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Charleston A Great Place to Visit … a Better Place to Call Home

Compliments of

photo/ Joe’s Retirement Blog

The Litchfield Company Charleston

R E A L

E S T A T E

S A L E S

We know the way home… 843-979-5310 | www.litchfieldcompanyofcharleston.com NEWCOMER INFORMATION • AREA MAPS • NEIGHBORHOODS • SPORTS & RECREATION • PLACES TO SEE AND THINGS TO DO


Photos/Kathy Allen

» WELCOME T he Charleston region is full of life, history and opportunity. You have probably already discovered this as you are considering, or have already chosen, the region as your new home. On the surface, the region’s beauty is impossible to ignore. In fact, it’s probably one of the many things that attracted you to the area. Rivers serenely wind through scenic marshlands. Historic buildings are shaded by grand live oaks draped in Spanish moss. There are a lot of advantages to living in an area that’s easy on the eyes, whether you’ve set down roots in Summerville, Charleston, Mount Pleasant or somewhere in between. But much deeper than the region’s beauty is its history, which dates back to 1670 when the first English settlers arrived and established Charles Towne on the banks of the Ashley River. As a

favorite destination for travelers, the Charleston region proudly celebrates its history and the people who have helped shape the area into what it is today. In addition, quality of life is something each community takes seriously. Schools are a high priority. New pedestrian and familyfriendly neighborhoods are being built that mix seamlessly with established neighborhoods. There are abundant opportunities to experience arts, culture, outdoor recreation, shopping, dining and nightlife. We invite you to explore the region, get to know your neighbors and discover the charms of the Lowcountry. It won’t take long before you become immersed in the area’s progressive Southern culture and call Charleston your new hometown. We’re certainly glad you’re here. Welcome home.

WELCOME |

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» WE’VE GOT IT ALL

Charleston was named No. 1 tourist city in the United States in 2013 by Conde’ Nast Traveler readers for the third year in a row. Here are a few reasons why:

Atmosphere and Ambiance Day or night, Charleston’s atmosphere and ambiance beckon. Take a carriage ride to learn about the historic area, take in a beautiful sunset at a rooftop bar or venture to the beach to relax. Charleston gets into your soul and we think you’ll agree there’s nothing quite like it.

Arts and History Photo/Ashley Heffe Charleston Regio rnan/ nal Business Journa l

The Charleston area is the home of many firsts. The city was founded in 1670, and you can barely take a step in any direction without seeing a historic building, plantation or other landmark. From Rainbow Row and the Market downtown to Fort Moultrie on Sullivan’s Island, there is much to see and learn about. And the Charleston arts scene is vibrant as well. Performing and visual Opening ceremonie s for Spoleto Festi val USA. arts come together in the annual Spoleto Festival.

Friendliness Our rankings as Friendliest City and Most Mannerly City are two things we’re proud of. We take life a little slower here in Charleston and extend to visitors and newcomers the same hospitality that the city’s founders did. It won’t be long before you, too, will be saying, “Welcome, y’all!”

Lodging

Photo/Greater Charleston Restaurant Association

Want to stay in a historic inn? No problem. Like the beach with a golf course nearby? You can stay there too. Luxury hotel, bed and breakfast, marsh or ocean view, harbor or skyline vista? If you can dream it, we probably have it.

Restaurants Charleston has become a hotspot on the gourmet food scene. Chefs focus on using farm fresh produce and seafood straight from local waters. Lots of festivals and events feature our local cuisine, from spontaneous Food Truck Rodeos to the annual Wine and Food Festival.

Shopping

The Lowcountry Oyster Festival, the world’s largest, takes place in January at Boone Hall Plantation.

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| WELCOME

Pick up a handmade sweetgrass basket in the Market or shop the latest fashions on King Street downtown. Head out to the Tanger Outlets in North Charleston if you’re looking for a great deal or swing by Town Centre in Mount Pleasant for trendy shops and locally owned boutiques. Whatever you’re looking for, you can find it here.

WHY, THANK

YOU

The Charleston area keeps racking up the recongnition in many areas. Here are a few examples. We’re flattered... Charleston is the No. 1 Best City in North America - Travel & Leisure, 2015 No. 2 World’s Best City -Travel & Leisure, 2015 No. 1 Small U.S. City - Conde Nast Traveler, Readers’ Choice Awards, 2015 No. 3 Best cities for jobs in summer 2016 - Forbes, 2015 No. 7 Best midsize city for jobs in 2016 -Forbes, 2015 No. 19 Best places to live in the U.S. - U.S. News & World Report, 2015 No. 12 Greatest Places to Live in America - Outside Magazine, 2014 No. 3 Best Cities for Young Entrepreneurs - Under30CEO.com, 2013 Top 12 Technology hubs in America - SlateTech, 2013 No. 2 America’s Most Exciting midsize cities - Movoto, 2014 Sources: Charleston County Economic Development, Charleston Regional Development Alliance


» WHY I LIVE HERE Welcome messages from our sponsors

“I like living in Charleston because of the respect people have for diverse cultures that comprise our community. Not only do we have such diversity, we have so many recreational and leisure activities that are readily available. In one day you can go to a beach and swim in the ocean, enjoy a culinary feast from one of many of the country’s best restaurants, and enjoy a myriad of cultural events. Charleston is like no other city in the world, and that is why I like calling myself a Charlestonian.”

"Charleston is a wonderful place to live. Our great city has become a player on the world stage, and we welcome everyone moving into the area. As Charlestonians, we’re known for our hospitality, wonderful year-round events, outstanding culinary delights, and a beautiful, well preserved city. What better place is there to live, work, play, and enjoy the good life?" Mary Garcia Senior Vice President/City Executive, BNC Bank

Tom O’Rourke Executive Director, Charleston County Park & Recreation Commission

“The Lowcountry has been the “Get-Away” destination for my family throughout our lives. As teens, we both escaped to the beaches. Later we honeymooned and celebrated anniversaries on the Battery. And, until recently from out-of-state, vacationed on the Sea Islands. After 20 years as a military nomad, the great food, rich culture, friendly people, great job opportunity, and balmy weather drew us to make Charleston our forever home.”

“FrontDoor chose to make roots in the Lowcountry because of its natural charm, the exceptional lifestyle and most of all because of the people here. Life here is just a little less hectic, and our homes reflect the relaxed lifestyle that makes Charleston such a great place to be.” Mark Lipsmeyer Division Vice President/Charleston, FrontDoor Communities

“Charleston, and surrounding areas, are the perfect backdrop for families. Having raised an 18, 21, and 23 year old here myself, I can vouch that it offers something for everyone. Where else can you spend a day at the beach, enjoy some of the country’s best food and take in a baseball game just by hopping over a bridge?” Cregg Glover South Carolina Federal Credit Union

David Louder, M.D., MBA Chief, MUSC Primary Care Integrated Center for Clinical Excellence WELCOME |

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contents | WELCOME

» Living In 40 Historic Charleston 44 Mount Pleasant 46 Isle of Palms and Sullivan’s Island 48 North Charleston 50 West Ashley 53 James Island and Folly Beach 55 Johns and Wadmalaw Islands 56 Daniel Island 58 Kiawah and Seabrook Islands 60 Summerville 64 Moncks Corner 66 Goose Creek

»Resource Guide 68 Sports and Recreation 72 Dog Parks 75 Golf Courses 76 Dining Out 78 Places to Stay 81 Alternative and Outdoor Venues 84 Arts Abound 88 Attractions and Tours 93 Calendar of Events 96 Newcomer Information and Map

Photo/Explore Charleston

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2 Introduction to Charleston 3 Sponsors’ Welcome 6 Education in the Lowcountry 13 Higher Education 18 Market Facts 26 Health and Wellness

Photo/Ryan Wilcox/Charleston Regional Business Journal

Volume 8

Photo/MUSC

2016

»Welcome


Photo/Charleston County

Special Projects Editor - Licia Jackson ljackson@scbiznews.com • 803.726.7546 Associate Editor, Special Projects - Jenny Peterson jpeterson@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3145

Parks

Creative Director - Ryan Wilcox rwilcox@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3117 Senior Graphic Designer - Jane Mattingly jmattingly@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3118 Graphic Designer - Andrew Sprague asprague@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3128 Assistant Graphic Designer - Emily Matesi ematesi@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3124 ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Director of Business Development - Mark Wright mwright@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3143 Senior Account Executive - Sue Gordon sgordon@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3111 Senior Account Executive - Robert Reilly rreilly@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3107 Account Executive - Sara Cox scox@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3109 Account Executive - Bennett Parks bparks@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3126

South Carolina’s Media Engine for Economic Growth

What are Market Facts and Lists? Each year, the Charleston Regional Business Journal collects all kinds of data and facts about our region. These are presented in a visual way in Market Facts, which is published annually. In the following pages, you will be introduced to a sampling of this data, presented in chart, graph and table format. You will also be treated to samples from our annual Book of Lists. The lists are just what they sound like: listings of businesses and other organizations by category. The information is ranked by number of employees or some other criteria, and details about each company are painstakingly gathered by our researchers. The facts and lists published here are ones that will be of interest to newcomers. We hope you enjoy both these added features to Intro Charleston.

President and Group Publisher - Grady Johnson gjohnson@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3103 Vice President of Sales - Steve Fields sfields@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3110 Event Manager - Kathy Allen kallen@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3113 Audience Development & IT Manager - Kim McManus kmcmanus@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3116 Event Planner - Jacquelyn Fehler jfehler@scbiznews.com • 864.235.5677, ext. 113 Accounting Manager - Vickie Deadmon vdeadmon@scbiznews.com • 864.235.5677, ext. 100 SC BUSINESS PUBLICATIONS LLC A portfolio company of Virginia Capital Partners LLC Frederick L. Russell Jr., Chairman

The entire contents of this newspaper are copyright by SC Business Publications LLC with all rights reserved. Any reproduction or use of the content within this publication without permission is prohibited. SCBIZ and South Carolina’s Media Engine for Economic Growth are registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

WELCOME |

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Education T

he greater Charleston region has four school districts covering areas from downtown to suburban neighborhoods to rural and beach communities. Each district offers a variety of school programs, including magnet and charter schools with specialized programs of study. Charleston County School District is the largest, serving nearly 50,000 students countywide. Students living in the city of Charleston, North Charleston and Mount Pleasant all attend Charleston County schools as well as those on James Island, Johns Island and Sullivan’s Island. Berkeley County School District serves more than 32,000 students in more than 40 schools that span the vast county. Students in such areas as Goose Creek, Hanahan, Daniel Island and Moncks Corner attend these schools. Dorchester County is divided into two districts. Dorchester School District 2 serves Summerville and areas around it. Dorchester School District 4 educates children in the more rural parts of the county, including St. George, Ridgeville and Harleyville. Details on each district are given on the pages that follow.

Sponsored by

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| EDUCATION

In this section School Districts.....................................................8 Private Schools....................................................10 Higher Education................................................ 13 Colleges and Universities............................... 15


Photo/Ryan Johnson/City of North Charleston Photo/Ashley Heffernan

Center Creative Ticket School of Excellence and in 2010 as a National Blue Ribbon School. The Berkeley Center for the Arts at Goose Creek High School offers programs in creative writing, dance, orchestral strings, theater, visual arts, vocal music, and wind and percussion studies. The Gifted and Talented program serves academically advanced students. They are enrolled in classes to enrich and accelerate learning beyond the regular school curriculum, including in English and mathematics. In November 2012, Berkeley County voters passed a school improvement referendum that will construct and equip five new schools and renovate 29 other schools in the district. New schools include: • A new high school in the Daniel Island/Cainhoy area. • A new middle school in the Daniel Island/Cainhoy area. • A new elementary school in the Sheep Island Road area. • A new elementary school in the Tanner Plantation area. • A new elementary school in the FoxBank Plantation area.

