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Program Book 2010 AACC International Annual Meeting October 24-27 Savannah Convention Center Savannah, Georgia, U.S.A.

Location photos courtesy of www.SavannahVisit.com.


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Thank You, Sponsors

Session Sponsors Cargill Global Technology The China Yuren Food Group ConAgra Foods Fortune Bakery Co., Ltd. General Mills, Inc. Guangdong Kailan Flour Foods Co., Ltd PepsiCo Advanced Research R-Biopharm AG Romer Labs

Workshop Sponsors Kellogg Company Rich Products SunOpta Ingredients Group

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Table of Contents Welcome Letter from Program Chair ............................................ 5 Message from the AACC International President ......................... 6 New Program Session Format ....................................................... 7 General Information ...................................................................... 8 Safety Tips ................................................................................... 9 Networking Opportunities/Social Program ................................. 11 Division and Alumni Meetings/Events ...................................... 12 Personal Schedule ....................................................................... 13 Schedule-at-a-Glance .................................................................. 14 Program Highlights ..................................................................... 16 Daily Program Schedule and Sessions Friday and Saturday Schedule ................................................ 19 Saturday Premeeting Short Courses ........................................ 19 Sunday Schedule ..................................................................... 20 Sunday Premeeting Workshops ............................................... 20 Monday Schedule .................................................................... 22 Monday Sessions (8:30 – 10:10 a.m.) & Presenters ............... 23 Monday Sessions (10:40 a.m. – 12:20 p.m.) & Presenters.. .... 24 Monday Hot Topic, Science Café, PosterTalk Sessions .......... 26 Tuesday Schedule..................................................................... 28 Tuesday Sessions (8:30 – 10:10 a.m.) & Presenters ................ 29 Supplier Innovation Sessions ................................................... 30 Tuesday Sessions (10:40 a.m. – 12:20 p.m.) & Presenters.. .... 30 Tuesday Hot Topic, Science Café, PosterTalk Sessions .......... 32 Wednesday Schedule................................................................ 35 Closing Session with Keynote Speaker.................................... 36 Wednesday Sessions (8:30 – 10:10 a.m.) & Presenters ........... 36 Wednesday Sessions (10:40 a.m. – 12:20 p.m.) & Presenters ............................................................................ 38 Wednesday Hot Topic, Science Café, PosterTalk Sessions ............................................................................... 39 Poster Schedule and Poster Categories ........................................ 43 Poster Titles and Authors ............................................................. 45 Recognition Sponsors ................................................................................... 57 Program Team ......................................................................... 57 Corporate Members ................................................................ 58 2010 AACC International Awardees ........................................ 59 2009-2010 AACC International Board of Directors ................ 63 Volunteer Recognition.............................................................. 64 Past Presidents ......................................................................... 67 Staff .......................................................................................... 67 Maps Shuttle Bus and Ferry Schedule .............................................. 69 Savannah Area Meeting Facilities & Addresses ...................... 70 Savannah Convention Center ................................................... 71 Westin Savannah ...................................................................... 72 Exhibition Exhibit Hall Floor Plan ............................................................ 73 Exhibit Hours ........................................................................... 74 Exhibition................................................................................. 74 Exhibitor Numerical Listing .................................................... 86 Author Index ................................................................................ 87 Advertisers’ Index ........................................................................ 93 Notes ........................................................................................... 94


The Resources You Need and More!

Your Science. Your Association. AACC International’s 7 Key ScientiďŹ c Initiatives To increase the quality of research and satisfy the diverse needs of our members, the AACC International Annual Meeting focuses on 7 Key ScientiďŹ c Initiatives. These initiatives will guide the program and provide members with relevant information, strong scientiďŹ c content, and signiďŹ cant opportunities for disseminating research ďŹ ndings.

Analytical Methods & Quality

AACC Intl. Marketplace – Grain Brain Central Win an AACC Intl. Grain Brain shirt

ANALYTICALMETHODSDEVELOPMENTANDCHANGESsMEASURINGQUALITY OFGRAIN INGREDIENTS ORlNISHEDFOODSsRHEOLOGY

Biotechnology & Sustainability CONVENTIONALBREEDINGsGENETICMODIlCATIONsINTERACTIONEFFECTSOF ENVIRONMENTONGENEEXPRESSIONsGLOBALCLIMATECHANGEsREDUCING ENERGYCONSUMPTIONsSOCIALPOLITICALlNANCIALIMPACTS

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Browse the books for sale N

Review the job board for open positions or post your resume N

Receive a FREE 2GB Flash Drive when you set up a saved-search alert in Cereal Chemistry N

Pick up a member ribbon to display the number of years you’ve been a member N

Pick up a copy of Cereal Foods World N

Ask questions about your membership N

Make a Foundation donation

Cereal & Polymer Chemistry FUNDAMENTALWHOLECEREAL STARCH ANDPROTEINCHEMISTRYsRELATED POLYMERSCIENCEAPPROACHESsCHEMICALINTERACTIONSOFCOMPONENT parts

Engineering & Processing PHYSICALPROCESSINGOFGRAINS PULSES ANDFOODPRODUCTSsFUELS INDUSTRIALCHEMICALS ANDOTHERIN PROCESSMATERIALSsMOREEFlCIENT engineering processes and equipment

Food Safety & Regulatory MICROBESsCONTAMINANTSsHAZARDSsREGULATORYISSUESsLEGAL challenges

Health & Nutrition HEALTHANDNUTRITIONOFCEREALSANDPULSESsSOCIALIMPACTOF HEALTHANDNUTRITIONINITIATIVESsMEDICALREPORTS

Ingredients & Cost of Goods Sold RAWMATERIALSsNEWDISCOVERIESOFNOVELINGREDIENTSsAPPLICATIONS OFINGREDIENTSsREDUCEINGREDIENTCOSTS

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Learn about the check sample program

Learn more about these initiatives and how AACC International is focusing on you—visit www.aaccnet.org/7.

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Find out about the 2011 annual meeting in Palm Springs, California, U.S.A.

About AACC International AACC International is a unique association dedicated to grains and grain science. Discover the most recent trends and research through resources only available through AACC Intl., and connect with a worldwide community of scientists, researchers, and product developers just like you. Find out more at www.aaccnet.org.

Share the AACC Intl. Annual Meeting with the World!

Palm Springs Aerial Tramway courtesy of the Palm Springs Bureau of Tourism.

Want to share the excitement of the 2010 Annual Meeting? Tweet using the hashtags #aacc10 to join the conversation, and visit the AACC Intl. Facebook page to create discussions, share photos, make comments, and post videos. 3


Welcome from the Program Chair s the 2010 AACC International program chair, I am excited to be here in Savannah and very proud of the program we’ve got planned for you.

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The AACC International Annual Meeting is always a place where a lot of different people come together to share knowledge. In a full three-day meeting, you have the opportunity to share your cereal research, learn what others are doing in the ďŹ eld, and then take time to discuss future opportunities and needs. You should come away from the meeting with an understanding of the current issues in government, academia, and industry and, hopefully, a set of ideas and goals that will help you in your daily work. Christophe Courtin

As the program planning team, we have built the 2010 scientiďŹ c program around the priorities SETFORWARDBYTHEMEMBERSOFTHEORGANIZATION)NADDITION WHENPLANNINGTHEMEETING WE wanted to add more time for debate and discussion into the scientiďŹ c program to broaden the impact of the science and insights presented at the meeting. For that reason, we’re offering four Science CafĂŠ sessions, which are a twist on the traditional symposia session with more time built in for questions, discussion, and debate. It is important that everyone take this opportunity to ask questions of the speakers, share related information from their personal experience, and really think about how these ideas can be applied. Also new for 2010, PosterTalk sessions give poster authors the opportunity to quickly present the main ďŹ ndings of their posters. Posters and poster authors will be available in the room for questions and discussion, so I strongly encourage you to attend these sessions and be a part of the discussion. Finally, as most of you know, the networking and social opportunities are a very important part of the meeting and help us to build a support network that we can turn to throughout the year with questions and concerns in the ďŹ eld. Please be sure to join us for the Opening General Session Reception at 4:30 p.m. on Sunday – it’s a great way for everyone to get together at the beginning of the meeting. Following the Opening General Session and Awards Ceremony, the Grand Opening Exhibition will include over 120 of today’s leading industry suppliers featuring their news products. Finally, the Closing Session with Keynote Speaker Margaret Bath and Farewell Reception is a great way to wrap up the meeting. My special thanks go to Margaret Bath for agreeing to speak and giving us her take on how industry is approaching new challenges in the ďŹ eld. I would like to warmly thank the members of the Annual Meeting Technical Program Planning #OMMITTEE INCLUDINGMYCO CHAIR$EIRDRE/RTIZ FORTHEIRDEDICATIONANDHARDWORKOVERTHEPAST year in helping me plan this year’s meeting. I hope you have a great time here in Savannah. Christophe Courtin AACC International Annual Meeting Program Chair

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Message from the President elcome to Savannah! We’re excited about the new program changes and session formats that we’re offering this year, as well as the incredible scientiďŹ c program.

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Over the next several days, speakers and presenters representing 94 companies, 74 universities, and 34 countries worldwide will present at 8 traditional Symposia, 4 new Science CafĂŠs, and 17 4ECHNICAL3ESSIONS4HESESESSIONSAREAGAINORGANIZEDACCORDINGTO!!##)NTERNATIONALS+EY ScientiďŹ c Initiatives. Although many sessions fall under a single initiative, others fall under more than one. As you examine the program, you’ll notice that the appropriate iniative or initiatives are listed for each session. Khalil Khan

The Annual Meeting Technical Program Planning Committee, led by Christophe Courtin and VICECHAIREDBY$EIRDRE/RTIZ HASDESIGNEDTHEPROGRAMWITHSPECIlCREQUESTSFROM!!## International members and previous meeting attendees in mind. The scientiďŹ c program has grown from 24 sessions in 2009 to 34 sessions in 2010. Please note that the Opening General Session and Awards Ceremony has been moved to Sunday evening from its customary Monday morning. This change gives us an extra morning time slot for scientiďŹ c sessions each day and gives you the opportunity to attend three sessions per day instead of two sessions per day as in previous years. A special highlight for this year will be the Closing Session with Keynote Speaker Margaret Bath of Kellogg Company. Margaret is not only a long-time member of AACC International and a former board member but also a very important member of the scientiďŹ c community and a key industry representative. She will discuss the relationship between diet and health, the obesity epidemic, and increasing consumer concerns about nutrition. Please be sure to join us on Wednesday at 4:15 p.m. for her talk, “Challenge Facing the Cereal Processing Industry and How Cereal Science Can Improve the Lives of Consumers.â€? Thank you for joining us in Savannah. I’m excited about the new opportunities for 2010 and looking forward to a great meeting. Khalil Khan AACC International President

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Your Science. Your Program. The 2010 scientiďŹ c program continues to focus on AACC International’s 7 Key ScientiďŹ c Initiatives and offers several new features designed to facilitate discussion among speakers, poster presenters, exhibitors, and attendees.

You asked. We listened. You’ve got more scientiďŹ c content to choose from and more time scheduled each day to attend the sessions. The updated schedule gives you the opportunity to attend three full scientiďŹ c sessions each day on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday, allowing more time for educational content and scientiďŹ c discussion with your peers. This year’s AACC International Annual Meeting program features a blend of traditional and new formats for the scientiďŹ c sessions.

Symposia and Science CafĂŠs focus on multidisciplinary, crossscientiďŹ c initiative topics. They have been crafted around themes identiďŹ ed by the AACC International community and expanded by THEPROGRAMTEAMANDSESSIONORGANIZERS s

Symposia are aimed at optimal knowledge transfer through

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New! Science CafĂŠs consist of two-hour sessions set up to

Technical Sessions and PosterTalk sessions focus on more indepth coverage of central themes within single scientiďŹ c initiatives. They are put together, after peer-review and selection, from abstracts submitted through the online-abstract submission system.

Technical Sessions each feature 20-minute talks covering new scientiďŹ c insights and technological advancements in the ďŹ eld. s New! PosterTalk sessions consist of short talks, highlighting the main ďŹ ndings and take-home messages found on selected posters, followed by in-room poster viewing and discussion. s

ďŹ ve regular 20-minute talks with room for topical questions. combine shorter position talks with debate and discussion.

The Symposia and Technical Sessions are “swappableâ€? morning sessions, allowing people to easily transition from one session to another. The Science CafĂŠ and PosterTalk sessions are “here to stayâ€? afternoon sessions, where participation during a whole session is a guarantee for insightful and rewarding debate.

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Your Science. Your Meeting.

General Information Registration The AACC International Registration Desk will be open during the following hours:

Hall A, Convention Center Sunday, October 24 Monday, October 25 Tuesday, October 26

3:30 – 9:00 p.m. 7:30 a.m. – 6:30 p.m. 7:30 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Foyer Area, 106, Convention Center Wednesday, October 27

7:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.

Exhibits Hall A, Convention Center Sunday, October 24 Monday, October 25 Tuesday, October 26

6:00 – 9:00 p.m. 4:00 – 7:00 p.m. 12:00 – 2:30 p.m.

Grand Opening Exhibition Exhibits with Beer and Poster Viewing Lunch with the Exhibitors

Posters Hall A, Convention Center Monday, October 25

7:00 – 10:00 a.m. 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. 4:00 – 7:00 p.m. 4:30 – 5:30 p.m.

Poster Set-Up Poster Viewing Beer and Poster Viewing Poster Authors Present – even-numbered posters

Tuesday, October 26

8:00 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. 1:15 – 2:15 p.m. 2:30 – 6:00 p.m.

Poster Viewing Poster Authors Present – odd-numbered posters Poster Take-Down

AACC Intl. Marketplace – Grain Brain Central Hall A, Convention Center Sunday, October 24 Monday, October 25 Tuesday, October 26

6:00 – 9:00 p.m. 4:00 – 7:00 p.m. 12:00 – 2:30 p.m.

Foyer Area, 106, Convention Center Monday, October 25 Tuesday, October 26 Wednesday, October 27

9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. 9:00 – 11:30 a.m. 9:00 – 11:00 a.m.

Offsite Venues Student Division Social and Dinner Churchill’s Pub 13 W. Bay Street Savannah, Georgia Telephone: 912.232.8501

Cereals&Europe Section Event and Dinner Alligator Soul 114 Barnard Street Savannah, Georgia Telephone: 912.232.7899

Carbohydrate Division Dinner Bistro 45 Restaurant 123 East Broughton Street Savannah, Georgia Telephone: 912.234.3111

Open Meeting Rooms A meeting room will be available at the Westin for groups of 12 people or less and at the Convention Center for groups of 20 people or less. Sign up at the Registration Desk in Hall A. Sunday, October 24 Monday, October 25 Tuesday, October 26 Wednesday, October 27

1:00 – 6:00 p.m. 7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. 7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. 7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Westin and Convention Center Westin and Convention Center Westin and Convention Center Westin and Convention Center

Shuttle Bus and Ferry Transporation Schedule (see page 69 for complete schedule) Shuttle bus and ferry shuttle will be accessible throughout the meeting between the Convention Center and Westin, to and from the Hyatt, Marriott, and Holiday Inn Express. continued 8


Abstract Printing Stations

Job Board

Abstracts are available during the meeting at the abstract printing stations, located by exhibit 134 and meeting rooms 204 on Level 2 and 106 on Level 1, where you can search and print the abstracts for those sessions you are most interested in attending.

Meeting attendees are invited to stop by the job board in the AACC Intl. Marketplace – Grain Brain Central, located in Exhibit Hall A, to post resumes, open positions, or calls for research collaborators.

Medical Emergencies Transportation for Sightseeing While in Savannah

Medical emergencies should be communicated to an AACC International staff member as soon as possible.

The DOT is a complimentary transportation system in Savannah designed to help you navigate the town easily. The River Street Streetcar runs Thursday through Saturday from 12:00 to 8:00 p.m. and stops along seven historic places between Montgomery Street and the Waving Girl Landing. The Express Shuttle operates seven days a week, stops every 20 minutes or less from 11:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. at ten stops around the Historic District, and connects to municipal parking facilities, Visitor Centers, the streetcar, and the ferry. The Belles Ferry connects downtown to Hutchinson Island and the Savannah International Trade & Convention Center. The ferries operate seven days a week from 7:00 a.m. to midnight from the Convention Center (adjacent to the Westin) to City Hall Landing (adjacent to the Hyatt Regency).

An emergency medical technician (EMT) is available at the Savannah Convention Center during the main meeting hours.

Media Information Members of the media seeking interviews onsite should contact AACC International staff member Susan Schoepke or Susan Kohn at the Registration Desk. Media kits and press releases will also be available at the Registration Desk.

Photo Release

The nearest medical facilities are: Candler Hospital, an affiliate of St. Joseph’s/Candler 5353 Reynolds Street Savannah, Georgia Telephone: 912.819.6000 www.sjchs.org Memorial Health 4700 Waters Ave. Savannah, Georgia Telephone: 912.350.8515 www.memorialhealth.com

Guest Program The AACC International Annual Meeting is not offering a guest orientation this year. Guests at the annual meeting are encouraged to explore the city and visit the Savannah Convention and Visitors Bureau or check with the hotel concierge for more information and to arrange tours of the Savannah area.

Photographs will be taken at the 2010 AACC International Annual Meeting. By attending this meeting, you agree to allow AACC International’s use of your photo in any AACC International publications or website.

Safety Procedures s Do not travel alone – stay in groups and travel in well-lit areas. s Remove name badges when outside the hotel and Convention Center unless you are participating in an annual meeting event. s Do not give your room number out to anyone you do not know and avoid giving out your room number in conversations that strangers may overhear. s Bolt your hotel room door and only open it when you know who is on the other side. (Note: Hotel personnel wear uniforms and have identification badges. If in doubt, call hotel security or the front desk to verify an employee’s identity.) s Do not leave your door ajar if you are going down the hall for ice. Someone may enter when you are not looking. s Know where the stairs are located in case of a fire. Do not use elevators. Also, count the number of doors to the nearest exit in case you cannot see in a smoke-filled hallway. s Valuables, airline tickets, and money should be kept in a hotel safety deposit box or in a room safe, if available.

Procedures in Case of a Fire in the Hotel s Leave the hotel as quickly as possible. If you cannot, stay in your room and call the operator or security to let them know you are in your room. s Put your hand on the room door to see if it is hot before opening it. If it is, do not open it quickly. Open it just a crack to see what is on the other side and be prepared to slam it quickly if necessary. s If you leave your room, take your room key with you. Shut your room door to keep smoke out. You may have to return if the exit is blocked. Remember the way back to your room as you go to the exit in case you need to return. s If necessary, drop to your knees to avoid smoke. Tie a wet towel around your nose and mouth to act as a smoke filter. Fold it into a triangle and put the corner in your mouth. s Do not take the elevator when you smell smoke or if you know that there is a fire in the building.

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AACC Intl. Marketplace – Grain Brain Central Sunday ....................................................... 6:00 – 9:00 p.m. Monday ..................................................... 4:00 – 7:00 p.m. Tuesday ................................................... 12:00 – 2:30 p.m.

AACC Intl. PRESS Bookstore – Near Rooms 101–106 Monday ............................................. 9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. Tuesday ................................................... 9:00 – 11:00 a.m. Wednesday ............................................ 9:00 – 11:00 a.m.

Receive a FREE 2GB Cereal Chemistry Flash Drive! Create a custom alert in your Cereal Chemistry Online Profile at the 2010 AACC Intl. Annual Meeting and receive a FREE 2GB Flash Drive. Visit Marketplace – Grain Brain Central (Hall A) or the AACC Intl. Bookstore – Near Rooms 101–106 Ad#8-2010


Networking Opportunities/Social Program For additional social events check the program schedule for division, section, and alumni activities.

Sunday, October 24 Mentoring Kick-Off Event nPMs#HATHAM"ALLROOM #ONVENTION#ENTER New day and time! Start your annual meeting experience with guidance, breakthroughs, encouragement, and connections. Join other mentors and protĂŠgĂŠs during the AACC Intl. Professional Development Panel’s 2010 Mentoring Program Event. Learn about the program, and meet your partner for the year. This event is for all members who signed up for the 2010 Mentoring Program, and is also open to anyone interested in participating but did not sign up.

Grand Opening Exhibition nPMs(ALL! #ONVENTION#ENTER New time! Kick off the 2010 Annual Meeting at the Grand Opening Exhibition! Greet old friends, make new acquaintances, and visit with more than 120 of the industry’s leading suppliers during this CASUALANDFESTIVEEVENT,IGHTAPPETIZERSANDBEVERAGESWILLBE served.

Monday, October 25

Taste of Savannah Pub Crawl – SOLD OUT 7:00 – 9:00 p.m. s-EETAT(YATT(OTELLOBBYATPM Join us for an evening of fun, history and scares on the AACC International Foundation’s Taste of Savannah Pub Crawl. Hear grand stories of Savannah’s history along with some interesting ghost tales as we walk to three of Savannah’s oldest, most haunted PUBSANDENJOYASAMPLESIGNATUREDRINKANDAPPETIZERSATEACH This custom tour is unlike any other offered. Best of all, while you experience this unique event you will be supporting the Foundation’s scholarship program. Party for a Purpose with the AACC International Foundation! Preregistration is required.

Wednesday, October 27 ICC Luncheon nPMs #ONVENTION#ENTER The ICC Luncheon is a great ICC tradition and a unique opportunity to network in a convivial atmosphere, along with excellent food. It is also where those who have made a major contribution to ICC and to cereal science and technology WORLDWIDEAREACKNOWLEDGEDnTHISYEARTHE0ERTEN0RIZEWILLBE awarded. Preregistration is required.

Exhibits with Beer and Poster Viewing and Poster Authors nPMs(ALL! #ONVENTION#ENTER nPMs0OSTER!UTHORS0RESENT – even-numbered posters Grab a beer, it’s free‌ Expand your knowledge and meet the authors as they present their latest research. Also, take time to visit the exhibits and meet with leading suppliers.

Tuesday, October 26 Returning! Lunch with the Exhibitors plus Poster Viewing and Poster Authors nPMs(ALL! #ONVENTION#ENTER nPMs0OSTER!UTHORS0RESENT – odd numbered posters New Time! Lunch included with registration fee! Brought back from the past‌grab lunch and visit with industry suppliers, view posters, and shop at the AACC Intl. Marketplace – Grain Brain Central.

Laboratory Accuracy Begins With AACC International “Participation in proďŹ ciency testing programs supplied by AACC Intl. enables us to validate and improve the quality of our results and identify any issues. It also provides reassurance to our customers.â€? —Simon Geraghty, Weston Food Lab Customize a testing program for your lab by choosing Analytical, Physical Testing, and Food Safety Check Sample Series.

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Young Professionals Event This is a wonderful chance to discuss your impressions of the latest research and trends presented during the meeting with other young/ new professionals and association leaders. Chat about the latest hot topics or set up a dinner engagement with fellow attendees. Anyone 35 and younger, new to the profession, or wanting to network with this group are invited. This event is sponsored by the Joseph Warthesen Young Professional Endowment Fund. Preregistration is required.

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Division and Alumni Meetings/Events .ETWORKWITHATTENDEESWHOSPECIALIZEINSPECIlCSUBJECTAREAS WORKINVARIOUSGEOGRAPHICLOCATIONS ORAREFELLOWALUMNIBYPARTICIPATING in these meetings, events, and socials. Check at the Registration Desk for availability and to purchase tickets. Preregistration is required. For events not taking place at the Westin or the Convention Center (CC), see page 7 for location addresses. † offsite location

Monday, October 25 12:30 – 2:00 p.m. nPM nPM nPM nPM nPM nPM nPM

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Wednesday, October 27 nAM nAM nPM

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Personal Schedule Use the blank lines to fill in the sessions and meetings you’ll be attending.

Sunday, October 24

Tuesday, October 26

8:00 a.m.

__________________________________________

7:00 a.m.

8:30 a.m.

__________________________________________

Approved Methods Technical Committee Meetings

9:30 a.m.

______________________________________

8:30 a.m.

Session:

10:00 a.m.

__________________________________________

10:30 a.m.

__________________________________________

11:00 a.m.

__________________________________________

11:30 a.m.

__________________________________________

12:00 p.m.

__________________________________________

1:30 p.m.

__________________________________________

2:00 p.m.

__________________________________________

2:30 p.m.

__________________________________________

3:30 p.m.

__________________________________________

4:00 p.m.

__________________________________________

4:30 p.m.

Opening General Session Reception

5:00 p.m.

Opening General Session and Awards Ceremony

6:00 – 9:00 p.m.

__________________________________________ 10:40 a.m.

Session: __________________________________________

12:00 – 2:30 p.m. Lunch Break 2:30 p.m.

Session: __________________________________________

4:00 p.m.

__________________________________________

4:30 p.m.

__________________________________________

5:00 p.m.

__________________________________________

5:30 p.m.

__________________________________________

6:00 p.m.

__________________________________________

6:30 p.m.

__________________________________________

7:00 p.m.

__________________________________________

Grand Opening Exhibition

Wednesday, October 27 Monday, October 25 7:00 a.m. 8:30 a.m.

Approved Methods Technical Committee Meetings

Approved Methods Technical Committee Meetings

8:30 a.m.

Session:

Session: __________________________________________

10:40 a.m.

7:00 a.m.

__________________________________________ 10:40 a.m.

Session: __________________________________________

12:20 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Lunch Break

2:00 p.m.

Session: __________________________________________

4:00 – 7:00 p.m.

Exhibits with Beer and Poster Viewing

7:00 p.m.

__________________________________________

Session: __________________________________________

12:30 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Lunch Break

2:00 p.m.

Session: __________________________________________

4:15 p.m.

Closing Session with Keynote Speaker and Farewell Reception

13


2010 Schedule-at-a-Glance Sessions are in the Savannah Convention Center. Initiatives are listed in italics after each session. Saturday 8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Short Course – 3UGARS4HE.OT 3O 3IMPLE3TORYs ##

9:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Short Course – %NZYMESIN'RAIN "ASED0RODUCTSs ##

Sunday nPM

Premeeting Workshop – (EALTHY'RAINS)MPLICATIONSOFTHE2HEOLOGYOF$IGESTIVE0ROCESSESs ##

nPM

Premeeting Workshop – 'REEN4ECHNOLOGYAND#ARBON&OOTPRINTn)MPACTON&OODAND&EED0ROCESSINGs ##

nPM

Opening General Session and Awards Ceremony PM2ECEPTION PM'ENERAL3ESSION s#HATHAM"ALLROOM ##

6:00 – 9:00 p.m.

'RAND/PENING%XHIBITIONs(ALL! ##

Monday 7:00 – 8:30 a.m.

!PPROVED-ETHODS4ECHNICAL#OMMITTEE-EETINGSsSee page 16 for listing.

nAM

Symposia: #ELIAC$ISEASE!-ULTIDISCIPLINARY0OINTOF6IEWs Cereal & Polymer Chemistry; Food Safety & Regulatory; Health & Nutrition s!UDITORIUM ##

AMnPM

Student Product Development Competitions  ##

AMnPM

Symposia: .EW-ILLINGAND0RETREATMENT4ECHNOLOGIESFOR #HANGING&UNCTIONALITYAND.UTRITIONAL0ROlLESOF&LOURSs Engineering & Processing; Health & Nutrition; Ingredients & Cost of Goods Sold s!UDITORIUM ##

nPM

Posters ViewingAND,UNCH/N9OUR/WNs$IVISION,UNCHES

nPM

Science CafĂŠ:7HOLE'RAINS5NRAVELEDs Health & Nutrition; Ingredients & Cost of Goods Sold s!UDITORIUM ##

Technical Session:&OOD3AFETY(AZARD$ETECTIONAND 4REATMENTsFood Safety & Regulatory s  ##

Technical Session:#EREAL#ONSTITUENT)NTERACTIONSsCereal & Polymer Chemistry s  ##

Hot Topic: #EREALS#HALLENGESINTHE/RIENTAL7ORLD (ends at 4:30 p.m. s  ##

nPM

Beer and Poster ViewingEVEN NUMBEREDPOSTERAUTHORSPRESENTnPM s(ALL! ##

Open Evening

Division and Section Socials and Dinners

Tuesday 7:00 – 8:30 a.m.

!PPROVED-ETHODS4ECHNICAL#OMMITTEE-EETINGSsSee page 16 for listing.

nAM

Symposia: "EST3TUDENT2ESEARCH0APER#OMPETITION (ends at 11:00 a.m. s  ##

Technical Session: Biofuels Part l: Bioeconomy and Pretreatments in Biofuel Production (includes Applied Research Award Lecture by Larry A. Johnson)s Engineering & Processing s!UDITORIUM ##

AMnPM

Symposia: %MERGINGAND0ERSISTING&OOD(AZARDS !NALYTICAL#HALLENGESAND3OCIOECONOMIC)MPACTsFood Safety & Regulatory s!UDITORIUM ##

Symposia: 2ECENT!DVANCESIN+NOWLEDGE2ELATEDTO3TARCH 3YNTHESISAND3TRUCTUREsAnalytical Methods & Quality; Cereal & 0OLYMER#HEMISTRYs  ##

nPM

Lunch with the Exhibitorss(ALL! ## 0OSTER6IEWINGODD NUMBEREDPOSTERAUTHORSPRESENTnPM

nPM

Science CafĂŠ:!3TATISTICAL3MORGASBORDFOR #EREAL#HEMISTRYsAnalytical Methods & Quality s  ##

Open Evening

$IVISION3OCIALSAND$INNERs&OUNDATION%VENT

Science CafĂŠ:"IOENGINEERINGFOR(UMAN(EALTHsBiotechnology & Sustainability; Food Safety & Regulatory; Health & Nutrition s !UDITORIUM ##

Wednesday 7:00 – 8:30 a.m.

Approved Methods Technical Committee Meetings sSee page 16 for listing.

nAM

Symposia: 4HE)MPACTOF#LIMATE#HANGEONTHE0RODUCTIONAND 5TILIZATIONOF7HEATAND2ICEsBiotechnology & Sustainability; Engineering & Processing s !UDITORIUM ##

Symposia: 3MALL 'RAIN"IORElNINGˆ!GRONOMYAND'RAIN3UPPLY "IORElNING4ECHNOLOGY %NVIRONMENTAL3USTAINABILITY AND#OMMERCIAL $EVELOPMENTsBiotechnology & Sustainability; Engineering & Processing s  ##

AMnPM

Symposia: 'RAIN "ASED&OODAND)NGREDIENT3AFETYINTHE 3UPPLY#HAINsFood Safety & Regulatory; Ingredients & Cost of Goods Sold s  ##

Technical Session: Extrusion Processing (includes Young 2ESEARCH3CIENTIST!WARD0RESENTATIONBY3AJID!LAVI s %NGINEERING0ROCESSINGs  ##

nPM

,UNCH/N9OUR/WNs)##,UNCHs$IVISION,UNCHES

nPM .OTE(OT4OPICBEGINS ATPM

Science CafĂŠ:!SSESSMENTOF'RAIN1UALITY&ROM"REEDING TO3TORE3HELFsAnalytical Methods & Quality; Ingredients & #OSTOF'OODS3OLDs!UDITORIUM ##

nPM

#LOSING3ESSIONWITH+EYNOTE3PEAKER-ARGARET"ATHAND&AREWELL2ECEPTIONs#HATHAM"ALLROOM! ##

14

Hot Topic: 3ALTAND3ODIUM,OOKINGFOR-Y,ONG,OST3HAKEROF 3ALTx2EPLACER&LAVOR &UNCTION &UTUREBegins at 1:30 p.m. s   ##


Technical Session: Genetic Engineering and %NVIRONMENTAL)MPACTON#EREAL#ONSTITUENTSs "IOTECHNOLOGY3USTAINABILITYs  ##

Technical Session:)NSIGHTSIN2ELATIONSBETWEEN 0ROCESSINGAND&INAL0RODUCT#HARACTERISTICSs %NGINEERING0ROCESSINGs  ##

Technical Session: Resistant Starch and Glycemic )NDEXs(EALTH.UTRITIONs  ##

Technical Session:2HEOLOGYs Analytical Methods 1UALITYs  ##

PosterTalk:!NALYTICAL-ETHODSAND1UALITYs   ##

PosterTalk:#EREALAND0OLYMER#HEMISTRY 3TARCH3TRUCTUREs  ##

Technical Session:#ELIAC$ISEASEAND'LUTEN 2EPLACEMENTsCereal & Polymer Chemistry; %NGINEERING0ROCESSING(EALTH.UTRITIONs   ##

Technical Session:%NZYMESIN"READMAKINGs #EREAL0OLYMER#HEMISTRYs  ##

Technical Session: Biofuels Part ll: Use of %NZYMESAND$$'6ALORIZATIONsEngineering & 0ROCESSINGs  ##

Technical Session:)NGREDIENT&UNCTIONALITY AND#OSTs)NGREDIENTS#OSTOF'OODS3OLDs   ##

Hot Topic: &ORECASTFOR532EGULATORY#LIMATE! 'ATHERING3TORMOF%NFORCEMENT 2EGULATION AND ,EGISLATIONFOR&OODSends at 5:00 p.m. s  ##

PosterTalk:#EREALAND0OLYMER#HEMISTRY #EREAL#HEMISTRYs  ##

Technical Session:!NALYTICAL-ETHODS #HALLENGESAND.EW-ETHODOLOGIES(includes Edith Christensen Award Presentation by John L. -AC$ONALD s!NALYTICAL-ETHODS1UALITYs   ##

Technical Session:"RANAND&IBERsHealth & .UTRITIONs  ##

Technical Session:-ICRONUTRIENTSsHealth & .UTRITIONs  ##

Technical Session: Starch Structure and &UNCTIONALITYs#EREAL0OLYMER#HEMISTRYs   ##

PosterTalk: Biotechnology and Engineering nPM s  ##

PosterTalk:%NGINEERINGAND0ROCESSINGs   ##

Supplier Innovation Session (ends at 11:40 a.m. s ##

Technical Session: Processing Effects on #EREAL#ONSTITUENTS3TRUCTUREAND&UNCTIONALITYs #EREAL0OLYMER#HEMISTRYs  ##

PosterTalk(EALTHAND.UTRITIONs  ##

PosterTalk:)NGREDIENTSAND#OSTOF'OODS3OLD nPM s  ##

15


Program Highlights Premeeting Short Courses Sugars: The Not-So-Simple Story Saturday, October 23 AMnPMs ## Organizer: Brinda Govindarajan, McDonald’s Corporation, Chicago, IL, U.S.A. See page 19 for more information on this short course. Preregistration required. Enzymes in Grain Based Products Saturday, October 23 AMnPMs ## Organizer:0ETER-OODIE %NZYME$EVELOPMENT#ORPORATION New York, NY, U.S.A. See page 19 for more information on this short course. Preregistration required.

New Day and Time! Reception followed by Opening General Session and Awards Ceremony Sunday, October 24  PM2ECEPTIONs#HATHAM"ALLROOM ## 5:00 – 6:00 p.m. Opening General Session and Awards #EREMONYs#HATHAM"ALLROOM ## Join fellow attendees for a beverage and snacks followed by an update on what your association is doing to further the advancement of grain science. A special part of the session will be honoring members who have made signiďŹ cant contributions to the ďŹ eld of grain science through their talent and vision. Awardees are listed on pages 59–61. The William F. Geddes Memorial Award, the highest honor in service to AACC International, will also be presented. The name of the recipient is kept secret until the moment of the presentation. Snack items donated by General Mills Inc.

Premeeting Workshops Healthy Grains: Implications of the Rheology of Digestive Processes Sunday, October 24 nPMs ## See page 20 for more information on this short course. Preregistration required. Green Technology and Carbon Footprint – Impact on Food and Feed Processing Sunday, October 24 nPMs ## See page 21 for more information on this short course. Preregistration required.

Calling All Young Professionals!

Approved Methods Technical Committee Meetings Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday Technical committee meetings are your chance to join other scientists and experts in your specialty area to identify and discuss issues critical to you. Don’t miss this opportunity to bring your ideas, learn about key advances, and help enhance the AACC International Approved Methods of Analysis. These meetings are open to all attendees.

Monday, October 25 7:00 – 8:30 a.m. Asian Products %NZYME!NALYSIS Methods for Grain and Flour Testing Physical Testing Methods Protein Methods Soft Wheat and Flour Products Vitamins, Minerals, and Lipids

Grand Ballroom F, Westin 'RAND"ALLROOM# 7ESTIN Grand Ballroom E, Westin Grand Ballroom D, Westin Grand Ballroom C, Westin Moorings, Westin Grand Ballroom C, Westin

Tuesday, October 26

Tuesday, October 26 4:30 – 5:30 p.m. Tondee’s CafÊ, Convention Center Relax and have some fun to finish off your hard day of learning! Get to know your colleagues during the Young Professionals Networking Event, open to anyone 35 or younger, those new to the profession, or those who would like to network with this group. 16

7:00 – 8:30 a.m. Biotechnology Methods Food Safety and Microbiology Near Infrared Analysis Oat and Barley Products Pasta Products Analysis Rice Milling and Quality Statistical Advisory

Grand Ballroom F, Westin Grand Ballroom C, Westin Grand Ballroom E, Westin Grand Ballroom D, Westin Moorings, Westin Grand Ballroom C, Westin Grand Ballroom C, Westin

Wednesday, October 27 7:00 – 8:30 a.m. Bioactive Compounds Methods Bread Baking Methods Chemical Leavening Agents Dietary Fiber and Other Carbohydrates Experimental Milling Pulse and Legume Yeast Evaluation

Grand Ballroom F, Westin Moorings, Westin Grand Ballroom E, Westin Grand Ballroom D, Westin Grand Ballroom C, Westin Grand Ballroom C, Westin Grand Ballroom C, Westin


New! Exhibit Times and Activities in the Exhibit Hall #HECKOUTTHENEWACTIVITIESANDPRIZEDRAWINGSTAKINGPLACETHIS year! Connect with leading suppliers advancing the work of the industry. New exhibit times allow for greater opportunities to meet with suppliers of ingredients, instruments, equipment, and services. Sunday, October 24 6:00 – 9:00 p.m. Grand Opening Exhibition and RECEPTION Monday, October 25 4:00 – 7:00 p.m. Exhibits with BEER and Poster Viewing (grab a beer and meet with exhibitors)

new group will connect researchers engaged in mapping end-use quality traits in wheat and will facilitate the sharing of information and strategies for population development, phenotyping, marker development, and marker-trait validation. Want to participate? Interest Groups will be meeting on Tuesday, October 26 from 1:30 – 2:30 p.m. Watch for designated tables in the concessions eating area next to Marketplace in Exhibit Hall A. Mission’s of these Interest Groups and their respective scientiďŹ c output will be discussed.

Exhibits with Beer, Poster Viewing, and Poster Authors

Tuesday, October 26 12:00 – 2:30 p.m. LUNCH with the Exhibitors (grab lunch and meet with the exhibitors)

Monday, October 25 nPMs(ALL! ## nPMs0OSTER!UTHORS0RESENT (even-numbered posters)

Student Product Development Competition

Grab a beer, it’s free‌and expand your knowledge area as poster authors present their latest research. Also, take time to visit the exhibits and meet with leading suppliers.

Monday, October 25 Presentations: AMnPMs  ## Posters will be set in Exhibit Hall at 1:00 p.m. for viewing through 2:30 p.m. on Tuesday, October 26. Get a glimpse of the future of the grain science industry as these young scientists show off their product development skills! This exciting competition challenges students to develop a new product containing at least one cereal product as the main ingredient. All meeting attendees are invited to view the oral and poster presentations. Thank you to the many sponsors who make the COMPETITIONPOSSIBLETHROUGHTHEIRPRIZEMONEYDONATIONS Cheer on your alma mater – teams competing this year are Cornell University, Iowa State University, Kansas State University, University of Arkansas, and University of Manitoba.

Hot Topic! Cereals: Challenges in the Oriental World Monday, October 25 nPMs  ## Organizers: Weining Huang, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, China; Okkyung Kim Chung, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, USA. Moderator: Bob Cracknell, AACC Intl. China Strategies Task Force Financial Sponsors: Fortune Bakery Co., Ltd., Zhangjiagang, China; Fujian Panpan Food Group Co., Ltd., Jinjiang, China; Jiangsu Yurun Food Industry Group Co., Ltd., Nanjing, China Supported by: AACC Intl. China Strategies Task Force See page 27 for session content.

New! AACC International Interest Groups nPMs%XHIBIT(ALL! ## .EWIN !!##)NTERNATIONAL)NTEREST'ROUPSARESPECIALIZED groups, in subjects relevant to the AACC Intl. mission. Grain science is constantly evolving and interfaces with many other areas and as such AACC Intl. has created new opportunities for members to build connections with others who hold the same interests. Each Interest Group will share information, provide networking opportunities, and represent the profession on relevant issues. Members have come forward and asked that Food Safety and Gluten-free Interest Groups be formed. Additionally Craig Morris is forming a Mapping Quality of Small Grains Interest Group. This

Applied Research Award Lecture Tuesday, October 26 nAMs!UDITORIUM ## “The bioeconomy – 2010 and beyond,â€? presented by Larry A. *OHNSON #ENTERFOR#ROPS5TILIZATION2ESEARCH )OWA3TATE University, Ames, IA, U.S.A.

Best Student Research Paper Competition Tuesday, October 26 nAMs  ## Witness the best of the best compete in the second annual "EST3TUDENT2ESEARCH0APER#OMPETITIONORGANIZEDBYTHE AACC International Professional Development Panel. Based on preliminary presentations, the following six ďŹ nalists will be: s )EVA!LAUNYTE -ANCHESTER-ETROPOLITAN5NIVERSITY “Development of consumer acceptable and nutritious Teff (Eragrostis tef)BREADUSINGENZYMECOMBINATIONTREATMENTSv s .ISHA!RAVIND 5NIVERSITYOF.EW%NGLAND h%FFECTOFDIETARY lBREENRICHMENTINSPAGHETTI !NENZYMATICANDSTRUCTURAL studyâ€? s *UNG3UN(ONG 5NIVERSITYOF)DAHO h2EACTIONKINETICS of amylose and amylopectin branch chains in a model DERIVATIZATIONSYSTEMv s (ONGXIN*IANG )OWA3TATE5NIVERSITY h3TARCH GRANULE DEVELOPMENTINHIGH AMYLOSEMAIZEv s 2EETTA+IVELĂ˜ 5NIVERSITYOF(ELSINKI h#HANGESINOATBETA glucan properties by heat induced oxidationâ€? s 'EORGE/NDIER 5NIVERSITYOF!RKANSAS h3INGLEPASSDRYINGOF rough rice using glass transition principlesâ€? Awards will be given for ďŹ rst through third place, with awards INCLUDINGCASHPRIZES TRAVELGRANTS ANDTHEPUBLICATIONOFTHE winning papers. Winners will be announced during the closing Session and Farewell Reception on Wednesday afternoon. AACC Intl. would like to thank the following sponsors for providing award funds: Cargill Inc. CSM Innovation Center Bakery Ingredients Flowers Foods Frito Lay Inc. General Mills Inc.

ICL Performance Products LP Kellogg Co. Kraft Foods McCormick Co. Inc. The Schwan Food Co. 17


Lunch with the Exhibitors and Poster Viewing with Poster Authors Tuesday, October 26 nPMs(ALL! ## nPMs0OSTER!UTHORS0RESENT (odd-numbered posters) Grab lunch, it’s free‌and take one last opportunity to visit the exhibitors and poster authors.

Hot Topic! Forecast for U.S. Regulatory Climate: A Gathering Storm of Enforcement, Regulation, and Legislation for Foods Tuesday, October 26 nPMs  ## Organizer: Barbara Heidolph, ICL Performance Products LP, St. Louis, MO, U.S.A. See page 33 for session content.

Edith Christensen Award Lecture Wednesday, October 27 nAMs  ## “Measurement of fat soluble vitamins in foods, feeds, and ingredients: Progress and problemsâ€? presented by John MacDonald, NP Analytical Laboratories, St. Louis, MO, U.S.A.

Young Research Scientist Award Lecture Wednesday, October 27 10:40 – 11:20 a.m. s  ##

UNITE We are thrilled that you get excited about rice, wheat, oats, rye, and corn. We love that you care more about what’s in your bread than the peanut butter or jelly on it. You are deďŹ nitely a grain brain—and AACC International is where you belong! Thank you for being a part of a community of grain brains just like you. Be sure to stop by the AACC International Marketplace – Grain Brain Central from 6:00 to 9:00 p.m. on Sunday, October 24 for your chance at special grain brain swag.

“Extrusion processing – Research and engagement for addressing nutritional challenges worldwide� presented by Sajid Alavi, Department of Grain Science and Industry, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.

Hot Topic! Salt and Sodium: Looking for my Lost Shaker of Salt‌Replacer: Flavor, Function, Future Wednesday, October 27 nPMs  ## Organizer: Barbara Heidolph, ICL Performance Products LP, St. Louis, MO, U.S.A. See page 41 for session content.

Closing Session with Keynote Speaker and Farewell Reception “Challenges Facing the Cereal Processing Industry and How Cereal Science Can Improve the Lives of the World’s Consumersâ€? Keynote Speaker: Margaret Bath, Vice President – Research, Quality and Technology, Kellogg Company, Battle Creek, MI, U.S.A. Wednesday, October 27 nPMs#HATHAM"ALLROOM! ## No meeting is complete without a closing session speaker and ceremonies followed by a farewell send-off for meeting attendees. Immediately following the closing session speaker, join colleagues and friends for great conversation and beverages as we close the 2010 annual meeting. See page 36 for description of Closing Session keynote presentation.

www.grainbrains.org 18


Daily Program Schedule and Sessions All meetings take place at the Savannah Convention Center (CC) unless otherwise noted.

Friday, October 22 3:00 – 5:00 p.m.

Finance Committee Meeting

Moorings, Westin

Saturday, October 23 Board of Directors Meeting Short Course – Sugars: The Not-So-Simple Story* Short Coursen%NZYMESIN'RAIN "ASED0RODUCTS

Grand Ballroom F, Westin 102, CC  ##

&RIDAYs3ATURDAY

8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. 8:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. 9:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. * ticket required

Premeeting Short Courses

Enzymes in Grain-Based Products

Sugars: The Not-So-Simple Story

Organizer:0ETER-OODIE %NZYME$EVELOPMENT#ORPORATION New York, NY, U.S.A.

Organizer: Brinda Govindarajan, McDonald’s Corporation, Chicago, IL, U.S.A. Sugar comes in many simple and complex forms and understanding its impact is critical to the food processing industry. As consumption of sugar continues to rise and sugar ďŹ nds its way into our diets in unprecedented quantities, experts from around the world are exploring sugar’s impact on our health, as well as its role in food processing and in the marketplace. This course will cover market trends, regulatory implications, functionality of sweeteners, nonnutritive sweeteners, sensory implications, health aspects, and formulating low sugar, grain-based products. As the market trends toward natural and less-processed foods, naturally sweet options are critical for consumer acceptance. Preregistration is required.

%NYZMESAREBECOMINGINCREASINGLYIMPORTANTINGRAIN BASED products, including processed foods and fermentation ethanol, because of their impact on processing and on the ďŹ nal product. This course will provide an overview of the current state of technology as well as present new concepts and development OFFUNCTIONALFOODSBYENZYMATICPROCESSINGOFGRAINS Preregistration is required.

Keep the Competitive Edge

Attend AACC International Short Courses

 BREAKFAST CEREALS February 28 – March 2, 2011 St. Gallen, Switzerland

 FOOD EXTRUSION March 14 – 16, 2011 Tampa, Florida, U.S.A.

Visit the Continuing Education Center at Ad#7-2010

www.aaccnet.org.

19


Sunday, October 24 8:00 – 10:00 a.m. 8:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. 9:30 – 11:30 a.m. 9:30 – 11:30 a.m. 9:30 – 11:30 a.m. 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. 11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. 1:00 – 4:00 p.m. 1:00 – 6:00 p.m. 1:00 – 6:00 p.m. 1:30 – 3:00 p.m. 1:30 – 4:30 p.m.

Sunday

2:00 – 3:00 p.m. 3:00 – 4:00 p.m. 3:00 – 4:00 p.m. 3:30 – 5:00 p.m. 3:30 – 9:00 p.m. 4:00 – 5:00 p.m. 4:30 – 5:00 p.m. 5:00 – 6:00 p.m. 6:00 – 7:00 p.m. 6:00 – 9:00 p.m. 6:00 – 9:00 p.m.

Check Sample Committee Meeting Exhibitor Set-Up and Registration Books Committee Meeting Journals Committee Meeting Online Products Committee Meeting 2011 Technical Program Planning - Team Leaders Meeting Cereal Chemistry Editorial Board Luncheon Premeeting Workshop - Healthy Grains: Implications of the Rheology of Digestive Processes* Room Available for Small Meetings – Westin Room Available for Small Meetings – CC Leadership Forum Premeeting Workshop - Green Technology and Carbon Footprint – Impact on Food and Feed Processing* Milling & Baking Division Advisory Board Meeting Awards Committee Meeting Milling & Baking Division Executive Committee Meeting Approved Methods Technical Committee Chairs Meeting Registration Open Mentoring Kick-off Event Opening General Session Reception Opening General Session and Awards Ceremony Student Division Executive Committee and University Representative Meeting AACC Intl. Marketplace – Grain Brain Central Open Grand Opening Exhibition*

Moorings, Westin Hall A, CC Grand Ballroom E, Westin Grand Ballroom E, Westin Grand Ballroom E, Westin Riverscape, Westin Harbor A, Westin 102, CC Moorings, Westin Gwinnett, CC Grand Ballroom B, Westin 104, CC Moorings, Westin Gwinnett, CC Moorings, Westin Harbor A, Westin Hall A, CC Chatham Ballroom, CC Chatham Ballroom, CC Chatham Ballroom, CC Gwinnett, CC Hall A, CC Hall A, CC

*ticket required

Premeeting Workshops Workshop number (1-W) refers to the Author Index in the program book. Cereal Foods World (CFW) number refers to the abstract page location within the online searchable abstract document. !FlLIATIONSARELISTEDASPROVIDEDBYTHEORGANIZERPRESENTER

1:00 p.m.

1:20 p.m.

1:45 p.m.

Healthy Grains: Implications of the Rheology of Digestive Processes /RGANIZERS-ODERATORS4ERI0AESCHKE #HICAGO ), 53! Martin Scanlon, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada Sponsors: Rheology Division, Nutrition Division Financial Sponsors: SunOpta, Kellogg Company The rheology of the human digestive system is critically important to many health and food phenomena, such as the physiological beneďŹ t of cereal ďŹ bers and the bioavailability of antioxidants. Processes such as chewing, swallowing, and peristaltic actions of the stomach and intestines involve very complex rheology. In vivo analyses are invasive and expensive, so there is a real need FORINVITROMODELSTHATWILLACCURATELYCHARACTERIZETHEDIGESTIVE processes of cereal foods. This workshop will present the state of the science regarding gut rheology as well as spark discussion on future paths of research. The ultimate objective is to gain consensus regarding common methods of analysis for sound evaluations of the health beneďŹ ts of cereal foods.

2:10 p.m.

2:35 p.m.

3:00 p.m.

3:25 p.m. 20

1-W, CFW 55:A4 Rheological challenges in modelling digestive processes. T. PAESCHKE (1). (1) Chicago, IL, U.S.A. 2-W, CFW 55:A4 Hydration and mixing of cereal foods during eating and digestion. S. E. HILL (1). (1) University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom 3-W, CFW 55:A4 Future trends of artiďŹ cial mouth: Generation of FOODPARTICLESIZESSIMILARTOORALLYPROCESSEDFOODS to help the comprehension of digestive processes. G. ARVISENET (1), P. Poinot (1), E. Vigneau (1), C. Prost (1). (1) ONIRIS - College of Veterinary Medicine, Food Science and Engineering, Nantes, France 4-W, CFW 55:A4 Dynamic Gastric Model: A realistic model of the human stomach. M. S. WICKHAM (1). (1) Leatherhead Food Research, Surrey, United Kingdom 5-W, CFW 55:A5 Surface architecture, lubrication and nanorheological properties of mucins and mucosal biouids. G. E. YAKUBOV (1). (1) Unilever Corporate Research, Sharnbrook, United Kingdom 6-W Examining the effect of rheology on digestive physiology in animal nutrition studies. M. NYACHOTI (1). (1), University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada Panel Discussion


As global warming concerns take center stage and fuel and energy costs remain volatile, food processors in North America and Europe, including the cereal-based industry, are making efforts toward reducing environmental impact and decreasing the use of electricity, natural gas, coal, diesel fuel, and other conventional energy sources. Efforts to adopt green technologies and reduce the carbon footprint make good business sense, are environmentally laudable, and will enable industry to meet rapidly evolving regulations. This premeeting workshop focuses on the basics of carbon trading, regulatory issues and initiatives to track the carbon footprint in food, pet food, animal feed and ethanol industries, and identify opportunities to reduce this footprint from raw materials to the final product. 1:30 p.m. 1:35 p.m.

