil Microbiology and Root Diseases; Diagnostics; Chemical Control; Mycology This session will provide updates on the current knowledge about Pythium phylogenetics, population genetics and diversity, sampling, diagnostics, disease management, and economic impact.

WEDNESDAY

8:30 a.m. 8:45 a.m.

9:00 a.m. 9:15 a.m.

48

121-S. Ecology and biology of Pythium spp. and their impact on crop production. F. N. MARTIN (1). (1) USDA-ARS, Salinas, CA, U.S.A. 122-S. Sampling and processing of samples for Pythium. G. W. MOORMAN (1). (1) Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, U.S.A. 123-S. Assessment of Pythium diversity in forest nurseries. J. WEILAND (1). (1) USDA ARS, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A. 124-S. Role of Pythium spp. in the seedling disease complex on cotton; results from the National Cottonseed Treatment Trials. S. A. Winters (1), C. S. ROTHROCK (1), E. E. Gbur (1), L. L. Verhalen (2), T. S. Isakeit (3), W. E. Batson (4), F. M. Bourland (5), P. D. Colyer (6), H. W. Kaufman (7), T. A. Wheeler (8), G. L. Sciumbato (9), K. S. Lawrence (10), A. Y. Chambers (11), P. M. Thaxton (12), W. S. Gazaway (10), T. L. Kirkpatrick (13), P. M. Phipps (14), D. R. Sumner (15), L. J. Littlefield (2), G. B. Padgett (16), F. M. Shokes (14), R. B. Hutmacher (17), R. M. Davis (18), K. W. Seebold (19), J. D. Mueller (20), J. D. Barham (13), M. A. Newman (11), R. H. Garber (21). (1) University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A.; (2) Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, U.S.A.; (3) Texas AgriLife Research, College Station, TX, U.S.A.; (4) Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, U.S.A.; (5) University of Arkansas, Keiser, AR, U.S.A.; (6) LSU AgCenter, Bossier City, LA, U.S.A.; (7) Texas AgriLife Extension, Lubbock, TX,

U.S.A.; (8) Texas AgriLife Research, Lubbock, TX, U.S.A.; (9) Mississippi State University, Stoneville, MS, U.S.A.; (10) Auburn University, Auburn, AL, U.S.A.; (11) University of Tennessee, Jackson, TN, U.S.A.; (12) Mississippi State University, Cypress, TX, U.S.A.; (13) University of Arkansas, Hope, AR, U.S.A.; (14) Virginia Tech University, Suffolk, VA, U.S.A.; (15) University of Georgia, Tifton, GA, U.S.A.; (16) LSU AgCenter, Winnsboro, LA, U.S.A.; (17) University of California-Davis, Five Points, CA, U.S.A.; (18) University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A.; (19) University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, U.S.A.; (20) Clemson University, Edisto, SC, U.S.A.; (21) USDA, Shafter, CA, U.S.A. 9:30 a.m. 125-S. Pythium species associated to plants: The aggressive vs. the moderately, low and nonaggressive. Z. ABAD (1). (1) USDA-APHISMolecular Diagnostics Laboratory, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A. 10:00 a.m. Break 10:15 a.m. 126-S. DNA barcode, genomics, and phylogenetics of Pythium species. C. LEVESQUE (1), G. P. Robideau (2), A. W. de Cock (3), K. Bala (1), Q. A. Eggertson (2), T. L. Rintoul (1), J. Hamilton (4), N. Tisserat (5), C. Buell (4). (1) Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada; (2) Dept. of Biology, Carleton University, Ottawa, ON, Canada; (3) CBS KNAW Fungal Biodiversity Centre, Utrecht, Netherlands; (4) Dept. of Plant Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, U.S.A.; (5) Colorado State University, Ft. Collins, CO, U.S.A. 10:45 a.m. 127-S. Population genetics and inter-species boundaries within the Pythium irregulare complex. C. D. GARZON (1). (1) Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, U.S.A. Integrated Microbial Bioinformatics 8:30 – 10:00 a.m.; 207CD Section: Biology of Pathogens Organizers/Moderators: Scot Hulbert, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, U.S.A.; Jan Leach, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committee: Public Policy Board This session will cover the outcomes of a workshop in the Washington, DC area in February concerning genomic data management and utilization. The speed in which microbial genome sequences are becoming available has created a need for better and more integrated databases and bioinformatic support for microbial researchers. The topic of the session will be the feasibility and mechanics of creating an integrated network of databases, analysis tools, and training in sequence analysis and utilization. Several genomics researchers with extensive experience in database issues, including Brett Tyler, Christina Cuomo, Ralph Dean, and Yong-Hwan Lee will present their views on integrated databases. This will be followed by a general discussion to gain input from APS


members into what types of information and analysis tools the databases should have and how they should be integrated. 8:30 a.m.

8:45 a.m.

9:00 a.m. 9:15 a.m.

9:30 a.m.

128-S. Integrated fungal and oomycete genome resources: The perspective from a user community. B. TYLER (1). (1) Virginia Bioinformatics Inst., Blacksburg, VA, U.S.A. 129-S. Fungal genome resources and the impact of new sequencing technologies. C. CUOMO (1). (1) Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA, U.S.A. 130-S. Comparative genome analysis: Impediments and solutions. R. DEAN (1). (1) North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A. 131-S. Bioinformatic Plantform for comparative fungal genomics. Y. LEE (1). (1) Dept. of Agricultural Biotechnology, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea Panel Discussion

Necrotrophic plant pathogens have long been thought to be less sophisticated than the well-studied biotrophs in their interactions with their corresponding hosts. Recent exciting research in the area of necrotrophic plant pathogen interactions has shown that the necrotrophic pathogen interactions may be just as sophisticated in their attack on their respective hosts. Speakers in this session will present research in the area of necrotrophic plant pathogen interactions from both the host and pathogen perspectives. This session will look specifically at virulence/pathogenicity of necrotrophic plant pathogens as well as at the host response to effectors involved in this interaction. 8:30 a.m.

132-S. Live and let die: The smart lifestyle of Botrytis cinerea. J. A. VAN KAN (1). (1) Wageningen University, Wageningen, Netherlands 9:00 a.m. 133-S. Necrotrophy in Sclerotinia sclerotiorum: To oxalate and beyond. J. ROLLINS (1). (1) University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A. 9:30 a.m. 134-S. Systematic characterization of the kinome of the wheat scab fungus Fusarium graminearum. J. XU (1). (1) Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A. 10:00 a.m. Break 10:15 a.m. 135-S. Pathogen hijacking of disease resistance mechanisms in wheat. J. D. FARIS (1), Z. Zhang (2), S. Lu (2), H. Lu (3), J. Fellers (4), S. Cloutier (5), S. Xu (2), R. Oliver (6), J. Rasmussen (2), S. Meinhardt (2), T. Friesen (2). (1) Northern Crop

Virus Fishing with Chips: Plant Virus Microarrays and Next-Generation Sequencing 8:30 – 11:15 a.m.; 207AB Section: Diseases of Plants Organizers: John Hammond, USDA-ARS, Molecular Plant Pathology Lab, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.; William Schneider, USDA ARS, Fort Detrick, Frederick, MD, U.S.A.; Maher Alrwahnih, University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A. Moderators: John Hammond, USDA-ARS, Molecular Plant Pathology Lab, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.; Maher Alrwahnih, University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committee: Virology Financial Sponsors: APS-APHIS Virus Working Group; Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation The list of viruses infecting plants is growing. There are many viruses that are not identified and characterized. Use of microarrays and next-generation sequencing techniques are offering unprecedented opportunities to identify viruses, find new viruses, and examine virus populations. This session will bring experts together to share current knowledge on these topics and on how the new technologies are revolutionizing plant virology. 8:30 a.m.

137-S. Universal plant virus microarray development and validation. B. Bagewadi (1), K. Fischer (2), D. C. Henderson (3), R. L. Jordan (3), D. Wang (4), K. L. Perry (5), U. Melcher (6), J. Hammond (3), C. M. FAUQUET (7). (1) ILTAB/Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, St. Louis, MO, U.S.A.; (2) University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, U.S.A.; (3) USDA-ARS, MPPL, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.; (4) Washington University, St. Louis, MO, U.S.A.; (5) Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A.; (6) Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, U.S.A.; (7) Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, St. Louis, MO, U.S.A. 9:00 a.m. 138-S. High throughput sequencing—Next wave diagnostics. N. BOONHAM (1), I. Adams (1), R. Glover (1), W. Monger (1), T. Hodges (2), P. Ashton (2). (1) Food and Environment Research Agency, York, United Kingdom; (2) University of York, York, United Kingdom 9:30 a.m. 139-S. Viral population analysis by genomic sequencing. Z. XIONG (1), Z. Weng (1), D. W. Galbraith (1), W. O. Dawson (2). (1) University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, U.S.A.; (2) University of Florida, Lake Alfred, FL, U.S.A. 10:00 a.m. Break 10:15 a.m. 140-S. Next-generation sequencing as a tool

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WEDNESDAY

The Sophistication of Host-Pathogen Interactions Involving Necrotrophic Fungi 8:30 – 11:15 a.m.; 217D Section: Biology of Pathogens Organizers: Timothy Friesen, Northern Crop Science Laboratory, USDA-ARS, Fargo, ND, U.S.A.; Shaobin Zhong, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, U.S.A. Moderator: Timothy Friesen, Northern Crop Science Laboratory, USDA-ARS, Fargo, ND, U.S.A. Sponsoring Committee: Genetics

Science Laboratory, USDA-ARS, Fargo, ND, U.S.A.; (2) Fargo, ND, U.S.A.; (3) Amarillo, TX, U.S.A.; (4) Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.; (5) Winnipeg, MB, Canada; (6) Murdoch, Australia 10:45 a.m. 136-S. Dissection of effector-induced host susceptibility pathways in Stagonospora nodorum blotch of wheat. S. LU (1), T. L. Friesen (1), J. D. Faris (1). (1) Northern Crop Science Laboratory, USDA-ARS, Fargo, ND, U.S.A.


for studying virus ecology. U. MELCHER (1). (1) Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, U.S.A. 10:45 a.m. 141-S. Bioinformatic analysis of microarray and next-generation sequencing data. K. F. FISCHER (1). (1) University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT, U.S.A.

ORAL TECHNICAL SESSIONS – Wednesday Morning

10:30 a.m.

10:45 a.m.

Listed in alphabetical order by title. ‘Candidatus Liberibacter’/Epidemiology & Ecology 8:30 – 11:30 a.m.; 217BC Section: Epidemiology/Ecology/Environmental Biology Moderators: Daniel Anco, Ohio State University, OARDC, Wooster, OH, U.S.A.; Magdalen Lindeberg, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A.

11:15 a.m.

8:30 a.m.

WEDNESDAY

124-O. Impact of zebra complex disease on the development of potato plants from seedborne infection of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’. A. WEN (1), X. Wang (1), J. S. Pasche (1), N. C. Gudmestad (1). (1) North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, U.S.A. 8:45 a.m. 125-O. Detection of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ associated with huanglongbing disease in the salivary glands and alimentary canal of Diaphorina citri. E. AMMAR (1), R. G. Shatters (1), D. G. Hall (1). (1) ARS-USDA, Fort Pierce, FL, U.S.A. 9:00 a.m. 126-O. Comparative analyses of the ‘Candidatus Liberibacter’ species reductive genome features. H. DODDAPANENI (1), H. Lin (2), Y. Duan (3), V. Lou (4), C. Chen (4), C. Vahling (3), Z. Lijuan (5), E. L. Civerolo (2). (1) Carver Center for Genomics, Dept. of Biology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, U.S.A.; (2) USDA, ARS, SJVARC, Parlier, CA, U.S.A.; (3) USDA, ARS, USHRL, Fort Pierce, FL, U.S.A.; (4) Guangxi Citrus Res. Institute, Guilin, Guangxi, China, Parlier, CA, U.S.A.; (5) University of Florida, Indian River Res. and Education Center, Fort Pierce, FL, U.S.A. 9:15 a.m. 127-O. Bioinformatic analysis of genome sequence data for ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’. M. LINDEBERG (1), S. Saha (1). (1) Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A. 9:30 a.m. 128-O. Epidemiology of potato zebra chip in the Texas Panhandle. D. C. HENNE (1), F. Workneh (1), C. Rush (1). (1) Texas AgriLife Res., Bushland, TX, U.S.A. 9:45 a.m. 129-O. Evaluation of the edge factor in epidemiology of zebra chip disease in potato fields. F. WORKNEH (1), D. C. Henne (1), A. C. Childers (1), C. M. Rush (1. (1) Texas AgriLife Res., Bushland, TX, U.S.A. 10:00 a.m. Break 10:15 a.m. 130-O. Sporulation of Phomopsis viticola on

11:00 a.m.

50

infected grape tissues. D. J. ANCO (1), L. V. Madden (1), M. A. Ellis (1). (1) Ohio State University, OARDC, Wooster, OH, U.S.A. 131-O. Controlling fire blight on popular apple cultivars with M9 rootstock. K. BASTAS (1). (1) Selcuk University Faculty of Agriculture, Konya, Turkey 132-O. Effects of temperature and wetness duration on sporangia germination and infection of cucurbit varieties by Pseudoperonospora cubensis. K. NEUFELD (1), P. Ojiambo (1). (1) North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A. 133-O. Host and life strategy adaptations mediate competition among isolates of Aspergillus flavus. H. L. MEHL (1), P. J. Cotty (1). (1) USDA-ARS, Tucson, AZ, U.S.A. 134-O. Effect of climate change on plantpathogen-beneficial microorganism interactions. Y. ELAD (1), O. Agra (2), H. Ben Kalifa (2), D. Rav David (2), M. Borenshtein (2). (1) ARO, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel; (2) Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel

Chemical Control 8:30 – 11:30 a.m.; 217A Sections: Plant Disease Management; Diseases of Plants Moderator: David C. Thompson, Rutgers University, Princeton, NJ, U.S.A. 8:30 a.m.

135-O. IR-4 Project fungicide registration update. D. C. THOMPSON (1), J. Corley (1), W. Barney (1), D. Carpenter (1). (1) Rutgers University, Princeton, NJ, U.S.A. 8:45 a.m. 136-O. Ametoctradin: A new oomycete-specific fungicide. K. KLAPPACH (1), K. Walker (2). (1) BASF, Limburgerhof, Germany; (2) BASF, Research Triangle Park, NC, U.S.A. 9:00 a.m. 137-O. A new fungicide for control of Phytophthora capsici on vegetable crops. P. JI (1), J. Yin (1), M. Purvis (1), A. S. Csinos (1), L. J. Newsom (2). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, University of Georgia, Tifton, GA, U.S.A.; (2) BASF Corporation, Tifton, GA, U.S.A. 9:15 a.m. 138-O. A new fungicide for control of oomycete diseases of vine and vegetable crops. K. A. WALKER (1), J. S. Barnes (1), L. J. Newsom (2). (1) BASF, Res. Triangle Park, NC, U.S.A.; (2) BASF, Tifton, GA, U.S.A. 9:30 a.m. 139-O. Luna fungicides for the control of diseases of horticultural crops. L. FOUGHT (1), G. H. Musson (2), H. Young (2). (1) Bayer CropScience, Fresno, CA, U.S.A.; (2) Bayer CropScience, Res. Triangle Park, NC, U.S.A. 9:45 a.m. 140-O. The impact of a strobilurin fungicide and other pesticides on soybean yield and yield components. R. HENRY (1), K. Wise (1). (1) Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A. 10:00 a.m. Break 10:15 a.m. 141-O. Oxidized forms of silver as safe, effective


10:30 a.m.

10:45 a.m.

11:00 a.m.

11:15 a.m.

Epidemiology & Ecology/Plant Diseases 8:30 – 11:30 a.m.; 208B Sections: Epidemiology/Ecology/Environmental Biology; Plant Disease Management Moderators: Adam Sparks, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.; Margaret L. Ellis, Ohio State University, OARDC, Wooster, OH, U.S.A. 8:30 a.m.

8:45 a.m.

9:00 a.m.

146-O. Multiscale spatial heterogeneity in disease incidence of Fusarium head blight of wheat. A. B. KRISS (1), P. A. Paul (1), L. V. Madden (1). (1) Ohio State University, Wooster, OH, U.S.A. 147-O. Probability distributions for disease severity and time-to-event data. N. MCROBERTS (1), L. V. Madden (2). (1) Scottish Agric. College, Edinburgh, United Kingdom; (2) OARDC, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH, U.S.A. 148-O. Phenotyping the components of resistance as a bottleneck to breed rice varieties with suitable resistance to sheath blight. L.

9:15 a.m.

9:30 a.m.

9:45 a.m.

10:00 a.m. 10:15 a.m.

10:30 a.m.

10:45 a.m.

11:00 a.m.

11:15 a.m.

WILLOCQUET (1), M. Noel (1), N. Magculia (1), J. Lore (2), A. Srinivasachary (1), S. Savary (1). (1) IRRI, Los Banos, Philippines; (2) PAU, Ludhiana, India APS 149-O. Effect of environment, FOUNDATION cultivar, and disease on soft red winter wheat (Triticum aestivum) production in Wisconsin. K. LACKERMANN (1), J. Gaska (1), M. Martinka (1), S. Conley (1), P. Esker (1). (1) University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A. 150-O. Mapping the future: Metamodels for scaling potato late blight risk analysis in climate change scenarios. A. SPARKS (1), G. Forbes (2), R. Hijmans (3), K. Garrett (1). (1) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.; (2) International Potato Center, Lima, PERU; (3) University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A. 151-O. Interaction between pattern, process, and scale in plant disease epidemics. P. SKELSEY (1), K. A. Garrett (1), K. A. With (1). (1) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. Break 152-O. Response of hard red spring wheat germplasm to the bacterial leaf streak pathogen (Xanthomonas campestris pv. translucens). Y. R. KANDEL (1), L. E. Osborne (1), K. D. Glover (1), C. Tande (1). (1) South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD, U.S.A. 153-O. Survey of Stagonospora nodorum toxins and wheat sensitivity genes in the southeastern U.S. A. D. ZEARFOSS (1), T. L. Friesen (2), P. S. Ojiambo (1), C. Cowger (3). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; (2) USDAARS, Dept. of Plant Pathology, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, U.S.A.; (3) USDAARS, Dept. of Plant Pathology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A. 154-O. Identifying resistance to Pythium irregulare and Fusarium graminearum in soybean. M. L. ELLIS (1), P. A. Paul (1), A. E. Dorrance (1). (1) Ohio State University, OARDC, Wooster, OH, U.S.A. 155-O. Response of U.S. bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria) plant introductions (PI) to crown rot caused by Phytophthora capsici. C. S. KOUSIK (1), J. A. Thies (2). (1) USDA ARS, Charleston, SC, U.S.A.; (2) U.S. Vegetable Laboratory, USDA ARS, Charleston, SC, U.S.A. APS 156-O. Interactions between FOUNDATION Fusarium virguliforme and Phialophora gregata in soybean using greenhouse studies. C. MATTUPALLI (1), P. D. Esker (1). (1) University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A.

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WEDNESDAY

seed treatments. M. W. HARDING (1), D. A. Sowa (2), R. J. Howard (3), M. E. Olson (2). (1) Innovotech Inc., Brooks, AB, Canada; (2) Innovotech Inc., Edmonton, AB, Canada; (3) Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development, Brooks, AB, Canada 142-O. A new product for Peronospora and Pseudoperonospora control in ornamentals. R. J. KEESE (1), K. E. Kalmowitz (2), C. Palmer (3). (1) BASF Corp., Research Triangle Park, NC, U.S.A.; (2) BASF Corp., Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; (3) IR-4 Project, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Princeton, NJ, U.S.A. 143-O. Efficacy of ametoctradin + dimethomorph for control of Phytophthora species infecting ornamental plants in the eastern United States. D. J. NORMAN (1), M. M. Benson (2), M. L. Daughtrey (3). (1) University of Florida, Apopka, FL, U.S.A.; (2) North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; (3) Cornell University, Long Island, NY, U.S.A. 144-O. A survey of fungicide resistance in the Venturia inaequalis populations of Indiana and Michigan. K. S. CHAPMAN (1), G. Sundin (2), J. Beckerman (1). (1) Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A.; (2) Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, U.S.A. 145-O. Competitiveness of Penicillium expansum isolates with reduced sensitivity to fludioxonil and pyrimethanil during infection of apple fruit. J. Adaskaveg (1), H. FORSTER (2). (1) University of California, Riverside, CA, U.S.A.; (2) University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A.


Do You Have Your iPad Ticket? Exclusive! iPad Raffle Now Being Offered by the APS Foundation

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you could be one of the cutting-edge gadget gurus flying home from Charlotte with a magical and revolutionary iPad in your hands! Access to the latest plant pathology content at the touch of a finger could be yours. And best of all, the raffle proceeds support the causes you care about most through the efforts of the APS Foundation. The odds are in your favor, only a maximum of 1,000 tickets will be sold during the APS Annual Meeting. Don’t delay, stop by the APS Foundation to buy your tickets today, or buy direct from any APS Foundation board member during the meeting. Special Offer!

Ticket Pricing 1 ticket for $10 or increase your odds with 3 tickets for $25

Make a $250 or mor to the APS Foun e donation dation during the meeting, an d automatically receive one com plimentary iPad raffle ticke t!

Ticket sales begin Saturday, August 7, 2010 with the drawing taking place on Wednesday, August 11 at 10:00 a.m. EST. The winning ticket will be selected at the APS Foundation booth. The lucky winner will be able to bring the iPad home with them that day. In the event the winner is not present, they will be contacted about shipping arrangements.

Rules • The contest is open to all registered APS Annual Meeting attendees ages 18 or over. • Contestants are not limited by the number of entries and may purchase as many tickets as they wish. • Tickets for the raffle are not tax deductible. • Proceeds will be donated to the APS Foundation Annual Giving Fund. • APS Foundation board members and APS staff are not eligible.

iPad Prize Features • Apple® iPad™ with Wi-Fi 16GB • Specs: 9.7” widescreen display; 802.11a/b/g/n Wi-Fi; Bluetooth; iBooks support; measures just 0.5” thin and weighs only 1.5 lbs; does not include a 3G plan. • Estimated value of prize is $540.

Say hello to the hairs on the back of your neck…buy a ticket for a chance to win a magical new Apple iPad at the meeting!

52


Sustaining Associate Members Advancing APS and Plant Pathology Sustaining Associate members play an important role in breakthroughs, both for the science of plant pathology and the society. Thank you to our current Sustaining Associate members for their support and involvement. AC Diagnostics Inc Agdia Inc BAAR Scientific LLC Ball Horticultural Co BASF Corp Bayer CropScience BIOREBA AG Cereal Research Non Profit Co Inst Cheminova Inc Dow AgroSciences LLC DuPont Ag & Nutrition EnviroLogix Eurofins/STA Laboratories Inc Gylling Data Management Inc ISK Biosciences Corp

Janssen PMP Landis International Inc Monsanto Co Natl Alliance of Ind Crop Consultants Percival Scientific Inc Pest Pros Inc Pioneer Hi-Bred Intl Inc Plant Pathology Research Group Sakata Seed America Inc Spectrum Technologies Inc Syngenta Crop Protection Syngenta Seeds United Phosphorus Inc Valent USA Corp

Make a Breakthrough for Your Company Today! For more information on how to become a Sustaining Associate member, visit www.apsnet.org/join, call 1.800.471.2698, or e-mail apsinfo@scisoc.org.

RECOGNITION

Visit the online Sustaining Associate Member Directory for company descriptions and contact information.


2010 APS Foundation Awardees Congratulations to the following recipients of 2010 APS Foundation Awards.

Lucy Hastings de Gutiérrez Award for Excellence in Teaching Scott Evan Gold, University of Georgia   Noel T. Keen Award for Research in Molecular Plant Pathology Gregory B. Martin, Cornell University 10th I. E. Melhus Graduate Student Symposium Bhabesh Dutta, University of Georgia Robert Louis (Lou) Hirsch, University of Arkansas Kameka Johnson, University of Georgia Jose Pablo Soto-Arias, Iowa State University

RECOGNITION

Schroth Faces of the Future Early Career Professionals Symposium Olufemi J. Alabi, Washington State University Lucy Stewart, USDA-ARS Ioannis Tzanetakis, University of Arkansas Anna Whitfield, Kansas State University Raymond J. Tarleton Student Fellowship Jonathan Jacobs, University of Wisconsin-Madison Student Travel Awards The José and Silvia Amador Award Andre Souza, North Carolina State University and Universidade Federal de Vicosa (Brazil) The Elsie J. and Robert Aycock Award Xiulan Xu, The Ohio State University The Kenneth F. Baker Award and The John F. Fulkerson Award H. Y. Kitty Cheung, Trent University, Canada APS Foundation Awardees are marked with

The Kenneth and Betty Barker Award and The Stuart D. Lyda Award Marcos da Silva, Iowa State University The Myron Brakke Award and The Gustaaf A. and Ineke de Zoeten Award Lingyun Hao, University of WisconsinMadison The J. Artie and Arra Browning Awards Samuel Glucksman, University of Florida Peter Horevaj, University of Arkansas Karen Lackermann, University of Wisconsin-Madison The C. Lee Campbell Award and The Forest Pathology Award Claudia Probst, University of Arizona The Caribbean Division Award Diego Quito, Oregon State University The H. J. Dubin Student Travel Award in honor of the Peace Corps Pamela Rojas, Universidad de Talca (Chile) The Eddie Echandi Award and The H. David Thurston Award Tiffany Enzenbacher, Michigan State University The Zahir Eyal Award and The Eugene S. Saari Award Lorena Gomez, Kansas State University The Robert W. Fulton Award TeeCie Brown, Oklahoma State University The Richard L. Gabrielson Award and The Raymond G. Grogan Award Andrea Payne, Oklahoma State University The Dennis H. Hall Award and The Donald E. Munnecke Award Michele Burnham, University of Georgia

APS FOUNDATION

The Janell Stevens Johnk Award Kehinde Obasa, Kansas State University The Stephen A. Johnston Award Lisa Beirn, Rutgers University The Arthur Kelman Award Richard McNally, Michigan State University The Tsune Kosuge Award and The Harry E. Wheeler Award Ye Xia, University of Kentucky The Don E. Mathre Award Chakradhar Mattupalli, University of Wisconsin-Madison The William J. Moller Award and The Roger C. Pearson Award Lucky Mehra, University of Georgia The Larry Wallace Moore Award and The John F. Schafer Award Nicole Ward, Louisiana State University The John S. Niederhauser Award Erica Lassiter, North Carolina State University The Joseph M. Ogawa Award and The Albert Paulus Award Guirong Zhang, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign The Malcolm and Catherine Quigley Award Andrew Gougherty, Iowa State University The Luis Sequeira Award Marco Mammella, Universita Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria (Italy) The Virology Award Bindu Poudel, University of Arkansas

in the program book to easily reference their presentations during the meeting.


POSTER SCHEDULE AND POSTER TITLES BY CATEGORY

Taking photographs of materials projected during presentations or displays is strictly prohibited without permissions from the authors. See the following pages for poster titles. Reference the supplement of the June issue of Phytopathlogy for abstracts or visit http://meeting. apsnet.org.

Poster Viewing Hours

Poster Categories

Exhibit Hall A Sunday, August 8 12:00 – 3:00 p.m. Poster Set-Up 4:30 – 10:00 p.m. Poster Viewing

Biology of Pathogens Bacteria Fastidious Bacteria Fungi Nematodes Phytoplasma Postharvest Pathology and Mycotoxicology Viruses

Monday, August 9 3:30 – 10:00 p.m. 4:00 – 5:30 p.m. 5:30 – 7:00 p.m. Tuesday, August 10 3:30 – 5:30 p.m. 3:30 – 5:30 p.m.

Poster Viewing Posters and Authors— odd-numbered poster authors present Posters and Authors— even-numbered poster authors present Flash-and-Dash Sessions with Author Time Poster Viewing

Wednesday, August 11 7:00 – 9:00 a.m. Poster Take-Down

APS FOUNDATION

indicates an APS Foundation Awardee.

F&D indicates a Flash-and-Dash presentation.

Poster Numbers 157–167 168–179 180–215 216–218 219–221 222–233 234–245

Diseases of Plants Cereals, Field, and Fiber Crops Crop Loss Management Disease Detection and Diagnosis Forest Pathology Fruits and Nuts Ornamentals Seed Pathology Tropical Plant Pathology Turfgrasses Vegetables

246–280 281–284 285–339 340–347 348–367 368–377 378–379 380–387 388–395 396–419

Epidemiology/Ecology/Environmental Biology Assessment Biology Environment Etiology and Ecology Incidence & Diversity Phyllosphere/Rhizosphere Microbiology Resistance

420–429 430–438 439–455 456–468 469–497 498–514 515–520

Molecular/Cellular/Plant-Microbe Interactions Bacteria Biotechnology Fungi Nematodes Virus

521–566 567–569 570–651 652–657 658–685

Plant Disease Management Biological Control Chemical Control Host Resistance Integrated Pest Management Regulatory

686–729 730–799 800–823 824–860 861–865

Professionalism/Outreach

866–872

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2010 APS POSTERS n Biology of Pathogens Bacteria

157-P. Long-term survival of Xanthomonas fragariae in infected strawberry leaf tissue. M. KONG (1). (1) Driscoll Strawberry Assoc. Inc., Watsonville, CA, U.S.A. 158-P. Sequence data of Xanthomonas strains isolated from U.S. rice fields reveals substantial divergence from Xanthomonas oryzae pvs. oryzae and oryzicola. L. R. TRIPLETT (1), J. P. Hamilton (2), N. A. Tisserat (1), C. R. Buell (2), J. E. Leach (1). (1) Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, U.S.A.; (2) Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, U.S.A. 159-P. Pantoea agglomerans, a maize seed-transmitted bacterium in Mexico. H. V. SILVA-ROJAS (1), G. Mahuku (2), P. D. Esker (3). (1) Colegio de Postgraduados, Montecillo, Mexico; (2) Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maiz y Trigo, Texcoco, Mexico; (3) University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A. 160-P. A broad-host-range tailocin from Burkholderia. I. DUARTE (1), G. Wang (1), J. J. Gill (1), R. F. Young (1), J. J. LiPuma (2), C. F. Gonzalez (1). (1) Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, U.S.A.; (2) University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Harbor, MI, U.S.A. APS 161-P. FOUNDATION F&D Visualization of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis infection of tomato seedlings using a bioluminescent strain. X. XU (1), G. Rajashekara (1), S. A. Miller (1). (1) Ohio State University, OARDC, Wooster, OH, U.S.A. 162-P. Cmm-tomato interactions: Visualization during infection, biofilm formation, and epiphytic fitness. L. CHALUPOWICZ (1), O. Dror (2), M. CohenKandli (2), R. Eichenlaub (3), E. Zellermann (3), K. Gartemann (3), G. Sessa (4), I. Barash (4), S. Manulis-Sasson (2). (1) Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, Israel; (2) ARO, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel; (3) University of Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany; (4) Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel 163-P. Regulation of Dickeya dadantii type III secretion system by polynucleotide phosphorylase. Q. ZENG (1), A. Ibekwe (2), C. Yang (1). (1) University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, U.S.A.; (2) USDAARS, U.S. Salinity Laboratory, Riverside, CA, U.S.A. 164-P. Isolation and characterization of Pectobacterium carotovorum mutants host-signal responsive genes. P. A. AGYEMANG (1). (1) Tennessee State University, Nashville, TN, U.S.A. 165-P. Biological traits of Pectobacterium clades. M. Marquez-Villavicencio (1), A. CHARKOWSKI (1). (1) University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A. 166-P. Identification of novel regulatory genes of Burkholderia glumae for virulence factors. J. HAM (1), I. Barphagha (1), H. Karki (1), B. Shrestha (1),

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R. Melanson (1), R. Chen (1). (1) Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A. 167-P. F&D The Á factor rpoN is required by Brenneria rubrifaciens for HR elicitation in tobacco and virulence on walnut plants . A. MCCLEAN (1). (1) CPGRU USDA-ARS, Davis, CA, U.S.A.

Fastidious Bacteria

168-P. Phylogenetic analysis and population identification of the phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa using zot and gyrB genes. H. L. SCHREIBER (1), J. M. Repshare (1), C. E. Skipper (1), L. D. Morano (2), B. R. Bextine (1). (1) University of Texas, Tyler, TX, U.S.A.; (2) University of Houston-Downtown, Houston, TX, U.S.A. 169-P. Functional identification of Xylella fastidiosa plasmid replication and stability factors. M. LEE (1), E. E. Rogers (1), D. C. Stenger (1). (1) USDA ARS, Parlier, CA, U.S.A. 170-P. Regulatory role of c-di-GMP biosynthesis genes of Xylella fastidiosa’s virulence factors. V. ANCONA (1), D. N. Appel (1), P. de Figueiredo (1). (1) Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, U.S.A. 171-P. Selection of single-chain variable fragments (scFv) against Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca by phage display. Q. YUAN (1), R. Jordan (1), R. H. Brlansky (2), O. Minenkova (3), J. Hartung (1). (1) USDA ARS MPPL, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.; (2) University of Florida, Lake Alfred, FL, U.S.A.; (3) Sigma-tau Pharmaceuticals, Rome, Italy 172-P. Evaluation of tandem repeat polymorphisms between two pathogenically similar strains of Xylella fastidiosa from almond and grape in California. J. CHEN (1). (1) USDA ARS PWA, Parlier, CA, U.S.A. 173-P. Extracellular Xylella fastidiosa genomic DNA enhances biofilm formation in vitro. H. LIN (1), D. M. Cheng (1), E. L. Civerolo (1). (1) USDA-ARS PWA, Parlier, CA, U.S.A. 174-P. F&D Organization and structure of two stable ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’ prophage lysogens that become lytic in plant infections. S. ZHANG (1). (1) University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A. 175-P. WITHDRAWN Phytopathology 100:5116 176-P. F&D Incidence of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter americanus’ and ‘Ca. L. asiaticus’ in orange jasmine and citrus trees in urban areas in Sao Paulo State, Brazil. S. LOPES (1), G. F. Frare (1), R. B. Bassanezi (2), L. E. Camargo (2), N. A. Wulff (3), D. C. Teixeira (3), A. C. Beattie (4), A. J. Ayres (3). (1) FUNDECITRUS, Araraquara, Brazil; (2) University of Sao Paulo Esqalq, Piracicaba, Brazil; (3) Araraquara, Brazil; (4) Sydney, Australia 177-P. Development of conventional monoclonal antibody and recombinant antibody (scFv) against ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’. Q. YUAN (1), R. Jordan (1), R. C. Bohannon (2), R. H. Brlansky (3), O. Minenkova (4), J. S. Hartung (1). (1) USDA ARS MPPL, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.; (2) Agdia, Elkhardt, IN, U.S.A.; (3) University of


F&D indicates a Flash-and-Dash presentations. Florida, Lake Alfred, FL, U.S.A.; (4) Sigma-tau Pharmaceuticals, Rome, Italy 178-P. Variation of prophage frequency in ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ strains from two geographical distinct citrus-growing provinces in China. R. Liu (1), P. Zhang (1), J. Chen (2), X. DENG (1). (1) South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, PRC Peoples Rep of China; (2) USDA ARS PWA, Parlier, CA, U.S.A. 179-P. SSR-based genetic analysis of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ isolates from multiple continents. J. M. GLYNN (1), H. Lin (1), C. Chen (2), Y. Duan (3), L. Zhou (4). (1) USDA, Parlier, CA, U.S.A.; (2) Guangxi Citrus Res. Institute, Guangxi, PRC Peoples Rep of China; (3) USDA, Ft. Pierce, FL, U.S.A.; (4) University of Florida, Ft. Pierce, FL, U.S.A.

Fungi

180-P. Activity of hydrolytic enzymes and antioxidants in mycorrhized pistachio root infected by Phytophthora drechsleri. A. Mohammadi (1), Z. BANIHASHEMI (2). (1) Iran Pistachio Res. Center, Rafsenjan, Iran; (2) Shiraz University, Shiraz, Iran 181-P. F&D Exploring the diversity of Phytophthora and related genera in aquatic environments in Maryland, U.S.A. D. SKALTSAS (1). (1) University of Maryland, College Park, MD, U.S.A. 182-P. Characterization of Phytophthora infestans from northern Thailand based on their mating type, metalaxyl sensitivity, and mtDNA haplotypes. J. SOPEE (1), S. Sangchote (1), P. Chiampiriyakul (2). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, Kasetsart University, Bangkok, Thailand; (2) Dept. of Plant Protection, Maejo University, ChiangMai, Thailand 183-P. Prevalence of benzimidazole resistance in Botrytis cinerea isolates from rose greenhouses in center of Iran. P. KHAZAELI (1), H. Zamanizadeh (1), B. Morid (2), S. Hajmansoor (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, Science and Res. Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran; (2) Dept. of Plant Protection, Takestan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Takestan, Iran 184-P. Two new homothallic species of Phytophthora from irrigation reservoirs and natural waterways in Virginia. C. HONG (1), P. Richardson (1), S. Ghimire (1), W. Hao (1), P. Kong (1), G. Moorman (2), J. Lea-Cox (3), D. Ross (3). (1) VPI & State University, Virginia Beach, VA, U.S.A.; (2) Penn State University, University Park, PA, U.S.A.; (3) University of Maryland, College Park, MD, U.S.A. 185-P. Phylogenetic history and genetic diversity of Phytophthora cryptogea and P. drechsleri isolates from floriculture crops in North Carolina greenhouses. H. A. OLSON (1), I. Carbone (1), M. Benson (1). (1) North Carolina State

University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A. 186-P. F&D Description of two putative new species of Pythium isolated from soybean and corn in Ohio. M. L. ELLIS (1), K. D. Broders (2), P. A. Paul (1), A. E. Dorrance (1). (1) Ohio State University, OARDC, Wooster, OH, U.S.A.; (2) University of Guelph, ON, Canada 187-P. Characterization of Pythium and Fusarium species associated with soybean seeds and seedlings. J. Rupe (1), C. Rothrock (1), M. AVANZATO (1). (1) University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A. 188-P. A unique microbe-microbe and host-specific rhizosphere interaction that is detrimental to plant health. M. STANGHELLINI (1), I. Misaghi (1). (1) University of California, Riverside, CA, U.S.A. 189-P. Reclassification of the butternut canker fungus, Sirococcus clavigigenti-juglandacearum, into the genus Ophiognomonia. K. D. BRODERS (1), G. J. Boland (1). (1) University of Guelph, ON, Canada 190-P. Study on the influence on germination of resting spores of Plasmodiophora brassicae on pakchoi. Y. LIU (1), X. Huang (1), H. Liu (1). (1) Sichuan Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Institute of Plant Protection, Chengdu, PRC Peoples Rep of China 191-P. Races of Puccinia striiformis identified in the United States in 2009. A. WAN (1), X. Chen (2). (1) Washington State University, Pullman, WA, U.S.A.; (2) USDA ARS, Pullman, WA, U.S.A. 192-P. Pustule density and latent period of Puccinia hordei on Iraqi barley genotypes. M. AL-HAMDANY (1), M. M. Salih (1). (1) Ministry of Science and Technology, Baghdad, Iraq 193-P. Effect of light on germination, germ tube growth, and infection of daylily by Puccinia hemerocallidis and of geranium by Puccinia pelargonii-zonalis. W. DONG (1). J. W. Buck (1).(1) University of Georgia, Griffin, GA, U.S.A. 194-P. Diversity of sooty blotch and flyspeck fungi from apples in northeastern Turkey. J. M. BLASER (1), A. Karakaya (2), D. A. Mayfield (1), J. C. Batzer (1), M. L. Gleason (1) J. W. Buck. (1) Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A.; (2) University of Ankara, Ankara, Turkey 195-P. Genetic variation of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum on four crops from the north central United States. L. ALDRICH-WOLFE (1), S. E. Travers (2), B. D. Nelson (3). (1) Plant Pathology, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, U.S.A.; (2) Biological Sciences, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, U.S.A.; (3) North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, U.S.A. 196-P. Structure of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum within and among lettuce fields in California. P. CHITRAMPALAM (1), Z. K. Atallah (1), B. Wu (2), K. V. Subbarao (1). (1) University of

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2010 APS POSTERS Fungi continued

California-Davis, Salinas, CA, U.S.A.; (2) Oregon State University, Madras, OR, U.S.A. 197-P. Mitochondrial haplotype analysis as a tool for differentiating populations of Verticillium dahliae. F. N. MARTIN (1). (1) USDA ARS, Salinas, CA, U.S.A. 198-P. F&D Effect of solar radiation on disease severity of soybean rust. H. M. YOUNG (1), D. F. Narvaez (2), J. J. Marois (3), D. L. Wright (3). (1) University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A.; (2) Monsanto, St. Louis, MO, U.S.A.; (3) University of Florida, Quincy, FL, U.S.A. 199-P. WITHDRAWN Phytopathology 100:S34 200-P. F&D Characterization of the cytochrome b gene from three stone fruit infecting Monilinia species. J. HILY (1), S. Singer (1), K. Cox (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, Cornell University, Geneva, NY, U.S.A. 201-P. Multilocus phylogeny of Ophiosphaerella species causing spring dead spot of bermudagrass. N. WALKER (1), S. Marek (1). (1) Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, U.S.A. 202-P. Application of Fungal Secretome Database to identify effector proteins in the plant-pathogenic fungi. J. CHOI (1), J. Park (1), D. Kim (1), K. Jung (1), S. Kang (2), Y. Lee (1). (1) Dept. of Agricultural Biotechnology, CeFP, CFGR, and CAB, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea; (2) Dept. of Plant Pathology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, U.S.A. 203-P. Morphological and molecular characterization of Olpidium virulentus, the fungal vector of the Macana virus disease in Colombia. C. GONZALEZ (1), D. L. Osorio (1), M. C. Cepero de GarcĂ­a (1), L. Sastoque (1), C. BeltrĂĄn (1), A. M. Cotes (1). (1) CORPOICA, Mosquera, Cundinamarca, Colombia 204-P. Histopathology of Colletotrichum acutatum on citrus leaves. S. G. MORAES (1), N. A. Peres (2), N. S. Massola (3). (1) University of Sao Paulo, Piracicaba, Brazil; (2) University of Florida, Wimauma, FL, U.S.A.; (3) University of Sao Paulo/ESALQ, Piracicaba, Brazil 205-P. Colletotrichum capsici and Colletotrichum coccodes: Predominant causal agents of anthracnose of chile pepper in New Mexico. S. SANOGO (1). (1) New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM, U.S.A. 206-P. Analysis of Mycosphaerella graminicola populations from California, Indiana, Kansas, and North Dakota with mating type and SSR markers. S. GURUNG (1), S. B. Goodwin (2), M. Kabbage (3), W. W. Bockus (4), T. B. Adhikari (1). (1) North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS, Crop Production and Pest Control Res. Unit, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A.; (3) Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, U.S.A.; (4) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.

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207-P. Addressing the relationship between Pseudoperonospora cubensis and P. humuli using multigenic and host specificity assays. M. N. MITCHELL (1), D. H. Gent (2). (1) Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A.; (2) USDA ARS NFSPRC/OSU BPP, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A. 208-P. F&D Insights into sexual reproduction in Aspergillus flavus from variation in experimental crosses and natural populations. R. A. OLARTE (1), B. W. Horn (2), J. T. Monacell (3), E. A. Stone (4), I. Carbone (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; (2) National Peanut Res. Laboratory, Agricultural Res. Service, USDA, Dawson, GA, U.S.A.; (3) Bioinformatics Res. Center, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; (4) Dept. of Genetics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A. 209-P. F&D Identifying heterokaryon incompatibility loci in Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus using array-comparative genome hybridization (aCGH). J. T. MONACELL (1), B. W. Horn (2), R. Singh (3), E. A. Stone (4), I. Carbone (3). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology and Bioinformatics Res. Center, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; (2) National Peanut Res. Laboratory, USDA, ARS, Dawson, GA, U.S.A.; (3) Dept. of Plant Pathology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; (4) Dept. of Genetics and Bioinformatics Res. Center, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A. 210-P. F&D Exploring lineage-specific chromosomes in F. oxysporum species complex. L. MA (1), S. Zhou (2), L. R. Gale (3), A. Breakspear (3), A. Chakrabarti (4), D. Gardiner (5), W. Jonkers (3), K. Kazan (5), J. Manners (5), P. Dodds (6), D. Schwartz (2), J. White (1), M. Koehrsen (1), Q. Zeng (1), J. Galagan (1), C. Cuomo (1), J. Ellis (6), C. Kistler (3). (1) Broad Institute, Cambridge, MA, U.S.A.; (2) University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A.; (3) University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, U.S.A.; (4) Canberra, Australia; (5) Brisbane, Australia; (6) Black Mountain, Australia 211-P. Isolation and characterization of P. chlamydospora from grapevines in Mexico. L. G. Morales-Pedraza (1), R. HERNANDEZ-MARTINEZ (1), C. Valenzuela-Solano (2). (1) Microbiology Dept., CICESE, Carretera Ensenada-Tijuana No. 3918 Zona Playitas, Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico; (2) INIFAP, Campo Experimental Costa de Ensenada, Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico 212-P. Evolutionary relationships among Aspergillus flavus vegetative compatibility groups. L. C. GRUBISHA (1), P. J. Cotty (1). (1) USDA-ARS, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, U.S.A. 213-P. Effect of an at tassel fungicide application on Aspergillus and Fusarium spp. infestations in harvested field corn in Mississippi. A. Henn (1), T.


F&D indicates a Flash-and-Dash presentations. W. ALLEN (2), D. M. Ingram (3). (1) Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS, U.S.A.; (2) Mississippi State University, Stoneville, MS, U.S.A.; (3) Mississippi State University, Raymon, MS, U.S.A. 214-P. Genetic stability of Magnaporthe oryzae isolates on the host and artificial media. S. PARK (1), M. Chi (1), H. Kim (1), S. Kang (2), Y. Lee (1). (1) Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea; (2) Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA, U.S.A. 215-P. Infection of rice by Ustilaginoidea virens. D. TE BEEST (1). (1) University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A.

Nematodes

216-P. Exploring attraction of C. elegans to the brown garden snail, Helix aspersa. J. A. Cotton (1), K. R. SANCHEZ (1), E. P. Caswell-Chen (1). (1) University of California-Davis, CA, U.S.A. 217-P. Soybean cyst nematode infects roots of sugar beet. K. RUDOLPH (1), M. D. Bolton (2), B. D. Nelson (3). (1) Plant Pathology, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS Sugar Beet Unit, Fargo, ND, U.S.A.; (3) North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, U.S.A. 218-P. Annular rings for enhancing photographs of perineal patterns of root-knot nematodes. J. D. EISENBACK (1). (1) Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, U.S.A.