Charleston County School District

Top: A class from Hursey Elementary School visited North Charleston Mayor Keith Summey in his office during a field trip to City Hall Bottom: Junior Girls Day Out participants learned how to use a 3-D modeling software called SketchUp to build and print their own 3-D houses during Geek Squad Academy.

Berkeley County School District 229 E. Main St. Moncks Corner, SC 29461 843-899-8600 www.berkeley.k12.sc.us For a complete list of schools in Berkeley County School District, visit www.berkeley. k12.sc.us/Schools.cfm. To determine your neighborhood school based on home address, contact the school district office. Berkeley County School District, the

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| EDUCATION

fourth-largest school system in the state, serves more than 32,000 students and operates more than 40 schools, including seven high schools, 11 middle schools, 21 elementary schools and three alternative schools. Berkeley County provides arts magnet schools at each level of elementary, middle and high school. Howe Hall Arts Infused Magnet School serves students in kindergarten through fifth grade who are selected through a lottery process. Howe Hall is a model site for arts infusion in South Carolina and was selected in 2007 as a Kennedy

75 Calhoun St. Charleston, SC 29401 843-937-6300 www.ccsdschools.com For information on all the individual schools in the district, along with information on registering your child in the district, visit www.ccsdschools.com/Schools. To look up your neighborhood school based on home address, visit www.croppermap.com/charleston. Charleston County School District is the second-largest school system in South Carolina, representing a blend of urban, suburban and rural schools over 1,000 square miles. The district serves nearly 50,000 students in 80 schools and several specialized programs. In Charleston County, each school-aged child is assigned to a neighborhood school


» School District Overview School District Map

Student enrollment, 2014

In Dorchester County, the districts divide along Eagle Drive, Indigo Road and Cummings Chapel Road. Berkeley Dorchester County School County School District District 4

50,000 40,000 30,000 20,000 10,000

Dorchester County School District 2

Berkeley

Charleston

Dorchester 2

Dorchester 4

Dorchester 2

Dorchester 4

Average SAT scores, 2015 Charleston County School District

based on grade level and home address. In addition, the district offers specialized programs, magnet schools and charter schools, including such specialized programming as Montessori, International Baccalaureate, single-gender, military-infused, math and science, arts and global studies programs. Charleston County School District’s current strategic plan, Charleston Achieving Excellence, centers on four priorities: literacy improvement; effective teaching and leadership; world-class schools and systems; and strategic partnerships. The district has three main goals: close the achievement gap; elevate achievement overall; and raise the graduation rate.

Dorchester School District 2 102 Green Wave Blvd. Summerville, SC 29483 843-873-2901 www.dorchester2.k12.sc.us For a complete list of schools, look under the District Information tab on the website. This link has a list of schools for each subdivision. For questions about attendance zones and which neighborhood school your child would attend, call the district office.

1,500 1,450 1,400 1,350 1,300 Berkeley

Charleston

Source: South Carolina Department of Education

Dorchester School District 2 is the largest employer in Dorchester County. The district serves more than 25,000 students in suburban Summerville through three high schools, six middle schools and 15 elementary schools, plus an alternative program for grades six to 12 and an adult community education program. In November 2012, the community approved a $179 million School Improvement Referendum to provide three new elementary schools and a new middle school of the arts. It will also fund major expansions and renovations at five elementary and three middle schools. All three high schools will have classroom additions to accommodate increased career and technology programs. The new schools opened in 2015 to alleviate overcrowding at all schools in the district.

Dorchester School District 4 500 Ridge St. St. George, SC 29477 843-563-4535 www.dorchester4.k12.sc.us For a complete list of schools in the district, visit http://bit.ly/SA6syD. To determine your neighborhood school zone, call the district office. Dorchester School District 4 is home to six schools — three elementary schools, two middle schools and one high school — and the Odyssey Educational Center, serving a student population of about 2,000. The district offers honors/advanced placement, college prep, tech prep and occupational courses.

EDUCATION |

9


Private Schools

For more lists subscribe to:

Ranked by 2015 Enrollment School

Phone / Website Email

Porter-Gaud School 300 Albemarle Road Charleston, SC 29407

843-556-3620 www.portergaud.edu thirni@portergaud.edu

Bishop England High School 363 Seven Farms Drive Charleston, SC 29492

843-849-9599 www.behs.com kbrownell@behs.com

Pinewood Preparatory School 1114 Orangeburg Road Summerville, SC 29483 Ashley Hall 172 Rutledge Ave. Charleston, SC 29403

843-873-1643 www.pinewoodprep.com bcrom@pinewoodprep.com 843-722-4088 www.ashleyhall.org info@ashleyhall.org

Northwood Academy 2263 Otranto Road North Charleston, SC 29406 Christ Our King-Stella Maris School 1183 Russell Drive Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 Palmetto Christian Academy 361 Egypt Road Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 Mason Preparatory School 56 Halsey Blvd. Charleston, SC 29401

www.CharlestonBusiness.com

Fall Administrator Enrollment / / Year Founded Teachers

Student:Teacher Ratio

| EDUCATION

Grades

NAIS, PAIS, SCISA, NAES / SAIS, SACS

1st through 12th

David DuBose Egleston Jr. 1867 Patrick Finneran, Nancy Heath, Kit Brownell 1915 Stephen M. Mandell 1952

715 55

13:1

700 85

9:1

Jill Muti 1909

685 75

9:1

NAIS, NCGS, PAIS, SCISA / SACS, SAIS

Ages 2 through 5 (co-ed); K through 12th (girls only)

843-764-2284 www.northwoodacademy.com admissions@northwoodacademy.com

Larry L. Evanoff, Darlene W. Anderson, Melanie Van Deusen 1978

684 48

15:1

ACSI, TAC, SCOIS, CEEB, IFCSA, IACEE, / SCISA, AdvancEd

Pre-school through 12th

843-884-4721 www.coksm.org -

John Byrnes, Susan Splendido 1950

600 37

16:1

Roman Catholic Diocese of Charleston / Diocese of Charleston

Pre-K through 8th

843-881-9967 www.palmettochristianacademy.org lisas@palmettochristianacademy.org 843-723-0664 www.masonprep.org mainoffice@masonprep.org

Mike E. Lindsey 1992

579 55

14:1

SCISA / ACSI, SACS

Pre-K2 through 12th

Erik Kreutner 1964

338 40

14:1

NAIS, SCISA / SACS, SAIS

K through 8th

880 128

View this list online at www.scbiznews.com/data. Although every effort is made to ensure accuracy, errors sometimes occur. Email additions or corrections to lists@scbiznews.com or go to www.tinyurl.com/joinourlists.

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Affiliations / Accreditations

12:1

NCEA, SCHSL, NASSP, SACAC, NACAC/SACS-CASI Catholic Diocese of Charleston / 9-12 Catholic Education Honor Roll School of Excellence NAIS, PAIS, SAIS, SCISA, The College Board / Pre-K3 through 12th SAIS, SACS, SCISA

Researched by Business Journal staff


EDUCATION |

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Private Schools

For more lists subscribe to:

Ranked by 2015 Enrollment School St. John's Christian Academy 204 W. Main St. Moncks Corner, SC 29461 Faith Christian School 337 Farmington Road Summerville, SC 29486 Cathedral Academy 3790 Ashley Phosphate Road North Charleston, SC 29418 Charleston Day School 15 Archdale St. Charleston, SC 29401 Coastal Christian Preparatory School 681 McCants Drive Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 Charleston Collegiate School 2024 Academy Drive Johns Island, SC 29455 The Oaks Christian School 505 Gahagan Road Summerville, SC 29485

Phone / Website Email 843-761-8539 www.sjcacavaliers.com info@sjcacavaliers.com 843-873-8464 www.faithchristiansc.com admin@faithchristiansc.com 843-760-1192 www.cathedralacademy.com contact@cathedralemail.com 843-377-0315 www.charlestondayschool.org christy.lowell@charlestonday.org

www.CharlestonBusiness.com

Fall Administrator Enrollment / / Year Founded Teachers

Student:Teacher Ratio

Grades K3 through 12th

Eric M. Denton 1966

325 35

10:1

SCISA / SCISA 5 year advanced; AdvancEd

John R. Davis 1987

280 26

11:1

AdvancED, ACSI, SCISA / AdvancED, SCISA

K3 through 12th

Chris Bateman 1999

275 28

15:1

Cathedral of Praise / SCISA, ACSI, AdvancEd

K4 through 12th

Brendan J. O'Shea 1937

260 39

6:1

NAIS, SAIS, ERB, PAIS, NBOA / SAIS, SACS, NAIS

1st through 8th

843-884-3663 www.coastalchristian.org aprilvail@coastalchristian.org

Becky King 1953

255 36

7:1

Interdenominational Christian, Southern Baptist / AdvancEd and SCISA

K3 through 12th

843-559-5506 www.charlestoncollegiate.org tfrank@charlestoncollegiate.org 843-875-7667 www.oakschristianschool.org theoakschristianschool@gmail.com

Hacker H. Burr 1970

250 33

Robin B. Boehler 1998

228 25

Blessed Sacrament Catholic School 7 St. Teresa Drive Charleston, SC 29407

843-766-2128 www.scbss.org sbendt@scbss.org

Katharine Murphy 1948

215 18

Dorchester Academy 234 Academy Road St. George, SC 29477

843-563-9511 Blake Whitney www.dorchesteracademy.org headmaster@dorchesteracademy.org 1966

CES, ERB, NACAC, NAIS, PAIS, SCISA, SACAC, SACS, SAIS, TCAC / SAIS, SACS Crossroads Community Church, K3-K5 18:2; 1st-8th 18:1 SCISA, AdvancEd / SCISA, AdvancEd National Catholic Education Association / NCEA, Southern Association of 13:1 Colleges and Schools, Council on Accreditation and School Improvement

207 16

View this list online at www.scbiznews.com/data. Although every effort is made to ensure accuracy, errors sometimes occur. Email additions or corrections to lists@scbiznews.com or go to www.tinyurl.com/joinourlists.