2:00 p.m.

2:25 p.m.

2:50 p.m. 3:05 p.m.

3:30 p.m.

3:55 p.m.

Welcome and Introductory Comments 7-W, CFW 55:A3 The business of trading carbon. G. DELONG (1). (1) Novecta, Johnston, IA, U.S.A. 8-W, CFW 55:A3 Climate, carbon, and energy policy impacts on sustainable livestock production. J. H. TRUITT (1). (1) Policy Solutions Motley-Scher-Truitt, Alexandria, VA, U.S.A. 9-W, CFW 55:A4 Sustainability and life cycle principles for food products. C. BALDWIN (1). (1) Green Seal, Washington, DC, U.S.A. Poster-Viewing and Break 10-W, CFW 55:A3 Sustainability and the pulse industry. G. KURBIS (1). (1) Pulse Canada, Winnipeg, MB, Canada 11-W, CFW 55:A4 Sustainability in the ethanol and feed processing industry. C. R. HURBURGH (1), C. Hart (1), C. L. Hardy (1), B. Lamsal (1). (1) Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A. Panel Discussion

NEW & ON SALE during the meeting! NEW ARRIVAL! First copies rushed to Savannah from the printers.

First major revision in 24 years!

NEW

Sunday

/RGANIZERS3AJID!LAVI AND(ULYA$OGAN +ANSAS3TATE University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.; Buddhi Lamsal, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A. Moderators: Sajid Alavi, and Hulya Dogan, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. Financial Sponsor: Rich Products

NEW

First major revision in 21 years! NEW

SAVE 20% Plus FREE SHIPPING if you buy 2 or more AACC Intl. PRESS titles AACC Intl. Marketplace – Grain Brain Central Sunday .................................................... 6:00 – 9:00 p.m. Monday .................................................. 4:00 – 7:00 p.m. Tuesday ................................................12:00 – 2:30 p.m. AACC Intl. PRESS Bookstore – Near Rooms 101–106 Monday ..........................................9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. Tuesday ................................................9:00 – 11:00 a.m. Wednesday .........................................9:00 – 11:00 a.m.

Ad#4-2010

Green Technology and Carbon Footprint - Impact on Food and Feed Processing

21


Monday, October 25 7:00 – 8:00 a.m. 7:00 – 8:30 a.m.

Monday

7:00 – 8:30 a.m. 7:00 – 9:00 a.m. 7:00 – 10:00 a.m. 7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. 7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. 7:30 a.m. – 6:30 p.m. 8:30 – 10:10 a.m.

9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. 10:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. 10:40 a.m. – 12:20 p.m.

12:20 – 2:00 p.m. 12:30 – 2:00 p.m. 12:30 – 2:00 p.m. 12:30 – 2:00 p.m. 12:30 – 2:00 p.m. 2:00 – 3:30 p.m. 2:00 – 3:30 p.m. 2:00 – 4:00 p.m.

2:00 – 4:30 p.m. 4:00 – 5:00 p.m.

4:00 – 7:00 p.m. 4:00 – 7:00 p.m.

22

Grains for Health Foundation Breakfast Meeting* Riverscape, Westin Approved Methods Technical Committee Meetings s !SIAN0RODUCTS 'RAND"ALLROOM& 7ESTIN s %NZYME!NALYSIS 'RAND"ALLROOM# 7ESTIN s -ETHODSFOR'RAINAND&LOUR4ESTING 'RAND"ALLROOM% 7ESTIN s 0HYSICAL4ESTING-ETHODS 'RAND"ALLROOM$ 7ESTIN s 0ROTEIN-ETHODS 'RAND"ALLROOM# 7ESTIN s 3OFT7HEATAND&LOUR0RODUCTS -OORINGS 7ESTIN s 6ITAMINS -INERALS AND,IPIDS 'RAND"ALLROOM# 7ESTIN Whole Grains Working Group 100-101, CC Breakfast Concessions East Concourse, First Floor, CC Poster Set-Up by Authors Hall A, CC Room Available for Small Meetings – Westin Moorings, Westin Room Available for Small Meetings – CC Gwinnett, CC Registration Open Hall A, CC Scientific Sessions s #ELIAC$ISEASE!-ULTIDISCIPLINARY0OINTOF6IEWn3YMPOSIA !UDITORIUM ## (Scientific Initiatives: Cereal & Polymer Chemistry; Food Safety & Regulatory; Health & Nutrition) s &OOD3AFETY(AZARD$ETECTIONAND4REATMENTn4ECHNICAL   ## (Scientific Initiative: Food Safety & Regulatory) s 'ENETIC%NGINEERINGAND%NVIRONMENTAL)MPACTON   ## s #EREAL#ONSTITUENTSn4ECHNICAL(Scientific Initiative: Biotechnology & Sustainability) s )NSIGHTSIN2ELATIONSBETWEEN0ROCESSINGAND   ## Final Product Characteristics – Technical (Scientific Initiative: Engineering & Processing) Bookstore Open Foyer Area, 106, CC Student Product Development Competition Presentations 103-104, CC Poster Viewing Hall A, CC Scientific Sessions s .EW-ILLINGAND0RETREATMENT4ECHNOLOGIESFOR !UDITORIUM ## Changing Functionality and Nutritional Profiles of Flours – Symposia (Scientific Initiatives: Engineering & Processing; Health & Nutrition; Ingredients & Cost of Goods Sold) s #EREAL#ONSTITUENT)NTERACTIONSn4ECHNICAL   ## (Scientific Initiative: Cereal & Polymer Chemistry) s 2ESISTANT3TARCHAND'LYCEMIC)NDEXn4ECHNICAL   ## (Scientific Initiative: Health & Nutrition) s 2HEOLOGYn4ECHNICAL(Scientific Initiative: Analytical Methods & 201-202, CC Quality) Lunch Break – Cash Concessions Available Hall A, CC Engineering & Processing Division Meeting and Lunch* Pulaski, CC Milling & Baking Division Meeting and Networking Lunch* 100-101, CC Nutrition Division Meeting and Lunch* 102, CC Rice Division Lunch* Greene, CC Audit Task Force Meeting 200, CC Student Division Business Meeting Grand Ballroom B, Westin Scientific Sessions s 7HOLE'RAINS5NRAVELEDn3CIENCE#AF£(Scientific Initiatives: Auditorium, CC Health & Nutrition; Ingredients & Cost of Goods Sold) s !NALYTICAL-ETHODSAND1UALITYn0OSTER4ALK(Scientific Initiative: 105-106, CC Analytical Methods & Quality) s #EREALAND0OLYMER#HEMISTRY3TARCH3TRUCTUREn0OSTER4ALK   ## (Scientific Initiative: Cereal & Polymer Chemistry) Hot Topic - Cereals: Challenges in the Oriental World 201-202, CC AACC International Interest Groups Concession Area, Hall A, CC s &OOD3AFETY s 'LUTEN&REE s -APPING1UALITYOF3MALL'RAINS AACC Intl. Marketplace – Grain Brain Central Open Hall A, CC Beer and Poster Viewing Hall A, CC Poster Authors Present (even # posters 4:30 – 5:30 p.m.)


4:00 – 7:00 p.m. 5:00 – 6:00 p.m. 6:00 – 6:30 p.m. 6:15 – 9:00 p.m.

Exhibition Open Carbohydrate Division Executive Committee Meeting Cereals&Europe Section Meeting Biotechnology Division Meeting and Dinner*

7:00 – 10:00 p.m. 7:00 – 11:00 p.m.

Cereals&Europe Section Dinner* Student Division Social and Dinner*

Hall A, CC Greene, CC Scarbrough 4, Hyatt Member Dining Room, Westin Golf Course Alligator Soul Restaurant† Churchill’s Pub†

* ticket required † see page 7 for location address

9:10 a.m.

(listed in alphabetical order by title) Session number (1-S) and technical number (1-O) refer to the Author Index in the program book. Cereal Foods World (CFW) number refers to abstract page location within the online searchable abstract document. !FlLIATIONSARELISTEDASPROVIDEDBYTHEORGANIZERPRESENTER

9:30 a.m.

9:50 a.m.

Celiac Disease: A Multidisciplinary Point of Views 3YMPOSIAsAuditorium, CC ScientiďŹ c Initiatives: Cereal & Polymer Chemistry; Food Safety & Regulatory; Health & Nutrition /RGANIZERS-ODERATORS0ETER+OEHLER 'ERMAN2ESEARCH#ENTER for Food Chemistry, Freising, Germany; Jodi Engleson, Consultant, Minneapolis, MN, U.S.A. Financial Sponsors: R-Biopharm AG; General Mills, Inc.; and Romer Labs In genetically susceptible individuals, the ingestion of gluten triggers an immune-related entheropathy known as celiac disease (CD). CD is a multidisciplinary issue. Research is being conducted aimed at understanding the mechanisms that trigger CD. Because patients have to adhere to a strict, lifelong, gluten-free diet, methods are required to properly prepare gluten-free foods and to check whether they are in fact gluten-free. Novel approaches are aimed at using gluten-containing raw materials and degrading gluten during food processing, thereby providing gluten-free food with nutritional, textural, and sensory attributes that are comparable to those of gluten-containing foods. Another promising way to deal with CD is to use speciďŹ c peptidases as drugs, which EXTENSIVELYHYDROLYZEDIETARYGLUTENAND THUS INHIBITTOXICGLUTEN peptides from entering the small intestine. The symposium gives an overview of current activities related to CD and gluten-free foods. 8:30 a.m.

8:40 a.m.

8:50 a.m.

1-S, CFW 55:A9 Biochemistry of celiac disease. P. KOEHLER (1). (1) German Research Center of Food Chemistry, Freising, Germany 2-S, CFW 55:A10 Next generation of gluten antibodies—What’s after R5? E. HALBMAYR (1), J. Coutts (2), R. Fielder (2), A. Rogers (2). (1) ROMER Labs Division Holding GmbH, Tulln, Austria; (2) Romer Labs UK Ltd., Abergele, United Kingdom 3-S, CFW 55:A10 Improved Gliadin Quantitation - Second generation of a competitive ELISA in compliance with Codex Alimentatius. S. HAAS-LAUTERBACH (1), U. Immer (1). (1) R-Biopharm AG, Darmstadt, Germany

4-S, CFW 55:A10 Proteolytic elimination of gluten. J. LOPONEN (1). (1) University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland 5-S, CFW 55:A10 ALV003, a mixture of two oral proteases, Degrades immunogenic gluten epitopes in a complex food environment. M. GARBER (1). (1) Alvine Pharmaceuticals, Inc., San Carlos, CA, U.S.A. 6-S, CFW 55:A11 Renovation to innovation: Developing a portfolio of gluten-free offerings. J. MORRIS (1). (1) General Mills Inc., Minneapolis, MN, U.S.A.

Monday a.m.

Sessions – Monday Morning (8:30 – 10:10 a.m.)

Food Safety: Hazard Detection and Treatment sTechnical s 203-205, CC ScientiďŹ c Initiative: Food Safety & Regulatory Moderator(s): TBA 8:30 a.m.

8:50 a.m.

9:10 a.m.

9:30 a.m.

9:50 a.m.

1-O, CFW 55:A30 Cadmium in wheat – A new challenge? S. SELING (1). (1) Max Rubner-Institut, Detmold, Germany 2-O, CFW 55:A21 #ONTINUOUSOZONATIONTREATMENTSYSTEMSASAMORE efďŹ cient nonchemical grain protection technology. C. A. CAMPABADAL (1). (1) Purdue University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. 3-O, CFW 55:A21 Carbon dioxide sensing: A new food safety tool for early detection of spoilage due to fungi, mycotoxins and stored-product insects in stored grain. L. CHANNAIAH (1), D. Maier (1). (1) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. 4-O, CFW 55:A28 #HARACTERIZATIONOFFOOD GRADETRACERSFORTHEGLOBAL grain tracing and recall system. K. LEE (1), P. R. Armstrong (2), A. Thomasson (3), R. Sui (4), M. Casada (2), T. J. Herrman (1). (1) OfďŹ ce of the Texas State Chemist, Texas AgriLife Research, Texas A&M University System, College Station, TX, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS, GMPRC, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.; (3) Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, U.S.A.; (4) USDA-ARS, Cotton Ginning Research Unit, Stoneville, MS, U.S.A. 5-O, CFW 55:A22 Hyperspectral imaging of wheat kernels for Fusarium damage. S. R. DELWICHE (1). (1) USDA ARS, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A.

23


Genetic Engineering and Environmental Impact on Cereal Constituents sTechnical s  ##

9:30 a.m.

ScientiďŹ c Initiative: Biotechnology & Sustainability -ODERATORS%DWARD*3OUZA 53$!!23 7OOSTER /( 53! Matthew K. Morell, CSIRO, Canberra, ACT, Australia 8:30 a.m.

Monday a.m.

8:50 a.m.

9:10 a.m.

9:30 a.m.

9:50 a.m.

6-O, CFW 55:A29 Response of wheat plant to stress as expressed by antioxidant levels of whole grains. O. F. RAMOS  2-ADL !+&RITZ #-3MITH  Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.; (2) Bioprocessing & Industrial Value-Added Program, Dept. of Grain Science & Industry, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.; (3) Wheat Breeding Project, Dept. of Agronomy, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.; (4) Department of Entomology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. 7-O, CFW 55:A28 Environmental effects during crop growth on properties of wheat grain starch. T. Nhan Minh (1), S. Wang (1), M. Wilkes (1), L. COPELAND (1). (1) University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia 8-O, CFW 55:A19 Molecular cloning and expression analysis of multiple polyphenol oxidase genes in developing wheat (Triticum aestivum) kernels. B. S. BEECHER (1), D. Z. Skinner (1). (1) USDA-ARS Wheat Genetics, Quality, Physiology and Disease Research, Pullman, WA, U.S.A. 9-O, CFW 55:A33 Creation and properties of sweet wheat. P. VRINTEN (1), T. Shimbata (2), T. Nakamura (3), M. Saito (3), T. Takiya (2), T. Inokuma (2), A. Sunohara (2). (1) Bioriginal Food and Science Corp., Saskatoon, Canada; (2) Nippon Flour Mills Co., Ltd., Atsugi, Japan; (3) Tohoku National Agriculture Research Center, Morioka, Japan 10-O, CFW 55:A24 Genetic improvement of barley lines for altered GRANULESIZEDISTRIBUTION3*!)37!, -"ÂťGA (1), B. G. Rossnagel (1), R. N. Chibbar (1). (1) University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada

Insights in Relations Between Processing and Final Product Characteristicss4ECHNICALs105-106, CC ScientiďŹ c Initiative: Engineering & Processing -ODERATORS!TZE*AN6AN$ER'OOT 7AGENINGEN5NIVERSITY Wageningen Netherlands; Stanley P. Cauvain, BakeTran, High Wycombe, United Kingdom 8:30 a.m.

8:50 a.m.

9:10 a.m.

24

11-O, CFW 55:A32 New mechanistic insights in the shear-induced separation of wheat our. A. VAN DER GOOT (1), E. Van der Zalm (1), R. Boom (1). (1) Wageningen University, Wageningen, Netherlands 12-O, CFW 55:A26 The effect of mixing conditions on the behavior of refrigerated wheat dough. R. KING (1), E. Labat (2), !2YTZ 35LRICH  .ESTL£2ESEARCH#ENTRE ,AUSANNE 3WITZERLAND .ESTL£04#+ONOLlNGEN +ONOLlNGEN 3WITZERLAND 13-O, CFW 55:A32 Technical challenges with reducing the sodium content of bread. G. S. TUCKER (1). (1) Campden BRI, Chipping Campden, United Kingdom

9:50 a.m.

14-O, CFW 55:A24 Permeability of crust is key to crispness retention. A. HIRTE (1), R. J. Hamer (2), M. B. Meinders (3), C. Primo-Martin (3). (1) TI Food & Nutrition, Zeist, Netherlands; (2) Wageningen University, Wageningen, Netherlands; (3) TI Food & Nutrition, Wageningen, Netherlands 15-O, CFW 55:A30 Effect of alkali dipping prior to baking on the levels of dehydroalanine, lanthionine and lysinoalanine in hard PRETZELS)2/-"/543 ":WINNEN " Lagrain (1), K. Brijs (1), J. A. Delcour (1). (1) Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven, Belgium

Sessions – Monday Morning (10:40 a.m. – 12:20 p.m.) (listed in alphabetical order by title) Session number (1-S) and technical number (1-O) refers to the Author Index in the program book. Cereal Foods World (CFW) number refers to abstract page location within the online searchable abstract document. !FlLIATIONSARELISTEDASPROVIDEDBYTHEORGANIZERPRESENTER

Cereal Constituent Interactions sTechnical s105-106, CC ScientiďŹ c Initiative: Cereal & Polymer Chemistry Moderators: Kristof Brijs, Katholieke Univ. Leuven, Heverlee Belgium; Matthew A. Gennrich, Cargill Bakery Technology, Plymouth, MN U.S.A. 10:40 a.m. 16-O, CFW 55:A27 (EAT INDUCEDGLUTENPOLYMERIZATIONANDITSAPPLICATION in biotechnological processes. B. LAGRAIN (1), I. Rombouts (1), K. Brijs (1), J. A. Delcour (1). (1) Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven, Belgium 11:00 a.m. 17-O, CFW 55:A23 Effect of sugar and salt on gluten development when studied by using uorescence spectroscopy and Gluten Peak Tester. A. GOLDSTEIN (1), K. Seetharaman (1). (1) University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada 11:20 a.m. 18-O, CFW 55:A20 The impact of redox agents and N-ethyl maleimide on the extractability of gluten proteins during fresh pasta making and cooking. K. BRIJS (1), C. Bruneel (1), B. Lagrain (1), J. A. Delcour (1). (1) Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven, Belgium 11:40 a.m. 19-O, CFW 55:A26 %FFECTSOFICE STRUCTURINGPROTEINSONTHEFREEZE THAW stability of corn and wheat starch gels. Y. KIM (1), L. Li (1), W. Huang (1). (1) Jiangnan University, Wuxi, PRC Peoples Rep of China 12:00 p.m. 20-O, CFW 55:A18 Impact on the pasting properties of wheat starch with the addition of emulsiďŹ ers. A. S. AHMED (1), Y. Shi (1), J. M. Faubion (1), T. T. Boutte (2), G. H. Feng (2). (1) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.; (2) Caravan Ingredients, Lenexa, KS, U.S.A. 12:20 p.m. 21-O, CFW 55:A31 Crystal structure, carbohydrate- and protein-protein interactions of barley limit dextrinase, limit dextrinase inhibitor and thioredoxin. B. SVENSSON (1), J. M. Jensen (1), M. B. Vester-Christensen (1), P. Hagglund (1), A. Henriksen (2), M. Abou-Hachem (1).


New Milling and Pretreatment Technologies for Changing Functionality and Nutritional ProďŹ les of Flourss Symposia s!UDITORIUM ## ScientiďŹ c Initiatives: Engineering & Processing; Health & Nutrition; Ingredients & Cost of Goods Sold /RGANIZERS'IRISH'ANJYAL 0EPSI#O 0LANO 48 53!3ATHYA Kalambur, Frito-Lay, Plano, TX, U.S.A. Moderators: Sathya Kalambur, Frito-Lay, Plano, TX, U.S.A.; Buddhi Lamsal, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A. Sponsor: Engineering and Processing Committee Financial Sponsors: Cargill Global Technology; ConAgra; PepsiCo Advanced Research Milling science and technology have evolved over time. There have been various advancements in the pretreatment technologies for milling. The symposium will cover various advances in pretreatment technologies that help change the functional and nutritional proďŹ les of ours. 10:40 a.m. 7-S, CFW 55:A13 Understanding how wheat pretreatment and milling relate to our functionality: Innovations from a process engineering approach. G. CAMPBELL (1). (1) Satake Centre for Grain Process Engineering, The University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom 11:00 a.m. 8-S, CFW 55:A13 New ways to control wheat product composition through dry fractionation. V. LULLIEN-PELLERIN (1), C. Barron (1), M. Chaurand (1), A. Sadoudi (1), A. Duri (1), X. Rouau (1). (1) INRA, UMR “IngĂŠnierie des Agropolymères et Technologies Emergentesâ€?, Montpellier, France 11:20 a.m. 9-S, CFW 55:A14 Technological improvement of wheat our through ENZYMATICTREATMENTDURINGTEMPERING#- ROSELL (1). (1) Institute of Agrochemistry and Food Technology (IATA-CSIC), Valencia, Spain 11:40 a.m. 10-S, CFW 55:A14 New processing ways for dry fractionation of wheat bran. Y. Hemery (1), J. ABECASSIS (1), C. Barron (1), M. Chaurand (1), A. Duri (1), V. Lullien-Pellerin (1), X. Rouau (1). (1) INRA, Montpellier, France 12:00 p.m. 11-S, CFW 55:A14 Process and opportunities for 100% whole grain and nutrient enhancement with wheat bran and germ our. E. A. ARNDT (1). (1) ConAgra Foods, Inc., Omaha, NE, U.S.A.

Resistant Starch and Glycemic Indexs4ECHNICALs 203-205, CC ScientiďŹ c Initiative: Health & Nutrition Moderator: Devin J. Rose, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, U.S.A.; Len Marquart, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, U.S.A. 10:40 a.m. 22-O, CFW 55:A28 Glycemic impact as a cereal food property. J. A. MONRO (1). (1) New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research, Palmerston North, New Zealand 11:00 a.m. 23-O, CFW 55:A20 Starch granules under attack: Multidisciplinary investigation of structural mechanisms governing

starch digestion. J. BLAZEK (1), E. P. Gilbert (1). (1) Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Kirrawee, Australia 11:20 a.m. 24-O, CFW 55:A19 TIM-Carbo: Validated in vitro technology to accurately predict the glycemic response on carbohydrates. S. C. BELLMANN (1), M. Minekus (1), P. Sanders (2), E. Zeijdner (1), M. Verwei (1), R. Havenaar (1). (1) TNO, Zeist, Netherlands; (2) University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands 11:40 a.m. 25-O, CFW 55:A20 Digestion mechanism and in vitro test method of MAIZESTARCHGRANULEDIGESTION,2"2%7%2 L. Cai (1), Y. Shi (1). (1) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. 12:00 p.m. 26-O, CFW 55:A24 %XTRACTIONANDCHARACTERIZATIONOFSTARCHFROMPIG digesta to understand the in vivo digestion of starch. J. HASJIM (1), M. J. Gidley (1), R. G. Gilbert (1). (1) Centre for Nutrition and Food Science, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD, Australia

Rheology sTechnical s201-202, CC ScientiďŹ c Initiative: Analytical Methods & Quality Moderators: Arnaud Dubat, CHOPIN Technologies, Villeneuve la Garenne France; Clyde Don, Foodphysica, Driel, Netherlands 10:40 a.m. 27-O, CFW 55:A22 Wheat quality and its relation to kernel elastic properties of high- and low-molecular-weight glutenin subunits. J. FIGUEROA (1), R. J. PeĂąa (2), T. Maucher (3), P. Rayas-Duarte (4), K. Khan (5). (1) CINVESTAV Unidad Queretaro, Queretaro, Mexico; (2) CIMMYT, Mexico City, Mexico; (3) University of Applied Science Furtwangen, VillingenSchwenningen, Germany; (4) Robert M. Kerr Food & Agricultural Products Center, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, U.S.A.; (5) Department of Cereal and Food Science, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, U.S.A. 11:00 a.m. 28-O, CFW 55:A23 Inverse identiďŹ cation of viscoelastic material properties using the biaxial bubble ination test. A. S. GOH (1). (1) Curtin University of Technology Sarawak, Miri, Malaysia 11:20 a.m. 29-O, CFW 55:A27 The relationship between RP and SE-HPLC peaks and some quality characteristics in a double-haploid wheat population varying in LMW glutenin subunits. M. T. LABUSCHAGNE (1), A. van Biljon (2). (1) University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, Rep of South Africa; (2) Lecturer University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, Rep of South Africa 11:40 a.m. 30-O, CFW 55:A29 Modeling of Mixolab proďŹ les by nonlinear curve ďŹ tting and prediction of breadmaking parameters. J. OHM (1), S. Simsek (2), M. Mergoum (2). (1) USDA ARS RRVARC NCSL, Fargo, ND, U.S.A.; (2) NDSU, Fargo, ND, U.S.A. 12:00 p.m. 31-O, CFW 55:A29 The basis for compressibility of bread. M. C. Poole (1), S. P. PENSON (1), M. B. Whitworth (1). (1) Campden BRI, Chipping Campden, United Kingdom

25

Monday a.m.

(1) Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark; (2) Carlsberg Laboratory, Valby, Denmark


Hot Topic, Science CafĂŠ, PosterTalk Sessions Monday Afternoon (listed in alphabetical order by title) Session number (1-S) and poster number (1-P) refers to the Author Index in the program book. Cereal Foods World (CFW) number refers to abstract page location within the online searchable abstract document. !FlLIATIONSARELISTEDASPROVIDEDBYTHEORGANIZERPRESENTER

Analytical Methods and Qualitys0OSTER4ALKs105-106, CC ScientiďŹ c Initiative: Analytical Methods & Quality

Monday p.m.

Moderators: Arthur D. Bettge, USDA ARS WWQL, Pullman, WA, U.S.A.; Sean M. Finnie, Cargill Inc., Plymouth, MN, U.S.A. 94-P, CFW 55:A45 Fundamental study on the relationship between protein changes occurring during malting and malting quality in sorghum. L. I. EZEOGU (1), G. Mokhawa (1), B. Bulawayo (1). (1) Natl. Food Technology Research Centre, Kanye, Botswana 95-P, CFW 55:A55 Effects of specialty proteins from high-selenium wheat on dough properties. P. G. KRISHNAN (1), V. Vankar (1), K. Glover (1), 7"ERZONSKY +7OO  3OUTH$AKOTA3TATE5NIVERSITY Brookings, SD, U.S.A.; (2) MGP Ingredients, Atchison, KS, U.S.A. 99-P, CFW 55:A60 Microscopic and spectral analysis of soybeans with differing PROTEINSUBUNITCOMPOSITION33-),,%2 ,.0IETRZAK (1), V. Poysa (2), S. Gleddie (1), E. M. Watson (1). (1) Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada; (2) Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada, London, ON, Canada 100-P, CFW 55:A72 A new method to determine the carbohydrate proďŹ le in soy ďŹ ber ORCEREALGRAINS442!. "0IERCE 70EREZ  Solae LLC, St. Louis, MO, U.S.A. 101-P, CFW 55:A70 Fiber variation in whole-grain soft wheat our within the United States. E. SOUZA (1), M. Guttieri (2). (1) USDA ARS, Wooster, OH, U.S.A.; (2) Ohio State University, Wooster, OH, U.S.A. 84-P, CFW 55:A60 A reinterpretation of SKCS Crush Response ProďŹ les. N. Misailidis (1), G. M. CAMPBELL (1). (1) Satake Centre for Grain Process Engineering, The University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom 85-P, CFW 55:A68 Taking the hands and eyes out of grain inspection. J. 3#(7%):%2 20RADON  &/33!NALYTICAL (šGANĂ˜S Sweden 105-P, CFW 55:A49 Using lateral ow devices for quantitative and semi-quantitative analysis of mycotoxins and GMOs. D. HOUCHINS (1), M. Prinster (1), S. Nenonen (1). (1) Romer Labs, Inc., Union, MO, U.S.A. 127-P, CFW 55:A71 #HARACTERIZATIONANDDISCRIMINATIONOFPOPCORNmAKE polymorphology. J. SWELEY (1), D. J. Rose (2), D. S. Jackson (2). (1) University of Nebraska, Omaha, NE, U.S.A.; (2) University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, U.S.A. 120-P, CFW 55:A45 Investigation of wheat quality requirements and Australian wheat suitability for the traditional Indian wheat food chapati. H. K. FENTON (1), V. A. Solah (1), D. Diepeveen (2), H. Gujral (3), 26

G. B. Crosbie (4), H. G. Williams (1). (1) Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Australia; (2) Department of Agriculture Western Australia, Perth, Australia; (3) Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar, India; (4) Crosbie Grain Quality Consulting, Perth, Australia 118-P, CFW 55:A42 Improvement of sponge cake baking test procedure for simple and reliable estimation of soft white wheat quality. H. CHOI (1), T. Harris (2), B. Baik (2). (1) School of Food Science, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, U.S.A.; (2) Department of Crop & Soil Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, U.S.A. 102-P, CFW 55:A72 Using the latest technology to measure gastrointestinal transit time after dietary ďŹ ber intervention. D. TIMM (1). (1) University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, U.S.A. Time with Poster Authors at Individual Posters

Cereal and Polymer Chemistry: Starch Structures PosterTalks  ## ScientiďŹ c Initiative: Cereal & Polymer Chemistry -ODERATORS0ETER+OEHLER (ANS $IETER "ELITZ )NSTITUTE &REISING Bavaria, Germany; Koushik Seetharaman, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada 142-P, CFW 55:A44 3TRUCTURE PROPERTYCHARACTERISATIONOFMAIZEANDPOTATOSTARCH OFVARYINGGRANULESIZES3$()4!, !+3HRESTHA M. J. Gidley (1). (1) Centre for Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Brisbane, QLD, Australia 143-P, CFW 55:A40 -ELTINGANDCRYSTALLIZATIONOFSHORTLINEARä GLUCANSSTUDIEDBY in situ synchrotron wide-angle X-ray diffraction. L. CAI (1), Y. Bai (1), Y. Shi (1). (1) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. 144-P, CFW 55:A74 Polymorphic structure, crystallinity, and double helical component of developing wheat starch granules. R. N. WADUGE (1), K. Seetharaman (1). (1) University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada 145-P, CFW 55:A61 Distribution of granule channels, protein and phospholipid in triticale and corn starches as revealed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. S. NAGULESWARAN (1), J. Li (1), T. Vasanthan (1), D. Bressler (1). (1) University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada 159-P, CFW 55:A38 Reaction of octenyl succinic anhydride with insoluble granular starch and soluble maltodextrin. Y. BAI (1), Y. Shi (1). (1) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. 146-P, CFW 55:A77 Effects of octenylsuccinylation on the structure and digestibility OFHIGH AMYLOSEMAIZESTARCH":HANG 1(5!.' & Luo (1), X. Fu (1). (1) College of Food Science, South China 5NIVERSITYOF4ECHNOLOGY 'UANGZHOU 02#0EOPLES2EPOF China 166-P, CFW 55:A60 Rheological and structural properties of waxy corn mutant STARCHESASHYDROLYZEDBYISOAMYLASEANDBETA AMYLASEINTHE granular state. M. MENDEZ-MONTEALVO (1), Y. Wang (1), M. Campbell (2). (1) University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A.; (2) Truman State University, Kirksville, MO, U.S.A. 147-P, CFW 55:A62 Effect of annealing on segmental mobility of polymers in starches from different botanical sources. K. K. NANTANGA


Cereals: Challenges in the Oriental Worlds(OT4OPICs 201-202, CC /RGANIZERS7EINING(UANG *IANGNAN5NIVERSITY 7UXI #HINA Okkyung Chung, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. Moderator: Bob Cracknell, AACC Intl. China Strategies Task Force Financial Sponsors: Fortune Bakery Co., Ltd.; The China Yuren Food Group; Guangdong Kailan Flour Foods Co. Ltd. Supported by: AACC Intl. China Strategies Task Force Cereal foods industry which is the mainstream food industry in Asia, plays a critical role in this booming oriental market. SigniďŹ cant changes have taken place in the past decade in China, Japan, Korea, etc. in production technology, consumption patterns and market trends. In particular, China is a major country in terms of consumption as well as in production. The presentations will show how the application of underpinning science and technology is used to understand the contribution of new ingredients and PROCESSINGMETHODSINTHEINDUSTRIALIZATION STANDARDIZATION AND OPTIMIZATIONOFQUALITYFORARANGEOFTRADITIONALFOODPRODUCTS in this challenging oriental world. This Hot Topic Session will indicate that while the underpinning grain science may be global, its application requires a sound knowledge of local products and their associated manufacturing and consumer preference bases for millers, bakers, or traders to remain successful in the era of ECONOMICGLOBALIZATION CFW 55:A1 Status and trends for the development of science and industry of cereal-based foods in China. W. HUANG (1), J. Wan (1), W. Ding (2). (1) Jiangnan University, Wuxi, Jiangsu, China; (2) Wuhan Polytechnic University, Wuhan, Hubei, China CFW 55:A1 Grain research and potential new opportunities for Asian markets. V. A. Solah (1), S. K. Johnson (1), H. FENTON (1), L. Cato (2), G. B. Crosbie (3). (1) School of Public Health, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, WA, Australia; (2) Department of Food and Agriculture, South Perth, WA, Australia; (3) Crosbie Grain Quality Consulting, East Fremantle, WA, Australia CFW 55:A1 Potential ways to improve the nutritional and health beneďŹ ts of Asian noodles. G. G. HOU (1), P. K.W. Ng (2). (1) Wheat Marketing Center, Portland, OR, U.S.A.; (2) Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, U.S.A. CFW 55:A2 Sourdough fermentation processing of Chinese Northern-style steamed breads and their volatile compounds. B. Xu (1), R. LIU (2). (1) Jiangsu Yurun Food Industry Group Co., Ltd., Nanjing, Jiangsu, China; (2) Jiangnan University, Wuxi, Jiangsu, China

CFW 55:A2 A health-conscious approach to developing rice-based products. S. LU (1). (1) China Grain Product R&D Institute, Bali, Taipei County, Taiwan CFW 55:A2 Effect of frying conditions and yeast fermentation on the acrylamide content in you-tiao, a traditional Chinese fried twisted dough-roll. W. Huang (1), Q. Zou (2), M. TILLEY (3). (1) Jiangnan University, Wuxi, Jiangsu, China; (2) Fortune Bakery Co., Ltd., Zhangjiagang, Jiangsu, China; (3) USDA-ARS Center for Grain and Animal Health Research, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. CFW 55:A2 Changes in wheat products consumption in Japan: Trends, new products, and quality. H. OKUSU (1). (1) Nippon Flour Mills, Atsugi, Kanagawa, Japan CFW 55:A2 Effects of transglutaminase on the rheological and noodlemaking characteristics of oat dough. J. WAN (1), F. Wang (1), B. Liu (2). (1) Jiangnan University, Wuxi, Jiangsu, China; (2) Guangdong Kailan Flour Foods Co., Ltd., Kaiping, Guangdong, China Discussion

Whole Grains Unraveled sScience CafĂŠs!UDITORIUM ## ScientiďŹ c Initiatives: Health & Nutrition; Ingredients & Cost of Goods Sold /RGANIZERS-ODERATORS"RUCE(AMAKER 0URDUE5NIVERSITY West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A.; Brinda Govindarajan, McDonald’s Corporation, Chicago, IL, U.S.A. Sponsors: Carbohydrate Division; Nutrition Division The science cafe format will be used to explore the topic of whole grains in the context of what factors lead to positive health outcomes. A keynote speaker will provide background material on studies relating different components of whole grains to health. This will be followed by a series of short presentations on speciďŹ c components with mechanistic relationships to beneďŹ cial physiologic effect and a panel discussion. 12-S, CFW 55:A16 Keynote speech: Whole grain health beneďŹ ts – Components and mechanisms. R. W. WELCH (1). (1) University of Ulster, Coleraine, United Kingdom 13-S, CFW 55:A16 Health beneďŹ ts of insoluble dietary ďŹ bers from whole grains. D. J. ROSE (1). (1) University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE, U.S.A. 14-S, CFW 55:A16 Hydroxycinnamic acids in whole grains and their potential health beneďŹ ts. M. BUNZEL (1). (1) University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, U.S.A. 15-S, CFW 55:A16 Relationships between solubility and molecular weight of oat β-glucan and cholesterol lowering effect. P. J. WOOD (1), S. M. Tosh (1), R. Duss (2), T. M. Wolever (3). (1) Guelph Food Research Centre, Guelph, ON, Canada; (2) Creanutrition AG, :UG 3WIZTERLAND 5NIVERSITYOF4ORONTO 4ORONTO /. Canada 16-S, CFW 55:A17 Betaine and other bioactives in whole grains. S. A. CRAIG (1). (1) Danisco A/S, Tarrytown, NY, U.S.A. Discussion

27

Monday p.m.

(1), R. Hoover (2), K. Seetharaman (1). (1) University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada; (2) Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, Newfoundland, NF, Canada 148-P, CFW 55:A73 The impact of structural changes on heat-moisture treatment on the susceptibility of normal and waxy potato starches TOWARDSä AMYLASE66!-!$%6!. 2(OOVER + Seetharaman (2), J. Li (3), T. Vasanthan (3), L. Qiang (4). (1) Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NF, Canada; (2) University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada; (3) University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada; (4) Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Guelph, ON, Canada 160-P, CFW 55:A57 WITHDRAWN Time with poster authors at individual posters


Tuesday, October 26 7:00 – 8:00 a.m. 7:00 – 8:00 a.m. 7:00 – 8:30 a.m.

7:00 – 8:30 a.m. 7:00 – 9:00 a.m. 7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. 7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. 7:30 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. 8:00 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. 8:30 – 11:00 a.m.

Tuesday 8:30 – 11:00 a.m. 8:30 – 11:40 a.m. 9:00 – 11:30 a.m. 10:00 – 11:00 a.m. 10:40 a.m. – 12:20 p.m.

11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. 12:00 – 2:30 p.m. 12:00 – 2:30 p.m. 2:30 – 4:30 p.m.

2:30 – 5:00 p.m.

2:30 – 6:00 p.m. 2:30 – 6:00 p.m. 3:30 – 4:30 p.m. 4:30 – 5:30 p.m. 4:30 – 5:30 p.m. 4:30 – 5:30 p.m. 28

Cincinnati Section Meeting and Breakfast Aqua Star Restaurant, Westin Past Presidents’ Breakfast Riverscape, Westin Approved Methods Technical Committee Meetings s "IOTECHNOLOGY-ETHODS 'RAND"ALLROOM& 7ESTIN s &OOD3AFETYAND-ICROBIOLOGY 'RAND"ALLROOM# 7ESTIN s .EAR)NFRARED!NALYSIS 'RAND"ALLROOM% 7ESTIN s /ATAND"ARLEY0RODUCTS 'RAND"ALLROOM$ 7ESTIN s 0ASTA0RODUCTS!NALYSIS -OORINGS 7ESTIN s 2ICE-ILLINGAND1UALITY 'RAND"ALLROOM# 7ESTIN s 3TATISTICAL!DVISORY 'RAND"ALLROOM# 7ESTIN Education Division Meeting Pulaski, CC Breakfast Concessions East Concourse, First Floor, CC Room Available for Small Meetings – Westin Moorings, Westin Room Available for Small Meetings – CC Gwinnett, CC Registration Open Hall A, CC Poster Viewing Hall A, CC Scientific Sessions s "IOFUELS0ART)"IOECONOMYAND0RETREATMENTS !UDITORIUM ## in Biofuel Production – includes Applied Research Award presentation – Larry A. Johnson – Technical (Scientific Initiative: Engineering & Processing) s #ELIAC$ISEASEAND'LUTEN2EPLACEMENTn4ECHNICAL   ## (Scientific Initiatives: Cereal & Polymer Chemistry; Engineering & Processing; Health & Nutrition) s %NZYMESIN"READMAKINGn4ECHNICAL(Scientific Initiative: 201-202, CC Cereal & Polymer Chemistry) Best Student Research Paper Competition 105-106, CC Supplier Innovation Session 200, CC Bookstore Open Foyer Area, 106, CC Foundation Board Meeting Riverscape, Westin Scientific Sessions s %MERGINGAND0ERSISTING&OOD(AZARDS!NALYTICAL#HALLENGES !UDITORIUM ## and Socioeconomic Impact – Symposia (Scientific Initiative: Food Safety & Regulatory) s 2ECENT!DVANCESIN+NOWLEDGE2ELATEDTO3TARCH3YNTHESIS   ## and Structure – Symposia (Scientific Initiatives: Analytical Methods & Quality; Cereal & Polymer Chemistry) s "IOFUELS0ART))5SEOF%NZYMESAND$$'6ALORIZATIONn4ECHNICAL   ## (Scientific Initiative: Engineering & Processing) s )NGREDIENT&UNCTIONALITYAND#OSTn4ECHNICAL(Scientific 103-104, CC Initiative: Ingredients & Cost of Goods Sold) Professional Development Panel Greene, CC AACC Intl. Marketplace – Grain Brain Central Open Hall A, CC Lunch with the Exhibitors and Poster Viewing Hall A, CC Poster Authors Present (odd-numbered posters 1:15 – 2:15 p.m.) Scientific Sessions s !3TATISTICAL3MORGASBORDFOR#EREAL#HEMISTRYn3CIENCE#AF£   ## (Scientific Initiative: Analytical Methods & Quality) s "IOENGINEERINGFOR(UMAN(EALTHn3CIENCE#AF£ !UDITORIUM ## (Scientific Initiatives: Biotechnology & Sustainability; Food Safety & Regulatory; Health & Nutrition) s #EREALAND0OLYMER#HEMISTRY#EREAL#HEMISTRYn0OSTER4ALK   ## (Scientific Initiative: Cereal & Polymer Chemistry) Hot Topic – Forecast for U.S. Regulatory Climate: A 203-205, CC Gathering Storm of Enforcement, Regulation, and Legislation for Foods Exhibit Take-Down Hall A, CC Poster Take-Down Hall A, CC China Strategies Task Force Gwinnett, CC Carbohydrate Division Meeting 100 -101, CC Protein Division Business Meeting* Greene, CC Young Professionals Event* Tondee’s Café, CC


4:30 – 6:00 p.m. 4:45 – 6:00 p.m. 5:30 – 7:00 p.m. 6:30 – 9:00 p.m. 7:00 – 9:00 p.m.

2011 Technical Program Planning Meeting Iowa State University and Friends Reception* Protein Division Social* Carbohydrate Division Dinner* Taste of Savannah Pub Crawl* – Foundation Event Meet at Hyatt Hotel lobby at 6:45 p.m.

Pulaski, CC Midnight Sun Tent, Pool Area,Westin Tondee’s CafÊ, CC Bistro 45 Restaurant†

Sessions –Tuesday Morning (8:30 – 10:10 a.m.) (listed in alphabetical order by title) Session number (1-S) and technical number (1-O) refer to the Author Index in the program book. Cereal Foods World (CFW) number refers to abstract page location within the online searchable abstract document. !FlLIATIONSARELISTEDASPROVIDEDBYTHEORGANIZERPRESENTER

10:15 a.m. 21-S, CFW 55:A8 Effect of dietary ďŹ ber enrichment in spaghetti – An ENZYMATICANDSTRUCTURALSTUDY.!2!6).$ M. Sissons (2), C. Fellows (1), E. Gilbert (3), J. "LAZEK  5NIVERSITYOF.EW%NGLAND !RMIDALE Australia; (2) NSW DPI, Tamworth, Australia; (3) ANSTO, Menai, Australia 10:40 a.m 22-S, CFW 55:A9 3TARCH GRANULEDEVELOPMENTINHIGH AMYLOSEMAIZE H. JIANG (1), J. Jane (2). (1) Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A.

Best Student Research Paper Competition s  ## ScientiďŹ c Initiatives: Analytical Methods & Quality; Biotechnology & Sustainability; Cereal & Polymer Chemistry; Health & Nutrition 8:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. (extended time)

Biofuels Part 1: Bioeconomy and Pretreatments in Biofuel Production s Technicals!UDITORIUM ##

/RGANIZER*ON&AUBION +ANSAS3TATE5NIVERSITY $EPARTMENTOF Grain Science, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. Moderator: Pierre Faa, Frito Lay, Inc., Plano, TX, U.S.A. Sponsor: Professional Development Panel

Moderators: Charles R. Hurburgh, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A.; John W. Lawton, Poet Research, Sioux Falls, SD, U.S.A.

See the best of the best compete in the second annual Best Student 2ESEARCH0APER#OMPETITIONORGANIZEDBYTHE0ROFESSIONAL Development Panel. Each of these students was nominated by their department head to compete. Based on preliminary screening by a panel of subject matter experts, the following students were chosen TOCOMPETEFORCASHPRIZES TRAVELFUNDS ANDPUBLICATIONOFWINNING papers. Winners will be announced during the Closing Session and Farewell Reception on Wednesday afternoon. 8:30 a.m. 8:35 a.m.

9:00 a.m.

9:25 a.m.

9:50 a.m

Welcome 17-S, CFW 55:A8 Development of consumer acceptable and nutritious Teff (Eragrostis tef BREADUSINGENZYMECOMBINATION treatments. I. ALAUNYTE (1), V. Stojceska (1), A. Plunkett (1), E. Derbyshire (1), P. Ainsworth (1). (1) The Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, United Kingdom 18-S, CFW 55:A8 Changes in oat beta-glucan properties by heat-induced oxidation. R. KIVELĂ„ (1), U. Henniges (2), L. NystrĂśm (3), H. Salovaara (1), T. Sontag-Strohm (1), A. Potthast (2). (1) University of Helsinki, Helsinki, &INLAND 6IENNA !USTRIA :URICH 3WITZERLAND 19-S, CFW 55:A8 Reaction kinetics of amylose and amylopectin branch CHAINSINAMODELDERIVATIZATIONSYSTEM*(/.' K. C. Huber (1). (1) University of Idaho, Moscow, ID, U.S.A. 20-S, CFW 55:A8 Single pass drying of rough rice using glass transition principles. G. O. ONDIER (1), T. J. Siebenmorgen (1). (1) University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A.

ScientiďŹ c Initiative: Engineering & Processing

8:30 a.m.

9:10 a.m.

9:30 a.m.

9:50 a.m.

32-O, CFW 55:A25 Applied Research Award – The Bioeconomy – 2010 and Beyond. L. A. JOHNSON (1). (1) Center FOR#ROPS5TILIZATION2ESEARCH )OWA3TATE5NIVERSITY Ames, IA, U.S.A. 33-O, CFW 55:A19 Evaluation of different agricultural feedstocks for bioethanol production. S. BANSAL (1), P. Vadlani (1), S. Staggenborg (1). (1) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. 34-O, CFW 55:A34 Systematic investigation of thermo-mechanical extrusion processing as a pretreatment method for ethanol production from soybean hull and sorghum stover. J. YOO (1), S. Alavi (1), V. Amanor-Boadu (1), P. Vadlani (1). (1) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. 35-O, CFW 55:A27 Effects of corn preparation method on ethanol yield and solids partitioning in dry-grind corn ethanol production using raw starch hydrolysis. B. LAMSAL (1), H. Wang (1), L. A. Johnson (1). (1) Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A.

Celiac Disease and Gluten Replacement sTechnicals 203-205, CC ScientiďŹ c Initiatives: Cereal & Polymer Chemistry; Engineering & Processing; Health & Nutrition Moderator: Jodi A. Engleson, Jodi A. Engleson LLC, Minneapolis, MN, U.S.A.; John R. N. Taylor, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa 8:30 a.m.

36-O, CFW 55:A25 Is there a role for gluten-free diets beyond celiac disease? A review of the literature. J. M. JONES (1). (1) St. Catherine University, Arden Hills, MN, U.S.A. 29

Tuesday a.m.

* ticket required † see page 7 for location address


8:50 a.m.

9:10 a.m.

9:30 a.m.

9:50 a.m.

Tuesday a.m.

37-O, CFW 55:A32 A novel method for the production of gluten-free products using whey proteins. L. E. VAN RIEMSDIJK (1), A. van der Goot (1), R. M. Boom (1), R. J. Hamer (1). (1) Wageningen University, Wageningen, Netherlands 38-O, CFW 55:A22 ModiďŹ cation of gluten by methionine binding to prepare wheat bread with reduced reactivity for serum IgA of celiac disease patients. A. C. DE LA BARCA  &#ABRERA #HĂ•VEZ !)SLAS 2UBIO / 2OUZAUD 3Ă•NDEZ  #)!$ !# (ERMOSILLO Sonora, Mexico; (2) Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico 39-O, CFW 55:A30 Development of a gluten-free sorghum based master baking mix. S. S. RUAN (1), J. M. Faubion (1), C. E. Walker (1). (1) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. 40-O, CFW 55:A31 Improvement in the protein quality of sorghumbased foods through compositing with legumes and biofortiďŹ cation. J. R. TAYLOR (1), J. Taylor (1), C. A. Serrem (1), J. O. Anyango (1). (1) University of Pretoria, Pretoria, Rep of South Africa

Enzymes in Breadmaking sTechnical s  ## ScientiďŹ c Initiative: Cereal & Polymer Chemistry Moderator: Maarten Van Oort, Baking Technology Group AB/ Mauri, Made, Netherlands; Emilia Nordlund, VTT Technical Restarch Centre of Finland, Espoo, Finland 8:30 a.m.

8:50 a.m.

9:10 a.m.

9:30 a.m.

9:50 a.m.

30

41-O, CFW 55:A26 Protein composition of rye dough as affected by the addition of transglutaminase. P. KOEHLER (1), P. Selmair (1). (1) German Research Center for Food Chemistry, Freising, Germany 42-O, CFW 55:A23 Effects of tyrosinase and laccase on the oat proteins and the quality parameters of gluten-free oat breads. L. H. FLANDER (1), K. Kruus (1), J. Buchert (1). (1) VTT, Espoo, Finland 43-O, CFW 55:A25 3TUDYOFTHEROLEOFNICOTINAMIDECOENZYMES in breadmaking. I. J. JOYE (1). (1) Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven, Belgium 44-O, CFW 55:A29 Improved shelf life and bread quality by use of NEWANTI STALINGENZYMES),0/6,3%. - Philipsen (2), K. M. Kragh (3), B. Fatula (4), J. Sigel (4). (1) Danisco, Brabrand, Denmark; (2) Danisco, Brabrand, Denmark, Aarhus, Denmark; (3) Danisco, Genencor, Aarhus, Denmark; (4) Danisco, New Century, KS, U.S.A. 45-O, CFW 55:A22 Potential of xylanases with different temperature optima and substrate hydrolysis patterns in bread making. E. DORNEZ (1), P. Verjans (1), J. A. Delcour (1), C. M. Courtin (1). (1) Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven, Belgium

Supplier Innovation Sessions nAMs ## 8:30 – 9:00 a.m. Company: Perten Instruments Name of Product: Updated Flour & Grain Analysis Contact: Larry Black Category: Instruments/Equipment/Services Updates to our and grain analysis using NIR on-line instruments, lab systems, and rheological instruments, including the RVA and doughLAB. 9:10 – 9:40 a.m. Company: Tate & Lyle Name of Product: Promitor Soluble Corn Fiber Contact: Pashen Black Category: Ingredients With economic uncertainty inuencing consumer purchasing decisions, function and value have bubbled to the top consumers’ MUST HAVELISTS$ESPITETHEHAZINESSOFTHEECONOMY THREETHINGS remain clear: First, consumers want natural foods with clean labels and look to you, the food manufacturer, to provide it. Second, consumers want healthy, indulgent foods with reduced calories. Finally, you can meet consumer demand for functional, value-added foods without overspending your budget. In this session, discover how Tate & Lyle’s broad portfolio of sweeteners, texturants and wellness products can help you continually deliver the function and value your consumers seek with the dollars you’ve allocated. 9:50 – 10:20 a.m. Company: Buhler Inc. Name of Product: Value Added Milling Products Through Extrusion Process Contact: Jenni Harrington Category: Instruments/Equipment/Services While using extrusion technology generate additional value to the milling products and by-products including modiďŹ ed ours, breadcrumbs, reconstituted rice, etc. 10:30 – 11:00 a.m. Company: ANKOM Technology .AMEOF0RODUCT!UTOMATED4$&!NALYZER Contact: Chris Kelley Category: Instruments/Equipment/Services Automating total dietary ďŹ ber analysis; the process and comparative studies. 11:10 – 11:40 a.m. Company: Thermo Fisher ScientiďŹ c Name of Product: Applied Analysis Techniques for Grains and Cereal Contact: Gerry Broski Category: Instruments/Equipment/Services There are a wide variety of food safety challenges facing producers and processors. From a workow perspective, learn about techniques which can provide accurate analysis for a variety of intrinsic and quality parameters. The presentation will include topics such as ingredient analysis and veriďŹ cation, traceability and product quality.