Phytoplasma

219-P. Influence of time, host plant, and location on diversity of aster yellows phytoplasma strains. S. Y. ELATEEK (1), M. L. Ivey (1), A. P. Michel (1), P. A. Paul (1), S. A. Miller (1). (1) Ohio State University, Wooster, OH, U.S.A. 220-P. Finer differentiation of phytoplasma strains based on phylogenetic analysis of the secY gene. I. LEE (1), K. D. Bottner-Parker (1), Y. Zhao (1), R. E. Davis (1), N. A. Harrison (2). (1) USDA ARS MPPL, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.; (2) FLREC, University of Florida, Ft. Lauderdale, FL, U.S.A. 221-P. Acholeplasmavirus P1 from Acholeplasma palmae, an ancestral relative of plant-pathogenic phytoplasmas. R. E. DAVIS (1), R. Jomantiene (2), Y. Zhao (1), I. Lee (1), E. L. Dally (1), J. Shao (1). (1) USDAARS, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.; (2) Nature Res. Center, Vilnius, Lithuania

Postharvest Pathology and Mycotoxicology

222-P. Pathogenicity and fusaric acid production by Fusarium proliferatum isolated from garlic in Spain. D. PALMERO LLAMAS (1), M. de Cara (2), W. Nosir (3), C. Iglesias (1), M. García (1), S. Woodward (3), J. Tello (2). (1) Technical University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain; (2) Universidad de Almería, Almeria, Spain; (3) University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, Scotland

223-P. Impact of gaseous ozone on postharvest fungal decays of tomato fruits. M. ELKAHKY (1), J. Bartz (2), M. El-Sheshtawi (1), S. Elafifi (1), M. Elmazaty (1). (1) Faculty of Agriculture, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt; (2) IFAS, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A. 224-P. Impact of hail damage during early reproductive stages on ear rot and mycotoxin contamination of maize. A. E. ROBERTSON (1), G. P. Munkvold (1), C. R. Hurburgh (1), S. M. Ensley (1). (1) Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A. 225-P. Response by Aspergillus flavus to a sublethal atmosphere of ozone. C. P. WOLOSHUK (1), L. Zhang (1), B. N. Reese (1), G. A. Payne (2). (1) Purdue University, Dept. of Botany and Plant Pathology, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A.; (2) North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A. 226-P. Evaluation of varying sugar concentrations for growth of and aflatoxin production by Aspergillus flavus. S. UPPALA (1), K. L. Bowen (1). (1) Dept. of Entomology and Plant Pathology, Auburn University, AL, U.S.A. 227-P. Production of mycotoxins by members of the Aspergillus section Nigri isolated from peanuts and maize in the United States. C. Bacon (1), E. PALENCIA (2). (1) USDA ARS, Athens, GA, U.S.A.; (2) Dept. of Plant Pathology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A. 228-P. Sphingoid bases and their 1-phosphates, but not fumonisins, are translocated from roots to aerial tissues of maize seedlings watered with fumonisins. N. C. ZITOMER (1), S. Jones (2), C. Bacon (1), A. E. Glenn (1), T. Baldwin (1), R. T. Riley (1). (1) USDA–ARS, Toxicology and Mycotoxin Res. Unit, Athens, GA, U.S.A.; (2) South Carolina State University, Dept. of Biological Sciences, Orangeburg, SC, U.S.A. 229-P. Relationship of substrate and surfactin production by Bacillus mojavensis strains and their antagonistical response to Fusarium verticillioides. C. W. BACON (1), D. M. Hinton (2), T. Mitchell (2), M. Snook (2). (1) USDA ARS, Athens, GA, U.S.A.; (2) USDA, ARS, Russell Res. Center, Athens, GA, U.S.A. 230-P. Dose-response relationship in UV-C-induced disease resistance and phytoalexin accumulation in stored carrots. N. KOUASSI (1), R. Corcuff (1), R. Tweddell (2), J. Arul (1). (1) Dept. of Food Science and Nutrition and Horticultural Res. Center, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC, Canada; (2) Horticultural Res. Center, Université Laval, Quebec, QC, Canada 231-P. Purification and biochemical characterization of a polygalacturonase produced during Penicillium solitum decay of ‘Anjou’ pear fruit. W. JURICK (1), I. Vico (1), B. Whitaker (1), V. Gaskins (1), W. J. Janisiewicz (2), W. Conway (1). (1) USDA ARSFood Quality Laboratory, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS, AFRS, Kearneysville, WV, U.S.A.

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2010 APS POSTERS

Postharvest Pathology and Mycotoxicology continued 232-P. Characterization of the MADS-box family of transcription factors in Fusarium verticillioides. C. ORTIZ (1), W. Shim (1). (1) Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, U.S.A. 233-P. Isolation of Aspergillus section Nigri strains and incidence of ochratoxin A in California raisins. J. D. PALUMBO (1), T. L. O’Keeffe (1), N. E. Mahoney (1), S. Vasquez (2). (1) USDA ARS WRRC, Albany, CA, U.S.A.; (2) University of California Coop Extension, Fresno, CA, U.S.A.

Viruses

234-P. F&D The effect of new aphid vectors on the evolution of Soybean dwarf virus. B. TIAN (1), W. L. Schneider (2), F. E. Gildow (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS, Fort Detrick, MD, U.S.A. 235-P. Infectious RNA transcripts derived from cloned cDNA of Calibrachoa mottle virus (CbMV). A. GULATI-SAKHUJA (1), H. Liu (1). (1) USDAARS, Salinas, CA, U.S.A. 236-P. Tracing the emergence of resistance-breaking variants of Beet necrotic yellow vein virus in nature. R. ACOSTA-LEAL (1), B. K. Brian (2), C. M. Rush (2). (1) AgriLife Res., Texas A&M, Amarillo, TX, U.S.A.; (2) Texas AgriLife Res., Amarillo, TX, U.S.A. 237-P. Preliminary characterization of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus in Hawaii. M. J. Melzer (1), D. Y. Ogata (1), S. K. Fukuda (1), R. Shimabuku (2), W. B. Borth (1), D. M. Sether (1), J. S. HU (3). (1) University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI, U.S.A.; (2) University of Hawaii at Manoa, Maui, HI, U.S.A.; (3) University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, U.S.A. 238-P. Alterations of capsid protein amino acid positions internal to virions of Cucumber mosaic virus disrupt nonpersistent virus transmission by aphids. K. PERRY (1), C. Bricault (1). (1) Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A. 239-P. Complete 3(prime) end genome analysis of the asymptomatic Citrus tristeza virus isolate B192 and its eight symptomatic single aphid-transmitted subisolates. A. ROY (1), N. Choudhary (1), V. D. Damsteegt (2), J. S. Hartung (3), R. H. Brlansky (1). (1) University of Florida, Lake Alfred, FL, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS, Foreign Disease-Weed Science, Fort Detrick, MD, U.S.A.; (3) USDAARS, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A. APS Epidemiology of two Diodia virginiana 240-P. FOUNDATION criniviruses. I. E. TZANETAKIS (1), A. Cortez (2), J. Zhou (1), B. Poudel (1), L. Hladky (2), R. Larsen (3), W. M. Wintermantel (2). (1) University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS, Salinas, CA, U.S.A.; (3) Vegetable and Forage Crops Res. Laboratory, USDA-ARS, Prosser, AR, U.S.A.

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241-P. Characterization of promoter elements from plant pararetroviruses associated with dahlia (Dahlia variabilis). C. V. ALMEYDA (1), K. L. Druffel (1), H. R. Pappu (1). (1) Washington State University, Pullman, WA, U.S.A. 242-P. Investigations on population and hosts of Bean pod mottle virus in Mississippi. R. C. STEPHENSON (1), S. Sabanadzovic (1). (1) Dept. of Entomology and Plant Pathology, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, U.S.A. 243-P. Distribution and prevalence of strains of Potato virus Y (PVY) in north western Iran as determined by RT-PCR. L. MOUSAVI (1), J. Mozafari (1), F. Rakhshandehroo (2), S. Ghadamyari (3), N. Sokhandan (3). (1) Dept. of Genetics and National Plant Gene-Bank, Seed and Plant Improvement Institute, Karaj, Iran; (2) Dept. of Plant Pathology, Islamic Azad University, Science and Res. Branch, Tehran, Iran; (3) Dept. of Plant Pathology, Tabriz University, Tabriz, Iran 244-P. A chemo-thermotherapy technique for eliminating viruses from rose plants. A. MODARRESI CHAHARDEHI (1), J. Mozafari (2), F. Rakhshandehroo (3), D. Ibrahim (1). (1) School of Biological Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM), Penang, Malaysia; (2) Dept. of Genetics and National Plant Gene-Bank, Seed and Plant Improvement Institute, Karaj, Iran; (3) Dept. of Plant Pathology, Islamic Azad University, Science and Res. Branch, Tehran, Iran 245-P. Effect of multiple virus infections on seed transmission in cowpea. K. E. OGUNSOLA (1), C. A. Fatokun (2), C. O. Ilori (3), P. Lava Kumar (2). (1) International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), and Crop Protection and Environmental Biology Dept., University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria; (2) International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Ibadan, Nigeria; (3) Crop Protection and Environmental Biology Dept., University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria

n Diseases of Plants Cereal, Field, and Fiber Crops

246-P. Occurrence of a rice dwarf disease in China caused by Southern rice black-streaked dwarf virus, a new species in genus Fijivirus. G. ZHOU (1), Q. Wang (1), J. Wen (1), D. Xu (1). (1) Laboratory of Plant Virology, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, PRC Peoples Rep of China 247-P. Genotypic and pathotypic diversity of the Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola in southern China. R.-W. Pan (1), W.-C. Zou (1), D.-G. XU (1), R.-Q. Pan (1), C.-Y. Ji (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, PRC Peoples Rep of China 248-P. First report of new strains of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici pathogenic to Zhong 4 (Trititrigia) in


F&D indicates a Flash-and-Dash presentations. China. B. WANG (1), X. Hu (1), Q. Li (1), G. Li (1), Z. Kang (1). (1) Plant Protection College and Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology for Agriculture, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi, PRC Peoples Rep of China APS 249-P. FOUNDATION F&D Determining the effects of foliar and heading diseases on soft red winter wheat (Triticum aestivum) yield in Wisconsin. K. LACKERMANN (1), J. Gaska (1), M. Martinka (1), S. Conley (1), P. Esker (1). (1) University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A. 250-P. Frequency of 3ADON and 15ADON isolates of Fusarium graminearum from field plots of wheat inoculated with mixed pathogen populations in North Dakota. S. ALI (1), K. Puri (1), M. McMullen (1), S. Zhong (1). (1) North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, U.S.A. 251-P. Additional sources of broad-spectrum resistance to Puccinia coronata f. sp. avenae in Canadian accessions of Avena barbata. M. CARSON (1). (1) USDA ARS, St. Paul, MN, U.S.A. 252-P. Leaf blotch disease complex in Norwegian wheat. A. FICKE (1), O. Elen (1), U. Abrahamsen (1), G. Brodal (1). (1) Bioforsk Norwegian Inst. of Agric. & Env. Res., Aas, Norway 253-P. Evaluation of winter wheat accessions for resistance to Xanthomonas translucens pv. undulosa. T. B. ADHIKARI (1), J. Hansen (1), S. Gurung (1), J. M. Bonman (2). (1) North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS, Small Grains and Potato Germplasm Res. Unit, Aberdeen, ID, U.S.A. 254-P. Genome wide association mapping of resistance to tan spot and spot blotch in spring wheat. S. GURUNG (1), J. M. Bonman (2), M. Acevedo (2), T. B. Adhikari (1). (1) North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS, Small Grains and Potato Germplasm Res. Unit, Aberdeen, ID, U.S.A. 255-P. Morphological and pathogenic variability of Cochliobolus sativus from Nepal. B. N. MAHTO (1), S. Gurung (1), T. B. Adhikari (1). (1) North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, U.S.A. 256-P. Races of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici with virulence on Sr13 and Sr9e in durum screening nursery in Ethiopia. P. OLIVERA FIRPO (1), Y. Jin (2), A. Badebo (3), D. Singh (4). (1) University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, U.S.A.; (2) USDAARS Cereal Disease Laboratory and University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, U.S.A.; (3) Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Res., Debre Zeit, Ethiopia; (4) International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), Nairobi, Kenya 257-P. Evaluation of wheat world genetic collections to harmful pathogens. E. D. Kovalenko (1), T. M. Kolomiets (1), M. I. KISELEVA (1), I. F. Lapochkina (2), I. B. Ablova (3), Z. N. Khudokormova (3), H. Bockelman (4). (1) All Russian Res. Institute of Phytopathology, Moscow region, Bolshie Vyazemi, Russia; (2) Agriculture

Res. Institute of Non Chernozem Zone, Russia; (3) Krasnodar Agriculture Res. Institute named after P.P. Lukyanenko, Russia; (4) USDA-ARS Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN), Aberdeen, ID, U.S.A. 258-P. Impact of cropping sequence on diseases, nematodes, and yield of peanut, cotton, and corn in central Alabama. H. L. CAMPBELL (1), A. K. Hagan (1), K. L. Bowen (1), K. S. Lawrence (1), S. P. Nightengale (2). (1) Auburn University, Auburn, AL, U.S.A.; (2) EV Smith Res. Center, Plant Breeding Unit, Tallassee, AL, U.S.A. APS Interactions between lesion nematodes 259-P. FOUNDATION and Pythium ultimum on maize seedlings. M. P. DA SILVA (1), G. Munkvold (1). (1) Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A. 260. P. Real-time PCR detection of the southern corn rust pathogen Puccinia polysora J. CROUCH (1), L. J. Szabo (1). (1) Cereal Disease Laboratory, USDAARS, St. Paul, MN, U.S.A. 261-P. Interactions of the endophyte Acremonium zeae and Aspergillus flavus in maize hybrids in the field. G. L. WINDHAM (1), W. P. Williams (1). (1) USDA ARS, Mississippi State, MS, U.S.A. 262-P. Survey of soybean diseases in the Ohio River Valley Region of Ohio during 2009. K. GEARHART (1), D. Dugan (2), J. Grimes (3), L. Farley (4), J. Fisher (5), C. Burskey (4), A. E. Dorrance (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, The Ohio State University, OARDC, Wooster, OH, U.S.A.; (2) Ohio State University Extension, Georgetown, OH, U.S.A.; (3) Ohio State University Extension, Hillsboro, OH, U.S.A.; (4) Ohio State University Extension, Owensville, OH, U.S.A.; (5) Ohio State University Extension, Waverly, OH, U.S.A. APS 263-P. FOUNDATION Baseline sensitivity of Cercospora sojina to azoxystrobin, trifloxystrobin, and pyraclostrobin. G. ZHANG (1), D. V. Phillips (2), C. A. Bradley (1). (1) University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, U.S.A.; (2) University of Georgia, Griffin, GA, U.S.A. 264-P. Effects of soybean cyst nematode on growth of kidney and navy bean. S. H. POROMARTO (1), B. D. Nelson (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, U.S.A. 265-P. Lack of adaption toward greater reproduction of soybean cyst nematode on dry bean. S. H. POROMARTO (1), B. D. Nelson (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, U.S.A. 266-P. Disease survey of commercial soybean fields in Alabama in 2009. E. J. SIKORA (1), J. F. Murphy (1), K. S. Lawrence (1). (1) Auburn University, Auburn, AL, U.S.A. 267-P. Factors affecting the development of the green stem malady in soybean. R. W. SCHNEIDER (1), G. B. Padgett (2), D. J. Boquet (2), R. A. Valverde (1). (1) Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A.; (2) Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Winnsboro, LA, U.S.A.

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Cereal, Field, and Fiber Crops continued

268-P. F&D Effects of environment and cultivar on charcoal rot development in soybeans. M. DOUBLEDEE (1), J. Rupe (1), C. Rothrock (1), S. Bajwa (1), A. Steger (1), R. Holland (1). (1) University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A. 269-P. Identification of soybean lines resistant to Frog eye leaf spot at ultra-low plant density. R. R. DABALA (1), W. D. Clark (1), S. K. Kantartzi (1). (1) Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL, U.S.A. 270-P. Sugar beet seedling damping-off in Michigan. L. E. HANSON (1), J. McGrath (1). (1) USDA ARS, East Lansing, MI, U.S.A. 271-P. Aggressiveness of Rhizoctonia solani AG 2-2 on sugar beet and rotation crops. J. R. BRANTNER (1), C. E. Windels (1). (1) University of Minnesota, NWROC, Crookston, MN, U.S.A. 272-P. Occurance of Prothallonema asymmetricum Siddiqi, 1986 in Arak Province of Iran. M. MIRZAEEQOMI (1), F. Khozeini (2), S. Barooti (3), S. Rezaee (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Science and Res. Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran; (2) Plant Protection Ministry, Iranian Res. Institute of Plant Protection, Tehran, Iran; (3) Nematology Res. Dept., Iranian Res. Institute of Plant Protection, Tehran, Iran 273-P. A survey to determine predominant diseases found in Nebraska sunflower production. R. M. HARVESON (1). (1) University of Nebraska, Scottsbluff, NE, U.S.A. 274-P. WITHDRAWN Phytopathology 100:S39 275-P. The response of the energy crop Miscanthus to fungal pathogens: A preliminary study. J. M. BRENNAN (1), E. Glynn (2), K. McDonnell (3). (1) Plant Health Laboratory, Seed Certification Division, Dept. of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, Backweston, Celbridge, Kildare, Ireland; (2) Dept. of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, Backweston & UCD School of Agriculture, Food Science and Veterinary Medicine, UCD College of Life Sciences, Belfield, Dublin 4, Kildare, Ireland; (3) UCD School of Agriculture, Food Science and Veterinary Medicine, UCD College of Life Sciences, Belfield, Dublin 4, Dublin, Ireland 276-P. Sorghum as a bioenergy crop in Alabama: Disease and yield evaluations. K. L. BOWEN (1), A. K. Hagan (1), A. C. Rocateli (2), R. L. Raper (3), E. B. Schwab (4), D. Bransby (2), F. J. Arriaga (5), K. S. Balkcom (5). (1) Auburn University, Auburn, AL, U.S.A.; (2) Agronomy and Soils, Auburn University, AL, U.S.A.; (3) USDA-ARS Dale Bumpers Res. Center, Booneville, AR, U.S.A.; (4) USDA-NRCS, Auburn, AL, U.S.A.; (5) USDA-ARS National Soil Dynamics Lab, Auburn, AL, U.S.A. 277-P. Screening of exotic and commercial sorghum accessions against a new virulent race (P6) of Peronosclerospora sorghi causing downy mildew disease. G. L. Radwan (1), R. Perumal (1), T.

60

Isakeit (1), L. K. Prom (2), C. R. LITTLE (3), C. W. Magill (1). (1) Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS, Southern Plains Agricultural Res. Center, College Station, TX, U.S.A.; (3) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. 278-P. Viability staining of naturally and artificially molded sorghum caryopses using tetrazolium violet. L. W. Noll (1), D. N. Butler (1), C. R. LITTLE (1). (1) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. 279-P. Survey of diseases of agronomic switchgrass in Tennessee. A. L. VU (1), M. M. Dee (1), T. Russell (1), O. L. Fajolu (1), K. D. Gwinn (1), J. Zale (1), B. H. Ownley (1). (1) University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, U.S.A. 280-P. Quantify changes in root architecture caused by Meloidogyne incognita, Thielaviopsis basicola or their combination on cotton. J. MA (1), J. JarabaNavas (1), T. Kirkpatrick (2), C. Rothrock (1). (1) University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A.; (2) Southwest Res. & Extension Center (SWREC), University of Arkansas, Hope, AR, U.S.A.

Crop Loss Management

281-P. Effects of soybean cyst nematode infestation and resistance on Fusarium root rot on soybeans. M. M. DIAZ ARIAS (1), G. Tylka (1), L. Leandro (1), G. Munkvold (1). (1) Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A. 282-P. Relationship between citrus variegated chlorosis intensity and yield reduction. F. P. GONÇALVES (1), E. S. Stuchi (2), S. A. Lourenço (1), L. Amorim (1). (1) Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz/USP, Piracicaba, Brazil; (2) Embrapa Mandioca e Fruticultura/Estação Experimental de Citricultura de Bebedouro, Bebedouro, Brazil 283-P. Yield loss incited by orange rust (Puccinia kuehnii) on a highly susceptible sugarcane cultivar in Florida. R. N. RAID (1), J. C. Comstock (2), N. Glynn (2). (1) University of Florida, Belle Glade, FL, U.S.A.; (2) ARS-USDA Sugarcane Field Station, Canal Point, FL, U.S.A. 284-P. Microbial Rosetta Stone Central Agricultural Database: A database for high-consequence plant pathogens. S. KAMENIDOU (1), A. Simonson (2), R. Jain (2), K. Hari (2), J. Robertson (3), J. Fletcher (1). (1) Oklahoma State University, National Institute of Microbial Forensics & Food and Agricultural Biosecurity, Stillwater, OK, U.S.A.; (2) cBIO Inc., Freemont, CA, U.S.A.; (3) Federal Bureau of Investigation, Quantico, VA, U.S.A.

Disease Detection and Diagnosis

285-P. PCR-RFLP analysis on genetic diversity of Fusarium spp. isolates collected from sugarbeet fields of Iran. S. Beladi (1), S. REZAEE (1), B. Mahmoodi (2).


F&D indicates a Flash-and-Dash presentations. (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Science and Res. Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran; (2) Sugar Beet Seed Institute, Karaj, Iran 286-P. F&D Description of two genotypes of Phytomonas associated to oil palm diseases in Peru: Marchites Sorpresiva and a new disease manifestationMarchites Lenta. M. J. TALLEDO ALBUJAR (1), S. S. Morales Ruiz (2), E. Trinidad Chipana (3), J. Arevalo Zelada (2), A. Trelles Di Lucca (3), Y. Montoya Piedra (1). 1) Bio Links S.A., Lima, Peru; (2) Institute of Tropical Medicine “Alexander von Humboldt” Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Peru; (3) Palmas del Espino SA, Uchiza, Peru 287-P. First report of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici race 3 on tomato in Iran. S. PIRAHESH (1), H. Zamanizadeh (1), S. Rezaee (1), B. Morid (2). (1) Islamic Azad University-Science and Res. Branch, Tehran, Iran; (2) Islamic Azad University-Takestan Branch, Takestan, Iran 288-P. Soil detection of crown and root rot of tomato caused by Fusarium in Sonora and Baja California (Mexico) using soil phytopathometry. M. de Cara (1), D. Palmero (2), M. Vazquez-Mundo (3), F. Camacho (1), J. TELLO MARQUINA (1). (1) Univ. of Almería, Almería, Spain; (2) Technical Univ. of Madrid, Madrid, Spain; (3) Almería, Spain 289-P. Highly sensitive molecular detection of five Pythium species. M. ARIF (1), F. Flores (1), F. M. OchoaCorona (1), C. Garzon (1). (1) Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, U.S.A. 290-P. Increased PCR amplification incorporating primer flap sequences and free energy values near equilibrium. M. ARIF (1), I. Oikonomakos (1), D. Caasi (1), F. M. Ochoa-Corona (1). (1) Oklahoma State University, Dept. of Entomology and Plant Pathology, National Institute for Microbial Forensic and Food & Agricultural Biosecurity (NIMFFAB), Stillwater, OK, U.S.A. 291-P. Quantification and rapid detection of Verticillium dahliae in soil. G. BILODEAU (1), P. Uribe (1), S. T. Koike (2), F. Martin (1). (1) USDA-ARS, Salinas, CA, U.S.A.; (2) University of California Cooperative Extension, Monterey County, Salinas, CA, U.S.A. 292-P. Black leg of basil caused by Plectosporium tabacinum is reported in the United States. D. S. Egel (1), G. S. RUHL (2), S. Hoke (1), B. Dicklow (3), R. Wick (3). (1) Purdue University, Vincennes, IN, U.S.A.; (2) Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A.; (3) University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, U.S.A. 293-P. Cercospora and Corynespora leaf spots in Hydrangea macrophylla. M. T. MMBAGA (1). (1) Tennessee State University School of Agriculture and Consumer Sciences, McMinnville, TN, U.S.A. 294-P. A qPCR assay for detection and quantification of Verticillium dahliae in spinach seed. G. RAUSCHER (1), B. Mou (1), R. J. Hayes (1), S. T. Koike (2), K. Maruthachalam (3), K. V.

Subbarao (3), S. J. Klosterman (1). (1) USDA ARS, Salinas, CA, U.S.A.; (2) University of California Cooperative Extension, Monterey and Santa Cruz Counties, Davis, CA, U.S.A.; (3) University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A. 295-P. Five years of monitoring foliar diseases of soybean in Minnesota. J. E. KURLE (1), D. K. Malvick (2), C. M. Floyd (2), G. M. Anderson (2). (1) University of Minnesota Dept. of Plant Pathology, Minneapolis, MN, U.S.A.; (2) University of Minnesota Dept. of Plant Pathology, St. Paul, MN, U.S.A. 296-P. Assessment of new biomaterials for sample collection and nucleic acid recovery. D. J. CAASI (1), M. Arif (1), F. M. Ochoa-Corona (1). (1) Oklahoma State University, Dept. of Entomology and Plant Pathology, National Institute for Microbial Forensic and Food & Agricultural Biosecurity (NIMFFAB), Stillwater, OK, U.S.A. 297-P. Pomegranate decay caused by Pilidiella granati in California. T. J. MICHAILIDES (1), R. Puckett (1), D. Morgan (1). (1) University of CaliforniaDavis, Parlier, CA, U.S.A. 298-P. Immunodiagnostic assays targeted to urediniospore wall proteins of Asian soybean rust. D. G. LUSTER (1), M. B. McMahon (1). (1) USDA ARS Foreign Disease Weed Science Res. Unit, Fort Detrick, MD, U.S.A. 299-P. The CYP51C gene, a novel marker for phylogenetic analysis of Fusarium species. D. Fernandez-Ortuno (1), E. Loza-Reyes (1), S. L. Rogers (1), B. A. FRAAIJE (1). (1) Rothamsted Res., Harpenden, United Kingdom 300-P. Phytophthora ramorum and Phytophthora kernoviae in Ireland: The current situation. J. BRENNAN (1), D. Cummins (1), S. Kearney (1), G. Cahalane (1), S. Nolan (1), J. Choiseul (1). (1) Dept. of Agriculture, Fisheries & Food, Kildare, Ireland 301-P. A multiplexed, probe-based quantitative PCR assay for DNA of Phytophthora sojae. J. S. HAUDENSHIELD (1), G. L. Hartman (1). (1) USDA ARS, Urbana, IL, U.S.A. 302-P. Detection of Phytophthora species in retail nurseries and urban forest environments in northern Nevada. S. WANG (1), S. Garneni (1). (1) Nevada Dept. of Agriculture, Sparks, NV, U.S.A. 303-P. Detection of viable Phakopsora pachyrhizi spores by indirect immunofluorescence and propidium iodide staining. R. VITTAL (1), J. S. Haudenshield (2), G. L. Hartman (3). (1) University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign, Urbana, IL, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS, Urbana, IL, U.S.A.; (3) University of IllinoisUrbana Champaign; USDA-ARS, Urbana, IL, U.S.A. 304-P. F&D PCR detection of aflatoxin-producing strains of Aspergillus spp. from corn and red flour beetle. S. DOBHAL (1), D. Blazheva (2), M. Arif (1), P. Garrido (1), F. M. Ochoa-Corona (1), G. Opit (1), C. Garzon (1). (1) Oklahoma State University, Dept. of Entomology and Plant Pathology, Stillwater, OK, U.S.A.; (2) University

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2010 APS POSTERS

Disease Detection and Diagnosis continued

of Food Technologies, Dept. of Organic Chemistry and Microbiology, Plovdiv, Bulgaria 305-P. Evaluation of selective media and selective chemicals on the isolation of Rhizoctonia spp. from soil. T. N. SPURLOCK (1), C. S. Rothrock (2), W. S. Monfort (3). (1) University of Arkansas, Cave Springs, AR, U.S.A.; (2) University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A.; (3) University of Arkansas, Lonoke, AR, U.S.A. 306-P. Update on olive pathologies in Argentina. B. A. PEREZ (1), M. L. Otero (2), E. Oriolani (3), M. Roca (4), N. Brancher (5), A. C. Matias (6). (1) IMYZA-INTA, Hurlingham, Buenos Aires, Argentina; (2) INTA-IFFIVE, Cordoba, Argentina; (3) INTA-EEA, Mendoza, Argentina; (4) SENASA, La Rioja, Argentina; (5) Ministerio de la Produccion, Catamarca, Argentina; (6) INTA EEA, Catamarca, Argentina 307-P. A strain differentiating macroarray for Plum pox virus detection. D. SHERMAN (1), D. Suciu (2), R. Vigaya Satya (3), W. Schneider (1). (1) USDAARS-FDWSRU, Ft. Detrick, MD, U.S.A.; (2) CombiMatrix Corporation, Mukilteo, WA, U.S.A.; (3) Biotechnology HPC Software Applications Institute, TATRC, USAMRMC, Frederick, MD, U.S.A. 308-P. Development of a multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay for simultaneous detection of three pome fruit viroids. L. LIN (1), R. Li (1), R. Mock (1), G. Kinard (1). (1) USDA ARS, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A. 309-P. One-step multiplex RT-PCR for simultaneous detection of four viroids affecting pome fruit trees. L. LIN (1), R. Li (1), R. Mock (1), G. Kinard (1). (1) USDA ARS, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A. 310-P. F&D Detecting Sugarcane yellow leaf virus in asymptomatic sugarcane leaves with hyperspectral remote sensing and associated leaf pigment changes. M. P. GRISHAM (1), R. M. Johnson (1), P. V. Zimba (2). (1) USDA ARS, Houma, LA, U.S.A.; (2) Texas A&M, Corpus Christi, TX, U.S.A. 311-P. Surveys for Tomato ringspot virus in central Maryland vineyards. W. MSIKITA (1), K. A. Rice (1). (1) Maryland Dept. of Agriculture, Annapolis, MD, U.S.A. 312-P. A tospovirus new to North America: Virus detection and discovery through the use of a macroarray for viruses of solanaceous crops. K. PERRY (1), X. Lu (1). (1) Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A. 313-P. Characterization of nepoviruses by an integrated approach. E. MEEKES (1), M. Botermans (2), R. Hooftman (1), T. van Schadewijk (3), R. Miglino (3), A. Roenhorst (2). (1) Naktuinbouw, Roelofarendsveen, Netherlands; (2) Plant Protection Service, Wageningen, Netherlands; (3) Dutch Flower Bulb Inspection Service, Lisse, Netherlands 314-P. Application of a simple extraction method for the detection of viruses in plants and insect vectors. S. POOJARI (1), G. Karthikeyan (2), O. J. Alabi (3),

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T. A. Damayanti (4), K. Manoranjitham (5), N. Balakrishnan (6), R. A. Naidu (3). (1) Washington State University, Prosser, WA, U.S.A.; (2) Dept. of Plant Pathology, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore, India; (3) Washington State University, Irrigated Agriculture Res. and Extension Ctr., Prosser, WA, U.S.A.; (4) Faculty of Agriculture, Bogor Agricultural University, Bogor, Indonesia; (5) Dept. of Fruit Crops, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Horticultural College and Res. Institute, Coimbatore, India; (6) Dept. of Plant Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore, India 315-P. Serological detection and molecular analysis of Tobacco ringspot virus and Strawberry latent ringspot virus in mint (Mentha sp.). N. L. ROBERTSON (1), B. J. Furman (1). (1) USDA ARS, Arctic and Subarctic Plant Genetic Resources Unit, Palmer, AK, U.S.A. 316-P. Molecular characterization and ELISA-based detection of Bean leafroll virus and Pea enation mosaic virus from the Pacific Northwestern U.S.A. B. Vemulapati (1), K. L. DRUFFEL (1). (1) Washington State University, Pullman, WA, U.S.A. 317-P. An investigation into mixed infections by potato purple top and potato witches’-broom phytoplasmas in tomato. W. WEI (1), W. Wu (1), I. Lee (1), R. E. Davis (1), R. A. Owens (1), D. L. Nuss (2), Y. Zhao (1). (1) Molecular Plant Pathology Laboratory, ARS-USDA, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.; (2) Center for Biosystems Res., University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute, Rockville, MD, U.S.A. 318-P. Genome organization and structure of a putative member of the Flexiviridae family infecting sweet cherries. D. V. VILLAMOR (1), K. L. Druffel (2), K. Eastwell (1). (1) Washington State University, Prosser, WA, U.S.A.; (2) Washington State University, Pullman, WA, U.S.A. 319-P. Viruses infecting soybean (Glycine max L. Merill) in Nigeria. I. TIME (1), G. I. Atiri (2), P. Lava Kumar (3). (1) International Institute of Agriculture and University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria; (2) Dept. of Crop Protection and Environmental Biology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria; (3) International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Ibadan, Nigeria 320-P. Resistance to Maize streak virus in test crosses of early generation lines of maize. M. T. SALAUDEEN (1), A. Menkir (2), G. I. Atiri (3), S. Hearne (2), P. Lava Kumar (2). (1) International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA) and Dept. of Crop Protection and Environmental Biology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria; (2) International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Ibadan, Nigeria; (3) Dept. of Crop Protection and Environmental Biology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria 321-P. Development of a real-time PCR assay, to detect


F&D indicates a Flash-and-Dash presentations. and quantify a 16SrIII-L phytoplasma associated with cassava frogskin disease (CFSD). E. ALVAREZ (1), J. F. Mejia (2), J. M. Pardo (2). (1) CIAT, Cali, Colombia; (2) CIAT, Palmira, Colombia 322-P. Detection of Xylella fastidiosa in petioles is independent of sample storage time and temperature. B. F. AMSDEN (1), P. Vincelli (1), J. R. Hartman (1). (1) University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, U.S.A. 323-P. Towards solving “inconclusive” quantitative PCR for the presence of huanglongbing (HLB) in orange jasmine leaf samples in Texas. M. KUNTA (1), J. V. da Graça (1), M. Sétamou (1), M. Skaria (1). (1) Texas A&M University-Kingsville Citrus Center, Weslaco, TX, U.S.A. 324-P. Association of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ with psyllid-affected carrots in Europe. J. E. Munyaneza (1), T. W. Fisher (2), V. SENGODAGOUNDER (3), S. F. Garczynski (1), A. Nissinen (4), A. Lemmetty (4). (1) YARL, USDA-ARS, Wapato, WA, U.S.A.; (2) Dept. of Entomology, Washington State University, USDAARS, Wapato, WA, U.S.A.; (3) Dept. of Plant Pathology, Washington State University, YARL, USDA-ARS, Wapato, WA, U.S.A.; (4) Agrifood Res. Finland, Plant Protection, Jokioinen, Finland 325-P. Multiplex PCR for simultaneous detection of eight major onion bacterial pathogens. M. Mansfield (1), B. GUGINO (1). (1) The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, U.S.A. 326-P. Improved extraction of DNA of ‘Ca. Liberibacter’ species from plants and cultivated cells using pressure cycling technology (PCT). N. Schaad (1), A. SECHLER (2), A. Marques (3), N. Lawrence (4), R. Schumacher (4). (1) USDA ARS NAA FDWSRU, Ft. Detrick, MD, U.S.A.; (2) FDWSRU, USDA-ARS, Ft. Detrick, MD, U.S.A.; (3) EMBRAPA, Brasilia, Brazil; (4) Pressure BioSciences Inc., South Easton, MA, U.S.A. 327-P. Xanthomonas sacchari—A pathogen or an endophyte? C. J. MAROON-LANGO (1), K. L. Schneider (2), R. S. Turner (1), G. G. Presting (2), A. M. Alvarez (3). (1) USDA APHIS PPQ PHP Plant Germplasm Quarantine Program, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.; (2) Molecular Biosciences and Bioengineering, University of Hawaii, Manoa, HI, U.S.A.; (3) Plant Pathology Dept., University of Hawaii, Manoa, HI, U.S.A. 328-P. Initial characterization of a Xanthomonas sp. causing bacterial spot of shrub rose (Rosa spp.). G. VALLAD (1), C. Summers (1), H. Adkison (1), E. Margenthaler (1). (1) University of Florida, Wimauma, FL, U.S.A. 329-P. Citrus greening in commercial orchards in Puerto Rico. C. ESTEVEZ DE JENSEN (1), A. Vitoreli (2), F. Roman (3). (1) University of Puerto Rico, Juana Diaz, U.S.A.; (2) Plant Disease Clinic/ University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A.; (3) University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, U.S.A. 330-P. Development of primers and probes for detection of

citrus ‘Candidatus Liberibacter’ species by real-time PCR. A. GOVINDARAJULU (1), N. Choudhary (1), J. S. Hartung (2), A. L. Stone (3), V. D. Damsteegt (3), R. H. Brlansky (1). (1) University of Florida, Lake Alfred, FL, U.S.A.; (2) USDAARS, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.; (3) USDA-ARS, Fort Detrick, MD, U.S.A. 331-P. F&D Alternative method for rapid processing, shipping, and testing of a large number of psyllids for the presence of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter’ spp. K. L. MANJUNATH (1), C. Ramadugu (2), J. Drake (1), H. A. Arevalo (3), S. E. Halbert (4), P. A. Stansly (3), R. Lee (1). (1) USDA ARS National Clonal Germplasm Repository for Citrus and Dates, Riverside, CA, U.S.A.; (2) Dept. of Botany and Plant Sciences, University of California, Riverside, CA, U.S.A.; (3) University of Florida SWFREC, Immokalee, FL, U.S.A.; (4) Florida Division of Plant Industry, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A. 332-P. F&D Novel detection of Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 using magnetic capture hybridization and real-time PCR. Y. HA (1), T. P. Denny (1), M. A. Schell (1). (1) University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A. 333-P. Simple, rapid, and specific DNA-based diagnostics for detection of the bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2. R. KUBOTA (1), M. A. Schell (2), G. D. Peckham (1), A. M. Alvarez (1), C. Allen (3), D. M. Jenkins (1). (1) University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, U.S.A.; (2) University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A.; (3) University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A. 334-P. Detection and distribution of Longidoridae and Trichodoridae nematodes from Golestan National Park of Iran. A. TALEZARI (1), F. Khozeini (2), S. Barouti (3), H. Zamanizadeh (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, Science and Res. Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran; (2) Iran Plant Protection Organization, Tehran, Iran; (3) Laboratory Complex, Science and Res. Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran 335-P. Distribution and diversity of Pratylenchus spp. associated with biofuel crops and species identification in a multiplex PCR assay. H. LOPEZ NICORA (1), T. Mekete (1), K. Reynolds (1), M. E. Gray (1), T. L. Niblack (1). (1) University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, U.S.A. 336-P. A semi-automated system for quantitative analysis of Meliodogyne reproduction. J. KILCREASE (1), F. Solano (1), A. Rascon (1), S. Hanson (1). (1) New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM, U.S.A. 337-P. Detection of reniform nematode by conventional and real-time PCR. R. J. SAYLER (1), T. L. Kirkpatrick (1), R. T. Robbins (1), R. D. Cartwright (1). (1) University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A. 338-P. CANARY biosensors for rapid detection of Ralstonia, Potyvirus and Phytophthora. Z. LIU (1), K. Rappaport (1), E. Twieg (1), V. Mavrodieva (1), L. Levy (1). (1) USDA-APHIS-PPQ-CPHST,

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2010 APS POSTERS

Disease Detection and Diagnosis continued

National Plant Germplasm and Biotechnology Laboratory, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A. 339-P. Development of commercial products based on immunocapture RT-PCR technology. J. XIA (1), C. Feng (2), K. Ling (3). (1) AC Diagnostics, Inc., Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A.; (2) Dept. of Plant Pathology, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A.; (3) USDA-ARS, U.S. Vegetable Laboratory, Charleston, SC, U.S.A.

Forest Pathology 340-P.

341-P.

342-P.

343-P.

344-P.

345-P.

346-P.

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Do climate and outbreak frequency affect levels of foliar phytochemistry in different lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) stands? C. WALLIS (1), D. P. Huber (2), K. J. Lewis (2). (1) USDA ARS, Parlier, CA, U.S.A.; (2) University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, BC, Canada Visual and quantitative characterization of ironwood tree (Casuarina equisetifolia) decline on Guam. Z. MERSHA (1), R. L. Schlub (1), P. C. Spaine (2), J. A. Smith (3), S. C. Nelson (4). (1) UOG Cooperative Extension, University of Guam, Mangilao, Guam; (2) USDA Forest Service, Athens, GA, U.S.A.; (3) University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A.; (4) Cooperative Extension Service, University of Hawaii-Manoa, Hilo, HI, U.S.A. Melaleuca quinquenervia plants differ in susceptibility towards fungus Puccinia psidii infection and disease development. M. B. RAYAMAJHI (1), G. Wheeler (1), P. D. Pratt (1), T. D. Center (1). (1) USDA-ARS, Ft. Lauderdale, FL, U.S.A. Protecting the endangered Eugenia koolauensis from further loss in the Hawaiian environment. J. UCHIDA (1), C. Y. Kadooka (1), R. Hauff (2), L. Loope (3). (1) University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, U.S.A.; (2) State of Hawaii Dept. of Land & Natural Resources, Division of Forestry & Wildlife, Honolulu, HI, U.S.A.; (3) USGS Pacific Island Ecosystems Res. Center, Haleakala Field Station, Makawao, HI, U.S.A. F&D Identification and characterization of Fusarium oxysporum, the causal agent of koa wilt in Hawaii. A. SHIRAISHI (1), J. Uchida (1). (1) University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI, U.S.A. Causal organisms of black spot on postharvest rambutan in Mexico. D. NIETO (1), M. G. Hernandez (1), D. Teliz (1), C. Nava (1), M. T. Martinez (2), N. Bautista (1). (1) Colegio de Postgraduados, Texcoco, Mexico; (2) Universidad Autonoma Chapingo, Texcoco, Mexico First report of blue stain fungi associated with decline of pine trees in Lebanon. A. T. SAAD (1), L. Hanna (1), M. Temsah (2). (1) American

347-P.

University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon; (2) Beirut, Lebanon Foliar chlorophyll content of ponderosa pine on black stain root disease sites after prescribed burning and subsoiling treatment combinations. W. J. OTROSINA (1), P. C. Spaine (1), S. S. Sung (2), W. Woodruff (3), J. T. Kliejunas (4). (1) USDA Forest Service, Athens, GA, U.S.A.; (2) USDA Forest Service, Pineville, LA, U.S.A.; (3) USDA Forest Service, Susanville, CA, U.S.A.; (4) USDA Forest Service, Kent, WA, U.S.A.

Fruits and Nuts

348-P. Evaluation of southern highbush blueberry cultivar and propagation methods for stem blight mortality during the first year of growth in Florida. A. F. WRIGHT (1), P. F. Harmon (1). (1) University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A. 349-P. Relationship between pathogenicity and toxin production in tangerine pathotype of Alternaria alternata the causal agent of citrus brown spot in Iran. N. AMINI (1), N. Kakvan (1), H. Zamanizadeh (1), S. Hajmansoor (1). (1) Science and Res. Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran 350-P. Fungal and oomycete pathogens associated with crown and root diseases of strawberry in western Australia. X. L. FANG (1), D. Phillips (2), H. Li (1), K. Sivasithamparam (3), M. Barbetti (4). (1) University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia; (2) Dept. of Agriculture and Food Western Australia, Midland, Australia; (3) University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Australia; (4) University of Western Australia, Crawley, Australia APS 351-P. FOUNDATION Fruit flesh type and harvest method affect postharvest decay of southern highbush blueberry. L. MEHRA (1), H. Scherm (1). (1) University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A. 352-P. Taxonomic status of Acanthorhynchus vaccinii: Reassessment of the identity of the cranberry pathogen Physalospora vaccinii. J. POLASHOCK (1), P. Oudemans (2), J. Crouch (3). (1) USDA ARS, Chatsworth, NJ, U.S.A.; (2) Rutgers University, Chatsworth, NJ, U.S.A.; (3) Cereal Disease Laboratory, USDA-ARS, St. Paul, MN, U.S.A. 353-P. Elimination of Black raspberry necrosis virus (BRNV) from Rubus occidentalis by in vitro thermotherapy. A. JEON (1), E. Cheong (1), R. Mock (1). (1) USDA, ARS, NGRL, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A. 354-P. Identifying anthracnose disease resistant strawberry clones using traditional techniques and molecular markers for screening. M. MILLER-BUTLER (1), B. Krieser (1), K. J. Curry (1), B. J. Smith (2). (1) University of Southern Mississippi, Dept. of Biological Sciences, Hattiesburg, MS, U.S.A.; (2) USDA ARS Southern Horticultural Laboratory,


F&D indicates a Flash-and-Dash presentations. Small Fruit Res. Unit, Poplarville, MS, U.S.A. 355-P. Epidemiology of almond leaf scorch disease in the San Joaquin Valley of California. M. SISTERSON (1), J. Chen (2), K. Daane (3), R. Groves (4), B. Higbee (5), C. Ledbetter (1). (1) USDA ARS, Parlier, CA, U.S.A.; (2) USDA ARS PWA, Parlier, CA, U.S.A.; (3) University of California, Berkeley, CA, U.S.A.; (4) University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A.; (5) Paramount Farming Co., Bakersfield, CA, U.S.A. 356-P. F&D Association of multiple virus infections with apple disease in western Colorado. R. POKHAREL (1), R. Mock (2), R. Li (2), G. Kinard (2), H. Larsen (1). (1) Colorado State University, Grand Junction, CO, U.S.A.; (2) Beltsville, MD, U.S.A. 357-P. Culture-independent examination of microbial community shifts associated with replant disease of almond. L. S. SCHMIDT (1), R. G. Bhat (2), G. T. Browne (1). (1) USDA ARS CPGRU, Davis, CA, U.S.A.; (2) University of Californa, Davis, CA, U.S.A. 358-P. Another marafivirus infecting blackberries. S. SABANADZOVIC (1), N. Abou GhanemSabanadzovic (1). (1) Dept. of Entomology and Plant Pathology, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, U.S.A. 359-P. Grapevine necrotic union, a newly recognized disease in grapevines on 110 Richter rootstock in California. M. Al Rwahnih (1), A. Rowhani (1), R. J. Smith (2), J. K. Uyemoto (3), M. R. SUDARSHANA (3). (1) University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A.; (2) University of California Cooperative Extension, Santa Rosa, CA, U.S.A.; (3) USDA ARS, Davis, CA, U.S.A. 360-P. Anthracnose fruit rot resistance in blueberries: Evaluation of a rapid screening technique and correlation with fruit characteristics. T. D. MILES (1), J. F. Hancock (1), P. W. Callow (1), A. M. C. Schilder (1). (1) Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, U.S.A. 361-P. Molecular characterization of Colletotrichum populations causing crown rot of strawberry in Australia. S. Mackenzie (1), A. Gomez (2), D. Hutton (2), N. A. PERES (1). (1) University of Florida, Gulf Coast Res. and Education Center, Wimauma, FL, U.S.A.; (2) Queensland Primary Industries and Fisheries, Maroochy Res. Station, Nambour, Australia 362-P. Correlation of Erwinia amylovora virulence characteristics to disease severity in fire blight in apple trees and seedlings. S. A. LEE (1), H. K. Ngugi (2), T. W. McNellis (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, Penn State University, University Park, PA, U.S.A.; (2) Dept. of Plant Pathology, Fruit Res. and Extension Center, Penn State University, Biglerville, PA, U.S.A. 363-P. Fusarium stem blight of blueberry in Argentina. M. Caprara (1), E. R. WRIGHT (1), M. C. Rivera (1), B. A. Perez (2). (1) Facultad de Agronomía, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad de Buenos

Aires, Argentina; (2) IMYZA-INTA, Hurlingham, Buenos Aires, Argentina 364-P. Blueberry pathologies in nursery plants. B. A. Perez (1), E. R. WRIGHT (2), M. Divo de Sesar (2). (1) IMYZA-INTA, Hurlingham, Buenos Aires, Argentina; (2) Facultad de Agronomía, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad de Buenos Aires, Argentina 365-P. Distribution of Arabis mosaic virus on vineyards in ‎northern provinces of Iran. H. Doustseddigh (1), F. RAKHSHANDEHROO (1), M. Shamsbakhsh (2). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, ‎Science and Res. Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran; (2) Plant Pathology Dept., College of Agriculture, Tarbiat Modarres University, Tehran, Iran 366-P. Etiology of pod rot of Valencia peanut in New Mexico. S. SANOGO (1), N. Puppala (2). (1) New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM, U.S.A.; (2) Clovis, NM, U.S.A. 367-P. Attempting to transmit citrus canker from diseased ripe grapefruit to healthy grapefruit saplings under field conditions. T. SCHUBERT (1), G. Bonn (1). (1) Florida Dept. of Agriculture & Consumer Services, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A.