12

Affiliations / Accreditations

| EDUCATION

8:1

12:1

SCISA, NAIS / SCISA SACS AdvancEd

Pre-K through 12th K3 through 8th

K3 through 8th

K4 through 12th Researched by Business Journal staff


Photo/College of Charleston

» HIGHER EDUCATION

W

hether you are a college-bound student, a college football fanatic, an employee or a resident interested in lectures and continuing education opportunities, there’s a good chance you will find what you are looking for in South Carolina’s higher education system. Enrollment number have remained steady in recent years. More than 246,000 students were enrolled in South Carolina’s public and independent two- and four-year institutions during the 2013-2014 school year. Founded in 1770, the College of Charleston is the city’s oldest institution. It is a Photo/Charleston Southern University

nationally recognized public liberal arts and sciences university located in the heart of historic Charleston. Students attend class in centuries old buildings, and many spend their evenings working as waiters and bartenders — or pedaling tourists around in rickshaws. Because of both their work ethic and spending power, the students are a vital part of Charleston’s thriving hospitality industry. The Citadel is another college with deep roots in Charleston. It’s not uncommon to spot a “knob” walking the Lowcountry’s streets. The freshman class is easily identified by the men’s shaved heads that

South Carolina is home to 84 institutions of higher learning, including: •

Three research institutions

10 comprehensive teachi ng institutions

Four regional campuses of

16 technical colleges

23 independent senior ins

Two two-year independe nt institutions

Two private professional

24 out-of-state degree gra nting institutions

USC

titutions

schools

EDUCATION |

13


Photo/The Citadel

ffernan/ Photo/Ashley He nal Business Journal Charleston Regio

Left: The Cistern Yard at the College of Charleston. Right: Cadets at the Citadel.

resemble doorknobs — hence the nickname. A few dozen women also attend the military college, although females were not allowed until 1996. The school is unique because it offers a classic military education described as “intense, meaningful and academically strong.� It differs from the nation’s traditional military schools because students are not required to join the service upon graduation. The Medical University of South Carolina is one of the area’s premier hospitals and includes a strong teaching component. Its specialty degree programs include dental, graduate studies, medicine, nursing and pharmacy. It is also one of the region’s largest employers, and the research conducted there is a vital part of the region’s high-tech biomedical industry. The Charleston School of Law is a private institution located in downtown Charleston. While the school was founded in 2003, like most things in this city, it is steeped in history. In November 1825, a group of Charleston attorneys petitioned the S.C. General Photo/Art Institute of Charleston

Graphic design students at the Art Institute learn the skills they’ll need to enter the thriving design scene in Charleston.

14

30%$B,QWUR&KDVWBYLQGG

| EDUCATION

$0


Colleges and Universities

For more lists subscribe to:

Ranked by 2015 Enrollment

www.CharlestonBusiness.com

Evening Classes? Weekend Classes? Online Classes?

Institution

Phone / Website Email

Fall Enrollment/ Administrator(s)/Year FT Faculty/ Founded Employees

Trident Technical College 7000 Rivers Ave. North Charleston, SC 29406

843-574-6111 www.tridenttech.edu infocenter@tridenttech.edu

Mary Thornley 1964

15,043 342 753

Public

Associate in Arts Associate in Science Nursing

Y N Y

College of Charleston 66 George St. Charleston, SC 29424

843-953-5507 www.cofc.edu admissions@cofc.edu

Glenn F. McConnell 1770

10,440 542 1,566

Public

Business Administration Biology Psychology

Y N Y

Charleston Southern University 9200 University Blvd. Charleston, SC 29406

843-863-7050 www.charlestonsouthern.edu enroll@csuniv.edu

Jairy C. Hunter Jr. 1964

3,598 162 550

Private

Nursing, computer science, business

Y N Y

The Citadel 171 Moultrie St. Charleston, SC 29409

843-225-3294 www.citadel.edu cgc@citadel.edu

John W. Rosa 1842

2,671 192 633

Public

Business Administration Criminal Justice Political Science

Y N Y

Southern Wesleyan University 4055 Faber Place Drive, Suite 301 Charleston, SC 29405

843-266-7981 www.swu.edu charleston@swu.edu

Todd S. Voss 1906

1,418 0 5

Private

Business Administration Human Services Biology

Y N Y

Miller-Motte Technical College 8085 Rivers Ave., Suite E North Charleston, SC 29406

843-574-0101 www.miller-motte.edu sara.eichelman@millermotte.edu

Sara A. Eichelman 1916

500 18 35

Private

Medical and Health Science Programs Management-International Trade Program

Y Y Y

The Art Institute of Charleston 24 N. Market St. Charleston, SC 29401

843-727-3500 www.artinstitutes.edu/ charleston aicscadm@aii.edu

Todd Harrison 2006

471 16 36

Private

Culinary Arts Graphic & Web Design Fashion

Y N Y

Medical University of South Carolina 171 Ashley Ave. Charleston, SC 29425

843-792-2300 www.musc.edu eslweb@musc.edu

David J. Cole 1824

319 620 5,406

Public

Nursing Cardiovascular Perfusion

Y Y Y

ECPI University & Medical Careers Institute 7410 Northside Drive, Suite 100 Charleston, SC 29420

843-414-0350 www.ecpi.edu jweaver@ecpi.edu

James Weaver 1966

280 16 50

Private

Health Science Computer and Information Science Electronics Engineering Technology

Y N Y

Virginia College 6185 Rivers Ave. North Charleston, SC 29406

843-614-4300 www.vc.edu lynett.alston@vc.edu

Mitch Sudy 2009

108 12 40

Private

Medical Assisting Cosmetology Pharmacy Technician

Y N Y

Saint Leo University - North Charleston Center 2430 Mall Drive, Suite 185 North Charleston, SC 29406

843-554-2111 www.saintleo.edu/ northcharleston northcharleston@saintleo.edu

Elizabeth Heron 2012

56 2 4

Private

Business Administration Health Care Administration Criminal Justice

Y N Y

Webster University 4105 Faber Place Drive, Suite 100 North Charleston, SC 29405

843-760-1324 www.webster.edu/charleston charleston@webster.edu

Vivian Gallman-DeRienzo 1915

52 50 7

Private

Management Psychology

Y Y Y

American College of the Building Arts 21 Magazine St. Charleston, SC 29401

843-577-5245 www.buildingartscollege.us info@buildingartscollege.us

Colby M. Broadwater III, James M. Waddell V 2004

43 9 21

Private

Timber Framing, Architectural Iron, Trowel Trades

N N N

Southern Illinois University Carbondale 101 W. Hill Blvd., Building 221, Room 128 Charleston AFB, SC 29404

843-552-7320 M. Stoner www.distanceeducation.siu.edu Gayla 1869 charleston@siu.edu

30 4 14

Public

Workforce Education and Development Accounting Business Administration

N Y Y

Lowcountry Graduate Center 3800 Paramount Drive North Charleston, SC 29405

843-953-4723 Muller www.lowcountrygradcenter.org Nancy info@lowcountrygradcenter.org 2001

0 0 10

Public

None

Y Y N

USC Darla Moore School of Business 151 Market St. Charleston, SC 29401

803-777-2730 www.moore.sc.edu gradadmit@moore.sc.edu

109 87

Public

International business, finance and marketing

Y N N

Peter Brews xxxx

Because of space constraints, only the top-ranked companies are printed. For a full list of participating companies, visit www.scbiznews.com/data. Although every effort is made to ensure accuracy, errors sometimes occur. Email additions or corrections to lists@scbiznews.com or go to www.tinyurl.com/joinourlists.

Public/Private

Top Three Undergraduate Majors, by Enrollment

Researched by Business Journal staff

EDUCATION |

15


Photos/Gibson Pitts

Students in the aerospace training program at Trident Technical College.

Assembly for a charter institution. The following year, the Forensic Club started offering law lectures, beginning the Southeast’s earliest law school. In 2002, prominent Charleston judges and attorneys set out to establish a law school that would continue the 19th century club’s tradition. The school earned accreditation in 2006 and graduated its first class the following year. The Charleston region is also home to several technical colleges that offer a host of two-year degrees and trade certifications. These include Trident Technical College, the region’s largest two-year school. Upon the Boeing Co.’s 2009 announcement that it

Culinary Institute students at Trident Technical College work in a commercial-grade kitchen.

would locate an assembly plant for its 787 Dreamliner in North Charleston, Trident Tech announced it would expand its aviation electronics programs and dedicate nearly 10,000 square feet of space for Boeing-related training programs at its main campus. Students also have the option of attending satellite campuses for specialty training, such as Embry Riddle Aeronautical University located at the Charleston Air Force Base. The Art Institute of Charleston opened in 2007 and is a branch of the Art Intitute of Atlanta. The programs it offers include commercial photography, culinary arts, fashion and retail management, graphic

design and more. Charleston is also home to the American College of the Building Arts, which trains students in historical building trades such as ironwork or plaster. The Lowcountry Graduate Center in North Charleston is an organization that formed to help working professionals gain advanced degrees through collaboration between the state’s colleges and universities. Despite myriad choices, South Carolina, like many states, is at a crossroads when it comes to higher education. Many exciting programs are under way here, including the South Carolina Centers Photo/College of Charleston

The College of Charleston Observatory.

16

| EDUCATION


Photo/Charleston Southern University

for Economic Excellence program. The state created the Centers for Economic Excellence program in 2002 to provide incentives for the state’s research universities to raise capital from private sources to fund endowments for specialized research professorships. The professorships serve a unique role in helping cultivate critical public-private industrial partnerships and expanding the state’s knowledge base. At the same time, South Carolina is grappling with decreasing state funds and increased tuition costs. Without money for new facilities, demand in the coming years may outstrip capacity. And schools are constantly challenged with training students for the evolving high-tech industry. The good news is that university officials and lawmakers spend countless hours studying, debating and creating innovative ways to advance higher learning in South Carolina — without putting the financial burden on students and their families.

Students in the computer lab at Charleston Southern University.

The state’s colleges and universities — including many in the Lowcountry — offer a competitive education to traditional and returning students. They also help fuel the local economy by serving as some of the area’s largest employers, by luring students and families to town, and by fostering relationships with

the community and businesses. The Lowcountry’s institutions of higher learning are — and will continue to be — a major part of the cultural fabric of this region. For more information on higher education institutions in South Carolina, visit the S.C. Commission on Higher Education at www.che.sc.gov.

EDUCATION |

17


Market Facts C

harleston’s economy has been growing and diversifying at a steady pace, with technology, engineering, architecture, service industries and health care ranking as the area’s fastest-growing job sectors. The emergence of technology startups heralds a growing knowledge economy and has earned Charleston the nickname “Silicon Harbor.” An economic driver for the entire state, the Port of Charleston has rebounded strongly after a dip in exports and imports during the recession. Ports, logistics, manufacturing and distribution companies account for a significant amount of economic activity in the Charleston region. As the housing market has recovered, the demand for commercial real estate and rental properties has surged. Construction has bounced back with an increase in building permits and the dollar value of the construction market. Financial institutions operating in the Charleston area represent more than 25% of the financial assets in banks across the state. In the pages that follow we give you a visual representation of some data on the Charleston market through Market Facts. Each year, the Charleston Regional Business Journal publishes Market Facts: data and facts about our region presented in chart, graph and table format. The information here is from the most recent Market Facts publication.

Sponsored by

18

| EDUCATION

In this section Economic Drivers.............................................. 20 Area Information................................................ 22 Real Estate............................................................ 24


» ECONOMIC DRIVERS Manufacturing The economic landscape of the Lowcountry changed recently when two automobile manufacturers made the decision to invest $1 billion in new manufacturing facilities. Mercedes-Benz Vans and Volvo Cars both announced manufacturing operations in the Charleston region to build and assemble commercial vans and automobiles. The companies join a slate of manufacturers in the Charleston region responsible for more

Port of Charleston The S.C. State Ports Authority expected to handle 1 million pier containers by the end of the 2015 fiscal year, a goal that CEO Jim Newsome said the port has not achieved since before the recession. Charleston’s port is the eighth-largest in the U.S., behind Savannah, Gal., its nearest competitor geographically, which ranks sixth in terms of the value of goods handled each year.

20

| MARKET FACTS

than 10,000 jobs, including Boeing, Robert Bosch, KapStone, Nucor Steel, Cummins Turbo Technologies, Century Aluminum, JW Aluminum and more. Volvo Cars picked Berkeley County for the company’s first North American manufacturing operations after going through a multi-state selection process. The company expects to employ 4,000 workers at the plant near Ridgeville over the next 10 years.