(listed in alphabetical order by title) Session number (1-S) and technical number (1-O) refer to the Author Index in the program book.

11:00 a.m.

Cereal Foods World (CFW) number refers to abstract page location within the online searchable abstract document. !FlLIATIONSARELISTEDASPROVIDEDBYTHEORGANIZERPRESENTER 11:20 a.m.

Biofuels Part II: Use of Enzymes and DDG Valorization s Technicals  ## ScientiďŹ c Initiative: Engineering & Processing Moderator: Ronald L. Madl, Kansas State University, Bioprocessing & Ind Value Added Program, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.; Kent D. Rausch, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, U.S.A. 10:40 a.m. 46-O, CFW 55:A26 Phytase treatment to improve the E-Mill process. E. KHULLAR (1), J. K. Shetty (2), K. D. Rausch (1), M. E. Tumbleson (1), V. Singh (1). (1) University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL, U.S.A.; (2) Genencor, a Danisco Division, Palo Alto, CA, U.S.A. 11:00 a.m. 47-O, CFW 55:A32 Protease treatment to enhance a dry fractionated corn ethanol process. B. C. VIDAL (1), K. D. Rausch (1), M. E. Tumbleson (1), V. Singh (1). (1) University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, U.S.A. 11:20 a.m. 48-O, CFW 55:A21 #ELLULOLYTICENZYMEPRODUCTIONINSOLIDSTATE fermentation: Role of physico-chemical characteristics of a substrate. K. BRIJWANI (1), P. V. Vadlani (1). (1) Department of Grain Science & Industry, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. 11:40 a.m. 49-O, CFW 55:A27 2ECOVERYOFZEINFROMDISTILLERSDRIEDGRAINSOBTAINED from a raw starch fermentation bioethanol process. J. W. LAWTON (1), L. S. Freeman (1). (1) Poet Research, Sioux Falls, SD, U.S.A.

Emerging and Persisting Food Hazards: Analytical Challenges and Socioeconomic Impact sSymposias Auditorium, CC ScientiďŹ c Initiative: Food Safety & Regulatory /RGANIZERS2OLAND0OMSAND-ARCELLA'ROSS )## )NTERNATIONAL Association for Cereal Science and Technology, Vienna, Austria Moderators: John R.N. Taylor, University of Pretoria, Dept. of Food Science, Pretoria, Republic of South Africa (ICCPresident); Marcella Gross, ICC – International Association for Cereal Science and Technology, Vienna, Austria Sponsors: ICC – International Association for Cereal Science and Technology, and MoniQA Network of Excellence This session will provide an overview of the state of the art with regard to analytical challenges and socioeconomic impacts connected with emerging and persisting food scares. In particular, this session will provide an in-depth look at areas including food allergens, chemical and processing toxicants, mycotoxins/ phycotoxins, and emerging issues. 10:40 a.m. 23-S, CFW 55:A11 Multi-criteria analysis for impact assessment of food safety regulations: An application to T-2 and HT-2 toxins in cereals in the EU. M. RAGONA (1), M.

11:40 a.m.

12:00 p.m.

-AZZOCCHI !*!LLDRICK -3OLFRIZZO H. P. van Egmond (4). (1) University of Bologna, Italy; (2) Campden BRI, Chipping Campden, United Kingdom; (3) National Research Council, Bari, Italy; (4) RIKILT - Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen, Netherlands 24-S, CFW 55:A11 Emerging multiscreening methods and new reference materials for food allergen analysis. B. POPPING (1). (1) EuroďŹ ns ScientiďŹ c Group, Pocklington, United Kingdom 25-S, CFW 55:A11 Chemical contaminants in food: A snapshot of selected events and associated costs. B. M. THOMSON (1). (1) Institute of Environmental Science and Research Ltd., Christchurch, New Zealand 26-S, CFW 55:A11 0YRROLIZIDINALKALOIDSn0LANTTOXINSOFGROWING concern in food and feed safety. E. HALBMAYR*%#( '(Ă˜UBL %0ICHLER  2OMER Labs Division Holding GmbH, Tulln, Austria; (2) Romer Labs Diagnostic GmbH, Tulln, Austria 27-S, CFW 55:A11 Safety assessment of engineered nanoparticles in food: 4HEIMPORTANCEOFDETECTIONANDCHARACTERIZATION+ Tiede (1), A. B.A. BOXALL (1). (1) FERA, York, United Kingdom

Ingredient Functionality and Cost sTechnical s  ## ScientiďŹ c Initiative: Ingredients & Cost of Goods Sold Moderators: Rajen S. Mehta, Sunopta Ingredients Group, Chelmsford, MA, U.S.A.; Brigid McKevith, Cereal Partners UK, Welwyn Garden City, Hertfordshire, United Kingdom 10:40 a.m. 50-O, CFW 55:A29 Impact of processing aids on the net cost of goods sold for various extruded products with consideration toward regulatory and sustainability issues. S. PEIRCE (1). (1) RIBUS, Inc., St. Louis, MO, U.S.A. 11:00 a.m. 51-O, CFW 55:A25 Novel hydrocolloid matrices for protecting bioactive components in food formulations. S. JANASWAMY (1). (1) Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A. 11:20 a.m. 52-O, CFW 55:A30 A novel lecithin organogel technology suitable for use in food products. B. R. SEBREE (1). (1) ADM Research, Decatur, IL, U.S.A. 11:40 a.m. 53-O, CFW 55:A28 Literature review project on pulse processing, INGREDIENTS FUNCTIONALITYä&INDINGTHEPULSEINYOUR food product formulation. H. D. MASKUS (1). (1) Pulse Canada, Winnipeg, MB, Canada 12:00 p.m. 54-O, CFW 55:A23 Rebiana, a natural high-potency sweetener, is stable in baking consumer-acceptable, reduced-sugar cookies and mufďŹ ns. J. C. FRY (1), T. A. Christensen (2), N. Yurttas (3), B. M. Furlano (4). (1) Connect Consulting, Horsham, United Kingdom; (2) Cargill Global Food Technology, Plymouth, MN, U.S.A.; (3) Cargill 'LOBAL&OOD4ECHNOLOGY 7AYZATA -. 53! Cargill Health & Nutrition, Savage, MN, U.S.A. 12:20 p.m. 55-O, CFW 55:A28 Breakfast cereal nutrition renovation. B. MCKEVITH (1), S. Cretegny (2), L. Jolly-Zarrouk (3), M. Mondragon (4), L. Midness (2). (1) Cereal 31

Tuesday a.m.

Sessions – Tuesday Morning (10:40 a.m. – 12:20 p.m.)


Partners Worldwide, Welwyn Garden City, United Kingdom; (2) Cereal Partners Worldwide, Lausanne, 3WITZERLAND #EREAL0ARTNERS7ORLDWIDE 0ARIS France; (4) Mexico City, Mexico

Hot Topic, Science CafÊ, PosterTalk Sessions – Tuesday Afternoon (listed in alphabetical order by title)

Recent Advances in Knowledge Related to Starch Synthesis and Structure s Symposias  ##

Session number (1-S) and poster number (1-P) refers to the Author Index in the program book.

ScientiďŹ c Initiatives: Analytical Methods & Quality; Cereal & Polymer Chemistry

Cereal Foods World (CFW) number refers to abstract page location within the online searchable abstract document. !FlLIATIONSARELISTEDASPROVIDEDBYTHEORGANIZERPRESENTER

/RGANIZERS-ELISSA&ITZGERALD )NTERNATIONAL2ICE2ESEARCH Institute (IRRI), Metro Manila, Philippines; Matthew Morell, CSIRO, Brisbane, Australia Moderators: Matthew Morell, CSIRO, Brisbane, Australia; Melissa &ITZGERALD )NTERNATIONAL2ICE2ESEARCH)NSTITUTE)22) -ETRO Manila, Philippines Sponsors: Carbohydrate Division; Rice Division

Tuesday a.m. & p.m.

Starch is one of the most abundant biopolymers in nature. The apparent similarity of starches from different sources and the concomitant diversity in the functional properties make starch one of the most versatile compounds, with applications in food and nonfood industries. The biosynthesis and breakdown of starch are both complex processes governed by a number of genetic and environmental factors. Research over the past few decades HASREVEALEDMUCHABOUTSTARCHSYNTHESISANDORGANIZATIONOF the granules at both the micro and nano scales. However, much remains to be discovered about the regulatory processes and the ORGANIZATIONOFTHEGRANULESATDIFFERENTSCALES4HISSYMPOSIUM will provide an overview of our current understanding of starch SYNTHESIS REGULATORYMECHANISMS ANDGRANULARORGANIZATIONTHAT will help starch scientists to adopt new tools for grain-improvement programs and for nutritional and functional applications. 10:40 a.m. 28-S, CFW 55:A14 Genetic modiďŹ cation of adenosine diphosphate glucose pyrophosphorylase causes unexpected, but beneďŹ cial, effects in cereals. C. HANNAH (1). (1) University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A. 11:00 a.m. 29-S, CFW 55:A14 Suppression of the Glucan Water Dikinase (GWD) by RNAi increases yield in wheat. J. P. RAL (1), Z. Li (1), X. Sirault (2), R. Furbank (2), J. Pritchard (1), M. Bloemsma (1), C. R. Cavanagh (1), C. A. Howitt (1), M. K. Morell (1). (1) CSIRO Food Futures National Research Flagship, Canberra, ACT, Australia; (2) CSIRO, Canberra, ACT, Australia 11:20 a.m. 30-S, CFW 55:A15 The complexities of starch synthesis. I. J. TETLOW (1), F. Liu (1), A. Makhmoudova (1), A. E. Lee (2), M. J. Emes (1). (1) Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada; (2) Department of Plant Agriculture, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada 11:40 a.m. 31-S, CFW 55:A15 4HEFUNCTIONOFSTARCHSYNTHASEISOZYMESINRICE developing endosperm. N. FUJITA (1). (1) Akita Prefectural University, Akita, Japan 12:00 p.m. 32-S, CFW 55:A15 Eating starch: How to ďŹ ght crystalline starch energy deposits. A. BLENNOW (1), B. Svensson (2), J. T. Svensson (1), S. B. Engelsen (1). (1) University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg C, Denmark; (2) The Technical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark

32

A Statistical Smorgasbord for Cereal Chemistrys Science CafĂŠs  ## ScientiďŹ c Initiative: Analytical Methods & Quality /RGANIZER-ODERATOR$EBRA0ALMQUIST 53$!!23 0EORIA ), U.S.A. Sponsor: Statistical Advisory Technical Committee Presentations on a wide variety of statistical topics covering issues in cereal chemistry, including what to do if an experiment is not hypothesis driven, effective presentation of statistical analyses, and avoiding common pitfalls in designing experiments. Come listen and interact with a combination of speakers from industry, academic environments, and government research and regulatory agencies. 33-S, CFW 55:A6 What is the meaning of statistics? P. C. WILLIAMS (1). (1) PDK Projects Inc., Nanaimo, BC, Canada 34-S, CFW 55:A6 Effective presentation of statistical analyses. T. C. NELSEN (1). (1) Retired, Port Byron, IL, U.S.A. 35-S, CFW 55:A6 Avoiding common pitfalls in designing experiments. M. M. MANDERFELD (1). (1) General Mills, Inc., Minneapolis, MN, U.S.A. 36-S, CFW 55:A6 CV, RSD, and the HorRat—Applications and limitations. P. WEHLING (1). (1) General Mills, Inc., Minneapolis, MN, U.S.A. Discussion

Bioengineering for Human Healths Science CafĂŠs Auditorium, CC ScientiďŹ c Initiatives: Biotechnology & Sustainability; Food Safety & Regulatory; Health & Nutrition /RGANIZERS-ODERATORS"RIAN"EECHER 53$! !23 0ULLMAN WA, U.S.A.; Tandace Scholdberg, USDA-GIPSA, Kansas City, MO, U.S.A. Sponsor: Biotechnology Division The majority of transgenes currently in the marketplace relate to traits relevant to crop production, such as insect, herbicide, and pathogen resistance. Most consumers perceive little direct beneďŹ t to themselves from this current generation of transgenic CROPS(OWEVER ITISNOWINCREASINGLYRECOGNIZEDTHATADDITIONAL bioengineering efforts are well on the way to producing products designed to offer positive beneďŹ ts to the consumer. These efforts take the form of increased nutritional content, increased levels of health-promoting substances, and the reduction of risk associated with naturally occurring allergens or toxins. This session aims to provide information about how bioengineering can improve the human condition by changing food composition in ways that improve it for human consumption.


Cereal and Polymer Chemistry: Cereal Chemistry PosterTalk s  ## ScientiďŹ c Initiative: Cereal & Polymer Chemistry -ODERATORS0ETER+OEHLER (ANS $IETER "ELITZ )NSTITUTE &REISING Bavaria, Germany; Koushik Seetharaman, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada 188-P, CFW 55:A58 Physico-chemical properties of African rice (Oryza glaberrima) VARIETIES*4-!.&5, -!&ITZGERALD  !FRICA Rice Center, Cotonou, Benin; (2) International Rice Research Institute, Los Banos, Philippines 189-P, CFW 55:A50 Hydration characteristics of hybrid and pureline rice cultivars. M. B. HUNT (1), A. A. Ambardekar (1), T. J. Siebenmorgen (1). (1) University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A. 190-P, CFW 55:A70 0RODUCTIONANDPROPERTIESOFPREGELATINIZEDRICEmOURSFROM colored rice varieties. R. SOMPONG (1), R. Schoenlechner (1), E. Berghofer (1). (1) University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, DFST, Vienna, Austria 191-P, CFW 55:A41 Formation and stability of rice bran oil-in-water (o/w) EMULSIONSSTABILIZEDBYFOOD GRADEBIOPOLYMERS2#(!2/%. (1), D. J. McClements (1), A. Jangchud (2), K. Jangchud (2), T. Harnsilawat (2), O. Naivikul (2). (1) University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, U.S.A.; (2) Kasetsart University, Bangkok, Thailand 170-P, CFW 55:A50 ,IPIDEFFECTSINCLUDINGAMONOGLYCERIDE STABILIZEDSHORTENING alternative on structural features of our proteins assessed by front-face uorescence. B. HUSCHKA (1), F. Bonomi (2), K. Seetharaman (1). (1) University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada; (2) University of Milan, Milan, Italy 157-P, CFW 55:A38 Effect of pearling on the morphological and physicochemical characteristics of barley starch. L. A. BELLO-PEREZ (1), M. -3ANCHEZ 2IVERA #.UÂśEZ 3ANTIAGO 3,2ODRIGUEZ !MBRIZ  #%02/") )0. 9AUTEPEC -EXICO 187-P, CFW 55:A56 %FFECTSOFmOURPARTICLESIZEANDAUTOCLAVINGONPHYSICOCHEMICAL and functional properties of dough and Cretan barley rusks. A. LAZARIDOU (1), A. Marinopoulou (1), N. P. Matsoukas (1), C. G. Biliaderis (1). (1) Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece

171-P, CFW 55:A53 Relationship between solution and gel behavior of arabinoxylans: Effect of structure on properties in aqueous systems. M. S. KALE (1), C. Yang (2), O. H. Campanella (1), B. R. Hamaker (1). (1) Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A.; (2) Jiangnan University, Wushi, PRC Peoples Rep of China 172-P, CFW 55:A75 Removal of the 3-O-substituent from 2,3-disubstituent increases THEENZYMATICDEGRADABILITYOFALKALI EXTRACTABLEARABINOXYLANS from corn bran. H. XU (1), B. Reuhs (1), B. R. Hamaker (1). (1) Purdue University, Whistler Center for Carbohydrate Research, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A. 167-P, CFW 55:A60 Effect of the Hofmeister series on gluten aggregation measured using a torque-based technique. J. P. MELNYK (1), J. Dreisoerner (2), M. F. Marcone (1), K. Seetharaman (1). (1) University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada; (2) Brabender GmbH and Co. KG, Duisburg, Germany 173-P, CFW 55:A73 %NDOGENOUSä GLUCANASEACTIVITYINSELECTED/NTARIOWHEATS! VATANDOUST (1), S. Ragaee (1), P. Wood (2), S. Tosh (2), K. Seetharaman (1). (1) University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada; (2) Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Guelph, ON, Canada Time with Poster Authors at Individual Posters

Forecast for the U.S. Regulatory Climate: A Gathering Storm of Enforcement, Regulation, and Legislation for Foods sHot Topic s  ## /RGANIZER-ODERATOR"ARBARA(EIDOLPH )#,0ERFORMANCE Products LP, St. Louis, MO, U.S.A. Fall 2010 will likely see a perfect storm in the regulatory and legislative realm of the food and beverage business. The dietary guidelines will issue; the Obama family effort on childhood obesity will take shape; the FDA has issued warning letters as they enforce food safety/regulation; further guidance with regard to sodium is anticipated; and the FTC is still working on protecting children via advertisement. In addition, Congress will conclude their session in preparation for elections and we will know which legislative efforts have passed. In this Hot Topic Session, experts in the area of regulation and legislation will provide both a summary of what has taken place and a forecast. This panel discussion, moderated by Barbara Heidolph will also provide attendees with the opportunity to ask the panel questions. Introduction. B. HEIDOLPH, ICL Performance Products LP, St. Louis, MO, U.S.A. Latest news on government nutrition. J. ADAMS, President, Grain Foods Foundation and Wheat Council, Ridgway, CO, U.S.A. USDA will publish the 2010 dietary guidelines in the Fall of 2010. These guidelines will be the summary of the key nutritional messages that consumers will receive and live by and will impact food and beverage forumlators as they modify products to deliver better nutritional content. Also included will be gluten-free diet trends and the surrounding regulatory issues. Nutrition and obesity issues on the forefront. L. SANDERS, ABA Senior Vice President, Government Relations and Public Affairs, American Bakers Association, Washington, DC, U.S.A. Nutrition issues and concerns regarding childhood obesity are key priorities in Washington policy circles. This session will provide an update on nutrition activities ranging from The First 33

Tuesday p.m.

37-S, CFW 55:A9 Improving the content and composition of wheat dietary ďŹ ber. P. R. SHEWRY (1). (1) Rothamsted Research, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Hertfordshire, United Kingdom 38-S, CFW 55:A9 Crop development for improved nutrition and downstream value-added products. M. H. LUETHY (1). (1) Monsanto Company, St. Louis, MO, U.S.A. 39-S, CFW 55:A9 Enhanced levels of Ă&#x;-carotene in oilseed crops. M. SCHMIDT (1), W. Parrott (2). (1) Danforth Plant Science Center, St. Louis, MO, U.S.A.; (2) Athens, GA, U.S.A. 40-S, CFW 55:A9 Plant-made vaccines and biopharmaceuticals. H. DANIELL (1). (1) University of Central Florida, College of Medicine, Orlando, FL, U.S.A. Discussion


Tuesday p.m.

Lady’s Childhood Obesity Initiative and recommendations from President Obama’s Interagency Obesity Task Force to OBESITYLEGISLATION CHILDNUTRITIONREAUTHORIZATION IMPLICATIONS of changes in USDA’s WIC program, and other labeling issues including sodium reduction. Update on food safety regulations. M. OLEWNIK, Vice President, Audits & Technical Services, AIB International, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. Food safety continues to be a top concern for the Obama Administration, Congress, and the food industry. Congress is creating legislation with new requirements for preventative programs, food defense plans, traceability systems, performance standards, and mandatory recalls. Hear the latest news on what is happening with these and other regulations. Forecast for food marketing enforcement and policy: FDA, FTC & the states. S. ROLLER, JD, RD, MPH, Partner & Chair – Food & Drug Law Practice; Kelley Drye & Warren LLP., Washington, DC, U.S.A. This presentation will highlight key FDA, FTC, and state enforcement, regulatory, and legislative developments and forecast the regulatory climate ahead for food labeling and marketing claims and food safety-related post-market reporting requirements. Key developments will be addressed concerning changing enforcement policies with respect to current regulatory requirements, as well as regulatory and legislative policies that are shaping future regulatory requirements for companies that manufacture or market food. Topics will include recent FDA warning letters, front-of-package nutrition labeling initiative, FTC food marketing consent orders and ongoing investigation of industry food marketing practices concerning food marketing to children/youth, and related federal and state legislative developments. Open Panel Discussion

2011 Call for Papers Do you want the top grain scientists in the world to see what you’re working on? Show us your research at the 2011 AACC International Annual Meeting! Submissions for oral and poster presentations may be made March 1 – April 15, 2011. AACC International Annual Meeting October 16-19, 2011 Palm Springs Convention Center Palm Springs, CA, U.S.A.

Visit http://meeting.aaccnet.org for continued updates and information.

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Wednesday, October 27

7:00 – 8:30 a.m. 7:00 – 8:30 a.m. 7:00 – 9:00 a.m. 7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. 7:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. 7:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. 8:30 – 10:10 a.m.

9:00 – 11:00 a.m. 10:00 – 11:00 a.m. 10:40 a.m. – 12:20 p.m.

12:30 – 2:00 p.m. 12:30 – 2:00 p.m. 12:30 – 2:00 p.m. 12:30 – 3:30 p.m. 1:30 – 4:00 p.m. 2:00 – 4:00 p.m.

4:15 – 5:30 p.m.

Kansas State University Breakfast* Approved Methods Technical Committee Meetings s "IOACTIVE#OMPOUNDS-ETHODS s "READ"AKING-ETHODS s #HEMICAL,EAVENING!GENTS s $IETARY&IBERAND/THER#ARBOHYDRATES s %XPERIMENTAL-ILLING s 0ULSEAND,EGUME s 9EAST%VALUATION North Dakota State University Alumni and Friends Breakfast* ScientiďŹ c Advisory Panel Breakfast Concessions Room Available for Small Meetings – Westin Room Available for Small Meetings – CC Registration Open ScientiďŹ c Sessions s 4HE)MPACTOF#LIMATE#HANGEONTHE0RODUCTIONAND5TILIZATION of Wheat and Rice – Symposia (ScientiďŹ c Initiatives: Biotechnology & Sustainability; Engineering & Processing) s 3MALL 'RAIN"IORElNING !GRONOMYAND'RAIN3UPPLY "IORElNING Technology, Environmental Sustainability, and Commercial Development – Symposia (ScientiďŹ c Initiatives: Biotechnology & Sustainability; Engineering & Processing) s "RANAND&IBERn4ECHNICAL(ScientiďŹ c Initiative: Health & Nutrition) s 0ROCESSING%FFECTSON#EREAL#ONSTITUENTS3TRUCTUREAND Functionality –Technical (ScientiďŹ c Initiative: Cereal & Polymer Chemistry) s !NALYTICAL-ETHODS#HALLENGESAND.EW-ETHODOLOGIES includes Edith Christensen Award presentation – John L. MacDonald – Technical (ScientiďŹ c Initiative: Analytical Methods & Quality) Bookstore Open Nominating Committee Meeting ScientiďŹ c Sessions s 'RAIN "ASED&OODAND)NGREDIENT3AFETYINTHE3UPPLY#HAINn Symposia (ScientiďŹ c Initiatives: Food Safety & Regulatory; Ingredients & Cost of Goods Sold) s %XTRUSION0ROCESSING includes Young Research Scientist Award presentation – Sajid Alavi – Technical (ScientiďŹ c Initiative: Engineering & Processing) s -ICRONUTRIENTSn4ECHNICAL(ScientiďŹ c Initiative: Health & Nutrition) s 3TARCH3TRUCTUREAND&UNCTIONALITYn4ECHNICAL(ScientiďŹ c Initiative: Cereal & Polymer Chemistry) Lunch Break – Cash Concessions Available ICC Lunch* Rheology Division Meeting and Lunch* – Sponsored by Frito-Lay Approved Methods Technical Committee Chairs Meeting and Lunch Hot Topic: Salt and Sodium: Looking for my Lost Shaker of Salt‌Replacer: Flavor, Function, Future ScientiďŹ c Sessions s !SSESSMENTOF'RAIN1UALITY&ROM"REEDINGTO3TORE3HELFn Science CafĂŠ (ScientiďŹ c Initiatives: Analytical Methods & Quality; Ingredients & Cost of Goods Sold) s nPM"IOTECHNOLOGYAND%NGINEERINGn0OSTER4ALK (ScientiďŹ c Initiative: Biotechnology & Sustainability) s nPM)NGREDIENTSAND#OSTOF'OODS3OLDn0OSTER4ALK (ScientiďŹ c Initiative: Ingredients & Cost of Goods Sold) s %NGINEERINGAND0ROCESSINGn0OSTER4ALK(ScientiďŹ c Initiative: Engineering & Processing) s (EALTHAND.UTRITIONn0OSTER4ALK(ScientiďŹ c Initiative: Health & Nutrition) Closing Session with Keynote Speaker, Margaret Bath followed by a Farewell Reception—Presentation content on next page

100-101, CC 'RAND"ALLROOM& 7ESTIN -OORINGS 7ESTIN 'RAND"ALLROOM% 7ESTIN 'RAND"ALLROOM$ 7ESTIN 'RAND"ALLROOM# 7ESTIN 'RAND"ALLROOM# 7ESTIN 'RAND"ALLROOM# 7ESTIN Greene, CC Harbor A, Westin East Concourse, First Floor, CC Moorings, Westin Gwinnett, CC Hall A, CC !UDITORIUM ##

  ##

201-202, CC   ##

Wednesdday

7:00 – 8:00 a.m. 7:00 – 8:30 a.m.

103-104, CC

Foyer Area, 106, CC Gwinnett, CC   ##

105-106, CC

201-202, CC 203-204, CC East Concourse – River Concourse 100, CC 205, CC Harbor A, CC 103-104, CC

!UDITORIUM ##

  ##   ## 201-202, CC 203-204, CC Chatham Ballroom A, CC

35


Closing Session with Keynote Speaker Challenges Facing the Cereal Processing Industry and How Cereal Science Can Improve the Lives of the World’s Consumers Consumers have increasingly become aware of the relationship between diet and health. Today, nutrition is at the forefront of their food purchase decisions. Additionally, with the obesity epidemic on Margaret Bath the rise, government agencies have also taken a more active role in health intervention through consumer education and regulations related to food guidelines and claims. An emphasis on plant-based foods is driven by the phytochemicals they contain and the desire to increase ďŹ ber intake, which is lacking in many diets. It follows from the above that the cereal processing industry in particular has an important role to play in improving the lives of the world’s consumers.

Wednesday a.m.

The history of the ready-to-eat cereal industry had its beginnings in improving nutrition and adding ďŹ ber to the diet. Research has indeed shown that consumers who regularly eat breakfast cereals tend to have lower body mass indices and that increased intake of ďŹ ber-rich foods helps a number of health-related issues such as cardiovascular disease, digestive health, obesity, and type II diabetes. However, ďŹ ber and ďŹ ber-rich whole grain products are often perceived by the consumer to lack avor and/or exhibit reduced palatability. Challenges for the cereal processing industry include: How to increase dietary ďŹ ber, resistant starch, and phytochemical levels without affecting the avor or texture of its products? How to develop new processing technologies to concentrate or extract the best fractions from cereals? How to link the healthy components of grain to health-biomarkers for faster and reliable studies on health beneďŹ ts? How to gain alignment globally on deďŹ nitions of whole grains and on analytical methods for ďŹ ber? Better alignment between regulatory agencies and the scientiďŹ c community is also needed to provide a consistent message for the consumer. Likewise, as new research becomes available, clear communication of the health beneďŹ ts of cereal products can improve consumers’ diet choices. With the consumer as the focal point, there are many opportunities to make a difference through cereal science.

8:30 a.m.

9:10 a.m.

9:30 a.m.

9:50 a.m.

Bran and Fiber sTechnicals  ## ScientiďŹ c Initiative: Health & Nutrition Moderator: Mary Ellen Camire, University of Maine, Orono, ME, U.S.A. 8:30 a.m.

8:50 a.m.

9:10 a.m.

Sessions – Wednesday Morning (8:30 – 10:10 a.m.) (listed in alphabetical order by title)

9:30 a.m.

Session number (1-S) and technical number (1-O) refer to the Author Index in the program book. Cereal Foods World (CFW) number refers to abstract page location within the online searchable abstract document. !FlLIATIONSARELISTEDASPROVIDEDBYTHEORGANIZERPRESENTER

Analytical Methods: Challenges and New Methodologies s Technical s  ## ScientiďŹ c Initiative: Analytical Methods & Quality Moderators: Debi E. Rogers, AIB International, Manhattan, KS, 53!-IRKO"UNZEL 5NIVERSITYOF-INNESOTA 3T0AUL -. U.S.A. 36

56-O, CFW 55:A28 Edith Christensen Award – Measurement of fat soluble vitamins in foods, feeds, and ingredients: Progress and problems. J. L. MACDONALD (1), K. L. Riter (1). (1) NP Analytical Laboratories, St. Louis, MO, U.S.A. 57-O, CFW 55:A21 Metabolomics - a new platform in establishing metabolome proďŹ les of basmati and jasmine rices. M. N. CALINGACION (1), R. de Vos (2), R. Mumm (2), 2(ALL -&ITZGERALD  )NTERNATIONAL2ICE Research Institute, Los Banos, Philippines; (2) Plant Research International, Wageningen, Netherlands; (3) International Rice Research Institute, Los Banos, Laguna, Philippines 58-O, CFW 55:A33 Using residual lipid to assess rice degree of milling. D. F. WOOD (1), T. J. Siebenmorgen (2), T. G. Williams (1), W. J. Orts (1), G. M. Glenn (1), A. Graves (2). (1) USDA ARS WRRC, Albany, CA, U.S.A.; (2) University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A. 59-O, CFW 55:A26 $EVELOPMENTOFASTANDARDIZED BATTER BASED PANCAKE making method. M. KWEON (1), T. Donelson (1), L. Slade (2), H. Levine (2). (1) USDA ARS, Wooster, OH, U.S.A.; (2) Food Polymer Science Consultancy, Morris Plains, NJ, U.S.A.

9:50 a.m.

60-O, CFW 55:A27 Whole grain or high ďŹ ber: Which message is most effective with young adults? S. Lash (1), M. P. Dougherty (1), M. CAMIRE (1). (1) University of Maine, Orono, ME, U.S.A. 61-O, CFW 55:A24 Components and beneďŹ ts of cereal brans. B. GOVINDARAJAN (1), M. Camire (2), C. Gendron (2). (1) Kellogg, Battle Creek, MI, U.S.A.; (2) University of Maine, Orono, ME, U.S.A. 62-O, CFW 55:A32 0HYSICO CHEMICALPROPERTIESOFä GLUCANINCEREALBARS containing creatine are key for increased creatine retention in the body. G. VANDEPUTTE (1), J. $ECOMBAZ -2OY ##AVADINI 6,ELOUP   .ESTLE04#/RBE /RBE 3WITZERLAND .ESTLE2ESEARCH#ENTER,AUSANNE /RBE 3WITZERLAND 63-O, CFW 55:A30 Outer layers of rye, oat and wheat grains show differences in their in vitro fermentation quality in colon. E. SELINHEIMO (1), A. Aura (1), T. KĂśssĂś (1), X. Rouau (2), P. Lehtinen (1), K. Poutanen (1). (1) VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo, Finland; (2) INRA, UMR 1208 “Agropolymers Engineering and Emerging Technologiesâ€?, Montpellier, France 64-O, CFW 55:A21 Nutritional enhancement of soybean carbohydrates and hulls for animal feed using microbial cultures. L. CHEN (1), P. Vadlani (1), R. Madl (1), D. O’Brien (1). (1) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.


The Impact of Climate Change on the Production and Utilization of Wheat and Rice sSymposia s!UDITORIUM ##

/RGANIZERS-ODERATORS0ETER3HEWRY #ENTREFOR#ROP'ENETIC Improvement, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Herts, United +INGDOM-ELISSA&ITZGERALD )NTERNATIONAL2ICE2ESEARCH Institute (IRRI), Metro Manila, Philippines Sponsor: Biotechnology Committee The effects of climate change on the two major food crops, wheat and rice, will be discussed. Presentations will cover modeling the impacts on crop yield and quality, the economic and strategic impacts of changes in production, biochemical and molecular mechanisms affecting grain yield and quality, and developing novel varieties that are resistant to abiotic stress. 8:30 a.m.

8:50 a.m.

9:10 a.m.

9:30 a.m.

9:50 a.m.

41-S, CFW 55:A12 Identifying future threats: Impacts of climate change on wheat. M. A. SEMENOV (1). (1) Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Herts, United Kingdom 42-S, CFW 55:A13 Maintaining sufďŹ cient stocks of rice in a warming world. X. ZHAO (1), V. Daygon (1), M. Gamalinda (1), F. Xie (1), K. McNally (1), R. Sackville Hamilton  -&ITZGERALD  )22) -ETRO-ANILA Philippines 43-S, CFW 55:A12 Ecophysiological, biochemical and molecular effects of heat stress on wheat grain development and end use quality. P. MARTRE (1). (1) INRA, UMR1095 GDEC, Clermont-Ferrand, France 44-S, CFW 55:A13 Identifying high temperature-sensitive processes during grain ďŹ lling of rice. C. Lin (1), C. Li (1), F. Yang (1), F. Chang (1), H.-S. LUR (1). (1) National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan 45-S, CFW 55:A13 Developing new wheats with increased resistance to abiotic stress. P. LANGRIDGE (1). (1) Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics, Adelaide, Australia

Processing Effects on Cereal Constituents Structure and Functionality s Technicals  ##

9:10 a.m.

9:30 a.m.

9:50 a.m.

Small-Grain BioreďŹ ning—Agronomy and Grain Supply, BioreďŹ ning Technology, Environmental Sustainability, and Commercial Development sSymposias  ## ScientiďŹ c Initiatives: Biotechnology & Sustainability; Engineering & Processing /RGANIZERS-ODERATORS+EVIN"(ICKS AND2OBERT!-OREAU ARS, USDA, Eastern Regional Research Center, Wyndmoor, PA, U.S.A. Sponsor: Engineering & Processing Division In the United States, corn is the number one grain that is bioreďŹ ned to produce foods, feeds, and (bio)fuels. The corn bioreďŹ neries are located in the Corn Belt. Small grain “beltsâ€? also exist outside the Corn Belt that can become regions for enhanced bioreďŹ ning activities. A “winter barley beltâ€? exists between Pennsylvania and South Carolina along the Atlantic coast that can produce a “generation 1.5â€? feedstock for producing foods, feeds, and fuels. This symposium will focus on the research that has been accomplished in small grain breeding, agronomics, life-cycle analysis, and bioprocessing to create and support a new and sustainable commercial industry that does not compete with food uses for small or coarse grains. 8:30 a.m.

ScientiďŹ c Initiative: Cereal & Polymer Chemistry Moderators: Michael J. Sissons, NSW Dept of Industry and Investment, Calala, NSW Australia; Samuel Millar, Campden BRI, Gloucestershire, United Kingdom 8:30 a.m.

8:50 a.m.

65-O, CFW 55:A31 Effect of extrusion and in vitro digestion on microstructure and amylopectin chain length distribution of high amylose starch. A. K. SHRESTHA  /,ARROQUE "&LANAGAN *"LAZEK E. Gilbert (3), M. K. Morrell (2), M. J. Gidley (1). (1) University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; (2) CSIRO Plant Industry, Canberra, Australia; (3) Australian Nuclear Science and Technology /RGANIZATION!.34/ 3YDNEY !USTRALIA 66-O, CFW 55:A31 Physical properties and microstructure of oat bran cereals processed to achieve a range of beta-glucan molecular weights. S. M. TOSH (1), S. Miller (2), R. Duss (3), P. J. Wood (1). (1) Agriculture and AgriFood Canada, Guelph, ON, Canada; (2) Agriculture

8:35 a.m.

8:55 a.m.

9:15 a.m.

46-S Symposium overview: Winter barley as a new feedstock for production of advanced biofuels and coproducts. K. B. HICKS (1). (1) Eastern Regional Research Center, ARS, USDA, Wyndmoor, PA, U.S.A. 47-S, CFW 55:A15 Development of new winter barley lines for production of advanced biofuels and coproducts: Yields, composition, and other agronomic factors. W. S. BROOKS (1), C. Griffey (1), W. Thomason (1). (1) Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, U.S.A. 48-S, CFW 55:A15 Conversion of barley to ethanol and DDGS: Technical challenges and advancements. P. J. TEUNISSEN (1). (1) Genencor, A Danisco Division, Leiden, Netherlands 49-S, CFW 55:A15 Value-added coproducts from barley reďŹ ning. R. A. MOREAU (1), C. A. Mullen (1), A. A. Boateng (1), M. P. Yadav (1), K. B. Hicks (1). (1) Eastern Regional Research Center, ARS, USDA, Wyndmoor, PA, U.S.A.

37

Wednesday a.m.

ScientiďŹ c Initiatives: Biotechnology & Sustainability; Engineering & Processing

and Agri-Food Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada; (3) #REA.UTRITION!' :UG 3WITZERLAND 67-O, CFW 55:A23 Rheological and structural properties of hard and soft wheat our systems with bran inclusions. H. GAJULA (1), J. Faubion (1), H. Dogan (1). (1) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. 68-O, CFW 55:A33 Changes of pasta structure and rheological properties during cooking. M. WAGNER (1), G. Della Valle (1), J. Abecassis (2), A. Buleon (1), D. Lourdin (1), M. Morel (2), B. Cuq (3). (1) INRA - Nantes, Nantes, France; (2) INRA - Montpellier, Montpellier, France; (3) Montpellier SupAgro, Montpellier, France 69-O, CFW 55:A19 High temperature exposure affects rice physiochemical properties. A. A. AMBARDEKAR (1), T. J. Siebenmorgen (1). (1) University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A.


9:35 a.m.

9:55 a.m.

50-S, CFW 55:A16 Life cycle assessment of greenhouse gas emissions for winter barley ethanol—Status as an advanced biofuel. S. SPATARI (1), A. Stadel (1), A. McAloon (2), P. R. Adler (3), K. B. Hicks (2). (1) Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, U.S.A.; (2) Eastern Regional Research Center, ARS, USDA, Wyndmoor, PA, U.S.A.; (3) USDA-ARS, Pasture Systems and Watershed Management Research Unit, University Park, PA, U.S.A. 51-S, CFW 55:A16 #OMMERCIALIZATIONOFTHElRST53WINTERBARLEY ethanol-production facility. P. SIMMS (1). (1) Osage Bio Energy, LLC, Glen Allen, VA, U.S.A.

Sessions – Wednesday Morning (10:40 a.m. – 12:20 p.m.) (listed in alphabetical order by title) Session number (1-S) and technical number (1-O) refer to the Author Index in the program book. Cereal Foods World (CFW) number refers to abstract page location within the online searchable abstract document. !FlLIATIONSARELISTEDASPROVIDEDBYTHEORGANIZERPRESENTER

Wednesday a.m.

Extrusion Processing s Technical s  ## ScientiďŹ c Initiative: Engineering & Processing Moderators: Vijay Singh, University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign, Urbana, IL, U.S.A.; Jose De J. Berrios, USDA ARS WRRC, Albany, CA, U.S.A. 10:40 a.m. 70-O, CFW 55:A18 Young Research Scientist Award – Extrusion processing – Research and engagement for addressing nutritional challenges worldwide. S. ALAVI (1). (1) Dept. of Grain Science and Industry, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. 11:20 a.m. 71-O, CFW 55:A25 Impact of cellular architecture and solid matrix properties on the texture of high-ďŹ ber expanded foods. E. L. KARKLE (1), S. Alavi (1), H. Dogan (1), Y. Shi (1), L. C. Keller (2). (1) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.; (2) Frito Lay, Inc., Plano, TX, U.S.A. 11:40 a.m. 72-O, CFW 55:A31 Effect of extruder screw speed on physical and chemical characteristics and in vitro starch hydrolysis of pinto, navy, red and black bean extrudates. C. SIMONS (1), C. Hall (1), M. Tulbek (2). (1) North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, U.S.A.; (2) Northern Crops Institute, Fargo, ND, U.S.A. 12:00 p.m. 73-O, CFW 55:A19 Lentil-based extruded snacks fortiďŹ ed with nutritional yeast: Physico-chemical and nutritional evaluation. J. D. BERRIOS (1), M. Tom (1), J. Pan (1), A. Cheong (2). (1) USDA ARS WRRC, Albany, CA, U.S.A.; (2) Lesaffre Nutrition & Health, San Francisco, CA, U.S.A.

38

Grain-Based Food and Ingredient Safety in the Supply Chain sSymposias  ## ScientiďŹ c Initiatives: Food Safety & Regulatory; Ingredients & Cost of Goods Sold /RGANIZER-ODERATOR%LIZABETH!RNDT #ON!GRA&OODS )NC Omaha, NE, U.S.A. Financial Sponsors: ConAgra Foods; Kellogg Company Top concerns for food and ingredient companies include safety and quality throughout the supply chain. The implementation of traceability systems can help control risks and inform consumers about certain food attributes. The activity in development of GM wheat and growth of identity-preserved grain varieties can help provide grain ingredients that are traceable. Strong growth in the development and sales of gluten-free foods has increased the awareness and need for knowledge of the requirements for processing, testing, labeling, and certiďŹ cation. This symposium will provide an overview of some of the challenges and practices in providing food and ingredient safety and quality. 10:40 a.m. 52-S, CFW 55:A12 Theory and experience with traceability of bulk commodities in grain handling systems. C. R. HURBURGH (1), M. Thakur (1), C. Laux (2), G. Mosher (1), K. Donnelly (3). (1) Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A.; (2) Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A.; (3) NoďŹ ma Market, Tromsoe, Norway 11:00 a.m. 53-S, CFW 55:A12 Industry collaboration for food safety—Third party audit initiative. J. ROBINSON (1), B. Heidolph (2).  #ARGILL)NC 7AYZATA -. 53! ))#, Performance Products LP, St. Louis, MO, U.S.A. 11:20 a.m. 54-S, CFW 55:A12 Challenges for “gluten-freeâ€? foods. S. L. TAYLOR (1). (1) University of Nebraska, Food Allergy Research & Resource Program, Lincoln, NE, U.S.A. 11:40 a.m. 55-S, CFW 55:A12 Mapping your food safety program: An integrated approach. M. OLEWNIK (1). (1) AIB International, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. 12:00 p.m. 56-S, CFW 55:A12 The future of biotech wheat. J. BAIR (1). (1) North American Millers’ Association, Washington, DC, U.S.A.

Micronutrients s Technical s  ## ScientiďŹ c Initiative: Health & Nutrition Moderator: Robert W. Welch, University of Ulster, Coleraine United Kingdom 10:40 a.m. 74-O, CFW 55:A24 Contributions of grain-products to total phenolic antioxidant intake in the DASH eating plan: Impact of whole-grain selection. J. L. HARGROVE (1), R. B. Swanson (1), K. Wickwire (1), C. L. DeMasie (1). (1) University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A. 11:00 a.m. 75-O, CFW 55:A20 Inuence of food matrix on the stability of polyphenols through processing. N. BORDENAVE  -'&ERRUZZI "2(AMAKER  0URDUE University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A.


Starch Structure and Functionality s Technicals 203-204, CC ScientiďŹ c Initiative: Cereal & Polymer Chemistry -ODERATORS-ELISSA&ITZGERALD )NTERNATIONAL2ICE2ESEARCH Institute, Metro Manila Philippines; Robert G. Gilbert, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia 10:40 a.m. 79-O, CFW 55:A33 Developing cereals with higher resistant starch: Goals and constraints. A. C. Wu (1), T. Witt (1), M. J. Gidley (1), R. G. GILBERT (1). (1) University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia 11:00 a.m. 80-O, CFW 55:A20 Composition of building blocks in clusters of amylopectins. E. J. BERTOFT (1). (1) Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden 11:20 a.m. 81-O, CFW 55:A33 Two-dimensional structural distributions for starch BASEDONSIZEANDBRANCHING-ETHODDEVELOPMENT and implications for biosynthesis. F. VILAPLANA (1), R. G. Gilbert (1). (1) CNAFS and LCAFS, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia 11:40 a.m. 82-O, CFW 55:A24 Morphology and physicochemical properties of ballmilled corn starches with different amylose contents. W. HUANG (1), H. Lai (1). (1) Department of Agricultural Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan 12:00 p.m. 83-O, CFW 55:A33 Direct chemical imaging of single modiďŹ ed starch granules with 320 Ă— 25 milliradian synchrotron beams and a focal plane array FT-IR microspectrometer. D. L. WETZEL (1). (1) Microbeam Molecular Spectroscopy Laboratory, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.

Hot Topic, Science CafÊ, PosterTalk Sessions – Wednesday Afternoon (listed in alphabetical order by title) Session number (1-S) and poster number (1-P) refer to the Author Index in the program book. Cereal Foods World (CFW) number refers to abstract page location within the online searchable abstract document. !FlLIATIONSARELISTEDASPROVIDEDBYTHEORGANIZERPRESENTER

Assessment of Grain Quality: From Breeding to Store Shelf sScience CafĂŠ s!UDITORIUM ## ScientiďŹ c Initiatives: Analytical Methods & Quality; Ingredients & Cost of Goods Sold /RGANIZERS-ODERATORS!RT"ETTGE 53$! !23771, 0ULLMAN WA, U.S.A.; Sean Finnie, Cargill Inc., Plymouth, MN, U.S.A. Assessing grain “qualityâ€? is an elusive goal. The deďŹ nition of quality changes during each of the breeding, marketing, milling, ANDEND USESTAGESOFGRAINUTILIZATION4HISSESSIONDISCUSSES new and novel analytical tools and techniques, based on cereal chemistry, appropriate to deďŹ ning quality at each stage of grain PRODUCTIONANDUTILIZATION4ECHNIQUESDISCUSSEDRANGEFROM molecular marker technology to analyses of bioactive compounds. .EWER NONTRADITIONALMETHODSOFANALYSISAREEMPHASIZED AND basic chemical tests are discussed more than are traditional analytical methods that have been used in previous years. Also incorporated is a discussion of how knowledge gained from end-use feedback is reworked into new breeding strategies. Understanding what quality is and how deďŹ nitions vary provides the basis for informed decisions in the marketplace. 57-S, CFW 55:A7 Assessment of genetic and molecular approaches for the prediction of wheat quality. R. A. GRAYBOSCH (1). (1) USDA-ARS, Lincoln, NE, U.S.A. 58-S, CFW 55:A7 The quest for knowledge: Dealing with the continuum of deďŹ ning quality parameters through the market channels. G. L. WEAVER (1). (1) ConAgra Mills, Omaha, NE, U.S.A. 59-S, CFW 55:A7 Experimental milling for wheat and our quality assessment. C. L. MILLER (1). (1) Kansas State University, Dept. of Grain Science and Industry, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. 60-S, CFW 55:A7 Please use the tradesman’s entrance: The back door to our quality. I. L. BATEY (1). (1) Sunset Cereal Services, Hornsby Heights, Australia 61-S, CFW 55:A7 (Bio)active compounds in ours and cereal products: What does it take to get reliable data? M. BUNZEL (1). (1) University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, U.S.A. 62-S, CFW 55:A7 Incorporating important biochemical attributes into breeding programs. E. J. SOUZA (1). (1) USDA-ARS Soft Wheat Quality Laboratory, Wooster, OH, U.S.A. Discussion

39

Wednesday a.m. & p.m.

11:20 a.m. 76-O, CFW 55:A22 Oat avenanthramides: Potential mode of action as natural anti-inammatory agents and production of an oat product with physiologically-signiďŹ cant level. F. COLLINS (1), M. Meydani (2). (1) Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada; (2) Vascular Biology Laboratory, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, MA, U.S.A. 11:40 a.m. 77-O, CFW 55:A21 Effect of steam-cooking and parboiling on phenolics and antioxidant capacities of red and purple rice cultivars. M. CHEN (1), B. Min (1), A. M. McClung (2). (1) USDA ARS Rice Research Unit, Beaumont, TX, U.S.A.; (2) USDA ARS Dale Bumpers National Rice Research Center, Stuttgart, AR, U.S.A. 12:00 p.m. 78-O, CFW 55:A18 /PTIMIZATIONOFANTHOCYANINEXTRACTIONFROMBLACK rice, blue wheat and purple corn by accelerated solvent and microwave-assisted extractors. E. M. ABDELAAL (1), M. Akhtar (1), I. Rabalski (1), M. Bryan (1). (1) Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Guelph, ON, Canada


Biotechnology and Engineering sPosterTalk s  ## ScientiďŹ c Initiative: Biotechnology & Sustainability Note this session is 2:00 – 3:00 p.m. Moderators: Peter Shewry, Rothamsted Research, Harpenden, Herts, United Kingdom; Craig F. Morris, USDA ARS WWQL, Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA U.S.A.

Wednesday p.m.

140-P, CFW 55:A77 Cyanophycin biosynthesis from sorghum-derived sugars and recombinant Escherichia coli. Y. ZHANG (1), A. Kumar (1), P. Vadlani (1), S. Narayanan (1). (1) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. 128-P, CFW 55:A38 Development of new markers to genotype the functional SNPs OF33))A AGENERESPONSIBLEFORGELATINIZATIONTEMPERATUREOF rice starch. J. BAO (1), Y. Lu (1), P. Xiao (1), Y. Shao (1). (1) :HEJIANG5NIVERSITY (ANGZHOU 02#0EOPLES2EPOF#HINA 129-P, CFW 55:A36 Inuence of wheat starch structure on starch hydrolysis. G. AHUJA (1), S. Jaiswal (1), P. Hucl (1), R. N. Chibbar (1). (1) Department of Plant Sciences & Crop Development Centre, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada 130-P, CFW 55:A37 Relationship between waxy alleles and the amylose content INWHEATISOGENICLINES4!533%.!# ,2HAZI ' Branlard (2). (1) Inst Polytechnique LaSalle Beauvais, Beauvais, France; (2) Inra Clermont-Ferrand, Clermont-Ferrand, France 133-P, CFW 55:A65 Effect of genotype and environment on wheat our water absorption tolerance. G. E. RATTIN (1), J. M. Faubion (1), R. Miller (1), J. Wilson (1). (1) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. Time with Poster Authors at Individual Posters

of Applied Biochemistry and Food Science, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Vienna, Hungary 202-P, CFW 55:A67 Production of xylo-oligosaccharides from corn ďŹ ber (separated from DDGS) by autohydrolysis. A. SAMALA (1), R. Srinivasan (2), M. P. Yadav (3), T. Kim (2), L. Prewitt (2). (1) Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS, U.S.A.; (2) Mississippi State, MS, U.S.A.; (3) Wyndmoor, PA, U.S.A. 209-P, CFW 55:A71 Electro-kinetic dewatering as a potential new low cost technique for drying food-processing waste. V. STOJCESKA (1), A. Plunkett (1), D. Russell (1), J. Hall (2), J. Lamont-Black (3). (1) The Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, United Kingdom; (2) University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom; (3) Electrokinetic Ltd., Manchester, United Kingdom 210-P, CFW 55:A65 WITHDRAWN 211-P, CFW 55:A58 Properties of high amylose starch-beeswax inclusion complexes prepared by steam jet cooking. S. X. LIU (1), J. Kenar (1), F. Felker (1), G. Fanata (1), J. Byars (1). (1) USDA ARS NCAUR, Peoria, IL, U.S.A. 235-P, CFW 55:A36 Starch/poly vinyl alcohol/ Na+ MMT based biodegradable nanocomposites produced through melt extrusion. S. ALI (1), S. Alavi (1), J. Faubion (1). (1) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. 236-P, CFW 55:A71 Structure and properties of poly (vinyl alcohol)/starch/laponite RD nanocomposite ďŹ lms. X. TANG (1), S. Alavi (1). (1) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. Time with Poster Authors at Individual Posters

Health and Nutrition sPosterTalks  ## Engineering and Processing sPosterTalk s  ## ScientiďŹ c Initiative: Engineering & Processing Moderators: Vijay Singh, University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign, Urbana, IL, U.S.A.; John Mathew, Frito-Lay, Inc., Plano, TX, U.S.A. 205-P, CFW 55:A69 Study of different mixing conditions with their possible effects on fermentation and dough rheology. A. SHEHZAD (1), G. Della Valle (2), H. Chiron (2), L. Chaunier (2), D. Lourdin (2), A. Reguerre (2). (1) INRA, Nantes, Cedex 3, France; (2) INRA, Nantes, France 197-P, CFW 55:A73 Functional properties of wheat gluten obtained by well-deďŹ ned shear ow. E. E. VAN DER ZALM (1), A. Van der Goot (1), R. M. Boom (1). (1) Wageningen University, Wageningen, Netherlands 201-P, CFW 55:A73 Effect of the outer bran layers from germinated wheat grists on BREAD MAKINGPROPERTIES-5OZU -3%'5#()  Kobe Women’s University, Kobe, Japan 214-P, CFW 55:A68 Production of bread and pasta from our blends of wheat and millet (Panicum miliaceum L.). R. SCHOENLECHNER (1), M. 3ZATMĂ•RI !"AGDI 34šMšSKšZI %"ERGHOFER  (1) University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Department of Food Science and Technology, Institute of Food Technology, Vienna, Austria; (2) Department of Applied Biochemistry and Food Science, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budapest, Hungary; (3) Department 40

ScientiďŹ c Initiative: Health & Nutrition Moderator: Bruce R. Hamaker, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN U.S.A. 243-P, CFW 55:A67 A new – physiologically more relevant –iIn vitro starch digestibility method for slow carbohydrates screening. P. SANDERS (1), A. van wijk (1), L. Oudhuis (2). (1) Top Institute Food and Nutrition / University of Groningen, Microbial Physiology, Groningen, Netherlands; (2) Top Institute Food and Nutrition / TNO Quality of Life, Food and Biotechnolgy Innovations, Zeist, Netherlands 244-P, CFW 55:A70 The development of low-glycemic-response rice noodles. K. SRIKAEO (1), S. Mingyai (1). (1) Pibulsongkram Rajabhat University, Muang Phitsanulok, Thailand 245-P, CFW 55:A57 The differential roles of the four mammalian mucosal glucosidase subunits in starch digestion. A. LIN (1), B. L. .ICHOLS 21UEZADA #ALVILLO $22OSE ,3IM B. R. Hamaker (1). (1) Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A.; (2) Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, U.S.A.; (3) Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, San Luis Potosi, Mexico; (4) University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada; (5) University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada 246-P, CFW 55:A69 $IGESTIBILITYOFCROSS LINKEDMAIZESTARCHESWITHDIFFERENT amylose contents. R. SHUKRI (1). (1) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.