Ornamentals

368-P. An Indiana survey of Phytophthora species in nurseries, greenhouses, and landscape plantings. A. J. LEONBERGER (1), C. Speers (1), G. Ruhl (1), T. Creswell (1), J. Beckerman (1). (1) Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A. 369-P. High-fidelity PCR as a sensitive molecular diagnostic tool to detect Phytophthora nicotianae on spathiphyllum. T. L. Tarnowski (1), A. J. PALMATEER (1). (1) University of Florida, Homestead, FL, U.S.A. 370-P. A new Bipolaris leaf spot of cordyline and disease response on five cordyline. T. L. Tarnowski (1), A. J. PALMATEER (1). (1) University of Florida, Homestead, FL, U.S.A. 371-P. Pseudomonas savastanoi found in association with stem galls on mandevilla. M. L. PUTNAM (1), M. Curtis (1), M. Serdani (1), A. J. Palmateer (2). (1) Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A.; (2) University of Florida, Homestead, FL, U.S.A. 372-P. A comparison of standard and high-fidelity PCR in the detection of Sclerotium rolfsii and a Dickeya sp. from Phalaenopsis orchids. R. A. Cating (1), M. A. Hoy (2), A. J. PALMATEER (1). (1) University of Florida, Homestead, FL, U.S.A.; (2) University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A. 373-P. Control of Fusarium vascular wilt on carnation using soil biodisinfection. A. García (1), D. Palmero (2), M. de Cara (3), M. Santos (3), J. TELLO MARQUINA (4). (1) Instituto Andaluz de Investigación y Formación Agraria, Pesquera, Alimentaria y de la Producción Ecológica (IFAPA), Cadiz, Spain; (2) Technical University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain; (3) Almería, Spain; (4) Univ. of Almeria, Almeria, Spain

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2010 APS POSTERS Ornamentals continued

374-P. Evaluation of resistance to Pucciniastrum hydrangeae in Hydrangea arborescens. Y. LI (1), M. Windham (2), R. Trigiano (2), A. Windham (3), S. Reed (4), T. Rinehart (5), J. Spiers (5). (1) Connecticut Agric. Experiment Station, New Haven, CT, U.S.A.; (2) University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, U.S.A.; (3) University of Tennessee, Nashville, TN, U.S.A.; (4) USDA/ARS, McMinnville, TN, U.S.A.; (5) USDA/ ARS, Poplarville, MS, U.S.A. 375-P. Application rate and interval impact the efficacy of Heritage 50WDG fungicide for the control of Alternaria leaf spot on marigold. A. K. HAGAN (1), J. R. Akridge (2). (1) Auburn University, Auburn, AL, U.S.A.; (2) Brewton Agricultural Res. Unit, Brewton, AL, U.S.A. 376-P. A new ilarvirus from subgroup 1 infects ligustrum. S. SABANADZOVIC (1), I. E. Tzanetakis (2). (1) Dept. of Entomology and Plant Pathology, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, U.S.A.; (2) Dept. of Plant Pathology, Division of Agriculture, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A. 377-P. Characterization of huanglongbing-associated ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ from citrus relatives. C. RAMADUGU (1), K. L. Manjunath (2), S. E. Halbert (3), R. H. Brlansky (4), M. Roose (1), R. F. Lee (2). (1) University of California, Riverside, CA, U.S.A.; (2) USDA ARS National Clonal Germplasm Repository for Citrus and Dates, Riverside, CA, U.S.A.; (3) Florida Division of Plant Industry, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A.; (4) University of Florida Citrus Res. and Education Center, Lake Alfred, FL, U.S.A.

Seed Pathology

378-P. Molecular studies of genotype, organ, and physiological stage dependent immunity against karnal bunt (Tilletia indica) of wheat (Triticum aestivum). S. PURWAR (1), S. Sundaram (2). (1) Allahabad University, Allahabad, India; (2) Center of Biotechnology, Nehru Science Center, Allahabad, India 379-P. Relationship of fungal and bacterial seed microflora to soybean seed vigor. K. A. COCHRAN (1), J. Rupe (1), A. Steger (1), R. Holland (1). (1) University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A.

Tropical Plant Pathology

380-P. F&D Late blight resistance assessing of a segregating population of diploid potatoes (Solanum phureja). J. G. MORALES (1), B. Franco (2), C. E. Ñústez (3), J. M. Cotes (2). (1) Universidad Nacional de Colombia sede Medellín, Depto. Ciencias Agronómicas, Medellin, Colombia; (2) Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Medellín, Colombia; (3) Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá D.C., Colombia

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381-P. Molecular diversity of Sugarcane yellow leaf virus in China. M. Wang (1), D. Xu (1), G. ZHOU (2). (1) Laboratory of Plant Virology, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, PRC Peoples Rep of China; (2) South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, PRC Peoples Rep of China 382-P. Evidence that fern distortion syndrome is caused by fluorescent pseudomonads. J. W. Kloepper (1), F. Saborío (2), J. A. MCINROY (1). (1) Auburn University, Auburn, AL, U.S.A.; (2) Centro de Investigaciones Agronómicas, Universidad de Costa Rica, San José, Costa Rica 383-P. Evaluating the resistance of plantain and banana genotypes to black sigatoka (Mycosphaerella fijiensis m.) under greenhouse conditions. E. ALVAREZ (1), A. Cuellar (2). (1) CIAT, Cali, Colombia; (2) CIAT, Palmira, Colombia 384-P. Association of a phytoplasma with dieback in palms in Puerto Rico confirmed by nested-PCR assays. J. V. RODRIGUES (1), A. M. Vitoreli (2), A. L. Ramirez (3). (1) University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, U.S.A.; (2) University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A.; (3) Dept. of Agriculture of Puerto Rico (CAPS), San Juan, U.S.A. 385-P. Distribution of canker lesions on grapefruit in Florida. C. H. BOCK (1), P. E. Parker (2), T. R. Gottwald (3). (1) USDA ARS, Ft. Pierce, FL, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-APHIS-PPQ, Edinburg, TX, U.S.A.; (3) USDA, ARS, USHRL, Fort Pierce, FL, U.S.A. 386-P. Genus Alternaria species as pathogens of Vaccinium meridionale in Colombia. C. Calderon (1), C. Socha (1), S. Restrepo (2), P. JIMENEZ (3). (1) Bogotá, Colombia; (2) Univ. de Los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia; (3) Univ. Militar Nueva Granada, Bogotá, Colombia 387-P. F&D Enhancing Guam’s agriculture professionals’ knowledge of ecological disease management. Z. MERSHA (1), R. W. Brown (1), R. L. Schlub (1). (1) UOG Cooperative Extension, University of Guam, Mangilao, Guam

Turfgrasses

F&D Molecular analysis of turfgrass rusts reveals the widespread distribution of Puccinia coronata as a pathogen of Kentucky bluegrass. L. A. BEIRN (1), B. B. Clarke (1), J. Crouch (1). (1) Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, U.S.A. 389-P. Using weather variables to predict the probability of dollar spot development. D. L. SMITH (1), J. P. Kerns (2). (1) Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, U.S.A.; (2) University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A. APS 390-P. FOUNDATION Evaluation of 15 new zoysiagrass lines for resistance to large patch disease caused by Rhizoctonia solani AG 2-2 LP. K. OBASA (1), M. Kennelly (1). (1) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.

388-P.

APS FOUNDATION


F&D indicates a Flash-and-Dash presentations. 391-P. Effects of temperature on growth of Sclerotinia homoeocarpa. C. WILSON (1), J. Kerns (1), D. Smith (2). (1) University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A.; (2) Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, U.S.A. 392-P. Validation of commercially available ELISA kits for analyzing chlorothalonil and iprodione residues on creeping bentgrass using gas chromatography. P. KOCH (1), J. Kerns (2). (1) University of Wisconsin, Verona, WI, U.S.A.; (2) University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A. 393-P. Anthracnose disease of annual bluegrass as affected by light-weight rolling and equipment traffic. J. A. ROBERTS (1), J. A. Murphy (1), B. B. Clarke (1). (1) Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, U.S.A. 394-P. Centipedegrass: A new host of Colletotrichum sublineola. M. TOMASO-PETERSON (1). (1) Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, U.S.A. 395-P. New and re-emerging rust diseases from Idaho and Oregon. R. SAMPANGI (1), M. C. Aime (2), K. Mohan (1), C. Shock (3). (1) University of Idaho, Parma, ID, U.S.A.; (2) Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A.; (3) Oregon State University, Ontario, OR, U.S.A.

Vegetables

396-P. Detection and identification of pectobacteria associated with potato blackleg reveals the presence of mixed populations. X. LI (1), L. Ward (1), J. Nie (1), J. Nickerson (1), A. MacDonald (1), J. Gourley (1), S. H. De Boer (1). (1) Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Charlottetown, PE, Canada 397-P. Development of a Sweet potato leaf curl virus infectious clone for agroinfection. V. PAHALAWATTA (1). (1) Alcorn State University, Lorman, MS, U.S.A. 398-P. Incidence and genetic variation of Tobacco mosaic virus through some tomato fields of Tehran. A. ALISHIRI (1), F. Rakhshandehroo (1), H. Zamanizadeh (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, Islamic Azad University, Science and Res. Branch, Tehran, Iran 399-P. Pathogenic variation of Pectobacterium carotovorum isolates and the effects of relative humidity on the severity of bacterial stem rot in potato. J. K. Dung (1), B. K. SCHROEDER (1), D. A. Johnson (1). (1) Washington State University, Pullman, WA, U.S.A. 400-P. Biological characterization and complete genomic sequence of Apium virus Y infecting celery. D. Xu (1), H. LIU (2), S. T. Koike (3), F. Li (1), R. Li (1). (1) USDA-ARS, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.; (2) USDA ARS, Salinas, CA, U.S.A.; (3) University of California Cooperative Extension, Salinas, CA, U.S.A. 401-P. First report of Cucurbit leaf crumple virus in snap bean in Georgia. R. LARSEN (1), K. Kmiecik (2). (1) USDA ARS, Prosser, WA, U.S.A., (2) Seminis Vegetable Seeds, Deforest, WI, U.S.A.

402-P. Survival of Erwinia tracheiphila on muskmelon (Cucumis melo) leaves during wetness periods. E. SAALAU ROJAS (1), A. Owens (1), M. L. Gleason (1). (1) Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A. 403-P. Efficacy of extended-duration row covers in suppressing bacterial wilt on muskmelon (Cucumis melo) in Iowa. E. SAALAU ROJAS (1), J. C. Batzer (1), M. L. Gleason (1). (1) Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A. 404-P. Assessing genetic diversity of Erwinia tracheiphila strains isolated from different cucurbit hosts using rep-PCR. E. SAALAU ROJAS (1), J. C. Batzer (1), M. L. Gleason (1). (1) Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A. 405-P. Identification of Groundnut ringspot virus in tomato in south Florida. C. WEBSTER (1), L. Horsman (2), G. Frantz (2), C. Mellinger (2), S. Adkins (1). (1) USDA ARS, Ft. Pierce, FL, U.S.A.; (2) GCC, Jupiter, FL, U.S.A. 406-P. Characterization of Sclerotiium rolfsii isolates affecting vegetables and row crops in the southern U.S. C. XIE (1), G. Vallad (1). (1) University of Florida-Gulf Coast Res. & Ed. Ctr., Wimauma, FL, U.S.A. 407-P. Genetic diversity of the vegetable pathogen Phytophthora capsici in Argentina. D. J. GOBENA (1), J. Roig (2), J. Hulvey (1), K. Lamour (1). (1) University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, U.S.A.; (2) INTA EEA La Consulta, Mendoza, Argentina 408-P. Survey and characterization of viral diseases affecting tomato crops in the north of Chile. I. ROSALES VILLAVICENCIO (1), P. SepĂşlveda (1), C. Medina (1), M. P. MuĂąoz (1), C. Rojas-Bertini (2), R. Mora (1), M. Madariaga (1), J. K. Brown (3). (1) Instituto de Investigaciones Agropecuarias, Santiago, Chile; (2) Instituto de Investigaciones Agropecuarias, Arica, Chile; (3) Dept. of Plant Science, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, U.S.A. 409-P. Incidence of bacterial spot on pumpkins in Illinois. A. RAVANLOU (1), M. Babadoost (1). (1) University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, U.S.A. 410-P. Curtoviruses in leafy greens in Arizona. C. NISCHWITZ (1). (1) University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, U.S.A. 411-P. Identification and characterization of the causal agent of a new viral disease on sweet pepper in Taiwan. C. HUANG (1), Y. Zheng (1), Y. Cheng (2), C. Chen (1), F. Jan (1). (1) National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan; (2) Division of Plant Pathology, Agricultural Res. Institute, Taichung, Taiwan 412-P. Characterization of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in common bean white mold resistance screening locations across the U.S.A. J. STEADMAN (1), S. McCoy (1), B. Higgins (1), L. K. Otto-Hanson (2). (1) University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, U.S.A.; (2) University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, U.S.A. 413-P. Virulence and molecular characterization of Verticillium species from spinach. A. IGLESIASGARCIA (1), C. Feng (1), L. du Toit (2), K.

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2010 APS POSTERS Vegetables continued

Subbarao (3), J. Correll (1). (1) University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A.; (2) Washington State University Mount Vernon NWREC, Mount Vernon, WA, U.S.A.; (3) University of CaliforniaDavis, Salinas, CA, U.S.A. 414-P. Grafting as a disease management tool for Fusarium wilt of heirloom tomatoes in Arkansas. K. D. WELCH (1), J. C. Correll (1), J. C. Gavin (2). (1) University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A.; (2) University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service, Warren, AR, U.S.A. 415-P. A new potyvirus infecting cantaloupe (Cucumis melo) in the Imperial Valley of California. O. BATUMAN (1), E. T. Natwick (2), R. L. Gilbertson (1). (1) University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A.; (2) University of California Cooperative Extension Imperial County, Holtville, CA, U.S.A. 416-P. Effect of limestone on development of Verticillium wilt of spinach. W. YANG (1), A. Iglesia-Garcia (1), L. du Toit (2), B. Bluhm (1), J. Correll (1). (1) University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A.; (2) Mount Vernon, WA, U.S.A. 417-P. Incorporation of edible brassicacious greens did not control nematode populations. K. STEDDOM (1), K. Ong (2), J. Starr (3). (1) Texas AgriLife Extension Service, Overton, TX, U.S.A.; (2) Texas AgriLife Extension Service, College Station, TX, U.S.A.; (3) Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, U.S.A. 418-P. Identification of Streptomyces stelliscabiei causing potato common scab in Michigan. Q. MENG (1), J. Hao (1). (1) Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, U.S.A. 419-P. Study on the genetic diversity within Phytophthora capsici with nuclear, mitochondria and SNPs markers in New Mexico. S. Hanson (1), M. PEIMAN WILLIAMS (1). (1) New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM, U.S.A.

n Epidemiology/Ecology/ Environmental Biology Assessment

420-P. Assessment of agreement between apple scab and fire blight forecasts based on SkyBit predictions and on-site weather records. N. O. Halbrendt (1), J. W. Travis (1), H. K. NGUGI (1), J. Russo (2). (1) Penn State University, Biglerville, PA, U.S.A.; (2) ZEDX, Inc., Bellefonte, PA, U.S.A. 421-P. Reliability and accuracy of visual methods used to quantify foliar symptoms of bacterial spot of peach and nectarine. S. J. Bardsley (1), H. K. NGUGI (1). (1) Penn State University, Biglerville, PA, U.S.A. 422-P. Spatial and temporal dynamics of postbloom fruit drop in sweet orange orchards in Sao Paulo State, Brazil. G. J. SILVA JUNIOR (1), M. B. Spósito (2), D. R. Marin (2), L. Amorim (1). (1) Escola

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Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ/ USP), Piracicaba-SP, Brazil; (2) Fundo de Defesa da Citricultura (Fundecitrus), Araraquara-SP, Brazil 423-P. Foliar symptoms expression and early infection of soybean sudden death syndrome. M. L. ZACCARON (1), X. Yang (1), S. S. Navi (1). (1) Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A. 424-P. Assessment of SIMBLIGHT1 and SIMPHYT1 models for prediction of Phytophthora infestans oubreak in north-eastern U.S. from 2004 to 2009 seasons. M. OLANYA (1), C. Honeycutt (1), R. P. Larkin (1), Z. He (1). (1) USDA-ARS, NEPSWL, Orono, ME, U.S.A. 425-P. Validating environmental parameters for primary infection of grapes by Erysiphe necator ascospores under Michigan conditions. L. L. AVILA (1), A. R. Sullenger (1), J. Kroll (2), N. L. Rothwell (2), A. M. C. Schilder (1). (1) Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, U.S.A.; (2) Michigan State University, Traverse City, MI, U.S.A. 426-P. Risk factors and modeling of powdery mildew occurrence on hop cones. D. H. GENT (1), J. L. Farnsworth (2), M. E. Nelson (3), G. G. Grove (3). (1) USDA ARS NFSPRC, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A.; (2) Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A.; (3) Washington State University, Prosser, WA, U.S.A. 427-P. Spatial analysis of lethal chlorosis cucurbits caused by Zucchini lethal chlorosis virus (ZLCV). A. S. Moreira (1), C. R. Costa (1), J. C. Barbosa (1), A. B. FILHO (1), J. A. Rezende (1), J. S. Giampan (2). (1) Escola Superior de Agricultura “Luiz de Queiroz”/Universidade de São Paulo, Piracicaba, Brazil; (2) Instituto Agrônomico do Paraná, Londrina, Brazil 428-P. Transmission of Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus by cucumber pollen. H. LIU (1), L. Luo (1), J. Hao (2), J. Li (1). (1) China Agricultural University, Beijing, PRC Peoples Rep of China; (2) Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, U.S.A. 429-P. Evaluating Thrips tabaci and Frankliniella fusca (Thysanoptera: Thripridae) as vectors of Iris yellow spot virus. R. SRINIVASAN (1), H. Pappu (2), D. G. Riley (1), R. D. Gitaitis (1). (1) University of Georgia, Tifton, GA, U.S.A.; (2) Washington State University, Pullman, WA, U.S.A.

Biology

430-P. Effect of VAM colonization in pistachio rootstock on growth, nutrition and Phytophthora root rot. A. Mohammadi (1), Z. BANIHASHEMI (2). (1) Iran Pistachio Res. Center, Rafsenjan, Iran; (2) Shiraz University, Shiraz, Iran 431-P. F&D Influence of crop rotation on persistence of the atoxigenic strain Aspergillus flavus AF36 in Arizona. R. JAIME-GARCIA (1), P. J. Cotty (2). (1) University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, U.S.A.; (2) USDA ARS/University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, U.S.A.


F&D indicates a Flash-and-Dash presentations. 432-P. Mitigation of aflatoxin contamination in Nigerian maize with atoxigenic strain mixtures. J. ATEHNKENG (1), P. J. Cotty (2), R. Bandyopadhyay (1). (1) International Institute for Tropical Agriculture, Ibadan, Nigeria; (2) University of Arizona, USDA ARS, Tucson, AZ, U.S.A. 433-P. Brown girdling root rot as a potential threat to canola production in North Dakota. A. NEPAL (1), L. E. del Rio Mendoza (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, U.S.A. 434-P. Validation of the accuracy of single-kernel nearinfrared technology to sort winter wheat kernels based on scab and deoxynivalenol levels. S. WEGULO (1), K. Peiris (2), P. Baenziger (1), F. Dowell (2). (1) University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. 435-P. A bacterial pathogen uses distinct type III secretion systems to alternate between host kingdoms. V. R. CORREA (1), D. R. Majerczak (2), E. Ammar (3), M. Merighi (2), R. C. Pratt (1), M. G. Redinbaugh (4), D. L. Coplin (2), S. A. Hogenhout (5). (1) Dept. of Horticulture and Crop Science, OARDC/ The Ohio State University, Wooster, OH, U.S.A.; (2) Dept. of Plant Pathology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, U.S.A.; (3) Dept. of Entomology, OARDC/The Ohio State University, Wooster, OH, U.S.A.; (4) USDA, ARS Corn and Soybean Res. Unit/Dept. of Plant Pathology, OARDC/The Ohio State University, Wooster, OH, U.S.A.; (5) Dept. of Disease and Stress Biology/ The John Innes Centre, Colney, Norwich, United Kingdom 436-P. Fairy ring disease of cranberry: Dissecting the life cycle and development of control strategies. P. V. OUDEMANS (1), J. Polashock (2), J. Vaiciunas (1). (1) Rutgers University, Chatsworth, NJ, U.S.A.; (2) USDA ARS, Chatsworth, NJ, U.S.A. 437-P. Comparison of fumigation, mustard meal amendments, and grafting on bulk soil microbial communities in tomato fields. B. LIU (1), J. Sun (2), C. Rivard (2), R. Welker (2), F. J. Louws (2). (1) North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; (2) PLPA, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A. 438-P. Bacterial communities associated to Eucalyptus plants infected by Ceratocystis fimbriata. A. FERREIRA (1), E. R. Gonzáles (2), F. D. Andreote (3), J. Azevedo (1), W. L. Araújo (4). (1) Dept. of Genetics, Escola Superior de Agricultura “Luiz de Queiroz”, University of São Paulo, Piracicaba, SP, Brazil; (2) Suzano Bahia Sul Papel e Celulose S/A, Suzano, SP, Brazil; (3) Embrapa Meio Ambiente, Jaguariúna, SP, Brazil; (4) Laboratory of Molecular Biology and Microbial Ecology, NIB, University of Mogi das Cruzes, SP, Mogi das Cruzes, SP, Brazil

Environment

439-P. Effects of temperature and wetness duration on the sporulation rate of Phomopsis viticola on infected grape canes. D. J. ANCO (1), L. V. Madden (1), M. A. Ellis (1). (1) Ohio State University, OARDC, Wooster, OH, U.S.A. 440-P. Role of El Niño—Southern oscillation and atmospheric teleconnection patterns on variability of Fusarium head blight in Ohio. A. B. KRISS (1), P. A. Paul (1), L. V. Madden (1). (1) Ohio State University, OARDC, Wooster, OH, U.S.A. 441-P. Influence of environment on periodicity and concentration of airborne Pseudoperonospora cubensis sporangia in commercial cucurbit fields. L. GRANKE (1), M. Hausbeck (1). (1) Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, U.S.A. 442-P. Analysis of induction and establishment of dwarf bunt of wheat under marginal climatic conditions. B. J. GOATES (1), G. L. Peterson (2), R. L. Bowden (3), L. D. Maddux (4). (1) USDA ARS, Aberdeen, ID, U.S.A.; (2) USDA ARS, Frederick, MD, U.S.A.; (3) USDA ARS, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.; (4) Kansas State University, Topeka, KS, U.S.A. 443-P. Cultivar susceptibility influences the leaf wetness duration (LWD) and temperature relationship of Alternaria alternata citrus infection. S. N. Mondal (1), L. P. Timmer (1), M. M. DEWDNEY (1). (1) CREC, University of Florida, Lake Alfred, FL, U.S.A. 444-P. Effect of temperature on clubroot (Plasmodiophora brassicae) symptom initiation on Shanghai pak choy. K. Sharma (1), B. D. Gossen (2), M. MCDONALD (3). (1) University of Kassel, Witzenhausen, Germany; (2) Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada, Saskatoon, SK, Canada; (3) University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada 445-P. Moderate temperature fluctuations rapidly reduce viability of Ralstonia solanacearum race 3 biovar 2 in infected geranium, tomato, and potato. J. M. Scherf (1), A. Milling (1), C. ALLEN (1). (1) University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A. 446-P. Effect of temperature on survival of chlamydospores and oospores of Phytophthora species in irrigation water. W. HAO (1), C. Hong (1). (1) VPI & State University, Virginia Beach, VA, U.S.A. 447-P. Weather patterns and the distribution of Asian soybean rust in the United States. R. O. OLATINWO (1), R. C. Kemerait (2), J. O. Paz (3), G. Hoogenboom (1). (1) University of Georgia, Griffin, GA, U.S.A.; (2) University of Georgia, Tifton, GA, U.S.A.; (3) Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, U.S.A. 448-P. The effects of temperature, humidity, and wounding on development of Phytophthora rot of cucumber. L. L. GRANKE (1), M. K. Hausbeck (1). (1) Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, U.S.A. 449-P. Revising the high temperature threshold for the Gubler-Thomas grape powdery mildew risk index. J. C. BROOME (1), E. K. Hand (1), P. Backup

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2010 APS POSTERS Environment continued

(1), C. N. Janousek (1), W. D. Gubler (1). (1) University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A. 450-P. Numerical simulation of the long-distance transports of wheat stripe rust pathogen in China. H. WANG (1), X. Yang (2), Z. Ma (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, China Agricultural University, Beijing, PRC Peoples Rep of China; (2) Dept. of Plant Pathology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A. 451-P. Influence of temperature in the aquisition of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter americanus’ by Diaphorina citri. J. C. BARBOSA (1), B. Eckstein (1), M. Gasparoto (1), R. da Silva (2), J. Belasque Jr. (2), A. Bergamin Filho (1). (1) Esalq-USP, Piracicaba, BRAZIL; (2) Fundecitrus, Araraquara, Brazil 452-P. Influence of environmental conditions on the development of soybean rust epidemics in soybean fields in Nigeria. M. TWIZEYIMANA (1), P. S. Ojiambo (2), R. Bandyopadhyay (3), G. L. Hartman (1). (1) University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, U.S.A.; (2) North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; (3) International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Ibadan, Nigeria 453-P. Influence of temperature and leaf wetness duration on orange rust of sugarcane. T. D. MARTINS (1), R. N. Raid (2), W. L. Burnquist (3), A. S. Urashima (4), A. Bergamin Filho (1), J. Comstock (5). (1) Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz/USP, Piracicaba, Brazil; (2) Everglades Res. and Education Center/University of Florida, Belle Glade, FL, U.S.A.; (3) Centro de Tecnologia Canavieira, Piracicaba, Brazil; (4) Centro de Ciências Agrárias/UFSCar, Araras, Brazil; (5) USDA/Sugarcane Field Station, Canal Point, FL, U.S.A. 454-P. Irrigation water is an unlikely source of inoculum of Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis. S. J. MAUZEY (1), C. T. Bull (2). (1) California State University Monterey Bay, Seaside, CA, U.S.A.; (2) USDA ARS, Salinas, CA, U.S.A. 455-P. F&D Climate change and potato late blight suppression. J. P. Comstock (1), D. W. Wolfe (1), L. Joseph (1), A. T. Degaetano (1), W. E. FRY (1). (1) Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A.

Etiology and Ecology

456-P. Movement, germination and production of Puccinia pelargonii-zonalis urediniospores on greenhousegrown geraniums. E. A. SCOCCO (1), J. Buck (1). (1) University of Georgia, Griffin, GA, U.S.A. 457-P. Root susceptibility and inoculum production from roots of eastern oak species to Phytophthora ramorum. T. L. WIDMER (1), N. Shishkoff (2), S. Dodge (2). (1) USDA ARS FDWSRU, Frederick, MD, U.S.A.; (2) FDWSRU/ARS/USDA, Frederick, MD, U.S.A. APS 458-P. FOUNDATION Epidemiological studies on Blackberry yellow vein associated virus. B. POUDEL (1),

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W. M. Wintermantel (2), S. Sabanadzovic (3), I. E. Tzanetakis (1). (1) University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS, Salinas, CA, U.S.A.; (3) Mississipi State University, Starkville, MS, U.S.A. 459-P. Presence of airborne inoculum of Mycosphaerella graminicola and occurrence of sexual reproduction during the growing season in Belgium. A. Clinckemaillie (1), G. Dedeurwaerder (1), M. Duvivier (2), J. Moreau (2), A. LEGREVE (1). (1) Université catholique de Louvain, Louvain-laNeuve, Belgium; (2) Centre wallon de Recherches agronomiques, Gembloux, Belgium 460-P. F&D Effects of water vapor, liquid water, and their interaction on the germination of urediniospores of Phakopsora pachyrhizi. M. R. BONDE (1). (1) USDA ARS, Frederick, MD, U.S.A. 461-P. A predictive model for carpogenic germination of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. A. NEPAL (1), L. E. del Rio Mendoza (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, U.S.A. 462-P. Chilling injury in tomatoes exposed to low temperatures in the field. J. A. BARTZ (1), M. A. Ritenour (2), M. Elkahky (3). (1) University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A.; (2) University of Florida/Indian River Res. and Education Center, Fort Pierce, FL, U.S.A.; (3) Plant Pathology Dept./ University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A. 463-P. Investigations of crown gall in the commercial propagation of weeping fig. W. TURECHEK (1). (1) USDA ARS SAA SPP, Fort Pierce, FL, U.S.A. 464-P. Density dependent latency in the grapevine powdery mildew (Erysiphe necator). D. M. GADOURY (1), M. M. Moyer (2), R. C. Seem (2), W. F. Wilcox (2), L. M. Wakefield (2), P. A. Magarey (3). (1) Cornell University, Geneva, NY, U.S.A.; (2) Cornell University NYSAES, Geneva, NY, U.S.A.; (3) Magarey Plant Pathology, Loxton, SA, Australia 465-P. Effect of temperature on latent period of Stagonospora nodorum blotch in winter wheat under field conditions. A. D. ZEARFOSS (1), C. Cowger (2), P. S. Ojiambo (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS, Dept. of Plant Pathology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A. 466-P. F&D Genetic structure of Phytophthora infestans population in eastern North America, 2002–2009. C. HU (1), F. G. Perez (2), R. Donahoo (3), A. McLeod (4), K. L. Myers (4), K. L. Ivors (5), P. D. Roberts (3), W. E. Fry (4), K. L. Deah (2), J. B. Ristaino (6). (1) North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS/PSI-Genetic Improvement of Fruits and Vegetables Laboratory, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.; (3) IFAS-SWFREC, University of Florida, Immokalee, FL, U.S.A.; (4) Dept. of Plant Pathology, Cornell University, Ithaca,


F&D indicates a Flash-and-Dash presentations. NY, U.S.A.; (5) MHCREC, North Carolina State University, Mills River, NC, U.S.A.; (6) Dept. of Plant Pathology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A. 467-P. The relationship between genetic diversity of Ralstonia solanancearum and mechanical transmission in tobacco. P. D. PETERSON (1), B. A. Fortnum (1), A. L. Mila (2). (1) Clemson University, Florence, SC, U.S.A.; (2) North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A. 468-P. Phytophthora capsici in New York State: Resistance to mefenoxam and population structure. A. R. CAMP (1), M. G. Milgroom (2), J. C. Meitz (3), A. McLeod (3), W. E. Fry (2), M. T. McGrath (4), H. R. Dillard (1), C. D. Smart (1). (1) Cornell University, Geneva, NY, U.S.A.; (2) Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A.; (3) University of Stellenbosch, Stellenbosch, Southwest Africa; (4) Cornell University, Riverhead, NY, U.S.A.

Incidence & Diversity

469-P. A survey for grapevine viruses in Virginia vineyards. M. NITA (1), T. Mekuria (2), R. A. Naidu (3). (1) Virginia Tech, Winchester, VA, U.S.A.; (2) Washington State University, IAREC, Prosser, WA, U.S.A.; (3) Washington State University, Prosser, WA, U.S.A. 470-P. Specific patterns of co-occurrence of grapevine viruses in Washington vineyards. M. NITA (1), T. Mekuria (2), R. A. Naidu (3). (1) Virginia Tech, Winchester, VA, U.S.A.; (2) Washington State University, IAREC, Prosser, WA, U.S.A.; (3) Washington State University, Prosser, WA, U.S.A. 471-P. Insights into the introduction of bacterial heart rot of pineapple to Hawaiian plantations on the basis of molecular and biochemical analyses. G. MARRERO (1), W. Kaneshiro Sueno (1), A. S. De Silva (1), A. M. Alvarez (1). (1) University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI, U.S.A. 472-P. First detection of Phakopsora pachyrhizi on jicama in the United States and on Florida beggarweed in Alabama. M. A. DELANEY (1), E. Sikora (2). (1) Auburn University Extension, Auburn, AL, U.S.A.; (2) Auburn University, Auburn, AL, U.S.A, 473-P. Viruses infecting cucurbit crops in Oklahoma. A. ALI (1), A. Khattab (2). (1) University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK, U.S.A.; (2) Dept. of Biological Science, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK, U.S.A. 474-P. Modeling Fusarium head blight and deoxynivalenol content in barley in response to field temperature and wetness durations. K. D. BONDALAPATI (1), J. M. Stein (1). (1) South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD, U.S.A. 475-P. WITHDRAWN Phytopathology 100:S10 APS Spatial and temporal analyses of Plum 476-P. FOUNDATION pox virus survey data. A. GOUGHERTY (1), R. Welliver (2), N. Richwine (2), F. W. Nutter (1). (1) Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A.; (2) Pennsylvania Dept. of Agriculture, Harrisburg, PA, U.S.A.

477-P. Emergence and establishment of Cucurbit yellow stunting disorder virus in California and Arizona poses a threat to desert melon production. W. M. WINTERMANTEL (1), R. L. Gilbertson (2), E. T. Natwick (3), J. K. Brown (4). (1) USDA ARS, Salinas, CA, U.S.A.; (2) Dept. of Plant Pathology, University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A.; (3) University of California Desert Res. and Extension Center, Holtville, CA, U.S.A.; (4) Dept. of Plant Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, U.S.A. Poster WITHDRAWN Phytopathology 100:S133 478-P. Thousand cankers disease of walnut: Status in California. J. K. Hasey (1), R. M. BOSTOCK (2), T. J. Michailides (3). (1) University of California, Yuba City, CA, U.S.A.; (2) University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A.; (3) University of California, Parlier, CA, U.S.A. 479-P. Multiple effects of grafting on tomatoes and associated microbial communities. C. CAO (1), F. Baysal-Gurel (2), S. A. Miller (2), T. L. Graham (3), M. D. Kleinhenz (2), D. M. Francis (2), B. B. McSpadden Gardener (2). (1) The Ohio State University, Wooster, OH, U.S.A.; (2) The Ohio State University, OARDC, Wooster, OH, U.S.A.; (3) The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, U.S.A. 480-P. Monitoring latent Colletotrichum acutatum infections in strawberry using a bioassay and realtime PCR in organic and conventional systems. M. E. CARNES (1), M. Rahman (1), F. J. Louws (1). (1) North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A. 481-P. Effects of sampling methods on the assessment of populations of Xanthomonas hortorum pv. carotae on carrot plants and on harvested carrot seeds. B. M. WU (1). (1) Oregon State University, Madras, OR, U.S.A. 482-P. Sensitive detection and discrimination of different Pepino mosaic virus genotypes. N. MEHLE (1), I. Gutierrez-Aguirre (1), N. Prezelj (1), D. Delic (2), U. Vidic (1), P. Kramberger (3), M. Ravnikar (1). (1) National Institute of Biology, Ljubljana, Slovenia; (2) University of Banjaluka, Faculty of Agriculture, Banjaluka, Bosnia-Herzegovina; (3) BIA Separations d.o.o, Ljubljana, Slovenia 483-P. Differentiation of Xylella fastidiosa strains via analysis of environmentally mediated genes. J. K. PARKER (1), L. De La Fuente (1). (1) Auburn University, Auburn, AL, U.S.A. 484-P. High-throughput detection of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum from oilseed rape by Taqman quantitative real-time PCR. C. CHEN (1), W. Zhao (1), M. Zhou (1), J. Wang (1). (1) Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, PRC Peoples Rep of China 485-P. Variation in the number of subrepeat sequence in the IGS region identifies isolates of Verticillium dahliae from crucifer hosts. K. MARUTHACHALAM (1), Z. K. Atallah (1), K. V. Subbarao (2). (1) University of California, Salinas,

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2010 APS POSTERS

Incidence & Diversity continued

CA, U.S.A.; (2) University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A. 486-P. Diversity of the tobacco black shank pathogen, Phytophthora nicotianae, in Virginia. V. PARKUNAN (1), C. Johnson (2), C. Hong (1). (1) VPI & State University, Virginia Beach, VA, U.S.A.; (2) VPI & State University, Blackstone, VA, U.S.A. 487-P. Molecular diversity and population dynamics of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis in the Caribbean region of Colombia. C. A. TRUJILLO (1), S. Restrepo (1), C. E. López (2), J. Esquivel (3), A. Bernal (1). (1) Universidad de Los Andes, Bogota, Colombia; (2) Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota, Colombia; (3) Corporation for the Sustainable and Participative Management of the Rural Small Growers in Colombia, PBA, Bogota, Colombia 488-P. Genotypic diversity of Phytophthora ramorum in Canada. E. M. GOSS (1), M. Larsen (1), A. Vercauteren (2), S. Werres (3), K. Heungens (2), N. J. Grunwald (1). (1) USDA ARS, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A.; (2) Institute for Agricultural and Fisheries Res., Merelbeke, Belgium; (3) Julius Kuehn Institute-Federal Res. Centre for Cultivated Plants, Braunschweig, Germany 489-P. F&D Guangdong (China) and Florida (U.S.) populations of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ distinguished by a genomic locus with short tandem repeats. J. CHEN (1), X. Deng (2), X. Sun (3), D. Jones (3), M. Irey (4), E. Civerolo (5). (1) USDA ARS PWA, Parlier, CA, U.S.A.; (2) South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, PRC Peoples Rep of China; (3) Division of Plant Industry, Dept. of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A.; (4) US Sugar Corp./S. Gardens Citrus, Clewiston, FL, U.S.A.; (5) USDA-ARS, Parlier, CA, U.S.A. APS 490-P. FOUNDATION Inferring evolutionary relationships of species in the Phytophthora Ic clade using nuclear and mitochondrial genes. E. S. LASSITER (1), C. Russ (2), C. Nusbaum (2), Q. Zeng (2), C. Hu (3), J. Thorne (1), J. B. Ristaino (3). (1) Dept. of Genetics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; (2) Broad Institute, Cambridge; (3) Dept. of Plant Pathology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A. 491-P. Fine-scale genetic structure of flowering dogwood in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. D. HADZIABDIC (1), B. M. Fitzpatrick (1), X. Wang (2), P. A. Wadl (1), T. A. Rinehart (3), B. H. Ownley (1). (1) University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, U.S.A.; (2) Texas A&M-Texas AgriLife Res. and Extension Urban Solutions Center, Dallas, TX, U.S.A.; (3) USDA-ARS, Southern Horticultural Laboratory, Poplarville, MS, U.S.A. 492-P. Multilocus analysis of Rhizoctonia solani and related species associated with rice sheath blight in Arkansas. V. L. CASTROAGUDIN (1), R. D.

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Cartwright (1), J. C. Correll (1). (1) University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A. 493-P. Genotypic and phenotypic diversity of Pyricularia oryzae in the contemporary rice blast pathogen population in Arkansas. L. ZHAI (1), C. Feng (1), R. Cartwright (1), J. Correll (1). (1) University of Arkansas, Dept. of Plant Pathology, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A. 494-P. Genetic variation and adaptation of M. perniciosa isolates in Bahia, Brazil. K. P. GRAMACHO (1), J. Pires (2), R. Moreira (3), U. V. Lopes (2). (1) CEPLAC CEPEC SEFIT, Itabuna, Bahia, Brazil; (2) CEPLAC CEPEC SEGEN, Itabuna, Brazil; (3) UFR, Cruz das Almas, Brazil 495-P. Correlation between antibody-binding properties and seasonal disease severity indices of Dickeya sp. that cause bacterial heart rot of pineapple. G. D. Peckham (1), A. de Silva (1), J. M. Berestecky (2), A. M. ALVAREZ (1). (1) University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, U.S.A.; (2) Kapiolani Community College, Honolulu, HI, U.S.A. 496-P. Genetic characterization of Fusarium verticillioides associated with ear rot of maize in Nigeria. K. SHARMA (1), M. Ayodele (1), P. Lava Kumar (1). (1) International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Ibadan, Nigeria 497-P. Identification of Burkholderia sp. genes related to biological control of phytopathogens. E. T. Mano (1), A. A. Neves (1), V. C. Santos (2), A. FERREIRA (2), W. L. Araújo (1). (1) Laboratory of Molecular Biology and Microbial Ecology, NIB, University of Mogi das Cruzes, Mogi das Cruzes, SP, Brazil; (2) Dept. of Genetics, Escola Superior de Agricultura “Luiz de Queiroz”, University of São Paulo, Piracicaba, SP, Brazil

Phyllosphere/Rhizosphere Microbiology

498-P. Investigating the ironwood tree (Casuarina equisetifolia) decline on Guam using applied multinomial modeling. K. A. SCHLUB (1), B. D. Marx (1), Z. Mersha (2), R. L. Schlub (2). (1) Dept. of Experimental Statistics, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A.; (2) Guam Cooperative Extension Service, University of Guam, Mangilao, GUAM 499-P. Effect of diverse cropping systems on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal community diversity and structure. E. G. JOHNSON (1), J. H. Graham (1), D. O. Chellemi (2). (1) University of Florida, Lake Alfred, FL, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS-USHRL, Ft. Pierce, FL, U.S.A. 500-P. Soil and rhizosphere populations of fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. associated with field-grown plants are affected by sorghum genotype. D. L. FUNNELLHARRIS (1), J. F. Pedersen (1), S. E. Sattler (1). (1) USDA ARS, Lincoln, NE, U.S.A.


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2010 APS POSTERS

Phyllosphere/Rhizosphere Microbiology continued

501-P. Phenology of natural inoculation of apples by sooty blotch and flyspeck fungi in Iowa apple orchards. S. ISMAIL (1), J. C. Batzer (1), D. A. Mayfield (1), M. L. Gleason (1). (1) Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A. 502-P. Enhanced quality, value, yield, carbon capture, and sustainability of switchgrass biomass by the improvement of root, microbe, and soil interactions. S. GHIMIRE (1), K. Craven (1), S. Chaluvadi (2), J. Bennetzen (2), E. Worley (1), J. Yang (1), M. Udvardi (1), M. Keller (3). (1) The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK, U.S.A.; (2) The University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A.; (3) BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, TN, U.S.A. 503-P. Effect of pH on the growth of Rhizoctonia spp. from cereal-based cropping systems in eastern Washington State. A. MOHD JAAFFAR (1), D. M. Weller (2), T. C. Paulitz (2), L. S. Thomashow (2). (1) Washington State University, Pullman, WA, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS, Pullman, WA, U.S.A. 504-P. F&D Comparison of bacterial communities from inside and outside of Rhizoctonia bare patches in wheat. C. Yin (1), S. H. Hulbert (1), K. L. Schroeder (2), O. Mavrodi (1), D. Mavrodi (1), A. Dhingra (3), T. C. PAULITZ (2). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS, Root Disease and Biological Control Res. Unit, Pullman, WA, U.S.A.; (3) Dept. of Horiculture and Landscape Architecture, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, U.S.A. 505-P. Use of a strip-till cover crop system to manipulate above and below ground organisms in cucurbit plantings. K. WANG (1), C. R. Hooks (2), S. P. Marahatta (1). (1) University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, U.S.A.; (2) University of Maryland, College Park, MD, U.S.A. 506-P. Effect of strawberry nursery infestation with Colletotrichum gloeosporioides on fruiting field anthracnose crown rot severity. M. RAHMAN (1), M. E. Carnes (1), F. J. Louws (1). (1) North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A. 507-P. Comparison of fumigation, mustard meal (MM) amendments, and grafting on Fusarium and Pythium communities in tomato fields. B. LIU (1), J. Sun (2), F. Louws (2). (1) North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; (2) PLPA, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A. 508-P. The role of fungal endophytes in the production of natural products in Echinacea purpurea. R. J. GUALANDI (1), K. D. Gwinn (1), B. H. Ownley (1), R. M. Auge (1). (1) University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, U.S.A. 509-P. Impact of mycorrhizal infection on sensitivity of wheat to sorghum allelopathy. M. M. ABDELKARIM (1), R. J. Gualandi (1), K. D. Gwinn (1), B. H. Ownley (1). (1) University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, U.S.A.

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F&D DNA pyrosequencing to determine the influence of fallow period on soil microbial communities in the Bolivian highlands. L. GOMEZ (1), A. Jumpponen (1), M. A. Gonzales (2), J. Cusicanqui (3), C. Valdivia (4), P. Motavalli (4), M. Herman (1), K. A. Garrett (1). (1) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.; (2) Fundacion PROINPA, La Paz, Bolivia; (3) Universidad Mayor de San Andres, La Paz, Bolivia; (4) University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, U.S.A. 511-P. Identification and characterization of fungal communities associated with soybean roots in Minnesota. J. C. BIENAPFL (1), D. K. Malvick (1), J. A. Percich (1). (1) University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, U.S.A. 512-P. F&D The relationship between endophytic Bacillus cereus and Bacillus cereus causing foodborne illness. R. MELNICK (1). (1) Penn State University, University Park, PA, U.S.A. 513-P. The effects of soil steaming on the abundance of bacterial microflora in the rhizosphere and roots of chrysanthemum. M. BURKETT-CADENA (1), E. van Santen (1), J. Kloepper (1). (1) Auburn University, Auburn, AL, U.S.A. 514-P. Infected fruit as source of inoculum and infection dynamic on olive anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum acutatum. J. Moral (1), M. VICENTE (1), A. Trapero-Casas (1). (1) Universidad de Cordoba, Cordoba, Spain 510-P.

APS FOUNDATION

Resistance

515-P. Ontogenic resistance to powdery mildew in hop cones: Implications for disease management. J. L. WOODS (1), M. E. Nelson (2), G. G. Grove (2), D. H. Gent (3). (1) USDA ARS, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A.; (2) Washington State University, Prosser, WA, U.S.A.; (3) USDA-ARS/Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A. 516-P. Evaluation of inoculation methods for screening of rapeseed materials for resistance against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. P. BURLAKOTI (1), V. Magnusson (2), W. D. Dai (2), L. E. del Rio Mendoza (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, U.S.A.; (2) Dept.of Plant Science, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, U.S.A. 517-P. F&D Effects of crop and environmental variables on sugarcane brown rust epidemics in Louisiana. W. BARRERA (1). (1) Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A. 518-P. F&D Screening of St. Augustinegrass (Stenotaphrum secundatum) germplasm for brown patch and large patch resistance. N. C. FLOR (1), P. F. Harmon (1), L. E. Datnoff (2), R. N. Raid (3). (1) University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A.; (2) Dept. of Plant Pathology & Crop Physiology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A.; (3) University of Florida, Belle Glade, FL, U.S.A.