Source: Charleston Regional Business Journal

The average day at S.C. ports

$150 million

Six vessels sail into South Carolina’s harbors.

$150 million is the average value of the cargo.


Photo/Ashley Heffernan/ Charleston Regional Business Journal

Hospitality & Tourism Hospitality and tourism pumps tens of millions of dollars each year into Charleston and South Carolina’s economy. The robust sector serves as a major economic driver for businesses and communities across the state. The year-round tourist season in the Lowcountry pulls visitors to the Charleston area in support of a vibrant food and beverage sector with world-class cuisine and events, including the Charleston Wine and Food Festival, Charleston Restaurant Week and the annual Chef’s Feast, among other festivals and events that center around culinary arts. Retail shopping, performing arts, conventions and history all weave throughout the Charleston region. In fiscal year 2014, the Charleston area received more than $14.2 million from accommodations taxes paid for hotel stays. Charleston County received the bulk of that money with $13.5 million. Overall, accommodations taxes brought more than $55 million to the state in 2014.

2014 tourism by the numbers

4.9 million visitors

$3.3 billion economic impact

$188 per person for expenditures per day Source: College of Charleston Tourism Analysis Photo/ Senior Airman Dennis Sloan

Defense Sector Joint Base Charleston, which was created when the Naval Weapons Station and the Charleston Air Force Base joined into one military team, serves as the largest employer in the area with more than 20,000 employees. The defense sector continues to

be a major jobs creator with manufacturing, technology, cyber security and contracting through SPAWAR Systems Center Atlantic, Lockheed, General Dynamics, SRC and many other defense contractors throughout the region. MARKET FACTS |

21


Âť AREA INFORMATION 2014 Charleston-area population By county and major city

198,205

148,469

Goose Creek

Summerville

106,749

77,796

381,015

Charleston County

Mount Pleasant

130,113 Charleston

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

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| MARKET FACTS

% chg

46,974

2015 Employment

40,370

2014 Employment

Berkeley County

Dorchester County

North Charleston

Fastest Growing Job Sectors, Charleston MSA

Legal Occupations

2,060

2,270

10.2%

Computer and Mathematical Occupations

8,460

9,250

9.3%

Farming, Fishing, and Forestry Occupations

440

480

9.1%

Management Occupations

13,550

14,630

8.0%

Building and Grounds Cleaning and Maintenance Occupations

11,180

12,040

7.7%

Occupation Category

Source: U.S Bureau of Labor Statistics


Commuting to work – 2014 American Community Survey

Berkeley

Charleston

Dorchester

South Carolina

Car, truck or van - drove alone

70,367

138,265

54,512

1,672,070

Car, truck or van - carpooled

7,499

15,038

6,257

188,542

Public transportation (excluding taxicab)

655

3,848

303

12,322

Bicycle

135

2,559

168

NA

Walked

2,703

5,812

691

42,556

Other means

891

1,844

531

33,523

2,429

9,102

2,550

73,006

Worked at home

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010-2014 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates.

Mean travel time to work in minutes, 2014

23.6

25.7

Charlotte, NC

Columbia, SC

24.9

Raleigh, NC

30.4

Atlanta, GA

23.2

24.6

Richmond, VA

Knoxville, TN

23.4

Savannah, GA

22.5

Greenville, SC

25.7

US Average

24.6

Charleston, SC

MARKET FACTS |

23


Âť REAL ESTATE Charleston Area Total Closed Sales

Berkeley County

Charleston County

3,879

(+12.7%)

Dorchester County

16,202 (+13.7%)

(Percent increase from 2014)

Percent new construction

2015 Charleston area home sales at-a-glance 8,591

(+19.2%)

2,989 (+13.7%)

21.3%

30.9%

18.4%

22.0%

Days on Market

62

57

62

59

Percent of original price received

95.9%

96.9%

95.6%

96.6%

Source: Charleston Trident Association of Realtors, 2015 Annual Report

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| MARKET FACTS


New constructions homes for sale

Days on market until sale

Charleston Area

Charleston Area

1,600

150

Single-Family Condos

140 1,500

130 120

1,400

110 1,300

100 90

1,200

80 70

1,100

60 1,000 2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

50 2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Source: Charleston Trident Association of Realtors, 2015 Annual Report

MARKET FACTS |

25


Health and Wellness W

e like to take things easy here in the Lowcountry, but that doesn’t mean we don’t give attention to a diet and activity level that contributes to our health and wellbeing. In this section you will read about all the reasons living here can help inspire you to healthy living. And when medical care is what you need, we offer the finest in physicians, clinics and hospitals. Charleston has long been home to some of the top hospitals in South Carolina. When you are moving to a new place, finding out about health care can be a challenge. In these pages, we give you a list of urgent care centers, hospitals and retirement communities with full information about each. We hope you’ll find our guide useful in helping you settle into a healthy lifestyle. It’s one of Charleston’s charms.

Sponsored by

26

| HEALTH AND WELLNESS

In this section Urgent Care Centers........................................ 32 Hospitals................................................................ 34 Retirement Communities............................... 35


HEALTH AND WELLNESS |

27


Photo/Kathy Allen/Charleston Regional Business Journal

The Mount Pleasant Farmers Market is a great spot for fresh, local food.

A

ll the pieces are in place for a healthy lifestyle when you move to Charleston. The weather is mild all year, fresh food and outdoor activities are readily available, and when you need it, topnotch medical care is close by. So what are you waiting for? If you need a nudge to get started, there are organized efforts to help you. Just one of the many possibilities is Adventure Out, an outdoor fitness program presented by a partnership of Medical University of South Carolina and City of Charleston Recreation Department. Every week, a free fitness class is offered in a city park. It might be yoga at Brittle Bank Park or kickboxing at Cannon Park. The classes

happen on Wednesday or Saturday, and it’s a great way to try out something new. For a schedule, see www.musc.edu/adventureout. If you prefer to exercise independently, try walking, swimming or hiking, suggests Suzie Walters, fitness specialist program coordinator in Health Sciences at Trident Technical College. “You have to enjoy what you do,” Walters said, so that you’ll stick with it. Just think about walking across the Arthur J. Ravenel Jr. bridge over the Cooper River or jogging along Folly Beach for inspiration. If you tire of the scenery in your own neighborhood, go walk downtown or along the water. You’re never more than 10 minutes away from a public park, and Charleston

area parks have dozens of activities on the weekend. MUSC also partners with other groups on programs that promote the active lifestyle. Here are a few of those: Fit Family Challenge, offered in five states including South Carolina, includes a website with tips on staying healthy and a place to track exercise minutes; includes free activities all over Charleston. www.myfitfamilychallenge.com Charleston Healthy Business Challenge, free for any business. Includes a website with scorecard and tips to help improve the culture of wellness with stress management, healthy eating and exercise. www. chbchallenge.com Like to run or walk with a lot of new Photo/ Coleman Photography

Yoga Unplugged at Folly Beach County Park.

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| HEALTH AND WELLNESS


HEALTH AND WELLNESS |

29


Photo/ Brian Fancher Photography

Race at Mullet Hall Equestrian Center.

friends? Find organized events and get registered at www.eventbrite.com/d/sc-Charleston/races/ For learning about healthy food – and observing how it grows – the Urban Farm at MUSC is a marvelous resource. “It’s five acres on the MUSC campus. We grow crops year-round, with 40 varieties of fruits, herbs and vegetables,” said Susan Johnson, director of Health Promotion at MUSC. The farm, at the corner of Bee and President streets, offers free gardening and health programs, field trips for school children, a wellness and dietitian program, guest speakers and community events. Visitors are invited to take a self-guided tour, or volunteer to help with gardening tasks. You won’t go home empty-handed, as the harvested crops are shared with the community. “It’s a free resource for our community,” Johnson said. Every other Saturday, there’s a work and learn program with a kid focus. You just might be inspired to plant your own garden – and the Lowcountry climate is congenial for that. During the growing season, fresh foods are always available at the many farmers markets in the Lowcountry. Two of the larger ones are at Marion Square downtown and

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| HEALTH AND WELLNESS

in Mount Pleasant. Another way to get your fresh food is by CSA – Community Supported Agriculture. About 10 farms in the area deliver fresh produce weekly to those who purchase a CSA membership. Information about CSAs, farmers markets and roadside markets can be found at agriculture.sc.gov. “When you buy local, you’re not promoting use of fossil fuels,” said Walters of Trident Tech. “It’s also fresher and better for us.” She pointed out that fresh seafoods are also easily found in the Lowcountry. The local seafood won’t contain the antibiotics of farmed seafoods and will be much fresher. Local food events help residents focus on a healthy diet. The Culinary Institute at Trident Tech and the hospital association sponsors the Cooking Well Invitational, this year scheduled for Sept. 25, in which an award-winning chef judges a competition of culinary teams from the hospitals. “We’re showcasing around healthy and delicious,” Johnson said. “Healthy food should taste great.” MUSC has also worked on a Taste of African Heritage event, taking traditional foods and preparing them in a healthy way, and is planning a Food Day event at the

Marion Square Farmers Market in October. When your quest for wellness means you need medical care, you’re in a good place. The Lowcountry is home to several major hospitals and many specialty clinics, rehabilitation services, nursing homes and assisted living facilities. MUSC is building a new hospital dedicated to the care of women and children. The MUSC Shawn Jenkins Children’s Hospital and the Women’s Pavilion are scheduled to open in 2019. The hospital will have a 10-story patient tower, with the top floor dedicated to children’s cancer care, and a five-story inpatient procedure area, with a dedicated floor for labor and delivery. The groundbreaking for the hospital, at Calhoun and Courtenay streets, is scheduled for August. Patient rooms will be larger and furnished to accommodate short or long stays by patients and their families. In addition to the cancer care floor, the hospital will have the largest neonatal intensive care unit in South Carolina and a comprehensive pediatric heart center. The Advanced Fetal Care Center will be the state’s first comprehensive prenatal center for families expecting babies with complex congenital birth defects and medical problems.


» MAKE ROOM FOR GOOD

HEALTH IN YOUR BUSY DAY Always on the run with no time to exercise or plan meals? Here are some tips to help: 1. Don’t allow technology to get in the way. Take the stairs, park a couple of blocks away from your destination, and at the golf course, walk rather than taking a cart. 2. At work, incorporate a treadmill desk if possible. You can walk at low speed while talking on the phone or reading reports. 3. Schedule workout meetings, where you walk while you talk.

»

4. With your children, look for exercise-based outdoor fun. Go to a park or seek out a “Mommy and Me” exercise class. Exercising with kids also builds family bonds and healthy habits. When you play with your children, you’re creating memories. 5. When you’re doing household chores or gardening, add a deep knee bend or squat in between steps of a task. Do arm curls with the cans while putting away groceries. 6. Choose the manual tool rather than the power tool when doing chores. A broom or rake gives you more exercise than a power blower. 7. When you’re tired at the end of the day, try the “10-minute ticker.” You can do anything for 10 minutes – such as walking or using the treadmill – and once you start, you’ll continue longer and feel energized. 8. Find a support group to walk or run with. You’ll make new friends and strengthen bonds with your community. 9. Learn to read food labels. Watch out for high levels of sugar and sodium in processed foods. Be sure to eat breakfast to get your metabolism going. 10. Make family meals a time to nourish your body and family by spending quality time with each other. Research suggests that eating family meals at home helps reduce risk of obesity in kids and helps adults maintain healthy weight.