Ingredients and Cost of Goods Sold sPosterTalks 105-106, CC ScientiďŹ c Initiative: Ingredients & Cost of Goods Sold Note this session is 3:00 – 4:00 p.m. -ODERATOR'REET6ANDEPUTTE .ESTLE04#/RBE /RBE 3WITZERLAND 304-P, CFW 55:A51 Effect of different emulsiďŹ ers on mechanical resistance of proofed dough and speciďŹ c volume of white pan bread with and without fat. K. Isola (1), N. Bedoya (1), R. H. Cunha (1), Y. K. Chang (1), C. J. STEEL (1). (1) University of Campinas, #AMPINAS "RAZIL 289-P, CFW 55:A43 Effects of milled axseed and hydrocolloids on processing and qualities of wheat tortillas. T. W. CROWE (1), T. Crowe (1), M. Stieve (2). (1) StratiTek, East Windsor, NJ, U.S.A.; (2) Glanbia Nutritionals, Madison, WI, U.S.A. 290-P, CFW 55:A55 Naked barley – Opportunities for food with more than taste. M. KINNER (1), S. Siebenhandel-Ehn (1), H. Grausgruber (1), '+RONAWETTER ,0ÂŁREZ"ERROCAL 4'OLLINGER 0 Wurbs (1), M. PrĂźckler (1), E. Berghofer (1). (1) University of Natural Res & Applied Life Sciences, Vienna, Austria 305-P, CFW 55:A55 $EVELOPMENTANDCHARACTERIZATIONOFANEW' AMYLASE for antistaling. K. M. KRAGH (1), A. Hemmingsen (2), R. Mikkelsen (2), R. Floor (3), J. Sigel (4), I. Povlsen (5), R. Mejldal (2). (1) Genencor, Danisco, Viby J., Denmark; (2) Genencor, Danisco, Brabrand, Denmark; (3) University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands; (4) Danisco USA Inc., New Century, KS, U.S.A.; (5) Danisco, Brabrand, Denmark 296-P, CFW 55:A58 Einkorn, from kernel to bread: Technological and nutritional aspects. M. MARIOTTI (1), A. Hidalgo Vidal (1), M. Lucisano  ,&ONGARO !#OZZI !"RANDOLINI  $I34!-$IPARTIMENTODI3CIENZEE4ECNOLOGIE!LIMENTARI e Microbiologiche), UniversitĂ  degli Studi di Milano, Milan, )TALY #ONSIGLIOPERLA2ICERCAELASPERIMENTAZIONEIN !GRICOLTURA#2! 5NITĂ?DIRICERCAPERLA3ELEZIONEDEI#EREALI ELA6ALORIZZAZIONEDELLEVARIETĂ?VEGETALI3#6 3!NGELO Lodigiano (LO), Italy Time with Poster Authors at Individual Posters

Salt and Sodium: Looking for My Lost Shaker of Salt‌. Replacer: Flavor, Function, Future s Hot Topics 103-104, CC /RGANIZER-ODERATOR"ARBARA(EIDOLPH )#,0ERFORMANCE0RODUCTS LP, St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.A. Introduction. Barbara Heidolph, ICL Performance Products LP, St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.A. “A spoon of salt in a glass of water makes the water undrinkable. A spoon of salt in a lake is almost unnoticed.â€? D. RAY, Vice President of Strategic Innovation, Natural Marketing Institute – NMI, Harleysville, PA, U.S.A. Are consumers aware of the connection between their health and the salt in their foods? You bet! Last year 43% of the Primary Grocery Shoppers in the US said they wanted to get rid of/ eliminate sodium in their foods and beverages. This number goes up to 59% when we look at Matures. Are we doing enough to offer food and beverage solutions? Come learn about Consumer demand, Industry response and Stretch Goals that can deliver on Health and Wellness expectations. Physiology – Health and nutritional aspects of sodium in the diet. K. RYAN, Group Manager-Nutrition Science & Regulatory Affairs, Frito-Lay, Inc., Plano, TX, U.S.A. This presentation will highlight the role of sodium and salt in the diet and will also review recent government recommendations regarding sodium intakes. Regulating salt and other dietary sources of sodium to promote public health: the global policy landscape and outlook. S. ROLLER, JD, RD, MPH, Partner & Chair - Food & Drug Law Practice; Kelley Drye & Warren LLP, Washington, D.C., U.S.A. This presentation will highlight regulatory standards governing salt and other sodium-containing food ingredients in the United States and internationally and recent policy developments aimed at promoting public health by further reducing dietary exposure to salt and sodium, and potential implications for food manufacturers. Sodium functionality in bakery applications - technological and sensory aspects. P. KOEHLER, German Research Center for Food Chemistry, Freising, Germany Technological studies showed that dough rheological properties strongly depended on salt concentration and probably have to be compensated for by using additives. Binding studies revealed that gluten proteins do not bind any signiďŹ cant amounts of sodium, as do the other constituents, because the entire added sodium was found in the supernatant of a bread/saliva-mix already after 15 seconds of chewing. Differences in the salty taste of bread could easily be detected in low sodium breads but almost no distinction was possible between breads both having realtively high but different sodium concentrations. Challenges and strategies for sodium reduction. J. WEBER, Sr. Technology Manager, Ingredient Technology Group, G-tech, General Mills, Inc., Minneapolis, MN, U.S.A. A sodium reduction 101 reviewing the role of salt and sodium in foods, challenges with reducing sodium and approaches for achieving sodium reduction. Strategies for improving the sensory proďŹ le of sodium reduced foods. M. NOORT, TNO Quality of Life, Utrechtseweg 48, 3704 HE, The Netherlands The need for salt reduction is clear to consumers, dieticians ANDFOODMANUFACTURERS"UTHOWDOWEREALIZEASUBSTANTIAL reduction of Sodium intake, whilst remaining high quality food and consumer’s acceptance? The complexity of this issue requires innovative approaches. Existing and new sodium reduction strategies will be reviewed, including results with a focus on bakery products. Furthermore, emerging approaches in food technology, sensory and receptor science will be discussed. Open Panel Discussion 41

Wednesday p.m.

283-P, CFW 55:A75 Locust bean germ our as a replacement for gluten in pan bread. S. YAN (1), Y. Chen (2), F. MacRitchie (1), J. Faubion (1). (1) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.; (2) USDAARS, CGAHR, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. 284-P, CFW 55:A62 WITHDRAWN 285-P, CFW 55:A40 Inulin-type fructans as gluten-free bread improver: Sensory and nutritional quality. V. D. CAPRILES (1), J. G. Arêas (1). (1) 5NIVERSIDADEDE3åO0AULO 3åO0AULO "RAZIL 263-P, CFW 55:A49 Whole wheat spaghetti contains more avonoid glycosides and lignans than regular wheat spaghetti. R. Hirawan (1), T. BETA (1). (1) University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada 276-P, CFW 55:A52 Relative healthful potential of extruded lentil snacks. T. S. KAHLON (1). (1) Western Regional Research Center, USDAARS, Albany, CA, U.S.A. Time with Poster Authors at Individual Posters


F CUS SEVEN KEY SCIENTIFIC INITIATIVES

Your Science. Your Association.

Analytical Methods & Quality Biotechnology & Sustainability Cereal & Polymer Chemistry Engineering & Processing Food Safety & Regulatory Health & Nutrition Ingredients & Cost of Goods Sold

AACC International has long been a resource for technical information and a pipeline for presenting breakthrough research. To continue this vital tradition, and to focus on the core of the organization, AACC International is rededicating itself to its primary mission—the global advancement of grain science. To increase the quality of research and satisfy the diverse needs of members, AACC International will focus on 7 key initiatives. These will guide the association in providing members with relevant information, strong scientific communities, and significant opportunities for disseminating research findings. Join us as we build a stronger association that serves you…

Learn how AACC International is focusing on you—visit www.aaccnet.org/7.


Poster Schedule and Poster Categories Taking photographs of displayed materials is prohibited without permission from the authors. See page 45 of this program book for poster titles. Poster abstracts are available online at http://meeting.aaccnet.org. Click “Program and Events”, then use the drop-down option to choose abstracts. A PDF of poster abstracts is also available at www.aaccnet.org/cerealfoodsworld/openarticles/2010/CFW-55-4-suppl.pdf.

Posters Hall A, Convention Center Monday, October 25

7:00 – 10:00 a.m. 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. 4:00 – 7:00 p.m. 4:30 – 5:30 p.m.

Poster Set-Up Poster Viewing Beer and Poster Viewing Poster Authors Present – even-numbered posters

Tuesday, October 26

8:00 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. 1:15 – 2:15 p.m. 2:30 – 6:00 p.m.

Poster Viewing Poster Authors Present – odd-numbered posters Poster Take-Down

Poster Categories Engineering & Processing Cereal Kernel Processing and Properties /Kernels & Flours (Posters 192–196) Proteins (Posters 197–200) Bran, Fiber, and Bioactive Components (Posters 201–204) Dough Processing (Posters 205–208) Process Steps (Posters 209–213) End Products (Posters 214–228) Biofuels (Posters 229–234) Non Food Applications (Posters 235–236)

Analytical Methods & Quality Analysis of Grains and Flour (Posters 84–90) Starch Analysis (Posters 91–93) Proteins (Posters 94–99) Fibers and Micronutrients (Posters 100–104) Toxin Analysis (Posters 105–107) Dough Analysis (Posters 108–115) End-Product Analysis and Quality (Posters 116–127) Biotechnology & Sustainability Starch Biotechnology (Posters 128–132) Environmental and Genetic Aspects of Grain Quality (Posters 133–139) %NZYME4ECHNOLOGY0OSTERSn

Food Safety & Regulatory Food Safety and Regulatory (Posters 237–242)

Cereal & Polymer Chemistry Starch Structure (Posters 142–157) Starch Physico-Chemical Properties (Posters 158–166) Protein Chemistry (Posters 167–170) Fiber Chemistry (Posters 171–177) Dough Properties (Posters 178–180) Constituent Chemistry and End-Product Properties (Posters 181–187) Rice Chemistry (Posters 188–191)

Health & Nutrition Starch and Sugars (Posters 243–256) Protein Quality (Posters 257–261) Bran and Fiber (Posters 262–264) Small Bioactive Compounds (Posters 265–275) End Products (Posters 276–282) Gluten Free Products (Posters 283–288) Ingredients & Cost of Goods Sold Bran and Fiber-Rich Ingredients (Posters 289 – 295) Ingredients in Relation to End-Product Quality (Posters 296 – 305)

2011 Call for Papers Submissions for oral and poster presentations may be made March 1 – April 15, 2011. AACC International Annual Meeting October 16-19, 2011 Palm Spring Convention Center Palm Springs, CA, U.S.A.

43


See a Demo of the Online 11th Edition Approved Methods of Analysis at Marketplace and the Bookstore! The new online edition offers real-time distribution for new and revised methods. Check out the new enhancements in the online 11th Edition at the meeting! Q Q Q Q

AACC Intl. Marketplace – Grain Brain Central Sunday ....................................................... 6:00 – 9:00 p.m. Monday ..................................................... 4:00 – 7:00 p.m. Tuesday ................................................... 12:00 – 2:30 p.m.

Calculators Charts Spreadsheets Collab Study Reports

Q Videos Q Photo Galleries Q Audio Powerpoints

AACC Intl. PRESS Bookstore – Near Rooms 101–106 Monday ............................................. 9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. Tuesday ................................................... 9:00 – 11:00 a.m. Wednesday ............................................ 9:00 – 11:00 a.m.

You’re Invited to Become a Tech Committee Insider!

Pick topics in your interest areas and check out what those committees are working on for the Approved Methods. See page 16 for the listings in the program for the 21 topic areas. Anyone may attend the Technical Committee meetings, and there are some committees that are taking on new members at this time. If you are interested in being considered for a specific committee, alert the committee chair, or contact Anne Bridges, overall chair of the Approved Methods Technical Committee.

44

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Approved Methods Technical Committees meet in Savannah on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday mornings.


Poster Titles and Authors ,ISTEDBYSCIENTIlCINITIATIVEANDCATEGORY!FlLIATIONSARELISTEDASPROVIDEDBYTHEORGANIZERPRESENTER Cereal Foods World (CFW) number refers to abstract page location with the online searchable abstract document. ( indicates a poster that is part of a PosterTalk session. See program schedule for PosterTalk days and times.

Analytical Methods&Quality Analysis of Grains and Flour ( 84-P.

( 85-P.

86-P.

87-P.

88-P.

89-P.

90-P.

CFW 55:A60 A reinterpretation of SKCS Crush Response ProďŹ les. N. Misailidis (1), G. M. CAMPBELL (1). (1) Satake Centre for Grain Process Engineering, The University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom CFW 55:A68 Taking the hands and eyes out of grain inspection. J. SCHWEIZER (1), R. Pradon (1). (1) FOSS Analytical, (šGANĂ˜S 3WEDEN CFW 55:A59 An automated classiďŹ cation model based on NIR spectra to predict the technological quality of common wheat. M. MARIOTTI (1), N. Sinelli (1), M. Lucisano (1), G. Foca (2), R. Caramanico (3), M. Pagani (1), !5LRICI  $I34!-$IPARTIMENTODI3CIENZEE Tecnologie Alimentari e Microbiologiche), UniversitĂ  degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy; (2) Department of Agricultural and Food Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Reggio Emilia, Italy; (3) #2! 3#6 5NITĂ?DIRICERCAPERLASELEZIONEDEICEREALI ELAVALORIZZAZIONEDELLEVARIETĂ?VEGETALI 3!NGELO Lodigiano (LO), Italy CFW 55:A47 7HEATCHARACTERIZATIONWITHTHE#$AUTOMILL S. Geoffroy (1), F. Weisang (1), N. Boinot (1), A. DUBAT (1). (1) CHOPIN Technologies, Villeneuve la Garenne, France CFW 55:A39 Quality control of industrial millstreams. N. BOINOT (1), S. Geoffroy (1), A. Dubat (1). (1) CHOPIN Technologies, Villeneuve la Garenne, France CFW 55:A64 True inline analysis of our using high-resolution diode array spectrometry. J. Persson (1), J. 3#(7%):%2  &/33!NALYTICAL (šGANĂ˜S Sweden CFW 55:A63 Microstructure and composition of white and whole WHEATmOURSFROMTWO"RAZILIANLINEAGESTriticum aestivum 4/2/ 2!/Z˜RIO -:DE Miranda (3). (1) Federal University of Santa Catarina, &LORIAN˜POLIS 3# "RAZIL #ENTRODE!QUICULTURE 5NIVERSIDADE&EDERALDE3ANTA#ATARINA &LORIAN˜POLIS 3ANTA#ATARINA "RAZIL %MBRAPA TRIGO 0ASSO &UNDO 23 "RAZIL

Starch Analysis 91-P.

CFW 55:A77 Damaged starch in whole grain our by Amperometric method: Affecting factors. N. ZHOU (1), G. Vericel (2), T. Hansen (3), A. Dubat (2), N. Boinot (2), M.

92-P.

93-P.

Sun (4). (1) Kraft Foods, East Hanover, NJ, U.S.A.; (2) CHOPIN Technologies, Villeneuve-la-Garenne, France; (3) Kraft Foods, Glenview, IL, U.S.A.; (4) University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Kraft Foods, Urbana, IL, U.S.A. CFW 55:A48 A new technique to extract and dissolve starch from cereal grains for accurate structural analysis. J. (!3*)- :3YAHARIZA %,I 934AN S. Chu (1), R. G. Gilbert (1). (1) Centre for Nutrition and Food Sciences, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD, Australia CFW 55:A56 SDmatic test: Boric acid substitution by citric acid. O. Le Brun (1), A. Ragaleux (1), N. Boinot (1), A. DUBAT (1). (1) CHOPIN Technologies, Villeneuve la Garenne, France

Proteins ( 94-P.

( 95-P.

96-P.

97-P.

98-P.

( 99-P.

CFW 55:A45 Fundamental study on the relationship between protein changes occurring during malting and malting quality in sorghum. L. I. EZEOGU (1), G. Mokhawa (1), B. Bulawayo (1). (1) Natl. Food Technology Research Centre, Kanye, Botswana CFW 55:A55 Effects of specialty proteins from high-selenium wheat on dough properties. P. G. KRISHNAN (1), V. Vankar  +'LOVER 7"ERZONSKY +7OO  (1) South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD, U.S.A.; (2) MGP Ingredients, Atchison, KS, U.S.A. CFW 55:A55 Distinction of spelt and wheat by means of speciďŹ c proteins. A. Koenig (1), H. Wieser (1), P. KOEHLER (1). (1) German Research Center for Food Chemistry, Freising, Germany CFW 55:A62 Determination of wheat type ratio in noodle our by ANALYZINGPROTEINCOMPOSITIONWITHHIGH PERFORMANCE liquid chromatograph (HPLC). H. OKUSU (1). (1) Nippon Flour Mills Co. Ltd., Kanagawa, Japan CFW 55:A35 Durum quality assessment: A comparison of different physical and rheological methods. W. A. ABUHAMMAD (1), E. M. Elias (1), F. A. Manthey (1). (1) North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, U.S.A. CFW 55:A60 Microscopic and spectral analysis of soybeans with differing protein subunit composition. S. S. MILLER  ,.0IETRZAK 60OYSA 3'LEDDIE % M. Watson (1). (1) Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada; (2) Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada, London, ON, Canada

45


Fibers and Micronutrients ( 100-P.

( 101-P.

( 102-P.

103-P.

104-P.

CFW 55:A72 A new method to determine the carbohydrate proďŹ le in soy ďŹ ber or cereal grains. T. TRAN (1), B. Pierce (1), 70EREZ  3OLAE,,# 3T,OUIS -/ 53! CFW 55:A70 Fiber variation in whole-grain soft wheat our within the United States. E. SOUZA (1), M. Guttieri (2). (1) USDA ARS, Wooster, OH, U.S.A.; (2) Ohio State University, Wooster, OH, U.S.A. CFW 55:A72 Using the latest technology to measure gastrointestinal transit time after dietary ďŹ ber intervention. D. TIMM (1). (1) University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, U.S.A. CFW 55:A53 Application of visible and near-infrared reectance spectroscopy (Vis/NIRS) to determine anthocyanin contents in leaf and stem of purple corn. E. KENTARO (1). (1) National Agriculture and Food 2ESEARCH/RGANIZATION +UMAMOTO *APAN CFW 55:A73 Antioxidant activity-guided fractionation of Blue WHEAT#49, -"UNZEL  5NIVERSITYOF Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, U.S.A.

111-P.

112-P.

113-P.

114-P.

Toxin Analysis ( 105-P.

106-P.

107-P.

CFW 55:A49 Using lateral ow devices for quantitative and semiquantitative analysis of mycotoxins and GMO. D. HOUCHINS (1), M. Prinster (1), S. Nenonen (1). (1) Romer Labs, Inc., Union, MO, U.S.A. CFW 55:A49 Testing for mycotoxins using LC/MS/MS. D. HOUCHINS (1), M. Prinster (1), C. Brewe (1), J. Richard (1), E. Pichler (2). (1) Romer Labs, Inc., Union, MO, U.S.A.; (2) Romer Labs Diagnostic GmbH, Tulln, Austria CFW 55:A64 Nondestructive single kernel DON analysis of wheat for FHB resistance evaluation. K. H. PEIRIS (1), W. W. Bockus (2), F. E. Dowell (3). (1) Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.; (2) Department of Plant Pathology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.; (3) USDA-ARS, Center for Grain and Animal Health Research, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.

115-P.

End-Product Analysis and Quality 116-P.

117-P. ( 118-P.

Dough Analysis 108-P.

109-P.

110-P.

46

CFW 55:A74 Dough mixing and expansion characteristics of our millstreams. K. Wall (1), G. M. CAMPBELL (1). (1) Satake Centre for Grain Process Engineering, The University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom CFW 55:A42 Extensigraph dough preparation based on protein CONTENTAND GMIXOGRAPHFORLIMITEDSAMPLESIZE Y. R. CHEN (1), B. W. Seabourn (1), T. J. Herald (1), M. Tilley (1). (1) USDA ARS CGAHR, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. CFW 55:A46 Mixolab studies for Kansas wheat varieties dough systems with bran addition. H. GAJULA (1), D.

!RDUZLAR ($OGAN *&AUBION  +ANSAS State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.; (2) Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul, Turkey CFW 55:A37 Determination of the mixing and pasting properties of health grains using Mixolab. D. ARDUZLAR (1), M. Boyacioglu (2), J. Faubion (3), H. Dogan (3). (1) Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul, Turkey; (2) Okan University Faculty of Engineering & Architecture, Istanbul, Turkey; (3) Kansas State University, Department of Grain Science and Industry, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. CFW 55:A70 Rheological studies of Kansas wheat varieties. S. 3TEEPLES ('!*5,! $!RDUZLAR ( Dogan (1). (1) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.; (2) Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul, Turkey CFW 55:A56 Rye and mixed rye-wheat our: Mixolab investigations. O. Le Brun (1), C. Leroux (1), N. BOINOT (1), A. Dubat (1). (1) CHOPIN Technologies, Villeneuve la Garenne, France CFW 55:A76 Correlation between rheological behavior of corn dough and the quality parameters of tortilla making. G. ZACARIAS (1), A. Felix (1), M. Trejo (1). (1) Granotec Mexico, El Marques, Mexico CFW 55:A50 Comparing the fermentation power of wheat and apple sourdough starters using the Risograph. Y. HSU (1), G. G. Hou (1). (1) Wheat Marketing Center, Portland, OR, U.S.A.

119-P.

( 120-P.

CFW 55:A70 2HEOLOGICALCHARACTERIZATIONOFFOUR+ANSASHARD red winter wheat cultivars in relation to end-product quality. S. Steeples (1), B. W. Seabourn (2), H. DOGAN (1). (1) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. WITHDRAWN CFW 55:A42 Improvement of sponge cake baking test procedure for simple and reliable estimation of soft white wheat quality. H. CHOI (1), T. Harris (2), B. Baik (2). (1) School of Food Science, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, U.S.A.; (2) Department of Crop & Soil Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, U.S.A. CFW 55:A35 Effect of whole waxy wheat our on mufďŹ n quality. K. ACOSTA (1), W. L. Kerr (1). (1) Department of Food Science & Technology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A. CFW 55:A45 Investigation of wheat quality requirements and Australian wheat suitability for the traditional Indian wheat food chapati. H. K. FENTON (1), V. A. Solah (1), D. Diepeveen (2), H. Gujral (3), G. B. Crosbie (4), H. G. Williams (1). (1) Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Australia; (2) Department of Agriculture Western Australia, Perth, Australia; (3) Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar, India; (4) Crosbie Grain Quality Consulting, Perth, Australia


121-P.

122-P.

123-P.

124-P.

125-P.

126-P.

( 127-P.

CFW 55:A46 Characterisation of HMW-GS and LMW-GS in Australian and Indian wheat cultivars and their relationship to chapati quality. H. K. FENTON (1), W. Ma (2), D. Diepeveen (2), V. A. Solah (1), H. G. Williams (1). (1) Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Australia; (2) Department of Agriculture Western Australia, WA State Agricultural Biotechnology Centre, Perth, Australia CFW 55:A46 A simple, fast, and reliable method to predict pasta yellowness. B. FU (1), L. Schlichting (1), A. Singh  #0OZNIAK  #ANADIAN'RAIN#OMMISSION Winnipeg, MB, Canada; (2) Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Swift Current, SK, Canada; (3) University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada CFW 55:A45 Extruded products based on whole wheat and mesquite: Chemical, sensory, and nutritional quality. M. FALCON-VILLA (1), J. M. Barron-Hoyos (1), /4ORTOLEDO /RTIZ .'(EREDIA 3ANDOVAL  (1) Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo, Sonora, -EXICO #ENTRODE)NVESTIGACI˜NENALIMENTACIONY Desarrollo, Hermosillo Sonora, Mexico CFW 55:A43 Physical-chemical evaluation of wheat triticale our mixtures and its relationship with tortilla quality. A. #/4!'!34%,5- -3ALAZAR'ARCIA # -EDINA 2ODRIGUEZ *#ARDENAS,OPEZ , 3ERNA$IAZ  5NIVERSIDADDE3ONORA (ERMOSILLO Sonora, Mexico; (2) Universidad Autonoma de Queretaro, Queretaro, Mexico CFW 55:A60 Texture evaluation of wheat our tortillas using the SHEARANDEXTENSIBILITYMETHODS#-EDINA2ODRIGUEZ (1), M. SALAZAR-GARCIA (2), N. Buitimea Cantua (2), M. Silveira Gramont (2), A. Cota Gastelum (2). (1) Univ Autonoma de Queretaro, Hermosillo Sonora, Mexico; (2) Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico CFW 55:A36 %VALUATIONOFNINEMAIZEGENOTYPES TOELABORATE TORTILLAS'!2!-"5,! 6),,! **IMENEZ *UĂ•REZ %'UTIERREZ !RIAS %DELA#RUZ ,Ă•ZARO -!PARICIO 4RAPALA  #).6%34!6 IPN Queretaro, Queretaro, Qro., Mexico; (2) Instituto 4ECNOL˜GICO3UPERIORDELA2EGI˜N3IERRA 4EAPA 4AB -EXICO 5NIVERSIDAD*UĂ•REZ!UT˜NOMADE4ABASCO Villahermosa, Tabasco, Mexico CFW 55:A71 #HARACTERIZATIONANDDISCRIMINATIONOFPOPCORNmAKE polymorphology. J. SWELEY (1), D. J. Rose (2), D. S. Jackson (2). (1) University of Nebraska, Omaha, NE, U.S.A.; (2) University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, U.S.A.

Biotechnology&Sustainability Starch Biotechnology ( 128-P.

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CFW 55:A38 Development of new markers to genotype the functional SNPs of SSIIa, a gene responsible for GELATINIZATIONTEMPERATUREOFRICESTARCH*"!/ (1), Y. Lu (1), P. Xiao (1), Y. Shao (1). (1) Zhejiang 5NIVERSITY (ANGZHOU 02#0EOPLES2EPOF#HINA CFW 55:A36 Inuence of wheat starch structure on starch hydrolysis. G. AHUJA (1), S. Jaiswal (1), P. Hucl (1), R. N. Chibbar (1). (1) Department of Plant Sciences & Crop Development Centre, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada CFW 55:A37 Relationship between waxy alleles and the amylose content in wheat isogenic lines. T. AUSSENAC (1), ,2HAZI '"RANLARD  )NST0OLYTECHNIQUE LaSalle Beauvais, Beauvais, France; (2) INRA Clermont-Ferrand, Clermont-Ferrand, France CFW 55:A59 Effect of planting date on cornstarch structures and properties. J. MEDIC (1), L. Abendroth (2), R. Elmore (2), M. Blanco (3), J. Jane (1). (1) Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A.; (2) Department of Agronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A.; (3) USDA-ARS Plant Introduction Research Unit, Ames, IA, U.S.A. CFW 55:A63 Starch characteristics of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) grown in two different localities and under rain fed or irrigation conditions. M. OVANDO-MARTINEZ (1), ,"ELLO 0EREZ +7HITNEY 0/SORIO $IAZ (2), S. Simsek (1). (1) North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, U.S.A.; (2) CEPROBI-IPN, Yautepec, Morelos, Mexico

Environmental and Genetic Aspects of Grain Quality ( 133-P.

134-P.

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136-P.

CFW 55:A65 Effect of genotype and environment on wheat our water absorption tolerance. G. E. RATTIN (1), J. M. Faubion (1), R. Miller (1), J. Wilson (1). (1) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. CFW 55:A45 The inuence of low nitrogen conditions on quality ANDNUTRITIONALVALUESINQUALITYPROTEINMAIZE (QPM). O. Elago (1), M. T. LABUSCHAGNE (1). (1) University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, Rep of South Africa CFW 55:A71 Unusual weather pattern impacts on wheat quality INNORTHERN0ARANÕ3TATE "RAZIL#34)"/,! -:-IRANDA *-&ERNANDES  "RAZILIAN Agricultural Research Corporation – Embrapa Trigo, 0ASSO&UNDO23 "RAZIL CFW 55:A44 Assessing our quality and functionality of fallplanted spring wheat. N. DHULL (1), S. Mojab (1), J. Larsen (1), K. Seetharaman (1). (1) University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada 47


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CFW 55:A41 Sponge & dough baking quality of wheat grown in Western Australian trials. L. CATO (1). (1) Dept. of Agriculture and Food WA, South Perth, WA, Australia CFW 55:A76 %VALUATIONOFä AMYLASEACCUMULATIONANDFALLING numbers in soft red and soft white wheat adapted TO-ICHIGAN.95 2,AURENZ ,3ILER (1), P. Ng (2), J. Lewis (1). (1) Michigan State University, Department of Crop and Soil Science, East Lansing, MI, U.S.A.; (2) Michigan State University, Department of Food Science & Human Nutrition, East Lansing, MI, U.S.A. CFW 55:A47 Physical, alimentary and functional properties of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) genotypes grew in the northwest of MĂŠxico. M. GĂ“MEZ-FAVELA  3-ORA 2OCHIN 2'UTIERREZ $ORADO * MilĂĄn Carrillo (2), E. MilĂĄn-Noris (3), M. Heiras0ALAZUELOS #2EYES -ORENO  -AESTR¤A EN#IENCIAY4ECNOLOG¤AEN!LIMENTOS 5NIVERSIDAD !UT˜NOMADE3INALOA #ULIACAN 3INALOA -EXICO Programa Regional del Noroeste para el Doctorado EN"IOTECNOLOG¤A 5NIVERSIDAD!UT˜NOMADE3INALOA #ULIACĂ•N 3INALOA -EXICO 5NIVERSIDAD!UT˜NOMA de Sinaloa, Culiacan, Sinaloa, Mexico

Enzyme Technology ( 140-P.

141-P.

CFW 55:A77 Cyanophycin biosynthesis from sorghum-derived sugars and recombinant Escherichia coli. Y. ZHANG (1), A. Kumar (1), P. Vadlani (1), S. Narayanan (1). (1) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. CFW 55:A44 The secondary substrate binding site of GH11 Bacillus subtilis xylanase A signiďŹ cantly affects substrate binding and activity. S. Cuyvers (1), E. DORNEZ (1), A. Pollet (1), J. A. Delcour (1), C. M. Courtin (1). (1) Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven, Belgium

Cereal&Polymer Chemistry

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Starch Structure ( 142-P.

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CFW 55:A44 3TRUCTURE PROPERTYCHARACTERIZATIONOFMAIZEAND POTATOSTARCHOFVARYINGGRANULESIZES3$()4!, (1), A. K. Shrestha (1), M. J. Gidley (1). (1) Centre for Nutrition and Food Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Brisbane, QLD, Australia CFW 55:A40 -ELTINGANDCRYSTALLIZATIONOFSHORTLINEARä GLUCANS studied by in situ synchrotron wide-angle X-ray diffraction. L. CAI (1), Y. Bai (1), Y. Shi (1). (1) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. CFW 55:A74 Polymorphic structure, crystallinity, and double helical component of developing wheat starch granules. R. N. WADUGE (1), K. Seetharaman (1). (1) University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada CFW 55:A61 Distribution of granule channels, protein, and phospholipid in triticale and corn starches as revealed by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

153-P.

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S. NAGULESWARAN (1), J. Li (1), T. Vasanthan (1), D. Bressler (1). (1) University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada CFW 55:A77 Effects of octenylsuccinylation on the structure ANDDIGESTIBILITYOFHIGH AMYLOSEMAIZESTARCH" Zhang (1), Q. HUANG (1), F. Luo (1), X. Fu (1). (1) College of Food Science, South China University of 4ECHNOLOGY 'UANGZHOU 02#0EOPLES2EPOF#HINA CFW 55:A62 Effect of annealing on segmental mobility of polymers in starches from different botanical sources. K. K. NANTANGA (1), R. Hoover (2), K. Seetharaman (1). (1) University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada; (2) Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NF, Canada CFW 55:A73 The impact of structural changes on heat-moisture treatment on the susceptibility of normal and waxy potato starches toward ι-amylase. V. VAMADEVAN (1), R. Hoover (1), K. Seetharaman (2), J. Li (3), T. Vasanthan (3), L. Qiang (4). (1) Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NF, Canada; (2) University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada; (3) University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada; (4) Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Guelph, ON, Canada CFW 55:A74 %FFECTOFIODINEONTHEORGANIZATIONOFGLUCAN polymers of developing wheat starch granules. R. N. WADUGE (1), K. Seetharaman (1). (1) University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada CFW 55:A35 -OLECULARCHARACTERISTICSOFMAIZESTARCHANDTORTILLA digestibility as affected by pigmentation of the grains. %!'!-! !#%6%$/ 0/SORIO $IAZ 3, 2ODRIGUEZ !MBRIZ  #%02/") )0. 9AUTEPEC Mexico CFW 55:A54 Acid-hydrolysis of various starches for blocklet isolation. H. KIM (1), J. Kim (1), S. Lim (1). (1) Korea University, Seoul, South Korea CFW 55:A69 Unique composition of our from sweet wheat lacking '"33)AND33))AENZYMES43()-"!4! - Saito (2), P. Vrinten (3), T. Takiya (1), T. Inokuma (1), A. Sunohara (1), T. Nakamura (2). (1) Nippon Flour Mills Co., Ltd., Atsugi, Japan; (2) Tohoku National Agriculture Research Center, Morioka, Japan; (3) Bioriginal Food & Science Corp., Saskatoon, SK, Canada CFW 55:A41 Evidence of polymer mobility in a starch lintner. F. CHAUHAN (1), K. Seetharaman (1). (1) University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada CFW 55:A54 Inuence of A/B-type granule ratio on cross-linked wheat starch properties. H. KIM (1), K. C. Huber (2). (1) Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A.; (2) University of Idaho, Moscow, ID, U.S.A. CFW 55:A40 3TRUCTURALCHARACTERIZATIONOF0ERUVIANCARROTSTARCHBY acid hydrolysis. R. B. Campanha (1), C. M. FRANCO (1). (1) São Paulo State University, São JosÊ do Rio 0RETO "RAZIL


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CFW 55:A69 Amylopectin ďŹ ne structure: Mechanism of the long chain function. X. SHEN (1), G. Zhang (2), E. J. Bertoft (3), H. R. Hamaker (1). (1) Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A.; (2) Jiangnan University, Wuxi, PRC Peoples Rep Of China; (3) University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden CFW 55:A38 Effect of pearling on the morphological and physicochemical characteristics of barley starch. L. !"%,,/ 0%2%: --3ANCHEZ 2IVERA # .UÂśEZ 3ANTIAGO 3,2ODRIGUEZ !MBRIZ  CEPROBI-IPN, Yautepec, Mexico

168-P.

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Starch Physico-Chemical Properties 158-P.

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CFW 55:A54 Effects of hydrocolloids on the pasting and paste properties of commercial pea starch. H. KIM (1), J. BeMiller (1). (1) Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A. CFW 55:A38 Reaction of octenyl succinic anhydride with insoluble granular starch and soluble maltodextrin. Y. BAI (1), Y. Shi (1). (1) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. CFW 55:A57 WITHDRAWN CFW 55:A71 Effects of the order of addition of reagent and catalyst on modiďŹ cation of starch with rapidly reacting reagents. Z. SUI (1), J. N. BeMiller (1). (1) Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A. CFW 55:A75 Physicochemical and pasting properties of starches from ďŹ eld pea, lentil and chickpea. N. WANG (1), R. Toews (2), L. Maximiuk (2). (1) Canadian Grain Commission, Grain Research Laboratory, Winnipeg, MB, Canada; (2) Canadian Grain Commission, Winnipeg, MB, Canada CFW 55:A51 'ELATINIZATIONBEHAVIOROFORGANICANDCONVENTIONAL rice starches assessed by rheological and thermal ANALYSES0)% 96ODOVOTZ  4HE/HIO3TATE University, Columbus, OH, U.S.A. CFW 55:A43 WITHDRAWN CFW 55:A48 Changes of physical properties of octenyl succinic anhydride rice starches by gamma irradiation. J. HAN (1). (1) Sangmyung University, Seoul, South Korea CFW 55:A60 Rheological and structural properties of waxy corn MUTANTSTARCHESASHYDROLYZEDBYISOAMYLASEAND beta-amylase in the granular state. M. MENDEZMONTEALVO (1), Y. Wang (1), M. Campbell (2). (1) University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A.; (2) Truman State University, Kirksville, MO, U.S.A.

Fiber Chemistry ( 171-P.

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Protein Chemistry ( 167-P.

CFW 55:A60 Effect of the Hofmeister series on gluten aggregation measured using a torque-based technique. J. P. MELNYK (1), J. Dreisoerner (2), M. F. Marcone (1), K. Seetharaman (1). (1) University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada; (2) Brabender GmbH and Co. KG, Duisburg, Germany

CFW 55:A39 Evaluation of hydration and wheat gluten secondary structure in dough in the presence of bran by ATRFTIR spectroscopy. J. E. BOCK (1), S. Damodaran (1). (1) University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, U.S.A. CFW 55:A54 Protein interactions of soy protein isolate obtained by high-moisture extrusion process (HMEP). Y. KIL CHANG (1), L. Sebio (1), N. Pampa-Quispe (1). (1) 5NIVERSIDADE%STADUALDE#AMPINAS #AMPINAS "RAZIL CFW 55:A50 ,IPIDEFFECTSINCLUDINGAMONOGLYCERIDE STABILIZED shortening alternative on structural features of our proteins assessed by front-face uorescence. B. HUSCHKA (1), F. Bonomi (2), K. Seetharaman (1). (1) University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada; (2) University of Milan, Milan, Italy

177-P.

CFW 55:A53 Relationship between solution and gel behavior of arabinoxylans: Effect of structure on properties in aqueous systems. M. S. KALE (1), C. Yang (2), O. H. Campanella (1), B. R. Hamaker (1). (1) Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A.; (2) Jiangnan University, Wushi, PRC Peoples Rep of China CFW 55:A75 Removal of the 3-O-substituent from 2,3-disubstituent INCREASESTHEENZYMATICDEGRADABILITYOFALKALI extractable arabinoxylans from corn bran. H. XU (1), B. Reuhs (1), B. R. Hamaker (1). (1) Purdue University, Whistler Center for Carbohydrate Research, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A. CFW 55:A73 %NDOGENOUSä GLUCANASEACTIVITYINSELECTED/NTARIO wheats. A. VATANDOUST (1), S. Ragaee (1), P. Wood (2), S. Tosh (2), K. Seetharaman (1). (1) University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada; (2) Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Guelph, ON, Canada CFW 55:A51 0HYSICOCHEMICALPROPERTIESOFWATER ANDENZYME extractable arabinoxylans from hulless barley. M. S. ):9$/2#:9+ 4-C-ILLAN 3"AZIN A. Chepurna (2). (1) Canadian Grain Commission, Winnipeg, MB, Canada; (2) University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada CFW 55:A65 Variation in oxidative gelation among wheat mill streams. D. D. RAMSEYER (1), A. D. Bettge (2), C. F. Morris (2). (1) School of Food Science, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, U.S.A.; (2) USDAARS Western Wheat Quality Laboratory, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, U.S.A. CFW 55:A62 #OMPOSITIONALANDSTRUCTURALCHARACTERIZATIONOF HULLESSBARLEYLINESOFVARIABLEä GLUCANCONTENT3 NAIR (1), S. Ullrich (1), B. Baik (1). (1) Washington State University, Pullman, WA, U.S.A. CFW 55:A67 Production of arabinoxylooligosaccharides from corn alkali-extractable arabinoxylan. P. RUMPAGAPORN (1), B. Hamaker (1). (1) Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A.

49


Dough Properties

Rice Chemistry

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CFW 55:A76 Ways of improving quality of dough during the dough mixing process. V. P. YANAKOV (1). (1) Tavryiska State Agro Technical University, Ukraine, Washington, DC, U.S.A. CFW 55:A73 Physical-chemical and rheological property of wheat our with addition of three different sources OFRESISTANTSTARCH-6ERNAZA 9+),#(!.' (1). (1) State University of Campinas – UNICAMP, #AMPINAS "RAZIL CFW 55:A52 Pasting properties of wheat our with the addition of whole grain wheat our. L. Z. Jaekel (1), M. Schmiele (1), S. Cardoso (1), C. J. Steel (1), Y. K. CHANG (1). (1) State University of Campinas – UNICAMP, #AMPINAS "RAZIL

Constituent Chemistry and End-Product Properties 181-P.

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50

CFW 55:A59 )NVESTIGATIONONSTARCHANDPROTEINORGANIZATIONIN semolina pasta. A. MARTI (1), M. Pagani (1), K. Seetharaman (2). (1) UniversitĂ  degli Studi Di Milano, Milano, Italy; (2) University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada CFW 55:A51 )NVESTIGATINGOFTHESTRUCTURALORGANIZATIONOFPROTEINS and polysaccharides in rice pasta. S. IAMETTI (1), A. Barbiroli (1), A. Marti (1), M. Pagani (1), P. Rasmussen (1), F. Bonomi (1). (1) UniversitĂ  degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy CFW 55:A52 .!$0 ( HYDROLYZINGENZYMESOFTriticum aestivum ,)DENTIlCATION CHARACTERIZATION ANDAPPLICATION in breadmaking. I. J. JOYE (1), K. Brijs (1). (1) Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven, Belgium CFW 55:A67 #OMPARISONBETWEENPOTASSIUMBROMATEANDOZONEGAS as oxidants in breadmaking. H. P. SANDHU (1), F. A. Manthey (1). (1) North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, U.S.A. CFW 55:A48 Physicochemical properties of high-yield rice varieties in relation to rice noodle quality. H. Han (1), J. Cho (2), B. KOH (1). (1) Keimyung University, Daegu, Korea; (2) National Institute of Crop Science, Rural Development Administration, 151, Seodun-dong Gwonseon-gu Suwon Gyeonggi-do, Korea CFW 55:A52 Relationship of tortilla quality to our and dough properties. T. JONDIKO (1), F. Barros (1), J. Alviola (1), L. W. Rooney (1), M. Tilley (2), A. Ibrahim (1), D. Hays (1), J. Awika (1). (1) Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS Center for Grain and Animal Health Research, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. CFW 55:A56 %FFECTSOFmOURPARTICLESIZEANDAUTOCLAVINGON physicochemical and functional properties of dough and Cretan barley rusks. A. LAZARIDOU (1), A. Marinopoulou (1), N. P. Matsoukas (1), C. G. Biliaderis (1). (1) Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece

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CFW 55:A58 Physico-chemical properties of African rice (Oryza glaberrima) varieties. J. T. MANFUL (1), M. A. &ITZGERALD  !FRICA2ICE#ENTER #OTONOU "ENIN (2) International Rice Research Institute, Los Banos, Philippines CFW 55:A50 Hydration characteristics of hybrid and pureline rice cultivars. M. B. HUNT (1), A. A. Ambardekar (1), T. J. Siebenmorgen (1). (1) University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A. CFW 55:A70 0RODUCTIONANDPROPERTIESOFPREGELATINIZEDRICEmOURS from colored rice varieties. R. SOMPONG (1), R. Schoenlechner (1), E. Berghofer (1). (1) University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, DFST, Vienna, Austria CFW 55:A41 Formation and stability of rice bran oil-in-water (o/w) EMULSIONSSTABILIZEDBYFOOD GRADEBIOPOLYMERS2 CHAROEN (1), D. J. McClements (1), A. Jangchud (2), K. Jangchud (2), T. Harnsilawat (2), O. Naivikul (2). (1) University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, U.S.A.; (2) Kasetsart University, Bangkok, Thailand

Engineering&Processing Cereal Kernel Processing and Properties/ Kernels & Flours 192-P.

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CFW 55:A68 Modelling wheat breakage during ďŹ rst break roller milling based on single kernel characteristics. C. J. Sharp (1), K. Wall (1), F. Mateos-Salvador (1), G. M. CAMPBELL (1). (1) Satake Centre for Grain Process Engineering, The University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom CFW 55:A65 Predicting the milling yield of wheat kernels based on their morphology. G. E. RATTIN (1), M. Brijwani (1), H. Dogan (1). (1) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. CFW 55:A37 Composition and functionality of wheat our mill fractions obtained through different test mills. D. !2$5:,!2 ($OGAN *'WIRTZ - Boyacioglu (3). (1) Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul, Turkey; (2) Kansas State University, Department of Grain Science and Industry, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.; (3) Okan University Faculty of Engineering & Architecture, Istanbul, Turkey CFW 55:A47 Distribution of nonstarch polysaccharides in soft wheat pilot mill streams. M. GUTTIERI (1), C. Sneller (1), %3OUZA  /HIO3TATE5NIVERSITY 7OOSTER OH, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS Soft Wheat Quality Laboratory, Wooster, OH, U.S.A. CFW 55:A66 Thermal and mechanical properties of whole and milled pulses. K. Rosentrater (1), M. TULBEK (2). (1) USDA ARS North Central Agricultural Research Laboratory, Brookings, SD, U.S.A.; (2) Northern Crops Inst., Fargo, ND, U.S.A.


Proteins ( 197-P.

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CFW 55:A73 Functional properties of wheat gluten obtained by well-deďŹ ned shear ow. E. E. VAN DER ZALM (1), A. Van der Goot (1), R. M. Boom (1). (1) Wageningen University, Wageningen, Netherlands CFW 55:A54 $ERIVATIZATIONOFRICEWINEMEALUSINGCOMMERCIAL PROTEASESANDCHARACTERIZATIONOFRICEWINEMEAL hydrolysates. S. KIM (1), C. Kim (1), H. Choi (1), B. Kim (1), C. Park (1), M. Baik (1). (1) Kyung-Hee University, Yong-in, South Korea CFW 55:A49 Hydrolysis of rice syrup mill using various commercial proteases. S. HONG (1), C. Kim (1), H. Choi (1), B. Kim (1), C. Park (1), M. Baik (1). (1) Kyung-Hee University, Yong-in, South Korea CFW 55:A56 Proteolysis of defatted rice bran using commercial proteases. A. LEE (1), C. Kim (1), H. Choi (1), B. Kim (1), C. Park (1), M. Baik (1). (1) Kyung Hee University, Yong-in, South Korea

206-P.

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Process Steps ( 209-P.

Bran, Fiber, and Bioactive Components ( 201-P.

( 202-P.

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CFW 55:A73 Effect of the outer bran layers from germinated wheat GRISTSONBREADMAKINGPROPERTIES-5OZU - SEGUCHI (1). (1) Kobe Women’s University, Kobe, Japan CFW 55:A67 Production of xylo-oligosaccharides from corn ďŹ ber (separated from DDGS) by autohydrolysis. A. SAMALA (1), R. Srinivasan (2), M. P. Yadav (3), T. Kim (2), L. Prewitt (2). (1) Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS, U.S.A.; (2) Mississippi State, MS, U.S.A.; (3) Wyndmoor, PA, U.S.A. CFW 55:A42 $ERIVATIZATIONOFRICEWINEMILLUSINGCOMMERCIAL carbohydrase. S. CHOI (1), J. Lee (1), J. Park (1), H. Choi (1), B. Kim (1), M. Baik (1). (1) Kyung Hee University, Yong-in, South Korea CFW 55:A61 %FFECTOFNIXTAMALIZATIONANDEXTRUSIONPROCESSON FERULICACIDCONTENTINPIGMENTED-EXICANMAIZE S. MORA-ROCHIN (1), C. Reyes-Moreno (1), J. 'UTIERREZ 5RIBE 33ERNA 3ALDIVAR *-ILĂ•N Carrillo (1). (1) Programa Regional del Noroeste PARAEL$OCTORADOEN"IOTECNOLOG¤A 5NIVERSIDAD !UT˜NOMADE3INALOA #ULIACAN 3INALOA -EXICO  $EPARTAMENTODE"IOTECNOLOG¤AE)NGENIER¤A DE!LIMENTOS )NSTITUTO4ECNOL˜GICOYDE%STUDIOS Superiores de Monterrey-Campus Monterrey, -ONTERREY .UEVO,E˜N -EXICO

Dough Processing ( 205-P.

CFW 55:A69 Study of different mixing conditions with their possible effects on fermentation and dough rheology. A. SHEHZAD (1), G. Della Valle (2), H. Chiron (2), L. Chaunier (2), D. Lourdin (2), A. Reguerre (2). (1) INRA, Nantes, Cedex 3, France; (2) INRA, Nantes, France

CFW 55:A37 Mixing and pasting characteristics of organic and conventional whole wheat ours milled on roller and stone mills. D. ARDUZLAR (1), H. Dogan (2), M. Boyacioglu (3). (1) Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul, Turkey; (2) Kansas State University, Department of Grain Science and Industry, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.; (3) Okan University Faculty of Engineering & Architecture, Istanbul, Turkey CFW 55:A63 Effect of kneading speed on thermomechanical properties of our doughs. A. S. PASTUKHOV (1), H. Dogan (2). (1) Saint-Petersburg State University, Peterhof, Russia; (2) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. CFW 55:A46 Studies on the improvement of the elastic component OFCORNZEINDOUGHS-&%6:)/',5 /( Campanella (1), B. R. Hamaker (1). (1) Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A.

( 210-P. ( 211-P.

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CFW 55:A71 Electro-kinetic dewatering as a potential new lowcost technique for drying food processing waste. V. STOJCESKA (1), A. Plunkett (1), D. Russell (1), J. Hall (2), J. Lamont-Black (3). (1) The Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, United Kingdom; (2) University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom; (3) Electrokinetic Ltd., Manchester, United Kingdom CFW 55:A65 WITHDRAWN CFW 55:A58 Properties of high amylose starch-beeswax inclusion complexes prepared by steam jet cooking. S. X. LIU (1), J. Kenar (1), F. Felker (1), G. Fanata (1), J. Byars (1). (1) USDA ARS NCAUR, Peoria, IL, U.S.A. CFW 55:A38 Estimating the theoretical energy required to dry rice. M. A. BILLIRIS (1), T. J. Siebenmorgen (1). (1) University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A. CFW 55:A66 Heat transfer fouling: Evaporation in bioprocessing. K. RAUSCH (1), A. Arora (2), N. Lin (1), M. Kwak (1), V. Singh (1), M. E. Tumbleson (1). (1) University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, U.S.A.; (2) University of Wisconsin, Stevens Point, WI, U.S.A.

End Products ( 214-P.