F&D indicates a Flash-and-Dash presentations. 519-P. F&D A Cucumber mosaic virus mutant that induces resistance to its aphid vector in tobacco. H. ZIEBELL (1), A. Murphy (2), M. G. Lewsey (2), J. H. Westwood (2), K. L. Perry (1), M. Stevens (3), J. P. Carr (2). (1) Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A.; (2) Cambridge University, Cambridge, United Kingdom; (3) Broom’s Barn Applied Crop Sciences, Bury St. Edmunds, United Kingdom 520-P. PGPR potential of Bacillus isolated from potato rhizosphere in the Andean highlands of Peru. P. CALVO-VELEZ (1), E. Ormeño-Orillo (2), E. Martínez-Romero (2), A. Oswald (3), D. ZuñigaDavila (4). (1) Auburn University, Auburn, AL, U.S.A.; (2) Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Cuernavaca, Mexico; (3) International Potato Center, Lima, Peru; (4) Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina, Lima, Peru

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F&D Cuticle plays an important role in basal as well as induced defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Y. XIA (1), Q. Gao (1), K. Yu (1), A. Kachroo (1), P. Kachroo (1). (1) University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, U.S.A. 522-P. Incidence of Agrobacterium tumefaciens on walnut seeds used for rootstock production: Implications for crown gall management strategies. L. E. YAKABE (1), S. R. Parker (1), D. A. Kluepfel (1). (1) USDA ARS Crops Pathology/Genetics Res. Unit, Davis, CA, U.S.A. 523-P. The role of calcium and other minerals on biofilm formation and adhesion force in Xylella fastidiosa cells. L. CRUZ (1), L. De La Fuente (1). (1) Auburn University, Auburn, AL, U.S.A. 524-P. Genotyping Xylella fastidiosa strains using multiplex PCR. B. A. MYERS (1), J. A. Brady (2), F. L. Mitchell (2), H. B. Rathburn (1). (1) Tarleton State University, Stephenville, TX, U.S.A.; (2) Texas AgriLife Res., Stephenville, TX, U.S.A. 525-P. Expression rate of the zonula occludens toxin (zot) gene in two growth states and two media types of Xylella fastidiosa. H. L. SCHREIBER (1), C. E. Skipper (1), J. M. Repshare (1), L. D. Morano (2), B. R. Bextine (1). (1) University of Texas, Tyler, TX, U.S.A.; (2) University of Houston-Downtown, Houston, TX, U.S.A. 526-P. Role of structural polysaccharides in the virulence and transmission of Xylella fastidiosa. N. KILLINY (1), R. Almeida (1). (1) University of California, Berkeley, CA, U.S.A. 527-P. Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes with differential susceptibility to the bacterial pathogen Xylella fastidiosa. E. E. ROGERS (1). (1) USDA-ARS, Parlier, CA, U.S.A.

521-P.

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2010 APS POSTERS Bacteria continued

528-P. A single amino acid substitution in PthA of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri altering canker formation on grapefruit leaves. H. LIN (1), S. Hsu (2), K. Tzeng (2). (1) Chungchou Institute of Technology, Changhua County, Taiwan; (2) National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan 529-P. Characterization of canker resistance in citrus plants created by “somatic cybridization”. M. I. FRANCIS (1), A. Pena (1), J. W. Grosser (1), J. H. Graham (1). (1) University of Florida, Lake Alfred, FL, U.S.A. Poster WITHDRAWN Phytopathology 100:S133 530-P. Genome sequence and comparative genomics of Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. glycinea. M. QI (1), D. Wang (1), C. A. Bradley (1), Y. Zhao (1). (1) University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, U.S.A. 531-P. Identification of potential virulence genes of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’, the pathogen associated with citrus greening (huanglongbing). A. SREEDHARAN (1), N. Wang (1). (1) University of Florida, Lake Alfred, FL, U.S.A. 532-P. CorA, a magnesium/nickel/cobalt transporter is required for full virulence in the soft rot pathogen, Pectobacterium carotovorum. C. KERSEY (1), C. K. Dumenyo (1). (1) Tennessee State University, Nashville, TN, U.S.A. 533-P. The ColS/ColR two-component system is involved in virulence of citrus canker pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri 306. Q. YAN (1), N. Wang (1). (1) Lake Alfred, FL, U.S.A. 534-P. F&D Expression profiling of host response of citrus to “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ infection. V. ARITUA (1), N. Wang (1). (1) Citrus Res. and Education Center, University of Florida, Lake Alfred, FL, U.S.A. 535-P. Biofilm formation and virulence associated with lipopolysaccharide biosynthetic genes in Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri. J. LI (1). (1) Citrus Res. and Education Center, University of Florida IFAS, Lake Alfred, FL, U.S.A. 536-P. RpfC control tctE/tctD expression and mutations in the genes reduced virulence of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae KACC10859. J. CHO (1), M. Jeong (2), W. Kim (3), J. Cha (2). (1) Chungbuk National Univ., Cheongju, South Korea; (2) Cheongju, South Korea; (3) Iksan, South Korea 537-P. Development of a quantitative real-time PCR protocol for the analysis of early colonization of sugarcane plantlets with Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli. G. Carvalho (1), R. S. de Faria (1), F. R. Oliveira (1), A. T. Ramos (1), C. B. Monteiro-Vitorello (1), L. E. CAMARGO (1). (1) University of São Paulo, Piracicaba, Brazil 538-P. Identification and characterization of genes involved in the type VI secretion system in Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis. N. MONTENEGRO (1), A. Alvarez (1), S. Restrepo (1), A. J. Bernal (1). (1)

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Universidad de Los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia 539-P. F&D Proteomics analysis of Ralstonia solanacearum identifies candidate proteins that contribute to pathogenicity on tomato plants at low temperatures. A. BOCSANCZY (1), U. C. Achenbach (2), D. J. Norman (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, University of Florida, IFASMREC, Apopka, FL, U.S.A.; (2) Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology and Biotechnology of Plants (IMBIO), Bonn, Germany 540-P. AvrGf1 from Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri strain Aw targets the chloroplast in grapefruit leaves. J. FIGUEIREDO (1), N. Potnis (1), P. Romer (2), T. Lahaye (2), J. Jones (1). (1) University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A.; (2) Martinsried, Germany 541-P. F&D Involvement of chloroplast localized reactive oxygen species in promoting host and nonhost bacterial pathogens induced cell death. Y. ISHIGA (1), T. Ishiga (1), T. Wangdi (1), C. Ryu (1), K. S. Mysore (1), S. R. Uppalapati (1). (1) The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK, U.S.A. 542-P. F&D Environmental regulation of stomate-based defense against bacterial infection in Arabidopsis. R. CHITRAKAR (1), M. Melotto (1). (1) University of Texas, Arlington, TX, U.S.A. 543-P. F&D Characterization of extracytoplasmic function sigma factors in plant pathogenesis by Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a. P. BASU THAKUR (1). (1) Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, U.S.A. APS 544-P. FOUNDATION F&D Comparative in planta microarray analysis modifies the regulatory model for the type three secretion system in Ralstonia solanacearum. J. M. JACOBS (1), F. Meng (1), L. Babujee (1), A. Milling (1), C. Allen (1). (1) University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A. 545-P. A bioinformatic study of pathogenicity factors in Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis. M. L. ARRIETA (1), L. M. Rodriguez-R (1), R. Koebnik (2), S. Restrepo (1), A. Bernal (1). (1) Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia; (2) Institut de recherche pour le développement, Montpellier, France 546-P. Characterization of type IV pilus in the bacterial biocontrol agent Lysobacter enzymogenes strain C3. N. PATEL (1), B. Hillman (1), D. Kobayashi (1). (1) Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ, U.S.A. 547-P. Identification of Xanthomonas sp. using resonance Raman spectroscopy. M. L. Paret (1), S. K. Sharma (2), A. K. Misra (2), T. Acosta (2), A. S. de Silva (1), T. Vowell (1), A. M. ALVAREZ (1). (1) Dept. of Plant and Environmental Protection Sciences, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI, U.S.A.; (2) Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, Honolulu, HI, U.S.A. 548-P. The rpfF mutation of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. glycines reduces bacterial pustule disease and


F&D indicates a Flash-and-Dash presentations. activates defense in soybean. S. Prathuangwong (1), W. Chuaboon (1), T. Chatnaparat (1), J. Thowthampitak (1) D. ATHINUWAT (2). (1) Kasetsart University, Chatuchack, Bangkok, Thailand; (2) Cornell University, Geneva, NY, U.S.A. 549-P. F&D A flgB mutation in Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. glycines confers reduced bacterial pustule disease of soybean. D. ATHINUWAT (1), T. J. Burr (1), S. Prathuangwong (2). (1) Cornell University, Geneva, NY, U.S.A.; (2) Kasetsart University, Bangkok, Thailand; (2) Cornell University, Geneva, NY, U.S.A. 550-P. The mechanisms associated with cellular resistance of calamondin and kumquat to citrus canker caused by Xanthomonas anxonopodis pv. citri. B. CHEN (1), L. Wang (2), K. Chung (3), M. Lee (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan; (2) Plant Protection Dept., Chiayi Agricultural Experiment Branch, Agricultural Res. Institute, Council of Agriculture, Chiayi, Taiwan; (3) Citrus Res. and Education Center, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS), University of Florida, Lake Alfred, FL, U.S.A. 551-P. Virulence factors in xanthomonads pathogenic on pepper increase in planta growth of Xanthomonas perforans. N. POTNIS (1), G. V. Minsavage (1), D. J. Norman (2), J. B. Jones (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A.; (2) Mid-Florida Res. & Education Center, University of Florida, Apopka, FL, U.S.A. 552-P. Global gene expression analysis of Pseudomonas syringae during epiphytic and endophytic growth. J. L. WILLIAMS (1), X. Yu (2), R. Scott (3), S. P. Lund (2), A. R. Records (4), G. A. Beattie (2), S. E. Lindow (3), D. C. Gross (1), D. Nettleton (2). (1) Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, U.S.A.; (2) Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A.; (3) University of California, Berkeley, CA, U.S.A.; (4) University of Maryland, College Park, MD, U.S.A. 553-P. Forward and reverse genetic approaches for functional analyses of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus. R. L. SYVERSON (1), C. A. Ishimaru (1). (1) University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, U.S.A. APS Characterization of Salmonella enterica 554-P. FOUNDATION genes, STM0978 and STM0693, with a role in plant colonization. L. HAO (1), J. Barak (1). (1) University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A. 555-P. Molecular characterization of the Enterobacter cloacae-onion (Allium cepa) interaction and the search for pathogenicity determinants. J. L. Humann (1), S. Dossey (1), J. PeĂąa (1), N. Peterson (1), A. A. Bates (1), R. Liesche (1), T. Peever (1), B. K. SCHROEDER (1). (1) Washington State University, Pullman, WA, U.S.A. 556-P. A tomato 14-3-3 protein (TFT7) positively regulates immunity-associated programmed

cell death mediated by diverse disease resistance proteins. C. OH (1), G. B. Martin (2). (1) Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Res., Ithaca, NY, U.S.A.; (2) Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Res. and Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A. 557-P. Production of antimicrobial compounds by endophytic bacteria. L. C. GALVEZ (1), A. K. Vidaver (1). (1) University of Nebraska Lincoln, Lincoln, NE, U.S.A. 558-P. Gene expression profiling of two Citrus cultivars in response to huanglongbing (HLB) using the Agilent citrus custom microarray chip. A. A. KHALAF (1), F. G. Gmitter (2), R. H. Brlansky (2), J. Fan (2), G. A. Moore (1). (1) University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A.; (2) Citrus Res. and Education Center, University of Florida, Lake Alfred, FL, U.S.A. 559-P. Comparative proteomic analysis of sugarcane response to infection by Xanthomonas albilineans, the causal agent of leaf scald. F. GARCES (1), J. W. Hoy (1), Z. Chen (1). (1) Louisiana State University, Plant Pathology and Crop Phisiology Dept., Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A. 560-P. Xanthomonas albilineans needs an OmpA family outer protein for disease symptom development and multiplication in the sugarcane stalk. P. C. Rott (1), L. A. FLEITES (2), G. Marlow (2), M. Royer (1), D. Gabriel (2). (1) CIRAD, Mixed Res. Unit for Biology and Genetics of Plant Pathogen Interactions, Montpellier, France; (2) University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A. 561-P. Burkholderia andropogonis from citrus appears to have a functional hrp system and pthA and pthB from Xanthomonas citri enhance its pathogenicity. G. REBELLO (1), D. Gabriel (1). (1) University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A. APS Microarray characterization of the 562-P. FOUNDATION HrpL regulon of the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora. R. R. MCNALLY (1), Y. Zhao (2), I. K. Toth (3), P. J. Cock (3), P. E. Hedley (3), G. W. Sundin (4). (1) Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, U.S.A.; (2) University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, U.S.A.; (3) Scottish Crop Res. Institute, Invergowrie, Scotland; (4) Scottish Crop Res. Institute, East Lansing, MI, U.S.A. 563-P. F&D Characterization of plant cell wall-degrading enzymes produced by Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii, the causal agent of Stewart’s wilt of corn. M. MOHAMMADI (1), L. Burbank (1), C. M. Roper (1). (1) University of California, Riverside, CA, U.S.A. 564-P. Functional analysis suggests evolutionary conservation of Pto and Rsb Pseudomonas resistance phenotypes between tomato and potato. Y. CHEN (1), M. Stolz (2), K. Neu (3), D. Halterman (3). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A.; (2) Memorial High School, Madison, WI, U.S.A.; (3) USDA-ARS, Vegetable Crops Res. Unit, Madison, WI, U.S.A.

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565-P. The use of Xspecies microarray to study changes in gene expression in phytoplasma-infected Catharanthus roseus. M. G. TUFFEN (1). (1) University of Nottingham, Loughborough, United Kingdom 566-P. AiiA-mediated quorum-quenching does not affect virulence or toxoflavin experession in Burkholderia glumae SL2376. J. PARK (1), S. Han (1), Y. Lee (2), B. B. McSpadden Gardner (3), Y. Kim (1). (1) Gwangju, South Korea; (2) Suwon, South Korea; (3) Wooster, OH, U.S.A.

Biotechnology

567-P. F&D Comparison of transient expression vectors for production of recombinant proteins in plants. K. H. SHAH (1), H. Bohlmann (1). (1) Institute of Plant Protection, Dept. of Applied Plant Sciences and Plant Biotechnology, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna, Austria 568-P. AtBAG7, an Arabidopsis Bcl2-associated athanogene resides in the endoplasmic reticulum and is involved in the unfolded protein response. M. KABBAGE (1), B. Williams (1), R. Britt (1), M. Dickman (1). (1) Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, U.S.A. 569-P. F&D One step construction of Agrobacterium recombination-ready plasmids (OSCAR), an efficient and robust tool for ATMT gene deletion construction in fungi. Z. Paz (1), S. E. GOLD (1), D. L. Andrews (1), S. J. Klosterman (2), M. D. García-Pedrajas (3), L. Baeza-Montañez (3). (1) University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS, Salinas, CA, U.S.A.; (3) Laboratorio de Micologia Estacion Experimental La Mayora, CSIC, Algarrobo-Costa, Malaga, Spain

Fungi

570-P. WITHDRAWN Phytopathology 100:S60 571-P. Maize chiA as a potential genetic marker for Stenocarpella maydis ear rot resistance. T. A. NAUMANN (1). (1) USDA/ARS/NCAUR, Peoria, IL, U.S.A. 572-P. Discovery of key transcription factor-encoding genes for pathogenicity in the plant-pathogenic fungus Alternaria brassicicola. Y. CHO (1). (1) University of Hawaii-Manoa, Honolulu, HI, U.S.A. 573-P. Molecular and morphological characterization of a Phytophthora infestans population in the Colombian Andean region. M. C. CÉSPEDES (1), M. E. Cárdenas (1), A. M. Vargas (1), A. J. Bernal (1), S. Restrepo (1). (1) Univ. De Los Andes, Bogota, Colombia 574-P. Phytophthora infestans oospores: Production and viability in Colombia. M. E. CÁRDENAS (1), M. C. Céspedes (1), A. J. Bernal (1), S. Restrepo (1). (1) Univ. De Los Andes, Bogota, Colombia

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575-P. ITS sequence analysis of Brazilian Stenocarpella macrospora and Stenocarpella maydis isolates. A. FESSEHAIE (1), G. Munkvold (2), E. Alves (3). (1) Seed Science Center, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A.; (2) Dept. of Plant Pathology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A.; (3) Pioneer Sementes Ltda., Rodovia GO, Brazil 576-P. ITS-RFLP as a criterion to study identification of Rhizoctonia solani. M. SAFFARIAN ABBAS ZADEH (1), S. Soltani Nejad (2), R. Farrokhi Nejad (1), B. Mahmoudi (3). (1) Dept. of Plant Protection, College of Agriculture, Shahid Chamran University-Ahvaz, Ahvaz, Iran; (2) Ahvaz, Iran; (3) Sugar Beet Seed Institute, Karaj, Iran 577-P. Generation of reactive oxygen species via NOXa is important in pathogenicity in Mycosphaerella graminicola. Y. CHOI (1), S. B. Goodwin (1). (1) USDA-ARS, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A. 578-P. A spinach BAC library for marker development, gene discovery, and functional genomics. C. FENG (1), J. C. Correll (1), B. H. Bluhm (1). (1) University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A. 579-P. F&D Characterization of EDS1 as a component of Vitis defense responses to Erysiphe necator. F. GAO (1), X. Shu (2), M. B. Ali (2), S. Howard (2), N. Li (2), P. Winterhagen (2), W. Qiu (2), W. Gassmann (1). (1) University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, U.S.A.; (2) Missouri State University, Mountain Grove, MO, U.S.A. 580-P. FEDB: The integrated platform for expressed sequence tags in fungal kingdom. J. PARK (1), S. Kim (2), W. Song (3), S. Kim (3), S. Jang (3), K. Cheong (1), D. Kim (1), J. Choi (1), K. Ahn (3), B. Park (4), D. Choi (5), S. Kang (4), Y. Lee (1). (1) Fungal Bioinformatics Laboratory, Center for Fungal Genetic Resources, Center for Fungal Pathogenesis, and Dept. of Agricultural Biotechnology, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea; (2) Fungal Bioinformatics Laboratory, Dept. of Plant Science, and Dept. of Agricultural Biotechnology, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea; (3) Fungal Bioinformatics Laboratory, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea; (4) Dept. of Plant Pathology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, U.S.A.; (5) Dept. of Plant Science, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea 581-P. Mapping of genes for brown spot (Bipolaris oryzae) disease resistance in rice. S. P. BANU (1), B. Meah (2), D. S. Brar (3), H. Leung (3), C. M. VeraCruz (3). (1) Bangladesh Agricultural Res. Institute, Gazipur, Bangladesh; (2) Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh, Bangladesh; (3) International Rice Res. Institute, Philippines APS 582-P. FOUNDATION Characterization of a putative Ustilago maydis pathogenesis gene, Upe. H. K. CHEUNG (1). (1) Trent University, Peterborough, ON, Canada


F&D indicates a Flash-and-Dash presentations. 583-P. Ulvan inhibits the appressorium differentiation of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides on apple leaves. J. STADNIK (1), L. Araujo (1). (1) Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, Brazil 584-P. A Ustilago maydis homolog of Aspergillus veA is required for hyphal proliferation in maize. B. KARAKKAT (1), S. Covert (2). (1) University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A.; (2) University of Georgia, Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, Athens, GA, U.S.A. 585-P. Differential expression of putative polyketide biosynthetic gene clusters in Fusarium verticillioides. R. BUTCHKO (1), D. Brown (1), M. Busman (1), B. Tudzynski (2), P. Wiemann (2). (1) USDA, Peoria, IL, U.S.A.; (2) Westfälische WilhelmsUniversität Münster Institut für Botanik, Münster, Germany 586-P. F&D Gene expressions of effectors in downy mildew of lima bean pathogen, Phytophthora phaseoli. S. G. KUNJETI (1), N. M. Donofrio (1), A. G. Marsh (1), B. C. Meyers (1), T. A. Evans (1). (1) University of Delaware, Newark, DE, U.S.A. 587-P. RT-qPCR analysis of genes associated with chestnut blight in susceptible American and resistant Chinese chestnut trees. K. BAIER (1), C. A. Maynard (1), W. A. Powell (1). (1) SUNY ESF, Syracuse, NY, U.S.A. 588-P. LysM receptor-like kinase 1-mediated chitin signaling and fungal resistance in Arabidopsis. M. H. LE (1), X. Zhang (1), G. Stacey (1). (1) University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, U.S.A. 589-P. Effect of maize kernels maturation on transcriptional activity in Aspergillus flavus. B. N. REESE (1), G. A. Payne (2), C. P. Woloshuk (1). (1) Purdue University, Dept. of Botany and Plant Pathology, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A.; (2) North Carolina State University, Plant Pathology, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A. 590-P. Functional characterization of FST1 from Fusarium verticillioides. H. KIM (1), C. P. Woloshuk (1). (1) Purdue University, Dept. of Botany and Plant Pathology, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A. 591-P. Gene transcription patterns in Phytophthora infestans cultures grown in vitro and in planta. M. D. OSPINA-GIRALDO (1), E. Laird (1), C. Mingora (1). (1) Lafayette College, Easton, PA, U.S.A. 592-P. Xanthomonas type III secretion system based analysis of candidate effectors from Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei. A. S. JAYASENA (1), Y. Meng (1), L. Bindschedler (2), P. Spanu (3), R. Wise (4), A. Bogdanove (1). (1) Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A.; (2) University of Reading, Reading, United Kingdom; (3) Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; (4) USDA-ARS/Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A. 593-P. F&D Biochemical and microscopical study of Phytophthora infestans process of infection on Physalis peruviana. C. A. ANTOLÍNEZ (1), G. Danies (1), G. Peña (1), Á. M. Vargas (1), A. J. Bernal (1), S. Restrepo (1). (1) Univ. De Los Andes, Bogota, Colombia

594-P. Expression and homology modeling of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase from the phytopathogenic oomycete Phytophthora infestans. M. F. GARAVITO (1), L. Garcia (1), G. L. Lozano (1), A. J. Bernal (1), B. H. Zimmerman (1), S. Restrepo (1). (1) Univ. De Los Andes, Bogota, Colombia 595-P. Physalis peruviana natural reservoir for Phytophthora infestans in the field. G. DANIES (1), A. M. Vargas (1), C. A. Antolínez (1), G. Peña (1), A. J. Bernal (1), S. Restrepo (1). (1) Univ. De Los Andes, Bogota, Colombia 596-P. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. gladioli to study pathogenesis in gladiolus. D. K. LAKSHMAN (1), R. Pandey (2), K. K. Kamo (3), A. Mitra (4). (1) Sustainable Agricultural Systems Laboratory, USDA-ARS, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.; (2) University of Lucknow, Lucknow, India; (3) Floral and Nursery Plants Res. Unit, USDA-ARS, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.; (4) Dept. of Plant Pathology, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, U.S.A. 597-P. F&D Fungal gene expression patterns during infection of field pea roots by F. graminearum and F. avenaceum. R. S. GOSWAMI (1), K. Chittem (1). (1) North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, U.S.A. 598-P. Fsr1-interacting proteins in Fusarium verticillioides are required for stalk rot virulence on maize. J. KIM (1), C. Wang (1), B. D. Shaw (1), W. Shim (1). (1) Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, U.S.A. 599-P. Histochemical detection of H2O2 and O2– in barley leaves infected with Cochliobolus sativus. P. Silva (1), S. RODRIGUEZ (1), C. Torres Puyo (1), F. Gamba (1), C. Pritsch (1). (1) University Uruguay, Montevideo, Uruguay 600-P. F&D Analysis of transgenic American chestnut. A. E. NEWHOUSE (1), A. B. Zhang (1), L. Northern (1), C. A. Maynard (1), W. A. Powell (1). (1) SUNY-ESF, Syracuse, NY, U.S.A. 601-P. Characterization of four mitogen-activated protein kinase genes (CsMPS1, CsHOG1, CsCHK1 and CsSte11) in the fungal cereal pathogen, Cochliobolus sativus. Y. LENG (1), S. Zhong (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, U.S.A. 602-P. Screening of medicago Tnt1 lines identifies genes involved in molecular interactions between Macrophomina phaseolina and its plant host. B. SHUAI (1), A. Reyes Gaige (1). (1) Wichita State University, Wichita, KS, U.S.A. 603-P. Comparative genomics of the plant vascular wilt pathogens, Verticillium dahliae and Verticllium alboatrum. S. J. KLOSTERMAN (1), K. V. Subbarao (2), S. Kang (3), P. Veronese (4), S. E. Gold (5), B. P. Thomma (6), Z. Chen (7), B. Henrissat (8), Y. Lee (9), J. Park (9), M. D. Garcia-Pedrajas (10), D. Barbara (11), A. Anchieta (1), R. de Jonge (6), P. Santhanam (6), K. Maruthachalam (2), Z. K. Atallah (2), S. Amyotte (12), Z. Paz (5), P.

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Inderbitzen (13), D. Heiman (7), S. Young (7), Q. Zeng (7), R. Engels (7), M. Koehrsen (7), J. Galagan (7), B. Birren (7), C. Cuomo (7), K. F. Dobinson (12), L. Ma (7). (1) USDA ARS, Salinas, CA, U.S.A.; (2) University of CaliforniaDavis, Salinas, CA, U.S.A.; (3) Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, U.S.A.; (4) North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; (5) University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A.; (6) Wageningen University and Res. Center, Wageningen, Netherlands; (7) Broad Institute, Cambridge, MA, U.S.A.; (8) Architecture et Fonction des Macromolecules Biologiques, CNRS, Universites Aix-Marseille, Marseille, France; (9) Dept. of Agricultural Biotechnology, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea; (10) Estacion Experimental La Mayora, CSIC, Malaga, Spain; (11) University of Warwick, Warwick, United Kingdom; (12) Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, ON, Canada; (13) University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A. 604-P. Distinct roles of two 9-lipoxygenase paralogs in the regulation of aflatoxin accumulation in maize seed. Y. PARK (1), M. Kolomiets (1). (1) Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, U.S.A. 605-P. F&D Recombinant antibody-mediated multiple disease tolerance in canola. S. S. VERMA (1), W. Yajima (1), M. H. Rahman (1), S. Shah (2), Y. Liang (1), N. N. Kav (1). (1) University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada; (2) Alberta Innovates, Vegreville, AB, Canada 606-P. F&D A Medicago truncatula resistance to rust (rer) mutant displays enhanced resistance to Phakopsora pachyrhizi but not to necrotrophic fungal pathogens. Y. ISHIGA (1), S. Mittal (1), S. R. Uppalapati (1), V. Doraiswamy (1), H. Schultheiss (2), K. S. Mysore (1). (1) The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK, U.S.A.; (2) BASF Plant Sci. GmbH, Limburgerhof, Germany 607-P. Selection of transformed somatic embryos by antibiotic drench technique. L. C. NORTHERN (1), C. A. Maynard (2), W. A. Powell (2). (1) SUNY-ESF, Jamesville, NY, U.S.A.; (2) SUNY-ESF, Syracuse, NY, U.S.A. 608-P. Involvement of rice endogenous peptide elicitors in defense signaling and disease resistance. W. LIU (1), Q. Wang (1), Y. Yang (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology and Huck Institutes of Life Sciences, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, U.S.A. 609-P. Identification of a conserved rice protein that interacts with a Nep1-like toxin from Magnaporthe oryzae. Z. LIU (1), Q. Wang (1), Y. Yang (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology and Huck Institutes of Life Sciences, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, U.S.A. 610-P. Microarray analysis identified Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici genes involved in infection and

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sporulation. X. Huang (1), X. CHEN (2), T. Coram (2), M. Wang (3), Z. Kang (1). (1) Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi, PRC Peoples Rep of China; (2) USDA ARS, Pullman, WA, U.S.A.; (3) Washington State University, Pullman, WA, U.S.A. 611-P. Understanding the nonhost resistance mechanisms of Medicago truncatula to Asian soybean rust and switchgrass rust. S. UPPALAPATI (1), Y. Ishiga (1), S. Mittal (1), H. Schultheiss (2), K. S. Mysore (1). (1) The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK, U.S.A.; (2) BASF Plant Science Company GmbH, Limburgerhof, Germany 612-P. Real-time PCR to measure head smut infection in maize seedlings. A. FESSEHAIE (1), G. Munkvold (2). (1) Seed Science Center, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A.; (2) Dept. of Plant Pathology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A. 613-P. Molecular characterization of genes differentially expressed during conidiation by Magnaporthe oryzae. K. KIM (1), Y. Lee (1). (1) Dept. of Agricultural Biotechnology, Center for Fungal Genetic Resources, and Center for Fungal Pathogenesis, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea 614-P. Phylogenetic and functional characterization of putative forkhead transcription factors in the rice blast fungus. J. PARK (1), J. Jeon (2), S. Park (1), S. Kong (1), J. Park (1), Y. Lee (1). (1) Dept. of Agricultural Biotechnology, Center for Fungal Genetic Resources, and Center for Fungal Pathogenesis, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea; (2) Dept. of Agricultural Biotechnology, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea 615-P. Cell cycle regulator MoCDC15 is required for conidiation and pathogenicity in Magnaporthe oryzae. J. GOH (1), K. Kim (1), Y. Lee (1). (1) Dept. of Agricultural Biotechnology, Center for Fungal Genetic Resources, and Center for Fungal Pathogenesis, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea 616-P. Genome-wide functional analysis of bZIP transcription factors in the rice blast fungus. S. KONG (1), S. Park (1), K. Jung (1), Y. Lee (1). (1) Dept. of Agricultural Biotechnology, Center for Fungal Genetic Resources, and Center for Fungal Pathogenesis, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea 617-P. Quantifying Fusarium virguliforme in soil using SYBR green and Taqman assays. G. C. Mbofung (1), M. Vincent (2), A. Fessehaie (3), M. K. Bhattacharyya (4), L. F. LEANDRO (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A.; (2) Food Science, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A.; (3) Seed Science Center, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A.; (4) Dept. of Agronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A.


F&D indicates a Flash-and-Dash presentations. 618-P. Cytological and genetic responses of near-isogenic lines carrying rice blast resistance genes. H. KITO (1), K. S. Zenbayashi (1), T. Nakajima (1). (1) National Agricultural Res. Organization, Daisen, Akita, Japan 619-P. Genetically distinct Cercospora species cause grey leaf spot of maize (Zea mays L.) in Nigeria. K. SHARMA (1), M. Ayodele (1), R. Bandyopadhyay (1), A. E. Anu (1), A. Menkir (1), P. Lava Kumar (1). (1) International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Ibadan, Nigeria 620-P. Regulation and functional characterization of Monilinia fructicola polygalacturonase genes MfPG1, MfPG2, MfPG3, and MfPG5. C. CHOU (1), R. M. Bostock (2), M. Lee (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan; (2) Dept. of Plant Pathology, University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A. 621-P. Colletotrichum acutatum forms a novel internal infection cushion-like structure in the cuticle layer of chili pepper. C. LIAO (1), K. Kuo (2), J. Wang (3), M. Lee (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan; (2) Dept. of Plant Protection, Bureau of Animal and Plant Health Inspection and Quarantine, Council of Agriculture, Executive Yuan, Taipei, Taiwan; (3) The World Vegetable Center, Shanhua, Tainan, Taiwan 622-P. Gene expression during appressorium formation by Phakopsora pachyrhizi. R. D. FREDERICK (1), C. L. Stone (1). (1) USDA ARS FDWSRU, Fort Detrick, MD, U.S.A. 623-P. Molecular interactions determining broadspectrum partial late blight resistance in potato. D. HALTERMAN (1), Y. Chen (2). (1) USDA/ARS, Madison, WI, U.S.A.; (2) Madison, WI, U.S.A. 624-P. The striatin ortholog of Colletotrichum graminicola plays a role in mycelial growth, conidiation, and virulence to maize. C. WANG (1), W. Shim (1), B. D. Shaw (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, Program for the Biology of Filamentous Fungi, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, U.S.A. 625-P. F&D Morphological and cytological modifications of Gibberella zeae germlings induced by mating pheromones and affinity-selected peptides. N. W. GROSS (1), J. E. Scholez (1), F. J. Schmidt (2), J. T. English (1). (1) Division of Plant Sciences, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, U.S.A.; (2) Dept. of Biochemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, U.S.A. 626-P. Over-expression of a maize WRKY transcription factor and its effect on the responses of Arabidopsis to biotic and abiotic stresses. P. HAN (1), Y. Xie (2), Z. Chen (2). (1) Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A.; (2) Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A. 627-P. Morphological and physiological alteration of maize root architectures on drought stress. T. JIANG (1), B. Scully (1), R. Kemerait (2), R. D. Lee (3), B. Guo (1). (1) USDA-ARS, Crop Protection

and Management Res. Unit, Tifton, GA, U.S.A.; (2) Dept. of Plant Pathology, The University of Georgia, Tifton, GA, U.S.A.; (3) Dept. of Crop and Soil Sciences, The University of Georgia, Tifton, GA, U.S.A. 628-P. Evaluation of the expression of genes associated with resistance to Aspergillus flavus colonization and aflatoxin production in different maize lines. J. C. Fountain (1), Z. Chen (2), B. Scully (1), R. C. Kemerait (3), R. L. Dewey (4), B. GUO (1). (1) USDA-ARS, Crop Protection and Management Res. Unit, Tifton, GA, U.S.A.; (2) Dept. of Plant Pathology and Crop Physiology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A.; (3) Dept. of Plant Pathology, The University of Georgia, Tifton, GA, U.S.A.; (4) Dept. of Crop and Soil Sciences, The University of Georgia, Tifton, GA, U.S.A. 629-P. Comparing ectomycorrhizal colonization on transgenic, hybrid, and wild-type Castanea dentata. K. M. D’AMICO (1), T. R. Horton (1), C. A. Maynard (1), W. A. Powell (1). (1) SUNY-ESF, Syracuse, NY, U.S.A. 630-P. F&D Demethylation inhibitor (DMI) fungicide resistance mechanism in Sclerotinia homoeocarpa causing dollar spot in turfgrasses. B. MA (1), L. P. Tredway (1). (1) North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A. 631-P. Over-expression of the calmodulin gene SCaM-4 in soybean enhances resistance to Phytophthora sojae. S. RAO (1), M. El-Habbak (1), J. S. Haudenshield (2), D. Zheng (2), G. L. Hartman (2), S. S. Korban (2), S. A. Ghabrial (1). (1) University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, U.S.A.; (2) University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, U.S.A. 632-P. Evaluation of nitric oxide detoxifying flavohaemoglobin in the Fusarium verticillioides– maize interaction. T. T. BALDWIN (1), A. E. Glenn (1). (1) USDA, ARS, Toxicology & Mycotoxin Res. Unit, Athens, GA, U.S.A. APS 633-P. FOUNDATION Identification and analysis of Fusarium verticillioides genes differentially expressed during conidiation. A. M. BURNHAM (1), D. W. Brown (2), A. E. Glenn (3). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A.; (2) USDA, ARS, Bacterial Foodborne Pathogens & Mycology Res. Unit, Peoria, IL, U.S.A.; (3) USDA, ARS, Toxicology & Mycotoxin Res. Unit, Athens, GA, U.S.A. 634-P. Possible functions of light-induced proteins in cercosporin biosynthesis by Cercospora kikuchii. A. K. CHANDA (1), Z. Chen (1), R. W. Schneider (1). (1) Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A. 635-P. Detection of toxin and nontoxin forms of Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus by RT-PCR in Georgia peanuts. P. ACHAR (1). (1) Kennesaw State University, Kennesaw, GA, U.S.A. 636-P. Using confocal microscopy to study the infection of Mentha longifolia by a GFP strain of the Verticillium wilt pathogen. M. E. MANSFIELD (1), K. J.

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2010 APS POSTERS Fungi continued

Vining (2), M. A. Townley (3), T. M. Davis (4). (1) Microbiology B.S. Program, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH, U.S.A.; (2) Oregon State University, Dept. of Forest Ecosystems and Society; also Oregon State University Center for Genome Res. and Biocomputing, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A.; (3) Dept. of Zoology, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH, U.S.A.; (4) Dept. of Biological Sciences, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH, U.S.A. 637-P. Validation and haplotyping of Fusarium head blight resistance genes in a diverse spring wheat germplasm. K. D. PURI (1), S. Chao (2), H. Bockelman (3), M. Mergoum (4), S. Zhong (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS Cereal Crops Res. Unit, Northern Crop Science Laboratory, Fargo, ND, U.S.A.; (3) USDA-ARS National Small Grains Collection, Aberdeen, ID, U.S.A.; (4) Dept. of Plant Sciences, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, U.S.A. 638-P. A metabolic fingerprinting technique for functional genomics in Fusarium verticillioides. J. E. SMITH (1), B. H. Bluhm (2). (1) University of Arkansas, Garfield, AR, U.S.A.; (2) University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A. APS 639-P. FOUNDATION Identification and disruption of a cercosporin polyketide synthase and ABC transporter in Cercospora coffeicola. A. G. SOUZA (1), S. Herrero (2), L. A. Maffia (3), M. E. Daub (2). (1) North Carolina State University/ Universidade Federal de Vicosa, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; (2) North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; (3) Universidade Federal de Vicosa, Vicosa, Brazil 640-P. Functional characterization of a transcription factor family in Fusarium verticillioides. J. B. RIDENOUR (1), C. P. Woloshuk (2), W. Shim (3), B. H. Bluhm (1). (1) University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A.; (2) Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A.; (3) Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, U.S.A. APS 641-P. FOUNDATION BDM1 regulates virulence in Fusarium graminearum. P. HOREVAJ (1), J. Xu (2), B. H. Bluhm (1). (1) University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A.; (2) Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A. 642-P. Effects of pH on genes involved in oxalic acid production in the brown rot fungus Postia placenta. B. CARLSON (1), J. Jellison (1). (1) University of Maine, Orono, ME, U.S.A. 643-P. Genetic diversity of Iranian Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceri by random amplified polymorphic DNA or vegetative compatibility groups. S. HAGHIGHI (1). (1) Islamic Azad University, Damghan Branch, Tehran, Iran 644-P. Identification of soybean genes that contributes to Rpp2-mediated defense against Asian soybean rust

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using VIGS. A. K. PANDEY (1), C. Yang (1), C. Zhang (1), K. F. Pedley (2), M. Graham (3), J. H. Hill (1), S. A. Whitham (1). (1) Plant Pathology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A.; (2) Foreign Disease-Weed Science Res. Unit, USDA-ARS, Ft. Detrick, MD, U.S.A.; (3) Corn Insects and Crop Genetics Res. Unit, USDA-ARS, Ames, IA, U.S.A. 645-P. Screening for differential resistance responses to Phakopsora pachyrhizi between Rpp3, Rpp?(Hyuuga), and 12 additional soybean accessions. M. D. KENDRICK (1), K. F. Pedley (1), R. D. Frederick (1), D. L. Hyten (2), P. B. Cregan (2), D. K. Harris (3), B. Ha (3), H. R. Boerma (3). (1) USDAARS, Fort Detrick, MD, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.; (3) University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A. 646-P. Protein profile differences between soybean accessions resistant and susceptible to soybean rust (Phakopsora pachyrhizi). S. PARK (1), Z. Chen (1), M. C. Ganiger (1), A. A. Fortunato (1). (1) Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A. 647-P. Exploring the role of nitroalkane dioxygenases in Magnaporthe oryzae morphogenesis and infection. R. WILSON (1). (1) University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, U.S.A. 648-P. Sclerotinia sclerotiorum induces redox changes in the host cellular environment via oxalic acid. M. KABBAGE (1), B. Williams (1), H. Kim (1), R. Britt (1), M. Dickman (1). (1) Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, U.S.A. 649-P. SM3: An intracellular paralog of the proteinaceous elicitor SM1 from Trichoderma virens. F. K. CRUTCHER (1), L. J. Dangott (1), C. M. Kenerley (1). (1) Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, U.S.A. 650-P. Regulation of genes involved in the interaction of tomato, Trichoderma hamatum 382, and Xanthomonas euvesicatoria. N. Subedi (1), F. BAYSAL-GUREL (1), H. Hoitink (1), M. Ivey (1), S. A. Miller (1). (1) Ohio State University, Wooster, OH, U.S.A. 651-P. Methyl esterase 1 (StMES1) is required for systemic acquired resistance against Phytophthora infestans in potato. P. MANOSALVA (1), S. Park (2), F. Forouhar (3), L. Tong (4), W. Fry (5), D. Klessig (1). (1) Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Res., Ithaca, NY, U.S.A.; (2) Virginia Bioinformatics Institute, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA, U.S.A.; (3) Dept. of Biological Sciences, Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Columbia University, New York, NY, U.S.A.; (4) Virginia Bioinformatics Institute, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, New York, NY, U.S.A.; (5) Dept. of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A.


F&D indicates a Flash-and-Dash presentations.

Nematodes

652-P. Host-derived RNAi targeted to a novel root-knot parasitism gene in tobacco. K. K. SCHWERI (1), G. Huang (2), B. Xue (1), M. G. Mitchum (3), T. J. Baum (4), R. S. Hussey (2), R. Lewis (1), E. L. Davis (1). (1) North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; (2) University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A.; (3) University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, U.S.A.; (4) Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A. 653-P. Dissecting cyst nematode CLE perception in Arabidopsis roots. A. REPLOGLE (1), J. Wang (1), J. Smeda (1), M. G. Mitchum (1). (1) University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, U.S.A. 654-P. A novel root-knot nematode secretory protein interacts with a golgi-associated host plant protein. B. XUE (1), G. Huang (2), T. Baum (3), R. Hussey (2), E. Davis (1). (1) North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; (2) University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A.; (3) Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A. 655-P. Candidate gene silencing in Glycine max using amiRNA to identify soybean cyst nematode resistance gene(s) at the Rhg1 locus. D. E. COOK (1), S. Melito (2), T. Hughes (1), A. MacGuidwin (1), A. F. Bent (1). (1) University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A.; (2) University of Sassari, Sassari, Italy 656-P. Functional analysis of soybean genes for a role in soybean cyst nematode resistance. P. KAITHERI KANDOTH (1), N. Ithal (1), J. Recknor (2), D. Nettleton (2), T. Maier (3), T. Baum (3), M. G. Mitchum (1). (1) Division of Plant Sciences, Bond Life Science Center, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, U.S.A.; (2) Dept. of Statistics, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A.; (3) Dept. of Plant Patholgy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A. 657-P. F&D Trafficking of soybean cyst nematodesecreted CLE proteins in plant cells. J. WANG (1), T. Hewezi (2), T. J. Baum (2), E. L. Davis (3), X. Wang (4), M. G. Mitchum (1). (1) University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, U.S.A.; (2) Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A.; (3) North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; (4) Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A.

Viruses

658-P. Characterization of pervasive latent viral infection of olive trees in the National Clonal Germplasm Repository. M. AL RWAHNIH (1), Y. Guo (1), S. Daubert (1), D. Golino (1), A. Rowhani (1). (1) University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A. 659-P. Multiple infection of Sugarcane streak mosaic virus in a single sugarcane plant and complete genomic sequences of two SCSMV genotypes. D. XU (1), G. Zhou (2), F. Li (1), R. Li (1). (1) USDA ARS, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.; (2) South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, PRC Peoples Rep of China

660-P. Genomic sequences and simultaneous detection of two cryptic viruses from pepper. S. Sabanadzovic (1), R. A. VALVERDE (2). (1) Dept. of Entomology and Plant Pathology, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, U.S.A.; (2) Dept. of Plant Pathology and Crop Physiology, Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A. 661-P. Viruses of plants in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. S. SABANADZOVIC (1), N. Abou Ghanem-Sabanadzovic (1). (1) Dept. of Entomology and Plant Pathology, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, U.S.A. 662-P. Two undescribed viral species isolated from native grapevines. N. Abou Ghanem-Sabanadzovic (1), S. SABANADZOVIC (1). (1) Dept. of Entomology and Plant Pathology, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, U.S.A. 663-P. WITHDRAWN Phytopathology 100:S90 664-P. A novel bipartite launch system for a potexviral vector suitable for either protein expression or virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). H. Lim (1), A. Vaira (2), L. L. Domier (3), J. HAMMOND (1). (1) USDA ARS MPPL, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.; (2) CNR, IVV, Torino, Italy; (3) USDA ARS, Urbana, IL, U.S.A. 665-P. Host proteins implicated in the aphid transmission of Cereal yellow dwarf virus-RPV. K. PETER (1), M. Cilia (2), F. Gildow (1), T. Thannhauser (2), S. Gray (3). (1) Penn State University, University Park, PA, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS, Robert W. Holley Center for Agriculture and Health, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A.; (3) USDA-ARS, Robert W. Holley Center for Agriculture and Health and Cornell University, Dept. of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A. 666-P. WITHDRAWN Phytopathology 100:S60 667-P. Electroporetic potyvirus transfection of pepper protoplasts. N. Y. VELASQUEZ (1), S. Suh (1), J. F. Murphy (1). (1) Auburn University, Auburn, AL, U.S.A. 668-P. Self- and cross-interaction studies among Pelargonium flower break and Pelargonium line pattern viruses coat proteins and their domains. G. RAIKHY (1), S. M. Leisner (1). (1) The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH, U.S.A. 669-P. F&D Role of Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) genes in seed transmission in soybean. S. JOSSEY (1), L. L. Domicr. (2). (1) University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL, U.S.A. 670-P. Development of Cucumber mosaic virus coat protein- and replicase-mediated resistant Gladiolus plants. K. Kamo (1), R. JORDAN (2), M. Guaragna (2), H. Hsu (1), P. Ueng (2). (1) Floral and Nursery Plants Res. Unit, USDA-ARS, U.S. National Arboretum, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.; (2) Molecular Plant Pathology Lab, PSI, USDA-ARS, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.

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2010 APS POSTERS Viruses continued

671-P. Direct delivery of viral vectors into plant suspension cells. S. A. MANABAYEVA (1), H. B. Scholthof (1). (1) Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, U.S.A. 672-P. Complete genome sequence of Capsicum chlorosis virus from Phalaenopsis orchid and prediction of the unexplored genetic information of tospoviruses. Y. Zheng (1), C. Chen (1), F. JAN (1). (1) National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan 673-P. Analysis of viral DNA accumulation in pepper plants with two different strains and chimeras of Pepper golden mosaic virus. C. HERNANDEZZEPEDA (1), A. M. Idris (1), J. K. Brown (1). (1) University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, U.S.A. 674-P. F&D TMV inclusion bodies: Their formation and relationship to virus accumulation. X. YANG (1), R. S. Nelson (1), S. Bhat (1). (1) The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK, U.S.A. 675-P. Development and use of an efficient and temperature-insensitive virus-induced gene silencing system in Nicotiana tabacum. C. HUANG (1), X. Zhou (1). (1) Institute of Biotechnology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, PRC Peoples Rep of China 676-P. A test of taxonomic and biogeographic predictivity: Resistance to Potato virus Y in wild relatives of the cultivated potato. X. CAI (1), D. Spooner (2), D. Halterman (2), A. Charkowski (3), R. Groves (4), S. Jansky (2). (1) University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A.; (2) USDA/ARS, Madison, WI, U.S.A.; (3) University of Wisconsin, Plant Pathology, Madison, WI, U.S.A.; (4) University of Wisconsin, Entomology, Madison, WI, U.S.A. 677-P. F&D Identification of molecular markers associated with resistance to TSWV through genetic mapping. H. QIN (1), Y. Li (2), Y. Guo (3), G. He (4), C. Chen (5), A. Culbreath (6), S. J. Knapp (3), D. R. Cook (7), C. C. Holbrook (8), M. Wang (9). (1) USDA-ARS, Crop Protection and Management Res. Unit, Tifton, GA, U.S.A.; (2) Dept. of Plant Pathology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A.; (3) Center for Applied Genetic Technologies, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A.; (4) Center for Plant Biotechnology, Tuskegee University, Tuskegee, AL, U.S.A.; (5) USDA-ARS, National Peanut Res. Laboratory, Dawson, GA, U.S.A.; (6) Dept. of Plant Pathology, University of Georgia, Tifton, GA, U.S.A.; (7) Dept. of Plant Pathology, University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A.; (8) USDA-ARS, Crop Genetics and Breeding Res. Unit, Tifton, GA, U.S.A.; (9) USDA-ARS, Plant Genetic Resources Conservation Unit, Griffin, GA, U.S.A. 678-P. A protein localization and interaction map for Potato yellow dwarf virus, a plant-adapted nucleorhabdovirus . A. BANDYOPADHYAY (1), K. Kopperud (1), G. Anderson (1), K. Martin (1), M. Goodin (1). (1) University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, U.S.A.