»

11. Grow your own vegetables to provide fresh produce while improving health, easing stress and building family connections.

12. Teach the value of exercise by teaming up with your children for a fund-raising race. These 5Ks are usually family-friendly with a mix of walkers and runners. Source: Susan Johnson, director of Health Promotion, MUSC; Suzie Walters, fitness specialist program coordinator, Health Sciences, Trident Technical College HEALTH AND WELLNESS |

31


Urgent Care Centers

For more lists subscribe to:

Listed alphabetically A Doctor on Call P.A. www.adoctoroncall.com admin@adoctoroncall.com 843-886-4402 1202-A Palm Blvd., Isle of Palms, SC 29451 Hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri. Family Medicine, Botox, Juvederm Filler, Urgent Care, Immigration Physicals, Laser Hair Removal, PCA Chemical Peels, Weight Loss No. of Physicians: 1 Blalock Urgent Care & Family Care www.blalockfamilycare.com info@blalockfamilycare.com 843-884-8121 1405 Ben Sawyer Blvd., Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-7 p.m Emergency services, family care, gynecology, pediatrics, and preventive medicine No. of Physicians: 1 Doctors Care Charleston West www.DoctorsCare.com Info@doctorscare.com 843-402-6834 3424 Shelby Ray Court, Charleston, SC 29414 Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat.-Sun. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Online check-in. Urgent care, family care. Onsite lab and X-rays; foreign travel medicine; sports and camp physicals; cold, flu and allergy testing and care; sprains, cuts, burns and other minor injuries. Non-surgical osteoarthritis knee treatment. DOT physicals and employer health services. Open late and on weekend, walk-ins welcome. No. of Physicians: 2 Doctors Care Dorchester Road www.DoctorsCare.com Info@doctorscare.com 843-871-7900 10160 Dorchester Road, Summerville, SC 29485 Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat.-Sun. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Online check-in. Urgent care, family care. Onsite lab and X-rays; foreign travel medicine; sports and camp physicals; cold, flu and allergy testing and care; sprains, cuts, burns and other minor injuries. Non-surgical osteoarthritis knee treatment. DOT physicals and employer health services. Open late and on weekend, walk-ins welcome. No. of Physicians: 2 Doctors Care Ivy Hall www.DoctorsCare.com Info@doctorscare.com 843-884-6424 3074 U.S. Highway 17 North, Mount Pleasant, SC 29466 Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat.-Sun. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Online check-in. Urgent care, family care. Onsite lab and X-rays; foreign travel medicine; sports and camp physicals; cold, flu and allergy testing and care; sprains, cuts, burns and other minor injuries. DOT physicals and employer health services. Open late and on weekend, walk-ins welcome. No. of Physicians: 2

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| HEALTH AND WELLNESS

www.CharlestonBusiness.com

Doctors Care James Island www.doctorscare.com Info@doctorscare.com 843-762-2360 743 Folly Road, Charleston, SC 29412 Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat.-Sun. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Online check-in. Urgent care, family care. Onsite lab and X-rays; foreign travel medicine; sports and camp physicals; cold, flu and allergy testing and care; sprains, cuts, burns and other minor injuries. Non-surgical osteoarthritis knee treatment. DOT physicals and employer health services. Open late and on weekend, walk-ins welcome. No. of Physicians: 2 Doctors Care Moncks Corner www.doctorscare.com Info@doctorscare.com 843-899-3870 459 U.S. Highway 52 N., Moncks Corner, SC 29461 Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat.-Sun. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Online check-in. Urgent care, family care. Onsite lab and X-rays; foreign travel medicine; sports and camp physicals; cold, flu and allergy testing and care; sprains, cuts, burns and other minor injuries. DOT physicals and employer health services. Open late and on weekend, walk-ins welcome. No. of Physicians: 2 Doctors Care Mount Pleasant www.DoctorsCare.com Info@doctorscare.com 843-881-0815 631 Johnnie Dodds Blvd., Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat.-Sun. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Online check-in. Urgent care, family care. Onsite lab and X-rays; foreign travel medicine; sports and camp physicals; cold, flu and allergy testing and care; sprains, cuts, burns and other minor injuries. Non-surgical osteoarthritis knee treatment. DOT physicals and employer health services. Open late and on weekend, walk-ins welcome. No. of Physicians: 2 Doctors Care Northwoods www.DoctorsCare.com Info@doctorscare.com 843-572-7000 8091 Rivers Ave., North Charleston, SC 29406 Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat.-Sun. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Online check-in. Urgent care, family care. Onsite lab and X-rays; foreign travel medicine; sports and camp physicals; cold, flu and allergy testing and care; sprains, cuts, burns and other minor injuries. DOT physicals and employer health services. Open late and on weekend, walk-ins welcome. No. of Physicians: 2

Doctors Care Summerville www.DoctorsCare.com Info@doctorscare.com 843-871-3277 410 N. Main St., Summerville, SC 29483 Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat.-Sun. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Online check-in. Urgent care, family care. Onsite lab and X-rays; foreign travel medicine; sports and camp physicals; cold, flu and allergy testing and care; sprains, cuts, burns and other minor injuries. Non-surgical osteoarthritis knee treatment. DOT physicals and employer health services. Open late and on weekend, walk-ins welcome. No. of Physicians: 2 Administrator(s): Thomas Gibbons MD Curtis Franke MD Doctors Care West Ashley www.DoctorsCare.com Info@doctorscare.com 843-556-5585 1851 Sam Rittenberg Blvd., Charleston, SC 29407 Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat.-Sun. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Urgent care, family care. Onsite lab and X-rays; foreign travel medicine; sports and camp physicals; cold, flu and allergy testing and care; sprains, cuts, burns and other minor injuries. Non-surgical knee pain treatment. DOT physicals and employer health services. Open late and on weekend, walk-ins welcome. No. of Physicians: 2 Health First - Mount Pleasant www.healthfirstcares.com 843-572-5990 2863 U.S. Highway 17 N., Mount Pleasant, SC 29466 Hours: Mon.-Sat. 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Urgent care, including treatment of cough, flu, cold, fever, sore throat, sinus and ear infections, allergic reactions and allergies, sprains No. of Physicians: 2 Health First - North Charleston www.healthfirstcares.com 843-572-5990 8740 Rivers Ave., North Charleston, SC 29406 Hours: Mon.-Sat. 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Sun. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Urgent care, including treatment of cough, flu, cold, fever, sore throat, sinus and ear infections, allergic reactions and allergies, sprains No. of Physicians: 2 Administrator(s): Frank Weller Health First - Summerville www.healthfirstcares.com 843-572-5990 1675 N. Main St., Summerville, SC 29483 Hours: Mon.-Sat. 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Urgent care, including treatment of hacking cough, flu, cold, fever, sore throat, sinus and ear infections, allergic reactions and allergies, sprains No. of Physicians: 2 Health First - West Ashley www.healthfirstcares.com 843-572-5990 1115 Savannah Highway, Charleston, SC 29407 Hours: Mon.-Sat. 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Urgent care, including treatment of cough, flu, cold, fever, sore throat, sinus and ear infections, allergic reactions and allergies, sprains No. of Physicians: 2

MedCare Urgent Care Center - North Charleston www.medcareurgentcare.com info@medcareurgentcare.com 843-552-3629 8720 Dorchester Road, North Charleston, SC 29420 Hours: Mon.-Sun. 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Walk-in treatment for injury and illness; coughs, colds, fevers, rashes, allergic reactions, abdominal pain, lacerations, sprains, fractures workers’ compensation injuries; on-site lab, digital X-ray, CT scans, EKGs, IV fluids, immunizations and vaccinations; annual physicals, sports physicals No. of Physicians: 1 MedCare Urgent Care Center - West Ashley www.medcareurgentcare.com info@medcareurgentcare.com 843-793-6093 1850 Sam Rittenberg Blvd., Charleston, SC 29407 Hours: 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Mon.-Sun. Walk-in treatment for injury and illness; coughs, colds, fevers, rashes, allergic reactions, abdominal pain, lacerations, sprains, fractures workers’ compensation injuries; on-site lab, digital X-ray, CT scans, EKGs, IV fluids, immunizations and vaccinations; annual physicals, sports physicals No. of Physicians: 1 Administrator(s): Radwan Hallaba MD Palmetto Urgent Care www.palmettoprimarycare.com/urgent-care-clinic 843-302-8840 2550 Elms Centre Road, North Charleston, SC 29406 Hours: Mon.-Sun. 7 a.m.-9 p.m. General medical care No. of Physicians: 2 Roper St. Francis After Hours Care www.rsfh.com/late 843-402-5283 Cross Creek Village, 325 Folly Road, Suite 101 Charleston, SC 29412 Hours: Mon.-Fri. 5-9 p.m.; Sat. 8 a.m.-4 p.m. After-hours primary and urgent care No. of Physicians: 10 Roper St. Francis After Hours Care www.rsfh.com/late (843) 402-5283 180 Wingo Way, Suite 110, Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 Hours: Monday-Friday, 5 - 9 p.m. Saturday, 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. After hours primary and urgent care. No. of Physicians: 10 Roper St. Francis Express Care www.rsfh.com/late 843-763-7906 5070 International Blvd., Suite 131 North Charleston, SC 29418 Hours: Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 9 p.m. Saturday, 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. Sunday, 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. After hours primary and urgent care. No. of Physicians: 10


HEALTH AND WELLNESS |

33


Hospitals

For more lists subscribe to:

Ranked by No. of Licensed Beds

www.CharlestonBusiness.com

Facility

Phone / Website Email

Administrator(s) / Year Founded

Licensed Beds / 2014 Admissions

Active Staff Physicians / Registered Nurses

MUSC Medical Center 169 Ashley Ave. Charleston, SC 29425

843-792-3232 www.muschealth.com -

David J. Cole 1824

709 36,166

921 2,455

Trident Health B 9330 Medical Plaza Drive North Charleston, SC 29406

843-847-4100 www.tridenthealthsystem.com noreply@tridenthealthsystem.com

Todd Gallati 1975

407 23,445

355 892

Roper Hospital 316 Calhoun St. Charleston, SC 29401

843-724-2901 www.rsfh.com/roper -

Matthew Severance, David Dunlap 1829

368 12,445

424 617

Bon Secours St. Francis Hospital 2095 Henry Tecklenburg Blvd. Charleston, SC 29414

843-402-1000 www.rsfh.com -

Allen Carroll, David Dunlap 1882

204 8,606

365 461

Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center 109 Bee St. Charleston, SC 29401

843-577-5011 www.charleston.va.gov -

Scott R. Isaacks 1966

149 4,066

247 493

East Cooper Medical Center 2000 Hospital Drive Mount Pleasant, SC 29464

843-881-0100 www.eastcoopermedctr.com -

Jason Alexander 1986

130 5,076

425 217

Palmetto Lowcountry Behavioral Health 2777 Speissegger Drive Charleston, SC 29405

843-747-5830 www.palmettobehavioralhealth.com gregory.gwisc@uhsinc.com

Shari Lynn W. Baker 2000

102 2,607

13 64

Roper St. Francis Mount Pleasant Hospital 3500 U.S. Highway 17 N. Mount Pleasant, SC 29466

843-606-7000 www.rsfh.com -

David Dunlap, John Sullivan 2010

85 1,658

231 97

Vibra Hospital of Charleston 1200 Hospital Drive Mount Pleasant, SC 29464

843-375-4111 www.vhcharleston.com -

Joseph Roche, Dan Dunmyer, Leah Willis, Lindsey Fisher 2004

59 734

83 81

Roper Rehabilitation Hospital 316 Calhoun St. Charleston, SC 29401

843-724-2842 www.rsfh.com cathy.therrell@rsfh.com

David Dunlap, Matthew Severance, Cathy Therrell 1992

52 1,075

6 46

Cognitive & Behavioral Health Center of Charleston 29 Leinbach Drive Charleston, SC 29407

843-501-7001 cbhealthcenters.com j.monnier@cbhealthcenter.com

Cindy Carter, Jeannine Monnier 2014

0 0

0 0

Roper Hospital - Berkeley 730 Stony Landing Road Moncks Corner, SC 29461

843-899-7700 www.rsfh.com -

David Dunlap, Brenda R. Myers 1992

0 0

29 19

View this list online at www.scbiznews.com/data. Although every effort is made to ensure accuracy, errors sometimes occur. Email additions or corrections to lists@scbiznews.com or go to www.tinyurl.com/joinourlists. B Trident Health includes Trident Medical Center, Summerville Medical Center, Moncks Corner Medical Center and Centre Pointe Emergency.