CFW 55:A68 Production of bread and pasta from our blends of wheat and millet (Panicum miliaceum L.). R. 3#(/%.,%#(.%2 -3ZATMÕRI !"AGDI  34šMšSKšZI %"ERGHOFER  5NIVERSITY of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Department of Food Science and Technology, Institute of Food Technology, Vienna, Austria; (2) Department of Applied Biochemistry and Food Science, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budapest, Hungary; (3) Department of Applied Biochemistry and Food Science, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Vienna, Hungary

51


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CFW 55:A48 Production of sourdough corn and barley breads using a starter culture. H. HERNANDEZ-SANCHEZ (1), I. Nava-Arenas (1). (1) Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biologicas, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico, D.F., Mexico CFW 55:A39 The effect of ďŹ ber inclusion in extruded snack products on physical and textural properties of extrudates. M. A. BRENNAN (1), C. S. Brennan (1), J. Monro (2). (1) Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, United Kingdom; (2) Plant and Food, Palmerston North, New Zealand CFW 55:A75 Twin screw extrusion of low-moisture soy protein meat analog. S. XU (1), H. Huff (2), F. Hsieh (2). (1) University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A.; (2) University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, U.S.A. CFW 55:A67 %XTRUSIONOFTEXTURIZEDVEGETABLEPROTEINUSINGPULSE ours. K. A. ROSENTRATER (1), M. C. Tulbek (2). (1) USDA ARS NCARL, Brookings, SD, U.S.A.; (2) Northern Crops Institute, Fargo, ND, U.S.A. CFW 55:A70 Insoluble distillers’ dried grain (DDG) fraction in chemically leavened bread. M. SINGH (1), S. Liu (1), G. Inglett (1). (1) USDA-ARS-NCAUR, Peoria, IL, U.S.A. CFW 55:A55 Inuence of extrusion process conditions on the properties of buckwheat products. M. Lacavalla (1), M. Lucisano (1), M. Mariotti (1), P. K. NG (2). (1) $IPARTIMENTODI3CIENZEE4ECNOLOGIE!LIMENTARIE Microbiologiche (DiSTAM), UniversitĂ  degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy; (2) Department of Food Science & Human Nutrition and Institute of International Agriculture, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, U.S.A. CFW 55:A36 #HARACTERISTICSOFNIXTAMALIZEDMAIZETORTILLA ADDED with banana native starch. G. ARAMBULA-VILLA  3,LERGO 2AM¤REZ **IMENEZ *UAREZ %'UTIERREZ !RIAS -!PARICIO 4RAPALA  (1) CINVESTAV-IPN Queretaro, Queretaro, Qro., -EXICO )NSTITUTO4ECNOL˜GICO3UPERIORDELA 2EGI˜N3IERRA 4EAPA 4AB -EXICO 5NIVERSIDAD *UĂ•REZ!UT˜NOMADE4ABASCO 6ILLAHERMOSA -EXICO CFW 55:A64 Changes of rheological behavior of dough from durum WHEATTOPRODUCEPIZZA*-0%Ă ! ,%2)#(% 2/RTEGA 2AMIREZ /2OUZAUD 3Ă•NDEZ  University of Sonora, Hermosillo, Mexico; (2) DIPA Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo, Mexico CFW 55:A58 Physical, nutritional, and sensory properties of cookies, pasta, and expanded snack products made of the legumes common white beans, peas, and lupines. G. LINSBERGER-MARTIN (1), R. Schoenlechner (1), E. Berghofer (1). (1) University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna, Austria CFW 55:A74 Improve bakery properties of Peruvian Wheat Centenario our and a blend with quinoa and kaĂąiwa USINGANENZYMECOMPLEX.6)!$)!:  Granotec Peru S.A., Lima, Peru

225-P.

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228-P.

CFW 55:A68 $ENTANDmINTCORNPARTICLESIZEINmUENCEONTHE technological characteristics for expanded extrudates. M. Schmiele (1), Y. KIL CHANG (1). (1) State University of Campinas – UNICAMP, Campinas, "RAZIL CFW 55:A45 Properties of water-dispersible carbon black prepared by steam jet cooking with corn starch. F. C. FELKER (1), J. A. Kenar (1), G. F. Fanta (1). (1) USDA/ARS/ NCAUR, Peoria, IL, U.S.A. CFW 55:A37 Sorghum-based gluten-free whole grain snacks. M. !3)& ,72OONEY -.2IAZ #! Mack (1). (1) Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, U.S.A. CFW 55:A40 Rheological properties of aqueous dispersions of amylose-sodium palmitate complexes. J. A. BYARS (1), G. F. Fanta (1), J. A. Kenar (1). (1) USDA/ARS/ NCAUR, Peoria, IL, U.S.A.

Biofuels 229-P.

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CFW 55:A76 0ROPERTIESOFOZONATEDHIGH TANNINGRAINSORGHUM our and its ethanol production. S. YAN (1), X. Wu (1), J. Faubion (1), Y. Shi (1), L. Cai (1), D. Wang (1). (1) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. CFW 55:A64 Effects of sorghum decortication and protease addition during liquefaction on bioethanol, free amino nitrogen and fusel alcohol production. E. PEREZ-CARRILLO  3/3ERNA 3ALDIVAR -!LVAREZ -, #ORTES #ALLEJAS ##HUCK (ERNANDEZ  ITESM, Monterrey, Mexico CFW 55:A43 Effect of red sorghum bran and its phenolics on the conversion of fermentable sugars and free amino nitrogen during yeast fermentation. C. CHUCKHERNANDEZ (1), M. Peralta-Contreras (1), N. Gaxiola-Cuevas (2), R. Tamayo-Limon (2), F. #ARDENAS 4ORRES %0EREZ #ARRILLO 3/ 3ERNA 3ALD¤VAR  )4%3- -ONTERREY -EXICO  5NIVERSIDAD!UT˜NOMADE3INALOA #ULIACĂ•N Mexico CFW 55:A55 )MPROVEDEXTRACTIONANDFUNCTIONALITYOFä ZEINFROM corn gluten meal and dry-grind distillers’ grains with solubles. B. LAMSAL (1), T. Anderson (1). (1) Iowa State University, Ames, IA, U.S.A. CFW 55:A53 Phenolic acids in cereal grains and their effect on starch liquefaction and sacchariďŹ cation. A. A. KANDIL (1), T. Vasanthan (1), D. Bressler (1), J. Li (1). (1) University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada CFW 55:A53 %NZYMEOPTIMIZATIONDURINGHIGHSOLIDSFERMENTATION in corn dry-grind process. P. Kaur (1), V. SINGH (2), K. D. Rausch (2), M. Tumbleson (2). (1) University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign, Champaign, IL, U.S.A.; (2) University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign, Urbana, IL, U.S.A.


GMPRC, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.; (3) Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, U.S.A.

Non-Food Applications ( 235-P.

( 236-P.

CFW 55:A36 Starch/poly vinyl alcohol/ Na+ MMT based biodegradable nanocomposites produced through melt extrusion. S. ALI (1), S. Alavi (1), J. Faubion (1). (1) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. CFW 55:A71 Structure and properties of poly (vinyl alcohol)/starch/ laponite RD nanocomposite ďŹ lms. X. TANG (1), S. Alavi (1). (1) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.

Health&Nutrition Starch and Sugars ( 243-P.

Food Safety&Regulatory Food Safety and Regulatory 237-P.

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CFW 55:A72 Wheat traceability: A tool for segregation and quality management. C. S. TIBOLA (1), J. M. Fernandes  /-,UKOW +!DAMS  "RAZILIAN Agricultural Research Corporation, Embrapa Wheat, 0ASSO&UNDO23 "RAZIL !GRICULTUREAND!GRI Food Canada, Winnipeg, MB, Canada CFW 55:A47 Validation of convenient methods for food allergen management – ELISA and lateral ow device test kits. E. HALBMAYR (1), J. Coutts (2), A. Rogers (2), R. Fielder (2), D. Houchins (3). (1) Romer Labs Division Holding GmbH, Tulln, Austria; (2) Romer Labs UK Ltd., Abergele, United Kingdom; (3) Romer Labs Inc., Union, MO, U.S.A. CFW 55:A59 Analysis and labeling of commercially available foods WITHANDWITHOUTGLUTEN FROM&LORIAN˜POLISn"RAZIL B. MATTIONI (1), A. L. Antunes (2), G. Ferreira (2), A. de Francisco (2). (1) Federal University of Santa #ATARINA &LORIAN˜POLIS 3# "RAZIL ,AB#%2%3 &EDERAL5NIVERSITYOF3ANTA#ATARINA &LORIAN˜POLIS 3# "RAZIL CFW 55:A72 Development of a real-time PCR assay for Fusarium thapsinum in grain sorghum. M. TILLEY (1), S. R. Prakash (1), L. W. Noll (2), S. R. Bean (1), C. R. Little (2). (1) USDA-ARS CGAHR, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.; (2) Department of Plant Pathology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. CFW 55:A75 Effect of Fusarium head blight on hard red spring wheat quality and correlation with accumulation deoxynivalenol in grain after fungicide treatment. K. WHITNEY (1), S. Halley (2), J. Ohm (3), S. Simsek (1). (1) North Dakota State University, Dept. of Plant Sciences, Fargo, ND, U.S.A.; (2) Langdon Research Extension Center, Langdon, ND, U.S.A.; (3) USDAARS Wheat Quality Lab, Fargo, ND, U.S.A. CFW 55:A57 Application of binomial and multinomial probability statistics to the sampling design process for a global grain tracing and recall system. K. LEE (1), P. R. Armstrong (2), A. Thomasson (3), M. Casada (2), T. J. Herrman (1). (1) OfďŹ ce of the Texas State Chemist, Texas AgriLife Research, Texas A&M University System, College Station, TX, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS,

( 244-P.

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CFW 55:A67 A new – physiologically more relevant – in vitro starch digestibility method for slow carbohydrates screening. P. SANDERS (1), A. van wijk (1), L. Oudhuis (2). (1) Top Institute Food and Nutrition / University of Groningen, Microbial Physiology, Groningen, Netherlands; (2) Top Institute Food and Nutrition / TNO Quality of Life, Food and Biotechnolgy Innovations, Zeist, Netherlands CFW 55:A70 The development of low glycemic response rice noodles. K. SRIKAEO (1), S. Mingyai (1). (1) Pibulsongkram Rajabhat University, Muang Phitsanulok, Thailand CFW 55:A57 The differential roles of the four mammalian mucosal glucosidase subunits in starch digestion. A. LIN (1), ",.ICHOLS 21UEZADA #ALVILLO $2 Rose (4), L. Sim (5), B. R. Hamaker (1). (1) Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A.; (2) Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, U.S.A.; (3) Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, San Luis Potosi, Mexico; (4) University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada; (5) University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada CFW 55:A69 $IGESTIBILITYOFCROSS LINKEDMAIZESTARCHESWITH different amylose contents. R. SHUKRI (1). (1) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. CFW 55:A61 A novel approach to predicting the glycemic impact of oats applied to a breeding population. S. MISHRA (1). (1) New Zealand Institute of Plant and Food, Palmerston North, New Zealand CFW 55:A77 Starch structure-property relations for digestion of cooked rice. S. ZAINUL ABIDIN (1), J. Hasjim (1), R. G. Gilbert (1). (1) University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia CFW 55:A77 Effect of temperature cycling on in vitro digestibility OFRETROGRADEDWAXYANDNORMALMAIZESTARCHGELS X. ZHOU (1), H. Chung (1), S. Lim (1). (1) Korea University, Seoul, Korea CFW 55:A41 Different technological approaches to reduce the glycemic index of bread. M. CASIRAGHI (1), S. Iametti (2), G. Bottega (2), M. Pagani (2). (1) University of Milan, Milano, Italy; (2) Università degli studi di Milano, Milan, Italy CFW 55:A63 Effect of the cooking on physicochemical and digestibility properties of two varieties of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). M. OVANDO-!24).%: ,!"ELLO 0EREZ +7HITNEY  0/SORIO $IAZ 33IMSEK  .ORTH Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, U.S.A.; (2) 53


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Centro de Desarrollo de Productos Bioticos del IPN, Yautepec, Mexico CFW 55:A69 A new twist on low-glycemic-index snack foods. A. SIMMONS (1). (1) Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, U.S.A. CFW 55:A58 %FFECTOFä AMYLASETREATMENTONRESISTANTSTARCH formation in high-amylose corn starch. C. R. LUCKETT (1). (1) University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A. CFW 55:A39 The use of gum arabic as a functional ingredient to modulate the glycemic effect of extruded snack products. C. S. BRENNAN (1), M. A. Brennan (1). (1) Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, United Kingdom CFW 55:A57 $IFFERENTHUMANPANCREATICä AMYLASEDIGESTION property of highly branched starch. B. LEE (1), B. R. Hamaker (1). (1) Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A. CFW 55:A42 Inuence of different sugars on the behavior of Caco-2 cells. M. CHENG (1), G. Zhang (2), K. Kim (1), B. R. Hamaker (1). (1) Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A.; (2) Jiangnan University, Wuxi, PRC Peoples Rep of China

261-P.

Bran and Fiber 262-P.

( 263-P.

264-P.

Protein Quality 257-P.

258-P.

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54

CFW 55:A43 Protein quality evaluation using rat bioassays of three new chickpea Cicer arietinum L. varieties for the northwest of Mexico. Y. I. CORNEJO-RAMIREZ (1), J. M. Barron-Hoyos (1), M. Falcon-Villa (1), F. J. Cinco-Moroyoqui (1), R. Anduaga-Cota (1), L. #HAIDEZ ,AGUNA #.(ERNANDEZ 4ELLEZ  Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico CFW 55:A53 Human acute leukemia anticancer properties of PEPTIDESOBTAINEDFROMHEAT STABILIZEDDEFATTEDRICE bran. A. Kannan (1), N. HETTIARACHCHY (1). (1) University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, U.S.A. CFW 55:A61 Beverage of high nutritional value based on extruded QUALITYPROTEINMAIZEmOURANDTOASTEDCHICKPEAmOUR A. MONTOYA-RODRIGUEZ (1), C. Reyes-Moreno  %-ILAN .ORIS 2'UTIERREZ $ORADO 3 Mora-Rochin (2), J. MilĂĄn-Carrillo (2). (1) Maestria en Ciencia y Tecnologia de Alimentos, Universidad Autonoma de Sinaloa, Culiacan Sinaloa, Mexico; (2) Programa Regional del Noroeste para el Doctorado en Biotecnologia, Universidad Autonoma de Sinaloa, Culiacan Sinaloa, Mexico; (3) Facultad de Ciencias Quimico Biologicas, Universidad Autonoma de Sinaloa, Culiacan Sinaloa, Mexico CFW 55:A38 Protein quality evaluation of new Mexican bean varieties by rat bioassays. J. M. BARRON-HOYOS  ,$#HAIDEZ ,AGUNA 9)#ORNEJO 2AMIREZ  #.(ERNANDEZ 4ELLEZ -&ALCON 6ILLA 2#ANETT 2OMERO *,#ARDENAS ,OPEZ R. Anduaga-Cota (1). (1) Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico

CFW 55:A48 !MAIZE BASEDSNACKFORTIlEDWITHTOASTEDCHICKPEA our: Evaluation of preference at the consumer level and protein quality by rat bioassays. C. N. (%2.!.$%: 4%,,%: 9)#ORNEJO 2AMIREZ  ,#HAIDEZ ,AGUNA *-"ARRON (OYOS 2#ANETT 2OMERO *,#ARDENAS ,OPEZ R. Anduaga-Cota (1). (1) Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico

CFW 55:A58 Crackers which contain ďŹ ber and resistant starch show positive effects on microora and satiety. X. LOPEZ (1), M. AlviĂąa (2), D. Piderit (3). (1) Granotec Grupo, Santiago, Chile; (2) Universidad de Valparaiso, Santiago, Chile; (3) Granotec Chile, Santiago, Chile CFW 55:A49 Whole wheat spaghetti contains more avonoid glycosides and lignans than regular wheat spaghetti. R. Hirawan (1), T. BETA (1). (1) University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada CFW 55:A56 )MPACTOFMOLECULARSTRUCTUREOFCEREALä GLUCANSON anti-inammatory activity in human aortic endothelial cells. A. LAZARIDOU (1), Z. Papoutsi (2), C. G. Biliaderis (1), P. Moutsatsou (2). (1) Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece; (2) University of Athens, Athens, Greece

Small Bioactive Compounds 265-P.

266-P.

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270-P.

CFW 55:A52 Total phenolics, avonoids, and antioxidant capacity of young rice. J. JO (1), M. Ko (1), H. Choi (1), B. Kim (1), M. Baik (1). (1) Kyung Hee University, Yong-in, South Korea CFW 55:A48 Antioxidative activity and quality properties of hard wheat our dough and bread with the addition of different phenolic acids. H. Han (1), B. KOH (1). (1) Keimyung University, Daegu, Korea CFW 55:A44 Antioxidant and biological activities of aqueous extracts from tannin sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) bran and marama bean (Tylosema esculentum) seed coat. K. DUODU (1), J. Shelembe (1), M. Bester (1), A. Minnaar (1). (1) University of Pretoria, Pretoria, Rep of South Africa CFW 55:A72 Polyphenol-rich sorghum brans promote fecal water retention and alter short chain fatty acids in Sprague Dawley rats. N. D. TURNER (1), S. S. Taddeo (1), C. M. McDonough (1), L. W. Rooney (1). (1) Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, U.S.A. CFW 55:A66 Phenolic compounds and antioxidant capacity of raw and processed Andean indigenous crops. R. A. REPOCARRASCO-VALENCIA (1), T. A. Vainio (2), E. P. *Ă˜RVENPĂ˜Ă˜  5.!,- ,IMA 0ERU 5NIVERSITY of Turku, Turku, Finland; (3) MTT AgriFood Research Finland, Jokioinen, Finland CFW 55:A35 Differences in free and bound phenolic acids of black, blue, and yellow barleys and their contribution to


271-P.

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antioxidant capacity. E. ABDEL-AAL (1), T. Choo (2), S. Dhillon (3), I. Rabalski (3). (1) Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Guelph, ON, Canada; (2) Ottawa, ON, Canada; (3) Guelph, ON, Canada CFW 55:A66 Ancient grains of Andes as sources of bioactive compounds. R. A. REPO-CARRASCO-VALENCIA (1), J. K. Hellstrom (2), J. Pihlava (2), P. H. Mattila (2). (1) UNALM, Lima, Peru; (2) MTT AgriFood Research Finland, Jokioinen, Finland CFW 55:A60 Consumer acceptability of pumpkin-spice mufďŹ ns prepared with spice combinations varying in total phenolics. E. E. Metherell (1), R. B. SWANSON (1), J. H. Hargrove (1). (1) University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A. CFW 55:A76 Phytoestrogenic potential of sorghum phenolic extracts. L. YANG (1), K. F. Allred (1), C. D. Allred (1), J. M. Awika (1). (1) Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, U.S.A. CFW 55:A57 Relationships between anthocyanin content and composition, and antioxidant activity of four hulless barley genotypes of different seed color. C. LEE (1), N. Baek (2), B. Kim (1), B. Baik (3). (1) Korea Food Research Institute, Sungnam, South Korea; (2) Graduate School of Biotechnology, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, South Korea; (3) Department of Crop & Soil Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, U.S.A. CFW 55:A50 Bioactive compounds of bran in colored rice. Y. HUANG (1), H. Lai (1). (1) Department of Agricultural Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan

280-P.

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Gluten-Free Products ( 283-P.

284-P.

( 285-P.

End Products ( 276-P.

277-P.

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CFW 55:A52 Relative healthful potential of extruded lentil snacks. T. S. KAHLON (1). (1) Western Regional Research Center, USDA-ARS, Albany, CA, U.S.A. CFW 55:A62 Determination of nutritional potential of germs from VARIOUSMAIZEHYBRIDS-.!3)2 -3"UTT (2), M. Siddiq (3), T. N. Pasha (1), I. Ahmad (4). (1) University of Veterinary & Animal Sciences, Lahore, Pakistan; (2) University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Pakistan; (3) Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, U.S.A.; (4) PCSIR Labs, Lahore, Pakistan CFW 55:A44 Specialty wheat protein, resistant wheat starch, and white wheat our application in popular ethnic food, wonton wraps. J. DARLY (1), P. Krishnan (1), K. Woo (2), G. Hou (3). (1) South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD, U.S.A.; (2) MGP Ingredients, Inc., Atchison, KS, U.S.A.; (3) Wheat Marketing Center, Inc., Portland, OR, U.S.A. CFW 55:A66 "RAZILIANHUMANFEED3TANDARDSFORANEWCONCEPT M. ROSA BORGES (1), B. Mattioni (1), A. de Francisco (1), A. L. Antunes (1), G. Ferreira (1). (1) Lab CERES Federal University of Santa Catarina, &LORIAN˜POLIS 3# "RAZIL

CFW 55:A46 Monitoring the sodium content of foods including grain-based products. S. E. GEBHARDT (1), R. G. 4HOMAS $"(AYTOWITZ ,%,EMAR B. A. Showell (1). (1) USDA ARS, Beltsville, MD, U.S.A. CFW 55:A37 Healthy cookies for woman. V. L. ARQUEROS (1), V. Castelli (1). (1) Granotec Argentina, Buenos Aires, Argentina CFW 55:A61 Low-trans, low-sat, ďŹ ber-enriched chocolate chip cookies. C. M. Murakami (1), L. M. Hayassaka (1), ,#"ESSA ,3ARANT˜POULOS ,5#ARECHE  -#!ZEVEDO &#.UNO -3'OUVEIA (1), C. J. STEEL (1). (1) University of Campinas, #AMPINAS "RAZIL

286-P.

287-P.

288-P.

CFW 55:A75 Locust bean germ our as a replacement for gluten in pan bread. S. YAN (1), Y. Chen (2), F. MacRitchie (1), J. Faubion (1). (1) Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS, CGAHR, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. CFW 55:A62 Development and evaluation of an allergen-free and gluten-free cake. J. Nguyen (1), M. B. OMARY (1), O. Zawadi (1), C. Fong (1), K. A. Rosentrater (2), C. Onwulata (3), P. H. Cooke (4), P. Finney (5). (1) Cal Poly Pomona University, Pomona, CA, U.S.A.; (2) USDA-ARS, Brookings, SD, U.S.A.; (3) USDAARS, Wyndmoor, PA, U.S.A.; (4) New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM, U.S.A.; (5) Roman Meal Company, Tacoma, WA, U.S.A. CFW 55:A40 Inulin-type fructans as gluten-free bread improver: Sensory and nutritional quality. V. D. CAPRILES (1), J. G. ArĂŞas (1). (1) Universidade de SĂŁo Paulo, SĂŁo 0AULO "RAZIL CFW 55:A39 Sorghum our: Characteristics and aptitude for glutenfree pasta making. G. BOTTEGA (1), M. Pagani (1), F. Bonomi (1), A. Marti (1), M. Casiraghi (1), A. Elkhalifa (2), P. Rasmussen (1), S. Iametti (1). (1) UniversitĂ  degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy; (2) Ahfad University for Women, School of Family Sciences, Omdurman, Sudan CFW 55:A40 /PTIMIZATIONOFNUTRITIONALANDSENSORYQUALITYOF amaranth-based gluten-free bread using response surface methodology. V. D. CAPRILES (1), J. G. ArĂŞas (1). (1) Universidade de SĂŁo Paulo, SĂŁo Paulo, "RAZIL CFW 55:A51 Gluten-free breads and cookies of raw and popped amaranth ours with good technological and nutritional qualities. A. R. ISLAS-RUBIO (1), A. M. #ALDER˜NDELA"ARCA -%2OJAS -ART¤NEZ &#ABRERA #HĂ•VEZ  #ENTRODE)NVESTIGACI˜NEN !LIMENTACI˜NY$ESARROLLO !# (ERMOSILLO 3ONORA Mexico

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Ingredients&Cost of Goods Sold

297-P.

Bran and Fiber-Rich Ingredients ( 289-P.

( 290-P.

291-P.

292-P.

293-P.

294-P.

295-P.

CFW 55:A43 Effects of milled axseed and hydrocolloids on processing and qualities of wheat tortillas. T. W. CROWE (1), T. Crowe (1), M. Stieve (2). (1) StratiTek, East Windsor, NJ, U.S.A.; (2) Glanbia Nutritionals, Madison, WI, U.S.A. CFW 55:A55 Naked barley – Opportunities for food with more than taste. M. KINNER (1), S. Siebenhandel-Ehn (1), H. Grausgruber (1), G. Kronawetter (1), L. 0ÂŁREZ"ERROCAL 4'OLLINGER 07URBS M. PrĂźckler (1), E. Berghofer (1). (1) University of Natural Resources & Applied Life Sciences, Vienna, Austria CFW 55:A50 #HARACTERIZATIONOFRICEDIETARYlBERISOLATEDFROM rice bran. J. HUR (1), J. Park (1), A. Kim (1). (1) CJ Cheiljedang Corporation, Seoul, South Korea CFW 55:A41 Sensory attributes of whole and reďŹ ned wheat products using descriptive analyses. C. CHALLACOMBE (1), 3$HILLION ,$UIZER +3EETHARAMAN  University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada CFW 55:A49 The effects of prebiotic carbohydrates on the physical properties of commercial food prototypes subjected to various processing treatments. M. A. Hoffman (1), R. L. WEHLING (1), R. W. Hutkins (1), V. L. Schlegel (1). (1) University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, U.S.A. CFW 55:A54 Enhancing the functionality of corn ďŹ ber gum as an EMULSIONSTABILIZINGAGENTBYCONJUGATIONWITHWHEY protein isolate. B. K. PATEL (1), B. R. Hamaker (1), O. H. Campanella (1). (1) Whistler Center for Carbohydrate Research, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A. CFW 55:A68 Effect of pea ďŹ ber in breaded ďŹ sh coatings as determined by functional, nutritional, and sensory properties. L. Sawyer (1), L. HUMISKI (1), J. Meseyton (1), A. Utioh (1). (1) Food Development Centre, Portage La Prairie, MB, Canada

Ingredients in Relation to End-Product Quality ( 296-P.

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CFW 55:A58 Einkorn, from kernel to bread: Technological and nutritional aspects. M. MARIOTTI (1), A. Hidalgo 6IDAL -,UCISANO ,&ONGARO !#OZZI  !"RANDOLINI  $IPARTIMENTODI3CIENZEE Tecnologie Alimentari e Microbiologiche (DiSTAM), UniversitĂ  degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy; (2) #ONSIGLIOPERLA2ICERCAELASPERIMENTAZIONEIN !GRICOLTURA#2! 5NITĂ?DIRICERCAPERLA3ELEZIONE DEI#EREALIELA6ALORIZZAZIONEDELLEVARIETĂ?VEGETALI (SCV), S. Angelo Lodigiano (LO), Italy

298-P.

299-P.

300-P.

301-P.

302-P.

303-P.

( 304-P.

( 305-P.

CFW 55:A40 5TILIZATIONOFSORGHUMIN#ENTRAL!MERICANFOODS V. R. CALDERON (1), L. W. Rooney (2), E. Pinilla (2), R. Clara (1). (1) Centro Nacional de Tecnologia Agropecuaria y Forestal (CENTA), San Salvador, El Salvador; (2) Texas A&M University/Soil & Crop Sciences/Cereal Quality Lab, College Station, TX, U.S.A. CFW 55:A65 Impact of rosemary extract or mixed tocopherols on the avor, aroma, and oxidative stability of an extruded oat cereal. J. RANDALL (1). (1) Kemin Food Technologies, Des Moines, IA, U.S.A. CFW 55:A74 Investigating on the replacement of modiďŹ ed potato starch with phosphate salts in instant ramen noodles. L. WANG (1), G. G. Hou (1), L. Zhou (2). (1) Wheat Marketing Center, Portland, OR, U.S.A.; (2) ICL Performance Products LP, Webster Groves, MO, U.S.A. CFW 55:A66 Formulation and physicochemical and sensorial evaluation of corn tortillas supplemented with chia (Salvia hispanica L.) our. R. RENDONVILLALOBOS (1), G. Pacheco-Vargas (1), J. Islas(ERNANDEZ  #%02/") )0. 9AUTEPEC -ORELOS Mexico CFW 55:A47 Roles of egg and egg replacers in determining yellow cake quality. B. Geera (1), D. A. Rybak (1), S. R. Bryant (1), W. S. RATNAYAKE (1). (1) The Food Processing Center, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, U.S.A. CFW 55:A42 Quality effects of sugar replacement with alternative sweetener blends in lean yellow-shortened cupcakes over a 4-day storage period. A. E. Chisamore (1), R. B. SWANSON (1), E. M. Savage (2), H. Zhuang (2). (1) University of Georgia, Athens, GA, U.S.A.; (2) USDA ARS Russell Research Center, Athens, GA, U.S.A. CFW 55:A63 Zymomonas mobilis as nonconventional leavening agent of bread dough. A. PAGANI (1), M. Rollini  !-USATTI '"OTTEGA --ANZONI  (1) Univ of Milan, Milano, Italy; (2) UniversitĂ  degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy; (3) Universitò degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy CFW 55:A51 Effect of different emulsiďŹ ers on mechanical resistance of proofed dough and speciďŹ c volume of white pan bread with and without fat. K. Isola (1), N. Bedoya (1), R. H. Cunha (1), Y. K. Chang (1), C. J. STEEL (1). (1) University of Campinas, Campinas, "RAZIL CFW 55:A55 $EVELOPMENTANDCHARACTERIZATIONOFANEW' amylase for antistaling. K. M. KRAGH (1), A. Hemmingsen (2), R. Mikkelsen (2), R. Floor (3), J. Sigel (4), I. Povlsen (5), R. Mejldal (2). (1) Genencor, Danisco, Viby J., Denmark; (2) Genencor, Danisco, Brabrand, Denmark; (3) University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands; (4) Danisco USA Inc., New Century, KS, U.S.A.; (5) Danisco, Brabrand, Denmark


RECOGNITION


RECOGNITION


Thank You, Sponsors

2010 AACC Intl. Annual Meeting Program Planning Team Program Team Chair: Christophe Courtin, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium Program Team Vice Chair: $EIRDRE/RTIZ Kellogg Company, U.S.A.

Scientific Initiative Chairs and Vice Chairs Analytical Methods & Quality Chair: Art Bettge, USDA ARS WWQL, U.S.A. Vice Chair: Sean Finnie, Cargill Inc., U.S.A. Biotechnology & Sustainability Chair: Peter Shewry, Rothamsted Research, United Kingdom Vice Chair: Baninder S. Sroan, Frito-Lay, U.S.A. Cereal & Polymer Chemistry Chair: Peter Koehler, German Research Center for Food Chemistry, Germany Vice Chair: Koushik Seetharaman, University of Guelph, Canada Engineering & Processing Chair: Vijay Singh, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, U.S.A. Vice Chair: John Mathew, Frito-Lay, U.S.A. Food Safety & Regulatory Chair: Lauren Jackson, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, U.S.A. Vice Chair: Dirk E. Maier, Kansas State University, U.S.A. Health & Nutrition Chair: Bruce Hamaker, Purdue University, U.S.A. Vice Chair: Brinda Govindarajan, McDonald’s Corporation, U.S.A. Ingredients & Cost of Goods Sold Chair: Greet Vandeputte, Nestle PTC Orbe, Switzerland Vice Chair: %LIZABETH!!RNDT ConAgra Foods Inc., U.S.A.

Session Sponsors Cargill Global Technology The China Yuren Food Group ConAgra Foods Fortune Bakery Co., Ltd. General Mills, Inc. Guangdong Kailan Flour Foods Co., Ltd PepsiCo Advanced Research R-Biopharm AG Romer Labs

Workshop Sponsors Kellogg Company Rich Products SunOpta Ingredients Group

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Thank You AACC International Corporate Members

Thank you to all our corporate members, who contribute their knowledge, expertise, and professional involvement to ensure the continued strength of the association and to promote excellence in grain science worldwide. 21st Century Grain Processing ADM Milling Co Agrifood Technology Agtron Inc AIB International Andy’s Seasoning Inc ANKOM Technology Anresco Inc Arla Foods Ingredients Baker Perkins Bay State Milling Co Bell Flavors & Fragrances BENEO-Orafti Bepex International LLC Birds Eye Foods Inc Blue Planet Foods Brabender GmbH & Co KG Brasseries Kronenbourg BRI Australia Briess Malt & Ingredients Co Brookfield Engineering Laboratories USA Buhler Inc Bunge North America Butter Buds Food Ingredients CW Brabender Instruments Inc Calbee Foods Co Ltd Calibre Control International Ltd California Natural Products California Raisin Marketing Board California Wheat Commission Campden BRI Can-Oat Milling Canadian Grain Commission Canadian International Grains Institute Canadian Wheat Board Caravan Ingredients Caremoli USA Inc

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Cargill Inc Cereal Food Processors Inc Cereal Ingredients Inc Cereal Science and Technology -SA CHOPIN Technologies Church & Dwight Co Inc CII Laboratory Services Colloides Naturels Inc ConAgra Mills Corpus Christi Grain Exchange Cotecna Inspection Inc Covance Laboratories CreaNutrition CTL Foods Inc Dakota Specialty Milling Inc Danisco USA Inc David Michael & Co Deibel Laboratories DeWafelbakkers LLC Diamond Foods Inc Dora Flour Mills SAL Emirates Grain Products Co LLC ENRECO Inc %NZYME$EVELOPMENT#ORP Eurofins Food & Agro Sweden AB Eurofins Scientific Inc &AZER"AKERIES,TD Firmenich Inc Five Star Flour Mills Co FONA International Inc Food & Water Laboratories Center SEEB Fortitech Inc Foss Analytical AB FOSS North America Inc FSI Centre for Grain Quality Assurance General Mills Inc Gold Coast Ingredients Inc Grain Millers Inc Grain Processing Corp

Granotec Grupo Haubelt Laborgerate GmbH Helica Biosystems Inc Hesco Inc Hunter Walton & Co Inc ICL Performance Products LP InfraReady Products Ltd Innophos, Inc Intertek Agri Services J Rettenmaier USA LP Kellogg Co Krueger Food Laboratories Inc Lallemand Baking Solutions Mafco Worldwide Corp Malt Products Corp Malt-O-Meal Marron Foods Matsutani America Inc McCormick & Co Inc -EGAZYME)NTL)RELAND,TD Merlin Development Inc Mid-America Food Sales Ltd Minot Milling Monsanto Co Morton International Inc Navas Instruments LLC Nisshin Seifun Group Inc NP Analytical Laboratories Oat Ingredients LLC Oatly AB OMIC USA Inc Ottens Flavors P&H Milling Group Limited Palatinit of America Inc Palsgaard Inc Penford Food Ingredients Co 0ANZANI #RECERPAL Perten Instruments AB Perten Instruments Inc PGP International Inc Polypro Intl Inc PT Lumbung Nasional Flour Mill

Puratos Corp Quali Tech Inc R-Biopharm Inc Red Star Yeast Co LLC Research Products Co Riceland Foods Inc Riviana Foods Inc Romer Labs Inc Seaboard Overseas Trading Group Sensient Colors Inc Sensus America Inc Silliker Inc Southern African Grain Laboratory SPEX SamplePrep LLC Spray Dynamics Stable Micro Systems Ltd Strasburger & Siegel Inc Sunopta Grain & Foods Group SunOpta Ingredients Group Symrise Inc Syral S.A.S. Takenouchi Barley Processing Inc Tate & Lyle Texture Technologies Corp The Hershey Co The Mennel Milling Co The Wright Group The XIM Group LLC TIC Gums Inc Tyson Foods United Flour Mill Co Ltd US Energy Partners LLC USA Rice Federation Virgo Publishing Vitamins Inc VTT Technical Research Centre Wenger Manufacturing Inc Z Trim Holdings Inc


2010 AACC International Awardees Congratulations to the following members selected to receive AACC International awards in honor of their signiďŹ cant contributions to the ďŹ eld of grain science. You are invited to the Opening General Session and Awards Ceremony on October 24, 2010, to celebrate their accomplishments. Lecture times for the individual awards are noted below.

AACC International Fellows The AACC International Board of Directors established a Fellows Program in 1985 to honor association members who have made distinguished contributions to the ďŹ eld of cereal science and technology in research, industrial achievement, leadership, education, administration, communication, or regulatory affairs. Anyone who has been a member for at least 10 years and made such a contribution is eligible. Perry K.W. Ng grew up in Hong Kong, obtained his university education in Canada, and studied with eminent cereal chemist Walter Bushuk, graduating with a Ph.D. degree from the University of Manitoba in 1987. Ng joined the faculty of Michigan State University (MSU) in 1992 to initiate a Cereal Science Program in the Department of Food Science & Human Nutrition (FSHN). His research foci include physicochemical and genetic properties of wheat proteins in relation to end-use qualities, cereal chemistry and technology, extrusion technology, and most recently, modifying grain components for functional food ingredients. In 2008, Ng was invited to join the Institute of International Agriculture at MSU in addition to his appointment in FSHN. Ng, a member of AACC International for more than 25 years, has served the association in many facets (e.g., as chair of the Protein Division, Cincinnati Section, Undergraduate and Graduate Scholarship Committee, etc.). He was program co-chair for the World Grains Summit: Foods and Beverages and the International Gluten Workshop, both in 2006. Ng teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in cereal SCIENCEHASGRADUATEDMORETHANADOZENPOST GRADUATESTUDENTS mentored 39 post-doctoral fellows, visiting scholars, and visiting professors from 10 countries; and has more than 110 scientiďŹ c publications and two books. David Wetzel has published research from the Kansas State University (KSU) Microbeam Molecular Spectroscopy Laboratory, established BY7ETZEL WHICHHASATTRACTED WORLDWIDEATTENTION,OCALIZED chemical analysis at the cellular and subcellular level is achieved. With INFRAREDMICROSPECTROSCOPY 7ETZEL has pioneered the studies of various biological materials. Under his guidance, graduate students developed numerous high-performance LIQUIDCHROMATOGRAPHICMETHODSFORANALYZINGCEREALGRAINSAND THEIRPRODUCTS7ETZELDESIGNEDANDBUILTANEWTYPEOF.)2 instrument, the basis for dedicated systems to optically measure polymer rheology and wheat protein strength. NIR analyses from his lab enabled KSU wheat breeders to achieve a 2.5% increase INWHEATPROTEINCONTENT7ETZELISPERHAPSTHElRSTSCIENTISTTO use the National Synchrotron Light Source infrared beamline to ANALYZEBIOLOGICALSAMPLES7ITHSYNCHROTRONMICROSPECTROSCOPY

he produced high-resolution images, revealing the microchemical structure of different botanical parts of single wheat kernel slices. He was invited to contribute the cover article for ScienceMAGAZINE in 1999 and edited a 280-page issue of a French journal devoted entirely to the biological applications of FT-IR microspectroscopy. At present, working with his two sons who are medical doctors, 7ETZELISUSINGMICROSPECTROSCOPYTOASSESSHEARTHEALTH Professionally, he offered the ďŹ rst AACC International short courses in HPLC and in NIR analysis and authored a Cereal Foods World column on instrumentation.

Applied Research Award Established in 2005, the AACC International Applied Research Award is presented to an individual or team for their signiďŹ cant body of distinguished contributions to the application of science in the cereals area. The award will consist of a $2,000 honorarium and a plaque. Recipients of the Applied Research Award are also accorded the status of AACC International fellow for their contributions leading to this award. Awardees will have the opportunity to present a lecture during an annual meeting of the association.

This year’s award lecture, “The bioeconomy: 2010 and beyond�, will take place at 8:30 a.m. on Tuesday, October 26.

Larry Johnson earned his Ph.D. degree from the Grain Science & Industry Department at Kansas State University. He spent seven years at the Food Protein R&D Center of Texas A&M University, leading their fats and oils research group. In 1985, he was appointed director of the Center FOR#ROPS5TILIZATION2ESEARCHAT)OWA State University, a center of excellence for 50 faculty developing value-added uses for grain. He has provided state and national leadership in adding value to and ďŹ nding new uses for corn and soybeans. He was also recently appointed director of the BioCentury Research Farm, an integrated research and demonstration facility dedicated to biomass production and processing for biofuels and biobased products. He has been awarded 11 patents and has published more than 140 peer-reviewed manuscripts on technologies to process soybeans into edible oil and protein products, increase coproduct returns in manufacturing fuel ethanol, and improve corn milling. He coedited the monographs Corn: Chemistry and Technology and Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing and Utilization, which are the world’s most complete references on corn and soybeans. He served for two years on the Board of Directors of AACC International, and in 2004, he served as president of the American Oil Chemists’ Society.

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Edith Christensen Award for Outstanding Contributions in Analytical Methods Established in 2005, this award and $1,500 honorarium recognizes scientific and technical contributions that have advanced the grain science field. Recipients of the award have demonstrated excellence through their contributions to the development of new analytical technologies, the application of new analytical technologies to cereal grain products, and/or the application of existing analytical technologies to solving detection and measurement problems in the field of grain science. They have also demonstrated leadership in methods activity within AACC International.

This year’s award lecture, “Measurement of fat soluble vitamins in foods, feeds, and ingredients: Progress and problems”, will take place at 8:30 a.m. on Wednesday, October 27.

John MacDonald is manager of organic analysis at NP Analytical Laboratories in St. Louis, MO, U.S.A., where he has spent the past 36 years applying gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography, and spectroscopy to the determination of nutrients and contaminants in foods, feeds, and ingredients. He was chair of the Approved Methods Technical Leadership Committee of AACC International from 1995 to 2000 and contributed to the publication of the 10th edition of the AACC International Approved Methods of Analysis. He also served on several technical committees, including the Dietary Fiber and Other Carbohydrates, Protein Methods, and Vitamin, Minerals, and Lipids, and Check Sample Committees. While serving on those committees, he contributed current AACC Intl. Approved Methods of Analysis for determination of amino acids in foods and determination of isoflavones in soy products. During and after his tenure as chair of the Approved Methods Technical Leadership Committee, he focused on strengthening technical committees and the method approval process. MacDonald is also a member of the American Chemical Society, the American Oil Chemists’ Society, and AOAC International, where he was corecipient of the 2001 Collaborative Study of the Year. He is a graduate of the University of Missouri, Rolla (now Missouri University of Science and Technology). In addition to his professional interests, he enjoys travel, photography, and cooking.

Excellence in Teaching Award The AACC International Excellence in Teaching Award is presented to a member and teacher who has made significant contributions through teaching in the broad field of cereal science and technology. The award consists of a $1,500 honorarium and plaque. Curtis Weller is a professor at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) with teaching and research appointments in the Department of Biological Systems Engineering and the Department of Food Science and Technology. He also serves as coordinator of the academic programs and as an undergraduate advisor in the Department of Biological Systems Engineering. Weller earned B.S. and M.S. degrees in food science and a Ph.D. degree in agricultural engineering from the University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign. He is licensed to practice engineering in South Carolina and Nebraska and has dairy and baking industry experience. During his 24 years of teaching at Clemson University and UNL, Weller has taught numerous courses related to food and biomaterial properties and processing, including safe and sanitary design of food plants. He has also been an instructor for the applied extrusion workshop given at UNL for numerous years. Weller has twice received a Certificate of Recognition for Contributions to Students at Nebraska and been honored by the Nebraska College of Engineering and Technology Student Advisory Board with an Excellent Advisor Recognition. A member of AACC International since 1989, and its Engineering and Processing Division since its inception, he has served the division through a rotation of officer positions and as a symposium cochair.

William F. Geddes Memorial Award The William F. Geddes Memorial Award was created in 1961 to honor the zeal and unselfish industry of an individual member and emphasize the importance of his or her contributions to the work of the society. Geddes served the association long and unselfishly as president (1938–1939), vice president (1937–1938), editor-in-chief of Cereal Chemistry (1943–1961), active member, and committee member. Over the long span of his association with AACC International, Geddes influenced the organization in many ways, contributing to its work and progress, increasing its usefulness to its members, and boosting its reputation in the fields of fundamental and applied cereal science. 2009 Recipient: Peter J. Wood, Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada 2010 Recipient: The name of the recipient is kept secret until unveiled during the Awards Ceremony.

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Young Scientist Research Award

Analytical Accuracy Awards for 2009

Established in 2006, the AACC International Young Scientist Research Award is presented to an individual for outstanding contributions in basic and applied research to cereal science with the expectation that contributions will continue. This award recognizes research relevant to the broad aims and interests of AACC International. Awardees must not be older than 40 years by June 1 of the year the award is given. The recipient will receive a $1,000 honorarium and a plaque and will be encouraged to present a lecture at the AACC International meeting of the year in which the award is given.

Winners of AACC International’s Analytical Accuracy awards, based on 2009 check sample results, have been announced. This is the twelfth such set of awards to be made since the AACC International Check Sample Committee approved it 12 years ago. Winners have received certiďŹ cates suitable for posting and will be listed in the AACC International Annual Meeting program.

This year’s award lecture, “Extrusion processing: Research and engagement for addressing nutritional challenges worldwide�, will take place at 10:40 a.m. on Wednesday, October 27.

Sajid Alavi is associate professor in the Department of Grain Science and Industry at Kansas State University (KSU), Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. He received his B.S. degree in agricultural engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, India, in 1995; an M.S. degree in agricultural and biological engineering from Pennsylvania State University, PA, U.S.A., in 1997; and a Ph.D. degree in food science/food engineering from Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, U.S.A., in 2002. He joined KSU as a faculty member in 2002. Alavi’s research interests are in food engineering and more speciďŹ cally in the areas of extrusion processing of food and feed materials, rheology, food microstructure imaging, structure-texture relationships, and value-added uses of biological materials and residues. His current research projects are 1) dynamics of microstructure formation in extruded biopolymer foams; 2) use of noninvasive 8 RAYMICROTOMOGRAPHY8-4 FORCHARACTERIZINGEXTRUDATE microstructure and structure-texture relationships; 3) gluten-free foods based on grain sorghum; 4) starch-clay nano-composite packaging; 5) high-ďŹ ber and fruit-based healthy snacks; and 6) cellulosic ethanol. Alavi’s teaching assignments include undergraduate- and graduatelevel courses in extrusion processing. The KSU Extrusion Lab, under his supervision, provides to the industry extrusion training through short courses and services for pilot scale trial runs for various products.

All subscribers to the various AACC International check sample series that include a proďŹ ciency testing option are eligible, whether or not they have elected the option, provided they have met the requirements for submission of results for the year involved. For each series, the award is made to the laboratory submitting the most accurate analyses. The statistical procedures used to select awardees are the same as those used to evaluate proďŹ ciency for other purposes. Awards are based primarily on the required analyses in each series. Analyses that are optional for proďŹ ciency test purposes are included if they improve the score to encourage subscribers to include the results of optional analyses in their reports. Series included in the 2009 awards are those shown in the list of awardees. Other AACC International check sample series for which the proďŹ ciency testing option is not now available may be added later as the number of subscribers and coefďŹ cient of variation of results warrant. Formal entry for award competition is not necessary—all check sample subscribers to a given series are automatically eligible and entered provided they have submitted the required results on all samples for the award year. However, the same considerations apply to the Analytical Accuracy Awards as to other achievement awards. Because there can be only one winner in any category and consideration is limited to those who have subscribed for the full year and submitted all required results, the results speak only to the performance of the awardees analyst or laboratory and not to that of many others who might be equally qualiďŹ ed. Check sample subscribers or others who would like more information about AACC International Check Sample and ProďŹ ciency Testing Service are invited to visit: www.aaccnet.org/ checksample. Series A—Hard Wheat Flour, Monthly AIB International, Manhattan, KS, U.S.A. Series B—Hard Wheat Flour, Bimonthly United Flour Mill Co. Ltd., Prapadeang-Samutprak, Thailand Series C—Soft Wheat Flour Mennel Milling Company of Virginia, Roanoke, VA, U.S.A. Series D—Feed Analyses South African Grain Laboratory, Pretoria, South Africa

AACC International is proud of the many accomplishments of its members who have advanced the association and the lELDOFGRAINSCIENCE(ELPUSRECOGNIZETHESEINDIVIDUALSBY nominating a colleague. All members are strongly encouraged to submit nominations. Descriptions of the awards, criteria, past awardees, and nomination deadlines are listed on AACCnet.

Series DF—Dietary Fiber Nestle Purina Analytical Lab, St. Louis, MO, U.S.A. Series HL and HS—Farinograph Calvin Watson, McKee Foods Corp, Collegedale, TN, U.S.A. Series I—Amylograph North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND, U.S.A.

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continued Series J—Mixograph South African Grain Laboratory, Pretoria, South Africa

NEW & ON SALE during the meeting!

Series K—Fat and Fatty Acids Covance Laboratories, Madison, WI, U.S.A. Series MBA—Microbiological Analyses (Including Pathogens) ADM Milling Co., Keokuk, IA, U.S.A. Series MBB—Microbiological Analyses AFB International, O’Fallon, MO, U.S.A. Series SA—HPLC Sugar Analysis Land O’Lakes Inc., St. Paul, MN, U.S.A. NEW

Series VMP—Vitamin Analyses Silliker Canada Co., Markham, ON, U.S.A. Series VMP—Mineral Analyses CTL Foods Inc., Colfax, WI, U.S.A. Series VMP—Proximate and Vitamin Analyses Silliker Canada Co., Markham, ON, Canada Series VMP—Proximate and Mineral Analyses CTL Foods Inc., Colfax, WI, U.S.A. Series VMP—Vitamins, Minerals, and Proximate Analyses Silliker Canada Co., Markham, ON, Canada

NEW

SAVE 20% Plus FREE SHIPPING if you buy 2 or more AACC Intl. PRESS titles AACC Intl. Marketplace – Grain Brain Central Sunday .................................................... 6:00 – 9:00 p.m. Monday .................................................. 4:00 – 7:00 p.m. Tuesday ................................................12:00 – 2:30 p.m.

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2009–2010 AACC International Board of Directors

President Khalil Khan North Dakota State University

President-Elect Barry McCleary -EGAZYME International Ireland Ltd.

Chair of the Board Mary Ellen Camire University of Maine

Treasurer Laura Hansen General Mills Inc.

Director Rodney Booth Newport Scientific Pty. Ltd.

Director Gerard Downey TEAGASC

Director Craig Morris USDA ARS WWQL

Director Maureen Olewnik AIB International

Director Lydia Tooker Midness Cereal Partners Worldwide

Director Sergio Serna Saldivar ITESM

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Volunteers—Making a Difference Volunteering to serve on an AACC International committee provides opportunities to gain skills and experience as well as the chance to give something back to the grains community. If you are interested in serving on a committee, please contact Susan Kohn at skohn@scisoc.org or at +1.651.994.3812 or visit www.aaccnet.org. AACC International thanks the following volunteers who served on AACC International’s committees; your dedication is deeply appreciated!