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679-P. Broad-spectrum virus resistance using oligoadenylate (OAS) system. L. C. GALVEZ (1), Z. Zhang (2), A. Mitra (1). (1) University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, U.S.A.; (2) University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, U.S.A. 680-P. Factors influencing the production of Maize fine streak virus proteins in Drosophila S2 cells. F. M. CISNEROS (1). (1) The Ohio State University, Wooster, OH, U.S.A. 681-P. Etiology of tomato yellow leaf curl disease complex in the Sultanate of Oman involves two helper begomoviruses, a betasatellite, and a DNA-2 satellite. A. M. Idris (1), J. K. BROWN (1). (1) University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, U.S.A. 682-P. Microarray analysis of tomato gene expression reveals complex effects on hormone signaling associated with viroid infection. R. OWENS (1), K. Tech (1), J. Shao (1), N. Mock (1), T. Sano (2). (1) USDA ARS, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.; (2) Hirosaki University, Hirosaki, Japan 683-P. First virus infecting kudzu in U.S.A. S. SABANADZOVIC (1), N. Abou GhanemSabanadzovic (1), W. F. Moore (1), T. W. Allen (2), R. C. Stephenson (1), A. Lawrence (3). (1) Dept. of Entomology and Plant Pathology, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, U.S.A.; (2) Delta Res. and Extension Center, Mississippi State University, Stoneville, MS, U.S.A.; (3) Electron Microscope Center, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, U.S.A. 684-P. DNA microarray-based universal plant virus detection and identification. B. BAGEWADI (1), D. C. Henderson (2), R. L. Jordan (2), K. L. Perry (3), U. Melcher (4), D. Wang (5), K. Fischer (6), J. Hammond (2), C. M. Fauquet (5). (1) Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, St. Louis, MO, U.S.A.; (2) Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.; (3) Ithaca, NY, U.S.A.; (4) Stillwater, OK, U.S.A.; (5) St. Louis, MO, U.S.A.; (6) Salt Lake City, UT, U.S.A. 685-P. AV2 protein encoded by Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus is a RNA silencing suppressor. J. Wu (1), J. Zhang (1), X. ZHOU (1). (1) Hangzhou, PRC Peoples Rep of China

n Plant Disease Management Biological Control

686-P. Evaluation of biologically based products for managing bacterial spot disease of tomato. S. ZHANG (1), T. L. White (1), Y. Fu (1). (1) TRECUniversity of Florida, Homestead, FL, U.S.A. 687-P. Isolation and application of a Bacillus subtilis strain to control gray mold on tomato and powdery mildew on cucumber. S. LI (1), X. Lu (1), B. Li (1), Q. Guo (1), Z. Li (1), P. Ma (1). (1) Plant Protection Institute, Hebei Academy of Agricultural and Forestry Sciences, Baoding, Hebei, PRC Peoples Rep of China


F&D indicates a Flash-and-Dash presentations. 688-P. F&D Synergistic effects between Regalia® and other fungicides in controlling cucumber powdery mildew and lettuce downy mildew. H. SU (1). (1) Marrone Bio Innovations, Inc., Davis, CA, U.S.A. 689-P. Management of powdery mildew on squash with biologically based products. S. ZHANG (1), T. L. White (1). (1) TREC-University of Florida, Homestead, FL, U.S.A. 690-P. Management of powdery mildew in cucurbit crops with biopesticides and integrated programs. M. MCGRATH (1). (1) Cornell University, Riverhead, NY, U.S.A. 691-P. Biological control with Xylella fastidiosa strain EB92-1 for the prevention of Pierce’s disease development in mature, producing grapevines. D. HOPKINS (1). (1) University of Florida, Apopka, FL, U.S.A. 692-P. Endophytic bacteria in the inhibition of the germination of spores of Ustilago scitaminea. L. RUARO (1), S. R. de Souza (1), E. Daros (1), R. B. Fragoso (1). (1) Universidade Federal do Parana, Curitiba, Brazil 693-P. Biological control of take-all of wheat by fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. from China. M. YANG (1), J. Guo (2), L. S. Thomashow (3), D. M. Weller (3). (1) Nanjing Agriculture University and Washington State University, Pullman, WA, U.S.A.; (2) Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, PRC Peoples Rep of China; (3) USDA-ARS, Pullman, WA, U.S.A. 694-P. F&D Field efficacy of Bacillus subtilis MBI 600 (IntegralR) for managing rice sheath blight caused by Rhizoctonia solani. V. KRISHNA KUMAR (1), M. Reddy (1), J. W. Kloepper (1), K. S. Lawrence (1), S. Krishnam Raju (2), D. Groth (3), M. Miller (1). (1) Auburn University, Auburn, AL, U.S.A.; (2) Andhra Pradesh Rice Res. Institute, Acharya NG Ranga Agricultural University, Maruteru, India; (3) Rice Res. Station, Louisiana State University Ag Center, Rayne, LA, U.S.A. 695-P. Screening of bacterial antagonists for suppression of sheath blight in rice. X. ZHOU (1), K. Kumar (2), M. Reddy (2), J. Kloepper (2), S. Zhang (3). (1) AgriLife Res., Texas A&M University System, Beaumont, TX, U.S.A.; (2) Dept. of Entomology and Plant Pathology, Auburn University, Auburn, AL, U.S.A.; (3) Tropical REC, University of Florida, Homestead, FL, U.S.A. 696-P. SoilGard 12G (Gliocladium virens strain GL-21): A solution for controlling lettuce drop (Sclerotinia minor/sclerotiorum) in conventional and organic systems. S. C. OCKEY (1). (1) Certis USA, Yakima, WA, U.S.A. 697-P. Development, registration and commercialization of a microbial fungicide for controlling cotton verticillium wilt in China. P. MA (1), S. Li (1), X. Lu (1), Q. Guo (1), B. Li (1). (1) Institute of Plant Protection, Hebei Academy of Agricultural and Forestry Sciences, Baoding, Hebei, PRC Peoples Rep of China

698-P. Evaluation of synergistic effect between rhizobacterial strains Fusarium oxysporum biological control agents. J. C. Bejarano (1), S. Franco (1), P. JIMENEZ (1). (1) Univ. Militar Nueva Granada, Bogota, Colombia 699-P. Evaluation of rhizobacterial strains as Fusarium oxysporum biological control agents. R. Urrea (1), L. F. Cabezas (2), S. Restrepo (2), P. JIMENEZ (1). (1) Univ. Militar Nueva Granada, Bogota, Colombia; (2) Univ de Los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia 700-P. Inhibition of Magnaporthe oryzae using cells and cell-free extracts of several strains of Bacillus. A. RAHMAN (1), W. Uddin (1). (1) Penn State University, State College, PA, U.S.A. 701-P. Bacterial toxins as natural nematicides: A highthroughput screen using C. elegans. A. A. RASCON (1), A. Garcia (1), S. Hanson (1). (1) New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM, U.S.A. 702-P. Effect of Trichoderma harzianum on soilborne pathogens affecting French beans in Kenya. G. M. KARIUKI (1), Z. M. Kinyua (2). (1) Kenyatta University, Nairobi, Kenya; (2) Kenya Agricultural Res. Institute, Nairobi, Kenya 703-P. MeloCon WG® and SoilGard 12G® used in a program as a methyl bromide alternative to control nematodes and soilborne diseases in vegetable production. H. HIGHLAND (1). (1) Certis USA, Nokomis, FL, U.S.A. 704-P. F&D Trichoderma asperellum T109 effect over Spongospora subterranea in potato field. E. GILCHRIST (1), J. Pérez (2), H. A. Vargas (2), S. Reynaldi (1). (1) Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Departamento Ciencias Agronómicas, Medellin, Antioquia, Colombia; (2) Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Medellin, Colombia 705-P. Efficacy of Streptomyces lydicus and cover crops for management of Fusarium wilt of watermelon. J. HIMMELSTEIN (1), K. Everts (2), J. Maul (3). (1) University of Maryland, College Park, MD, U.S.A.; (2) University of Maryland and University of Delaware, College Park, MD, U.S.A.; (3) Sustainable Agriculture Systems Lab. USDA-ARS, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A. 706-P. In vitro evaluation of native Trichoderma isolates against fungal trunk disease pathogens in Ensenada, Mexico. J. A. Plata-Caudillo (1), C. ValenzuelaSolano (2), R. HERNANDEZ-MARTINEZ (1). (1) Microbiology Dept., CICESE, Zona Playitas, Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico; (2) INIFAP, Campo Experimental Costa de Ensenada, Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico 707-P. The source of polypeptone in culture medium affects lipopeptide production by Bacillus subtilis. K. YOKOTA (1), E. Miwa (1), K. Higuchi (1). (1) Tokyo University of Agriculture, Tokyo, Japan 708-P. Biological control of bean broomrape (Orobanche crenata) and hemp broomrape (Orobanche ramosa) by Fusarium isolates. K. A. EL-TARABILY (1), M. Abouzeid (2). (1) United Arab Emirates Univ., Al-

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Ain, UAE; (2) Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt 709-P. Management of clubroot (Plasmodiophora brassicae) with microbial and synthetic fungicides. G. Peng (1), S. Hwang (2), M. McDonald (3), R. Lahlali (1), B. D. GOSSEN (1), R. H. Hynes (1), S. M. Boyetchko (1). (1) Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada, Saskatoon, SK, Canada; (2) Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development, Edmonton, AB, Canada; (3) University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada 710-P. Nematicidal activity of Gymnoascus reessii za-130 and the properties of its nematicidal substance. J. QIU (1), J. Liu (1), T. Liu (1). (1) Institute of Plant and Environment Protection, BAAFS, Beijing, PRC Peoples Rep of China 711-P. F&D Biological control of seven woody invasive plant species with the fungal pathogen Chondrosterium purpureum. A. R. POST (1), C. A. Judge (2), D. Little (3), J. C. Neal (3), M. Benson (3). (1) Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, U.S.A.; (2) BASF Corporation, Dewitt, MI, U.S.A.; (3) North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A. 712-P. Search for fungi as potential biological control agents of Salsola tragus. T. M. KOLOMIETS (1), D. K. Berner (2), Z. Á. Mukhina (3), Á. V. Alexandrova (4), O. Á. Skatenok (1). (1) All Russian Res. Institute of Phytopathology, Moscow region, Bolshie Vyazemi, Russia; (2) Foreign Disease-Weed Science Res. Unit, USDA, ARS, Frederick, MD, U.S.A.; (3) All Russian Scientific Res. Institute of Rice, Krasnodar, Belozerniy, Russia; (4) M.J. Lomonosov’s Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia 713-P. Population dynamics of Dactylella oviparasitica in a Heterodera schachtii suppressive soil. J. YANG (1), J. O. Becker (2), J. Borneman (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, University of California, Riverside, Riverside, CA, U.S.A.; (2) Dept. of Nematology, University of California, Riverside, CA, U.S.A. 714-P. Characterization of the antibacterial peptide herbicolin I biosynthetic operon in the fire blight biocontrol agent Pantoea vagans C9-1. T. Kamber (1), T. Lansdell (2), T. H. Smits (1), V. O. Stockwell (3), C. ISHIMARU (4), B. Duffy (1). (1) Agroscope Changins-Wädenswil ACW, Wädenswil, Switzerland; (2) Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, U.S.A.; (3) Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A.; (4) University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, U.S.A. 715-P. Pantocin A antibiotic produced by Pantoea vagans C9-1: Chemical and genetic characterization. C. A. ISHIMARU (1), T. Lansdell (2), J. Gross (3), J. Clardy (3), T. H. Smits (4), B. Duffy (4). (1) University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, U.S.A.; (2) Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, U.S.A.; (3) Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, U.S.A.; (4) Agroscope Changins-Wädenswil ACW,

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Wädenswil, Switzerland 716-P. Complete genome sequence of Pantoea vagans biocontrol strain C9-1. T. H. Smits (1), F. Rezzonico (1), T. Kamber (1), C. A. ISHIMARU (2), J. E. Frey (1), A. Goesmann (3), V. O. Stockwell (4), B. Duffy (1). (1) Agroscope Changins-Wädenswil ACW, Wädenswil, Switzerland; (2) University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, U.S.A.; (3) Universität Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany; (4) Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, U.S.A. 717-P. F&D A screening strategy of bacterial biocontrol agents towards Ralstonia wilt of ginger. W. Yang (1), J. GUO (1). (1) Nanjing, PRC Peoples Rep of China 718-P. New biocontrol strategy against the sexual fruiting bodies of grapevine powdery mildew. T. CAFFI (1), S. Legler (1), V. Rossi (1), L. Kiss (2), A. Pintye (2). (1) Univ. Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Piacenza, Italy; (2) Hungarian Academy of Science, Budapest, Hungary 719-P. Biological control of banana wilt. Y. Zheng (1), J. GUO (1). (1) Nanjing, PRC Peoples Rep of China 720-P. The powder formulation survey of strain Bacillus subtilis M36 for Ácontrol of bean root rot caused by Fusarium solani f. sp. phaseoli. P. MIRZAEE-QOMI (1), H. Zamanizadeh (1), R. Saberi-Riseh (2), M. Lak (3). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, ÁScience and Res. Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran; (2) Dept. of Plant Pathology & Entomology, College of Agriculture, University of Tehran, Rafsanjan, Iran; (3) Central Province Agricultural Res. and Natural Resources Center, Arak, Iran 721-P. A screening strategy of fungal biocontrol agents towards Verticillium wilt of cotton. L. Xu (1), J. GUO (1). (1) Nanjing, PRC Peoples Rep of China 722-P. F&D The irony of silicon: Accumulation in a nonaccumulator induced by TRSV. W. L. ZELLNER (1), J. Frantz (2), S. M. Leisner (1). (1) University of Toledo, Toledo, OH, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS, Toledo, OH, U.S.A. 723-P. Effects of surfactants on conidial germination of Myrothecium verrucaria. X. JIN (1). (1) USDA ARS, Stoneville, MS, U.S.A. 724-P. Aflatoxin persistence in corn residues under notill and conventional tillage management. H. K. ABBAS (1), R. M. Zablotowicz (2), C. Accinelli (3), C. A. Abel (4), N. A. Phillips (2), B. J. Johnson (2). (1) USDA ARS CG&PRU, Stoneville, MS, U.S.A.; (2) Stoneville, MS, U.S.A.; (3) Bologna, Italy; (4) Ames, IA, U.S.A. 725-P. Organic and polyethylene mulches with biofungicides for managing diseases in organic tomato production system. L. M. NYOCHEMBENG (1), R. N. Mankolo (1), S. R. Mentreddy (1). (1) Alabama A&M University, Normal, AL, U.S.A.


F&D indicates a Flash-and-Dash presentations. 726-P. Mechanism of suppression of a no-till hairy vetch cover crop on the spread of anthracnose on watermelon. X. ZHOU (1), K. L. Everts (2), C. Zhou (3). (1) AgriLife Res., Texas A&M University System, Beaumont, TX, U.S.A.; (2) University of Maryland and University of Delaware, Salisbury, MD, U.S.A.; (3) University of Maryland, Salisbury, MD, U.S.A. 727-P. Soil amendments with Brassica cover crops for control of Phytophthora blight on squash. J. YIN (1), D. KonĂŠ (1), M. Purvis (1), K. L. Jackson (1), A. S. Csinos (1), P. Ji (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, University of Georgia, Tifton, GA, U.S.A. 728-P. Effect of temperature and UV radiation on survival of Coniothyrium minitans and on efficacy in controlling lettuce drop caused by Sclerotinia minor. M. ALVARADO-HERNANDEZ (1), B. M. Pryor (1). (1) University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, U.S.A. 729-P. Evaluation of poultry litter for biocontrol of sclerotia of Sclerotium rolfsii in soil. R. PRATT (1). (1) USDA ARS, Mississippi State, MS, U.S.A.

Chemical Control

730-P. Baseline sensitivity of Ascochyta rabiei to penthiopryad, a new SDHI fungicide. N. H. Thaher (1), B. D. GOSSEN (2), M. McDonald (1). (1) University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada; (2) Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada, Saskatoon, SK, Canada 731-P. Sensitivity of Alternaria solani populations in Idaho to commonly used fungicides and its effect on potato early blight management in Idaho. A. R. BELCHER (1), E. Wood (1), P. S. Wharton (1). (1) University of Idaho, Aberdeen, ID, U.S.A. 732-P. Difenoconazole baseline sensitivity distribution of Colletotrichum coccodes isolates from potatoes. G. OLAYA (1), A. Cochran (2), G. Neil (3). (1) Syngenta Crop Protection, Vero Beach, FL, U.S.A.; (2) Syngenta Crop Protection, Greensboro, NC, U.S.A.; (3) North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, U.S.A. 733-P. Fludioxonil sensitivity monitoring of Penicillium expansum isolates collected from apples in Washington State. G. OLAYA (1), A. Mulcahy (1), A. Cochran (2). (1) Syngenta Crop Protection, Vero Beach, FL, U.S.A.; (2) Syngenta Crop Protection, Greensboro, NC, U.S.A. 734-P. Selection of isolates of Penicillium expansum with reduced sensitivity to fludioxonil and pyrimethanil from sensitive, single-spored isolates. J. Adaskaveg (1), H. FORSTER (2). (1) University of California, Riverside, CA, U.S.A.; (2) University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A. 735-P. An assessment of sensitivity to fungicides in Tennessee isolates of the cucurbit powdery mildew pathogen, Podosphaera xanthii. S. C. BOST (1). (1) University of Tennessee, Nashville, TN, U.S.A. 736-P. Sensitivity of Fusarium graminearum isolates to pyraclostrobin. M. ZWINGMAN (1), J. Hernandez

Nopsa (1), K. Eskridge (1), S. Wegulo (1). (1) University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, U.S.A. 737-P. Sensitivity of Botrytis cinerea isolates from strawberry to thiophanate-methyl and iprodione in Michoacan, Mexico. A. Alvarez-Medina (1), A. REBOLLAR-ALVITER (2), H. Silva-Rojas (3). (1) Universidad Autonoma Chapingo, Morelia, Mexico; (2) Univ. Autonoma Chapingo, Morelia, Mich, Mexico; (3) Programa de Semillas, Colegio se Postgraduados, Texoco, Mexico 738-P. Silencing of cysteine protease, acidic chitinase, or PR1-a individually, does not hamper BTHmediated resistance to P. infestans in tomato. A. ZULUAGA (1). (1) Cornell, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A. 739-P. Molecular characterization of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene in Podosphaera clandestina, the causal agent of powdery mildew on sweet cherry. Q. LIU (1), M. E. Nelson (1), G. G. Grove (1). (1) Washington State University, Prosser, WA, U.S.A. 740-P. Detecting resistance to QoI fungicides in Alternaria solani isolates collected from tomatoes in North Carolina. K. IVORS (1), L. Lacey (1), D. Milks (1), G. Olaya (2). (1) North Carolina State University, Mills River, NC, U.S.A.; (2) Syngenta Crop Protection, Vero Beach, FL, U.S.A. 741-P. Investigating altered triazole sensitivity in Rhynchosporium secalis. N. Hawkins (1), H. J. Cools (1), M. W. Shaw (2), H. Sierotzki (3), B. A. FRAAIJE (1). (1) Rothamsted Res., Harpenden, United Kingdom; (2) University of Reading, Reading, United Kingdom; (3) Syngenta Crop Protection, Stein, Switzerland 742-P. Aggressiveness and management of metalaxylresistant Pythium ultimum. L. D. PORTER (1). (1) USDA ARS, Prosser, WA, U.S.A. 743-P. F&D Status of dodine resistance and possibilities for renewed use against Venturia inaequalis populations in the northeastern U.S. K. COX (1), S. Villani (1), G. Jacon (2). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology, Cornell University, Geneva, NY, U.S.A.; (2) Groupe Agriphar, Ougree, Belgium 744-P. Rapid micro-dilution broth assay for evaluating in vitro fungicide resistance in Botrytis cinerea. D. E. WEDGE (1), K. J. Curry (2), B. Kreiser (2), A. Curry (2), M. Abril (3), B. J. Smith (4). (1) USDA ARS NPURU, University, MS, U.S.A.; (2) Dept. of Biological Sciences, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS, U.S.A.; (3) Dept. of Biological Sciences, University of Southern Mississippi, Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A.; (4) USDA ARS Southern Horticultural Laboratory, Poplarville, MS, U.S.A. 745-P. Effect of disinfectants on transmission of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis during grafting. F. BAYSAL-GUREL (1), X. Xu (1), G. Rajashekara (1), S. A. Miller (1). (1) The Ohio State University, Wooster, OH, U.S.A. 746-P. Efficacy of acibenzolar-S-methyl and copper fungicides for the control of angular leaf spot of

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2010 APS POSTERS

Chemical Control continued

strawberry. J. C. MERTELY (1). (1) University of Florida-GCREC, Wimauma, FL, U.S.A. 747-P. Soil application of neo-nicotinoid insecticides and acibenzolar-S-methyl for induction of SAR to control citrus canker on young citrus trees. J. H. GRAHAM (1), M. Myers (1). (1) University of Florida, Lake Alfred, FL, U.S.A. 748-P. F&D Bactericidal activities of antimicrobial molecules against huanglongbing-associated ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ in the diseased periwinkle. M. Zhang (1), Y. Duan (2), C. A. POWELL (3). (1) University of Florida, Ft. Pierce, FL, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS-USHRL, Fort Pierce, FL, U.S.A.; (3) IRREC-IFAS University of Florida, Fort Pierce, FL, U.S.A. 749-P. Flutriafol for control of cotton root rot, caused by Phymatotrichopsis omnivore. T. ISAKEIT (1), R. R. Minzenmayer (2), A. Abrameit (3). (1) Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, U.S.A.; (2) Texas Agri LIFE Extension Service, Ballinger, TX, U.S.A.; (3) Texas Agri LIFE Extension Service, Thrall, TX, U.S.A. 750-P. Control of Cylindrocladium black rot of peanut with Propulse, a 1:1 mixture of prothioconazole and fluopyram. P. M. PHIPPS (1), D. P. Telenko (1), G. H. Musson (2). (1) VPI&SU, Suffolk, VA, U.S.A.; (2) Bayer CropScience, Res. Triangle Park, NC, U.S.A. APS 751-P. FOUNDATION Evaluation of fungicides on white mold of peanuts. S. GLUCKSMAN (1), C. R. Semer (1). (1) University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A. 752-P. Management of Fusarium wilt of watermelon with fungicides. D. S. EGEL (1), K. Everts (2). (1) Purdue University, Vincennes, IN, U.S.A.; (2) University of Maryland College Park, Salisbury, MD, U.S.A. 753-P. Evaluation of seed treatments for management of Rhizoctonia damping-off in lettuce. F. BAYSALGUREL (1), S. A. Miller (1). (1) The Ohio State University, Wooster, OH, U.S.A. 754-P. Effect of fungicide dip treatments on pink root disease and yield of transplanted sweet onions in Georgia. F. SANDERS, JR. (1). (1) University of Georgia, Tifton, GA, U.S.A. 755-P. Effects of seed treatment on root diseases and yields of soybean. S. S. NAVI (1), X. Yang (1). (1) Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A. 756-P. Timing and methodology of application of azoxystrobin to control Rhizoctonia solani in sugarbeet. S. Pooran DeSouza (1), M. D. Bolton (2), M. F. KHAN (1). (1) North Dakota State University, Plant Pathology, Fargo, ND, U.S.A.; (2) USDA - ARS, Fargo, ND, U.S.A. 757-P. Development of a field inoculation method for Pythium blight of snap beans useful for field efficacy trials. L. HARRISON (1), S. L. Rideout (1). (1) Virginia Tech, Painter, VA, U.S.A. 758-P. Hormetic effect of cyazofamid on the radial growth

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of Pythium aphanidermatum. F. FLORES (1). (1) Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, U.S.A. 759-P. Volatile hexanal to postharvest control of brown rot of peach caused by Monilinia fructicola and M. laxa. J. SILVEIRA BAGGIO (1), S. de Afonseca Lourenço (1), L. Amorim (1). (1) Escola Superior de Agricultura “Luiz de Queiroz” (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, Brazil 760-P. Characteristics of Monilinia fructicola isolates from decayed stone fruits in eastern West Virginia. W. J. JANISIEWICZ (1), A. R. Biggs (2), W. M. Jurick II (3), I. Vico (3), W. S. Conway (3). (1) USDAARS, Appalachian Fruit Res. Station, Kearneysville, WV, U.S.A.; (2) West Virginia University, KTFRC, Kearneysville, WV, U.S.A.; (3) Food Quality Laboratory, USDA-ARS, BARC-East, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A. 761-P. Evaluation of effectiveness of carbendazim comparatively to trifloxystrobin + tebuconazole for control of citrus postbloom fruit drop in Brazil. G. J. SILVA JUNIOR (1), M. B. Spósito (2), D. R. Marin (2), L. Amorim (1). (1) Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba-SP, Brazil; (2) Fundo de Defesa da Citricultura (Fundecitrus), Araraquara-SP, Brazil 762-P. Yield response and control of crown rust on oats with fungicides. A. K. HAGAN (1), M. B. Pegues (2). (1) Auburn University, Auburn, AL, U.S.A.; (2) Gulf Coast Resarch and Extension Center, Fairhope, AL, U.S.A. 763-P. Use of formulation and adjuvant approaches to identify potential limitations in field performance of an experimental fungicide relative to benchmarks. C. YAO (1), J. Owen (1). (1) Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN, U.S.A. 764-P. Fungicidal control of stem rust (Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici) of wheat. V. GUPTA (1). (1) South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD, U.S.A. 765-P. Predicting field activity of experimental fungicides on Septoria leaf blotch of wheat using multiple regression modeling. C. J. KLITTICH (1), Y. Adelfinskaya (1), W. K. Brewster (1), C. Yao (1). (1) Dow AgroSciences LLC, Indianapolis, IN, U.S.A. 766-P. Foliar fungicides reduce anthracnose top dieback of maize. E. BYAMUKAMA (1). (1) Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A. 767-P. Comparison of the rainfastness of Revus® and Forum® on lettuce for control of downy mildew (Bremia lactucae). P. KUHN (1), A. Hert (1), G. Olaya (1), L. Mantoe (2), G. Knauf-Beiter (2). (1) Syngenta Crop Protection, Vero Beach, FL, U.S.A.; (2) Syngenta Crop Protection, Stein, Switzerland 768-P. Effect essential oils on inhibition of Phytophthora capsici. E. KELLEY (1), J. Hao (1). (1) Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, U.S.A. 769-P. Comparative efficacy of fungicide application programs alternating among different products for management of powdery mildew on cantaloupe.


F&D indicates a Flash-and-Dash presentations. M. E. MATHERON (1), M. Porchas (1). (1) University of Arizona, Yuma, AZ, U.S.A. 770-P. WITHDRAWN Phytopathology 100:S136 771-P. Evaluation of fungicides for management of downy mildew on sweet basil. R. N. RAID (1), E. McAvoy (2), D. D. Sui (3). (1) University of Florida, Belle Glade, FL, U.S.A.; (2) University of Florida, Labelle, FL, U.S.A.; (3) University of Florida, West Palm Beach, FL, U.S.A. 772-P. Leaf spot disease in ornamental flowering cherry nursery production. M. T. MMBAGA (1), L. Mackasmiel (2), J. Joshua (3). (1) Tennessee State University School of Agriculture and Consumer Sciences, McMinnville, TN, U.S.A.; (2) Tennessee State University, McMinnville, TN, U.S.A.; (3) Tennessee State University, Nashville, TN, U.S.A. 773-P. Challenges and constraints impacting development of new and novel plant disease management solutions. D. G. OUIMETTE (1). (1) Dow AgroSciences LLC, Indianapolis, IN, U.S.A. 774-P. Effect of an at tassel fungicide application on yield and the foliar disease complex in field corn in Mississippi. T. W. ALLEN (1), A. Henn (2), D. M. Ingram (3). (1) Mississippi State University, Stoneville, MS, U.S.A.; (2) Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS, U.S.A.; (3) Mississippi State University, Raymond, MS, U.S.A. 775-P. Nozzle selection for maximizing brown patch control with fungicides. D. S. MCCALL (1), B. J. Horvath (2), M. A. Cutulle (1), A. E. Nichols (1), V. R. Sykes (2). (1) Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, U.S.A.; (2) University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, U.S.A. 776-P. Derivation and validation of a model to predict selection for fungicide resistance. P. H. HOBBELEN (1), N. D. Paveley (2), B. A. Fraaije (1), J. A. Lucas (1), F. Van den Bosch (1). (1) Rothamsted Res., Harpenden, United Kingdom; (2) ADAS, High Mowthorpe, Duggleby, Malton, United Kingdom 777-P. Influence of foliar fungicide on components of grain yield in hybrid corn. M. W. WALLHEAD (1), L. Madden (1), P. Paul (1). (1) Ohio State University, OARDC, Wooster, OH, U.S.A. 778-P. Effect of foliar fungicides on hail-damaged corn in Wisconsin in 2009. P. D. ESKER (1), N. C. Koval (1). (1) University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A. 779-P. Screening of organically certifiable fungicides and natural compounds to control anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum orbiculare in cantaloupe. M. FELICIANO-RIVERA (1). (1) University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, U.S.A. 780-P. Control of peanut rust with fungicides in Nicaragua. J. AUGUSTO (1), T. B. Brenneman (1). (1) University of Georgia, Tifton, GA, U.S.A. 781-P. Evaluation of nematicides for the management of Rotylenchulus reniformis across management zones created using soil electrical conductivity. S. R. MOORE (1), K. S. Lawrence (1), B. V. Ortiz (1), J.

N. Shaw (1), J. Fulton (1). (1) Auburn University, Auburn, AL, U.S.A. 782-P. Alternative fumigants for management of root-knot nematode on carrots. B. B. WESTERDAHL (1), J. S. Gerik (2). (1) Nematology Dept., University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A.; (2) USDA, ARS, San Joaquin Valley Agricultural Center, Parlier, CA, U.S.A. 783-P. Evaluation of fluensulfone for root-knot nematode on tobacco. A. CSINOS (1), J. Whitehead (2), L. L. Hickman (1), S. S. LaHue (1). (1) University of Georgia, Tifton, GA, U.S.A.; (2) Makhteshim Agan of North America, Oxford, MS, U.S.A. 784-P. Evaluation of thiazosulfene nematicide drip applications to manage root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne spp.) on yellow squash. J. G. DRIVER (1). (1) North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A. 785-P. The effect of foliar fungicides on yield across Iowa in the 2008 and 2009 growing seasons. N. R. BESTOR (1), D. S. Mueller (1), A. E. Robertson (1). (1) Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A. 786-P. Phytotoxicity danger of phosphorous acidgenerating fungicides and fertilizer products applied to blueberry and grapes. P. M. BRANNEN (1), J. Garner (2), J. Smith (3). (1) University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A.; (2) University of Georgia, Blairsville, GA, U.S.A.; (3) University of Georgia, Alma, GA, U.S.A. 787-P. Sensitivity to pyraclostrobin and boscalid in Penicillium expansum populations from apple in Washington State. Y. KIM (1), Y. Yin (1), C. Xiao (1). (1) Washington State University, TFREC, Wenatchee, WA, U.S.A. 788-P. Characterization of pyraclostrobin resistance and detection of the Bcbi-143/144 intron in the cytochrome b gene in Botrytis cinerea isolates from apple. Y. YIN (1), Y. Kim (1), C. Xiao (1). (1) Washington State University, TFREC, Wenatchee, WA, U.S.A. 789-P. Molecular characterization of resistance to boscalid and penthiopyrad in Didymella bryoniae isolates collected from Georgia watermelon fields. H. F. AVENOT (1), A. Thomas (1), R. D. Gitaitis (1), D. B. Langston (1), K. L. Stevenson (1). (1) University of Georgia, Tifton, GA, U.S.A. 790-P. A new rapid assay for detecting tebuconazole resistance in Cercospora arachidicola. J. Qiu (1), A. K. Culbreath (1), K. L. STEVENSON (1). (1) University of Georgia, Tifton, GA, U.S.A. 791-P. Mechanisms of DMI resistance in field isolates of Cercospora arachidicola. J. Qiu (1), A. K. Culbreath (1), K. L. STEVENSON (1). (1) University of Georgia, Tifton, GA, U.S.A. 792-P. Competitive ability of iprovalicarb-resistant mutants of Phytophthora capsici. X. H. LU (1), J. Hao (2), X. Liu (1). (1) China Agricultural University, Beijing, PRC Peoples Rep of China; (2) Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, U.S.A.

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2010 APS POSTERS

Chemical Control continued

793-P. Succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor resistance risk assessment studies on Mycosphaerella graminicola the causal agent of Septoria leaf blotch. C. Bayon (1), M. W. Fraaije (2), H. J. Cools (1), S. L. Rogers (1), J. A. Lucas (1), B. A. FRAAIJE (1). (1) Rothamsted Res., Harpenden, United Kingdom; (2) University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands 794-P. A rapid screening method for fungicide resistance in Alternaria alternata. B. VEGA (1), P. F. Harmon (2), M. M. Dewdney (1). (1) CREC, University of Florida, Lake Alfred, FL, U.S.A.; (2) Dept. of Plant Pathology, University of Florida, Gainesville, GA, U.S.A. 795-P. Reduced sensitivity and complete resistance of Michigan Venturia inaequalis populations to steroland quinone-outside inhibitor fungicides. K. E. LESNIAK (1), T. J. Proffer (1), A. Irish-Brown (1), G. W. Sundin (1). (1) Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, U.S.A. 796-P. Current status of benzimidazole resistance of Erysiphe necator in Virginia. A. B. BAUDOIN (1). (1) Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, U.S.A. 797-P. Screening for strobilurin (QoI) resistance in grape powdery mildew populations in Michigan. L. L. AVILA (1), T. D. Miles (1), W. W. Kirk (1), A. M. C. Schilder (1). (1) Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, U.S.A. 798-P. Determining the development of practical fungicide resistance in cucurbit powdery mildew of pumpkin. C. A. WYENANDT (1). (1) Rutgers University, Bridgeton, NJ, U.S.A. 799.P. The usefulness of mixtures of a single-site and a multi-site fungicide as resistance management strategy. P. H. HOBBELEN (1), N. D. Paveley (2), F. Van den Bosch (1). (1) Rothamsted Res., Harpenden, United Kingdom; (2) ADAS, High Mowtorpe, Duggleby, Malton, United Kingdom

Host Resistance

800-P. Resistance to race TTKSK of Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici in tetraploid wheat. P. OLIVERA FIRPO (1), Y. Jin (2), S. Xu (3), D. Klindworth (3). (1) University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS Cereal Disease Laboratory and University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, U.S.A.; (3) USDA-ARS, Northern Crop Science Laboratory, Fargo, ND, U.S.A. 801-P. Genetic diversity of barley spot blotch resistance sources by chromosome haplotyping. S. RODRIGUEZ (1), C. Torres Tuyo (1), P. Silva (1), A. Castro (1), C. Pritsch (1). (1) University Uruguay, Montevideo, Uruguay 802-P. Field evaluation and genetic characterization of a quantitative trait locus conferring resistance to Southern leaf blight. J. SANTA-CRUZ (1), A. Belcher (2), J. Zwonitzer (3), C. Arellano (4), M. Krakowsky (5), P. Balint-Kurti (6). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; (2) Res. and

90

Extension Center, University of Idaho, Aberdeen, ID, U.S.A.; (3) Dow Agrosciences, Huxley, IA, U.S.A.; (4) Dept. of Statistics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; (5) Dept. of Crop Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; (6) Dept. of Plant Pathology, North Carolina State University, USDA-ARS, Plant Science Res. Unit, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A. 803-P. Resistance breakdown in Rz2-containing sugar beet cultivars to Beet necrotic yellow vein virus. M. J. Smith (1), R. Acosta-Leal (1), C. M. RUSH (1). (1) Texas AgriLife Res., Amarillo, TX, U.S.A. 804-P. Systemic acquired resistance for reducing bacterial wilt severity on annual bluegrass. A. CHAVES (1), N. A. Mitkowski (1). (1) University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI, U.S.A. 805-P. The activity of citrus canker lesions on grapefruit in Florida, June 2009–January 2010. C. H. BOCK (1), P. E. Parker (2), T. R. Gottwald (3), J. H. Graham (4). (1) USDA ARS, Fort Pierce, FL, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-APHIS-PPQ, Edinburg, TX, U.S.A.; (3) USDA, ARS, USHRL, Fort Pierce, FL, U.S.A.; (4) University of Florida, Lake Alfred, FL, U.S.A. 806-P. Evaluation of transgenic grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) for resistance to citrus scab caused by Elsinoë fawcetti. S. N. Mondal (1), M. Dutt (1), G. A. Barthe (1), J. W. Grosser (1), M. M. DEWDNEY (1). (1) CREC, University of Florida, Lake Alfred, FL, U.S.A. 807-P. Evaluation of winter wheat cultivars for resistance to Fusarium head blight and deoxynivalenol. J. HERNANDEZ NOPSA (1), S. N. Wegulo (1). (1) University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, U.S.A. 808-P. Selection indexes comparison to improve maize resistance to Aspergillus flavus, Fusarium moniliforme and Rhizoctonia solani grain and plant infection. J. M. ALEZONES (1), R. D. Perdomo (1), B. Borges (1), A. D. Gonzalez (1), J. J. Salazar (1), F. R. Hernandez (1). (1) Fundacion Danac, San Felipe, Venezuela 809-P. Screening of plant introduction materials from Brassica species for resistance against PG3 and PG4 isolates of blackleg. D. A. MARINO (1), L. E. del Rio (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, U.S.A. 810-P. Evaluation of runner bean germplasm for virus resistance. E. Peña-Reyes (1), G. Bascur (1), P. Mendoza (1), P. Sepúlveda (1), I. ROSALES VILLAVICENCIO (1). (1) Instituto de Investigaciones Agropecuarias, Santiago, Chile 811-P. New races of the rust pathogen in the United States affect Ur-3 a broadly used rust resistance gene in common bean. M. A. PASTOR-CORRALES (1). (1) USDA ARS, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A. 812-P. A modified method to screen for partial resistance to Phytophthora sojae in soybean. S. M. STEWART (1), A. E. Robertson (1). (1) Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A.


F&D indicates a Flash-and-Dash presentations. 813-P. Screening germplasm for resistance to Phomopsis seed decay in soybean. S. LI (1), J. C. Rupe (2), P. Chen (2), A. Wrather (3). (1) USDA ARS CGRU, Stoneville, MS, U.S.A.; (2) University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A.; (3) University of Missouri, Portageville, MO, U.S.A. 814-P. Differential reactions of sources of Rpp-resistance to an Rpp-virulent isolate of Puccinia polysora. J. K. PATAKY (1), W. E. Dolezal (2), J. L. Brewbaker (3). (1) University of Illinois, Dept. of Crop Sciences, Urbana, IL, U.S.A.; (2) Pioneer HiBred International, Inc., Johnston, IA, U.S.A.; (3) University of Hawaii-Manoa, Dept. of Tropical Plant and Soil Sciences, Manoa, HI, U.S.A. 815-P. Effect of temperature on bacterial wilt, caused by Ralstonia solanacearum, incidence in tobacco cultivars. R. J. BITTNER (1), A. Mila (1). (1) North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A. 816-P. Reaction to Plasmodiophora brassicae, pathotype 6 in lines of Brassica species. K. Kalpana (1), M. MCDONALD (1), B. D. Gossen (2). (1) University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada; (2) Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Saskatoon, SK, Canada 817-P. Response of late blight-resistant tomato lines to Florida genotypes of Phytophthora infestans. R. S. DONAHOO (1). (1) University of Florida, Immokalee, FL, U.S.A. APS 818-P. FOUNDATION Isolates of Phytophthora capsici differ in their ability to cause disease on cucurbit fruits. T. B. ENZENBACHER (1), M. K. Hausbeck (1). (1) Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, U.S.A. Poster WITHDRAWN Phytopathology 100:S35 819-P. Resistance of triploid watermelon cultivars to Fusarium wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum. K. PENNERMAN (1), K. Everts (2). (1) University of Maryland, College Park, MD, U.S.A.; (2) University of Maryland and University of Delaware, College Park, MD, U.S.A. 820-P. Effect of leaf age on primary infection and development of colonies of strawberry powdery mildew. B. ASALF (1), A. Stensvand (2), D. M. Gadoury (3), R. C. Seem (3), A. Tronsmo (2). (1) Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Aas, Norway; (2) Aas, Norway; (3) Geneva, NY, U.S.A. 821-P. Cultivar selection for sugar beet root rot resistance. C. A. STRAUSBAUGH (1), I. A. Eujayl (1), P. Foote (2). (1) USDA ARS NWISRL, Kimberly, ID, U.S.A.; (2) Amalgamated Sugar Company, Paul, ID, U.S.A. 822-P. Supplementing nutrition with calcium and potassium silicate to control Botrytis cinerea in poinsettia stock plants. L. TUROOP (1), J. E. Faust (2). (1) Jomo Kenyatta University of Agric. & Technology, Nairobi, Kenya; (2) Clemson, SC, U.S.A. 823-P. White pine blister rust resistance in a seven-year-old field trial of 28 western white pine (Pinus monticola) families in the coast range of Oregon. R. A.

SNIEZKO (1), J. Hill (2), R. S. Danchok (2), A. J. Kegley (2), S. Long (2), J. B. Mayo (2), A. J. Smith (3). (1) USDA FS Dorena Genetic Resource Center, Cottage Grove, OR, U.S.A.; (2) USDA Forest Service/Dorena Genetic Resource Center, Cottage Grove, OR, U.S.A.; (3) Plum Creek Timberlands, Cottage Grove, OR, U.S.A.

Integrated Pest Management

824-P. Effect of poultry litter on Heterodera glycines reproduction. P. DONALD (1), P. Allen (2), K. Sistani (3), D. Tyler (4), H. Tewolde (5). (1) USDA ARS, Jackson, TN, U.S.A.; (2) Knoxville, TN, U.S.A.; (3) Bowling Green, KY, U.S.A.; (4) Jackson, TN, U.S.A.; (5) Mississippi State, MS, U.S.A. 825-P. F&D Synergistic agents to reduce fungicide resistance and health risks. N. I. KHAN (1), J. A. Trogolo (1). (1) Agion-Technology Inc., Wakefield, MA, U.S.A. 826-P. Suppression of zinnia powdery mildew in the greenhouse with silicon-containing media amendments. J. C. LOCKE (1), J. E. Altland (2), J. M. Frantz (1). (1) USDA-ARS-ATRU, Toledo, OH, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS-ATRU, Wooster, OH, U.S.A. 827-P. Suppression of Fusarium crown and root rot in tomato by silicon. C. Huang (1), P. ROBERTS (2), L. Datnoff (3). (1) University of Florida, GCREC, Wimauma, FL, U.S.A.; (2) University of Florida, SWFREC, Immokalee, FL, U.S.A.; (3) Dept. of Plant Pathology & Crop Physiology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, U.S.A. 828-P. Effects of silicon amendment on diseases caused by Mycosphaerella fijiensis and Cylindrocladium spathiphylli in banana. L. KABLAN (1), M. Vermeire (1), J. Risede (2), M. Dorel (2), B. Delvaux (1), A. Legreve (1). (1) Université catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium; (2) CIRAD-FLHOR, Capesterre-Belle-Eau, Guadeloupe 829-P. Brief gaseous shocks to inhibit postharvest gray mold on ‘Mollar de Elche’ pomegranates. C. Montesinos-Herrero (1), V. Taberner (1), M. del Río (1), A. Guardado (1), L. PALOU (1). (1) IVIA, Postharvest Technology Center, Montcada, València, Spain 830-P. Exploring cover crop carbon sources for anaerobic soil disinfestation. D. M. Butler (1), E. N. ROSSKOPF (1), N. Burelle (1), J. Muramoto (2), C. Shennan (3). (1) USDA ARS, Fort Pierce, FL, U.S.A.; (2) Center for Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA, U.S.A.; (3) Dept. of Environmental Studies and Center for Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems, Santa Cruz, CA, U.S.A. 831-P. F&D Suppression of sheath blight of rice by cow urine. R. JEYARAMAN (1). (1) Annamalai University, Annamalainagar, Tamil Nadu, India

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2010 APS POSTERS

Integrated Pest Management continued

832-P. Effect of chemical and biological control treatments against brown rot blossom blight in an organic sour cherry orchard. I. J. HOLB (1), M. Fazekas (2), F. Abonyi (2), P. Lakatos (2). (1) University of Debrecen, Centre for Agricultural Sciences and Engineering, Debrecen, Hungary and Plant Protection Institute, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary; (2) University of Debrecen, Centre for Agricultural Sciences and Engineering, Debrecen, Hungary 833-P. Integrated management of Fusarium crown rot of wheat using fungicide seed treatment, cultivar resistance, and induction of systemic acquired resistance. E. A. MOYA (1), A. T. Dyer (1), B. J. Jacobsen (1). (1) Montana State University, Bozeman, MT, U.S.A. 834-P. Fungicide management strategies for the control of Fusarium head blight in southern Brazil. P. SPOLTI (1), L. Simon (1), J. dos Santos (1), N. Barros (1), D. S. Guerra (2), E. M. Del Ponte (1). (1) UFRGS, Porto Alegre, Brazil; (2) BASF, Passo Fundo, Brazil 835-P. Combination of genetic resistance, reduced-risk fungicides and Tom-Cast for tomato disease control. T. A. ZITTER (1), J. L. Drennan (1), M. A. Mutschler (1). (1) Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A. 836-P. Fusarium avenaceum as causal agent of root rot in field peas and its control. K. CHITTEM (1), L. Porter (2), K. McPhee (3), M. Khan (3), R. S. Goswami (3). (1) North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, U.S.A.; (2) Prosser, WA, U.S.A.; (3) Fargo, ND, U.S.A. 837-P. Pathogenicity of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis cucumerinum and control strategies of cucumber root and stalk rot in hydroponic systems. D. PALMERO (1), M. De Cara (2), M. Santos (2), C. Iglesias (1), J. Tello (2). (1) Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Madrid, Spain; (2) Universidad de AlmerĂ­a, Almeria, Spain 838-P. Managing Rhizoctonia root and crown rot in Nebraska utilizing azoxystrobin applications based on soil temperature measurements. R. M. HARVESON (1). (1) University of Nebraska, Scottsbluff, NE, U.S.A. 839-P. Multistate evaluation of integrated management strategies for Fusarium head blight and deoxynivalenol in small grain. K. T. WILLYERD (1), C. Bradley (2), A. Grybauskas (3), D. Hershman (4), L. Madden (1), M. McMullen (5), L. Osborne (6), L. Sweets (7), P. Paul (1). (1) Ohio State University, OARDC, Wooster, OH, U.S.A.; (2) University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, U.S.A.; (3) University of Maryland, College Park, MD, U.S.A.; (4) University of Kentucky, Princeton, KY, U.S.A.; (5) University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, U.S.A.; (6) South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD, U.S.A.; (7) University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, U.S.A.