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| HEALTH AND WELLNESS

Researched by Business Journal staff


Retirement Communities

For more lists subscribe to:

Ranked by No. of Beds/Units in the Charleston Area

www.CharlestonBusiness.com

Scheduled Activities

Transportation

843-406-6298 www.bishopgadsden.org

C. William Trawick, Sarah E.H. Tipton, Lynne Kerrison, C. William Trawick 1948

402 275

260

46

19

Sandpiper Retirement Community 1224 Village Creek Lane Mount Pleasant, SC 29464

843-884-5735 www.premierseniorliving.com/sandpiper

Susan Foreman, Eric Hadley, Sheena Janse, Corinne Carrington 1986

340 300

108

176

0

Franke At Seaside 1885 Rifle Range Road Mount Pleasant, SC 29464

843-856-4700 www.frankeatseaside.org

Sandy Stoll, Mark H. Lee 1892

331 -

221

44

22

The Village at Summerville 201 W. Ninth North St. Summerville, SC 29483

843-873-2550 www.preshomesc.org/communities/ summerville

Robin Miller 1958

275 220

92

86

0

Ashley Park Retirement Community 1451 Tobias Gadson Blvd. Charleston, SC 29407

843-571-6075 www.ashley-park.com

Tom Perregaux, Roxanne Perregaux 2005

117 14

117

0

0

SeniorAdvisor.com 7756 Northcross Drive, Suite 101 Charleston, SC 29406

206-802-1495 www.senioradvisor.com/charleston-sc/ assisted-living

Samatha Mora 2013

100 -

100

100

100

Carter-May Home/St. Joseph Residence 1660 Ingram Road Charleston, SC 29407

843-556-8314 www.charitiessc.org

Janine N. Bauder 1929

25 25

0

0

0

Company Bishop Gadsden Episcopal Retirement Community 1 Bishop Gadsden Way Charleston, SC 29412

Phone / Website

Total Beds/ Units/ Administrator/ Total Year Founded Employees

Because of space constraints, only the top-ranked companies are printed. For a full list of participating companies, visit www.scbiznews.com/data. Although every effort is made to ensure accuracy, errors sometimes occur. Email additions or corrections to lists@scbiznews.com or go to www.tinyurl.com/joinourlists.

Alzheimer's Care

Personal Laundry

Library

Guest Apartment

General Store

Fitness Facility

Salon/Barbershop

Skilled Care

Assisted Living

Physician Office

Services

Independent Living

No. of Beds/Units

Researched by Business Journal staff

HEALTH AND WELLNESS |

35


» RETIRING WELL Photo/File

E

ach year, more and more retirees discover the benefits of relocating to the Charleston area. The mild weather, historic surroundings, cultural arts and idyllic location on the water make it a picturesque place to celebrate days of leisure. South Carolina also has low property taxes and no estate tax, enticing retirees to move to the area. The cost of living is at the national average, a typical home is priced at $228,000, and crime remains low in the Charleston area. A robust economy, quality health care facilities and a host of recreational activities give the Charleston area everything retirees require for a relaxing lifestyle. The population of those 65 years and older is growing nationwide, and the Charleston area is no exception. That means planning for more health care facilities,

more affordable housing and recreational activities to address the needs of the aging population. The Medical University of South Carolina, Roper St. Francis Healthcare

Senior Centers

and East Cooper Medical Center all serve area health care needs. Trident Health Care System is another provider in the Charleston area, with locations in Summerville and Moncks Corner. The Summerville MediFor more lists subscribe to:

Listed alphabetically

www.CharlestonBusiness.com

Berkeley County

Charleston County

Dorchester County

Moncks Corner Senior Center Berkeley Seniors Inc. (BSI) 103 Gulledge St. Moncks Corner, SC 29461 843-761-0396

Awendaw Senior Center 6655 N Highway 17 Awendaw, SC 29429 843-928-4700

Faith Sellers Senior Center Dorchester Seniors Inc. 312 North Laurel St. Summerville, SC 29483 843-871-5053

St. Stephen Senior Center Berkeley Seniors Inc. (BSI) 1266 Russellville Road St. Stephen, SC 29479 843-567-2674 South Berkeley Seniors Inc. Berkeley Seniors Inc. (BSI) 103 Thurgood Road Goose Creek, SC 29445 843-572-2423

36

| HEALTH AND WELLNESS

CASC Senior Center Charleston Area Senior Citizens Inc. (CASC) 259 Meeting St. Charleston, SC 29401 843-722-4127 Lowcountry Senior Center 865 Riverland Dr. Charleston, SC 29412 843-762-9555 Mount Pleasant Senior Center 840 Von Kolnitz Road Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 843-856-2166

David Sojourner Senior Center Dorchester Seniors Inc. 5361 East Jim Bilton Blvd. St. George, SC 29477 843-563-3709


Photo/File

cal Center has found a niche in treating ailments common in seniors, routinely scoring top points from the Joint Commission for its treatment of heart attacks, heart failure and pneumonia. Strong retirement communities and long-term assisted living facilities are abundant in and around the Charleston area. The Charleston area offers a number of public recreational activities and options for a healthy lifestyle. The Charleston County Parks and Recreation Commission has a host of parks and waterfront piers and offers discounts on yearly memberships for seniors. The James Island County Park, Mount Pleasant Palmetto Islands County Park and North Charleston Wannamaker County Park offer walking trails, canoeing, kayaking and shelters for gatherings. For those looking for an easy stroll along the beach, there’s the Isle of Palms County Park and Kiawah Beachwalker Park. The Folly Beach Edwin S. Taylor Fishing Pier has

become a hot spot for catching fish. The Charleston County Parks and Recreation Department wants to create more biking options in the area. In the next several years, Charleston County also plans to construct Lowcountry Lowline, which will add miles of bike trails to connect all of the county’s parks. Numerous farmer’s markets address

the need to purchase fresh, local produce. A weekly Saturday morning market draws hundreds to downtown Charleston between April and November. A similar market draws residents and visitors in Mount Pleasant on Tuesday afternoons. Food stands dot the landscape, and most accept vouchers for seniors under the Senior Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program (SFMNP).

HEALTH AND WELLNESS |

37


Living In N

ow that you have decided to make the Charleston area your new home, you’ll need to decide where you want to live. There are so many choices, and all have something unique to offer. You could live in the historic downtown, across the harbor in Mount Pleasant, in a suburban neighborhood or at the beach. You really can’t go wrong, whether you settle in booming North Charleston or neighborly Moncks Corner. In these pages, we tell you at length about each of the possibilities. We talk about the community, the history, the neighborhoods and businesses and a touch of the lifestyle you can expect. To help you visualize, we show some photos of each area. And when you get ready to move in, you’ll find phone numbers and web sites to help you get settled. Enjoy!

In this section Historic Charleston........................................... 40 Mount Pleasant................................................... 44 Isle of Palms and Sullivan’s Island............ 46 North Charleston............................................... 48 West Ashley.......................................................... 50 James Island and Folly Beach..................... 53 Johns and Wadmalaw Islands..................... 55 Daniel Island........................................................ 56 Kiawah and Seabrook Islands..................... 58 Summerville.......................................................... 60 Moncks Corner................................................... 64 Goose Creek......................................................... 66

SC Safe Home In coastal South Carolina, hurricanes sometimes threaten. The S.C. Department of Insurance offers help through SC Safe Home. This program awards grants of up to $5,000 in matching and nonmatching funds to assist homeowners in coastal communities in strengthening their properties against the severe winds associated with hurricanes and other natural disasters. To learn more, visit the web site, www.scsafehome.com or call 803-737-6209.

Sponsored by

38

| LIVING IN


Photo/Ryan Wilcox

LIVING IN

Historic Charleston A blend of old Southern charm and new development

W

ith all the grace and charm of a Southern city, Charleston draws in visitors and residents with its historic charisma and waterfront panoramas. Stroll down King Street to browse boutiques, wander through art galleries in the French Quarter, or tour some of the city’s historic homes. The peninsula is home to a rich history that is revealed in nearly all of its buildings, streets and parks. Charleston is home to a vibrant higher education community. The College of Charleston was granted a charter in 1785 and the school garners a large presence downtown. In 1824, the Medical University of South Carolina was founded, becoming the first medical school in the South. The MUSC campus and hospital occupy a large area

40

| LIVING IN HISTORIC CHARLESTON

on the peninsula’s western side between Calhoun and Bee streets, where a cluster of other health care providers have hospitals, such as Roper St. Francis and the VA Medical Center. Despite a major earthquake in 1886 and Hurricane Hugo in 1989, Charleston still has some of the most historic homes and buildings in the South. A designated “historic district” preserves many residential properties.

Neighborhoods The housing options downtown range

MOVING IN

Sweetgrass Baskets One of the oldest handcrafts of African origin in the U.S. Numerous resident artists still create these baskets from indigenous plants at the Charleston City Market.

All phone numbers are 843 area code, except where noted

City of Charleston.................................................724-3765 www.charleston-sc.gov Charleston County School District.........937-6300

Building permits....................................................724-7320 Charleston Water System..............................727-6800 S.C. Electric & Gas Co..............................800-251-7234 Trash and recycling............................................724-7364


LIVING IN HISTORIC CHARLESTON Photo/File

INTRO CHARLESTON

41


Photo/Kim McManus/Charleston Regional Business Journal

THE MUST

DO’S Photo/Andrew Cebulka courtesy of Charleston + Wine Festival

Charleston Wine and Food Festival Held in late February/early March, this annual festival celebrates the culinary history and culture of the Lowcountry. The Pineapple Fountain is an iconic landmark in downtown Charleston.

This 17-day festival draws dozens of music, dance and theater companies to Charleston with more than 120 performances at many historic and unique venues starting in early May. Photo/Paul Mulkey, SEWE

Southeastern Wildlife Exposition Conservation exhibits, birds of prey, retriever demonstration and Dock Dogs are among the highlights of this expo held each February.