Administrative Committees 2010 Annual Meeting Technical Program Planning Committee: Chair: Christophe Courtin. Vice Chair:$EIRDRE/RTIZMembers: %LIZABETH!!RNDT !RT"ETTGE 3EAN&INNIE "RINDA'OVINDARAJAN Bruce Hamaker, Lauren Jackson, Peter Koehler, Dirk E. Maier, John Matthew, Koushik Seetharaman, Peter Shewry, Vijay Singh, Baninder S. Sroan, Greet Vandeputte. 2011 Annual Meeting Technical Program Planning Committee: Chair:$EIRDRE/RTIZVice Chair: Art Bettge. Members: %LIZABETH!!RNDT 2ANGAN#HINNASWAMY #LYDE$ON 3EAN Finnie, Michael Giroux, Brinda Govindarajan, Dirk E. Maier, John Matthew, Andrew McPherson, Rajen S. Mehta, S. Shea Miller, +OUSHIK3EETHARAMAN %DWARD3OUZA "ANINDER33ROAN Aleurone Task Force: Chair: William Atwell. Members: Gary Fulcher, ValĂŠrie Lullien-pellerin, Len Marquart, Elaine Meloan, Louise Slade, Joanne Slavin, Walter Von Reding. Ex-ofďŹ cio: Susan Kohn. Alsberg-French-Schoch Award: Chair: Donald Thompson. Members: Alain Buleon, Mike Gidley, Bruce Hamaker, David Mauro, Yasuhito Takeda. Applied Research Award: Chair: David Lineback. Members: Ann Blechl, Roberto Ranieri, Peter Shewry, Pamela White, Philip C. Williams. Approved Methods Technical Committee: Chair: Anne Bridges. Vice Chair: Paul Wehling. Members: Elsayed Abdelaal, Helen Allen, Nancy Ames, Arthur Bettge, Larisa Lara Cato, Stuart Craig, 3TEVE$ELWICHE *ONATHAN$E6RIES #LYDE$ON -ELISSA&ITZGERALD Gary Hou, J. Michael Hudson, Ron Jenkins, Padmanaban Krishnan, Barry McCleary, Wayne Moore, Terry Nelsen, Debra 0ALMQUIST 0OLAMREDDY2EDDY 6ENKAT2EDDY %LIZABETH2USSELL Linda Schlichting, Tandace Scholdberg, Elaine Sopiwnyk, Brenda Stahl, Mingwei Wang, Ning Wang. Staff: Karen Cummings, Greg Grahek, Steve Kronmiller, Linda Schmitt. Audit Task Force: Chair: Barbara Heidolph. Members: Tim Aschbrenner, Steve Bell, Bill Besson, Bernie Bruinsma, Gina Clapper, Jane DeMarchi, Joel Dick, Maureen Downey, Janet Funke, Donna Garren, Lisa Hammond, Paul Harper, Gary Heiserman, Joe Horton, Charles Hurburgh, Scott Jensen, John Kukoly, Janice Levenhagen, Lynne Morehart, Laurie Murphy, Maureen Olewnik, Sarah Oxendale, Micael Pate, Dinesh Prasad, .ICOLE2EES *ENNIFER2OBINSON #ELETTA,EE3ANDERS *OHN3CHULZ Terry Selleck, Robert Sombke, Kent Symns, Robert Wainwright, Nick Weigel, Lori Wilson, Kathleen Wybourn, Rasma Zvaners. Awards: Chair: Peter Weegels. Members: William Atwell, James BeMiller, Anne Bridges, Okkyung Kim Chung, David Lineback, Samuel Millar, Donald Thompson. Cecil F. Pinney Travel Award Jury: Chair: Barbara Heidolph. Members: Jose Berrios, Cliff Hall, Sandra Hill, Debra Patterson. 64

Check Sample: Chair: Ellen Gay. Members: Janette Gelroth, Wayne Moore, Elaine Sopiwnyk, Kenneth Ulbrich. Ex-ofďŹ cio: Anne Bridges. China Strategies Task Force: Chair: Robert Cracknell. Members: Zhongu He, Weining Huang, Wujun Ma, Barry McCleary, Mingwei Wang, Yi-Min Wei, Decai Zhang. Ex-ofďŹ cio: Susan Kohn, Steven C. Nelson. Edith A. Christensen Award: Chair: Anne Bridges. Members: Helen Allen, Jonathan DeVries, Charles Gaines, Barry McCleary, Terry Nelsen. Excellence in Teaching Award: Chair: James BeMiller. Members: Dilek Austin, Hamit Koksel, Steven Mulvaney, Debi E. Rogers. Executive: Chair: Mary Ellen Camire. Members: Laura Hansen, Khalil Khan, Barry McCleary. Ex-ofďŹ cio: Steven C. Nelson. Fellows: Chair: Okkyung Kim Chung. Members: Antoinette Betschart, Robert Cracknell, James Dexter, Harry Levine, Mark Stearns. Finance: Chair: Laura Hansen. Members: Rodney Booth, Khalil Khan, Barry McCleary, Maureen Olewnik. Ex-ofďŹ cio: Barbara Mock, Steve Nelson. Foundation Board: Chair: Barbara Heidolph. Members: Cliff Hall, Bill Olson, Debra Patterson, Patricia Rayas-Duarte. ExofďŹ cio: Laura M. Hansen, Michael Tilley. Staff: Susan Kohn. Geddes Memorial Award: Chair: William Atwell. Members: Filip Arnaut, Stuart Craig, Steven Nelson. Journal Task Force: Chair: Jan Delcour. Members: Trust Beta, David Jackson, John Lawton, Craig Morris, Joanne Slavin. ExofďŹ cio: Karen Cummings, Greg Grahek. Membership Panel: Chair: Jorge Morales. Members: Trust Beta, Lynda Cabrales, Les Copeland, Thomas Herald, Matthew McGuffey, Jelena Medic. Board Ex-ofďŹ cio: Maureen Olewnik. Nomination: Chair: James Dexter. Members: Bernie Bruinsma, Ravi Chibbar, Gerard Downey, Ellen Gay, David Mauro, Craig Morris, Perry K.W. Ng, Debi Rogers. Board Liaison Ex-ofďŹ cio: Sergio Serna Saldivar. Staff: Susan Kohn, Linda Schmitt. Osborne Medal Award: Chair: David Lineback. Members: Ann Blechl, Roberto Ranieri, Peter Shewry, Pamela White, Philip C. Williams. Professional Development Panel: Chair: Jon Faubion. Members: William Atwell, Stanely Cauvain, Robin Connelly, Pierre Faa, Maryke Lebuschagne, Seok-Ho Park, Kari Tronsmo. Ex-ofďŹ cio: Amy Hope, Susan Kohn.


Pub Panel - Book Acquisitions: Chair: Rajen Mehta. Members: Michelle Beaver, Elaine Thompson Champagne, Ravi Chibbar, *AMES'LUECK "RINDA'OVINDARAJAN 2EBECCA-ILLER ,UKASZ 0IETRZAK -IAN2IAZ -ARTIN3CANLON -ICHAEL3ISSONS ,UIS Tovar, Mehmet Caglar Tulbek, Delilah Wood. Ex-ofďŹ cio: Karen Cummings. Pub Panel – Journal: Chair: John Lawton. Members: Jan $ELCOUR *ON&AUBION -ARTA)ZYDORCZYK 3TEVEN-ULVANEYExofďŹ cio: R. Carl Hoseney, Karen Cummings.

Journals Cereal Chemistry Editorial Board: Editor-in-Chief: R. Carl Hoseney. Senior Editors: Jan Delcour, Jon Faubion, Marta )ZYDORCZYKAssociate Editors: Byung-Kee Baik, Ian L. Batey, Brian S. Beecher, Mary Ellen Camire, Elaine Thompson Champagne, Pavinee Chinachoti, F. William Collins, Christophe M. Courtin, Stephen R. Delwiche, Nancy M. Edwards, Girish Ganjyal, Weining Huang, Peter Koehler, Meera Kweon, Buddhi P. Lamsal, Rebecca Miller, Kent D. Rausch, Andrew S. Ross, Sergio Serna Saldivar, Yong-Cheng Shi, Kris Spence, John Taylor, Ya-Jane Wang, Peter L. Weegels, Robert W. Welch, Jeff Wilson.

Pub Panel – Online Products: Chair: Girish Ganjyal. Members: Arthur Bettge, Christophe Courtin, Jodi Engleson, Mark Haub, Sensay Simsek, Vicky Solah, Kyung-Soo Woo. Ex-ofďŹ cio: Steve Kronmiller.

Cereal Foods World: Executive Editor: Susan Kohn. Managing Editor: Amanda Aranowski.

Publications Panel: Chair: Shea Miller. Members: Girish Ganjyal, John Lawton, Rajen Mehta. Board Liaison Ex-ofďŹ cio: Gerard Downey, Laura Hansen. Ex-ofďŹ cio: Karen Cummings, Greg Grahek, Steve Kronmiller.

Cereal Science Knowledge Database Advisory Committee: Editor-in-Chief: Mary Ellen Camire. Members: Michael J. Giroux, Mark Haub, Joan M. King, Ken Lee, Ronald L. Madl, JeanFrancois Meullenet, Frank T. Rittig.

Scholarship & Fellowship: Chair: Michael Tilley. Members: Emmerich Berghofer, Trust Beta, Hulya Dogan, Gary Hou, Peter Koehler, Tomoko Maeda, Frank Manthey, Maria Omary, Harmit Singh. ScientiďŹ c Advisory Panel: Chair: William Atwell. Members: !RTHUR"ETTGE #HRISTOPHE#OURTIN $EIRDRE/RTIZ 4HERESA Cogswell, Sean Finnie, Robert Gilbert, Stephane Guilbert, Robert Hamer, Sathya Kalambur, Perry Ng, Monika Okoniewska. CAST Representative, Ex-ofďŹ cio: Lawrence A. Johnson. Board Liaison Ex-ofďŹ cio: Craig Morris. Ex-ofďŹ cio: Susan Kohn, Steven C. Nelson. Short Course Advisory Board: Members: Jeff Casper, Brinda Govindarajan, Cliff Hall, Sakharam Patil, Peter Ranum. Staff: Tressa Patrias. Strategic Implementation Team: Chair: Eugene Wisakowsky. Members:-IRKO"UNZEL #HRISTOPHE#OURTIN *ODI%NGLESON David Hahn, Khalil Khan, Shea Miller, Craig Morris, Jorge Morales. Ex-ofďŹ cio: Arthur Bettge, Susan Kohn, Barry McCleary, 3TEVEN#.ELSON $EIRDRE/RTIZ Traceability Task Force: Chair: Anne Bridges. Members: Ellen Gay, Charles Hurburgh, Khalil Khan, Robert Magaletta, Barry McCleary, Terry Nelsen, Paul Wehling. Whole Grains Working Group: Chair: Julie M. Jones. Members:*UDI!DAMS %LIZABETH!RNDT 3TEVEN"UCKHOLDT *EFF Dahlberg, Brinda Govindarajan, Cynthia Harriman, Jorge Morales, Kristin Nelson, Michael Orlando, Kaisa Poutanen, Kathryn Wiemer, Laura Wilson. Ex-ofďŹ cio: Stephen Brooks, Susan Kohn, Joan Lyon. Young Scientist Research Award: Chair: Samuel Millar. Members: Christophe Courtin, Chunjian Lin, Kaisa Poutanen, Mukti Singh, Vijay Singh.

Technical Committees Approved Methods Technical Committee Leadership: Chair: Anne Bridges. Vice Chair: Paul Wehling. Statistician: Deb Palmquist. Harmonization Task Force: Phil Williams. AMTC Advisor: John MacDonald. Staff: Karen Cummings, Greg Grahek, Steve Kronmiller, Linda Schmitt. Asian Products: Cochairs: Larisa Lara Cato, Gary Hou. Members: Helen Allen, Esey Assefaw, Richard Chen, Graham Crosbie, Bin X. Fu, David Hatcher, Craig Morris, Hideki Okusu, Andrew Ross, Linda Schlichting, Vicky Solah, Yibin Zhou. Bioactive Compounds Methods: Chair: Elsayed Abdelaal. Members:4RUST"ETA -IRKO"UNZEL 7ILLIAM#OLLINS 'YEBI Duodu, Bin X. Fu, Talwinder Kahlon, Padmanaban Krishnan, Qin ,IU 2UI(AI,IU ,EN-ARQUART *OHN-ICHAELIDES "ORIS.EMZER Perry K.W. Ng, Vamshidhar Puppala, Sanaa Ragaee, Peter Shewry, Michael Sissons. Biotechnology Methods: Cochairs: Ron Jenkins, Tandace Scholdberg. Members: Anne Bridges, Jingwen Chen, Ravi Chibbar, Gina Clapper, Tigst Demeke, Satoshi Futo, David 'ROTHAUS -ARCIA(OLDEN 2ANDAL'IROUX 2ONALD*ENKINS +AZUMI Kitta, Tim Norden, Bert Popping, Sanaa Ragaee, Raymond Shillito, Frank Spiegelhalter, Deepak Srivastava, Michael Sussman, Pamela Teran, Simon Varney, Paul Wehling. Bread Baking Methods: Cochairs: Helen Allen, Mingwei Wang. Members: Connie Briggs, Margo Caley, Larisa Lara Cato, WooKyung Chung, Mark Ingelin, Bon Lee, Rebecca Miller, Yvonne Supeene, Yohei Ushio, Vani Vemulapalli. Chemical Leavening Agents: Chair:%LIZABETH2USSELL Members: Cindy Alosco, Tim Bauer, Craig Baumer, Robert Berube, Stephen Bright, John Brodie, Leonard Ciani, Jr., N’Jere English, Robert Finn, Barbara Heidolph, Susan Kay, Russell Kemp, %LIZABETH+NIGHT -EERA+WEON .ITA,IVVIX -ICHELLE-ROZIK Manderfeld, James McDonnell, William McKeown, Zory QuindeAxtell, Deepa Sethi, James Vysoky, Ron Zelch.

continued 65


Dietary Fiber and Other Carbohydrates: Co-Chairs: Stuart Craig, Jonathan DeVries. Members: Mary Ellen Camire, Doris Dougherty, Brinda Govindarajan, Yulai Jin, Qiang Liu, John MacDonald, Clodualdo Maningat, Barry McCleary, Rajen Mehta, Teresa Paeschke, Louise Slade, Jan Willem van der Kamp, Jeanny Zimeri. Enzyme Analysis: Chair: Barry McCleary. Members: Clyde Don, Victor Huang. Experimental Milling: Chair: Polamreddy V. Reddy. Members: Scott Baker, Nelly Boinot, Richard Chen, Hulya Dogan, Arnaud Dubat, James Elkins, Diane Gannon, Bon Lee, Chunjian Lin, Ron ,INDGREN -ARIANO,OZA 9UFENG-AO 'ERHARD0ICKELMANN *AMES Schuh, Thorne Seese. Food Safety and Microbiology: Chair: Brenda Stahl. Members: Nancy Eggink, Ellen Gay, Hassan Gourama, Salam Ibrahim, Don Mu, Dojin Ryu, Robert Schrader, Terry Selleck, Tam Tran, Charlene Wolf-Hall. Methods for Grain and Flour Testing: Cochairs: Wayne Moore, Terry Nelsen. Members: Arthur Bettge, Clyde Don, Nancy Edwards, Janette Gelroth, John McCammon, Venkateshwar Reddy, Debbie Sobering, Elaine Sopiwnyk, Philip C. Williams. Near Infrared Analysis: Chair: Stephen Delwiche. Members: Michael Barnett, Anthony Blakeney, Jeff Boedigheimer, Nelly Boinot, Robert Cocciardi, Floyd Dowell, Arnaud Dubat, Charles Hurburgh, Yueshu Li, John McCammon, Samuel Millar, Larry Mills, Lindsay O’Brien, Gavin O’Reilly, Marvin Paulsen, +AMARANGA0EIRIS 0ETER0ERTEN ,UKASZ0IETRZAK 7ES3HADOW Debbie Sobering, Mehmet Caglar Tulbek, Shyh-Jaung Yen. Oat and Barley Products: Chair: Nancy Ames. Members: Elsayed Abdelaal, William Bonner, F. William Collins, Jonathan DeVries, Douglas Doehlert, D. Scott Dumler, Ruedi Duss, Christine Fastnaught, Kelly Henderson, Alan Koechner, Padmanaban Krishnan, William Liska, Christian Lukie, Barry McCleary, Kristin Nelson, Clarence Newman, Rosemary Newman, Hannu Salovaara, Darren Schubert, Susan Tosh, Francis Webster, Peter Wood, Shyh-Jaung Yen. Pasta Products Analysis: Chair: Linda M. Schlichting. Member: Clara Fares, Bin Fu, Ann Heider, Hamit Koksel, Frank Manthey, Hideki Okusu, Mike Sissons, Elaine Sopiwnyk. Physical Testing Methods: Chair: Elaine Sopiwnyk. Members: Bo Allvin, Scott Baker, Mark Bason, Johan Bjurenvall, Nelly Boinot, Stanley Cauvain, Rangan Chinnaswamy, Paul Cliffe, Clyde $ON !RNAUD$UBAT "ARBARA(EIDOLPH 3ALVATORE)AQUEZ -ARK Ingelin, Wayne Moore, Gavin O’Reilly, Seok-Ho Park, Micahel Pate, Jan Perten, Debi Rogers, Paolo Santangelo, Theresa Sutton, Rich Thoma, Feng Xie.

66

Protein Methods: Chair: Clyde Don. Members: Susan Altenbach, Nancy Ames, Scott Bean, Ana-Maria De la Barca, Girish Ganjyal, Sigrid Haas-Lauterbach, Robert Hamer, Sarah Harmer, Thomas Herald, Navam Hettiarachchy, Peter Koehler, Maryke Labuschagne, Ron Madl, Polamreddy Reddy, Tilman Schober, Patrick Selmair, Baninder Sroan, Michael Tilley, Sean Tinkey. Pulse and Legume: Chair: Ning Wang. Members: Helbert Almeida, Byung-Kee Baik, Anne-Sophie Bellido, Jose Berrios, Peter Frohlich, Gordon Gregory, Clifford Hall, Jay Han, Shannon Hood-Niefer, Linda Malcolmson, Heather Maskus, Glenn O’Hara, -ARIA/MARY *OE0ANOZZO -EHMET#AGLAR4ULBEK 2OBERT4YLER Albert Vandenberg, Jennifer Wood. Rice Milling and Quality: Chair: -ELISSA&ITZGERALD Members: -ARK"ASON 0RICILA:ACZUK"ASSINELLO #HRISTINE"ERGMAN Rolfe Bryant, Elaine Thompson Champagne, Cheryl Earp, Molly Johnson, Talwinder Kahlon, Anna McClung, Terry Siebenmorgen, Rachelle Ward. Soft Wheat and Flour Products: Chair: Arthur Bettge. Members: Alice Andlovec, Byung-Kee Baik, Brian Beecher, Woo-Kyung Chung, Dean Creighton, Patricia Dailey, James Elkins, Jr., Robert Fesler, Sean Finnie, Diane Gannon, Gang Guo, Timothy Hansen, Lynn Haynes, Barbara Heidolph, Gary Hou, Yulai Jin, Meera Kweon, Grace Lai, Bon Lee, Janice Levenhagen, Harry Levine, Chunjian Lin, Angie Monical, Jennifer Monke, Craig Morris, Laurie Murphy, Terry Nelsen, Perry Ng, Katherine /"RIEN $EIRDRE/RTIZ :ORY1UINDE !XTELL 6ENKATESHWAR2EDDY Nicole Rees, Andrew Ross, Marsha Sayre, James Schuh, Deepa 3ETHI ,OUISE3LADE %DWARD3OUZA ,ORI7ILSON "IN:HAO .ING Zhou, Jeanny Zimeri. Statistical Advisory: Chair: Debra Palmquist. Members: !RTHUR"ETTGE 3TEPHEN$ELWICHE 3EAN&INNIE -ICHELLE-ROZIK Manderfeld, Terry Nelsen, Linda Schlichting, Paul Wehling, Philip C. Williams. Vitamin, Minerals and Lipids: Chair: Padmanaban Krishnan. Members: Mary Ellen Camire, Gina Clapper, Jonathan DeVries, Barbara Heidolph, Padmanaban Krishnan, John MacDonald, David Nelson, Kathryn Phillips, Peter Ranum, Robert Lee Wright. Yeast Evaluation: Chair: J. Michael Hudson. Members: Barbara Heidolph, Cristian Lupp, Ombretta Polenghi, Scott Wise.


AACC International Past Presidents 1915-1917: H. E. Weaver* 1917-1919: C. J. Patterson* 1919-1921: R. W. Mitchell* 1921-1923: S. J. Lawellin* 1923-1925: M. J. Blish* 1925-1927: R. J. Clark* 1927: L. R. Olsen* 1928: C. E. Mangels* 1929: M. A. Gray* 1930: C. G. Harrel* 1931: R. K. Durham* 1932: L. D. Whiting* 1933: R. C. Sherwood* 1934: M. M. Brooke* 1935: W. Platt* 1936: H. D. Liggitt, Jr.* 1937: C. H. Bailey* 1938: W. F. Geddes* '&'ARNATZ

1940: C. F. Davis* 1941: C. N. Frey* 1942: J. M. Doty* 1943: B. Sullivan* 1944-1946: O. Skovholt* 1946: P. Logue* 1947: R. M. Sandstedt* 1948: W. L. Haley* 1949: F. C. Hilderbrand* 1950: J. A. Shellenberger* 1951: H. K. Parker* 1952: J. A. Anderson* 1953: R. A. Barackman* 1954: F. R. Schwain* 1955: W. H. Cathcart* 1956: L. Zeleny* 1957: W. B. Bradley* 1958: C. L. Brooke* 1959: D. B. Pratt, Jr.* 1960: J. A. Johnson* 1961: J. W. Evans* 1962: M. M. MacMasters* 1963: J. W. Pence* 1964: P. E. Ramstad* 1965: R. H. Cotton 1966: W. S. Claus*

1967: K. L. Harris* 1968: D. K. Mecham* 1969: B. S. Miller 1970: E. J. Bass 1971: K. A. Gilles 1972: R. L. Whistler 1973: J. H. Nelson 1974: F. E. Horan* 1975: H. C. Becker* 1976: W. Bushuck 1977: D. G. McPherson* 1978: L. F. Marnett* 1979: R. A. Morck* 1980: W. J. Hoover 1981: J. J. Watson* .,"ETZ 1983: D. R. Lineback 1984: B. L. D’Appolonia 1985: W. M. Schwecke 1986: J. Vetter 1987: L. F. Hood 1988: R. R. Hahn 1989: R. C. Hoseney 1990: J. J. Warthesen* 1991: B. Stillings 1992: A. A. Betschart 1993: W. A. Atwell 1994: D. G. Metcalf 1995: H. Faridi 1996: W. Hurley* 1997: O. K. Chung 1998: F. Hegele 1999: J. M. Jones 2000: J. BeMiller 2001: B. B. Heidolph 2002: B. J. Donnelly 2003: J. Dexter 2004: G. Lookhart 2005: S. Craig 2006: R. Hamer 2007: B. Bruinsma 2008: M. Camire 2009: K. Khan

AACC International Headquarters and Staff AACC International 3340 Pilot Knob Road St. Paul, MN 55121 U.S.A. Phone: +1.651.454.7250 Fax: +1.651.454.0766 E-mail: aacc@scisoc.org Website: www.aaccnet.org Meeting Website: http://meeting.aaccnet.org

Staff The listing below provides the names of some key AACC International contacts. Executive Vice President/Publisher ................... Vice President of Operations ............................ Vice President of Finance ................................. AACC International Foundation ....................... Annual Meeting ................................................ Annual Meeting – Abstracts/Registration ........ Annual Meeting Exhibit Sales ......................... Approved Methods ........................................... Cereal ChemistryŽ ............................................. Cereal Foods WorldŽ ......................................... Cereal Foods World Advertising ....................... Check Sample ................................................... Continuing Education ....................................... Divisions and Local Section Dues .................... Divisions and Local Section Events .................. Member Services .............................................. Publications – Electronic .................................. Publications – Marketing .................................. Publications – Production .................................

Steven C. Nelson Amy L. Hope Barbara Mock Susan Kohn Betty Ford Rhonda Wilkie Barbara Divver Greg Grahek R. Carl Hoseney Susan Kohn Barbara Divver Barbara Mock Tressa Patrias Denise Kessler Linda Schmitt Susan Kohn Denise Kessler Steve Kronmiller Greg Grahek Linda Gold Karen Cummings 0HYLLIS!LBERTZ

* Deceased

Note: Presidential terms run from annual meeting to annual meeting. Year listed is year term began.

67


AACC International Annual Meeting

2011

Join us in sunny Palm Springs, California!

October 16-19, 2011 Palm Springs Convention Center Palm Springs, CA, U.S.A.

Vis

ting.a e e /m / : p tt ti h

accnet.org for m ore info rm ati on .


MAPS


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Shuttle Bus and Ferry Schedule Between Convention Center/Westin and the Hyatt, Holiday Inn Express, Marriott For those staying in AACC Intl.-designated hotels, the following transportation options are available free of charge. Consult the Savannah hosts in green vests for additional assistance.

Ferry Schedule NOTE: For all dates other than those listed below, see standard ferry schedule.

Saturday, October 23 Sunday, October 24 Monday, October 25 Tuesday, October 26 Wednesday, October 27

PEAK TIMES Two routes: Convention Center/ Westin to Hyatt/City Hall Dock OR Convention Center/Westin to Marriott (Waving Girl Dock) 20-minute wait time

OFF-PEAK TIMES One route: Convention Center to the Hyatt (City Hall Dock) 20-minute wait time

7:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. 7:00 a.m. – 10:00 p.m. 6:00 a.m. – 9:00 p.m. 6:00 a.m. – 7:30 p.m. 6:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m.

6:00 p.m. – midnight 10:00 p.m. – midnight 9:00 p.m. – midnight 7:00 p.m. – midnight 7:00 p.m. – midnight

PEAK TIMES Approximately 15 minute wait time expected; check for RED or BLUE route*

OFF-PEAK TIMES No routes, continuous loop to all hotels

3:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m. 6:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m./4:00 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. 6:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m./4:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. 6:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m./3:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.

7:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. 7:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. 9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Shuttle Bus Schedule

Saturday, October 23 Sunday, October 24 Monday, October 25 Tuesday, October 26 Wednesday, October 27

* Both routes run continuously to Savannah International Trade & Convention Center RED Route: Hyatt Regency Savannah BLUE Route: Savannah Marriott Riverfront & Holiday Inn Express

See page 70 for a map of transportation routes.

69


70 Westin Savannah Harbor Golf Resort & Spa 1 Resort Drive Savannah, GA 31421 912.201.2000

Hyatt Regency Savannah on the Historic Riverfront 2 West Bay Street Savannah, GA 31401 912.238.1234

Savannah Marriott Riverfront 100 General McIntosh Boulevard Savannah, GA 31401 912.233.7722

Holiday Inn Express 199 East Bay Street Savannah, GA 31401 912.231.9000

Shuttle bus and ferry shuttles will take meeting attendees to and from the Convention Center and Westin to the Hyatt, Holiday Inn Express, and Marriott.

Savannah International Trade and Convention Center One International Drive P.O. Box 248 Savannah, GA 31402 912.447.4000

Savannah Area and Meeting Facilities Locations


Savannah Convention Center

FLOOR 1

FLOOR 2 71


Westin Savannah Harbor Golf Resort & Spa

72


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2010 AACC International Exhibition The 2010 Annual Meeting would not be complete without an exhibition of the latest products and services that advance the work of the industry. Make valuable connections with suppliers, known and new, for the latest information on ingredients, instruments, equipment, and services in the grain-based food industry. Network with exhibitors and peers, enjoy refreshments, and view technical posters. To help you target products and services, please use the following descriptions supplied directly from the exhibiting company. Exhibitors reserving space after this section had gone to press are listed in the Program Addendum.

Exhibit Hours Sunday, October 24 Monday, October 25 Tuesday, October 26

6:00 – 9:00 p.m. 4:00 – 7:00 p.m. 12:00 – 2:30 p.m.

Grand Opening Exhibition Exhibits with Beer and Poster Viewing Lunch with the Exhibitors

* AACC International Corporate Member † Participant in Supplier Innovation Session

Alphabetical Listing of Exhibitors 414*

21st Century Grain Processing, 4800 Main St., Suite 501, Kansas City, MO, 64112 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.816.994.7600, Fax: +1.816.994.7629, Web: www.21centurygrain.com. Creative solutions to new product applications begin with custom coated whole grains and clusters from 21st Century Grain ProcessingŽ. 7EDELIVERCUSTOMIZEDGRAINBASEDSOLUTIONSTOMEETYOUR product development requirements and consumer trends. Wheat, corn, oats, custom whole grains, and clusters‌ Custom Ingredients – Innovative IdeasŠ‌just the way you like it! ADM, 4666 E Faries Pkwy., Decatur, IL, 62526 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.217.424.5200, Web: www.adm.com. ADM connects the harvest to the home and provides the food industry with high-quality ingredients – made from corn, oilseeds, wheat and cocoa – and unparalleled technical assistance. Our lecithins, ours, specialty milled products, specialty baking products, dry sweeteners, wheat glutens, isolates, and starches are ideal for a variety of food applications.

523

AHD International, LLC, 3340 Peachtree Road NE, Suite 1685, Atlanta, GA, 30326 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.404.233.4022, Fax: +1.404.233.4041, Web: www.ahdintl.com. AHD International consists of individuals with extensive experience in all areas of the nutritional products industry. Since its inception, AHD International has grown dramatically and continues to increase its global customer base of manufacturers, wholesalers, and distributors. We supply the highest quality nutritional products in raw material powders and oils.

Exhibitors

519*

503*

74

AIB International, P.O. Box 3999, 1213 Bakers Way, Manhattan, KS, 66505-3999 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.785.437.4750 or 1.800.633.5137, Fax: +1.785.537.1493, Web: www.aibonline.org. AIB International can solve your real world problems – consulting for production and QUALITYISSUESINGREDIENTTESTINGFORMULAOPTIMIZATION for maximum performance; product development or improvement; commercial feasibility assessments; audits of ingredient and ďŹ nished product quality; in plant audits of processes and product quality; assistance with commercial start-ups; one-of-a-kind Baking Science and Technology Course.

301*† ANKOM Technology, 2052 O’Neil Rd., Macedon, NY, 14502 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.315.986.8090, Fax: +1.315.986.8091, Web: www.ankom.com. ANKOM Technology manufactures and markets analytical instrumentation for the food and feed industry. In 2009, ANKOM announced developments in automating TDF analysis. In 2010, TDF automation becomes reality. Talk to us about developments in TDF automation, fat extraction and gas measurement. 409*

Arla Foods Ingredients, 645 Martinsville Rd., Basking Ridge, NJ, 07920-0624 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.908.604.8551, Fax: +1.908.604.9310, Web: www.arlafoodsingredients.com. AFI provides natural dairy protein solutions for all bakery applications, including egg alternatives, NFDM replacement, nutritional improvements, COSTOPTIMIZATION ANDPRICESTABILITY4ECHNICALSUPPORTIS available from benchtop to production. Successfully used in cakes, mufďŹ ns, cookies, wafes and pasta. New solutions for gluten-free applications are also available.

124*

Baker Perkins Inc., 3223 Kraft Ave. SE, Grand Rapids, MI, 49512-2027 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.616.784.3111, Fax: +1.616.784.0973, Web: www.bakerperkinsgroup. com. Baker Perkins supplies unit machines and complete systems for virtually every kind of breakfast cereal as well as the snack cookie, cracker and other grain-based food industries. Proven process technology is fully supported by an Innovation Centre for new product development and a full range of aftermarket services.

230*

BENEO-Orafti, 2470 State Rd. 10W, Morris Plains, NJ, 07950 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.973.867.2140, Fax: +1.973.867.2141, Web: www.orafti.com. The BENEOGroup is made of the companies BENEO-Orafti, BENEO0ALATINIT AND"%.%/ 2EMYANDISAPARTOFTHE3Ă“DZUCKER Group – one of the leading foodstuffs producers in Europe. BENEO-Orafti manufactures chicory based prebiotic ďŹ bers inulin and oligofructose, BENEO-Palatinit manufactures Isomalt and Isomaltulose, and BENEO-Remy manufactures rice derivatives, rice ours, and rice starches.


302

308*

200*

BIPEA, 6 a 14 Avenue Louis Roche, 92 230 Gennevilliers, France; Telephone: +00.33.1.47.33.54.60, Fax: +00.33.1.47.86.92.59, Web: www.bipea.org. Founded in 1970 by the cereal industry, Bipea is the ďŹ rst French ORGANIZEROFINTERLABORATORYCOMPARISONSTOBEACCREDITED Participation to our proďŹ ciency testing schemes is open to both private and public laboratories. Creator of homogeneous samples, we evaluate the performance of laboratories thanks to an in-house statistical treatment. .OWADAYS OURNONPROlTORGANIZATIONGATHERSMORETHAN 1,130 laboratories in 60 different countries. Blue Diamond Growers, 1802 C St., Sacramento, CA, 95812 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.916.442.0771, Fax: +1.916.446.8422, Web: www.bluediamond.com. Blue Diamond Growers, established in 1910, is the world’s largest processor and marketer of almonds. The Blue Diamond brand is known for quality and service in more than 90 countries. Our industrial products include inshell, brown, and manufactured almonds – in a variety of forms for applications across confectionery, bakery, dairy, and snacking. Blue Planet Foods, 9104 Apison Pike, Collegedale, TN, 37315 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.423.396.3145 X68550 or 1.877.396.3145 X68550, Web: www.blueplanetfoods.net. Seeking your whole grain solution? Blue Planet Foods has been manufacturing granola with whole grains for more than 30 years. Dessert toppings, toasted oats, graham pie shells, and private label – we do that too. Custom formulations? We have the capability to design a product around your speciďŹ cations. Intrigued? Let’s talk. Together we’ll turn your next project into a reality.

212

413*† Buhler Inc., 13105 12th Ave N., Plymouth, MN, 55441 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.763.847.9900, Fax: +1.763.847.9911, Web: www.buhlergroup.com. Buhler is your global technology partner for the food industry. We are a leader in technologies for milling of grains, grain handling, brewing/malting, color sorting, chocolate/ cocoa, pasta, extrusion systems, and nanotechnology. With 150 years of grain processing experience, we have the knowledge to be your solution provider. Our priority is to improve your performance. See our ad on the back of the program tab. 220*

Bunge Milling, 11720 Borman Dr., St. Louis, MO, 63146-1000 U.S.A.; Telephone: 1.800.528.4633, Fax: +1.314.292.2333, Web: www.bungenorthamerica.com. Bunge Milling is a primary supplier to the top food manufacturers in North America and the leading corn dry miller in the world. Bunge Milling offers unparalleled value, quality, and service. But it’s our commitment to innovation and our collaborative partnerships with the manufacturers of North America’s favorite brands that are the hallmarks of our success.

222*

Bunge Oils .ORTH+INZIE!VE "RADLEY ), 60915 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.314.292.2000, Web: www.bungenorthamerica.com. Bunge Oils transforms commodity oils into value-added food ingredients for restaurants, bakeries, and food producers. Bunge Oils’ products are sold in markets that reach consumers everywhere, every day.

329*

Butter Buds Food Ingredients, 2330 Chicory Rd., Racine, WI, 53403 U.S.A.; Telephone: 1.800.426.1119, Fax: +1.262.598.9999, Web: www.bbuds.com. We use PROPRIETARYENZYMEMODIlCATIONTECHNOLOGYTOhUNLOCKv the potent avor elements in butter, cream, cheese, and other avorful fats, delivering highly concentrated natural avor in convenient powdered, paste, and liquid form. These natural dairy concentrates are used at extremely low applications levels, easy to use and stable in price. They allow the production of better-tasting, more economical, healthier foods with very clean label statements. Organic forms of core products are available.

202*

C.W. BrabenderÂŽ Instruments, Inc., 50 E. Wesley St., South Hackensack, NJ, 07606 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.201.343.8425, Fax: +1.201.343.0608, Web: www.cwbrabender.com. For more than 85 years C.W. BrabenderÂŽ Instruments, Inc. has been the leading manufacturer of instrumentation designed for testing PHYSICALPROPERTIESANDQUALITYOFVARIOUSMATERIALSUTILIZED within the food industry. From sample preparation and R&D to evaluation, quality control and production, C.W. BrabenderÂŽ is the choice for you.

ÂŽ

Brabender GmbH & Co. KG, Kulturstr. 51 – 55, Duisburg, 47055 Germany; Telephone: +49.0.203.7788.0, Fax: +49.0.203.7788.102, Web: www.brabender.com. BrabenderŽ GmbH is the worldwide leading manufacturer of instrumentation for testing physical properties and QUALITYOFMATERIALSUTILIZEDINTHEFOODINDUSTRY&ROM sample preparation and R&D to evaluation, quality control, and production, BrabenderŽ GmbH has the world covered.

514*

Briess Malt & Ingredients Company, 625 South Irish Road, P.O. Box 229, Chilton, WI, 53014 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.920.849.7711, Fax: +1.920.849.4277, Web: www.Briess.com. “Put a better label on the tableâ€? with minimally processed, all natural ingredients from Briess. Ingredient categories include natural sweeteners (syrups and malt extracts); malted barley ours and grits; roasted grain ingredients; roasted potato our; reduced cook-time ours, akes, and particles; organic tapioca maltodextrin; and sprouted-roasted wheat ours.

210*

BrookďŹ eld Engineering Laboratories, Inc., 11 Commerce Blvd., Middleboro, MA, 02346 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.508.946.6200, Fax: +1.508.946.6262, Web: www. brookďŹ eldengineering.com. BrookďŹ eld is the world’s leading manufacturer of viscometers for laboratory and online process measurement and control. BrookďŹ eld also offers solutions for both texture analysis and powder ow applications in the form of our low-cost CT3 Texture !NALYZERAND0&40OWDER&LOW4ESTER

Bruker Optics, 19 Fortune Dr., Billerica, MA, 01821 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.978.439.9899, Fax:+1.978.667.3954, 7EBWWWBRUKEROPTICSCOM"RUKERS4$ .-2ANALYZERS and near infrared (NIR) spectrometers can be used for the research and development, quality and process control of grains. Determine multiple parameters using our nondestructive and rapid spectroscopy techniques; without using any consumables. www.bruker.com/foodquality.

Exhibitors

323

See our ad on the back of the index tab. 75


110*

225*

411*

Exhibitors

434*

224

408*

76

Calibre Control International Ltd., Asher Court, Lyncastle Way, Appleton, Warrington, WA4 4ST United Kingdom; Telephone: +44.1925.860401, Fax: +44.1925.860402 Web: www.calibrecontrol.com. Calibre will be demonstrating the popular C-Cell instrument for image analysis of cellular structures in baked products. C-Cell is now widely used in test baking and ingredient evaluation for bread and other baked products, providing transfer of objective information within the industry. Newer advanced models are now used for extruded products and confectionery. California Natural Products, P.O. Box 1219, 1250 E. Lathrop Rd., Lathrop, CA, 95330 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.209.858.2525, Web: www.cnp.com. Syrups, solids, and natural functional ingredients from grain-rice syrups, rice syrup solids, rice oligodextrins, tapioca syrups, and rice milk powder. Completo (the soluble whole grain rice-powder or liquid) and Bake-Trimi – the natural rice syrup solid dough conditioner, emulsiďŹ er, and fat replacer. Organic and conventional versions are available California Raisin Marketing Board, 3445 N. First St., Suite 101, Fresno, CA 93726 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.559.248.0287, Fax: +1.559.224.7016, Web: www.LoveYourRaisins.com. The California Raisin Marketing Board represents the nearly 3,500 raisin farmers in California. The Board’s mission is to increase demand for California raisins by conducting marketing activities and fostering new product development. The board also funds crop and health research on behalf of the industry. Visit LoveYourRaisins.com for recipes and more information. Canadian Food Barley, The Canadian International Grains Institute (CIGI), 1000 - 303 Main St., Winnepeg, MB, R3C 3G7 Canada, Telephone: +1.204.983.8584, Fax: +1.204.983.2642, Web: www.canadianfoodbarley.ca and www.cigi.ca. CIGI is a nonproďŹ t market development ORGANIZATIONDEDICATEDTOPROMOTING#ANADASGRAINS oilseeds, pulses and special crops in global markets. Based in Winnipeg, Canada, CIGI is an industry leader in DELIVERINGCUSTOMIZEDEDUCATIONALPROGRAMSANDAPPLIED research to customers worldwide. With growing interest in using barley in foods, CIGI has undertaken extensive testing on the use of barley in food products, including pan and pita breads, Artisan breads, tortillas, pasta, and extruded products. Can-Oat Milling, a Division of Viterra Inc., 1 Can-Oat Dr., Portage La Prairie, MB, R1N 3WI Canada; Telephone: 1.800.663.6287, Fax: +1.204.857.9500, Web: www.can-oat.com. Three milling facilities strategically located in western Canada produce a wide variety of oat and barley products. Whole grain oat products include akes, our, whole groats, and steel-cut groats. Oat bran can be custom milled to elevate the level of soluble ďŹ ber. Barley products include pearled, dehulled, aked, and our. Caravan Ingredients, 7905 Quivira Rd., Lenexa, KS, 66215 U.S.A.; Telephone: 1.800.669.4092, Fax: +1.913.888.7970, Web: www.caravaningredients.com. Caravan Ingredients is a leader in the ďŹ nest quality bakery and food ingredients. For more than 100 years we have delivered innovative solutions, technical expertise, and

endless customer service. With an extensive product portfolio, including industrial and artisan baking products and ingredients, specialty ingredients, grain processing, polymer additives and specialty blending equipment, Caravan Ingredients serves a wide range of customer channels. Service and technology working for you. 410*

Caremoli USA, Inc., 23959 580th St., Ames, IA, 50010 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.515.233.1255, Fax: +1.515.233.2933, Web: www.caremoliusainc.com. #AREMOLI53!SPECIALIZESINTHECUSTOMMANUFACTUREOF precooked cereals and legumes, multigrain ours thru all natural cooking and drying technologies, milling, and mixing processes. Caremoli also produces instant ours, gluten-free ours and mixes, natural anhydrous creams, high PDI defatted soy ours, and a variety of natural gums.

334

Carmi Flavor & Fragrance Co., Inc., 6030 Scott Way, Commerce, CA, 90040 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.323.888.9240 or 1.800.421.9647, Fax: +1.323.888.9339, Web: www.carmiavors.com. Carmi Flavor & Fragrance manufactures a full line of high-quality avors for the entire food and beverage industry. Flavors are available in natural, artiďŹ cial, natural/artiďŹ cial, and organic from our facilities throughout North America and we also have no required minimum orders. For more information call 1.877.888.5949.

609

CE Elantech, Inc., 170 Oberlin Ave. N. Suite 5, Lakewood, NJ, 08701 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.732.370.5559, Fax: +1.732.370.3888, Web: www.ceelantech.com. CE Elantech and Thermo ScientiďŹ c introduce the NEW Flash 4000 Combustion Nitrogen/ 0ROTEIN!NALYZERFEATURINGTRUELARGESAMPLEGRAMS nominal for most applications) capability, twin-trap technology consisting of two CO2 traps, which are automatically activated and regenerated, and moisture removal by a Peltier condensing device without the need for solid adsorbents.

613*

Cereal Ingredients, Inc., 4720 S. 13th St., Leavenworth, KS, 66048 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.913.727.3434, Fax: +1.913.727.3681, Web: www.cerealingredients.com. Cereal Ingredients produces food particulates that add avor, texture, and color to baked goods and ready-toeat cereals, as well as preblended mixes to create added avor and swirl effects in bread products. CII’s newest product line, Nutri-BitesÂŽ, consists of particles with special nutritional qualities such as extra levels of ďŹ ber, protein, vitamins, or minerals.

422

CEREX AG (outside North America), Worbstrasse  #( 'UEMLIGEN 3WITZERLAND4ELEPHONE +41.31.954.0110, Fax: +41.31.954.0111, Web: www.cerex.ch. We are specialists in the processing of raw grain products into modern breakfast cereals. We offer expertise based on long experience in all the following areas: direct and indirect expansion (by pufďŹ ng and extrusion) of all types of cereals; cooking, rolling, and roasting of aked products; coating, drying, and cooling of coated products; mixing and baking of muesli-type and crunchy cereals.


CHOPIN Technologies, 20 Avenue, Marcellin Berthelot, Villeneuve-la-Garenne, 92390 France; Telephone: +33141475079, Fax: +33141210710, Web: www.chopin. fr. CHOPIN Technologies methods and equipment for the quality control of grains, ours, and derivatives: test milling, moisture content, NIR analysis, starch damage, dough behavior during mixing, prooďŹ ng, and heating. Accompanying services: training, calibration development, adaptation of protocols and speciďŹ c studies.

518

CPM Wolverine Proctor, 251 Gibraltar Rd., Horsham, PA, 19044 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.215.443.5200, Fax: +1.215.443.5206, Web: www.wolverineproctor.com Wolverine Proctor offers a complete line of energy efďŹ cient equipment: dryers, coolers, impingement ovens (jet tube ORPARAJETNOZZLE JETZONEmUIDBEDDRYERSPUFFERSTOASTERS shredding mills, aking mills, and batch cookers. Our Tech Center offers continuous as well as batch testing for a wide range of products and materials.

See our ad on the inside front cover.

214*

Dakota Specialty Milling Inc., 4014 15th Ave. NW, Fargo, ND 58102 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.701.282.9656 or 1.877.282.9743, Fax: +1.701.282.9743, Web: www.dakotaspecialtymilling.com. Dakota Specialty Milling, is a manufacturer and supplier of multigrain and whole-grain blends. The company partners with bakers as a trusted supplier for America’s leading brands of variety breads, cereals, crackers, snack foods, donuts, and granola. Products include custom whole-grain blends, specialty ours (including multigrain), batter blends, granolas, and oven-toasted ingredients.

424*

Church and Dwight Co., Inc., 469 North Harrison St., Princeton, NJ, 08540 U.S.A.; Telephone: 1.800.631.5591, Web: www.churchdwight.com. Church and Dwight is the manufacturer of Arm & HammerŽ brand sodium bicarbonate, ammonium bicarbonate, and potassium bicarbonate. Church and Dwight caters to the food industry offering only the highest quality bicarbonates for your end use – our special blends offer unsurpassed performance and innovation.

501*

CII Laboratory Services, 10835 NW Ambassador Dr., Kansas City, MO, 64153 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.303.774.8262, Fax: +1.303.774.7545, Web: www.ciilab.com. The leading cereal chemistry laboratory in the United States is an ISO 9001 certiďŹ ed laboratory providing extensive services dedicated to the grain, milling, and baking industries. As a full-service food laboratory, CII also provides other extensive analytical capabilities that include microbiology, chromatography, mycotoxin testing, foreign material, and nutritional testing.

511*

Danisco USA Inc., Four New Century Pkwy., New Century, KS, 66031 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.913.764.8100, Fax: +1.913.764.8239, Web: danisco.com. Danisco is one of the world’s leading producers of ingredients and services for food and other consumer products. Danisco’s broad technology platform and product portfolio includes ENZYMES EMULSIlERS ANTIMICROBIALS ANTIOXIDANTS CULTURES hydrocolloids, tailored blends, and sweeteners. Key areas of expertise include improving the eating qualities and shelf life of bakery and dairy products.

See our ad on the inside back cover.

525*

David Michael & Co., 10801 Decatur Road, Philadelphia, PA, 19154 U.S.A.; Telephone: 1.800.DM.FLAVORS, Web: www.dmavors.com. Hit your avor target faster.Ž David Michael & Co. is a leading manufacturer of avors, STABILIZERS ANDNATURALCOLORSFORTHEFOODINDUSTRY with more than 100 years of experience serving clients worldwide. Well known for vanilla, we offer much more, including total product development assistance. Whatever your application may be, hit your avor target faster with David Michael.

228

Domino Specialty Ingredients, One N. Clematis St., West Palm Beach, FL, 33401-5551 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.561.336.5150, Fax: +1.561.336.5158, Web: www.dominospecialtyingredients.com. Domino Specialty Ingredients’ is a leading manufacturer producing, high quality certiďŹ ed organic and natural sugar, malt, molasses, honey & honey granules, rice, rice syrup, rice bran, rice our, rice maltodextrins, specialty sugars, and pharmaceutical products. We are proud offer Florida Crystals certiďŹ ed carbonfree™ Evaporated Cane Juice and Golden Granulated™ products.

404

DSM Food Specialties USA, Inc., 45 Waterview Blvd., Parsippany, NJ, 07054 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.973.257.8290, Web: www.dsm-foodspecialties.com. DSM Food 3PECIALTIES53! )NCISAWORLDLEADERINENZYME manufacturing. DSM is committed to creating value by DISCOVERING DEVELOPING ANDMARKETINGENZYMESFORCEREAL based applications. DSM offers a complete range of activity levels of amylase, hemicellulase, glucose oxidase, lipase, ANDPROTEASEENZYMES$3-MANUFACTURESASPARAGINASE A NEWENZYMESOLUTIONTOREDUCEACRYLAMIDELEVELSINFOOD

402

420*

234

Clextral Inc., 14450 Carlson Circle, Tampa, FL, 33626 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.813.854.4434, Fax: +1.813.855.2269, Web: www.clextral.com. Clextral manufactures twin screw extruders, dryers, and complete production lines for snacks, cereals, ingredients (precooked ours, encapsulated avors, soy/rice crisps, etc.), instant baby foods/drink mixes, meat analogs, premium petfood/ treats, and many other extruded products. Many valueadded products can also be made, including healthy products made from whole grains, legumes, and fruits and vegetables and bi-color and co-extruded products to name a few. The range of extruders includes small-scale pilot extruders for R&D to full-scale production models. Clextral also has a pilot plant facility with extruders and food scientists to assist in conďŹ dential new product development and testing. Colloides Naturels, Inc., 1140 US Highway 22, Suite 102, Bridgewater, NJ, 08809 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.908.707.9400, Fax: +1.908.707.9405, Web: www.cniworld.com. Colloides Naturels, Inc. is the U.S. subsidiary of Colloides Naturels International, the world’s leading manufacturer of Acacia gum. CN focuses on development of the nutritional aspects of gum acacia as a native soluble ďŹ ber source through their FIBREGUM™ and EQUACIA™ product line. Corn Products U.S., 5 Westbrook Corporate Center, Westchester, IL, 60154 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.708.551.2536, Fax: +1.708.551.2780, Web: www.cornproductsus.com.

77

Exhibitors

312*


PRODUCTS#ONTACTYOUR"AKEZYMEÂŽ Sales Department at Eleanor.DiBias@dsm.com or +1.507.254.7859. 209

130

134*

315*

Elementar Americas, Inc., 520 Fellowship Rd., Ste. D-408, Mt. Laurel, NJ, 08054 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.856.787.0022, Fax: +1.856.787.0055, Web: www.chnos.com. Elementar Americas offers the rapid N cube for accurate automated protein determination via Dumas combustion method. Dumas is safer, faster and less expensive than Kjeldahl. Key features: small footprint, LARGESAMPLESIZE STABLECALIBRATION  MINUTEANALYSIS time, low-maintenance design, exible Windows-based software, no-stacking 60-position carousel, 10-year furnace warranty, excellent service. EnviroLogix Inc., 500 Riverside Indl. Pkwy., Portland, ME, 04103 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.207.797.0300 or 1.866.408.4597, Fax: +1.207.797.7533, Web: www.envirologix.com. EnviroLogix is the worldwide leading provider of rapid test kits for the detection of GMOs in grains and oil seeds. Responding to the CHALLENGESPOSEDBYAGLOBALIZEDSUPPLYCHAIN THE company has also developed a line of innovative food and feed safety tests, including the QuickTox Kit for Melamine. Enzyme Development, 360 West 31st St., Suite 1102, New York, NY, 10001-2727 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.212.736.1580, Fax: +1.212.279.0056, Web: WWWENZYMEDEVELOPMENTCOM%NZYMESFORFOOD processing applications, brewing, and baking, including shelf-life extension, avor production, nutritional supplements, low lactose products, animal feeds, and many other applications.

Exhibitors

EuroďŹ ns ScientiďŹ c, Inc., 2315 N. Causeway Blvd., Ste. 200, Metairie, LA, 70001 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.504.297.4330, Fax: +1.504.297.4335. Web: www.euroďŹ nsus.com. EuroďŹ ns ScientiďŹ c is an independent, international, multidisciplined laboratory group staffed BYWORLD RECOGNIZEDSCIENTISTS TECHNICIANS ANDSUPPORT staff. With more 150 laboratories worldwide, EuroďŹ ns forms a bioanalytical company with an unrivaled range of analytical capabilities for clients in the food, feed, petfood, animal health, plant health, nutraceutical, grain, and seed industries.

405*

Firmenich Inc., P.O. Box 5880, Princeton, NJ, 08543 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.609.452.1000, Web: www. ďŹ rmenich.com. Firmenich, a leader in supplying avors to the bakery and cereal industries, offers a diverse range of avors that include bake-stable encapsulated avors and indulgent sweet brown avors and fruit avors.

512*

FONA International Inc., 1900 Averill Rd., Geneva, IL, 60134 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.630.578.8600, Web: www.fona.com. FONA International creates and manufactures avors for some of the largest food, beverage and nutraceutical companies in the world through its state-of-the-art, 33-acre campus in Geneva, IL. FONA has established a reputation as the forward-thinking, independent solution provider in the very competitive avor industry.

421*

Fortitech, Inc., 2105 Technology Dr., Schenectady, NY, 12308 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.518.372.5155, Fax: +1.518.372.5599, Web: www.fortitech.com. Fortitech is the world leader in the development of custom nutrient premixes for the food, beverage, and pharmaceutical industries. Fortitech premixes integrate functional ingredients from a comprehensive selection of vitamins, minerals, amino acids, nucleotides, and nutraceuticals. Fortitech has facilities in the United States, Europe, Asia PaciďŹ c, South America, and Mexico. For more information, visit fortitech.com.

325*

FOSS North America, 8091 Wallace Rd., Eden Prairie, MN, 55344 U.S.A.; Telephone: 1.800.547.6275 or +1.952.974.9892, Fax: +1.952.974.9823, Web: www.foss. us. FOSS provides and supports analytical instrumentation for the food, agricultural, and pharmaceutical industries. The FOSS name is known in laboratories and production facilities around the world for its robust, reliable, and easyto-use instruments. FOSS solutions are sold and supported in more than 100 countries and by more than 75 dedicated distributors.