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840-P. Evaluation of multiple management strategies for FHB barley. P. L. GROSS (1), S. M. Neate (2), R. Brueggeman (1). (1) North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, U.S.A.; (2) Toowoomba, Australia 841-P. Effect of resistant catch crops on population decline of sugar beet cyst nematode. A. Mohammad Deimi (1), S. BAROUTI (1). (1) Dept. of Plant Pathology, Faculty of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran 842-P. Mustard cover crop for management of Phytophthora blight (Phytophthora capsici) in cucurbit fields. S. B. THRU PPOYIL (1), M. Babadoost (1). (1) University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, U.S.A. 843-P. Management of Verticillium wilt of potato with disease-suppressive crop rotations. R. P. LARKIN (1), W. Honeycutt (1), M. Olanya (1). (1) USDA ARS, Orono, ME, U.S.A. 844-P. To what extent can winter pruning intensity reduce apple powdery mildew in integrated and organic apple orchards? I. J. HOLB (1), M. Fazekas (2), B. Balla (2), F. Abonyi (2). (1) University of Debrecen, Centre for Agricultural Sciences and Engineering, Debrecen, Hungary and Plant Protection Institute, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary; (2) University of Debrecen, Centre for Agricultural Sciences and Engineering, Debrecen, Hungary 845-P. Inoculum sources and spore survival in field soil of the sour rot pathogen, Geotrichum candidum. M. A. YAGHMOUR (1), R. M. Bostock (1), J. E. Adaskaveg (2), T. J. Michailides (3). (1) University of California, Davis, CA, U.S.A.; (2) University of California, Riverside, CA, U.S.A.; (3) University of California, Parlier, CA, U.S.A. 846-P. Effects of irrigation and crop rotation on Verticillium wilt of cotton in Texas. J. E. WOODWARD (1), T. A. Wheeler (2), J. P. Bordovsky (2). (1) Texas AgriLife Extension Service, Lubbock, TX, U.S.A.; (2) Texas AgriLife Res., Lubbock, TX, U.S.A. 847-P. Brassica juncea seed meal amendment induces longterm suppressiveness to Pythium abappressorium under enclosed and open soil incubation conditions. M. WEERAKOON (1), A. Izzo (2), M. Mazzola (3). (1) Washington State University, Wenatchee, WA, U.S.A.; (2) Elon University, Elon, NC, U.S.A.; (3) USDA ARS, Wenatchee, WA, U.S.A. 848-P. Evaluating the impact of nutritional treatments on Xylella fastidiosa in grapevine. J. BRADY (1), J. Faske (1), T. Faske (2), D. McGahan (2). (1) Texas AgriLife Res., Stephenville, TX, U.S.A.; (2) Tarleton State University, Stephenville, TX, U.S.A. 849-P. Management of bunch rot of Vignoles and Chardonnay grapes with gibberellic acid. B. HED (1), H. K. Ngugi (2), J. W. Travis (2). (1) Lake Erie Regional Grape Res. & Ext. Ctr., North East, PA, U.S.A.; (2) Penn State Fruit Res. and Extension Center, Biglerville, PA, U.S.A.


F&D indicates a Flash-and-Dash presentations. 850-P. Influence of row covers on muskmelon pollination in the absence of bacterial wilt. X. CIBILS STEWART (1), E. Saalau Rojas (1), M. L. Gleason (1). (1) Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A. 851-P. Sampling for pod rot of peanut. T. A. WHEELER (1), J. E. Woodward (2), S. A. Russell (3), M. G. Cattaneo (4). (1) Texas AgriLife Res., Lubbock, TX, U.S.A.; (2) Texas AgriLife Extension, Lubbock, TX, U.S.A.; (3) Texas AgriLife Extension, Brownfield, TX, U.S.A.; (4) Texas AgriLife Extension, Seminole, TX, U.S.A. 852-P. Tomato grafting to manage bacterial wilt (caused by Ralstonia solanacearum) in the southeastern U.S. C. L. RIVARD (1), R. M. Welker (1), S. O’Connell (1), M. M. Peet (2), F. J. Louws (1). (1) North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, U.S.A.; (2) USDA, Washinton, DC, U.S.A. 853-P. Controlling powdery mildew in the greenhouse on hybrid Cucurbita seedlings used as rootstocks for grafting watermelon. A. P. KEINATH (1), G. V. Baccari (1), V. B. DuBose (1). (1) Clemson University, Charleston, SC, U.S.A. 854-P. Turfgrass disease identification and management aided by “smart” phone technology. A. MARTINEZ-ESPINOZA (1), C. F. Waltz (1), W. Hudson (2), P. McCullough (1). (1) University of Georgia, Griffin, GA, U.S.A.; (2) University of Georgia, Tifton, GA, U.S.A. 855-P. Detection of Pyrenophora teres in infested plant tissues by PCR. R. T. LARTEY (1), T. CaesarTonThat (1), A. J. Caesar (1), S. Hanson (1), U. M. Sainju (1). (1) USDA ARS, Sidney, MT, U.S.A. 856-P. F&D Time spray strategies for Septoria leaf blotch disease progress on winter wheat: The use of forecasting model. M. El Jarroudi (1), F. Giraud (2), P. Delfosse (3), L. Hoffmann (3), H. Maraite (4), B. TYCHON (5). (1) Univ of Liege, Arlon, Belgium; (2) Martillac, France; (3) Belvaux, Luxembourg; (4) Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium; (5) Arlon, Belgium 857-P. Relationship between grain yield and Fusarium head blight in soft red winter wheat as influenced by cultivar resistance. J. D. SALGADO (1), M. W. Wallhead (1), L. V. Madden (1), P. A. Paul (1). (1) Ohio State University, OARDC, Wooster, OH, U.S.A. 858-P. Development of prototype Pathogen Detection Lab-On-a-Chip (PADLOC) system for real-time on-field plant disease diagnostics. M. M. MALAPINELSON (1), V. L. Vaughn (1), B. Ma (1), A. Han (1), D. Gross (1), W. Shim (1). (1) Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, U.S.A. 859-P. Identification of seedling pathogens from soybean planted in field soils at three temperatures. K. URREA (1), J. Rupe (1), C. Rothrock (1). (1) University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A. 860-P. Isolation and molecular identification of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum race 2 present in Alabama cotton. J. D. CASTILLO (1), K. S. Lawrence (1), L. F. Cruz (1), K. M. Glass (1). (1) Auburn University, Auburn, AL, U.S.A.

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On SALE in the APS PRESS Bookstore Located in Exhibit Hall A Sunday, August 8............................. 4:30 – 6:30 p.m. Monday, August 9................... 9:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. Tuesday, August 10.................. 8:00 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, August 11...................8:00 – 11:00 a.m.

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Book & Companion DVD “In conclusion, this book is awesome! It is really essential for any plant pathologist. If you are a teacher, you should have this book. If you are a student, either undergraduate or graduate, you must have this book!” —Inoculum

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2010 APS POSTERS Regulatory

861-P. Development of a national standard for virus certification of ornamental and fruit tree nursery stock. R. Welliver (1), M. Hansen (2), N. OSTERBAUER (3). (1) Pennsylvania Dept. of Agriculture, Harrisburg, PA, U.S.A.; (2) Michigan Dept. of Agriculture, St. Joseph, MI, U.S.A.; (3) Oregon Dept. of Agriculture, Salem, OR, U.S.A. 862-P. A new molecular diagnostic tool for quantitatively detecting and genotyping ‘Candidatus Liberibacter’ species. H. LIN (1), H. Liao (2), Y. Bai (2), E. L. Civerolo (1). (1) USDA ARS PWA, Parlier, CA, U.S.A.; (2) Guangxi Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Nanning, PRC Peoples Rep of China 863-P. Spread of huanglongbing through citrus and citrus relatives in retail nurseries and garden centers. S. E. Halbert (1), K. L. Manjunath (2), C. Ramadugu (3), R. F. LEE (2). (1) Florida Division of Plant Industry, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A.; (2) USDA ARS National Clonal Germplasm Repository for Citrus and Dates, Riverside, CA, U.S.A.; (3) Dept. of Botany and Plant Sciences, University of California, Riverside, CA, U.S.A. 864-P. WITHDRAWN Phytopathology 100:S131 865-P. Testing for mycotoxins using LC-MS/MS. J. RICHARD (1), D. Houchins (1), C. Brewe (1), M. Prinster (1). (1) Romer Labs, Inc., Union, MO, U.S.A.

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n Professionalism/Outreach 866-P.

Dual-use res. in the life sciences. P. LEWIS (1). (1) Natl. Inst of Health, Bethesda, MD, U.S.A. 867-P. The Fungal Genetics Stock Center at UMKC is an international biological resource center. K. MCCLUSKEY (1), A. Wiest (1), M. Plamann (1). (1) University of Missouri, Kansas City, MO, U.S.A. 868-P. Sowing the seeds of science. A. R. Camp (1), H. W. Lange (1), S. Reiners (1), C. D. SMART (1). (1) Cornell University, Geneva, NY, U.S.A. 869-P. Oomycete res. at undergraduate institutions: An update on SPACES, an internet resource for and by the oomycete community. M. D. OSPINAGIRALDO (1), C. Bentley (1). (1) Lafayette College, Easton, PA, U.S.A. 870-P. Sick Plants and a Hungry World: An online course for master gardeners. S. D. ELLIS (1), P. J. Bennett (2), M. J. Boehm (1). (1) The Ohio State University Dept. of Plant Pathology, Columbus, OH, U.S.A.; (2) Ohio State University Extension State Master Gardener Program, Springfield, OH, U.S.A. 871-P. WITHDRAWN Phytopathology 100:S61 872-P. WITHDRAWN Phytopathology 100:S22


2011 APS-IPPC Joint Meeting August 6-10, 2011 • Honolulu, Hawaii

The American Phytopathological Society (APS) and the International Association for the Plant Protection Sciences (IAPPS) will join forces August 6-10 in Honolulu, Hawaii, for a multidisciplinary meeting of two premier professional plant science associations.

Go global with APS in Hawaii!

Focus on new global initiatives and create connections with scientists from around the world in Honolulu. Relaxed, refreshed, and ready to learn. Hawaii offers: • Exotic plant life (and exotic plant diseases!) • A central location for a meeting focused on global issues • Easy access for new attendees from Pacific Rim and Asian countries • Opportunities for new session topics and a fresh perspective

Preliminary topics include: ✔ Omics Approaches to Food Safety ✔ Global Issues in IPM ✔ Phytopathological Phreakonomics ✔ Arthropod-Vector Specificity ✔ Translational Biotechnology ✔ Pesticides: Management and Resistance

This is just the beginning!

Why meet with IAPPS? The International Association for the Plant Protection Sciences (IAPPS) ensures production of sufficient quality of food/feed/fiber for a growing population and advocates implementation of sustainable plant health management strategies. Visit www.plantprotection.org for more information.

Check the website often for new updates on the program you don’t want to miss.

Joint Meeting August 6–10 Honolulu, Hawaii

www.apsnet.org/meet

Implementing Change for Plant Protection

EXHIBITION

2011

APS•IPPC


APS Exhibit Hall A Floor Plan

ABSTRACT PRINTING STATION

POSTERS

Exhibit Hours Sunday, August 8

4:30 – 6:30 p.m.

Monday, August 9

9:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m.

Tuesday, August 10

8:00 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Exhibitors Listed in numerical order. 100

Berthold Technologies USA, LLC

117

Eurofins STA Laboratories/ BIOREBA AG

303

British Society for Plant Pathology

202

BigC

304

APS Office of International Programs (OIP)

305

Bio Chambers Incorporated

306

APS Office of Public Relations and Outreach (OPRO)

311

DuPont Crop Protection

312

Pressure BioSciences, Inc.

EXHIBITION

101-200 Agdia, Inc. 102

Natural Industries

103

Gylling Data Management, Inc.

203-302 Bayer CropScience

104

Academia Book Exhibits

204

American Peat Technology LLC

105

USDA/APHIS/PPQ/PHP

206

107

Marrone Bio Innovations

Burkard Manufacturing Co. Ltd., UK

110

Conviron

111-210 PhytoTechnology Laboratories 112-114 BASF Corporation 113 115 117

The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation Microbiology International BIOREBA AG/Eurofins STA Laboratories

211-310 EnviroLogix Inc. 212

BioSciConcepts

213

Environmental Growth Chambers

214

Elchrom Scientific AG

215

National Plant Diagnostic Network (NPDN)

216

Dow AgroSciences LLC

217

Diagnostics Committee

313-315 USDA-APHIS-PPQ Center for Plant Health Science and Technology 316

Percival Scientific, Inc.

402

AC Diagnostics, Inc. (ACDI)

404

Springer

410

Spectrum Technologies, Inc.


Thank You!

Annual Meeting Program Planning Committee These leaders are recognized and acknowledged for their time and expertise in the development of the program: Program Committee Chair......................... John Sherwood University of Georgia, U.S.A. Program Committee Vice Chair................. Carol Ishimaru University of Minnesota, U.S.A. APS Scientific Program Board Director........................................................ Scott Adkins USDA ARS USHRL, U.S.A. Workshop Chair............................................ James Buck University of Georgia, U.S.A. APS Section Chairs........................................ Janna Beckerman Purdue University, U.S.A.

Amy Charkowski University of Wisconsin, U.S.A.

Christina Cowger USDA ARS, North Carolina State University, U.S.A.

Martin Dickman Texas A&M University, U.S.A.

Paul Esker University of Wisconsin, U.S.A.

Aaron Hert Syngenta Crop Protection, U.S.A.

Members....................................................... Antonius Baudoin Virginia Tech, U.S.A.

Michael Boehm Ohio State University, U.S.A.

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The American Phytopathological Society

Elected and Appointed Officers, Representatives, and Committees for 2010 These listings reflect current appointments as of June 1, 2010. For up-to-date listings following the annual meeting, please refer to APSnet. APS Council President: B. J. Christ President-Elect: J. L. Sherwood Vice President: C. A. Ishimaru Immediate Past President: J. W. Moyer Internal Communications Officer (ICO) [fna Secretary]: D. T. Beadle ICO-Elect: D. M. Gadoury Treasurer: R. C. Rowe Editor-in-Chief, Phytopathology: N. Grunwald Editor-in-Chief, Plant Disease: R. M. Davis Editor-in-Chief, Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions: G. Stacey Editor-in-Chief, Phytopathology News: D. J. Jardine Editor-in-Chief, APS Press: M. L. Daughtrey Senior Councilor-at-Large: M. J. Boehm Intermediate Councilor-at-Large: C. T. Bull Junior Councilor-at-Large: A. E. Dorrance Councilor of the Pacific Division: J. E. Adaskaveg Councilor of the Northeastern Division: W. H. Elmer Councilor of the Potomac Division: K. L. Everts Councilor of the Caribbean Division: M. M. Roca Councilor of the Southern Division: J. C. Rupe Councilor of the North Central Division: G. W. Sundin APS Foundation Rep (ex officio non-voting): G. S. Abawi Executive Vice President (ex officio non-voting): S. C. Nelson APS Foundation-Board of Directors: Chair: G. S. Abawi. Vice Chair: R. D. Martyn, Treasurer (ex officio non-voting): R. C. Rowe, Members: A. M. Alvarez, J. Amador, R. Cook, S. M. Douglas, T. D. Murray, A. H. Tally. Ex-Officio (non-voting): H. A. Olson APS Publications Board: Chair: M. E. Daub. Members: A. B. Baudoin, M. L. Daughtrey, R. M. Davis, D. M. Eastburn, N. Grunwald, D. J. Jardine, M. E. Matheron, G. Stacey, F. P. Wong Annual Meetings Board (AMB) (fnaSPB): Director: S. T. Adkins. Program Chair: J. L. Sherwood. Vice Chair: C. A. Ishimaru. Section Chairs: Diseases of Plants: J. L. Beckerman. Biology of Pathogens: A. O. Charkowski, Professionalism and Outreach: C. Cowger, Molecular/Cellular/Plant Microbe Interactions: M. B. Dickman, Epidemiology/Ecology/ Environmental Biology: P. Esker, Plant Disease Management: A. P. Hert. Workshops Chair: J. W. Buck. Members: A. B. Baudoin, A. E. Dorrance Auxiliary Meetings Board (XMB): Director: G. C. Bergstrom. Members: K. S. Arthur, A. R. Bennett, J. W. Buck, S. H. Hulbert, S. A. Miller, A. E. Robertson, K. L. Smith, K. V. Subbarao Office of Electronic Communications (OEC): Director: D. M. Eastburn. APSnet Feature Editor: G. D. Franc. Members: A. M. Brunings, D. A. Glawe, S. Kang, K. J. Martin, G. M. Rauscher, J. M. Windes, Ex-Officio Voting: A. B. Baudoin Office of Industry Relations (OIR): Director: B. D. Olson. Members: J. R. Bloomberg, A. Cochran, P. T. Himmel, G. J. Holmes, C. L. Kohls, D. G. Ouimette, M. R. Schwarz, V. Spadafora, R. Van Haren, W. L. Wiebe, M. D. Wiglesworth. Industry Liaison: A. P. Hert, Sustaining Associates Chair: D. Myhaver Office of International Programs Advisory Board (OIP): Director: S. A. Miller. Members: M. Babadoost, J. K. Brown, S. Kamoun, J. H. McBeath, M. A. Pastor-Corrales, A. C. Schilder, J. R. Steadman Office of Public Relations and Outreach (OPRO): Director: M. L. Elliott. Immediate Past Director: D. J. Jardine. Members: R. H. Brlansky, J. P. Damicone, N. M. Donofrio, M. A. Grabowski, E. W. Honeycutt, M. A. Langham, J. Q. Liu, K. Ong, K. T. Schneider. Ex-Officio, APSnet Feature Editor: G. D. Franc. Ex-Officio Voting: J. Fletcher, J. W. Moyer Phytopathology News Advisory: Editor-in-Chief: D. J. Jardine, Members: A. E. Dorrance, D. G. Fernando, M. Lorito, D. G. Schmale III Public Policy Board (PPB): Chair: J. Fletcher. Members: J. D. Barak, A. R. Bennett, B. J. Christ, P. T. Himmel, S. H. Hulbert, C. A. Ishimaru, J. E. Leach, J. P. Mueller, J. L. Sherwood, J. R. Steadman. Ex-Officio Voting: M. L. Elliott. Intern: S. J. Vasquez. DC Rep: K. A. Eversole APS Historian: P. D. Peterson

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Affiliate Representatives: American Association for the Advancement of Science: D. G. Gilchrist; Coalition on Funding Agricultural Research: J. L. Sherwood; Intl Society for Aboriculture: G. W. Hudler; Intl Society for Plant Pathology: T. A. Evans. Members: J. H. Andrews, M. Babadoost, A. R. Bennett, L. A. Calvert, K. F. Cardwell, J. C. Correll, J. H. McBeath, S. A. Miller, R. C. Ploetz. Intl Union of Microbiological Societies: C. T. Bull; Mycological Society of America: C. M. Stiles; National Council for Science and the Environment: J. J. Marois; PlantingScience: A. B. Baudoin, K. Ong, Society of Evnv Toxicology and Chemistry: M. Simini; Society of Nematologists: T. L. Niblack Editorial Boards APS Press: Editor-in-Chief: M. L. Daughtrey. Associate Editor-in-Chief: T. C. Paulitz. Acquisitions Editors: D. M. Benson, L. V. Madden. Senior Editors: C. Allen, J. K. Brown, L. E. Datnoff, D. M. Eastburn, J. H. Graham, S. T. Koike, G. P. Munkvold, M. E. Palm-Hernandez, H. F. Schwartz. Ex-Officio (non-voting): R. C. Rowe Education Center-Plant Health Instructor: Editor-in-Chief: A. B. Baudoin. Senior Editors: W. W. Bockus, P. D. Brune, T. A. Evans, A. B. Gould, S. J. Pethybridge, W-B. Shim, N. Shishkoff, C. D. Smart, K. L. Stevenson. Associate Editors: S. L. Giammaria, J-R. Xu MPMI: Editor-in-Chief: G. Stacey. Senior Editors: J. R. Alfano, G. A. Beattie, J. P. Carr, B. Ding, B. N. Kunkel, M. Lorito, J. M. McDowell, T. P. Nuernberger, U. Paszkowski, S. Robatzek, D. Roby, M. J. Sadowsky, K. Shirasu, G. Smant, K. Szczyglowski. Associate Editors: M. Barnett, J. Boch, A. Brachmann, A. O. Charkowski, E. Cytrin, B. Day, D. Desveaux, A. DiPietro, L. Johnson, P. Kachroo, M. Kawaguchi, K. Kazan, B. Kemmerling, D. Mackey, P. Mergaert, M. Mitchum, P. Moffett, N. Requena, P. Solomon, J. Verchot-Lubicz, P. van West, P. Veronese, J. Zhou, C. Zipfel Phytopathology: Editor-in-Chief: N. Grunwald. Senior Editors: T. B. Adhikari, V. C. Blok, C. M. Deom, B. K. Duffy, G. A. Forbes, D. H. Gent, S. B. Goodwin, R. C. Hamelin, A. V. Karasev, N. McRoberts, T. L. Peever, J. J. Polashock, B. M. Pryor, G. W. Sundin, W. W. Turechek. Associate Editors: P. J. Balint-Kurti, J. D. Barak, N. M. Donofrio, L. J. du Toit, K. J. Evans, E. Jacquot, M. Jimenez-Gasco, S. T. Koike, W. F. Mahaffee, D. Mavrodi, A. L. Mila, E. S. G. Mizubuti, J. Palumbo, S. Restrepo, H. Sanfacon, S. Savary, B. Sipes, I. E. Tzanetakis, G. E. Vallad, C. M. Vera Cruz, L. A. Wanner, S. L. Woo, F. Workneh, X. Xu, and Y. Zhao Plant Disease: Editor-in-Chief: R. M. Davis. Focus Editor. Thor Kommedahl. Senior Editors: K. Baumgartner, R. H. Brlansky, J. W. Buck, A. O. Charkowski, J. C. Correll, C. Cowger, L. J. du Toit, M. L. Gleason, R. M. Harveson, D. A. Inglis, B. D. Nelson, S. J. Pethybridge, E. N. Rosskopf, G. Schnabel, J. J. Stapleton, C. A. Strausbaugh, Feature Editor: J. J. Farrar. Disease Notes Assigning Editors: J. Hao, B. M. Wu. Associate Editors: B. J. Aegerter, C. A. Bradley, M. E. L. Burrows, D. J. Chitwood, A. E. Dorrance, A. Elling, A. Eskalen, P. Esker, C. D. Garzon, F. E. Gildow, S. F. Hanson, C. Hong, M. M. Kennelly, M. Lapidot, R. F. Lee, S. M. Marek, M. R. Miles, P. A. Paul, N. Peres, M. K. Romberg, D. G. Schmale III, C. D. Smart, K. C. Steddom, I. E. Tzanetakis, C. Y. Warfield, F. P. Wong, C. Xiao Plant Disease Management Reports: Editor-in-Chief: F. P. Wong. Section Editors: R. F. Davis, M. M. Kennelly, C. S. Kousik, J. C. Mertely, J. S. Miller, G. B. Padgett, S. L. Rideout, K. A. Wise, C. A. Wyenandt. Assigning Editors: C. M. Becker, J. L. Beckerman, A. Henn, C. R. Hollingsworth, C. S. Johnson, R. C. Kemerait, D. B. Langston, R. P. Larkin Plant Health Progress: Editor-in-Chief: M. E. Matheron. Senior Editors: G. T. Browne, D. M. Ferrin, T. P. Kuhar, C. M. Ocamb, M. W. Olsen, P. M. Phipps, N. A. Tisserat, N. R. Walker. Associate Editor: S. T. Koike APS Society Internal Relations Committees Awards and Honors: Chair: D. M. Weller, Immediate Past Chair: C. L. Schardl, Members: S. M. Coakley, N. P. Keller, S. A. Lommel, M. P. McMullen, H. Scherm Executive: Chair: B. J. Christ, Members: D. T. Beadle, M. J. Boehm, C. A. Ishimaru, J. W. Moyer, S. C. Nelson, R. C. Rowe, J. L. Sherwood Financial Advisory: Chair: R. C. Rowe, Members: M. J. Boehm, B. J. Christ, M. L. Daughtrey, J. C. Rupe, J. L. Sherwood APS Ad Hoc Committees Annual Meeting Models: Chair: A. E. Dorrance. Members: J. E. Adaskaveg, J. C. Beinapfl, C. Cowger, C. A. Ishimaru, D. J. Jardine, R. P. Kaiser, W. F. Mahaffee, J. W. Moyer, J. E. Takach


APS Governance: Chair: M. J. Boehm. Members: M. E. Daub, J. E. Loper, T. K. Mitchell, S. C. Nelson, J. C. Rupe, G. E. Shaner Divisional Forum: Chair: D. G. Schmale III. Members: J. E. Adaskaveg, W. H. Elmer, K. L. Everts, M. M. Roca, J. C. Rupe, G. W. Sundin, ISF Collaboration on Codification of Plant Races/Strains: Chair: P. T. Himmel. Members: W. E. Dolezal, L. J. du Toit, V. Grimault, C. J. Kurowski, J. Mizicko, G. A. Pederson, R. Ranganathan, C. M. Sandlin, K. van Ettekoven, E. Vivoda, K. M. Webb. Consulting Members: R. L. Dunkle, A. W. LaVigne Leadership Institute: Cochair: R. M. Bostock. Cochair: C. D. Smart. Members: J. Beckerman, L. M. Ciuffetti, M. M. Kennelly, W. Schneider, J. E. Schoelz, E. C. Tedford, L. P. Tredway Visionary Forum: Chair: C. C. Mundt. Cochair: L. L. Kinkel. Members: C. Allen, W. E. Dolezal, C. E. De Jensen, S. E. Gold, N. Grunwald, R. P. Kaiser, S. Kamoun, F. J. Louws, K. Ong, P. A. Paul, L. J. Vaillancourt, F. P. Wong Special Committees APS Advisory Committee on Plant Biosecurity: Chair: J. P. Stack. Members: W. E. Dolezal, M. A. Draper, J. Fletcher, L. J. Giesler, S. Kim, C. Levesque, D. G. Luster, M. H. Royer, K. L. Smith APS-PMN Oversight: Chair: B. D. Olson. Cochair: K. L. Ivors. JEC Representative: R. D. Martyn. Members: J. E. Kaminski, C. L. Palmer, N. A. Tisserat Emerging Diseases and Pathogens: Chair: D. G. Luster, Members: A. M. Alvarez, A. R. Bennett, P. H. Berger, M. R. Bonde, J. K. Brown, R. Bulluck, W. Chun, V. D. Damsteegt, J. Fletcher, N. Grunwald, J. Hammond, J. S. Hartung, D. M. Huber, C. A. Ishimaru, G. Kuldau, A. Levesque, L. Levy, R. F. Line, L. V. Madden, C. W. Magill, R. R. Martin, D. C. McGee, F. W. Nutter, M. E. Palm-Hernandez, N. W. Schaad, J. L. Sherwood, D. R. Smith, J. P. Stack, S. A. Tolin, A. T. Tschanz, A. K. Vidaver, W. M. Wintermantel, G. C. Wisler, C. P. Woloshuk, X. Yang APS General Policy Committees Collections and Germplasm: Chair: K. McCluskey. Immediate Past Chair: A. Wiest. Vice Chair: S. Li. Members: N. Abou-Zeid, M. G. Bakker, M. D. Bandla, F. M. Dugan, M. L. Miller, A. Sechler Committee for Diversity and Equality: Chair: M. L. Burgos. Immediate Past Chair: S. B. Ware. Vice Chair: L. Ma. Members: M. Abril, C. W. Bacon, A. M. Brunings, C. T. Bull, R. Bulluck, M. L. Cromwell, S. Y. Elateek, A. Espinosa, P. L. Fashing, N. Cristina Flor, A. Gambhir, R. S. Goswami, W. Haggag, L. Harrison, M. C. Hayslett, E. Hernandez, D. M. Hinton, C. M. Horlock, P. Lu, S. Lunden, K. J. Martin, F. M. Mathew, S. A. Mazurek, G. C. Y. Mbofung, R. Melanson, R. L. Melnick, A. M. Poleatewich, M. M. Roca, P. Rojas, D. Selimi, D. Serrano, N. Sharma, J. L. Stephens, A. Terry, T. Y. Toruno, L. R. Triplett, C. H. Walkinshaw, N. Ward, A. F. Watson, A. Wen, A. E. Whitfield, L. Yan, B. Yang, L. Zhang Early Career Professionals: Chair: G. M. Rauscher. Immediate Past Chair: L. D. Porter. Vice Chair: T. J. Hughes. Members: O. Batuman, K. D. Broders, R. Bulluck, M. L. Burgos, E. Z. Byamukama, T. E. Coram, S. L. Giammaria, C. E. Jahn, J. Marelli, T. K. Mitchell, E. A. Moya, K. J. Owens, V. Parkunan, S. Restrepo, K. T. Schneider, B. K. Scholz-Schroeder, K. L. Schroeder, V. Sengoda Gounder, A. Terry, K. M. Webb, A. Westphal, M. Xiang, L. Xing Extension: Chair: K. W. Seebold. Immediate Past Chair: K. Ong. Vice Chair: B. K. Gugino. Members: B. J. Aegerter, T. W. Allen, C. J. Balbalian, C. A. Bradley, A. DeMarsay, M. M. Dewdney, H. R. Dillard, A. E. Dorrance, J. S. Engle, P. Esker, K. L. Everts, D. M. Ferrin, L. J. Giesler, M. A. Grabowski, R. M. Harveson, A. C. Hodges, R. M. Hunger, T. A. Jackson, Y. Jo, M. F. R. Khan, J. L. Koenig, D. K. Malvick, S. G. Markell, M. T. McGrath. K. A. McGuire, J. C. Mertely, O. T. Neher, S. C. Nelson, L. E. Osborne, A. E. Robertson, B. E. Ruden, G. E. Ruhl, A. U. Tenuta, S. J. Vasquez, K. A. Wise, J. E. Woodward, C. A. Wyenandt, A. D. Ziems, Graduate Student: Chair: H. A. Olson. Immediate Past Chair: C. A. Gallup. Vice Chair: K. R. Lannon. Members: F. E. Bartz, G. C. Bernard, A. M. Brunings, O. Burbano-Figueroa, M. L. Burgos, K. Burr, E. V. Campoverde, A. K. Chanda, C. Chen, J. S. Clark, J. F. Colcol, S. J. Colucci, M. L. Cromwell, S. Y. Elateek, M. L. Ellis, K. Fiedler, S. L. Giammaria, V. Gupta, S. Hill, J. Hu, J. M. Jacobs, C. E. Jahn, J. C. Jirak, S. G. Kunjeti, S. C. Marine, S. A. Mazurek, R. Melanson, A. F. Morris, M. M. Moyer, K. L. Ness, J. Patel, R. Raudales Banegas, A. R. Records, C. L. Rivard, M. Soledad Benitez, A. Terry, L. R. Triplett, M. C. Velez, P. Wallace, N. Ward, L. P. Wasala, K. R. Whitten Buxton, J. L. Williams, K. T. Willyerd, Z. Zhang, C. R. Zumpetta Industry: Chair: A. P. Hert. Immediate Past Chair: R. S. Bounds. Vice Chair: J. L. Chaky. Members: D. T. Beadle, P. D. Brune, M. L. Burgos, W. E. Dolezal, J. E. Fajardo, L. Fought, C. A. Gallup, G. J. Holmes, E. W. Honeycutt, R. Joost, R. P. Kaiser, P. J. Kuhn, D. McKenzie, C. B. Meador, H. Mellinger, H. Morton, G. H. Musson, D. Myhaver, B. D. Olson, P. M. Rogers, B. E. Ruden, C. T. Schiller, V. Spadafora, E. C. Tedford, D. C.

Thompson, R. S. Whitson, K. R. Whitten Buxton, J. Xia Regulatory Plant Pathology: Chair: T. S. Schubert. Immediate Past Chair: S. Rizvi. Vice Chair: N. K. Osterbauer. Members: P. Abad, M. A. Abdelshife, P. H. Berger, C. L. Blomquist, T. N. Boratynski, V. A. Brewster, L. G. Brown, W. L. Bruckart, R. Bulluck, C. Chung, S. Hill, D. A. Johnson, M. J. Kenney, K. L. Kosta, O. Koyaolu-Salami, K. W. Kromroy, R. T. Lartey, C. J. Maroon-Lango, J. M. McKemy, A. F. Morris, P. A. Nolan, C. M. Ocamb, G. L. Peterson, D. D. Picton, E. V. Podleckis, E. S. Serrano, T. Tedla, S. Thomas, C. S. Thomas, D. C. Thompson, M. G. Tiffany, A. T. Tschanz, K. M. Tubajika, S. Wang Teaching: Chair: C. Little. Immediate Past Chair: M. H. Shintaku. Vice Chair: M. Skaria. Members: S. Durairaj, M. B. Riley, C. M. Stiles APS Subject Matter Committees Bacteriology: Chair: M. Roper. Immediate Past Chair: J. D. Barak. Vice Chair: Y. Zhao. Members: T. B. Adhikari, C. Allen, A. M. Alvarez, V. Ancona, G. A. Beattie, F. Behlau, M. L. Burgos, P. Champoiseau, A. O. Charkowski, L. De La Fuente, T. P. Denny, S. M. Dossey, S. Durairaj, J. Figueiredo, L. Fleites, Z. Flores, F. F. Garces, C. F. Gonzalez, J. M. Jacobs, H. S. Karki, L. M. Keith, S. Kim, D. Y. Kobayashi, S. A. Lee, Q. Liu, S. Lu, M. Marquez Villavicenci, F. Meng, G. OKeefe, J. Palumbo, G. D. Peckham, G. De Rebello, A. R. Records, P. Rott, D. Selimi, F. Smith, T. Y. Toruno, H. Tseng, N. Wang, L. A. Wanner, A. Wen, J. L. Williams, C. R. Zumpetta Biological Control: Chair: X. Jin. Immediate Past Chair: S. S. Gnanamanickam. Vice Chair: M. A. Weaver. Members: H. K. Abbas, N. Abou-Zeid, M. G. Bakker, M. L. Burgos, J. J. Cascino, S. Chen, S. A. Conaway, D. R. Fravel, E. Hernandez, B. J. Jacobsen, R. Jaime-Garcia, P. Ji, D. A. Kluepfel, D. Lakshman, R. G. Linderman, S. Lu, R. L. Melnick, M. T. Mmbaga, O. T. Neher, A. M. Poleatewich, B. M. Pryor, B. Spakes Richter, D. C. Sands, D. A. Schisler, F. Smith, A. Tohamy, G. S. Tomimatsu, W. Wechter, J. Yu, G. Y. Yuen, S. Zhang Biotechnology: Chair: Y. Yang. Immediate Past Chair: D. A. Kluepfel. Members: S. Chaluvadi, A. Chambers, X. Chen, V. R. Correa, C. M. De La Torre Cuba, S. Durairaj, J. Figueiredo, D. A. Halterman, S. F. Hanson, A. Sheer Hyten, S. J. Klosterman, J. Marelli, R. R. Martin, P. Moffett, A. F. Morris, E. Ng, P. Obilo, W. O. Okunowo, A. Pashaee, W. Pipatpongpinyo, M. M. Roca, A. E. Rodriguez Estrada, G. Shirsekar, P. Songkumarn, G. S. Tomimatsu, N. A. Weinsetel Chemical Control: Chair: A. Cochran. Immediate Past Chair: W. D. Gubler. Vice Chair: G. J. Holmes. Members: J. E. Adaskaveg, R. S. Bounds, W. Chen, A. Cochran, D. R. Cooley, C. D. Cruz, J. E. Fajardo, H. C. Forster, L. Fought, C. D. Garzon, U. U. Gisi, M. F. R. Khan, C. L. Kohls, B. D. Olson, E. C. Tedford, A. Terry, D. C. Thompson, C. A. Wyenandt, Crop Loss Assessment and Risk Evaluation (CARE): Chair: L. Willocquet. Immediate Past Chair: D. H. Gent. Vice Chair: L. G. Brown. Members: K. L. Bowen, E. Z. Byamukama, A. K. Chatterjee, P. Esker, D. H. Gent, C. A. Hollier, S. J. Jones, A. B. Kriss, D. L. Long, L. V. Madden, N. McRoberts, O. Modesto Olanya, H. K. Ngugi, F. W. Nutter, K. J. Odenbach, P. V. Oudemans, P. A. Paul, S. J. Pethybridge, W. F. Pfender, K. M. Tubajika, W. W. Turechek, Diagnostics: Chair: C. D. Garzon. Immediate Past Chair: A. Phibbs. Vice Chair: M. R. Williamson. Members: F. M. Assis Filho, C. J. Balbalian, R. G. Bhat, T. D. Blunt, A. Bulajic, J. M. Byrne, J. L. Chaky, P. B. de Sa, S. M. Dobesh, B. A. Edmunds, C. K. Evans, H. M. Fouly, A. C. Hodges, E. W. Honeycutt, G. P. Hoyos, W. Kaneshiro, S. Kim, U. C. Kodira, S. T. Koike, R. Kubota, J. H. LaForest, L. Levy, S. R. May, S. A. McBride, T. Mekuria, D. D. Miller, O. Mor, M. K. Nakhla, P. R. Northover, J. L. Mara, M. E. Palm-Hernandez, J. H. Payne, K. K. Rane, G. E. Ruhl, M. Serdani, R. Singh, C. A. Smith, K. L. Snover-Clift, N. J. Taylor, A. M. Vitoreli, A. Vrient, C. A. Webb, J. Q. Xia, A. D. Ziems, Diseases of Ornamental Plants: Chair: C. L. Palmer. Immediate Past Chair: D. J. Norman. Vice Chair: A. J. Palmateer. Members: F. M. Assis Filho, A. Bulajic, M. L. Burgos, A. R. Chase, W. E. Copes, J. H. Dobbs, B. A. Edmunds, J. L. Hall, J. R. Hartman, K. L. Ivors, C. R. Krause, J. S. Lamborn, W. F. Mahaffee, B. L. Meiring, M. T. Mmbaga, K. K. Rane, B. Rao, C. A. Smith, K. C. Steddom, N. J. Taylor, A. Vrient Epidemiology: Chair: A. L. Mila. Immediate Past Chair: S. S. Savary. Vice Chair: P. S. Ojiambo. Members: D. J. Anco, L. G. Brown, E. Z. Byamukama, N. P. Castilla, X. Chen, K. Chiang, D. R. Cooley, P. Esker, D. M. Gadoury, E. M. Goss, N. Grunwald, I. J. Holb, A. B. Kriss, S. Livingston, M. M. Moyer, H. K. Ngugi, K. J. Odenbach, S. J. Pethybridge, W. F. Pfender, V. Philion, J. D. Salgado, A. C. Schuerger, A. H. Sparks, L. Turoop, M. W. Wallhead, L. Willocquet, K. T. Willyerd Forest Pathology: Chair: P. O. Spaine. Immediate Past Chair: N. B. Klopfenstein. Vice Chair: J. J. Bronson. Members: G. A. Chastagner, M. Chen, S. J. Frankel, E. M. Goheen, E. M. Hansen, L. M. Haugen, M. T. Kasson, M. Kim, G. Laflamme, W. L. MacDonald, M. T. Mmbaga, D. Noshad, J. G.

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O’Brien, W. D. Ostrofsky, W. J. Otrosina, B. A. Richardson, D. M. Rizzo, S. F. Shamoun, W. C. Shortle, Y. Wu, P. J. Zambino Genetics: Chair: S Zhong. Immediate Past Chair: P. Veronese. Vice Chair: E. M. Goss. Members: T. B. Adhikari, S. Amyotte, R. G. Bhat, M. L. Burgos, W. Chen, X. Chen, K. F. Dobinson, T. L. Friesen, S. L. Giammaria, N. Grunwald, B. Guo, R. Hernandez-Martinez, H. Kistler, S. Li, L. Ma, J. Xu, K. A. Zeller, L. Zhang, Host Resistance: Chair: K. M. Webb. Immediate Past Chair: Z. Chen. Vice Chair: A. Mengistu. Members: T. B. Adhikari, P. J. Balint-Kurti, R. G. Bhat, R. L. Brown, E. V. Campoverde, M. L. Carson, W. Chen, C. Chung, T. E. Coram, W. Dong, J. S. Engle, X. Gao, S. L. Giammaria, N. W. Gross, D. A. Halterman, R. Joost, C. S. Kousik, S. Li, Y. Li, E. A. Milus, O. Mor, M. Ortega, L. E. Osborne, M. A. Pastor-Corrales, J. B. Rasmussen, K. J. Riggs, J. C. Rupe, G. Shirsekar, P. Songkumarn, J. M. Stein, J. A. Thies, P. Uribe, C. M. Vera Cruz, A. Westphal, Y. Yang Integrated Plant Disease Management: Chair: S. Sanogo. Vice Chair: P. D. Roberts. Members: E. Z. Byamukama, D. H. Gent, C. S. Kousik, H. Mellinger, O. T. Neher, K. L. Pernezny, S. Zhang, X. Zhou Molecular and Cellular Phytopathology: Chair: D. A. Halterman. Immediate Past Chair: J. E. Flaherty. Vice Chair: N. M. Donofrio. Members: T. B. Adhikari, G. C. Bernard, B. H. Bluhm, M. D. Bolton, O. BurbanoFigueroa, M. L. Burgos, A. K. Chanda, L. M. Ciuffetti, V. R. Correa, Y. Dai, C. M. De La Torre Cuba, M. L. Ellis, J. Figueiredo, X. Gao, C. D. Garzon, A. E. Glenn, M. Gowda, L. Guo, S. Herrero, S. Lunden, L. Ma, S. M. Marek, R. Melanson, T. K. Mitchell, M. Mukherjee, M. Ortega, K. J. Riggs, W. Shim, G. Shirsekar, D. Kumar Singh, P. Songkumarn, S. R. Uppalapati, H. Wang, R. P. Wise, T. J. Wolpert, Y. Yang, X. Zhou Mycology: Chair: A. J. Gevens. Immediate Past Chair: M. E. Palm-Hernandez. Vice Chair: T. E. Chase. Members: G. Z. Abad, M. Abril, G. Avila Quezada, R. G. Bhat, K. D. Broders, W. L. Bruckart, M. L. Burgos, M. Chen, J. C. Dianese, F. M. Dugan, D. M. Eastburn, M. L. Ellis, Z. Fan, D. L. FunnellHarris, D. A. Glawe, L. Guo, P. Inderbitzin, S. A. Jordan, M. Karunakaran, H. Kistler, D. Lakshman, C. Lapaire Harmon, S. Li, S. Livingston, M. L. McPherson, J. Morales Osorio, S. Moricca, E. Nyaga Njambere, P. Obilo, M. Ortega, B. M. Pryor, K. Rappaport, R. Ren, L. Ma RodriguezSalamanca, L. I. Santamaria, M. Skaria, T. L. Slaminko, C. M. Stiles, A. M. Vitoreli, M. W. Wallhead, A. Wan, B. M. Wu, J. Xu, H. M. Young, S. Zhong Mycotoxicology: Chair: A. E. Glenn. Immediate Past Chair: A. M. Fakhoury. Vice Chair: H. K. Abbas. Members: C. W. Bacon, B. H. Bluhm, R. L. Brown, L. Chambliss-Bush, Z. Chen, P. J. Cotty, A. E. Desjardins, R. Dill-Macky, A. Dolezal, A. M. Fakhoury, N. P. Garber, B. Guo, L. Guo, S. Herrero, D. M. Hinton, R. Jaime-Garcia, M. V. Kolomiets, G. Kuldau, S. Mansouri, M. McDonald, T. J. Michailides, G. G. Moore, M. Mukherjee, A. Ortega-Beltran, E. R. Palencia, J. Palumbo, G. A. Payne, J. F. Plasencia, C. Probst, R. H. Proctor, A. Schaafsma, W. Shim, C. P. Woloshuk, I. E. Yates, N. C. Zitomer Nematology: Chair: A. D. Ziems. Immediate Past Chair: S. L. Meyer. Vice Chair: K. Wang. Members: J. Becker, G. W. Bird, J. P. Bond, R. Bulluck, W. Dong, A. Elling, R. N. Huettel, A. E. MacGuidwin, T. L. Niblack, V. Parkunan, B. S. Sipes, F. M. Vera-Solis, I. A. Zasada Pathogen Resistance: Chair: F. P. Wong. Immediate Past Chair: G. Olaya. Vice Chair: C. A. Wyenandt. Members: J. E. Adaskaveg, M. J. Boehm, K. D. Cox, A. K. Culbreath, M. M. Dewdney, H. C. Forster, W. D. Gubler, P. F. Harmon, K. L. Ivors, L. Kanetis, W. D. Koeller, D. B. Langston, P. I. Lewis, S. Livingston, M. T. McGrath, H. Morton, B. D. Olson, N. Peres, K. L. Stevenson, W. L. Wiebe, W. F. Wilcox Phyllosphere Microbiology: Chair: S. A. Lee. Immediate Past Chair: G. A. Beattie. Vice Chair: V. O. Stockwell. Members: B. Balogh, M. L. Burgos, S. D.

Cohen, B. C. Freeman, S. E. Lindow, W. F. Mahaffee, V. Philion, G. W. Sundin, V. Toussaint, N. Ward, A. Wen Plant Pathogen and Disease Detection: Chair: M. K. Nakhla. Immediate Past Chair: R. G. Bhat. Vice Chair: C. J. Maroon-Lango. Members: J. A. Abad, R. N. Attanayake, N. B. Bajet, A. Bulajic, T. P. Denny, S. Durairaj, H. M. Fouly, R. K. Genger, L. E. Hanson, D. R. Henderson, G. P. Hoyos, M. Karunakaran, R. Kubota, Z. Liu, S. Livingston, S. K. Marquardt, R. R. Martin, V. A. Mavrodieva, S. R. May, O. Mor, S. Moricca, S. Negi, H. R. Pappu, K. F. Pedley, D. D. Picton, D. F. Quito Avila, R. K. Sampangi, B. Shew, M. R. Sudarshana, P. Sudarshana, M. G. Tiffany, A. Wen, J. Xia Postharvest Pathology: Chair: C. Xiao. Immediate Past Chair: E. C. Tedford. Vice Chair: W. M. Jurick. Members: J. E. Adaskaveg, J. A. Bartz, R. S. Bounds, P. D. Brune, B. D. Bruton, A. Cochran, W. S. Conway, H. Dou, H. C. Forster, B. J. Jacobsen, W. J. Janisiewicz, C. M. Jewell, Y. Kim, C. L. Kohls, M. J. Mahovic, J. Mercier, T. J. Michailides, D. B. Prusky, P. G. Sanderson, P. L. Sholberg, J. L. Smilanick, D. Sugar, I. Vico Seed Pathology: Chair: S. A. Heuchelin. Immediate Past Chair: L. J. du Toit. Vice Chair: G. P. Munkvold. Members: A. C. Alcala, A. N. Awurum, N. B. Bajet, C. C. Block, H. Bouzar, P. R. Brown, L. L. Carter, A. C. Castro, Q. L. Chen, W. Chen, A. Cochran, W. E. Dolezal, B. Dutta, A. Fessehaie, E. W. Gatch, R. L. Gilbertson, Y. Ha, P. T. Himmel, G. P. Hoyos, S. Z. Islam, K. Johnson, S. Kim, U. C. Kodira, H. Koenraadt, D. Lakshman, Z. Lan, S. Li, M. E. May, M. E. Meadows, J. C. Rupe, R. K. Sampangi, C. M. Sandlin, L. M. Shepherd, A. Terry, S. Thomas, D. L. Thomas, A. B. Thornton, M. G. Tiffany, J. C. Trolinger, C. M. Vera Cruz, E. Vivoda, A. Vrient, R. R. Walcott, S. L. Walker, S. K. Walker, W. L. Wiebe, L. P. Woudt, H. L. Ypema, X. Zheng Soil Microbiology and Root Diseases: Chair: J. Hao. Immediate Past Chair: C. A. Strausbaugh. Vice Chair: G. E. Weiland. Members: T. T. Barasubiye, K. D. Broders, G. T. Browne, R. Bulluck, M. L. Burgos, D. A. Doll, S. Durairaj, C. D. Garzon, B. K. Gugino, L. E. Hanson, J. Hao, P. Ji, Z. Kanaan-Atallah, M. Karunakaran, D. Lakshman, F. J. Louws, S. M. C. Njoroge, T. C. Paulitz, B. Spakes Richter, L. Shirley Schmidt, A. Terry, S. R. Uppalapati, L. A. Wanner, A. Westphal, B. M. Wu, M. J. Wunsch, X. Zhou Tropical Plant Pathology: Chair: R. F. Lee. Immediate Past Chair: K. A. Garrett. Vice Chair: K. J. Owens. Members: O. J. Alabi, T. T. Barasubiye, R. H. Brlansky, M. L. Burgos, J. Cobb, R. A. Coelho Netto, C. D. Cruz, V. D. Damsteegt, S. L. Giammaria, C. M. Herron, J. M. Jacobs, C. E. Jahn, L. M. Keith, D. Myhaver, R. E. Raudales Banegas, M. M. Roca, M. Soledad Benitez, J. L. Williams Turfgrass Pathology: Chair: J. P. Kerns. Immediate Past Chair: M. M. Kennelly. Vice Chair: D. L. Smith. Members: M. L. Agnew, T. D. Blunt, M. J. Boehm, G. T. Cooper, P. F. Harmon, B. J. Horvath, Y. Jo, K. S. Jordan, J. E. Kaminski, R. J. Keese, J. L. Koenig, R. Latin, S. B. Martin, L. Miller, D. Mosdell, D. H. Perry, B. Rao, M. Tomaso-Peterson, L. P. Tredway, R. L. Wick, F. P. Wong, J. R. Young, N. Zhang Virology: Chair: N. A. Rayapati. Immediate Past Chair: R. L. Jordan. Vice Chair: R. W. Hammond. Members: J. A. Abad, R. Acosta-Leal, B. Agindotan, O. J. Alabi, A. Ali, C. V. Almeyda, M. Alrwahnih, F. M. Assis Filho, I. Badillo-Vargas, O. Batuman, B. Blades, A. Bulajic, M. L. Burgos, E. V. Campoverde, F. M. Cisneros, C. M. De La Torre Cuba, S. Eid, F. F. Garces, M. R. Hajimorad, J. Hammond, S. F. Hanson, J. S. Hu, A. M. Idris, R. T. Lartey, S. Lunden, C. J. Maroon-Lango, T. Mekuria, U. K. Melcher, S. W. Mullis, B. Murthy Vemulapati, H. R. Pappu, S. Poojari, S. Rabindran, N. A. Rayapati, N. L. Robertson, D. Rotenberg, S. Sabanadzovic, R. K. Sampangi, W. Schneider, V. Sengoda Gounder, M. R. Sudarshana, I. E. Tzanetakis, A. E. Whitfield

APS HEADQUARTERS STAFF Administration Steve Nelson, Executive Vice President Amy Hope, Vice President of Operations Barbara Mock, Vice President of Finance Marci Smith Meetings Betty Ford, Director Jen Jansen, Meetings Manager Susan Schoepke, Marketing Rhonda Wilkie, Registration/Abstracts

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Membership and Communications Michelle Bjerkness, Director Amanda Aranowski Karen Deuschle Denise Kessler Cindy Scheller Graphics Joel Berg Agnes Walker

Book & Journal Editorial/Production Karen Cummings, Director Steve Kronmiller, Director Kristen Barlage Patti Ek Sue Figueroa Janet Kuhn Ina Pfefer Luca Rescigno Diana Roeder Jim Wicklatz Kris Wilbur


2010 APS Annual Meeting Exhibitors Listed alphabetically and current as of June 16, 2010, Representatives from leading industry suppliers will be at this year’s meeting to answer questions and share information on products and services. 402

AC Diagnostics, Inc. 1131 W. Cato Springs Road, Fayetteville, AR 72701; Phone: +1.479.595.0320 or +1.479.251.1960; Fax: +1.479.251.1791; Web: www.acdiainc.com AC Diagnostic, Inc., a leading diagnostic company, provides high quality diagnostic products with affordable rates. AC Diagnostic, Inc. offers ELISA reagents/kits for testing more than 300 plant pathogens and new product-immunocapture PCR kits. They also provide testing services and contract research for customer requirements.