42

| LIVING IN HISTORIC CHARLESTON

from the sprawling pastel-colored multimillion-dollar homes to new luxury condos overlooking the Ashley River. The median price of homes downtown is higher than surrounding areas. South of Broad is the neighborhood literally south of Broad Street that includes the often-photographed Battery and Waterfront Park. Full of large traditional homes, this area has some of the most expensive real estate in Charleston with most of the houses coming with a price tag in the millions. Walk down the streets in this quiet, storied neighborhood to catch a glimpse of traditional Charleston gardens and verandas. The French Quarter, above Broad Street, is bound by Market and Meeting streets and Waterfront Park. It is characterized by the many art galleries, cobblestone streets and restaurants that fill the area, and it is named for the French merchants who once occupied the area. Above the French Quarter is Ansonborough, the peninsula’s first neighborhood, although much of it was destroyed in a fire

Photo/Rutledge Cab Co.

Spoleto Festival USA

Rutledge Cab Co. is a favorite of residents from the Wagener Terrace and Hampton Park neighborho ods.

in 1838 and had to be rebuilt. Many of the houses have Greek Revival characteristics and were built by some of Charleston’s oldest family names, such as Joseph Legare and Edward McCrady. Harleston Village is another one of the old neighborhoods that was developed in 1770. It encompasses the area north of Broad Street to Calhoun Street. It includes Colonial Lake, which was set aside for public use in 1768. Renovations in 2016 added more seating and pathways, popular with joggers and dog walkers. The architecture includes Italian and Georgian, as well as


Photo/Liz Segrist/Charleston Regional Business Journal

Charleston is nicknamed the "Holy City" thanks to the number of church spires and steeples in the skyline.

styles that span the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries. Radcliffeborough is bound by King, Vanderhorst, Smith and Radcliffe streets and contains much of the College of Charleston campus. Many of the houses have Italian and Gothic Revival influences. To the west and north of Radcliffeborough are Cannonborough and Elliottborough, where homes are being renovated at a rapid rate. Close to MUSC, this area is popular with medical students and families who want a house downtown without the price of a lower-peninsula property. New developments are opening up residential spaces, such as the Midtown project, expected to help revitalize upper King Street with condominiums and single-family houses mixed in with commercial space. The recently constructed Bee Street Lofts offer views of the Ashley River. With their proximity to the Medical University of South Carolina, the lofts have been popular with physicians moving to the area. To the east of Radcliffeborough is the Mazyck-Wraggborough neighborhood,

The peninsula is home to a rich history that is revealed in nearly all of its buildings, streets and parks. which stretches from King over to Washington Street. Anchoring the area is the landmark Marion Square, the 10-acre public park that houses a farmers market on Saturdays from April to December The area also includes the Children’s Museum of the Lowcountry, the Charleston Museum and the newly-renovated Gaillard Center, Charleston's premier venue for performances and special events. Farther up the peninsula, Hampton Park Terrace and Wagener Terrace offer more housing options with turn-of-the-century and brick bungalow homes. The Citadel campus also falls in the Hampton Park area.

LOCAL

KNOWLEDGE Many of the streets and buildings around the peninsula are pronounced in a very distinct way by the locals. Mispronunciation will be a telltale sign that you’re “from off.” Here are a few pronunciations and sayings that will have you sounding like a local, right from the start.

Huger Street Pronounced (Hugh-Gee)

The Gaillard Center Charleston’s premier venue is pronounced (Gil-yard)

From off If you weren’t born in Charleston, then come and live here, you’ll always be “from off ”

Pluff mud The mud of the tidal marshes that emit the signature smell of the Lowcountry

LIVING IN HISTORIC CHARLESTON |

43


Photo/Explore Charleston

A stroll on Shem Creek.

LIVING IN

Mount Pleasant

Town across the harbor offers many residential options

D

espite its reputation as a suburban gateway to Charleston and the East Cooper beaches, the historic heart of Mount Pleasant can still be found near picturesque Shem Creek, where the local fishing fleet dock beside popular locally owned eateries. The Old Village, founded in 1680 and incorporated in 1837, sits on breezy bluffs that overlook the harbor just seaward of Shem Creek. The opening of the $650 million Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge marked the beginning of a new era for the state’s fifth-largest municipality, now home to about 75,000. Despite the influx of residents and visitors, locals still treasure the area’s 18th century homes, quaint Pitt Street commercial district and the neighborhood’s authentic shade-drenched ambiance. Residents and

44

| LIVING IN MOUNT PLEASANT

visitors alike enjoy trips to Alhambra Hall Park and the nearby Pitt Street Bridge, which once connected the town to Sullivan’s Island by trolley but now offers views of Charleston Harbor and easy access to fishing and crabbing. Other glimpses of Mount Pleasant’s past can be found across town on scenic Long Point Road. On one side of the road, motorists may turn off and wander down a broad alley of oaks that leads to Boone Hall Plantation. Settled in 1743, it remains a working plantation. Its “you-pick ’em” fields and seasonal

MOVING IN

Shrimp season Fresh shrimp can be bought right off the boat on Shem Creek. Typically, brown shrimp are caught from May to August and white shrimp from September to December.

All phone numbers are 843 area code, except where noted

Town of Mount Pleasant .................................884-8517 www.tompsc.com Charleston County School District ........937-6300 Building permits ..................................................884-5184

Mount Pleasant Waterworks ....................884-9626 S.C. Electric & Gas Co. ...........................800-251-7234 Blue Flame Gas ......................................................884-2017 Trash and recycling ...........................................884-8518


Photo/Chart Photography

Photo/Charleston County Park And Recreation Commission

DO’S Cooper River Bridge Run

"Shaggin' on the Cooper" is a seasonal monthly event held on the Mt. Pleasant Pier.

Tens of thousands of runners participate

connects to the Ravenel Bridge by way of Memorial Waterfront Park. Mount Pleasant’s neighborhoods have varying styles and offer residents a range of choices including large historic homes in the town’s “Old Village,” new family home construction in many neighborhood developments and upscale condominium communities. I’On, a new-urbanist development off Mathis Ferry Road, is an award-winning neighborhood of beautiful homes, elaborate public spaces and mixed-use construction. Farther out, the sprawling new developments of Park West and Carolina Park are moving the geographic center of town more to the east. With people come businesses, most of them oriented on either U.S. 17 or Coleman Boulevard. The town’s most prominent shopping area is Towne Centre, between the Isle of Palms Connector and the end of Interstate 526. In keeping with tradition, the town loves a good festival. Mount Pleasant hosts festivals for the arts, oysters, Scottish games, local foodies and children. Every April, the town turns out for the annual Blessing of the Fleet at Memorial Waterfront Park. The Christmas parade is a big draw, as is the Cooper River Bridge Run, which attracts runners and walkers by the tens of thousands each spring.

in this world-class 10K held in late March or early April. The race starts on the Mount Pleasant side of the Arthur Ravenel Bridge. Runners get amazing views of Charleston Harbor as they run over the bridge to Charleston. Photo/Greater Charleston Restaurant Association

events are beloved by local families. On the other side of Long Point Road, the Charles Pinckney National Historic Site interprets life at Snee Farm Plantation, home of one of the original signers of the U.S. Constitution. The U.S. Park Service staff makes a special effort to explain and preserve the region’s Gullah culture. Glimpses of that Gullah heritage can be seen along U.S. 17, where the area’s “basket ladies” still make and sell the Lowcountry’s signature sweetgrass baskets from simple roadside stands. A weekly farmers market on Tuesday afternoons from April to October gives access to affordable, healthy food. The town unveiled two new modern hospitals in 2010. East Cooper Regional Medical Center and Roper St. Francis Mount Pleasant Hospital. Fitness has also been on the upswing since the new bridge opened in 2005 with a lane for bicyclists and pedestrians. Residents make extensive use of the town’s numerous parks, ballfields and gyms, and recreational sports leagues are numerous. Palmetto Islands County Park, a 943acre facility, has nature trails, picnic areas, a water park and pedal boat rentals. Patriots Point on Charleston Harbor boasts a staterun military museum that displays four World War II-era vessels and more than a dozen vintage aircraft. Patriots Point also

THE MUST

Lowcountry Oyster Festival More than 65,000 pounds of oysters are loaded on tractor trailers ready for hungry folks during this annual January event at Boone Hall Plantation.

LOCAL

KNOWLEDGE The Pitt Street Bridge Tucked away at the end of Pitt Street in the Old Village area of Mount Pleasant, the Pitt Street Bridge offers sweeping views of the Lowcountry and plenty of spots to drop a fishing line. LIVING IN MOUNT PLEASANT |

45


Photo//City of Isle of Palms

Docks line the Intracoastal Waterway on the back side of the Isle of Palms.

LIVING IN

Isle of Palms and Sullivans Island For a day’s visit or a lifetime, islands’ beaches beckon

E

ast Cooper’s two beach-front islands are connected by one bridge but represent two distinct lifestyles. Sullivan’s Island lies at the entrance to Charleston Harbor and spent much of its history as a slave port. Its strategic position made it a key to the seaward defense of the city of Charleston and it was fortified well into the 20th century. To Charlestonians of the late 19th and early 20th century, Sullivan’s Island was the beach to which they escaped by boat when the summer heat grew unbearable. Today, the island’s military and beach-retreat heritage give the place an elegantly shabby, slow-moving style that is unique among Southern beach communities. Islanders have adapted abandoned fortifications and disused buildings from Fort Moultrie’s sprawling past into creative liv-

46

ing spaces and public uses. Victorian homes line shaded streets. About 2,000 people live on the 3.3-square-mile island, which remains a popular destination for beach-goers from Charleston and Mount Pleasant. But with no hotels, the beach is seldom crowded. Easements and strict regulations protect the island’s dunes and maritime forests, and its lighthouse, which began operation in 1962, was conveyed to the National Parks Service in 2008. Though Sullivan’s Island was home to

MOVING IN

All phone numbers are 843 area code, except where noted

City of Isle of Palms...........................................886-6428 www.iop.net Town of Sullivan’s Island.................................883-3198 www.sullivansisland-sc.com Charleston County School District.........937-6300 Isle of Palms building permits...................886-9912 Isle of Palms Water and Sewer.................886-6148

| LIVING IN ISLE OF PALMS & SULLIVANS ISLAND

Release program Sea turtles that have been rehabilitated at the S.C. Aquarium are released at the Isle of Palms.

City of Isle of Palms trash..................................720-7111 Sullivan’s Island building permits...........883-5727 Sullivan’s Island water system................. 883-3947 Sullivan’s Island trash.......................................884-8518 S.C. Electric & Gas Co..............................800-251-7234 Recycling (Charleston County).....................720-7111


Photo/Poe’s Tavern

THE MUST

DO’S Sullivan’s Island Polar Bear Plunge Every New Year’s Day people flock to the shores of Sullivan’s Island for the annual Polar Bear Plunge.

Poe’s Tavern is one the lively restaurants Sullivan’s Island residents enjoy.

Start the year by diving in the cold

million-dollar homes line the water, and its Front Beach commercial district bustles with restaurants and shops. The IOP’s Windjammer Lounge is a classic beachfront bar and music venue, and the annual Polar Bear Swim on Sullivan’s Island, which draws thousands of high-spirited bathers every New Year’s Day, originates at Dunleavy’s Pub in the island’s tiny downtown. Life on the islands offers distinct choices for those who can afford them — the upscale energy of the IOP versus the quirkier charms of Sullivan’s Island. Residents of both islands benefit from one of the area's finest elementary schools, enjoy easy access to shopping via the Isle of Palms Connector and can often be spotted tooling around in their ubiquitous electric golf carts.

winter water of the Atlantic.

Isle of Palms Connector Run Run one of the most scenic bridges in the Lowcountry then enjoy the Isle of Palms for a post-race party.

LOCAL

KNOWLEDGE “Meet me at Station 12.”