303

Gamay, 2770 South 171st St., New Berlin, WI, 53151 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.262.789.5104, Fax: +1.262.789.5149, Web: gamayavors.com. Gamay is a top North American supplier in technology-based dairy avor solutions for the food industry. Areas of core competence include avor creation for natural and process cheeses, heat stable butter and cheese avors for snack and bakery applications, as well as premier dairy avors for customdesigned food applications.

305

Glanbia Nutritionals, 5951 McKee Road, Suite 201, Fitchburg, WI, 53719 U.S.A.; Telephone: 1.800.336.2183, Fax: +1.608.316.8504, Web: www.glanbianutritionals. com. Glanbia Nutritionals, North America’s most advanced axseed processor will showcase OptiSol 5000 series — uniquely processed ingredient systems with strong hydrocolloid properties to reduce gluten in breads, replace gum systems in gluten-free baked goods, or extend shelf life in sweet baked goods and tortillas—and MicroSure™ Plus Heat Treated Flax.

330

GNT USA, Inc., 660 White Plains Rd, Tarrytown, NY, 10591 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.914.524.0600, Web: www.gntusa.com. GNT USA, Inc. manufactures EXBERRYÂŽ natural food colorings and Nutrifood ÂŽ fruit

See our ad on the front of the exhibition tab. 429

529

78

Farmer Direct Foods, Inc., 511 Commercial St., P.O. Box 326, Atchison, KS, 66002-0326 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.913.367.4422, Fax: +1.913.367.4443, Web: www.farmerdirectfoods.com. Identity AssuredÂŽ Genuine stoneground whole wheat ours and brans (clean & heavy) from hard white or hard red wheats. High extraction HandcraftersÂŽ our. Fiberstar Inc., 713 St. Croix Street, River Falls, WI, 54022 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.715.425.7550, Fax: +1.715.425.7572, Website: www.citri-ďŹ .com. Citri-Fi ingredients are used by food manufacturers to improve quality, proďŹ t margins, ingredient declarations and nutrition. Citri-Fi accomplishes these objectives by tightly binding free and added moisture, inhibiting evaporative loss and moisture migration, and partially replacing oil, fat, and eggs. Citri-Fi is all-natural, non-allergenic, GRAS, nonGMO, and gluten free.


433

Givaudan, 1199 Edison Dr., Cincinnati, OH, 45216 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.513.948.8000, Web: www.givaudan. com. Givaudan is the leading company in the avor and fragrance industry with a vision to be the Essential Source of sensory innovation for their customers, driven by mutual passion for excellence. Through unique sensory experience and consumer insight, Givaudan provides customers with the taste and smell proďŹ les that are key to their products’ success. Givaudan serves global, regional and local customers around the world.

Grains for Hope, 658 220th St., Fairview, KS, 66425 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.785.284.2155 or +1.785.285.1261, Fax: +1.785.285.2600, Web: www.grainsforhope.com. Grains for Hope produces extruded, micronutrientenhanced fortiďŹ ed grain-like products to bring nutritious food to malnourished populations. A 501 c-3 not-for-proďŹ t foundation, local, national, and international food experts work with high school students in Sabetha, Kansas, to send FOODTO-OZAMBIQUEANDOTHERPOPULATIONSINNEEDAROUND the world.

300

Granotec North America, 1165 Globe Ave., Mountainside, NJ, 07092 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.908.301.1811, Fax: +1.908.301.1812, Web: www.granotec.com. Granotec offers nutrients, ingredients, laboratory services, technology transfer, and quality assurance systems, partnering with its customers in the production of healthy food. A leading supplier to the food industry in the Americas for more than 25 years, Granotec HASFACILITIESIN!RGENTINA "RAZIL #HILE %CUADOR -EXICO Peru, and the United States.

524*

Hesco, Inc./Dakota Organic Products, 500 19th St. SW, Watertown, SD, 57201 U.S.A.; Telephone: 1.800.243.7264, Fax: +1.605.884.1133, Web: www.hesco-inc.com. Hesco, )NC$AKOTA/RGANIC0RODUCTSSPECIALIZESINCEREALGRAINS grown in the heart of the United States grain belt and Canada. With our strategically located plants in South Dakota and Nebraska, our mission is to provide highquality, super-clean organic and conventional grain and grain-related products for the food industry.

332

ICC – International Association for Cereal Science and Technology, Marxergasse 2, Vienna, 1030 Austria; Telephone: +43170772020, Fax: +43170772040, Web: www.icc.or.at. ICC is a non-political, non-proďŹ t-making, NON RELIGIOUSORGANIZATION ANINDEPENDENT INTERNATIONALLY RECOGNIZEDORGANISATIONOFEXPERTS ANEUTRALFORUMFOR all cereal scientists and technologists, a publisher of international standard methods and other publications related to our ďŹ eld, and an important organiser of national and international events.

106*

ICL Performance Products LP, 622 Emerson Rd., Ste. 500, St. Louis, MO, 63141 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.314.983.7940 or 1.800.244.6169, Fax: +1.314.918.0617, Web: www.icl-perfproductslp.com. ICL is featuring LevonaÂŽ Brio and LevonaÂŽ Opus, calciumRICH ZEROSODIUMLEAVENINGAGENTS,EVONAHASCONTROLLED release for convenient, “better-for-youâ€? baked goods. Cal-SistentÂŽ, a new choice in calcium fortiďŹ cation, is ENGINEEREDTOBEAlNEPOWDERWITHANARROWPARTICLESIZE distribution. Cal-Sistent provides fortiďŹ cation without impact on sensory characteristics. ICL offers a complete line of phosphates and acids for leavening, shelf life, and dough conditioning of grain-based products.

218*† Gold Coast Ingredients, Inc., 2429 Yates Ave., Commerce, CA, 90040 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.323.724.8935, Fax: +1.323.724.9354, Web: goldcoastinc.com. Gold Coast Ingredients is a full-service manufacturer of avors and colors for the food industry. We offer a wide range of natural, natural & artiďŹ cial and artiďŹ cial avors in liquid, powder and spray dried forms. Kosher and organic certiďŹ ed avors are available. Custom avor and color formulations are our specialty, as well as heat-stable avors for speciďŹ c needs of the baking and grain-based food industry. Gold Coast Ingredients is committed to bringing you the ďŹ nest avors and food products at a fair value delivered with service that is unsurpassed in promptness, courtesy, and consistency. 328

635*

Golden Peanut Co., 100 North Point Center East, Suite 400, Alpharetta, GA, 30022 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.770.752.8190, Web: www.goldenpeanut.com. Golden Peanut Co. offers a full line of peanut ours in various roast levels both 12% fat or 28% fat which are used in baked goods, confections, and nutritional bars. Golden Peanut also offers a full line of peanuts, roasted peanut oils, peanut extract and reďŹ ned peanut oils. Grain Millers, Inc., 9531 W. 78th St., Suite 400, Eden Prairie, MN, 55344 U.S.A.; Telephone: 1.800.232.6287 or +1.952.829.8819, Fax: +1.952.829.8819, Web: www.grainmillers.com. Full line of specialty grain items and multigrain blends. Wide range of akes, our, steel-cut pearled grains, and custom products produced from oats, barley, wheat, rye, triticale and organic grains. Oat ďŹ ber ANDSTABILIZEDWHEATGERMBRANBLENDSARENOWAVAILABLE as ingredients or used in custom blends. With plants in Canada, West Coast United States and Midwest, Grain Millers is the only miller able to meet your needs for grainbased ingredients, grain blends, and mixes from multiple locations. See our ad on the back of the exhibition tab.

324*

Grain Processing Corporation (GPC), 1600 Oregon St., Muscatine, IA, 52761 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.563.264.4265, Fax: +1.563.264.4289. Web: www.grainprocessing.com. Quality ingredients for the food industry from GPC: MALTRINŽ maltodextrins and corn syrup solids, MALTRIN OR™ organic rice maltodextrins

and rice syrup solids, PURECOTEÂŽ binding/coating starches, INSCOSITYÂŽ cold water swelling starches, PURE-DENTÂŽ PFP and specialty starches, PURE-SETÂŽ thinboiling starches, PURE-GELÂŽSTABILIZEDSTARCHES TruBranÂŽ ďŹ bers, and Sterling ChoiceÂŽ axseed products.

See our ad on the front of the program tab.

79

Exhibitors

333

and vegetable extracts. EXBERRYÂŽ natural colors are STANDARDIZEDFORTHEIRCOLORHUEANDINTENSITY.UTRIfood ÂŽ PRODUCTSARESTANDARDIZEDEXTRACTSOFFRUITSANDVEGETABLES that offer consistent levels of phytochemicals. All products are made from fruits and vegetables, using only water and physical processing. Products are GMO-free, allergen free, kosher, and come in liquid and powder forms.


320*

401

231

Innophos, Inc., 259 Prospect Plains Rd., Bldg. N, Cranbury, NJ, 08512 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.609.495.2495, Fax: +1.609.860.0245, Web: www.innophos.com. Innophos, Inc., the leading North American manufacturer of specialty phosphates, offers a complete range of foodgrade phosphates for baking, beverage, dairy, meat, and nutritional supplement applications. Looking for healthy baking solutions? Discover CAL-RISEÂŽ. An easy-toformulate, sodium-free, calcium-based leavening. It can be used as a direct replacement for typical sodium-based leavening, such as SAPP 28, and is as economical to use. CAL-RISEÂŽ may also provide a calcium health claim of “goodâ€? or “excellentâ€?, depending on formulation. International Fiber Corp., 50 Bridge St., No. Tonawanda, NY, 14120 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.716.693.4040, Fax: +1.716.693.3528, Web: www.ifcďŹ ber.com. International Fiber Corporation gives you many ways to improve your products using Solka-FlocÂŽ, JustFiberÂŽ, and FibrexÂŽ functional ďŹ bers. We can assist you whether you want to make a ďŹ ber claim or need the functionality that ďŹ ber can offer. We have the ďŹ ber solutions to improve your product success and help manage your costs.

Exhibitors

International Flavor and Fragrance., 150 Docks Corner Rd., Dayon, NJ, 08810 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.732.275.4980, Fax: +1.732.329.5635, Web: www.iff.com. IFF is a leading creator of avors and fragrances used in a wide variety of consumer products and packaged goods, including ďŹ ne fragrance and detergents, as well as beverages and baked goods. The company leverages its competitive advantages of brand and consumer understanding combined with its focus on R&D and innovation, to provide customers with differentiated product offerings.

309*

J. RETTENMAIER USA LP, 16369 US 131 Highway, Schoolcraft, MI, 49087 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.269.679.2340, Fax: +1.269.679.2364, Web: www. jrsusa.com. J. RETTENMAIER VITACELÂŽ functional, label-friendly dietary ďŹ bers contribute nutritional beneďŹ ts, e.g. increased satiety and calorie reduction, to a variety of ďŹ ber-enriched food and beverage applications and technologically advanced food products. Products: VITACELÂŽ powdered cellulose, oat, wheat, potato, pea, sugarcane, cottonseed, apple, orange ďŹ bers, and microcrystalline cellulose.

310

Lab Synergy, 374 Pulaski Hwy., Goshen, NY, 10924 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.845.258.1200, Fax: +1.845.258.1208, Web: www.labsynergy.com. Lab Synergy is an exclusive provider of laboratory instrumentation SPECIALIZINGINASSISTINGCEREALGRAINMANUFACTURERSWITH their qualitative and quantitative measurements. With our INSTRUMENTATION WECANQUANTIFYANDCHARACTERIZEAVARIETY of constituents that are present in the cereal grains “nearâ€? line. Protein content, fat and oil content, total salt and acidity, starch damage, and our rheology are just a few or the components that we can monitor. Please drop by our booth and ask for an onsite presentation.

Baking Solutions is the specialty baking ingredients business of Lallemand, the Canadian yeast and bacteria company supplying EssentialŽENZYME BASEDDOUGH conditioners, FermaidŽ yeast-based dough relaxers, Lalvain du JourŽ and FlorapanŽ cultures to the global baking industry. Also offering Bocker ready-to-use cultured ours in North America. Let Lallemand design a baking solution for you. 132*

Malt Products Corp., 88 Market St, Saddle Brook, NJ, 07663 U.S.A.; Telephone: 1.800.526.0180, Fax: 1.201.845.0028, Web: www.maltproducts.com. Grainulose™ cereal based sweeteners, rice, oat, rye, wheat, and malt are on display. Whole grain products beneďŹ t from their use. Flavor, color, fermentable carbohydrates, and sweetness are provided. Also offered are molasses, tapioca syrup, invert and specialty sweetener blends.

521*

ADM/Matsutani, LLC, 500 Park Blvd. Ste. 1240, Itasca, IL, 60143 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.630.250.8720; Fax: +1.630.250.8725, Web: www@ďŹ bersol2.com. Fibersol-2, digestion resistant maltodextrin, is source of high ďŹ ber (90% min. DSB) with beneďŹ cial physiological properties supported by plentiful studies. It increases ďŹ ber content and nutritional value of virtually any food without adding taste. And it’s rapid dispersion, high solubility, and stability makes it easy to incorporate into any formulation.

625*

McCormick & Co., 204 Wight Ave., Hunt Valley, MD, 21031 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.952.345.0378, Web: www.mccormick.com. McCormick will be demonstrating their Create It Center process and stop in to learn more about the new McCormick Science Institute. There will also be product sampling of new avor and topical seasoning for cereal-based snacks.

400*

Medallion Labs/General Mills, 9000 Plymouth Ave., Minneapolis, MN, 55427 U.S.A.; Telephone: 1.800.245.5615, Fax: +1.763.764.4010, Web: www.medallionlabs.com. Medallion Labs, a division of General Mills, provides analytical testing for the food industry. Since 1974, we’ve served thousands of clients, earning us a reputation for quality, reliability, and exibility. Medallion’s areas of expertise include: nutritional labeling, microbiology, shelf life studies, dietary ďŹ ber as well as other specialty ďŹ bers. See our ad on page 10.

128*

80

Lallemand Baking Solutions, 5494 Notre-Dame Est, Montreal, QC H1N 2C4, Canada; Telephone: +1.514.251.3620 or +1.514.251.3610, Fax: +1.514.255.6861, Web: www.lallemand.com. Lallemand

207*

Megazyme International, Bray Business Pk., Bray County Wicklow, Ireland; Telephone: +353.1.2861220, &AX  7EBWWWMEGAZYMECOM -EGAZYMEISALEADINGMANUFACTUREROFTESTKITSAND reagents for the food, feed, fermentation, dairy, and wine industries. These kits are used in analytical laboratories worldwide for health and nutritional labeling purposes. Our total dietary ďŹ bre, total starch, fructan and beta-glucan assay kits are world standards. See our ad on the back of the recognition tab.

425*

The Mennel Milling Company, P.O. Box 806, Fostoria, OH, 44830 U.S.A.; Telephone: 1.800.688.8151, Fax: +1.419.436.5151, Web: www.mennel.com. The Mennel Milling Company with ďŹ ve our mills is one of the


LEADINGSOFTWHEATMILLIERSINTHECOUNTRYANDSPECIALIZESIN custom milling to customer needs. In addition, two of the ďŹ ve mills produce hard and spring wheat ours. Mennel also produces a line of heat-treated our products. Mills are located in Fostoria and Bucyrus, OH; Dowagiac, MI; Roanoke, VA; and Mt. Olive, IL.

215

629*

322

Merlin Development Inc., 181 Cheshire Ln., Suite 500, Plymouth, MN, 55441 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.763.475.0224, Fax: +1.763.475.1626, Web: www.merlindevelopment.com. Merlin Development provides cost-effective R&D services to the food industry. Merlin’s staff has a broad range of experience across the majority food systems and processes. We can provide complete product development services from prototype development to plant start up, or assist with a portion of a project. MGP Ingredients, 100 Commercial Street, P.O. Box 130, Atchison, KS, 66002-0130 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.866.547.2122, Fax: +1.913.367.0192, Web: www. mgpingredients.com. MGP Ingredients, Inc. produces ingredient solutions derived from wheat for bakery and processed food applications. These ingredients consist of resistant starches as a dietary ďŹ ber source, wheat protein isolates and concentrates, textured proteins, and instant and cook-up starches that provide functional, nutritional and sensory beneďŹ ts. Mid-America Food Sales Ltd., P.O. Box 904, Northbrook, IL, 60065 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.847.945.0104, Fax: +1.847.945.0424, Web: www.midamfoodsales.com. Mid-America Food Sales Ltd. provides quality ingredients, excellent service, and competitive prices. Cereal and cookie inclusions, cocoa, dietary ďŹ bers, fruit and nuts, gluten-free ours and grains, omega 3s, prebiotics, probiotics, specialty grains, Supreme Sofgrains, sweeteners, custom blending, manufacturing, and consulting. Mother Murphy’s Laboratories, 2826 S. Elm St., Greensboro, NC, 27406 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.336.273.1737 or 1.800.849.1277, Fax: +1.336.273.2615, Web: www.mothermurphys.com. Mother Murphy’s has a history of creating high quality avorings and Extracts since 1946. We offer a complete portfolio of creative and innovative avorings available in both liquid and dry forms to complement any application imaginable. Come ask us about our new reaction avors available for many grain based products.

531 & National Mfg. Cereal Chemistry Equipment, 533 535 J St., Lincoln, NE, 68508 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.402.475.3400, Fax: +1.402.742.2232, Web: www.national-mfg.com. Since 1939, National Mfg. has been supplying analysis equipment to the food science and production industry worldwide. Equipment items include the Risograph, Mixograph, 10- to 200-g dough mixers, fermentation cabinets, several models of test baking ovens, a set of small dough sheeting rolls, and a three-roll molder suitable for pup loaves. This year, National Mfg. is happy to introduce the Insectograph and three-row color sorter to the product list. 509

National Starch Food Innovation, 10 Finderne Ave., Bridgewater, NJ, 08807 U.S.A.; Telephone: 1.866.961.6285, Web: www.foodinnovation.com. National

505*

Navas Instruments, 105 Wind Tree Ln., Conway, SC, 29526 U.S.A.;Telephone: +1.843.347.1379, Fax: +1.843.347.2527, Web: www.navas-instruments.com. Navas manufactures and distributes the most efďŹ cient and economical analytical instrumentation available. Our multisample, multimatrix (MMS-4000) fully automatic ANALYZERFORMOISTUREANDORASHALLOWSLOADINGSAMPLES at one time. Our primary focus is our customers; to provide advanced, reliable, and economical analysis solutions for your QC and R&D laboratories.

233

Nutraceuticals World, 70 Hilltop Rd., Ste. 3000, Ramsey, NJ, 07446 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.201.825.2552, Fax: +1.201.825.0553, Web: www.nutraceuticalsworld.com. .UTRACEUTICALS7ORLDISTHEPREMIERMAGAZINESERVINGTHE global dietary supplement, functional food, nutritional beverage and sports nutrition industries. By providing valuable information on ingredient sourcing, marketing trends, new product launches, packaging, manufacturing equipment, and industry trends, Nutraceuticals World is an important resource for industry executives worldwide. Our weekly E-newsletter “Nutraceuticals World NOW� offers exclusive online articles. Visit www.nutaceuticalsworld. com for the most timely industry news and subscription information.

229

Northern Crops Institute, North Dakota State University, Dept. 7400, P.O. Box 6050, Fargo, ND, 58108-6050 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.701.231.6538, Fax: +1.701.231.7235, Web: www.northern-crops.com. Northern Crops Institute (NCI) provides education and technical services to the food industry that assist in expanding domestic and international MARKETSFORNORTHERN GROWN53CROPS.#)SPECIALIZES in baking, crop quality, pilot-scale extrusion, pilotscale milling, feed manufacturing, and pilot-scale pasta manufacturing in a conďŹ dential atmosphere.

208*

NP Analytical Laboratories, Checkerboard Sq., St. Louis, MO, 63164 U.S.A.; Telephone: 1.800.423.6832 or +1.314.982.1310, Fax: +1.314.982.1078, Web: www.npal. com. NP Analytical Laboratories provides comprehensive testing of foods and ingredients for nutrients, contaminants, microbial pathogens, and quality indicators. Services include measurement of vitamins, minerals, dietary ďŹ ber, fatty acids, sugars, amino acids, preservatives, fat quality and stability, pesticides, mycotoxins, and complete nutrition labeling services. Microbial shelf-life and challenge studies are also offered.

108*

Oat Ingredients, LLC, 4368 Park Ct., Boulder, CO, 80301-3964 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.303.818.1117, Fax: +1.413.385.9391, Web: www.oatingredients.com and www. OatWell.com Import, sales and distribution of OATWELLÂŽ oat bran, oat our and oat oil ingredients. OATWELL high ďŹ ber brans to 28% soluble ďŹ ber - beta glucan and 50%+ 81

Exhibitors

304*

Starch Food Innovation is a leading global supplier of nature-based functional and nutritional ingredient solutions to the food and beverage industries. The company has a strong focus on delivering innovation to meet market and consumer trends in wholesome and natural, texture, nutrition, wellness, vitality and extensive, award-winning product range, market knowledge and technical expertise makes National Starch Food Innovation a partner of choice for the next generation of food producers.


FOODS0ERTEN)NSTRUMENTSPROVIDESANALYZERSTOHELPYOU meet the functionality and nutritional requirements of your products. Stop by to discuss on-line analysis, NIR, RVA, DOUGHRHEOLOGY GLUTENANALYSIS ENZYMECHARACTERIZATION and much more.

TDF. Applications for FDA heart health claims, weight management, low GI and digestive health. All natural, nonGMO oat bran and oats-based ingredients. 331

513

321*

Omega Protein, 2105 City West Blvd., Suite 500, Houston, TX, 77042 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.713.623.0060, Fax: +1.713.940.6111, Web: www.omegapure.com. OmegaPureÂŽ products are rich in long-chain omega-3 fatty acids (EPA and DHA) made from menhaden, a sustainable resource harvested in U.S. waters. We offer innovative delivery systems for fortifying food products including: OmegaPureÂŽ high stability oils, custom ingredients’ OmegaBits (Bakery Inclusions) and Meadowpure UltraGrad Fish Oil and Flax blend. Oxford Instruments America, 300 Baker Avenue, Suite # 150, Concord, MA, 01742 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.978.369.9933, Fax: +1.978.369.8287, Web: www.oxford-instruments.com. The Magnetic Resonance group develops and manufactures cost-effective instrumentation for quality assurance. Since the 1960s Oxford Instruments’ low-ďŹ eld benchtop NMR has been the fastest and easiest technique available for accurately determining oil content of cereal grains, oilseeds, animal feed, and other foods using reliable, nondestructive methods.

Exhibitors

Palsgaard Inc., 55 Madison Ave., Suite 400, Morristown, NJ, 07960 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.973.285.3299, Fax: +1.973.538.0503, Web: www.palsgaard.com. Palsgaard SPECIALIZESINTHEMANUFACTURINGOFEMULSIlERSAND STABILIZERBLENDS/URINGREDIENTSMEETALLTHEPERTINENT quality criteria required, to ensure the highest quality and standard. Palsgaard offers product solutions for bakery, confectionary, dairy, ice cream, lipids, and ďŹ ne food applications. We combine theory with a wealth of experience, breaking new grounds with innovative solutions.

See our ad on page 1. 428*

PGP International, Inc., 351 Hanson Way, P.O. Box 2060, Woodland, CA, 95776 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.530.662.5056 or 1.800.333.0110, Fax: +1.530.662.6074, Web: www.pgpint.com. PGP International, Inc. is a leading supplier and innovative manufacturer of grain and dairy based ingredients to the food and nutritional industries. Primary ingredients in the PGP International portfolio include extruded particulates, ours and blends, Nutri Sperse, a line of nutritional beverage bases, PAC functional ingredients, whey concentrates, isolates and hydrolysates and lactose.

528

Pharmline, Inc., 41 Bridge St., P.O. Box 291, Florida, NY, 10921 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.845.651.4443, Fax: +1.845.651.6900, Web: www.pharmlineinc.com. A subsidiary of Gadot Biochemical Industries, Pharmline Inc. is a leading global supplier and manufacturer of high-quality enrichment minerals, citrates, and nutrient PREMIXES&OUNDEDIN 0HARMLINE)NCSPECIALIZESIN custom formulations, large-capacity blending of liquids, powders, and granulations. It provides custom-designed premixed blend services to the dietary supplements and the food and beverages industries. These processing services are coupled with modern QC laboratories applying stateof-the-art equipment and methods of analysis. Pharmline’s manufacturing facility is GMP, ISO-9001, and HACCP certiďŹ ed.

611

Prayon Inc., P.O. Box 1473, Augusta, GA, 30903-1473 U.S.A.; Telephone: 1.800.477.2966, Fax: +1.706.798.0015, Web: www.prayon.com. For a complete range of phosphate products, including MCPM, DCP, TCP, SAPP-28, SAPP-40, and SAPP-43 for baking and cereal applications, contact Prayon Inc. Prayon also offers phosphoric acid and a full range of calcium, potassium, and sodium phosphates for other applications.

418

Primera Foods, 612 S. Eighth St., Cameron, WI, 54822 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.715.458.4075, Fax: +1.715.458.4078, Web: www.primerafoods.com. Committed to providing high-quality products, service, and innovation at competitive prices, Primera Foods is the answer to all your egg needs. Our product line includes dried, liquid, and highly functional egg products. We also offer rice and tapioca maltodextrins and syrup solids, along with agglomerated and custom spray-dried ingredients.

412*

Quali Tech, Inc. ,AKE(AZELTINE$R #HASKA MN, 55318 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.952.448.5151, Fax: +1.952.448.3603, Web: www.qualitechco.com. Innovative Flavor Particulate Ingredients including Flavor-ettes, Flavor Islands, Pell-ettes, PepR, and Season-ettes where virtually any color and/or avor can be created through engineered formulas allowing for fruit content, non-GMO, non-trans, sugar free and organic systems. Also showing 100% natural &LAV 2 'RAINTOASTEDCORNGERMFORUTILIZATIONINALMOST

See our ad on page 13. 313*

112*

Penford Food Ingredients Co., 7094 S. Revere Pkwy., Centennial, CO, 80112 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.303.649.1900, Web: www.penfordfoods.com. Penford Food Ingredients is a premier carbohydrate company providing the processed food and nutraceutical industries with unmodiďŹ ed and modiďŹ ed potato, corn, tapioca, waxy MAIZE ANDRICESPECIALTYSTARCHES DEXTRIN ANDPETTREATS)T is the leader in ingredient system technology for coatings, meats, dairy, confectionery, bakery, soups/sauces/gravies, and gluten-free applications. Perten Instruments AB, P.O. Box 5101, SE-141 05 Kungens Kurva, Sweden; Telephone: +46.8.880.990, Fax: +46.8.881.210, Web: www.perten.com. NEW! The RVA 4500! The RVA 4500 features our largest viscosity range, highest sensitivity, and USB connectivity. Evaluate and CHARACTERIZETHEPERFORMANCEOFGRAIN mOUR STARCH AND OTHERFOOD ASSESSTHEEFFECTOFENZYMESONASUBSTRATE AND emulate production and cooking processes.

114*† Perten Instruments, Inc., 6444 S. 6th St. Rd., SpringďŹ eld, IL, 62712 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.217.585.9440, Fax: +1.217.585.9441, Web: www.perten.com. Instrumentation for analysis and process monitoring from R&D to ďŹ nished 82


213*

R-Biopharm, Inc., 7950 Old US 27 S., Marshall, MI, 49068 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.269.789.3033, Fax: +1.269.789.3070, Web: www.r-biopharm.com. R-Biopharm is a leading developer of test solutions for food and feed analysis. R-Biopharm test kits offer high precision and accuracy, key requirements where consumer health is at risk. The use of R-Biopharm tests to screen for mycotoxins, hormones, antibiotics, genetically modiďŹ ed material, speciďŹ ed risk material, allergens, and pathogens is fast, reliable and, above all, cost effective. R-Biopharm recently released the ďŹ rst test kit on the market for the detection of gluten fragments in beer, syrup, and starch.

211

rtech Laboratories, P.O. Box 64101, St. Paul, MN, 55164-0101 U.S.A.; Telephone: 1.800.328.9687, Fax: +1.651.481.2002, Web: www.rtechlabs.com. rtech Laboratories, a division of Land O’Lakes, is a comprehensive food science and technology research facility providing clients with microbiology and chemistry testing, nutrition labeling, sensory evaluation, consumer research, pilot plant, and information research services. Our laboratory is ISO 17025 accredited.

403*

Research Products Co., 1835 E. North St., P.O. Box 1460, Salina, KS, 67402-1460 U.S.A.; U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.785.825.2181, Fax: +1.785.825.8908, Web: www.researchprod.com. Serving the milling and baking industries worldwide since 1970, Research Products Company, a division of McShares, Inc., is the #1 provider of service and quality to grain millers around the world WITHOURVITAMINANDMINERALPREMIXES ENZYMEBLENDS our bleaching, maturing and improving products, custom blends, micro-ingredient dispensing systems, complete analytical laboratory testing and a full service ďŹ eld service team.

508*

532

Roquette America, Inc., 1417 Exchange St., Box 6647, Keokuk, IA, 52632 U.S.A.; Telephone: 1.800.553.7035 or +1.319.524.5757, Fax: +1.319.526.2345, Web: www.roquette.com. Roquette, offering the best of nature, is one of the world’s most advanced producers of starch and starch derivatives by transforming renewable resources corn, wheat, potatoes, and peas into an extensive line of high-quality ingredients for a wide range of food and nonfood industries throughout the world. Roquette is also a leading expert in polyols, pyrogen-free raw materials. and dry sweeteners.

204

Siemer Specialty Ingredients, 201 W. Main, Teutopolis, IL, 62467 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.217.857.3131, Fax: +1.217.857.3092, Web: www.siemerspecialtyingredients. com. SSI is a manufacturer of naturally modiďŹ ed, heat treated grain products for use in various applications. Replacing chemically modiďŹ ed food starches, improving batter/coatings, low microbial our, natural cake our, STABILIZEDGERM STABILIZEDWHITEBRAN ANDSTABILIZEDWHOLE wheat our for nutritional addition. Stop by for more info!

430†

Sensient Flavors LLC, 5600 W. Raymond St., Indianapolis, IN, 46241-4343 U.S.A.; Telephone: 1.800.445.0073, Fax: +1.317.244.6076, Web: www.sensient-tech.com. Sensient Flavors offers a diverse portfolio of avors that covers every segment, including baked goods, cereal, energy bars, crackers, and desserts. Sensient’s avor portfolio range includes fruit, sweet brown, chocolate and vanilla, as well as DairyBoost™ premium dairy avors, cocoa replacer avors, sweetness enhancer avors and SmoothenolŽ Natural Masking Technology.

432*

Sensient Food Colors, 2515 North Jefferson Ave., St. Louis, MO, 63106 U.S.A.; Telephone: 1.800.325.8110, Fax: +1.314.286.7160, Web: www.sensitentfoodcolors. COM 3ENSIENT#OLORS)NCISARECOGNIZEDLEADERIN the natural colors (our Fusion Precise Natural Color™ platform) and the FD&C colors market. We supply safe, secure, quality products along with unparalleled technical support, customer service, and product innovations with our proprietary technologies. Sensient Colors’ experienced technical specialists will assist you with all of your color requirements.

631

Solbar USA, 680 Hale Ave. North #110, St. Paul, MN, 55128 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.651.493.0250, Fax: +1.651.528.6728, Web: www.solbar.com. Solbar USA manufactures a full line of soy protein products ranging from functional soy protein isolates and concentrates to TEXTUREDCONCENTRATES3OLBARSPECIALIZESINPRODUCTSFOR the beverage, protein bar, nutrition, baking, and meat industries. Solbar also offers a full line of non-GMO and now offers organic and hexane-free soy proteins.

530

Sosland Publishing, 4800 Main St., Suite 100, Kansas City, MO, 64112 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.816.756.1000, Fax: +1.816.756.2618, Web: www.sosland.com. From Baking & Snack and Baking & Snack International to Milling & Baking News, Food Business News, World Grain, Baking Buyer and Instore Buyer, Sosland Publishing

Riviana Foods Inc., 2777 Allen Pkwy., Houston, TX, 77019 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.713.529.3251, Fax: +1.713.529.1661, Web: www.riviana.com. Riviana offers a variety of rice products that include white, parboiled, brown, instant rice, wild rice, milled rice, crisp rice, and rice our. We are a full-service rice supplier. See our ad on the back of the maps tab.

510

118

Roha Colors USA, 5015 Manchester Ave., St. Louis, MO, 63110 U.S.A.; Telephone: 1.888.533.7642, Fax: 888.531.0461, Web: www.rohagroup.com. ROHA is one of the world’s leading manufacturers of synthetic and natural COLORS SPECIALIZINGINTHEFOODANDBEVERAGE PAINTS COSMETICSANDPHARMACEUTICALINDUSTRIES2OHASPECIALIZES in the manufacture of water soluble synthetic dyes, lake pigments, dispersions, natural colors, fd&c colors, and d&c colors. Romer Labs, Inc., 1301 Stylemaster Ln., Union, MO, 63084 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.636.583.8600, Fax: +1.636.583.6553, Web: www.romerlabs.com. Romer LabsŽ is a leading provider of diagnostic solutions including mycotoxins, allergens and GMO tests for the agricultural, food and feed industries. Our broad range of innovative tests and laboratory services play a pivotal role

83

Exhibitors

in integrated food safety solutions to “Make the Worlds Food Safer�Ž.

any baking application where a natural roasted or nutty proďŹ le is desired.


delivers the world of baking business, technology, production and marketing. Web sites, directories, reference books, and industry conferences inform and educate today’s baking professional. 435*

SPEX SamplePrep LLC, 15 Liberty St, Metuchen, NJ, 08840 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.732.623.0465, Fax: +1.732.906.2492, Web: www.spexcsp.com/sampleprep. SPEX SamplePrep has been providing superior laboratory equipment since 1954. Our mills and grinders include the high-speed Mixer/Mills and all-new 2010 Geno/Grinder. "OTHMILLSACCOMMODATEAWIDERANGEOFVIALSIZESANDARE effective for mixing, grinding, and extraction for a variety of applications.

Exhibitors

515*

SunOpta Ingredients Group, 100 Apollo Drive, Chelmsford, MA, 01824 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.781.276.5141 or 1.800.353.6782, Fax: +1.781.276.5125, Web: www.sunopta.com/ingredients. SunOpta Ingredients is the world’s largest producer of natural and sustainable oat ďŹ bers for the food industry. SunOpta also offers SOYlBERS PEAlBERS STABILIZEDBRANOATWHEATCORN STABILIZEDWHEATGERMANDBRANGERMBLENDS "ARLEY Balance™ beta-glucan soluble ďŹ ber, MultiFiber™ Blends (insoluble and soluble ďŹ ber blends), and specialty starches.

615

Suzanne’s Specialties, Inc., 421 Jersey Ave., Suite B, New Brunswick, NJ, 08901 U.S.A.; Telephone: 1.800.762.2135, &AX  7EBWWWSUZANNES SPECIALTIES com. Supplier of natural and organic sweeteners. Portfolio includes rice syrups, honey, agave, sugars, molasses, malt extract, and chicory syrup. Offer account-speciďŹ c, proprietary blends of sweeteners meeting deďŹ ned application requirements. Organic and natural sugars are available in crystalline and liquid forms. Also have partial and full invert syrups (cane juice syrups).

633

Sweetener Supply Corporation/Ridgeland Fibers, 9501 West Southview Ave., BrookďŹ eld, IL, 60513 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.708.588.8400, Web: www.sweetenersupply. com. Sweetener Supply is proud to offer our Ridgeland line of functional dietary ďŹ bers. Ridgeland cellulose ďŹ bers offer multiple functional beneďŹ ts with the highest total dietary ďŹ ber levels available on the market today. Please stop by OURBOOTHANDSEEHOWOURlBERSCANBEUTLIZEDINANUMBER of applications.

431*

Symrise Inc., 300 North St., Teterboro, NJ, 07608 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.201.288.3200, Fax: +1.201.288.3200, Web: www.symrise.com. As a global leader in the creation and manufacturing of avors and seasonings, Symrise is well known for technological innovations and customer service. Symrise is one of the top names in the ďŹ eld for citrus, vanilla, and culinary avorings and seasonings.

311

Target Flavors, Incorporated, 7 Del Mar Dr., BrookďŹ eld, CT, 06804 U.S.A.; Telephone: 1.800.538.3350, Web: www.targetavors.com. Target Flavors, established 1981, is a full-service avor house. Current focus is on Health and Wellness market sectors with emphasis on cereal, bakery, and snack products. Our specialty avor systems include enhancers, shelf-life extenders, and avors uniquely designed to address challenging issues of process tolerance and undesirable tastes.

84

607*† Tate & Lyle, 2200 E. Eldorado St., Decatur, IL, 62521 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.217.423.4411, Web: www.tateandlyle.com. Tate & Lyle is a world-leading renewable food and industrial ingredients company, serving a global market from more than 50 production facilities throughout the Americas, Europe, and South East Asia. Tate & Lyle’s range of leading branded food ingredients includes SPLENDAŽ Sucralose, PROMITOR™ Dietary Fiber and STA-LITEŽ Polydextrose. SPLENDAŽ is a trademark of McNeil Nutritionals, LLC. 319*

Texture Technologies Corp., 18 Fairview Rd., Scarsdale, NY, 10583-2136 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.914.472.0531, Fax: +1.914.472.0532, Web: www.texturetechnologies. COM4HE4!840LUSTEXTUREANALYZERSYSTEMPROVIDES complete tests for all forms of cereal products. Among the attributes it quantiďŹ es are dough and gluten extensibility, dough stickiness, bread freshness, pasta ďŹ rmness and STICKINESS PIZZADOUGHANDCRUSTlRMNESSANDTOUGHNESS tortilla freshness and bendability, snack food crunchiness, breakfast cereal bowl life, cookie and cake ďŹ rmness, and much more. The TA.XTPlus can even simultaneously quantify the acoustic proďŹ le of a product. Please visit our booth to learn what our system can do for you.

335

TexVol Instruments AB, Box 45, Viken, 260 40, Sweden; Telephone: +46707.237020, Fax: +4642.237006, Web: WWWTEXVOLCOM4EX6OL)NSTRUMENTSSPECIALIZESINTHE development and marketing of analytical instruments for the food industry, with particular focus on texture and volume analysis. The instruments are comprehensive but still easy to use. The instruments are used globally by a large number of varying companies.

534†

Thermo ScientiďŹ c, 5225 Verona Rd., Bldg. 4, Madison, WI, 53711 U.S.A.; Telephone: 1.800.532.4752, Fax: +1.408.965.6113, Web: www.thermoscientiďŹ c.com/ foodsafety. Thermo Fisher ScientiďŹ c delivers the most comprehensive range of workow solutions to meet the growing requirements of consumer safety, global regulations, and brand protection for food intended for human or animal consumption with its Thermo ScientiďŹ c brand products.

423

Thymly Products Inc.,1332 Colora Road, Colora, MD, 21917 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.410.658.4820, Fax: +1.410.658.4824, Web: www.thymlyproducts.com. Founded in 1967, Thymly Products Inc. saw a need for SPECIALIZEDBAKERYBLENDS7EAREWELLKNOWNFOROUR ability to formulate ingredients to meet the baker’s needs. We do business with large and small bakeries. Our aim is to supply you functional ingredients that exceed your expectations and saves you money.

219*

TIC Gums, 10552 Philadelphia Road, White Marsh MD, 21162 U.S.A.; Telephone: 1.800.899.3953 or +1.410.273.7300, Fax: +1.410.273.6469, Web: www.ticgums.com. TIC Gums provides texture and STABILIZATIONSOLUTIONSTOTHEBAKERYANDGRAININDUSTRIES Gums not only provide soluble dietary ďŹ ber but also boost viscosity, provide moisture control, improve product stability and increase mouthfeel. Contact a Gum GuruÂŽ us to discuss your application.


506*

Wenger Manufacturing, Inc., 714 Main St., Sabetha, KS, 66534 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.785.284.2133, Fax: +1.785.284.3861, Web: www.wenger.com. Wenger will be supplying literature and technical information on extrusion and drying equipment for the cereal and snack industries. See our ad on the back cover.

619*

Watson Inc., 301 Heffernan Dr., West Haven, CT, 06516 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.203.932.3000, or 1.800.388.3481, Fax: +1.203.932.8266, Web: www.watson-inc.com. Watson manufactures a full range of standard enrichment blends or we can custom formulate a vitamin/mineral premix to achieve the nutritional profile you desire. Watson also manufactures a full line of functonal bakery ingredients. Watson has two production facilities in Connecticut and Illinois as well as three in-house labs for R&D and QC.

The Wright Group, 6428 Airport Rd., Crowley, LA, 70526 U.S.A.; Telephone: 1.800.201.3096, Web: www.thewrightgroup.net We are dedicated to putting our Balanced Solutions philosophy to work for you by providing the best products and services in the nutritional industry. Simply put, Balanced Solutions combines innovation, quality, technical expertise and 24/7 customer commitment to bring you the best value in the business. Our products include: Wrise – shelf life extenders, dough conditioners and leavening systems; WrightMade – enrichments, custom nutrient premixes; supercoat omega 3 and bake stable vitamin C.

See our ad on the front of the recognition tab.

See our ad on the front of the maps tab.

Exhibitors

535

Valley Fig Growers, 2028 S Third St., Fresno, CA, 93702 U.S.A.; Telephone: +1.559.237.3893, Fax: +1.559.237.3898, Web: www.valleyfig.com. Valley Fig Growers, a farmer-owned grower cooperative, is the most innovative fig company in the world and a full-line processor of California dried figs. Products include whole, sliced/diced, pastes (conventional & textured/seeded or deseeded), concentrate, powder, and extruded nuggets (assorted colors & flavors). Kosher, natural, and certified organic.

Improve Your Ingredient I.Q. Buy 3 Ingredient Handbooks and Get ALL 11 FREE Online! Receive FREE access to the information in all 11 Ingredient Handbooks in Food Developer’s e-Source for 6 months when you buy any 3 Ingredient Handbooks at the meeting.

SAVE 20% Each handbook has an easy-to-follow format with information on: s Basic Chemistry s Functional Properties s Food Applications s Problem-Solving Tips s Analytical Testing s Processing Characteristics s Production and Specification s Nutrition

Plus FREE SHIPPING if you buy 2 or more AACC Intl. PRESS titles AACC Intl. Marketplace Grain Brain Central Sunday ......................... 6:00 – 9:00 p.m. Monday ....................... 4:00 – 7:00 p.m. Tuesday .....................12:00 – 2:30 p.m. AACC Intl. PRESS Bookstore Near Rooms 101–106 Monday ...............9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. Tuesday .....................9:00 – 11:00 a.m. Wednesday ..............9:00 – 11:00 a.m.

Ad#5-2010

235

85


Exhibit Numeric List Bold type indicates an advertising company. Page numbers for advertisers are listed on the Advertisers’ Index on page 93. 106 108 110 112 114 118 124 128 130 132  200 202 204 207 208 209 210

Exhibitors

211 212 213 214 215 218 219 220 222 224 225 228 229 230 231 233 234 235 300 301 302 303 304 305 308

86

ICL Performance Products LP Oat Ingredients, LLC Calibre Control International Ltd. Perten Instruments AB Perten Instruments, Inc. Romer Labs, Inc. Baker Perkins Inc. Lallemand Baking Solutions EnviroLogix Inc. Malt Products Corp. %NZYME$EVELOPMENT BrabenderÂŽ GmbH & Co. KG C.W. BrabenderÂŽ Instruments, Inc. Siemer Specialty Ingredients Megazyme International NP Analytical Laboratories Elementar Americas, Inc. BrookďŹ eld Engineering Laboratories, Inc. rtech Laboratories Bruker Optics R-Biopharm, Inc. Dakota Specialty Milling Inc. MGP Ingredients Gold Coast Ingredients, Inc. TIC Gums Bunge Milling Bunge Oils Can-Oat Milling, a Division of Viterra Inc. California Natural Products Domino Specialty Ingredients Northern Crops Institute BENEO-Orafti International Flavor and Fragrance Nutraceuticals World CornProducts U.S. Valley Fig Growers Granotec North America ANKOM Technology Blue Diamond Growers Gamay Merlin Development Inc. Glanbia Nutritionals Blue Planet Foods

309 310 311 312 313 315 319 320 321 322 323 324 325 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 400 401 402 403 404 405 408 409 410 411 412 413 414 418 420 421 422 423 424 425 428 429 430

J. RETTENMAIER USA LP Lab Synergy Target Flavors, Incorporated CHOPIN Technologies Penford Food Ingredients Co. EuroďŹ ns ScientiďŹ c, Inc. Texture Technologies Corp Innophos, Inc. Palsgaard Inc. Mother Murphy’s Laboratories BIPEA Grain Processing Corporation (GPC) FOSS North America Golden Peanut Co. Butter Buds Food Ingredients GNT USA, Inc. Omega Protein ICC - International Association for Cereal Science and Technology Givaudan Carmi Flavor & Fragrance Co., Inc. TexVol Instruments AB Medallion Labs/General Mills International Fiber Corp. Clextral Inc. Research Products Co. DSM Food Specialties USA, Inc. Firmenich Inc. Caravan Ingredients Arla Foods Ingredients Caremoli USA, Inc. California Raisin Marketing Board Quali Tech, Inc. Buhler Inc. 21st Century Grain Processing Primera Foods Colloides Naturels, Inc. Fortitech, Inc. CEREX AG Thymly Products Inc. Church and Dwight Co., Inc. The Mennel Milling Company PGP International, Inc. Farmer Direct Foods, Inc. Sensient Flavors LLC

431 432 433 434

Symrise Inc. Sensient Food Colors Grains for Hope Canadian Food Barley, The Canadian International Grains Institute (CIGI) 435 SPEX SamplePrep LLC 501 CII Laboratory Services 503 AIB International 505 Navas Instruments 506 Wenger Manufacturing, Inc. 508 Riviana Foods Inc. 509 National Starch Food Innovation 510 Roha Colors USA 511 Danisco USA Inc. 512 FONA International Inc. 513 Oxford Instruments America 514 Briess Malt Ingredients Company 515 SunOpta Ingredients Group 518 CPM Wolverine Proctor 519 ADM 521 ADM/Matsutani, LLC 523 AHD International, LLC 524 Hesco, Inc./Dakota Organic Products 525 David Michael & Co. 528 Pharmline, Inc. 529 Fiberstar Inc. 530 Sosland Publishing 531 & National Mfg. Cereal Chemistry 533 Equipment 532 Roquette America, Inc. 534 Thermo ScientiďŹ c 535 Watson Inc. 607 Tate & Lyle 609 CE Elantech, Inc. 611 Prayon Inc. 613 Cereal Ingredients, Inc.  3UZANNES3PECIALTIES )NC 619 The Wright Group 625 McCormick & Co. 629 Mid America Food Sales Ltd. 631 Solbar USA 633 Sweetener Supply Corporation / Ridgeland Fibers 635 Grain Millers, Inc.


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INDEX

oatwell.com

Science

OatWell

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®*


INDEX


Author Index The number following each name refers to the presentation number in the program book. The letter following the abstract numbers refers to the type of presentation: O = oral technical session. P = poster, S = session, W = premeeting workshop. The {CFW 55:A} reference refers to the page number where the abstract can be found in the Cereal Foods World supplement online. Abdel-Aal, E. M., (78O) CFW 55:A18; (270P) CFW 55:A35 AbĂŠcassis, J., (10S) CFW 55:A14; (68O) CFW 55:A33 Abendroth, L., (131P) CFW 55:A59 Abou-Hachem, M., (21O) CFW 55:A31 AbuHammad, W. A., (98P) CFW 55:A35 Acosta, K., (119P) CFW 55:A35 Adams, K., (237P) CFW 55:A72 Adler, P. R., (50S) CFW 55:A16 Agama-Acevedo, E., (150P) CFW 55:A35 Ahmad, I., (277P) CFW 55:A62 Ahmed, A. S., (20O) CFW 55:A18 Ahuja, G., (129P) CFW 55:A36 Ainsworth, P., (17S) CFW 55:A8 Akhtar, M., (78O) CFW 55:A18 Alaunyte, I., (17S) CFW 55:A8 Alavi, S., (34O) CFW 55:A34; (70O) CFW 55:A18; (71O) CFW 55:A25; (235P) CFW 55:A36; (236P) CFW 55:A71 Ali, S., (235P) CFW 55:A36 Alldrick, A. J., (23S) CFW 55:A11 Allred, C. D., (273P) CFW 55:A76 Allred, K. F., (273P) CFW 55:A76 !LVAREZ - 0 #&7! AlviĂąa, M., (262P) CFW 55:A58 Alviola, J., (186P) CFW 55:A52 Amanor-Boadu, V., (34O) CFW 55:A34 Ambardekar, A. A., (69O) CFW 55:A19; (189P) CFW 55:A50 Anderson, T., (232P) CFW 55:A55 Anduaga-Cota, R., (257P) CFW 55:A43; (260P) CFW 55:A38; (261P) CFW 55:A48 Antunes, A. L., (239P) CFW 55:A59; (279P) CFW 55:A66 Anyango, J. O., (40O) CFW 55:A31 Aparicio-Trapala, M., (126P) CFW 55:A36; (221P) CFW 55:A36 Arambula-Villa, G., (126P) CFW 55:A36; (221P) CFW 55:A36 Aravind, N., (21S) CFW 55:A8 !RDUZLAR $ 0 #&7!0 CFW 55:A37; (112P) CFW 55:A70; (194P) CFW 55:A37; (206P) CFW 55:A37 ArĂŞas, J. G., (285P) CFW 55:A40; (287P) CFW 55:A40 Armstrong, P. R., (4O) CFW 55:A28; (242P) CFW 55:A57 Arndt, E. A., (11S) CFW 55:A14 Arora, A., (213P) CFW 55:A66 Arqueros, V. L., (281P) CFW 55:A37 Arvisenet, G., (3W) CFW 55:A4 Asif, M., (227P) CFW 55:A37 Aura, A., (63O) CFW 55:A30 Aussenac, T., (130P) CFW 55:A37 Awika, J. M., (186P) CFW 55:A52; (273P) CFW 55:A76 !ZEVEDO -# 0 #&7! Baek, N., (274P) CFW 55:A57 "ÂťGA - / #&7!