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APS Office of International Programs (OIP) 3340 Pilot Knob Road, St. Paul, MN 55121; Phone: +1.651.454.7250; Fax: +1.651.454.0766; Web: www.apsnet.org OIP is a global initiative designed to promote greater worldwide interaction among practitioners of plant pathology. Visit the OIP booth to mark your country on the map and learn about APS’s international activities, including promoting collaboration among plant pathologists and scientists of all nationalities and facilitating teaching, research, and extension, especially in developing countries.

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Academia Book Exhibits 3512 Willow Green Court, Oakton, VA 22124; Phone: +1.703.716.5537; Fax: +1.703.620.3676; E-mail: acadbkebs@aol.com Academia exhibits academic books and journals in a multipublisher display.

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APS Office of Public Relations and Outreach (OPRO) 3340 Pilot Knob Road, St. Paul, MN 55121; Phone: +1.651.454.7250; Fax: +1.651.454.0766; Web: www.apsnet.org OPRO’s mission is to educate the public on matters related to plant health and plant diseases and demonstrate the value of plant pathology to society. Stop by the OPRO booth to learn about PlantingSciences.org, view the 2010 video contest winners, and discover how social media can help spread the word about plant pathology.

101-200 Agdia, Inc. 30380 County Road 6, Elkhart, IN 46514; Phone: +1.574.264.2615 or 1.800.622.4342; Fax: +1.574.206.9360; E-mail: info@agdia.com; Web: www.agdia.com Agdia is a world leader in developing and providing quality plant pathogen diagnostic assays and testing services. We remain committed to providing the best customer support possible. Please take the opportunity to meet or talk with a member of our team. As customary, Agdia will have team members available to meet and talk to you during exhibit hours, or we can arrange a meeting with you outside exhibit hours. 204

American Peat Technology LLC 1132 Airpark Drive, Aitkin, MN 56431; Phone: +1.218.927.7888 or +1.218.831.3893; Fax: +1.218.927.3272; Web: www.AmericanPeatTech.com American Peat Technology (APT) is a leader in the manufacturing of microbial carriers using reed sedge peat. APT is a leading supplier of media for the rhizobia/soybean inoculant industry. Product is available in granular and powdered forms, has superior shelf life, and has proven to be an excellent microbe carrier.

112-114 BASF Corporation 26 Davis Drive, P.O. Box 13528, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709; Phone: +1.919.547.2000; Fax: +1.919.547.2488; Web: www.basf.com/usa The BASF agricultural products portfolio includes Cabrio, Caramba, Headline, Headline AMP, Endura, Forum, Twinline, and Pristine fungicides in agricultural production; Charter and Stamina fungicides in seed treatment; and Insignia, Emerald, Trinity, and Pageant fungicides in turf or ornamentals. These products feature the active ingredients pyraclostrobin, boscalid, dimethomorph, metconazole, or triticonazole. 203-302 Bayer CropScience 2 T. W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709; Phone: +1.919.549.2000; Fax: +1.919.549.2778; Web: www.bayercropscienceus.com Bayer CropScience is one of the world’s leading innovative crop science companies in the areas of crop protection, nonagricultural pest control, seeds, and plant biotechnology. The company offers an outstanding range of products and support for modern sustainable agriculture and for nonagricultural applications. Crop protection products to be highlighted at the booth include Adament, Luna brands, Proceed, Proline, Prosaro, Scala, Stratego Pro, and Votivo.

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Berthold Technologies USA, LLC 99 Midway Lane, Oak Ridge, TN 37830; Phone: +1.865.483.1488; Fax: +1.865.425.4309; E-mail: berthold-us@berthold.com; Web: www.berthold-us.com. Berthold Technologies is the worldwide leader in luminescent imaging and detection, offering a wide range of highly sensitive instruments used in research. Berthold manufactures the new NightSHADE plant-imaging system. This system includes LED light sources for day/night simulation, side view camera, and turntable for square petri dishes. BigC Suite 116, 20655 S. Western Avenue, Torrance, CA 90501; Phone: +1.310.618.9990; Fax: +1.310.618.9996; Web: www.bigc.com. Bigc.com offers the portable Dino-Lite digital microscope that provides high-quality microscopy video interfacing to PC with clear and steady imaging and 10X–200X magnification. The included software, DinoCapture, makes it easy and convenient to capture snapshots, take video, manipulate images, and save and e-mail discoveries.

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Bio Chambers Incorporated 477 Jarvis Avenue, Winnipeg, MB R2W 3A8, Canada; Phone: +1.204.589.8900; Fax: +1.204.582.1024; E-mail: info@biochambers; Web: www.biochambers.com See a live demonstration of how easy it is for us to provide technical support for our growth chambers and rooms in your facility! Visit our booth to tell us your needs and pick up information on our popular products.

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BioSciConcepts 2001 Aliceanna Street, Baltimore, MD 21231; Phone: +1.410.752.4224; Web: www.biosciconcepts.com BioSciConcepts is a leader in hands-on laboratory training in animal cell culture, PCR, and molecular biology techniques. As a full-time training center with more than 15 years of experience, we believe that intensive three- to five-day training sessions work best for those wanting to upgrade their laboratory skills. Visit us at www.biosciconcepts.com.

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BIOREBA AG/Eurofins STA Laboratories 1821 Vista View Drive, Longmont, CO 80504; Phone: +1.303.651.6417 or +1.408.846.9964; Fax: +1.303.772.4003; Web: www.stalabs.com/ BIOREBA_AG_Products/BIOREBA_AG_Products.php Eurofins STA Laboratories and BIOREBA AG are partners in providing agro-diagnostic products and services for results you can trust. Eurofins STA Laboratories, a leading independent diagnostic laboratory, is the exclusive distributor of BIOREBA

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products in the United States. ESTA offers effective seed quality, plant pathogen diagnosis, and disease eradication services for agricultural industries. BIOREBA’s R&D laboratory develops and produces reagents and complete ready-to-use kits for the detection of plant pathogens. 303

British Society for Plant Pathology Marlborough House, Basingstoke Road, Reading RG7 1AG, United Kingdom; Phone: +44 1603 450286; E-mail: publicity@bspp.org.uk; Web: www.bspp.org.uk The British Society for Plant Pathology supports the professional interests of plant pathologists worldwide. We publish articles in the high-quality journals: Molecular Plant Pathology and Plant Pathology (no page charges, except color). Members can apply for: travel awards, short-term visiting fellowships, summer student funds, and conference support.

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Burkard Manufacturing Co. Ltd., UK Unit 7, Woodcock Hill Industrial Estate, Rickmansworth, Hertsfordshire, WD3 IPJ, United Kingdom; Phone: +44 1923 773134; Fax: +44 1923 774790; E-mail: sales@burkard.co.uk; Web: www.burkard.co.uk Burkard Manufacturing Co. Ltd., England, will display an apparatus for plant pathology together with new instruments for field and laboratory applications utilizing microtiter wells for immunological evaluation. Apparatus for sampling from ground and plant foliage will be on view. Details of our complete range will be available and our representative will answer any enquiries during the meeting.

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Conviron 590 Berry Street, Winnipeg, MB R3H 0R9, Canada; Phone: +1.204.786.6451; Fax: +1.204.786.7736; E-mail: info@conviron.com; Web: www.conviron.com Conviron is a global supplier of controlled environment systems for plant science research. We offer an extensive product portfolio of single and multitier chambers and rooms as well as research greenhouses, much of which is customized to a client’s specific requirements. To help ensure project success, we also offer specialized services from early-stage engineering and design through installation, project commissioning, and on-going maintenance and support.

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Diagnostics Committee 127 Noble Research Center, Stillwater, OK 74078; Phone: +1.405.744.9947; Fax: +1.405.744.6039. Diagnostics Jeopardy: Have fun with your knowledge of plant diseases. Play individually or together with colleagues.


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Dow AgroSciences LLC 9330 Zionsville Road, Indianapolis, IN 46268-1054; Phone: +1.317.337.1000; Web: www.dowagro.com Dow AgroSciences LLC, based in Indianapolis, IN, U.S.A., is a top-tier agricultural company that combines the power of science and technology with the “human element” to constantly improve what is essential to human progress. Dow AgroSciences provides innovative technologies for crop protection, pest and vegetation management, seeds, traits, and agricultural biotechnology to serve the world’s growing population.

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DuPont Crop Protection P.O. Box 30, Newark, DE 19714; Phone: +1.302.366.5704; Web: www2.dupont.com/Agriculture/en_US DuPont’s mission in agriculture is to deliver global nutrition through higher, better-quality crop yields and healthier foods, while developing solutions to help meet the world’s energy needs. To help meet these goals, DuPont Crop Protection continues to develop and bring to the market new fungicides, such as penthiopyrad, proquinazid, and picoxystrobin.

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Elchrom Scientific AG Gewerbestr. 8, CH-6330 Cham, Switzerland; Phone: +41 41 747 25 50; Fax: +41 41 743 25 36; Web: www.elchrom.com Elchrom Scientific is a Swiss company specialized in providing excellent electrophoresis systems combined with ready-to-use gels of a novel nontoxic material for high-resolution (1bp) of DNA & RNA analysis. Elchrom’s products represent state-ofthe-art solutions for a wide range of applications meeting the requirements of plant pathology/health research. They are ideal for direct sequencing, cloning, and amplification.

211-310 EnviroLogix Inc. 500 Riverside Industrial Parkway, Portland, ME 04103; Phone: +1.866.408.4597; Fax: +1.207.797.7533; E-mail: info@envirlogix.com; Web: www.envirologix.com EnviroLogix Inc. develops immunoassay (ELISA) and DNA-based (DNAble) test kits for detection of multiple plant pathogens and GMO events. Product lines also include mycotoxin, toxin, and contaminant test kits. EnviroLogix specializes in custom assay development using ELISA and DNAble technologies, leading the horticultural market in cutting-edge rapid diagnostic development.

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Environmental Growth Chambers 510 East Washington Street, Chagrin Falls, OH 44022; Phone: +1.800.321.6854; Fax: +1.440.247.8710; Web: www.egc.com Environmental Growth Chambers has the largest selection of plant growth chambers of any company worldwide. We also produce controlled environmental rooms, tissue culture chambers, lighted and refrigerated biological incubators, shelf-lighted rooms, gas exchange chambers, hydroponics systems, day-lit chambers, and root zone cabinets. Stop by and discuss your requirements.

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Eurofins STA Laboratories/BIOREBA AG See listing under BIOREBA AG/Eurofins STA Laboratories for full details.

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Gylling Data Management, Inc. 405 Martin Boulevard, Brookings, SD 57006; Phone: +1.605.693.4150; Web: www.gdmdata.com Research management software since 1982. Use ARM software to establish, manage, analyze, and report information for crop protection research trials. Summary Across Trials for multitrial summarization. Psion Workabout Pro data collector with enhanced rating shell for your data collection. ARM Germplasm Manager is for germplasm improvement projects and crop performance trials.

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Marrone Bio Innovations Suite B-107, 2121 Second Street, Davis, CA 95618; Phone: +1.530.750.2800; Web: www.marronebio.com Marrone Bio Innovations discovers, manufactures, and markets unique biopesticides sourced from plant extracts and microorganisms. Visit the Marrone Bio booth to learn about new label uses for Regalia biofungicide to control a variety of fungal and bacterial diseases.

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Microbiology International 5111 Pegasus Court, Suite H, Frederick, MD 21704; Phone: 1.800.396.4276, Fax: +1.301.662.8096, E-mail: info@800ezmicro.com, Website: www.800ezmirco.com Discover how to fulfill your researchers’ plant media needs with revolutionary new media preparation equipment. Prepare up to 120L of plant media in a single instrument in less than two hours and dispense into any container in seconds. Leading agro-science companies use our instruments to save time and money.

 

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National Plant Diagnostic Network (NPDN)

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107 CIPS, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824; Phone: +1.517.353.8624; Fax: +1.517.353.1781; E-mail: hammersr@anr.msu.edu; Web: www.npdn.org NPDN is a consortium of plant diagnostic facilities at land-grant universities and several state departments of agriculture. NPDN’s mission is to facilitate early detection of plant pathogens and pests through education, perform rapid and accurate diagnoses, and support response through partnerships.

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Natural Industries 6223 Theall Road, Houston, TX 77066; Phone: +1.281.580.1643; Fax: +1.281.580.4163; Web: www.naturalindustries.com Natural Industries manufactures beneficial microorganisms for the agriculture, horticulture, and retail markets. The flagship product Actinovate was registered in 2004 with the EPA for control of root diseases like Pythium, Phytophthora, and others. Actinovate is also labeled for foliar use against diseases like powdery mildew, Botrytis, and aerial Sclerotinia.

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Percival Scientific, Inc. 505 Research Drive, Perry, IA 50220; Phone: +1.515.465.9363; Fax: +1.515.465.9464; E-mail: sales@percival-scientific.com; Web: www.percival-scientific.com Percival Scientific, Inc. (PSI) has been in business for more than 100 years. In the early 1950s, we became involved in creating the first commercially available plant growth chamber in cooperation with Iowa State University. Today, PSI continues to set the standard of excellence for the environmental control industry. Our products have led the industry in quality and dependability for more than 30 years. We invite you to visit our booth to learn more about our line of controlled environment products, including incubators and dew and plant growth chambers.

111-210 PhytoTechnology Laboratories P.O. Box 12205, Shawnee Mission, KS, 66282-2205; Phone: +1.913.341.5343; Fax: +1.913.544.0553; E-mail: sales@phytotechlabs.com; Web: www.phytotechlab.com PhytoTechnology Laboratories is a global supplier of microbiological media, biochemicals, plant tissue culture media, and laboratory supplies for the plant pathology, plant molecular biology, and plant science markets. Visit our booth for more details and information about our products and company. For unmatched quality and service, choose PhytoTechnology Laboratories.

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Pressure BioSciences, Inc. 14 Norfolk Avenue, South Easton, MA 02375; Phone: +1.508.230.1828; E-mail: info@pressurebiosciences.com; Web: www.pressurebiosciences.com Pressure BioSciences, Inc. (PBI) markets products based on pressure cycling technology (PCT). PCT uses alternating cycles of ambient and high pressure to control molecular interactions, including the safe, rapid, and reproducible extraction of DNA/RNA/ proteins/small molecules from a wide variety of cells and tissues, and the significant acceleration of protein digestion.

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The Samuel Roberts Nobel Foundation 2510 Sam Noble Parkway, Ardmore, OK 73401; Phone: +1.580.224.6232; Fax: +1.580.224.6240; Web: www.noble.org The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, headquartered in Ardmore, OK, is an independent, nonprofit institute conducting plant science research and agricultural programs. Its mission is to enhance agricultural productivity, which influences agriculture regionally, nationally, and internationally. Founded in 1945, the Noble Foundation now has 378 employees, representing more than 29 countries.

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Spectrum Technologies, Inc. 12360 S. Industrial Drive E., Plainfield, IL 60585; Phone: 1.800.248.8873 or +1.815.436.4440; Fax: +1.815.436.4460; E-mail: info@specmeters.com; Web: www.specmeters.com Spectrum Technologies, Inc. offers affordable devices to measure nutrient levels, soil qualities, light, weather, and other factors affecting plant growth. Our WatchDog weather stations and data loggers make it easy to record weather events and conditions. More than 15,000 customers count on Spectrum’s easy-to-use, dependable technology for their growing needs.

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Springer 233 Spring Street, New York, NY 10013; Phone: +1.212.460.1500 or 1.800.777.4643; Fax: +1.212.460.1575; E-mail: service-ny@springer.com; Web: www.springer.com Springer is a major publisher of books and journals in life sciences. Please stop by our booth to order books at a special conference discount and take a closer look at sample issues of journals. Staff will be available to answer any questions about publishing with Springer.


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USDA/APHIS/PPQ/PHP 4700 River Road, Unit 133, Riverdale, MD 20770; Phone: +1.301.734.0841; Fax: +1.301.734.5392; E-mail: permits@usda.gov; Web: www.aphis.usda.gov ePermits is an electronic permitting system used by USDA/APHIS to process permits. In order to access the system and submit a permit application, users must complete a registration process called eAuthentication. As a courtesy to potential permit holders, an eAuthentication Station will be open at our booth.

313-315 USDA-APHIS-PPQ Center for Plant Health Science and Technology 1730 Varsity Dr., Suite 400, Raleigh, NC 27606; Phone: +1.919.855.7400; Fax: +1.919.855.7480; E-mail: cphst@aphis.usda.gov; Web: www.aphis.usda.gov/plant_health/cphst The Center for Plant Health Science and Technology supports PPQ regulatory decisions and operations through methods development work, scientific investigation, analyse,s and technology.

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2010 APS Author Index Abad, J. A., 65O Abad, Z. G., 80S, 81S, 125S Abbas, H. K., 724P Abbasi, P. A., 5O Abd-Elgawad, M. M., 97O Abdelkarim, M. M., 509P Abel, C. A., 724P Ablova, I. B., 257P Abonyi, F., 832P, 844P Abou Ghanem-Sabanadzovic, N., 358P, 523P, 661P, 683P Abouzeid, M., 708P Abrahamsen, U., 252P Abrameit, A., 749P Abril, M., 744P Accinelli, C., 724P Acevedo, M., 254P Achar, P., 635P Achenbach, U. C., 539P Acosta, T., 547P Acosta-Leal, R., 10S, 236P, 803P Adams, I., 138S Adaskaveg, J. E., 25S, 99S, 145O, 734P, 845P Adelfinskaya, Y., 765P Adhikari, T. B., 206P, 253P, 254P, 255P Adkins, S., 20O, 52O, 405P Adkison, H., 328P Agindotan, B. O., 62O Agra, O., 134O Agyemang, P. A., 164P Ahn, K., 580P Ahonsi, M. O., 62O Aime, M. C., 395P Akridge, J. R., 375P Al Rwahnih, M., 359P, 658P Alabi, O. J., 115S, 93O, 314P Aldrich-Wolfe, L., 195P Alexandrova, А. V., 712P Alezones, J. M., 808P Al-Hamdany, M., 192P Ali, A., 473P Ali, M. B., 579P Ali, S., 250P Alishiri, A., 398P Allen, C., 11O, 333P, 445P, 544P Allen, P., 824P Allen, R., 94O Allen, T. W., 213P, 683P, 774P Almeida, R., 526P Almeyda, C. V., 241P Alrwahnih, M., 47O Altland, J. E., 826P Alvarado-Hernandez, M., 728P Alvarez, A., 538P Alvarez, A. M., 327P, 333P, 471P, 495P, 547P Alvarez, E., 321P, 383P Alvarez-Medina, A., 737P Amaradasa, B. S., 97S, 28O Amini, N., 349P Ammar, E., 125O, 435P Amorim, L., 282P, 422P, 759P, 761P Amsden, B. F., 322P Amyotte, S., 603P Anchieta, A., 603P Anco, D. J., 130O, 439P

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Ancona, V., 170P Anderson, A. J., 40S Anderson, G., 678P Anderson, G. M., 295P Anderson, R., 37S Andreote, F. D., 438P Andrews, D. L., 569P Andrews, K., 22O Antigliani, V., 37S Antolínez, C. A., 593P, 595P Anu, A. E., 619P Appel, D. N., 170P Araujo, L., 583P Araújo, W. L., 438P, 497P Arellano, C., 802P Arevalo Zelada, J., 286P Arevalo, H. A., 331P Arif, M., 40O, 289P, 290P, 296P, 304P Aritua, V., 534P Arredondo, F., 37S Arriaga, F. J., 276P Arrieta, M. L., 545P Arthur, K., 50S Arul, J., 230P Asalf, B., 820P Ashton, P., 138S Atallah, Z. K., 82O, 196P, 485P, 603P Atehnkeng, J., 432P Athinuwat, D., 548P, 549P Atiri, G. I., 319P, 320P Auge, R. M., 508P Augusto, J., 780P Avanzato, M., 187P Avenot, H. F., 789P Avila, L. L., 425P, 797P Awurum, A. N., 55O Ayodele, M., 496P, 619P Ayres, A. J., 176P Azevedo, J., 438P Babadoost, M., 115O, 409P, 842P Babujee, L., 11O, 544P Baccari, G. V., 853P Backup, P., 449P Backus, E. A., 22O Bacon, C. W., 227P, 228P, 229P Badebo, A., 256P Baenziger, P., 434P Baeza-Montañez, L., 569P Bagewadi, B., 137S, 684P Bai, Y., 862P Baier, K., 587P Bajwa, S., 268P Bakker, P., 19S Bala, K., 80S, 126S Balakrishnan, N., 314P Balci, Y., 87S Baldwin, T., Baldwin, T. T., 228P, 632P Balint-Kurti, P., 122O, 802P Balkcom, K. S., 276P Balla, B., 844P Bandyopadhyay, A., 678P Bandyopadhyay, R., 120S, 432P, 452P, 619P Banihashemi, Z., 180P, 430P Banu, S. P., 581P Barak, J., 16S, 88S, 554P

Barash, I., 162P Barbara, D., 603P Barbetti, M., 274P, 350P Barbosa, J. C., 427P, 451P Bardsley, S. J., 421P Barham, J. D., 124S Barnes, J. S., 138O Barney, W., 135O Barooti, S., 272P, 334P, 841P Barphagha, I., 166P Barrera, W., 517P Barros, N., 834P Barry, K. C., 62S Barthe, G. A., 806P Bartz, J. A., 223P, 462P Bascur, G., 810P Bass, J., 43O Bassanezi, R. B., 176P Bastas, K., 131O Basu Thakur, P., 543P Bates, A. A., 555P Batson, W. E., 124S Batuman, O., 415P Batzer, J. C., 194P, 403P, 404P, 501P Baudoin, A. B., 796P Baum, T. J., 652P, 654P, 656P, 657P Bautista, N., 345P Bayon, C., 793P Baysal-Gurel, F., 479P, 650P, 753P, 745P Beattie, A. C., 176P Beattie, G. A., 552P Becker, J. O., 713P Becker, K., 38S Beckerman, J. L., 75S, 144O, 368P Bednarek, P., 38S Beer, S. V., 9O Behlau, F., 33O Beirn, L. A., 388P Bejarano, J. C., 698P Beladi, S., 285P Belasque Jr., J., 451P Belcher, A. R., 731P, 802P Belknap, W. R., 114O Beltrán, C., 203P Ben Kalifa, H., 134O Bennett, A., 14S Bennett, M. H., 89O Bennett, P. J., 870P Bennetzen, J., 502P Benson, M. M., 143O, 185P, 711P Bent, A. F., 655P Bentley, C., 869P Berestecky, J. M., 495P Bergamin Filho, A., 451P, 453P Berger, P. H., 74S Bernal, A. J., 58O, 487P, 538P, 545P, 573P, 574P, 593P, 594P, 595P Berner, D. K., 712P Bestor, N. R., 785P Bextine, B. R., 168P, 525P, Beyer, D., 104S Bhat, R. G., 357P Bhat, S., 674P Bhattacharyya, M. K., 617P Bi, J., 38O Bienapfl, J. C., 511P

Biggs, A. R., 760P Bilodeau, G., 41O, 291P Bindschedler, L., 592P Birren, B., 603P Bittner, R. J., 815P Blaser, J. M., 194P Blomquist, C. L., 41O Bluhm, B. H., 31S, 416P, 578P, 638P, 640P, 641P Bock, C. H., 385P, 805P Bockelman, H., 257P, 637P Bockus, W. W., 206P Bocsanczy, A., 539P Boehm, M. J., 870P Boerma, H. R., 645P Bogdanove, A. J., 69S, 592P Bohannon, R. C., 61O, 177P Bohlmann, H., 567P Boland, G. J., 29O, 189P Bolton, M. D., 217P, 756P Bonasera, J. M., 9O Bondalapati, K. D., 474P Bonde, M. R., 460P Bonman, J. M., 253P, 254P Bonn, G., 367P Boonham, N., 138S Boquet, D. J., 267P Bordovsky, J. P., 846P Borenshtein, M., 134O Borges, B., 808P Borneman, J., 713P Borth, W. B., 237P Bost, S. C., 735P Bostock, R. M., 76O, 83O, 478P, 620P, 845P Botermans, M., 313P Bottner-Parker, K. D., 220P Bourland, F. M., 124S Bowden, R. L., 442P Bowen, K. L., 226P, 258P, 276P Boyetchko, S. M., 709P Boyette, D., 119S Bradley, C. A., 62O, 263P, 530P, 839P Brady, J. A., 524P, 848P Brancher, N., 306P Brannen, P. M., 786P Bransby, D., 276P Brantner, J. R., 271P Brar, D. S., 581P Braverman, M., 116S Breakspear, A., 210P Bremer, D., 24O Brennan, J. M., 275P, 300P Brenneman, T. B., 780P Brewbaker, J. L., 814P Brewe, C., 865P Brewster, W. K., 765P Brian, B. K., 236P Britt, R., 568P, 648P Brlansky, R. H., 171P, 177P, 239P, 330P, 377P, 558P Brodal, G., 252P Broders, K. D., 29O, 186P, 189P Bronstein, P. A., 62S Broome, J. C., 449P Brown, D. W., 585P, 633P Brown, J. K., 408P, 477P, 681P Brown, R. W., 387P


Brown, T., 57O Browne, G. T., 357P Bruce, M., 35S Brueggeman, R., 840P Brust, G. E., 104O Buck, J. W., 193P, 456P Buell, C. R., 126S, 158P Bull, C. T., 454P Burbank, L., 563P Burelle, N., 830P Burkett-Cadena, M., 513P Burlakoti, P., 516P Burnham, A. M., 633P Burnquist, W. L., 453P Burr, T. J., 38O, 549P Burskey, C., 262P Busman, M., 585P Butchko, R., 585P Butler, D. M., 830P Butler, D. N., 278P Byamukama, E., 766P Bylemans, D., 101S C. Schilder, A. M., 360P, 425P, 797P, Caasi, D. J., 290P, 296P Cabezas, L. F., 699P Cacciola, S. O., 31O Caesar, A. J., 855P Caesar-TonThat, T., 855P Caffi, T., 718P Cahalane, G., 300P Cai, X., 676P Calderon, C., 386P Caligari, P. D., 111O Calla, B., 117O Callow, P. W., 360P Calvo-Velez, P., 520P Camacho, F., 288P Camargo, L. E., 176P, 537P Camp, A. R., 468P, 868P Campbell, H. L., 258P Campbell-Nelson, K., 87O Canteros, B. I., 33O Cao, C., 479P Cao, M., 45O Capelluto, D. G., 37S Caprara, M., 363P Carbone, I., 55S, 185P, 208P, 209P Cárdenas, M. E., 573P, 574P Carlson, B., 642P Carnes, M. E., 480P, 506P Carpenter, D., 135O Carr, J. P., 89O, 519P Carson, M., 251P Cartwright, K., 119S Cartwright, R. D., 337P, 492P, 493P Carvalho, G., 537P Casassa, L. F., 48O Castillo, J. D., 860P Castro, A., 801P Castroagudin, V. L., 492P Caswell-Chen, E. P., 99O, 216P Cating, R. A., 372P Cattaneo, M. G., 851P Center, T. D., 342P Cepero de García, M. C., 203P Céspedes, M. C., 573P, 574P Cha, J., 536P Chaikam, V., 122O

Chakrabarti, A., 210P Chalupowicz, L., 162P Chaluvadi, S., 502P Chambers, A. Y., 124S Chanda, A. K., 634P Chandra-Shekara, A., 46O Chao, S., 637P Chapman, K. S., 144O Charkowski, A., 165P, 676P Chatnaparat, T., 548P Chaudhury, A., 118O Chaves, A., 804P Chellemi, D. O., 499P Chen, B., 550P Chen, C., 95S Chen, C., 126O, 179P Chen, C., 411P, 672P Chen, C., 484P Chen, C., 677P Chen, J., 172P, 178P, 355P, 489P Chen, K., 7O Chen, P., 813P Chen, R., 166P Chen, X., 191P, 610P Chen, Y., 564P, 623P Chen, Z., 65S, 559P, 626P, 628P, 634P, 646P Chen, Z., 603P Cheng, D. M., 173P Cheng, Y., 411P Cheong, E., 353P Cheong, K., 580P Cheung, H. K., 582P Chi, M., 214P Chiampiriyakul, P., 182P Childers, A. C., 129O Chintamanani, S., 122O Chitrakar, R., 542P Chitrampalam, P., 196P Chittem, K., 597P, 836P Cho, J., 536P Cho, Y., 572P Choi, D., 580P Choi, J., 202P, 580P Choi, Y., 84O, 577P Choiseul, J., 300P Chou, C., 620P Choudhary, N., 239P, 330P Chuaboon, W., 548P Chung, K., 550P Chunxue, C., 43S Cibils Stewart, X., 850P Cilia, M., 665P Cisneros, F. M., 680P Ciuffetti, L. M., 57S Civerolo, E. L., 126O, 173P, 489P, 862P Clardy, J., 715P Clark, W. D., 269P Clarke, B. B., 56O, 388P, 393P Clinckemaillie, A., 459P Cloutier, S., 135S Cobine, P. A., 21O Cochran, A., 102S, 732P, 733P Cochran, K. A., 379P Cock, P. J., 562P Coffey, M. D., 80S, 81S, 31O, 41O Cohen-Kandli, M., 162P Colyer, P. D., 124S Comstock, J. C., 283P, 453P

Comstock, J. P., 455P Conley, S., 149O, 249P Consonni, C., 38S Conway, W. S., 231P, 760P Cook, D. E., 655P Cook, D. R., 677P Cooksey, D. A., 38O Cools, H. J., 741P, 793P Coplin, D. L., 435P Coram, T., 610P Corcuff, R., 230P Corley, J., 135O Correa, V. R., 435P Correll, J. C., 413P, 414P, 416P, 492P, 493P, 578P Cortez, A., 240P Costa, C. R., 427P Cotes, A. M., 203P Cotes, J. M., 380P Cotton, J. A., 216P Cotty, P. J., 120S, 80O, 81O, 133O, 212P, 431P, 432P Covert, S., 584P Cowger, C., 153O, 465P Cox, K., 200P, 743P Craven, K., 502P Cregan, P. B., 645P Creswell, T., 368P Crouch, J., 53S, 85O, 260P, 352P, 388P Crutcher, F. K., 649P Cruz, L. F., 21O, 523P, 860P Csinos, A. S., 32O, 137O, 727P, 783P Cuellar, A., 383P Culbreath, A. K., 677P, 790P, 791P Cummins, D., 300P Cuomo, C., 53S, 129S, 210P, 603P Curry, A., 744P Curry, K. J., 354P, 744P Curtis, M., 371P Cusicanqui, J., 510P Cutulle, M. A., 97S, 105O, 775P da Graça, J. V., 323P da Silva, M. P., 259P da Silva, R., 451P Daane, K., 355P Dabala, R. R., 269P Dai, W. D., 516P Dalchau, N., 89O Dally, E. L., 221P Damann, K. E., 78O, 79O Damayanti, T. A., 314P D’Amico, K. M., 629P Damsteegt, V. D., 239P, 330P Danchok, R. S., 823P Dangott, L. J., 649P Danies, G., 593P, 595P Daros, E., 692P Datnoff, L. E., 518P, 827P Daub, M., 98O Daub, M. E., 639P Daubert, S., 47O, 658P Daughtrey, M. L., 143O Davidson, R. M., 35S, 63S Davis, E. L., 652P, 654P, 657P Davis, M., 106S Davis, R. E., 220P, 221P, 317P Davis, R. M., 124S, 83O Davis, T. M., 636P

Dawson, W. O., 139S, 49O de Afonseca Lourenço, S., 759P De Boer, S. H., 396P de Cara, M., 222P, 288P, 373P, 837P de Cock, A. W., 80S, 126S de Faria, R. S., 537P de Figueiredo, P., 170P de Jonge, R., 603P de la Cerda, K. A., 95S De La Fuente, L., 21O, 483P, 523P de Silva, A. S., 471P, 495P, 547P de Souza, S. R., 692P Deah, K. L., 466P Deahl, K., 4S Dean, R., 130S Deb, D., 37S Dedeurwaerder, G., 459P Dee, M. M., 279P Degaetano, A. T., 455P Del Castillo, J. M., 58O Del Ponte, E. M., 834P del Rio Mendoza, L. E., 433P, 461P, 516P, 809P del Río, M., 829P Delaney, M. A., 472P Delfosse, P., 100O, 101O, 856P Delic, D., 482P Delvaux, B., 828P Deng, X., 489P, 178P Deng, Y., 15O Denny, T. P., 332P DeRobertis, C., 78O Derr, J., 105O Devorshak, C., 74S Dewdney, M. M., 443P, 794P, 806P Dewey, R. L., 628P Dhawan, R., 122O Dhingra, A., 504P Diaz Arias, M. M., 281P Dicklow, B., 292P Dickman, M., 59S, 568P, 648P DiLeo, M. V., 76O Dillard, H. R., 468P Divo de Sesar, M., 364P Dobhal, S., 304P Dobinson, K. F., 603P Doddapaneni, H., 126O Dodds, P., 210P Dodge, S., 457P Dolezal, W. E., 814P Domier, L. L., 664P Donahoo, R. S., 466P, 817P Donald, P., 824P Dong, W., 193P Donofrio, N. M., 586P Doraiswamy, V., 606P Dorel, M., 828P Dorrance, A. E., 30O, 154O, 186P, 262P dos Santos, J., 834P Dou, D., 37S Doubledee, M., 268P Douhan, G. W., 95S Doustseddigh, H., 365P Dowell, F., 434P Drake, J., 331P Draper, M. A., 6S Drennan, J. L., 835P Driver, J. G., 784P

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Dror, O., 162P Druffel, K. L., 241P, 316P, 318P du Toit, L. J., 78S, 413P, 416P Duan, Y., 126O, 179P, 748P Duarte, I., 160P DuBose, V. B., 853P Duffy, B., 714P, 715P, 716P Duffy, S., 11S Dugan, D., 262P Dumenyo, C. K., 532P Dumonceaux, T., 60O Dung, J. K., 399P Dunkle, R. L., 90S Dutt, M., 806P Dutta, B., 30S Duveiller, E., 71S Duvivier, M., 459P Dyer, A. T., 833P Eastwell, K., 318P Eckstein, B., 451P Egel, D. S., 752P, 292P Eggertson, Q. A., 126S Eichenlaub, R., 162P Eisenback, J. D., 218P El Jarroudi, M., 100O, 101O, 856P Elad, Y., 134O Elafifi, S., 223P Elateek, S. Y., 219P Elen, O., 252P Elena, S. F., 9S El-Habbak, M., 12O, 631P Elkahky, M., 223P, 462P Ellis, J., 210P Ellis, M. A., 130O, 439P Ellis, M. L., 154O, 186P Ellis, S. D., 870P Ellor, T., 107S Elmazaty, M., 223P El-Sheshtawi, M., 223P El-Tarabily, K. A., 3O, 708P Emery, R., 73O Engels, R., 603P English, J. T., 625P Ensley, S. M., 224P Enzenbacher, T. B., 818P Esker, P. D., 149O, 156O, 159P, 249P, 778P Eskridge, K., 736P Esquivel, J., 487P Estevez De Jensen, C., 329P Eujayl, I. A., 821P Evans, T. A., 586P Eversole, K., 13S Everts, K. L., 705P, 726P, 752P, 819P Fajardo, J. E., 48S Fajolu, O. L., 279P Fan, J., 558P Fang, X. L., 350P Faris, J. D., 135S, 136S Farley, L., 262P Farnsworth, J. L., 426P Farrokhi Nejad, R., 576P Faske, J., 848P Faske, T., 848P Fatokun, C. A., 245P Fauquet, C. M., 137S, 684P Faust, J. E., 822P Fazekas, M., 832P, 844P Feliciano-Rivera, M., 779P

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Felise, H. B., 62S Fellers, J., 135S Feng, C., 64O, 339P, 413P, 493P, 578P Fernandez-Ortuno, D., 299P Ferreira, A., 438P, 497P Fessehaie, A., 575P, 612P, 617P Ficke, A., 252P Figueiredo, J., 540P Figueroa Betts, M., 57S Filho, A. B., 427P Fischer, K. F., 141S, 684P Fisher, J., 262P Fisher, T. W., 324P Fitzpatrick, B. M., 491P Fleites, L. A., 560P Fletcher, J., 93S, 57O, 94O, 284P Flor, N. C., 518P Flores, F., 289P, 758P Floyd, C. M., 295P Foote, P., 821P Forbes, G., 71S, 150O Forouhar, F., 651P Forster, H., 25S, 99S, 145O, 734P Fortnum, B. A., 467P Fortunato, A. A., 646P Foster, B., 118S Fought, L., 139O Fountain, J. C., 628P Fraaije, B. A., 299P, 741P, 776P, 793P Fraaije, M. W., 793P Fragoso, R. B., 692P Francis, D. M., 479P Francis, M. I., 529P Franco, B., 380P Franco, S., 698P Frank, M., 71O Frantz, G., 405P Frantz, J. M., 722P, 826P Frare, G. F., 176P Frederick, R. D., 622P, 645P French, R., 8S, 50O, Frey, J. E., 716P Friesen, T. L., 135S, 136S, 153O Fry, J., 24O Fry, W. E., 455P, 466P, 468P Fu, Y., 686P Fuchs, M., 59O Fudal, I., 37S Fukuda, S. K., 237P Fulton, J., 781P Funnell-Harris, D. L., 121O, 500P Furman, B. J., 315P Gabriel, D., 560P, 561P Gadoury, D. M., 109O, 464P, 820P Galagan, J., 210P, 603P Galbraith, D. W., 139S Gale, L. R., 210P Galvez, L. C., 557P, 679P Gamba, F., 599P Ganiger, M. C., 646P Gao, F., 579P Gao, Q., 14O, 521P Garavito, M. F., 594P Garbelotto, M., 111S, 70O Garber, N., 80O Garber, R. H., 124S Garces, F., 559P García, A., 373P, 701P

Garcia, L., 594P García, M., 222P García-Pedrajas, M. D., 569P, 603P Garczynski, S. F., 324P Gardiner, D., 210P Garg, A., 122O Garneni, S., 302P Garner, J., 786P Garrett, K. A., 150O, 151O, 510P Garrido, P., 304P Gartemann, K., 162P Garzon, C. D., 127S, 40O, 289P, 304P Gaska, J., 149O, 249P Gaskins, V., 231P Gasparoto, M., 451P Gassmann, W., 579P Gavin, J. C., 414P Gazaway, W. S., 124S Gbur, E. E., 124S Ge, X., 274P Gearhart, K., 262P Gent, D. H., 207P, 426P, 515P George, S., 77O Gergerich, R., 51O Gerik, J. S., 782P Gevens, A. J., 86O Ghabrial, S. A., 12O, 631P Ghadamyari, S., 243P Ghimire, S., 184P, 502P Giampan, J. S., 427P Gilbertson, R. L., 415P, 477P Gilchrist, E., 112O, 704P Gildow, F. E., 234P, 665P Gill, J. J., 160P Giraud, F., 100O, 101O, 856P Gisi, U., 98S Gitaitis, R. D., 429P, 789P Glaettli, A., 71O Glass, K. M., 860P Gleason, M. L., 194P, 402P, 403P, 404P, 501P, 850P, Glenn, A. E., 228P, 632P, 633P Glover, K. D., 152O Glover, R., 138S Glucksman, S., 751P Glynn, J. M., 179P Glynn, N., 283P Gmitter, F. G., 558P Goates, B. J., 442P Gobena, D. J., 407P Goesmann, A., 716P Goh, J., 615P Goheen, D. J., 109S Goheen, E. M., 108S Gold, S. E., 569P, 603P Golino, D., 658P Gomez, A., 361P Gomez, L., 510P Gonçalves, F. P., 282P Gonzáles, E. R., 438P Gonzales, M. A., 510P Gonzalez, A. D., 808P Gonzalez, C., 203P Gonzalez, C. F., 160P Goodin, M., 678P Goodwin, S. B., 84O, 206P, 577P Goss, E. M., 54S, 488P Gossen, B. D., 444P, 709P, 730P, 816P

Goswami, R. S., 597P, 836P Gottwald, T. R., 385P, 805P Gougherty, A., 476P Gourley, J., 396P Govindarajulu, A., 330P Gowda, S., 49O Graham, J. H., 33O, 499P, 529P, 747P, 805P Graham, T. L., 479P Gramacho, K. P., 494P Granke, L. L., 441P, 448P Gray, M. E., 62O, 335P Gray, S., 18O, 665P Green, J., 122O Greenberg, J. T., 60S Greve, C., 22O Grimes, J., 262P Grisham, M. P., 310P Gross, D. C., 552P, 858P Gross, J., 715P Gross, N. W., 625P Gross, P. L., 840P Grosser, J. W., 529P, 806P Groth, D., 694P Grove, G. G., 426P, 515P, 739P Groves, R., 355P, 676P Grubisha, L. C., 80O, 212P Grunwald, N. J., 52S, 85S, 488P Grybauskas, A., 839P Gu, B., 37S Gu, G., 7O Gualandi, R. J., 508P, 509P Guaragna, M., 670P Guardado, A., 829P Gubler, W. D., 42O, 110O, 449P Gudmestad, N. C., 124O Guerra, D. S., 834P Gugino, B., 325P Gulati-Sakhuja, A., 235P Guo, B., 627P, 628P Guo, J., 693P, 717P, 719P, 721P Guo, L., 119O Guo, Q., 687P, 697P Guo, Y., 34O Guo, Y., 658P Guo, Y., 677P Gupta, V., 764P Gurung, S., 206P, 253P, 254P, 255P Gutha, L. R., 48O Gutierrez-Aguirre, I., 482P Gwinn, K. D., 279P, 508P, 509P Ha, B., 645P Ha, Y., 332P Hadwiger, L., 16O Hadziabdic, D., 491P Hagan, A. K., 258P, 276P, 375P, 762P Hajimorad, M. R., 92O Hajmansoor, S., 88O, 183P, 349P Halbert, S. E., 331P, 377P, 863P Halbrendt, N. O., 420P Hall, D. G., 125O Halterman, D., 564P, 623P, 676P Ham, J., 166P Hamilton, J. P., 126S, 158P Hammond, J., 664P, 684P Hammond, R. W., 12S Han, A., 858P Han, P., 626P Han, S., 40S


Han, S., 566P Hancock, J. F., 360P Hand, E. K., 449P Hanke, D. E., 89O Hanna, L., 346P Hansen, J., 253P Hansen, M., 861P Hanson, L. E., 270P Hanson, S., 336P, 419P, 701P, Hanson, S., 855P Hao, J., 418P, 428P, 768P, 792P Hao, L., 554P Hao, W., 184P, 446P Harbertson, J. F., 48O Harding, M. W., 141O Hari, K., 284P Harman, G., 22S Harmon, P. F., 94S, 348P, 518P, 794P Harnsomburana, J., 122O Harris, D. K., 645P Harrison, L., 757P Harrison, N. A., 220P Hartman, G. L., 301P, 303P, 452P, 631P Hartman, J. R., 322P Hartung, J. S., 171P, 177P, 239P, 330P Harveson, R. M., 273P, 838P Hasey, J. K., 478P Hau, B., 54O Haudenshield, J. S., 301P, 303P, 631P Hauff, R., 343P Hausbeck, M. K., 441P, 448P, 818P Hawkins, N., 741P Hayes, R. J., 294P He, B., 92O He, G., 677P He, Z., 15O He, Z., 424P Hearne, S., 320P Hed, B., 102O, 849P Hedley, P. E., 562P Heiman, D., 603P Helliwell, E. E., 75O Henderson, D. C., 137S, 684P Henn, A., 213P, 774P Henne, D. C., 128O, 129O Henrissat, B., 603P Henry, G., 41S Henry, R., 140O Herman, M., 510P Hernandez Nopsa, J., 736P, 807P Hernandez, F. R., 808P Hernandez, M. G., 345P Hernandez-Martinez, R., 706P Hernandez-Zepeda, C., 673P Herrero, S., 639P Hershman, D., 839P Hert, A., 767P Heungens, K., 488P Hewezi, T., 657P Hickman, L. L., 783P Higbee, B., 355P Higgins, B., 412P Highland, H., 703P Higuchi, K., 707P Hijmans, R., 71S, 150O Hilf, M. E., 20O

Hill, J., 823P Hillman, B., 546P Hily, J., 200P Himmelstein, J., 705P Hinton, D. M., 229P Hirsch, R. L., 31S Hladky, L., 240P Hobbelen, P. H., 776P, 799P Hoch, H. C., 38O Hodges, T., 138S Hoffmann, L., 100O, 101O, 856P, Hogenhout, S. A., 435P Hoitink, H., 650P Hoke, S., 292P Holb, I. J., 832P, 844P Holbrook, C. C., 677P Holland, R., 379P, 268P Honeycutt, C., 424P Honeycutt, W., 843P Hong, C., 184P, 446P, 486P Hooftman, R., 313P Hoogenboom, G., 447P Hooks, C. R., 505P Hopkins, D., 691P Horevaj, P., 641P Horn, B. W., 55S, 208P, 209P Horsman, L., 405P Horton, T. R., 629P Horvath, B. J., 97S, 28O, 105O, 775P Hoshi, A., 8O Houchins, D., 865P Howard, R. J., 141O Howard, S., 579P Hoy, J. W., 559P Hoy, M. A., 372P Hsu, H., 670P Hsu, S., 528P Hu, C., 466P, 490P Hu, J. S., 237P Hu, X., 18O Hu, X., 248P Huang, C., 411P Huang, C., 675P Huang, C., 827P Huang, G., 652P, 654P Huang, X., 190P Huang, X., 610P Huber, D. P., 340P Huber, L., 100O Hudson, M., 117O Hudson, W., 854P Hughes, T., 655P Hulbert, S. H., 15S, 504P Hulvey, J., 407P Humann, J. L., 555P Humphry, M., 38S Hurburgh, C. R., 224P Hussey, R. S., 652P, 654P Hutmacher, R. B., 124S Hutton, D., 361P Hwang, J., 86S Hwang, S., 709P Hynes, R. H., 709P Hyten, D. L., 645P Ibekwe, A., 163P Ibrahim, D., 244P Idris, A. M., 673P, 681P Iglesia-Garcia, A., 416P Iglesias, C., 222P, 837P

Iglesias-Garcia, A., 413P Ilori, C. O., 245P Inderbitzin, P., 83O, 603P Ingram, D. M., 213P, 774P Irey, M., 489P Irish-Brown, A., 795P Isakeit, T. S., 124S, 277P, 749P Ishiga, T., 58S, 541P Ishiga, Y., 58S, 541P, 606P, 611P Ishii, Y., 8O Ishimaru, C. A., 553P, 714P, 715P, 716P Ismail, S., 501P Ithal, N., 656P Ivors, K. L., 466P, 740P Izzo, A., 847P Jackson, K. L., 32O, 727P Jacobs, J. M., 544P, 11O Jacobsen, B. J., 21S, 76S, 833P Jacon, G., 743P Jagadeeswaran, G., 93O Jaime-Garcia, R., 431P Jain, R., 284P Jalan, N., 35O Jan, F., 411P, 672P Jang, S., 580P Janisiewicz, W. J., 231P, 760P Janousek, C. N., 449P Jansky, S., 676P Jaraba-Navas, J., 280P Jarugula, S., 49O Jayaraj, J., 104O Jayasena, A. S., 592P Jeffers, S. N., 86S Jegan, S., 1O Jellison, J., 642P Jenkins, D. M., 333P Jeon, A., 353P Jeon, J., 614P Jeong, M., 536P Jeong, R., 46O Jeyaraman, R., 831P Ji, C., 247P Ji, P., 32O, 137O, 727P Jiang, T., 627P Jimenez, P., 386P, 698P, 699P Jin, X., 723P Jin, Y., 256P, 800P Jo, Y., 23O Johal, G., 122O Johnson, B. J., 724P Johnson, C., 486P Johnson, D. A., 399P Johnson, E. G., 499P Johnson, K., 33S Johnson, K. B., 29S Johnson, R. M., 310P Jomantiene, R., 221P Jones, D., 489P Jones, J. B., 33O, 540P, 551P Jones, S., 228P Jonkers, W., 210P Jordan, R. L., 137S, 171P, 177P, 670P, 684P Joseph, L., 455P Jossey, S., 669P Judelson, H., 123O Judge, C. A., 711P Jumpponen, A., 510P Jung, G., 27O, 87O

Jung, H., 60S Jung, K., 202P, 616P Jurick II, W. M., 231P, 760P Kabbage, M., 59S, 206P, 568P, 648P Kabeil, S. S., 97O Kablan, L., 828P Kachroo, A., 12O, 14O, 17O, 36O, 46O, 521P Kachroo, P., 17O, 46O, 521P Kadooka, C. Y., 343P Kaitheri Kandoth, P., 656P Kakizawa, S., 8O Kakvan, N., 349P Kale, S. D., 37S Kalmowitz, K. E., 142O Kalpana, K., 816P Kamber, T., 716P, 714P Kamenidou, S., 284P Kammerer, S., 94S Kamo, K. K., 596P, 670P Kandel, Y. R., 152O Kaneshiro Sueno, W., 471P Kang, S., 82S, 113O, 202P, 214P, 580P, 603P Kang, Z., 248P, 610P Kantartzi, S. K., 269P Karakaya, A., 194P Karakkat, B., 584P Karasev, A., 18O Kariuki, G. M., 702P Karki, H., 166P Karthikeyan, G., 314P Kaufman, H. W., 124S Kav, N. N., 605P Kazan, K., 210P Kearney, S., 300P Keese, R. J., 142O Kegley, A. J., 823P Keinath, A. P., 853P Keller, K., 51O Keller, M., 502P Kelley, E., 768P Kemerait, R. C., 447P, 627P, 628P Kendrick, M. D., 645P Kenerley, C. M., 649P Kennelly, M., 24O, 390P Kerlan, C., 18O Kerns, J. P., 25O, 26O, 389P, 391P, 392P Kersey, C., 532P Khalaf, A. A., 558P Khan, M. F., 756P, 836P Khan, N. I., 825P Khattab, A., 473P Khazaeli, P., 183P Khozeini, F., 272P, 334P Khudokormova, Z. N., 257P Kilcrease, J., 336P Killiny, N., 526P Kim, D., 202P, 580P Kim, H., 59S, 648P Kim, H., 214P Kim, H., 590P Kim, J., 598P Kim, K., 613P, 615P Kim, S., 3S Kim, S., 580P Kim, S., 580P Kim, W., 536P

107


Kim, Y., 40S, 566P Kim, Y., 100S, 68O, 69O, 787P, 788P Kinard, G., 308P, 309P, 356P Kinyua, Z. M., 702P Kirk, W. W., 797P Kirkpatrick, T. L., 124S, 280P, 337P Kiseleva, M. I., 257P Kiss, L., 718P Kistler, C., 210P Kito, H., 618P Klappach, K., 136O Kleinhenz, M. D., 479P Klessig, D., 651P Kliebenstein, D. J., 66S Kliejunas, J. T., 347P Klindworth, D., 800P Kline, T., 62S Klittich, C. J., 765P Kloepper, J. W., 20S, 382P, 513P, 694P, 695P Klosterman, S. J., 113O, 294P, 569P, 603P Kluepfel, D. A., 522P Kmiecik, K., 401P Knapp, S. J., 677P Knauf-Beiter, G., 767P Kobayashi, D., 546P Koch, P., 25O, 26O, 392P Koebnik, R., 545P Koehrsen, M., 210P, 603P Koike, S. T., 91S, 291P, 294P, 400P Kojima, N., 8O Kolomiets, M., 604P Kolomiets, T. M., 257P, 712P Koné, D., 727P Kong, M., 157P Kong, P., 184P Kong, S., 614P, 616P Koornneef, A., 61S Kopperud, K., 678P Korban, S. S., 631P Kouassi, N., 230P Kousik, C. S., 52O, 155O Koval, N. C., 778P Kovalenko, E. D., 257P Krakowsky, M., 802P Kramberger, P., 482P Krieser, B., 354P, 744P Krishna Kumar, V., 694P Krishnam Raju, S., 694P Kriss, A. B., 146O, 440P Kroll, J., 425P Kubota, R., 333P Kuhn, P., 767P Kuldau, G. A., 119O Kumar, K., 695P Kumar, L., 619P Kunjeti, S. G., 586P Kunkel, D., 116S Kunta, M., 323P Kuo, K., 621P Kurle, J. E., 295P Labavitch, J. M., 22O Lacey, L., 740P Lackermann, K., 149O, 249P Lahaye, T., 70S, 540P Lahlali, R., 709P LaHue, S. S., 783P

108

Laird, E., 591P Lak, M., 720P Lakatos, P., 832P Lakshman, D. K., 28O, 596P Lamour, K., 407P Laney, A. G., 51O Lange, H. W., 868P Langston, D. B., 72O, 789P Lansdell, T., 714P, 715P Lapochkina, I. F., 257P Larkin, R. P., 424P, 843P Larsen, H., 356P Larsen, M., 488P Larsen, R., 240P, 401P Lartey, R. T., 855P Lassiter, E. S., 490P Lauter, N., 36S Lava Kumar, P., 245P, 319P, 320P, 496P Lawrence, A., 683P Lawrence, C., 37S Lawrence, K. S., 124S, 258P, 266P, 694P, 781P, 860P Lawrence, N., 326P Le, M. H., 588P Leach, J. E., 15S, 35S, 63S, 158P, Lea-Cox, J., 184P Leandro, L. F., 281P, 617P Ledbetter, C., 355P Lee, I., 220P, 221P, 317P Lee, M., 169P Lee, M., 550P, 620P, 621P Lee, R. D., 627P Lee, R. F., 331P, 377P, 863P Lee, S. A., 362P Lee, Y., 131S, 202P, 214P, 580P, 603P, 613P, 614P, 615P, 616P Lee, Y., 566P Legler, S., 718P Legreve, A., 459P, 828P Leisner, S. M., 668P, 722P LeJeune, J. T., 89S Lemmetty, A., 324P Leng, Y., 601P Leonard, W., 60O Leonberger, A. J., 368P Leon-Reyes, A., 61S Leslie, D. L., 669P Lesniak, K. E., 795P Leung, H., 35S, 581P Leveau, J., 39S Lévesque, C. A., 80S, 126S Levy, L., 338P Lewandowski, D. J., 20O, 53O Lewis Ivey, M., 89S, 219P, 650P Lewis, K. J., 340P Lewis, P., 866P Lewis, R., 652P Lewsey, M. G., 89O, 519P Li, B., 687P, 697P Li, C., 91O Li, F., 400P, 659P Li, G., 248P Li, H., 274P, 350P Li, J., 428P Li, J., 535P Li, N., 579P Li, Q., 248P Li, R., 308P, 309P, 356P, 400P, 659P,

Li, S., 687P, 697P Li, S., 813P Li, W., 20O, 52O Li, X., 60O, 396P, Li, Y., 374P Li, Y., 677P Li, Z., 687P Liang, Y., 605P Liang, Z., 38O Liao, C., 621P Liao, H., 862P Liesche, R., 555P Lijuan, Z., 126O Lim, H., 664P Lin, H., 126O, 173P, 179P, 862P Lin, H., 528P Lin, J., 45O Lin, L., 308P, 309P Lin, Y., 65O Lindeberg, M., 127O Lindow, S. E., 552P Ling, K., 64O, 66O, 339P LiPuma, J. J., 160P Little, C. R., 277P, 278P Little, D., 711P Littlefield, L. J., 124S Liu, B., 437P, 507P Liu, H., 190P Liu, H., 235P, 400P Liu, H., 428P Liu, J., 710P Liu, Q., 739P Liu, R., 178P Liu, T., 710P Liu, W., 608P Liu, X., 792P Liu, Y., 190P Liu, Z., 338P Liu, Z., 609P Locke, J. C., 826P Long, D., 2O Long, S., 823P Loope, L., 343P Lopes, S., 176P Lopes, U. V., 494P Lopez Nicora, H., 335P López, C. E., 487P Lore, J., 148O Lorek, J., 38S Loschinkohl, C., 65O Lou, V., 126O Lourenço, S. A., 282P Louws, F. J., 437P, 480P, 506P, 507P, 852P Lozano, G. L., 594P Loza-Reyes, E., 299P Lu, H., 135S Lu, S., 7O Lu, S., 135S, 136S Lu, X., 312P Lu, X., 687P, 697P Lu, X. H., 792P Lucas, J. A., 793P, 776P Lund, S. P., 552P Luo, L., 428P Luster, D. G., 298P Ma, B., 630P Ma, B., 858P Ma, J., 280P Ma, L., 210P, 603P

Ma, P., 687P, 697P Ma, Z., 450P Macaulay, K., 89O MacDonald, A., 396P MacDonald, J. D., 76O MacDonald, W. L., 109S MacGuidwin, A., 655P Mackasmiel, L., 772P Mackenzie, S., 361P MacLean, D., 89O Madariaga, M., 408P Madden, L. V., 130O, 146O, 147O, 439P, 440P, 777P, 839P, 857P Maddux, L. D., 442P Maejima, K., 8O Maffia, L. A., 639P Magarey, P. A., 464P Magculia, N., 148O Magill, C. W., 277P Magnusson, V., 516P Mahmoodi, B., 285P, 576P Mahoney, N. E., 233P Mahto, B. N., 255P Mahtour, A., 100O Mahuku, G., 159P Maia, G. S., 86O Maier, T., 656P Majerczak, D. R., 435P Malapi-Nelson, M. M., 858P Malvick, D. K., 295P, 511P Mammella, M. A., 31O Manabayeva, S. A., 671P Mandal, M. K., 17O Manjunath, K. L., 377P, 331P, 863P Mankolo, R. N., 725P Mann, R. B., 109S Manners, J., 210P Manning, V. A., 57S Mano, E. T., 497P Manoranjitham, K., 314P Manosalva, P. M., 63S, 651P Mansfield, M. E., 325P, 636P Mantoe, L., 767P Manulis-Sasson, S., 162P Marahatta, S. P., 505P Maraite, H., 101O, 856P Marek, S. M., 40O, 201P Margenthaler, E., 328P Marin, D. R., 422P, 761P Marino, D. A., 809P Marlow, G., 560P Marois, J. J., 77O, 198P Maroon-Lango, C. J., 65O, 327P Marques, A., 326P Marquez-Villavicencio, M., 165P Marrero, G., 471P Marsh, A. G., 586P Martin, B., 96S Martin, F. N., 83S, 84S, 121S, 31O, 41O, 197P, 291P Martin, G. B., 556P Martin, K., 678P Martin, R. R., 19O, 51O, 111O Martinez, M. T., 345P Martinez-Espinoza, A., 854P Martínez-Romero, E., 520P Martinka, M., 149O, 249P Martins, T. D., 453P


Maruthachalam, K., 82O, 113O, 294P, 485P, 603P Marx, B. D., 498P Massola, N. S., 204P Mastouri, F., 22S Matheron, M. E., 769P Matias, A. C., 306P Mattupalli, C., 156O Maul, J., 705P Mauzey, S. J., 454P Mavrodi, D., 504P Mavrodi, O., 504P Mavrodieva, V., 338P Mayfield, D. A., 501P, 194P Maynard, C. A., 587P, 600P, 607P, 629P Mayo, J. B., 823P Mazzola, M., 847P Mbofung, G. C., 617P McAvoy, E., 771P McCabe, K. J., 42O McCall, D., 97S, 105O, 775P McClean, A., 167P McCluskey, K., 867P McCoy, S., 412P McCue, K. F., 114O McCullough, P., 854P McDonald, M., 444P, 709P, 730P, 816P McDonnell, K., 275P McDowell, J., 37S McFadd, T., 46S McGahan, D., 848P McGhee, G. C., 28S McGrath, J., 270P McGrath, M. T., 1S, 27O, 468P, 690P McInroy, J. A., 382P McKenna, F., 3O McKenzie, D., 102S McLeod, A., 466P, 468P McMahon, M. B., 298P McMullen, M., 250P, 839P McNally, R. R., 562P McNellis, T. W., 362P McPhee, K., 836P McRoberts, N., 147O McSpadden Gardener, B. B., 40S, 43S, 479P, 566P Meacham, T., 18O Meah, B., 581P Medina, C., 408P Meekes, E., 313P Mehl, H. L., 133O Mehle, N., 482P Mehra, L., 351P Meinhardt, S., 135S Meitz, J. C., 468P Mejia, J. F., 321P Mekete, T., 335P Mekuria, T., 63O, 469P, 470P, Melanson, R., 166P Melcher, U., 137S, 140S, 57O, 90O, 94O, 684P Melito, S., 655P Mellinger, C., 405P Melnick, R., 512P Melotto, M., 10O, 542P Melzer, M. J., 237P Mendoza, P., 810P

Meng, B., 91O Meng, F., 544P, 11O Meng, Q., 418P Meng, Y., 592P Menkir, A., 320P, 619P Mentreddy, S. R., 725P Mergoum, M., 637P Merighi, M., 435P Mersha, Z., 54O, 341P, 387P, 498P Mertely, J. C., 746P Meyers, B. C., 586P Michailides, T. J., 297P, 478P, 845P Michel, A. P., 219P Miglino, R., 313P Mila, A. L., 467P, 815P Miles, T. D., 797P, 360P Milgroom, M. G., 468P Milks, D., 740P Miller, M., 694P Miller, S. A., 89S, 161P, 219P, 479P, 650P, 745P, 753P Miller, S. I., 62S Miller-Butler, M., 354P Milling, A., 445P, 544P Minenkova, O., 171P, 177P Mingora, C., 591P Minsavage, G. V., 551P Minzenmayer, R. R., 749P Mirzaee-Qomi, M., 272P Mirzaee-Qomi, P., 720P Misaghi, I., 188P Misra, A. K., 547P Mitchell, F. L., 524P Mitchell, M. N., 207P Mitchell, T., 229P Mitchum, M. G., 652P, 653P, 656P, 657P Mitkowski, N. A., 804P Mitra, A., 596P, 679P Mittal, S., 611P, 606P Miwa, E., 707P Mmbaga, M. T., 293P, 772P Mock, N., 682P Mock, R., 308P, 309P, 353P, 356P Modarresi Chahardehi, A., 244P Mohammad Deimi, A., 841P Mohammadi, A., 180P, 430P Mohammadi, M., 563P Mohan, K., 395P Mohd Jaaffar, A., 503P Monacell, J. T., 55S, 208P, 209P Mondal, S. N., 443P, 806P Monfort, W. S., 305P Monger, W., 138S Monteiro-Vitorello, C. B., 537P Montenegro, N., 538P Montesinos-Herrero, C., 829P Montoya Piedra, Y., 286P Moore, G. A., 558P Moore, G. G., 55S Moore, S. R., 781P Moore, W. F., 683P Moorman, G. W., 122S, 184P Mora, R., 408P Moraes, S. G., 204P Moral, J., 514P Morales Ruiz, S. S., 286P Morales, J. G., 112O, 380P Morales-Pedraza, L. G. Morano, L. D., 168P, 525P

Moreau, J., 459P Moreira, A. S., 427P Moreira, R., 494P Morgan, D., 297P Morid, B., 88O, 183P, 287P Morris, T., 45O Morrison, E. N., 73O Morse, J. G., 38O Moscou, M., 36S Motavalli, P., 510P Mou, B., 294P Moulin, M., 89O Mousavi, L., 243P Moya, E. A., 833P Moyer, M. M., 109O, 464P Mozafari, J., 243P, 244P Msikita, W., 311P Mueller, D. S., 785P Mueller, J. D., 124S Mukhina, Z. М., 712P Mulat, H. K., 37O Mulcahy, A., 733P Munkvold, G. P., 32S, 224P, 259P, 281P, 575P, 612P Muñoz, M. P., 408P Munyaneza, J. E., 324P Muramoto, J., 830P Murphy, A. M., 89O, 519P Murphy, J. A., 393P Murphy, J. F., 266P, 667P Musson, G. H., 49S, 139O, 750P Mutschler, M. A., 835P Myers, B. A., 524P Myers, K. L., 466P Myers, M., 747P Mysore, K. S., 58S, 541P, 606P, 611P Nadler, S. A., 99O Naidu, R. A., 48O, 49O, 63O, 93O, 314P, 469P, 470P Nair, S., 1O Nakajima, T., 618P Namba, S., 8O Narvaez, D. F., 198P Natwick, E. T., 415P, 477P Naumann, T. A., 571P Nava, C., 345P Navarre, D., 14O Navi, S. S., 423P, 755P Neal, J. C., 711P Neate, S. M., 840P Negeri, A., 122O Neil, G., 732P Nelson, B. D., 195P, 217P, 264P, 265P Nelson, M. E., 426P, 515P, 739P Nelson, R. J., 73S Nelson, R. S., 674P Nelson, S. C., 341P Nepal, A., 433P, 461P, Nettleton, D., 552P, 656P Neu, K., 564P Neufeld, K., 132O Neves, A. A., 497P Newhouse, A. E., 600P Newman, M. A., 124S Newsom, L. J., 137O, 138O Ngugi, H. K., 67O, 102O, 362P, 420P, 421P, 849P Nguyen, H. V., 62S

Niblack, T. L., 335P Nichols, A. E., 105O, 775P Nickerson, J., 396P Nie, J., 396P, 60O Nieto, D., 345P Nightengale, S. P., 258P Nikolaeva, O., 18O Nischwitz, C., 410P Nissinen, A., 324P Nita, M., 469P, 470P Njambere, E. N., 56O Noel, M., 148O Nolan, S., 300P Noll, L. W., 278P Norman, D. J., 143O, 539P, 551P Northern, L. C., 600P, 607P Nosir, W., 222P Nusbaum, C., 490P Nuss, D. L., 317P Ñústez, C. E., 380P Nutter, F. W., 476P Nyochembeng, L. M., 725P Oak, S. W., 86S Obasa, K., 24O, 390P Obulareddy, N., 10O Ochoa Corona, F. M., 40O, 289P, 290P, 296P, 304P Ockey, S. C., 696P O’Connell, S., 852P Oerke, E., 72S Ogata, D. Y., 237P Ogunsola, K. E., 245P Oh, C., 556P Oikonomakos, I., 290P Ojiambo, P. S., 132O, 153O, 452P, 465P Ok, C., 27O, 87O Okano, Y., 8O O’Keeffe, T. L., 233P Olanya, M., 424P, 843P Olarte, R. A., 55S, 208P Olatinwo, R. O., 447P Olaya, G., 732P, 733P, 740P, 767P Oliveira, F. R., 537P Oliver, J. E., 59O Oliver, R., 135S Olivera Firpo, P., 256P, 800P Olson, B. D., 2S Olson, H. A., 185P Olson, M. E., 141O Ong, K., 417P Ongena, M., 41S Opit, G., 304P Oriolani, E., 306P Ormeño-Orillo, E., 520P Orr, G., 26S Ortega-Beltran, A., 80O Ortiz, B. V., 781P Ortiz, C., 232P Osborne, L. E., 152O, 839P Oshima, K., 8O Osorio, D. L., 203P Ospina-Giraldo, M. D., 591P, 869P Osterbauer, N., 861P Oswald, A., 520P Otero, M. L., 306P Otrosina, W. J., 347P Otto-Hanson, L. K., 412P Oudemans, P. V., 85O, 352P, 436P Ouimette, D. G., 773P

109


Owen, J., 763P Owens, A., 402P Owens, R., 317P, 682P Ownley, B. H., 279P, 491P, 508P, 509P Padgett, G. B., 124S, 267P Pagan, C., 99O Pahalawatta, V., 397P Palencia, E., 227P Palm, M., 17S Palmateer, A. J., 369P, 370P, 371P, 372P Palmer, C., 142O Palmer, J., 122O Palmero Llamas, D., 222P Palmero, D., 288P, 373P, 837P Palou, L., 829P Palumbo, J. D., 233P Pan, Q., 120O Pan, R., 247P Panchal, S., 10O Pandelova, I., 57S Pandey, A. K., 644P Pandey, R., 596P Panstruga, R., 38S Pappu, H. R., 65O, 241P, 429P Pardo, J. M., 321P Paret, M. L., 547P Park, B., 580P Park, D., 74O Park, J., 202P, 580P, 603P, 614P Park, J., 566P Park, J., 614P Park, S., 43S Park, S., 65S, 646P Park, S., 214P, 614P, 616P Park, S., 651P Park, Y., 604P Parker, J. K., 21O, 483P Parker, P. E., 385P, 805P Parker, S. R., 522P Parkunan, V., 486P Pasche, J. S., 124O Pastor-Corrales, M. A., 811P Pataky, J. K., 814P Patel, N., 546P Paul, P. A., 146O, 154O, 186P, 219P, 440P, 777P, 839P, 857P Paulitz, T. C., 503P, 504P Paveley, N. D., 776P, 799P Payne, A. F., 108O Payne, G. A., 225P, 589P Paz, J. O., 447P Paz, Z., 569P, 603P Peckham, G. D., 333P, 495P Pedersen, J. F., 121O, 500P Pedley, K. F., 644P, 645P Peduto, F., 110O Peet, M. M., 852P Peever, T. L. Pegues, M. B., 762P Peiman Williams, M., 419P Peiris, K., 434P Pena, A., 529P Peña, G., 593P, 595P Peña-Reyes, E., 810P Peng, G., 709P Pennerman, K., 819P Percich, J. A., 511P Perdomo, R. D., 808P

110

Peres, N. A., 204P, 361P Perez, B. A., 306P, 363P, 364P Perez, F. G., 466P Pérez, J., 704P Perry, K. L., 137S, 238P, 312P, 519P, 684P Perumal, R., 277P Peter, K., 665P Peters, R. D., 103O Peterson, G. L., 442P Peterson, N., 555P Peterson, P. D., 467P Pfeufer, E. E., 67O Phillips, D. 350P Phillips, N. A., 724P Phipps, P. M., 124S, 750P Pierson, E. A., 42S Pierson, L. S., 42S Pieterse, C. M., 61S Pintye, A., 718P Pirahesh, S., 287P Pires, J., 494P Plamann, M., 867P Plata-Caudillo, J. A., 706P Pokharel, R., 356P Polashock, J., 85O, 352P, 436P Ponciano, G. P., 114O Poojari, S., 314P Pooran DeSouza, S., 756P Popko, J. T., 27O, 87O Porchas, M., 769P Poromarto, S. H., 264P, 265P Porter, L. D., 742P, 836P Post, A. R., 711P Potnis, N., 540P, 551P Poudel, B., 240P, 458P Powell, C. A., 748P Powell, G., 89O Powell, W. A., 587P, 600P, 607P, 629P Prabavathy, V. R., 1O Prathuangwong, S., 548P, 549P Pratt, P. D., 342P Pratt, R., 729P Pratt, R. C., 435P Presting, G. G., 327P Pretorious, Z. A., 53S Prezelj, N., 482P Price, J. A., 43O Prinster, M., 865P Pritsch, C., 599P, 801P Probst, C., 80O, 81O Proffer, T. J., 795P Prom, L. K., 277P Prosser, S. W., 91O Pryor, B. M., 728P Puckett, R., 297P Puppala, N., 366P Puri, K. D., 250P, 637P Purvis, M., 137O, 727P Purwar, S., 378P Putnam, M. L., 371P Pye, M. F., 76O Qi, M., 530P Qin, H., 677P Qiu, J., 710P Qiu, J., 790P, 791P Qiu, W., 579P Qiugley, C., 87S Qu, F., 45O

Quito, D., 19O Radwan, G. L., 277P Radwan, O., 117O Rahman, A., 700P Rahman, M., 480P, 506P Rahman, M. H., 605P Raid, R. N., 283P, 453P, 518P, 771P Raikhy, G., 668P Rajashekara, G., 161P, 745P Rakhshandehroo, F., 243P, 244P, 365P, 398P Ramadugu, C., 331P, 377P, 863P Ramirez, A. L., 384P Ramos, A. T., 537P Rao, S., 631P Raper, R. L., 276P Rappaport, K., 338P Rascon, A. A., 336P, 701P Rasmussen, J., 135S Rathburn, H. B., 524P Rauscher, G., 294P, 44O Rav David, D., 134O Ravanlou, A., 409P Ravnikar, M., 482P Rayamajhi, M. B., 342P Rebello, G., 561P Rebollar-Alviter, A., 737P Recknor, J., 656P Records, A. R., 552P Reddy, M., 694P, 695P Redinbaugh, M. G., 45O, 435P Reed, S., 374P Reese, B. N., 225P, 589P Reeves, P. A., 63S Reiners, S., 868P Replogle, A., 653P Repshare, J. M., 168P, 525P Restrepo, S., 58O, 386P, 487P, 538P, 545P, 573P, 574P, 593P, 594P, 595P, 699P Reyes Gaige, A., 602P Reynaldi, S., 112O, 704P Reynolds, K., 335P Rezaee, S., 272P, 285P, 287P Rezende, J. A., 427P Rezzonico, F., 716P Rice, K. A., 311P Richard, J., 865P Richardson, K., 44O Richardson, P., 184P Richwine, N., 476P Ridenour, J. B., 640P Rideout, S. L., 757P Ridout, C. J., 34S Riley, D. G., 429P Riley, R. T., 228P Rinehart, T. A., 374P, 491P Rintoul, T. L., 126S Risede, J., 828P Ristaino, J. B., 5S, 466P, 490P Ritenour, M. A., 462P Rivard, C. L., 437P, 852P Rivera, M. C., 363P, 364P Rizzo, D., 111S Robbins, R. T., 337P Roberts, J. A., 393P Roberts, M., 47S, 119S Roberts, P. D., 466P, 827P

Robertson, A. E., 30O, 224P, 785P, 812P Robertson, C. L., 4O Robertson, J., 284P Robertson, N. L., 315P Robideau, G. P., 80S, 126S Roca, M., 306P Rocateli, A. C., 276P Rockhold, D. R., 114O Rodrigues, J. V., 384P Rodriguez, S., 599P, 801P Rodriguez-R, L. M., 545P Roenhorst, A., 313P Rogers, E. E., 169P, 527P Rogers, S., 94O Rogers, S. L., 299P, 793P Roig, J., 407P Rojas, P. F., 111O Rojas-Bertini, C., 408P Rollins, J., 133S Roman, F., 329P Romer, P., 540P Rommens, C. M., 114O Rong, X., 43S Roose, M., 377P Roper, C. M., 563P Rosales Villavicencio, I., 408P, 810P Ross, D., 184P Ross, R. E., 104O Rossi, L., 27S Rossi, V., 718P Rosskopf, E. N., 830P Rothrock, C. S., 124S, 187P, 268P, 280P, 305P, 859P Rothwell, N. L., 425P Rott, P. C., 560P Roubtsova, T. V., 76O Rouxel, T., 37S Rowhani, A., 47O, 359P, 658P Roy, A., 239P Royer, M., 560P Ruaro, L., 692P Rudolph, K., 217P Ruhl, G. E., 77S, 292P, 368P Rupe, J. C., 187P, 268P, 379P, 813P, 859P Rush, C. M., 10S, 43O, 128O, 129O, 236P, 803P Russ, C., 490P Russell, P., 61O Russell, S. A., 851P Russell, T., 279P Russo, J., 420P Ryu, C., 58S, 541P Saad, A. T., 346P Saalau Rojas, E., 402P, 403P, 404P, 850P Sabanadzovic, S., 242P, 358P, 376P, 458P, 523P, 660P, 661P, 683P Saberi-riseh, R., 720P Saborío, F., 382P Saffarian Abbas Zadeh, M., 576P Saha, S., 127O Sainju, U. M., 855P Sakthikumar, S., 53S Salaudeen, M. T., 320P Salazar, J. J., 808P Salgado, J. D., 857P Salih, M. M., 192P Sampangi, R., 395P


Sanchez, K. R., 99O, 216P Sanders, Jr., F., 754P Sanderson, K. R., 103O Sanderson, P. G., 101S Sandoval, C., 111O Sangchote, S., 182P SanMiguel, P. J., 29O Sano, T., 682P Sanogo, S., 205P, 366P Santa-Cruz, J., 802P Santhanam, P., 603P Santos, M., 373P, 837P Santos, V. C., 497P Sastoque, L., 203P Sattler, S. E., 121O, 500P Savary, S., 71S, 148O Saville, B. J., 73O Sayler, R. J., 337P Schaad, N., 326P Schell, M. A., 332P, 333P Schena, L., 31O Scherf, J. M., 445P Scherm, H., 32O, 351P Schlehuber, S., 71O Schlub, K. A., 498P Schlub, R. L., 341P, 387P, 498P Schmidt, D., 70O Schmidt, F. J., 625P Schmidt, L. S., 357P Schneider, K. L., 327P Schneider, R. W., 4O, 267P, 634P Schneider, W. L., 7S, 234P, 307P Scholez, J. E., 625P Scholthof, H. B., 671P Schreiber, H. L., 168P, 525P Schroeder, B. K., 399P, 555P Schroeder, K. L., 504P Schubert, T., 367P Schultheiss, H., 606P, 611P Schumacher, R., 326P Schwab, E. B., 276P Schwandt, J., 108S Schwartz, D., 210P Schweri, K. K., 652P Sciumbato, G. L., 124S Scocco, E. A., 456P Scott, R., 552P Scully, B., 627P, 628P Sechler, A., 175P, 326P Seebold, K. W., 124S Seem, R. C., 109O, 464P, 820P Selote, D., 36O Semer, C. R., 751P Sengodagounder, V., 324P Sepúlveda, P., 408P, 810P Serdani, M., 371P Sessa, G., 162P Sétamou, M., 323P Sether, D. M., 237P Shah, K. H., 567P Shah, S., 605P Shamsbakhsh, M., 365P Shan, W., 37S Shao, J., 221P, 682P Sharma, K., 444P, 496P, 619P Sharma, S. K., 547P Shatters, R. G., 125O Shaw, B. D., 598P, 624P Shaw, J. N., 781P Shaw, M. W., 741P

Shennan, C., 830P Sherman, D., 307P Shi, X., 38O Shim, W., 232P, 598P, 624P, 640P, 858P Shimabuku, R., 237P Shiraishi, A., 344P Shishkoff, N., 457P Shock, C., 395P Shokes, F. M., 124S Shrestha, B., 166P Shu, X., 579P Shuai, B., 602P Shyu, C., 122O Sierotzki, H., 98S, 741P Sikora, E. J., 266P, 472P Silva Junior, G. J., 422P, 761P Silva, P., 599P, 801P Silva-Rojas, H. V., 159P, 737P Silveira Baggio, J., 759P Simmons, A., 43O Simon, A., 45O Simon, L., 834P Simonson, A., 284P Singer, S., 200P Singh, A., 12O Singh, D., 256P Singh, R., 209P Sistani, K., 824P Sisterson, M., 355P Sivasithamparam, K., 274P, 350P, 570P Skaltsas, D., 87S, 181P Skaria, M., 323P Skatenok, O. О., 712P Skelsey, P., 151O, 151O Skelton, L. L., 92S Skipper, C. E., 168P, 525P, Sliva, D., 2O Smart, C. D., 468P, 868P Smeda, J., 653P Smith, A. G., 89O Smith, A. J., 823P Smith, B. J., 354P, 744P Smith, D. L., 108O, 389P, 391P Smith, D. S., 60O Smith, J., 786P Smith, J. A., 341P Smith, J. E., 638P Smith, L., 7O Smith, M. J., 803P Smith, R. J., 359P Smither, M. R., 65O Smits, T. H., 714P, 715P, 716P Snelling, J., 35S Sniezko, R. A., 109S, 823P Snook, M., 229P Socha, C., 386P Sokhandan Bashir, N., 90O, 243P Solano, F., 336P Soler, J., 112O Soltani Nejad, S., 576P Song, W., 580P Sopee, J., 182P Soto-Arias, J., 32S Souza, A. G., 639P Sowa, D. A., 141O Spadafora, V. J., 26S Spaine, P. C., 341P, 347P Spanu, P., 592P

Sparks, A., 150O Speers, C., 368P Spiers, J., 374P Spolti, P., 834P Spooner, D., 676P Spósito, M. B., 422P, 761P Spurlock, T. N., 305P Sreedharan, A., 531P Srinivasachary, A., 148O Srinivasan, R., 429P Srivastava, P., 77O St. John, R., 24O Stacey, G., 588P Stadnik, M. J., 583P Stafford, C. A., 95O Stammler, G., 71O Stanghellini, M., 188P Stansly, P. A., 331P Starr, J., 417P Steadman, J., 412P Stebbins, T. C., 79S Steddom, K., 417P Steffenson, B., 36S Steger, A., 379P, 268P Stein, J. M., 474P Stenger, D. C., 169P Stensvand, A., 820P Stephenson, R. C., 242P, 683P Stevens, M., 519P Stevenson, K. L., 72O, 789P, 790P, 791P Stewart, L. 114S Stewart, S. M., 812P, 30O Stockwell, V. O., 714P, 716P Stolz, M., 564P Stone, A. L., 330P Stone, C. L., 622P Stone, E. A., 55S, 208P, 209P Stowell, L., 95S Stoxen, S., 53S Strausbaugh, C. A., 821P Su, H., 688P Subbarao, K. V., 82O, 83O, 113O, 196P, 294P, 413P, 485P, 603P Subbarao, K. V., Subedi, N., 650P Suciu, D., 307P Sudarshana, M. R., 359P Sugawara, K., 8O Suh, S., 667P Sui, D. D., 771P Sullenger, A. R., 425P Summers, C., 328P Sumner, D. R., 124S Sun, J., 437P, 507P Sun, X., 489P Sundaram, S., 378P Sundin, G. W., 28S, 144O, 562P, 795P Sung, S. S., 347P Sunkar, R., 93O Sutherland, A. M., 42O Sweany, R. R., 78O, 79O Sweets, L., 839P Sykes, V. R., 97S, 775P Syverson, R. L., 553P Szabo, L. J., 53S, 260P Taberner, V., 829P Tabor, G., 64S Talezari, A., 334P

Talledo Albujar, M. J., 286P Tally, A. H., 23S Tande, C., 152O Tarnowski, T. L., 369P, 370P Tatineni, S., 50O Te Beest, D., 215P Tech, K., 682P Tedford, E., 102S Teixeira, D. C., 176P Telenko, D. P., 750P Teliz, D., 345P Tello Marquina, J., 288P, 373P Tello, J., 837P, 222P Temsah, M., 346P Tewolde, H., 824P Thaher, N. H., 730P Thannhauser, T., 665P Thaxton, P. M., 124S Thies, J. A., 155O Thomas, A., 72O, 789P Thomashow, L. S., 503P, 693P Thomma, B. P., 603P Thompson, D. C., 135O Thonart, P., 41S Thorne, J., 490P Thowthampitak, J., 548P Thru Ppoyil, S. B., 842P Tian, B., 234P Time, I., 319P Timmer, L. P., 443P Tisserat, N. A., 126S, 158P Tomaso-Peterson, M., 394P Torres Puyo, C., 599P Torres Tuyo, C., 801P Toscano, N. C., 38O Toth, I. K., 562P Townley, M. A., 636P Trapero-Casas, A., 514P Travers, S. E., 195P Travis, J. W., 67O, 102O, 420P, 849P Tredway, L. P., 630P Trelles Di Lucca, A., 286P Trigiano, R., 374P Trinidad Chipana, E., 286P Triplett, L. R., 158P Trivedi, P., 13O Trogolo, J. A., 825P Tronsmo, A., 820P Trujillo, C. A., 487P Tschaplinski, T., 60S Tudzynski, B., 585P Tuffen, M. G., 565P Turechek, W., 463P Turner, R. S., 327P Turoop, L., 822P Turski, C., 44S Tweddell, R., 230P Twieg, E., 338P Twizeyimana, M., 452P Tychon, B., 100O, 101O, 856P Tyler, B. M., 37S, 128S Tyler, D., 824P Tylka, G., 281P Tzanetakis, I. E., 112S, 51O, 240P, 376P, 458P Tzeng, K., 528P Uchida, J., 343P, 344P Uddin, W., 700P Udvardi, M., 502P

111


Ueng, P., 670P Ullah, H., 6O Ullman, D. E., 95O Uppala, S., 226P Uppalapati, S. R., 58S, 541P, 606P, 611P Urashima, A. S., 453P Urbez-Torres, J. R., 110O Uribe, P., 291P Urrea, K., 859P Urrea, R., 699P Uyemoto, J. K., 359P Vadivel, K., 107O Vahling, C., 126O Vaiciunas, J., 436P Vaira, A., 664P Valdivia, C., 510P Valenzuela-Solano, C., 211P, 706P Vallad, G., 328P, 406P Valverde, R. A., 267P, 660P Van den Bosch, F., 776P, 799P Van der Does, D., 61S van Kan, J. A., 132S van Santen, E., 513P van Schadewijk, T., 313P Van Wees, S. C., 61S Vargas, A. M., 573P, 593P, 595P Vargas, H. A., 704P Vasquez, S., 233P Vaughn, V. L., 858P Vazquez-Mundo, M., 288P Vega, B., 794P Velasquez, N. Y., 667P Vemulapti, B., 316P Venkata, B., 122O Vera Cruz, C. M., 35S, 581P Vercauteren, A., 488P Verhalen, L. L., 124S Verma, S. S., 605P Vermeire, M., 828P Veronese, P., 603P Vicente, M., 514P Vico, I., 231P, 760P Vidaver, A. K., 557P Vidic, U., 482P Vigaya Satya, R., 307P Villamor, D. V., 318P Villani, S., 743P Villanueva, L. M., 106O Vincelli, P., 322P Vincent, M., 617P Vining, K. J., 636P Vitoreli, A. M., 329P, 384P Vittal, R., 303P Vodkin, L., 117O Vowell, T., 547P Vu, A. L., 279P Wach, M., 103S Wade, L., 25S, 26S Wadl, P. A., 491P Wakefield, L. M., 464P Walgenbach, P. J., 2O Walker, D. R., 77O Walker, G. P., 95O Walker, K. A., 136O, 138O Walker, N., 201P Walkinshaw, C. H., 39O Wallhead, M. W., 777P, 857P Wallis, C., 340P Waltz, C. F., 854P

112

Wan, A., 191P Wang, B., 248P Wang, C., 598P, 624P Wang, D., 137S, 684P Wang, D., 530P Wang, G., 160P Wang, H., 450P Wang, J., 484P Wang, J., 621P Wang, J., 653P, 657P Wang, K., 505P Wang, L., 550P Wang, M., 381P Wang, M., 610P Wang, M., 677P Wang, N., 13O, 34O, 35O, 531P, 533P, 534P Wang, Q., 75O, 608P, 609P Wang, Q., 246P Wang, S., 302P Wang, X., 124O Wang, X., 491P Wang, X., 657P Wangdi, T., 58S, 541P Ward, L., 396P Ward, N. A., 4O Ward, T., 56S Watson, A., 117S Webster, C., 52O, 405P Wedge, D. E., 744P Weerakoon, M., 847P Wegulo, S. N., 434P, 736P, 807P Wei, W., 317P Weil, C., 122O Weiland, J., 123S Welch, K. D., 414P Welker, R. M., 437P, 852P Weller, D. M., 503P, 693P Welliver, R., 476P, 861P Wen, A., 124O Wen, J., 246P Wen, R., 92O Weng, Z., 139S Werres, S., 488P Westerdahl, B. B., 782P Westerman, R. P., 29O Westphal, A., 98O Westwood, J. H., 89O, 519P Whalen, M. C., 114O Wharton, P. S., 731P Wheeler, G., 342P Wheeler, T. A., 124S, 846P, 851P Whitaker, B., 231P White, F., 67S White, J., 210P White, T. L., 686P, 689P Whitehead, J., 783P Whitfield, A., 113S Whitham, S. A. Wick, R., 292P Widmer, T. L., 457P Wiemann, P., 585P Wiest, A., 867P Wiglesworth, M., 26S Wilcox, W. F., 109O, 464P Williams, B., 59S, 568P, 648P Williams, J. L., 552P Williams, W. P., 261P Willie, K., 45O Willocquet, L., 71S, 148O

Willyerd, K. T., 839P Wilson, C., 25O, 391P Wilson, R., 647P Windels, C. E., 271P Windham, A., 374P Windham, G. L., 261P Windham, M., 374P Wingo, R. M., 42O Winterhagen, P., 579P Wintermantel, W. M., 240P, 458P, 477P Winters, S. A., 124S Wise, K., 140O Wise, R., 36S, 592P With, K. A., 151O Woeste, K. E., 29O Wolfe, D. W., 455P Woloshuk, C. P., 225P, 589P, 590P, 640P Wong, F. P., 18S, 95S Wood, E., 731P Woodruff, W., 347P Woods, J. L., 515P Woodward, J. E., 846P, 851P Woodward, S., 222P Workneh, F., 128O, 129O Worley, E., 502P Worthington, C. J., 55S Wrather, A., 813P Wright, A. F., 348P Wright, D. L., 77O, 198P Wright, E. R., 363P, 364P Wu, B. M., 196P, 481P Wu, J., 685P Wu, W., 317P Wulff, N. A., 176P Wyenandt, C. A., 798P Xia, J. Q., 45S, 64O, 66O, 339P Xia, Y., 521P Xiang, Q., 123O Xiao, C., 100S, 68O, 69O, 787P, 788P Xie, C., 406P Xie, Y., 626P Xiong, Z., 139S Xu, D., 246P, 247P, 381P Xu, D., 400P, 659P Xu, J., 134S, 641P Xu, l., 721P Xu, S., 135S, 800P Xu, X., 161P, 745P Xue, B., 652P, 654P Yaghmour, M. A., 845P Yajima, W., 605P Yakabe, L. E., 522P Yan, Q., 533P Yang, B., 68S Yang, C., 163P Yang, C., 644P Yang, J., 502P Yang, J., 713P Yang, K., 40S Yang, M., 693P Yang, W., 416P Yang, W., 717P Yang, X., 423P, 450P, 755P Yang, X., 674P Yang, Y., 74O, 75O, 608P, 609P Yao, C., 763P, 765P Ye, X., 45O

Yin, C., 504P Yin, J., 137O, 727P Yin, J., 32O Yin, Y., 100S, 69O, 787P, 788P Yokota, K., 707P Young, C., 40O Young, H., 139O Young, H. M., 198P Young, R. F., 160P Young, S., 603P Ypema, H. 51S Yu, K., 521P Yu, X., 552P Yuan, Q., 171P, 177P Zablotowicz, R. M., 724P Zaccaron, M. L., 423P Zaid, A. M., 9O Zale, J., 279P Zamanizadeh, H., 88O, 183P, 287P, 334P, 349P, 398P, 720P Zearfoss, A. D., 153O, 465P Zellermann, E., 162P Zellner, W. L., 722P Zenbayashi, K. S., 618P Zeng, Q., 163P Zeng, Q., 210P, 490P, 603P Zhai, L., 493P Zhang, A. B., 600P Zhang, C., 65S, 644P Zhang, G., 263P Zhang, J., 74O Zhang, J., 685P Zhang, L., 225P Zhang, M., 748P Zhang, N., 56O Zhang, P., 178P Zhang, S., 174P Zhang, S., 686P, 689P, 695P Zhang, X., 588P Zhang, Z., 135S Zhang, Z., 679P Zhao, W., 484P Zhao, Y., 220P, 221P, 317P Zhao, Y., 530P, 562P Zheng, D., 631P Zheng, Y., 93O Zheng, Y., 411P, 672P Zheng, Y., 719P Zhong, S., 250P, 601P, 637P Zhou, C., 726P Zhou, G., 246P, 381P, 659P Zhou, J., 240P Zhou, L., 179P Zhou, M., 484P Zhou, S., 210P Zhou, X., 675P, 685P Zhou, X., 695P, 726P Ziebell, H., 89O, 519P Zimba, P. V., 310P Zimmerman, B. H., 594P Zitomer, N. C., 228P Zitter, T. A., 835P Zou, W., 247P Zuluaga, A., 738P Zu単iga-Davila, D., 520P Zwingman, M., 736P Zwonitzer, J., 802P


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