Bagdi, A., (214P) CFW 55:A68 Bai, Y., (143P) CFW 55:A40; (159P) CFW 55:A38 Baik, B., (118P) CFW 55:A42; (176P); CFW 55:A62 (274P) CFW 55:A57 Baik, M., (198P) CFW 55:A54; (199P) CFW 55:A49; (200P) CFW 55:A56; (203P) CFW 55:A42; (265P) CFW 55:A52 Bair, J., (56S) CFW 55:A12 Baldwin, C., (9W) CFW 55:A4 Bansal, S., (33O) CFW 55:A19 Bao, J., (128P) CFW 55:A38 Barbiroli, A., (182P) CFW 55:A51 Barron, C., (8S) CFW 55:A13; (10S) CFW 55:A14 Barron-Hoyos, J. M., (123P) CFW 55:A45; (257P) CFW, 55:A43; (260P) CFW 55:A38; (261P) CFW 55:A48 Barros, F., (186P) CFW 55:A52 Batey, I. L., (60S) CFW 55:A7 "AZIN 3 0 #&7! Bean, S. R., (240P) CFW 55:A72 Bedoya, N., (304P) CFW 55:A51 Beecher, B. S., (8O) CFW 55:A19 BeliĂŤn, T., (183P) CFW 55:A52 Bellmann, S. C., (24O) CFW 55:A19 "ELLO 0EREZ ,! 0 #&7! (157P) CFW 55:A38; (251P) CFW 55:A63 BeMiller, J. N., (158P) CFW 55:A54; (161P) CFW 55:A71 Berghofer, E., (190P) CFW 55:A70; (214P) CFW 55:A68; (223P) CFW 55:A58; (290P) CFW 55:A55 Berrios, J. D., (73O) CFW 55:A19 Bertoft, E. J., (80O) CFW 55:A20; (156P) CFW 55:A69 "ERZONSKY 7 0 #&7! Bessa, L. C., (282P) CFW 55:A61 Bester, M., (267P) CFW 55:A44 Beta, T., (263P) CFW 55:A49 Bettge, A. D., (175P) CFW 55:A65 Biliaderis, C. G., (187P) CFW 55:A56; (264P) CFW 55:A56 Billiris, M. A., (212P) CFW 55:A38 Blanco, M., (131P) CFW 55:A59 "LAZEK * 3 #&7!/ #&7 55:A20; (65O) CFW 55:A31 Blennow, A., (32S) CFW 55:A15 Bloemsma, M., (29S) CFW 55:A14 Boateng, A. A., (49S) CFW 55:A15 Bock, J. E., (168P) CFW 55:A39 Bockus, W. W., (107P) CFW 55:A64 Boinot, N., (87P) CFW 55:A47; (88P) CFW 55:A39; (91P) CFW 55:A77; (93P) CFW 55:A56, (113P) CFW 55:A56 Bonomi, F., (170P) CFW 55:A50; (182P) CFW 55:A51; (286P) CFW 55:A39 Boom, R. M., (11O) CFW 55:A32; (37O) CFW 55:A32; (197P) CFW 55:A73 Bordenave, N., (75O) CFW 55:A20

Bottega, G., (250P) CFW 55:A41; (286P) CFW 55:A39; (303P) CFW 55:A63 Boutte, T. T., (20O) CFW 55:A18 Boxall, A. B., (27S) CFW 55:A11 Boyacioglu, M., (111P) CFW 55:A37; (194P) CFW 55:A37; (206P) CFW 55:A37 Brandolini, A., (296P) CFW 55:A58 Branlard, G., (130P) CFW 55:A37 Brennan, C. S., (216P) CFW 55:A39; (254P) CFW 55:A39 Brennan, M. A., (216P) CFW 55:A39; (254P) CFW 55:A39 Bressler, D., (145P) CFW 55:A61; (233P) CFW 55:A53 Brewe, C., (106P) CFW 55:A49 Brewer, L. R., (25O) CFW 55:A20 Brijs, K., (15O) CFW 55:A30; (16O) CFW 55:A27; (18O) CFW 55:A20; (43O) CFW 55:A25; (183P) CFW 55:A52 Brijwani, K., (48O) CFW 55:A21 Brijwani, M., (193P) CFW 55:A65 Brooks, W. S., (47S) CFW 55:A15 Bruneel, C., (18O) CFW 55:A20 Bryan, M., (78O) CFW 55:A18 Bryant, S. R., (301P) CFW 55:A47 Buchert, J., (42O) CFW 55:A23 Buitimea Cantua, N., (125P) CFW 55:A60 Bulawayo, B., (94P) CFW 55:A45 Buleon, A., (68O) CFW 55:A33 "UNZEL - 3 #&7!3 #&7 55:A7; (104P) CFW 55:A73 Butt, M. S., (277P) CFW 55:A62 Byars, J. A., (211P) CFW 55:A58; (228P) CFW 55:A40 #ABRERA #HĂ•VEZ & / #&7! (288P) CFW 55:A51 Cai, L., (25O) CFW 55:A20; (143P) CFW 55:A40; (229P) CFW 55:A76 Calderon, V. R., (297P) CFW 55:A40 #ALDER˜NDELA"ARCA !- 0 #&7 55:A51 Calingacion, M. N., (57O) CFW 55:A21 Camire, M., (60O) CFW 55:A27; (61O) CFW 55:A24 Campabadal, C. A., (2O) CFW 55:A21 Campanella, O. H., (171P) CFW 55:A53; (208P) CFW 55:A46; (294P) CFW 55:A54 Campanha, R. B., (155P) CFW 55:A40 Campbell, G. M., (7S) CFW 55:A13; (84P) CFW 55:A60; (108P) CFW 55:A74; (192P) CFW 55:A68 Campbell, M., (166P) CFW 55:A60 Canett-Romero, R., (260P) CFW 55:A38; (261P) CFW 55:A48 Capriles, V. D., (285P) CFW 55:A40; (287P) CFW 55:A40 Caramanico, R., (86P) CFW 55:A59 #ARDENAS ,OPEZ *, 0 #&7! (260P) CFW 55:A38; (261P) CFW 55:A48 Cardenas-Torres, F., (231P) CFW 55:A43

87


Cardoso, S., (180P) CFW 55:A52 Careche, L. U., (282P) CFW 55:A61 Casada, M., (4O) CFW 55:A28; (242P) CFW 55:A57 Casiraghi, M., (250P) CFW 55:A41; (286P) CFW 55:A39 Castelli, V., (281P) CFW 55:A37 Cato, L., (137P) CFW 55:A41 Cavadini, C., (62O) CFW 55:A32 Cavanagh, C. R., (29S) CFW 55:A14 #HAIDEZ ,AGUNA ,$ 0 #&7! (260P) CFW 55:A38; (261P) CFW 55:A48 Challacombe, C., (292P) CFW 55:A41 Chang, F., (44S) CFW 55:A13 Chang, Y. K., (180P) CFW 55:A52; (304P) CFW 55:A51 Channaiah, L., (3O) CFW 55:A21 Charoen, R., (191P) CFW 55:A41 Chauhan, F., (153P) CFW 55:A41 Chaunier, L., (205P) CFW 55:A69 Chaurand, M., (8S) CFW 55:A13; (10S) CFW 55:A14 Chen, L., (64O) CFW 55:A21 Chen, M., (77O) CFW 55:A21 Chen, Y. R., (109P) CFW 55:A42; (283P) CFW 55:A75 Cheng, M., (256P) CFW 55:A42 Cheong, A., (73O) CFW 55:A19 Chepurna, A., (174P) CFW 55:A51 Chibbar, R. N., (10O) CFW 55:A24; (129P) CFW 55:A36 Chiron, H., (205P) CFW 55:A69 Chisamore, A. E., (302P) CFW 55:A42 Cho, J., (185P) CFW 55:A48 Choi, H., (198P) CFW 55:A54; (199P) CFW 55:A49; (200P) CFW 55:A56; (203P) CFW 55:A42; (265P) CFW 55:A52 Choi, H., (118P) CFW 55:A42 Choi, S., (203P) CFW 55:A42 Choo, T., (270P) CFW 55:A35 Christensen, T. A., (54O) CFW 55:A23 Chu, S., (92P) CFW 55:A48 #HUCK (ERNANDEZ # 0 #&7! (231P) CFW 55:A43 Chung, H., (249P) CFW 55:A77 Cinco-Moroyoqui, F. J., (257P) CFW 55:A43 Clara, R., (297P) CFW 55:A40 Collins, F., (76O) CFW 55:A22 Cooke, P. H., (284P) CFW 55:A62 Copeland, L., (7O) CFW 55:A28 #ORNEJO 2AMIREZ 9) 0 #&7! (260P) CFW 55:A38; (261P) CFW 55:A48 Cortes-Callejas, M. L., (230P) CFW 55:A64 Cota-Gastelum, A. G., (124P) CFW 55:A43; (125P) CFW 55:A60 Courtin, C. M., (45O) CFW 55:A22; (141P) CFW 55:A44 Coutts, J., (2S) CFW 55:A10, (238P) CFW 55:A47 #OZZI ! 0 #&7! Craig, S. A., (16S) CFW 55:A17 Cretegny, S., (55O) CFW 55:A28 Crosbie, G. B., (120P) CFW 55:A45 Crowe, T., (289P) CFW 55:A43 Crowe, T. W., (289P) CFW 55:A43 Cunha, R. H., (304P) CFW 55:A51 Cuq, B., (68O) CFW 55:A33 Cuyvers, S., (141P) CFW 55:A44

88

Damodaran, S., (168P) CFW 55:A39 Daniell, H., (40S) CFW 55:A9 Darly, J., (278P) CFW 55:A44 Daygon, V., (42S) CFW 55:A13 de Francisco, A., (239P) CFW 55:A59; (279P) CFW 55:A66 De la Barca, A. C., (38O) CFW 55:A22 DELA#RUZ ,Ă•ZARO % 0 #&7! De Miranda, M. Z., (90P) CFW 55:A63 de Vos, R., (57O) CFW 55:A21 $ECOMBAZ * / #&7! Delcour, J. A., (15O) CFW 55:A30; (16O) CFW 55:A27; (18O) CFW 55:A20; (43O) CFW 55:A25; (45O) CFW 55:A22; (141P) CFW 55:A44; (183P) CFW 55:A52 Della Valle, G., (68O) CFW 55:A33; (205P) CFW 55:A69 DeLong, G., (7W) CFW 55:A3 Delwiche, S. R., (5O) CFW 55:A22 DeMasie, C. L., (74O) CFW 55:A24 Derbyshire, E., (17S) CFW 55:A8 Dhillon, S., (270P) CFW 55:A35; (292P) CFW 55:A41 Dhital, S., (142P) CFW 55:A44 Dhull, N., (136P) CFW 55:A44 Diepeveen, D., (120P) CFW 55:A45; (121P) CFW 55:A46 Dogan, H., (67O) CFW 55:A23; (71O) CFW 55:A25; (110P) CFW 55:A46; (111P) CFW 55:A37; (112P) CFW 55:A70; (116P) CFW 55:A70; (193P) CFW 55:A65; (194P) CFW 55:A37; (206P) CFW 55:A37; (207P) CFW 55:A63 Donelson, T., (59O) CFW 55:A26 Donnelly, K., (52S) CFW 55:A12 $ORNEZ % / #&7!0 #&7 55:A44 Dougherty, M. P., (60O) CFW 55:A27 Dowell, F. E., (107P) CFW 55:A64 Dreisoerner, J., (167P) CFW 55:A60 Dubat, A., (87P) CFW 55:A47, (88P) CFW 55:A39, (91P) CFW 55:A77, (93P) CFW 55:A56, (113P) CFW 55:A56 $UIZER , 0 #&7! Duodu, K., (267P) CFW 55:A44 Duri, A., (8S) CFW 55:A13; (10S) CFW 55:A14 Duss, R., (15S) CFW 55:A16; (66O) CFW 55:A31 Elago, O., (134P) CFW 55:A45 Elias, E. M., (98P) CFW 55:A35 Elkhalifa, A., (286P) CFW 55:A39 Elmore, R., (131P) CFW 55:A59 Emes, M. J., (30S) CFW 55:A15 Engelsen, S. B., (32S) CFW 55:A15 %ZEOGU ,) 0 #&7! Falcon-Villa, M., (123P) CFW 55:A45; (257P) CFW 55:A43; (260P) CFW 55:A38 Fanata, G. F., (211P) CFW 55:A58; (226P) CFW 55:A45; (228P) CFW 55:A40 Fatula, B., (44O) CFW 55:A29 Faubion, J. M., (20O) CFW 55:A18; (39O) CFW 55:A30; (67O) CFW 55:A23; (110P) CFW 55:A46; (111P) CFW 55:A37; (133P) CFW 55:A65; (229P) CFW 55:A76; (235P) CFW 55:A36; (283P) CFW 55:A75

Felix, A., (114P) CFW 55:A76 Felker, F. C., (211P) CFW 55:A58; (226P) CFW 55:A45 Fellows, C., (21S) CFW 55:A8 Feng, G. H., (20O) CFW 55:A18 Fenton, H. K., (120P) CFW 55:A45; (121P) CFW 55:A46 Fernandes, J. M., (135P) CFW 55:A71; (237P) CFW 55:A72 Ferreira, G. D., (239P) CFW 55:A59; (279P) CFW 55:A66 &ERRUZZI -' / #&7! &EVZIOGLU - 0 #&7! Fielder, R., (2S) CFW 55:A10; (238P) CFW 55:A47 Figueroa, J., (27O) CFW 55:A22 Finney, P., (284P) CFW 55:A62 &ITZGERALD -! 3 #&7!/ CFW 55:A21; (188P) CFW 55:A58 Flanagan, B., (65O) CFW 55:A31 Flander, L. H., (42O) CFW 55:A23 Floor, R., (305P) CFW 55:A55 Foca, G., (86P) CFW 55:A59 Fong, C., (284P) CFW 55:A62 Fongaro, L., (296P) CFW 55:A58 Franco, C. M., (155P) CFW 55:A40 Freeman, L. S., (49O) CFW 55:A27 &RITZ !+ / #&7! Fry, J. C., (54O) CFW 55:A23 Fu, B., (122P) CFW 55:A46 Fu, X., (146P) CFW 55:A77 Fujita, N., (31S) CFW 55:A15 Furbank, R., (29S) CFW 55:A14 Furlano, B. M., (54O) CFW 55:A23 Gajula, H., (67O) CFW 55:A23; (110P) CFW 55:A46; (112P) CFW 55:A70 Gamalinda, M., (42S) CFW 55:A13 Garber, M., (5S) CFW 55:A10 Gaxiola-Cuevas, N., (231P) CFW 55:A43 Gebhardt, S. E., (280P) CFW 55:A46 Geera, B., (301P) CFW 55:A47 Gendron, C., (61O) CFW 55:A24 Geoffroy, S., (87P) CFW 55:A47; (88P) CFW 55:A39 Gidley, M. J., (26O) CFW 55:A24; (65O) CFW 55:A31; (79O) CFW 55:A33; (142P) CFW 55:A44 Gilbert, E. P., (21S) CFW 55:A8; (23O) CFW 55:A20 (65O) CFW 55:A31 Gilbert, R. G., (26O) CFW 55:A24; (79O) CFW 55:A33; (81O) CFW 55:A33; (92P) CFW 55:A48; (248P) CFW 55:A77 Gleddie, S., (99P) CFW 55:A60 Glenn, G. M., (58O) CFW 55:A33 Glover, K., (95P) CFW 55:A55 Goh, A. S., (28O) CFW 55:A23 Goldstein, A., (17O) CFW 55:A23 Gollinger, T., (290P) CFW 55:A55 '˜MEZ &AVELA - 0 #&7! Gouveia, M. S., (282P) CFW 55:A61 Govindarajan, B., (61O) CFW 55:A24 Grausgruber, H., (290P) CFW 55:A55 Graves, A., (58O) CFW 55:A33 Graybosch, R. A., (57S) CFW 55:A7 Griffey, C., (47S) CFW 55:A15 Gujral, H., (120P) CFW 55:A45


'UTIERREZ !RIAS % 0 #&7! (221P) CFW 55:A36 'UTIERREZ $ORADO 2 0 #&7! (259P) CFW 55:A61 'UTIERREZ 5RIBE * 0 #&7! Guttieri, M., (101P) CFW 55:A70; (195P) CFW 55:A47 'WIRTZ * 0 #&7! Haas-Lauterbach, S., (3S) CFW 55:A10 Hagglund, P., (21O) CFW 55:A31 Halbmayr-Jech, E., (2S) CFW 55:A10; (26S) CFW 55:A11; (238P) CFW 55:A47 Hall, C., (72O) CFW 55:A31 Hall, J., (209P) CFW 55:A71 Hall, R., (57O) CFW 55:A21 Halley, S., (241P) CFW 55:A75 Hamaker, B. R., (75O) CFW 55:A20; (171P) CFW 55:A53; (172P) CFW 55:A75; (177P) CFW 55:A67; (208P) CFW 55:A46; (245P) CFW 55:A57; (255P) CFW 55:A57; (256P) CFW 55:A42; (294P) CFW 55:A54 Hamaker, H. R., (156P) CFW 55:A69 Hamer, R. J., (14O) CFW 55:A24; (37O) CFW 55:A32 Han, H., (185P) CFW 55:A48; (266P) CFW 55:A48 Han, J., (165P) CFW 55:A48 Hannah, C., (28S) CFW 55:A14 Hansen, T., (91P) CFW 55:A77 Hardy, C. L., (11W) CFW 55:A4 Hargrove, J. H., (272P) CFW 55:A60 Hargrove, J. L., (74O) CFW 55:A24 Harnsilawat, T., (191P) CFW 55:A41 Harris, T., (118P) CFW 55:A42 Hart, C., (11W) CFW 55:A4 Hasjim, J., (26O) CFW 55:A24; (92P) CFW 55:A48; (248P) CFW 55:A77 (ร˜UBL ' 3 #&7! Havenaar, R., (24O) CFW 55:A19 Hayassaka, L. M., (282P) CFW 55:A61 Hays, D., (186P) CFW 55:A52 (AYTOWITZ $" 0 #&7! Heidolph, B. B., (53S) CFW 55:A12 (EIRAS 0ALAZUELOS - 0 #&7! Hellstrom, J. K., (271P) CFW 55:A66 Hemery, Y., (10S) CFW 55:A14 Hemmingsen, A., (305P) CFW 55:A55 Henniges, U., (18S) CFW 55:A8 Henriksen, A., (21O) CFW 55:A31 Herald, T. J., (109P) CFW 55:A42 Heredia-Sandoval, N. G., (123P) CFW 55:A45 (ERNANDEZ 3ANCHEZ ( 0 #&7! (ERNANDEZ 4ELLEZ #. 0 #&7 55:A43; (260P) CFW 55:A38; (261P) CFW 55:A48 Herrman, T. J., (4O) CFW 55:A28; (242P) CFW 55:A57 Hettiarachchy, N., (258P) CFW 55:A53 Hicks, K. B., (49S) CFW 55:A15; (50S) CFW 55:A16 Hidalgo Vidal, A., (296P) CFW 55:A58 Hill, S. E., (2W) CFW 55:A4 Hirawan, R., (263P) CFW 55:A49 Hirte, A., (14O) CFW 55:A24 Hoffman, M. A., (293P) CFW 55:A49 Hong, J., (19S) CFW 55:A8

Hong, S., (199P) CFW 55:A49 Hoover, R., (147P) CFW 55:A62; (148P) CFW 55:A73 Hou, G. G., (115P) CFW 55:A50; (278P) CFW 55:A44; (299P) CFW 55:A74 Houchins, D., (105P) CFW 55:A49; (106P) CFW 55:A49; (238P) CFW 55:A47 Howitt, C. A., (29S) CFW 55:A14 Hsieh, F., (217P) CFW 55:A75 Hsu, Y., (115P) CFW 55:A50 Huang, Q., (146P) CFW 55:A77 Huang, W., (19O) CFW 55:A26 Huang, W., (82O) CFW 55:A24 Huang, Y., (275P) CFW 55:A5 Huber, K. C., (19S) CFW 55:A8; (154P) Hucl, P., (129P) CFW 55:A36 Huff, H., (217P) CFW 55:A75 Humiski, L., (295P) CFW 55:A68 Hunt, M. B., (189P) CFW 55:A50 Hur, J., (291P) CFW 55:A50 Hurburgh, C. R., (11W) CFW 55:A4; (52S) CFW 55:A12 Huschka, B., (170P) CFW 55:A50 Hutkins, R. W., (293P) CFW 55:A49 Iametti, S., (182P) CFW 55:A51; (250P) CFW 55:A41; (286P) CFW 55:A39 Ibrahim, A., (186P) CFW 55:A52 Ie, P., (163P) CFW 55:A51 Immer, U., (3S) CFW 55:A10 Inglett, G., (219P) CFW 55:A70 Inokuma, T., (9O) CFW 55:A33; (152P) CFW 55:A69 )SLAS (ERNANDEZ * 0 #&7! Islas-Rubio, A. R., (38O) CFW 55:A22; (288P) CFW 55:A51 Isola, K., (304P) CFW 55:A51 )ZYDORCZYK -3 0 #&7! Jackson, D. S. (127P) CFW 55:A71 Jaekel, L. Z., (180P) CFW 55:A52 Jaiswal, S., (10O) CFW 55:A24; (129P) CFW 55:A36 Janaswamy, S., (51O) CFW 55:A25 Jane, J., (22S) CFW 55:A9; (131P) CFW 55:A59 Jangchud, A., (191P) CFW 55:A41 Jangchud, K., (191P) CFW 55:A41 *ร˜RVENPร˜ร˜ %0 0 #&7! Jensen, J. M., (21O) CFW 55:A31 Jiang, H., (22S) CFW 55:A9 *IMENEZ *Uร•REZ * 0 #&7! (221P) CFW 55:A36 Jo, J., (265P) CFW 55:A52 Johnson, L. A., (32O) CFW 55:A25; (35O) CFW 55:A27 Jolly-Zarrouk, L., (55O) CFW 55:A28 Jondiko, T., (186P) CFW 55:A52 Jones, J. M., (36O) CFW 55:A25 Joye, I. J., (43O) CFW 55:A25; (183P) CFW 55:A52 Kahlon, T. S., (276P) CFW 55:A52 Kale, M. S., (171P) CFW 55:A53 Kandil, A. A., (233P) CFW 55:A53 Kannan, A., (258P) CFW 55:A53 Karkle, E. L., (71O) CFW 55:A25 Kaur, P., (234P) CFW 55:A53

Keller, L. C., (71O) CFW 55:A25 Kenar, J. A., (211P) CFW 55:A58; (226P) CFW 55:A45; (228P) CFW 55:A40 Kentaro, E., (103P) CFW 55:A53 Kerr, W. L., (119P) CFW 55:A35 Khan, K., (27O) CFW 55:A22 Khullar, E., (46O) CFW 55:A26 Kil Chang, Y., (169P) CFW 55:A54; (179P) CFW 55:A73; (225P) CFW 55:A68 Kim, A., (291P) CFW 55:A50 Kim, B., (274P) CFW 55:A57 Kim, B., (198P) CFW 55:A54; (199P) CFW 55:A49; (200P) CFW 55:A56; (203P) CFW 55:A42; (265P) CFW 55:A52 Kim, C., (198P) CFW 55:A54; (199P) CFW 55:A49; (200P) CFW 55:A56 Kim, H., (151P) CFW 55:A54 Kim, H., (154P) CFW 55:A54; (158P) CFW 55:A54 Kim, J., (151P) CFW 55:A54 Kim, K., (256P) CFW 55:A42 Kim, S., (198P) CFW 55:A54 Kim, T., (202P) CFW 55:A67 Kim, Y., (19O) CFW 55:A26 King, R., (12O) CFW 55:A26 Kinner, M., (290P) CFW 55:A55 +IVELร˜ 2 3 #&7! Ko, M., (265P) CFW 55:A52 Koehler, P., (1S) CFW 55:A9; (41O) CFW 55:A26; (96P) CFW 55:A55 Koenig, A., (96P) CFW 55:A55 Koh, B., (185P) CFW 55:A48; (266P) CFW 55:A48 Kรถssรถ, T., (63O) CFW 55:A30 Kragh, K. M., (44O) CFW 55:A29; (305P) CFW 55:A55 Krishnan, P. G., (95P) CFW 55:A55; (278P) CFW 55:A44 Kronawetter, G., (290P) CFW 55:A55 Kruus, K., (42O) CFW 55:A23 Kumar, A., (140P) CFW 55:A77 Kurbis, G., (10W) CFW 55:A3 Kwak, M., (213P) CFW 55:A66 Kweon, M., (59O) CFW 55:A26 Labat, E., (12O) CFW 55:A26 Labuschagne, M. T., (29O) CFW 55:A27; (134P) CFW 55:A45 Lacavalla, M., (220P) CFW 55:A55 Lagrain, B., (15O) CFW 55:A30; (16O) CFW 55:A27; (18O) CFW 55:A20 Lai, H., (82O) CFW 55:A24; (275P) CFW 55:A5 Lamont-Black, J., (209P) CFW 55:A71 Lamsal, B., (11W) CFW 55:A4; (35O) CFW 55:A27; (232P) CFW 55:A55 Langridge, P., (45S) CFW 55:A13 Larroque, O., (65O) CFW 55:A31 Larsen, J., (136P) CFW 55:A44 Lash, S., (60O) CFW 55:A27 ,AURENZ 2 0 #&7! Laux, C., (52S) CFW 55:A12 Lawton, J. W., (49O) CFW 55:A27 ,AZARIDOU ! 0 #&7!0 CFW 55:A56 Le Brun, O., (93P) CFW 55:A56; (113P) CFW 55:A56 Lee, A., (200P) CFW 55:A56

89


Lee, B., (255P) CFW 55:A57 Lee, C., (274P) CFW 55:A57 Lee, E. A., (30S) CFW 55:A15 Lee, J., (203P) CFW 55:A42 Lee, K., (4O) CFW 55:A28; (242P) CFW 55:A57 Lehtinen, P., (63O) CFW 55:A30 Leloup, V., (62O) CFW 55:A32 Lemar, L. E., (280P) CFW 55:A46 Leroux, C., (113P) CFW 55:A56 Levine, H., (59O) CFW 55:A26 Lewis, J., (138P) CFW 55:A76 Li, C., (44S) CFW 55:A13 Li, E., (92P) CFW 55:A48 Li, J., (145P) CFW 55:A61; (148P) CFW 55:A73; (233P) CFW 55:A53 Li, L., (19O) CFW 55:A26 Li, Z., (29S) CFW 55:A14 Lim, S., (151P) CFW 55:A54; (249P) CFW 55:A77 Lin, A., (245P) CFW 55:A57 Lin, C., (44S) CFW 55:A13 Lin, N., (213P) CFW 55:A66 Linsberger-Martin, G., (223P) CFW 55:A58 Little, C. R., (240P) CFW 55:A72 Liu, F., (30S) CFW 55:A15 Liu, S. X., (211P) CFW 55:A58; (219P) CFW 55:A70 ,LERGO 2AM¤REZ 3 0 #&7! ,OPEZ 8 0 #&7! Loponen, J., (4S) CFW 55:A10 Lourdin, D., (68O) CFW 55:A33; (205P) CFW 55:A69 Lu, Y., (128P) CFW 55:A38 Lucisano, M., (86P) CFW 55:A59; (220P) CFW 55:A55; (296P) CFW 55:A58 Luckett, C. R., (253P) CFW 55:A58 Luethy, M. H., (38S) CFW 55:A9 Lukow, O. M., (237P) CFW 55:A72 Lullien-Pellerin, V., (8S) CFW 55:A13; 10S) CFW 55:A14 Luo, F., (146P) CFW 55:A77 Lur, H., (44S) CFW 55:A13 Ma, W., (121P) CFW 55:A46 MacDonald, J. L., (56O) CFW 55:A28 Mack, C. A., (227P) CFW 55:A37 MacRitchie, F., (283P) CFW 55:A75 Madl, R., (6O) CFW 55:A29; (64O) CFW 55:A21 Maier, D. E. (3O) CFW 55:A21 Makhmoudova, A., (30S) CFW 55:A15 Manderfeld, M. M., (35S) CFW 55:A6 Manful, J. T., (188P) CFW 55:A58 Manthey, F. A., (98P) CFW 55:A35; (184P) CFW 55:A67 -ANZONI - 0 #&7! Marcone, M. F., (167P) CFW 55:A60 Marinopoulou, A., (187P) CFW 55:A56 Mariotti, M., (86P) CFW 55:A59; (220P) CFW 55:A55; (296P) CFW 55:A58 Marti, A., (181P) CFW 55:A59; (182P) CFW 55:A51; (286P) CFW 55:A39 Martre, P., (43S) CFW 55:A12 Maskus, H. D., (53O) CFW 55:A28 Mateos-Salvador, F., (192P) CFW 55:A68 Matsoukas, N. P., (187P) CFW 55:A56 Mattila, P. H., (271P) CFW 55:A66

90

Mattioni, B., (239P) CFW 55:A59; (279P) CFW 55:A66 Maucher, T., (27O) CFW 55:A22 Maximiuk, L., (162P) CFW 55:A75 -AZZOCCHI - 3 #&7! McAloon, A., (50S) CFW 55:A16 McClements, D. J., (191P) CFW 55:A41 McClung, A. M., (77O) CFW 55:A21 McDonough, C. M., (268P) CFW 55:A72 McKevith, B., (55O) CFW 55:A28 McMillan, T., (174P) CFW 55:A51 McNally, K., (42S) CFW 55:A13 Medic, J., (131P) CFW 55:A59 -EDINA 2ODRIGUEZ # 0 #&7! (125P) CFW 55:A60 Meinders, M. B., (14O) CFW 55:A24 Mejldal, r., (305P) CFW 55:A55 Melnyk, J. P., (167P) CFW 55:A60 -ENDEZ -ONTEALVO - 0 #&7! Mergoum, M., (30O) CFW 55:A29 Meseyton, J., (295P) CFW 55:A68 Metherell, E. E., (272P) CFW 55:A60 Meydani, M., (76O) CFW 55:A22 Midness, L., (55O) CFW 55:A28 Mikkelsen, R., (305P) CFW 55:A55 MilĂĄn Carrillo, J., (139P) CFW 55:A47; (204P) CFW 55:A61; (259P) CFW 55:A61 MilĂĄn-Noris, E., (139P) CFW 55:A47; (259P) CFW 55:A61 Miller, C. L., (59S) CFW 55:A7 Miller, R., (133P) CFW 55:A65 Miller, S. S., (66O) CFW 55:A31; (99P) CFW 55:A60 Min, B., (77O) CFW 55:A21 Minekus, M., (24O) CFW 55:A19 Mingyai, S., (244P) CFW 55:A70 Minnaar, A., (267P) CFW 55:A44 Miranda, M. Z., (135P) CFW 55:A71 Misailidis, N., (84P) CFW 55:A60 Mishra, S., (247P) CFW 55:A61 Mojab, S., (136P) CFW 55:A44 Mokhawa, G., (94P) CFW 55:A45 Mondragon, M., (55O) CFW 55:A28 Monro, J. A., (22O) CFW 55:A28; (216P) CFW 55:A39 -ONTOYA 2ODRIGUEZ ! 0 #&7! Mora-Rochin, S., (139P) CFW 55:A47; (204P) CFW 55:A61, (259P) CFW 55:A61 Moreau, R. A., (49S) CFW 55:A15 Morel, M., (68O) CFW 55:A33 Morell, M. K., (29S) CFW 55:A14; (65O) CFW 55:A31 Morris, C. F., (175P) CFW 55:A65 Morris, J., (6S) CFW 55:A11 Mosher, G., (52S) CFW 55:A12 Moutsatsou, P., (264P) CFW 55:A56 Mullen, C. A., (49S) CFW 55:A15 Mumm, R., (57O) CFW 55:A21 Murakami, C. M., (282P) CFW 55:A61 Musatti, A., (303P) CFW 55:A63 Naguleswaran, S., (145P) CFW 55:A61 Nair, S., (176P) CFW 55:A62 Naivikul, O., (191P) CFW 55:A41 Nakamura, T., (9O) CFW 55:A33; (152P) CFW 55:A69 Nantanga, K. K., (147P) CFW 55:A62 Narayanan, S., (140P) CFW 55:A77

Nasir, M., (277P) CFW 55:A62 Nava-Arenas, I., (215P) CFW 55:A48 Nelsen, T. C., (34S) CFW 55:A6 Nenonen, S., (105P) CFW 55:A49 Ng, P. K., (138P) CFW 55:A76; (220P) CFW 55:A55 Nguyen, J., (284P) CFW 55:A62 Nhan Minh, T., (7O) CFW 55:A28 Nichols, B. L., (245P) CFW 55:A57 Noll, L. W., (240P) CFW 55:A72 .UÂśEZ 3ANTIAGO # 0 #&7! Nuno, F. C., (282P) CFW 55:A61 NystrĂśm, L., (18S) CFW 55:A8 O’ Brien, D., (64O) CFW 55:A21 Ohm, J., (30O) CFW 55:A29; (241P) CFW 55:A75 Okusu, H., (97P) CFW 55:A62 Olewnik, M., (55S) CFW 55:A12 Omary, M. B., (284P) CFW 55:A62 Ondier, G. O., (20S) CFW 55:A8 Onwulata, C., (284P) CFW 55:A62 Oro, T., (90P) CFW 55:A63 /RTEGA 2AMIREZ 2 0 #&7! Orts, W. J., (58O) CFW 55:A33 /SORIO $IAZ 0 0 #&7!0 CFW 55:A35; (251P) CFW 55:A63 Oudhuis, L., (243P) CFW 55:A67 /VANDO -ARTINEZ - 0 #&7! (251P) CFW 55:A63 /Z˜RIO 2!0 #&7! Pacheco-Vargas, G., (300P) CFW 55:A66 Paeschke, T., (1W) CFW 55:A4 Pagani, A., (303P) CFW 55:A63 Pagani, M., (86P) CFW 55:A59; (181P) CFW 55:A59, (182P) CFW 55:A51; (250P) CFW 55:A41, (286P) CFW 55:A39 Pampa-Quispe, N., (169P) CFW 55:A54 Pan, J., (73O) CFW 55:A19 Papoutsi, Z., (264P) CFW 55:A56 Park, C., (198P) CFW 55:A54; (199P) CFW 55:A49; (200P) CFW 55:A56 Park, J., (291P) CFW 55:A50 Park, J., (203P) CFW 55:A42 Parrott, W., (39S) CFW 55:A9 Pasha, T. N., (277P) CFW 55:A62 Pastukhov, A. S., (207P) CFW 55:A63 Patel, B. K., (294P) CFW 55:A54 Peirce, S., (50O) CFW 55:A29 Peiris, K. H., (107P) CFW 55:A64 PeĂąa, R. J., (27O) CFW 55:A22 PeĂąa-Leriche, J. M., (222P) CFW 55:A64 Penson, S. P., (31O) CFW 55:A29 Peralta-Contreras, M., (231P) CFW 55:A43 0EREZ 7 0 #&7! 0ÂŁREZ"ERROCAL , 0 #&7! 0EREZ #ARRILLO % 0 #&7! (231P) CFW 55:A43 Persson, J., (89P) CFW 55:A64 Philipsen, M., (44O) CFW 55:A29 Pichler, E., (26S) CFW 55:A11; (106P) CFW 55:A49 Piderit, D., (262P) CFW 55:A58 Pierce, B., (100P) CFW 55:A72 0IETRZAK ,. 0 #&7! Pihlava, J., (271P) CFW 55:A66 Pinilla, E., (297P) CFW 55:A40


Plunkett, A., (17S) CFW 55:A8; (209P) CFW 55:A71 Poinot, P., (3W) CFW 55:A4 Pollet, A., (141P) CFW 55:A44 Poole, M. C., (31O) CFW 55:A29 Popping, B., (24S) CFW 55:A11 Potthast, A., (18S) CFW 55:A8 Poutanen, K., (63O) CFW 55:A30 Povlsen, I. L., (44O) CFW 55:A29; (305P) CFW 55:A55 Poysa, V., (99P) CFW 55:A60 0OZNIAK # 0 #&7! Pradon, R., (85P) CFW 55:A68 Prakash, S. R., (240P) CFW 55:A72 Prewitt, L., (202P) CFW 55:A67 Primo-Martin, C., (14O) CFW 55:A24 Prinster, M., (105P) CFW 55:A49; (106P) CFW 55:A49 Pritchard, J., (29S) CFW 55:A14 Prost, C., (3W) CFW 55:A4 Prückler, M., (290P) CFW 55:A55 Qiang, L., (148P) CFW 55:A73 1UEZADA #ALVILLO 2 0 #&7! Rabalski, I., (78O) CFW 55:A18; (270P) CFW 55:A35 Ragaee, S., (173P) CFW 55:A73 Ragaleux, A., (93P) CFW 55:A56 Ragona, M., (23S) CFW 55:A11 Ral, J., (29S) CFW 55:A14 Ramos, O. F., (6O) CFW 55:A29 Ramseyer, D. D., (175P) CFW 55:A65 Randall, J., (298P) CFW 55:A65 Rasmussen, P., (182P) CFW 55:A51; (286P) CFW 55:A39 Ratnayake, W. S., (301P) CFW 55:A47 Rattin, G. E., (133P) CFW 55:A65; (193P) CFW 55:A65 Rausch, K. D., (46O) CFW 55:A26; (47O) CFW 55:A32; (213P) CFW 55:A66; (234P) CFW 55:A53 Rayas-Duarte, P., (27O) CFW 55:A22 Reguerre, A., (205P) CFW 55:A69 Rendon-Villalobos, R., (300P) CFW 55:A66 Repo-Carrasco-Valencia, R. A., (269P) CFW 55:A66; (271P) CFW 55:A66 Reuhs, B., (172P) CFW 55:A75 Reyes-Moreno, C., (139P) CFW 55:A47; (204P) CFW 55:A61; (259P) CFW 55:A61 2HAZI , 0 #&7! 2IAZ -. 0 #&7! Richard, J., (106P) CFW 55:A49 Riter, K. L., (56O) CFW 55:A28 Robinson, J. S., (53S) CFW 55:A12 2ODRIGUEZ !MBRIZ 3, 0 #&7 55:A35; (157P) CFW 55:A38 Rogers, A., (2S) CFW 55:A10; (238P) CFW 55:A47 2OJAS -ART¤NEZ -% 0 #&7! Rollini, M., (303P) CFW 55:A63 Rombouts, I., (15O) CFW 55:A30; (16O) CFW 55:A27 Rooney, L. W., (186P) CFW 55:A52; (227P) CFW 55:A37; (268P) CFW 55:A72; (297P) CFW 55:A40 Rosa Borges, M., (279P) CFW 55:A66 Rose, D. R., (245P) CFW 55:A57

Rose, D. J., (13S) CFW 55:A16; (127P) CFW 55:A71 Rosell, C. M., (9S) CFW 55:A14 Rosentrater, K. A., (196P) CFW 55:A66; (218P) CFW 55:A67; (284P) CFW 55:A62 Rossnagel, B. G., (10O) CFW 55:A24 Rouau, X., (8S) CFW 55:A13; (10S) CFW 55:A14; (63O) CFW 55:A30 2OUZAUD 3Ă•NDEZ / / #&7! (222P) CFW 55:A64 Roy, M., (62O) CFW 55:A32 Ruan, S. S., (39O) CFW 55:A30 Rumpagaporn, P., (177P) CFW 55:A67 Russell, D., (209P) CFW 55:A71 Rybak, D. A., (301P) CFW 55:A47 2YTZ ! / #&7! Sackville Hamilton, R., (42S) CFW 55:A13 Sadoudi, A., (8S) CFW 55:A13 Saito, M., (9O) CFW 55:A33; (152P) CFW 55:A69 3ALAZAR 'ARCIA - 0 #&7! (125P) CFW 55:A60 Salovaara, H., (18S) CFW 55:A8 Samala, A., (202P) CFW 55:A67 3ANCHEZ 2IVERA -- 0 #&7! Sanders, P., (24O) CFW 55:A19; (243P) CFW 55:A67 Sandhu, H. P., (184P) CFW 55:A67 3ARANT˜POULOS , 0 #&7! Savage, E. M., (302P) CFW 55:A42 Sawyer, L., (295P) CFW 55:A68 Schlegel, V. L., (293P) CFW 55:A49 Schlichting, L., (122P) CFW 55:A46 Schmidt, M., (39S) CFW 55:A9 Schmiele, M., (180P) CFW 55:A52; (225P) CFW 55:A68 Schoenlechner, R., (190P) CFW 55:A70; (214P) CFW 55:A68; (223P) CFW 55:A58 3CHWEIZER * 0 #&7!0 #&7 55:A64 Seabourn, B. W., (109P) CFW 55:A42; (116P) CFW 55:A70 Sebio, L., (169P) CFW 55:A54 Sebree, B. R., (52O) CFW 55:A30 Seetharaman, K., (17O) CFW 55:A23; (136P) CFW 55:A44; (144P) CFW 55:A74; (147P) CFW 55:A62; (148P) CFW 55:A73; (149P) CFW 55:A74; (153P) CFW 55:A41; (167P) CFW 55:A60; (170P) CFW 55:A50; (173P) CFW 55:A73; (181P) CFW 55:A59 ; (292P) CFW 55:A41 Seguchi, M., (201P) CFW 55:A73 Seling, S., (1O) CFW 55:A30 Selinheimo, E., (63O) CFW 55:A30 Selmair, P., (41O) CFW 55:A26 Semenov, M. A., (41S) CFW 55:A12 3ERNA$IAZ , 0 #&7! 3ERNA 3ALD¤VAR 3/ 0 #&7! (230P) CFW 55:A64; (231P) CFW 55:A43 Serrem, C. A., (40O) CFW 55:A31 Shao, Y., (128P) CFW 55:A38 Sharp, C. J., (192P) CFW 55:A68 3HEHZAD ! 0 #&7! Shelembe, J., (267P) CFW 55:A44 Shen, X., (156P) CFW 55:A69 Shetty, J. K., (46O) CFW 55:A26 Shewry, P. R., (37S) CFW 55:A9

Shi, Y., (20O) CFW 55:A18; (25O) CFW 55:A20; (71O) CFW 55:A25, (143P) CFW 55:A40; (159P) CFW 55:A38; (229P) CFW 55:A76 Shimbata, T., (9O) CFW 55:A33; (152P) CFW 55:A69 Showell, B. A., (280P) CFW 55:A46 Shrestha, A. K., (65O) CFW 55:A3; (142P) CFW 55:A441 Shukri, R., (246P) CFW 55:A69 Siddiq, M., (277P) CFW 55:A62 Siebenhandel-Ehn, S., (290P) CFW 55:A55 Siebenmorgen, T. J., (20S) CFW 55:A8; (58O) CFW 55:A33; (69O) CFW 55:A19; (189P) CFW 55:A50; (212P) CFW 55:A38 Sigel, J., (44O) CFW 55:A29; (305P) CFW 55:A55 Siler, L., (138P) CFW 55:A76 Silveira Gramont, M., (125P) CFW 55:A60 Sim, L., (245P) CFW 55:A57 Simmons, A., (252P) CFW 55:A69 Simms, P., (51S) CFW 55:A16 Simons, C., (72O) CFW 55:A31 Simsek, S., (30O) CFW 55:A29; (132P) CFW 55:A63; (241P) CFW 55:A75; (251P) CFW 55:A63 Sinelli, N., (86P) CFW 55:A59 Singh, A., (122P) CFW 55:A46 Singh, M., (219P) CFW 55:A70 Singh, V., (46O) CFW 55:A26; (47O) CFW 55:A32, (213P) CFW 55:A66; (234P) CFW 55:A53 Sirault, X., (29S) CFW 55:A14 Sissons, M., (21S) CFW 55:A8 Skinner, D. Z., (8O) CFW 55:A19 Slade, L., (59O) CFW 55:A26 Smith, C. M., (6O) CFW 55:A29 Sneller, C., (195P) CFW 55:A47 Solah, V. A., (120P) CFW 55:A45; (121P) CFW 55:A46 3OLFRIZZO - 3 #&7! Sompong, R., (190P) CFW 55:A70 Sontag-Strohm, T., (18S) CFW 55:A8 3OUZA %* 3 #&7!0 #&7 55:A70; (195P) CFW 55:A47 Spatari, S., (50S) CFW 55:A16 Srikaeo, K., (244P) CFW 55:A70 Srinivasan, R., (202P) CFW 55:A67 Stadel, A., (50S) CFW 55:A16 Staggenborg, S., (33O) CFW 55:A19 Steel, C. J., (180P) CFW 55:A52; (282P) CFW 55:A61; (304P) CFW 55:A51 Steeples, S., (112P) CFW 55:A70; (116P) CFW 55:A70 Stieve, M., (289P) CFW 55:A43 Stojceska, V., (17S) CFW 55:A8; (209P) CFW 55:A71 Sui, R., (4O) CFW 55:A28 Sui, Z., (161P) CFW 55:A71 Sun, M., (91P) CFW 55:A77 Sunohara, A., (9O) CFW 55:A33; (152P) CFW 55:A69 Svensson, B., (32S) CFW 55:A15; (21O) CFW 55:A31 Svensson, J. T., (32S) CFW 55:A15 Swanson, R. B., (74O) CFW 55:A24; (272P) CFW 55:A60; (302P) CFW 55:A42 Sweley, J., (127P) CFW 55:A71

91


3YAHARIZA : 0 #&7! 3ZATMĂ•RI - 0 #&7! Taddeo, S. S., (268P) CFW 55:A72 Takiya, T., (9O) CFW 55:A33; (152P) CFW 55:A69 Tamayo-Limon, R., (231P) CFW 55:A43 Tan, Y. S., (92P) CFW 55:A48 Tang, X., (236P) CFW 55:A71 Taylor, J., (40O) CFW 55:A31 Taylor, J. R., (40O) CFW 55:A31 Taylor, S. L., (54S) CFW 55:A12 Tetlow, I. J., (30S) CFW 55:A15 Teunissen, P. J., (48S) CFW 55:A15 Thakur, M., (52S) CFW 55:A12 Thomas, R. G., (280P) CFW 55:A46 Thomason, W., (47S) CFW 55:A15 Thomasson, A., (4O) CFW 55:A28; (242P) CFW 55:A57 Thomson, B. M., (25S) CFW 55:A11 Tibola, C. S., (135P) CFW 55:A71; (237P) CFW 55:A72 Tiede, K., (27S) CFW 55:A11 Tilley, M., (109P) CFW 55:A42; (186P) CFW 55:A52; (240P) CFW 55:A72 Timm, D., (102P) CFW 55:A72 Toews, R., (162P) CFW 55:A75 Tom, M., (73O) CFW 55:A19 4šMšSKšZI 3 0 #&7! 4ORTOLEDO /RTIZ / 0 #&7! Tosh, S. M., (15S) CFW 55:A16; (66O) CFW 55:A31; (173P) CFW 55:A73 Tran, T., (100P) CFW 55:A72 Trejo, M., (114P) CFW 55:A76 Truitt, J. H., (8W) CFW 55:A3 Tucker, G. S., (13O) CFW 55:A32 Tulbek, M. C., (72O) CFW 55:A31; (196P) CFW 55:A66; (218P) CFW 55:A67 Tumbleson, M. E., (46O) CFW 55:A26; (47O) CFW 55:A32; (213P) CFW 55:A66; (234P) CFW 55:A53 Turner, N. D., (268P) CFW 55:A72 Tyl, C., (104P) CFW 55:A73 Ullrich, S., (176P) CFW 55:A62 Ulrich, S., (12O) CFW 55:A26 Ulrici, A., (86P) CFW 55:A59 5OZU - 0 #&7! Utioh, A., (295P) CFW 55:A68 Vadlani, P. V., (33O) CFW 55:A19; (34O) CFW 55:A34; (48O) CFW 55:A21; (64O) CFW 55:A21; (140P) CFW 55:A77

92

Vainio, T. A., (269P) CFW 55:A66 Vamadevan, V., (148P) CFW 55:A73 van Biljon, A., (29O) CFW 55:A27 Van der Goot, A., (11O) CFW 55:A32; (37O) CFW 55:A32; (197P) CFW 55:A73 Van der Zalm, E. E., (11O) CFW 55:A32; (197P) CFW 55:A73 van Egmond, H. P., (23S) CFW 55:A11 van Riemsdijk, L. E., (37O) CFW 55:A32 van wijk, A., (243P) CFW 55:A67 Vandeputte, G., (62O) CFW 55:A32 Vankar, V., (95P) CFW 55:A55 Vasanthan, T., (145P) CFW 55:A61; (148P) CFW 55:A73; (233P) CFW 55:A53 Vatandoust, A., (173P) CFW 55:A73 Vericel, G., (91P) CFW 55:A77 Verjans, P., (45O) CFW 55:A22 6ERNAZA - 0 #&7! Verwei, M., (24O) CFW 55:A19 Vester-Christensen, M. B., (21O) CFW 55:A31 6IA$IAZ . 0 #&7! Vidal, B. C., (47O) CFW 55:A32 Vigneau, E., (3W) CFW 55:A4 Vilaplana, F., (81O) CFW 55:A33 6ODOVOTZ 9 0 #&7! Vrinten, P., (9O) CFW 55:A33; (152P) CFW 55:A69 Waduge, R. N., (144P) CFW 55:A74; (149P), CFW 55:A74 Wagner, M., (68O) CFW 55:A33 Walker, C. E., (39O) CFW 55:A30 Wall, K., (108P) CFW 55:A74; (192P) CFW 55:A68 Wang, D., (229P) CFW 55:A76 Wang, H., (35O) CFW 55:A27 Wang, L., (299P) CFW 55:A74 Wang, N., (162P) CFW 55:A75 Wang, S., (7O) CFW 55:A28 Wang, Y., (166P) CFW 55:A60 Watson, E. M., (99P) CFW 55:A60 Weaver, G., (58S) CFW 55:A7 Wehling, P., (36S) CFW 55:A6 Wehling, R. L., (293P) CFW 55:A49 Weisang, F., (87P) CFW 55:A47 Welch, R. W., (12S) CFW 55:A16 7ETZEL $, / #&7! Whitney, K., (132P) CFW 55:A63; (241P) CFW 55:A75; (251P); CFW 55:A63 Whitworth, M. B., (31O) CFW 55:A29 Wickham, M. S., (4W) CFW 55:A4 Wickwire, K., (74O) CFW 55:A24

Wieser, H., (96P) CFW 55:A55 Wilkes, M., (7O) CFW 55:A28 Williams, H. G., (120P) CFW 55:A45; (121P) CFW 55:A46 Williams, P. C., (33S) CFW 55:A6 Williams, T. G., (58O) CFW 55:A33 Wilson, J., (133P) CFW 55:A65 Witt, T., (79O) CFW 55:A33 Wolever, T. M., (15S) CFW 55:A16 Woo, K., (95P) CFW 55:A55; (278P) CFW 55:A44 Wood, D. F., (58O) CFW 55:A33 Wood, P. J., (15S) CFW 55:A16; (66O) CFW 55:A31; (173P) CFW 55:A73 Wu, A. C., (79O) CFW 55:A33 Wu, X., (229P) CFW 55:A76 Wurbs, P., (290P) CFW 55:A55 Xiao, P., (128P) CFW 55:A38 Xie, F., (42S) CFW 55:A13 Xu, H., (172P) CFW 55:A75 Xu, S., (217P) CFW 55:A75 Yadav, M. P., (49S) CFW 55:A15; (202P) CFW 55:A67 Yakubov, G. E., (5W) CFW 55:A5 Yan, S., (229P) CFW 55:A76; (283P) CFW 55:A75 Yanakov, V. P., (178P) CFW 55:A76 Yang, C., (171P) CFW 55:A53 Yang, F., (44S) CFW 55:A13 Yang, L., (273P) CFW 55:A76 Yoo, J., (34O) CFW 55:A34 Yu, N., (138P) CFW 55:A76 Yurttas, N., (54O) CFW 55:A23 Zacarias, G., (114P) CFW 55:A76 Zainul Abidin, S., (248P) CFW 55:A77 Zawadi, O., (284P) CFW 55:A62 Zeijdner, E., (24O) CFW 55:A19 Zhang, B., (146P) CFW 55:A77 Zhang, G., (156P) CFW 55:A69; (256P) CFW 55:A42 Zhang, Y., (140P) CFW 55:A77 Zhao, X., (42S) CFW 55:A13 Zhou, L., (299P) CFW 55:A74 Zhou, N., (91P) CFW 55:A77 Zhou, X., (249P) CFW 55:A77 Zhuang, H., (302P) CFW 55:A42 Zwinnen, B., (15O) CFW 55:A30


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C.W. Brabender Instruments .................................. Index Tab Back www.cwbrabender.com www.brabender.com Buhler, Inc. ......................................................... Program Tab Back www.buhlergroup.com Chopin Technologies ........................................................... Cover 2 www.chopin.fr CII Laboratory Services ...................................................... Cover 3 www.ciilab.com CreaNutrition .......................................................... Index Tab Front www.creanutrition-sof.com EuroďŹ ns ScientiďŹ c .......................................... Exhibition Tab Front www.euroďŹ nsus.com Grain Millers .................................................... Exhibition Tab Back www.grainmillers.com ICL Performance Products LP ........................... Program Tab Front www.icl-perfproductslp.com Medallion Labs ............................................................................. 12 www.medallionlabs.com -EGAZYME)NTERNATIONAL)RELAND,TD........... Recognition Tab Back WWWMEGAZYMECOM Palsgaard ‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌.. .......................................7 www.palsgaard.com Pan Pan Foods ..................................................................................4 www.panpanfood.com Perten Instruments ...........................................................................1 www.perten.com Riviana Foods Inc. ................................................... Maps Tab Back www.riviana.com Watson Inc. .................................................. Recognition Tab Front www.watson-inc.com Wenger Manufacturing, Inc. ................................................ Cover 4 www.wenger.com The Wright Group .................................................. Maps Tab Front www.thewrightgroup.net

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AACC International AACC Intl. Marketplace – Grain Brain Central .......................... 3 Oats and Cereal Chemistry Flash Drive ..................................... 10 Check Sample ............................................................................. 11 Young Professionals ................................................................... 16 Grain Brains Unite ..................................................................... 18 Short Courses ............................................................................. 19 Books on Sale ............................................................................ 21 2011 Call for Papers ................................................................... 34 AACC Intl. Initiatives ................................................................ 42 Approved Methods of Analysis .................................................. 44 Thank You AACC Intl. Corporate Members .............................. 58 Books on Sale ............................................................................ 62 2011 AACC Intl. Annual Meeting ............................................. 68 Handbook – E-Source ................................................................ 85 Books on Sale ............................................................................ 93

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Complete Quality Analyses for Cereal Grains & Finished Products ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' '

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2010 AACC Intl. Program Book