Photo/File

two settlements in the 19th century, the neighboring Isle of Palms remained a remote, sparsely populated vacation spot until the early 20th century. A 50-room hotel opened in 1906, followed in 1912 by a beach pavilion and amusement park. First known as Hunting Island, and then Long Island, developers renamed it the Isle of Palms in 1913 to attract tourists. Development of the 5.6-square-mile island didn’t begin in earnest until the 1940s. The boom started in 1944 with the purchase of 1,300 acres by The Beach Co., which laid out roads and began building a mixture of vacation and affordable housing. The Ben Sawyer Bridge connecting Mount Pleasant to Sullivan’s Island completed the Charleston-to-IOP automobile link in 1945 and more growth followed. By the 1970s, developers turned their eyes toward a 1,600-acre tract and began construction of what is today the gated Wild Dunes Resort. This exclusive community features two golf courses, extensive tennis facilities and a system of walking and bicycling trails. Hurricane Hugo destroyed 95% of the IOP’s buildings in 1989 and the influx of insurance cash led to a burst of luxurious gentrification. Today, the island has a population of more than 4,500 multi-

All of the cross streets on both Sullivan’s Island and Isle of Palms are called stations. Each one is numbered, so an easy way to make plans to meet on the beach is to pick a station and let all of your friends know.

Where the waves are The Isle of Palms is the place to go to catch a wave on this side of town. Surfers of all types and skill levels can be seen catching the waves on most days.

Storage of old barrels of civil war gun powder in Fort Moultrie on Sullivan’s Island in South Carolina. LIVING IN ISLE OF PALMS & SULLIVANS ISLAND |

47


Photo/Adam MacConnell/City of North Charleston

Residents gather for the annual 4th of July festival at Riverfront Park.

LIVING IN

North Charleston

Area is home to Boeing, ice hockey, concerts and conventions

N

orth Charleston is an area in transition. With industrial and military roots, the city in recent years has committed to redeveloping its central neighborhoods and reinventing itself as a trendy yet affordable place to live. The area north of Charleston was developed as plantations by early colonists, but after the Civil War, it grew into an industrial center. Just after the turn of the 20th century, the U.S. Navy targeted a huge swath of land along the Cooper River for a new naval base, and planned neighborhoods began to unfold to house workers, the military and their families. The North Charleston area boomed during World War II. The dynamic area incorporated as a city in 1972 and has expanded to include land in Charleston,

48

| LIVING IN NORTH CHARLESTON

Dorchester and Berkeley counties. In the 1990s, the federal government closed the navy base in North Charleston. The city of North Charleston has since partnered with developers to infuse new life into the area’s historic neighborhoods. Redevelopment areas include Park Circle, a community of neighborhoods planned early in the 20th century. Park Circle is now a trendy and vibrant community with a number of restaurants and bars. Residential developments coming online, such as Oak Terrace Preserve and Mixson, have earned a reputation for their

MOVING IN

In one of the largest economic development announcements ever made in the Lowcountry, Mercedes-Benz Vans, a division of Daimler, announced plans in 2015 to create 1,300 jobs and invest about $500 million to build a new van plant in North Charleston.

All phone numbers are 843 area code, except where noted

City of North Charleston ..............................554-5700 www.northcharleston.org Charleston County School District ........937-6300 Building permits .................................................. 740-2578

Charleston Water System ............................727-6800 S.C. Electric & Gas Co. ...........................800-251-7234 Trash ...............................................................................745-1026 Recycling (Charleston County).....................720-7111


Photo/City of North Charleston

THE MUST

DO’S Photo/Ryan Johnson/City of North Charleston

Oak Tree Preserve neighborhood.

sustainable building practices. Nearby Montague Avenue is a Main Street of the past alive again with shops and restaurants. Redevelopment is ongoing on the former naval base as well, where once empty military buildings now bustle with art studios, private offices and other commercial activity collectively known as the Navy Yard at Noisette. North Charleston remains a center of business activity for the region, with many of the Charleston area’s commercial and industrial employers located there. Boeing Co. announced plans in late 2009 to locate its second assembly line for its 787 Dreamliner in North Charleston. In 2011, South Carolina officials along with Boeing celebrated the

completion of the assembly plant. One of the area’s major attractions is the North Charleston Coliseum and Performing Arts Center and adjacent Charleston Area Convention Center. The complex is home to the Stingrays, a minor league hockey team, and is a venue for concerts, performances and meetings large and small. The Charleston International Airport is also located in North Charleston. Nearby shopping centers include the Tanger Outlet Center and Northwoods Mall. Interstate 26 runs through North Charleston toward Columbia. Interstate 526, which has terminal points in Mount Pleasant and West Ashley, reaches its peak in North Charleston.

Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day The largest St. Patrick’s Day in the Lowcountry is the best place to channel your inner Irishness. East Montague Street is closed and Park Circle comes alive for this annual tradition.

LOCAL

KNOWLEDGE

Photo/Ryan Johnson/City of North Charleston

A child enjoying the festivitiesat Riverfront Park.

Craft brewery capital of the Lowcountry North Charleston currently boasts five breweries, with more on the way. To imbibe on the local brews check out: • Coast Brewing Company • Freehouse Brewery • Frothy Beard Brewing Company • Holy City Brewing Company • Lo-Fi Brewing LIVING IN NORTH CHARLESTON |

49


Photos/Charleston Regional Business Journal

The Avondale Point area of West Ashley bustles with shops, salons, restaurants and bars.

LIVING IN

West Ashley

One of the first suburbs has old plantations, visionary greenway

T

he area west of the Ashley

New residential development has continued

River in Charleston is home to

in recent years, especially past the western

some of the area’s oldest sub-

boundary of Interstate 526, in neighborhoods

urban neighborhoods and, a

like Shadowmoss and Carolina Bay.

little farther out, some of the newest. West Ashley, as it’s called, also features a

Long-ago residents of West Ashley have left behind several historic plantations and

range of old and new shopping centers and

gardens that have been preserved and are

restaurants, historic plantations and other

open for tours. Magnolia Plantation, Middle-

Hidden art

attractions, and a unique outdoor walking trail.

ton Place and Drayton Hall Plantation allow

Neighborhoods closest to the Charleston

visitors to learn about the architecture and

Stroll Avondale and you’ll find art commissioned by the chART Outdoor Initiative & Gallery, which consists of public community art spaces supporting contemporary artists working in the visual arts.

peninsula were built in the 1920s through the

life of South Carolinians in the 1700s and the

1950s. Among the older subdivisions are Old

centuries following.

Windermere, Byrnes Down, Moreland, Avondale and The Crescent. Development continued through the 1970s and 1980s in neighborhoods farther out from the city, such as Northbridge, Northbridge Terrace and Wespanee Plantation.

50

| LIVING IN WEST ASHLEY

MOVING IN

All phone numbers are 843 area code, except where noted

West Ashley/City of Charleston ..............724-3765 www.charleston-sc.gov Charleston County School District ........937-6300 City of Charleston building permits ..... 724-7320

Charleston Water System ............................727-6800 S.C. Electric & Gas Co. ...........................800-251-7234 Trash ..............................................................................724-7364 Recycling (Charleston County).....................720-7111


Photo/Ryan Wilcox/Charleston Regional Business Journal

LOCAL

KNOWLEDGE West Ashley Greenway The West Ashley Greenway is an 8.25-mile tree-lined partially-paved hiking and bike trail just south of the Windemere Shopping Center and connects to John’s Island with marsh views. A favorite among local mountain bikers. This photograph was taken towards the southern end of it.

LIVING IN HISTORIC CHARLESTON |

51


Photo/Kathy Allen/Charleston Regional Business Journal

THE MUST

DO’S Photo/Julia Lynn Photography

Spoletto Finale Middleton Place has historically been the location for the Wells Fargo Festival Finale of Charleston’s 17-day Spoleto Festival. Guests pack a picnic and explore Middleton Place’s landscaped gardens while local and regional bands play throughout the afternoon. Photo/Gavin Lyons

Photo/Avondale 5K board

Another historic destination in West Ashley is Charles Towne Landing, the site of the English settlement that would become the Carolina colony. The 664-acre attraction is a state park. When getting around by car, main highway corridors in West Ashley are U.S. 17, called Savannah Highway, and S.C. 61, also known as Ashley River Road. The two highways are

Avondale 5k This popular annual neighborhood 5k winds through the scenic Avondale subdivision in West Ashley with a

Boulevard. Interstates 526 and 26 connect West Ashley to North Charleston to the north and Mount Pleasant to the east. For those interested in seeing West Ashley

Shopping is plentiful in West Ashley. The area is home to Citadel Mall, one of the area’s two enclosed malls. Shopping centers anchored

lively after party at the Triangle Char +

by foot or bike, the West Ashley Greenway is a

by national retailers and restaurants surround

Bar parking lot. Strollers and dogs are

good option. This 10.5-mile walking and biking

Citadel Mall, which is located just inside I-526

welcome! The race benefits Charleston’s

path weaves among residential areas and

near the intersection of U.S. 17 and Sam Rit-

Charles Webb Center, which serves children

shopping centers and through small marshy

tenberg Boulevard. West Ashley also includes

areas and swaths of trees. The trail starts near

eclectic shopping strips filled with many locally

the South Windermere Shopping Center and

owned stores and eateries, such as the Avondale

stretches to Johns Island.

shopping area along U.S. 17.

with special needs.

52

connected by S.C. 7, also called Sam Rittenberg

The Oak Barrel Tavern is a regular stop for the residents of the Avond ale neighborhood.

| LIVING IN WEST ASHLEY


Photo/Ryan Wilcox/Charleston Regional Business Journal

LIVING IN

James Island and Folly Beach Looking for the beauty of nature? You’ll find it here.

J

 ames Island and Folly Beach, located just south of Charleston, represent a distinctly independent streak in the Lowcountry character. Long a semi-rural area, James Island has seen its population boom since the early 1990s and the opening of the James Island Connector, a bridge that links the island directly to the Charleston peninsula. James Island is bounded by Wappoo Creek, Charleston Harbor and the Stono and Folly rivers. Its network of marshes, inlets, sounds and creeks gives it one of the most scenic natural environments in the region. It was a strategic key to Charleston during the Revolutionary and Civil wars.

The Confederate attack on Fort Sumter began in 1861 with a shot from the island’s Fort Johnson, modern-day home of a stateof-the-art government marine science research facility. McLeod Plantation, with its alley of slave cabins visible from Folly Road near the foot of the Wappoo Bridge, stands near the entrance to the private Country Club of Charleston. The Riverland Terrace neigh-

MOVING IN

borhood, located between Maybank Highway and Wappoo Creek, features enormous live oaks and deeply shaded lanes. A nearby commercial district offers fine restaurants, antiques and the Terrace Theatre, the area’s only art-house cinema. Recreational options include the Charleston Municipal Golf Course and James Island County Park, a 643-acre facility with trails, fishing docks, a 50-foot

All phone numbers are 843 area code, except where noted

Town of James Island .........................................795-4141 www.jamesislandsc.us City of Folly Beach .............................................588-2447 www.cityoffollybeach.com Charleston County School District ........937-6300 City of Charleston building permits ..... 724-7320

Charleston Water System ............................727-6800 S.C. Electric & Gas Co. ...........................800-251-7234 Berkeley Electric Cooperative...................559-2458 James Island trash .........................795-9060, ext. 118 Folly Beach Public Works .....588-2447, ext. 1832 Recycling (Charleston County).....................720-7111

LIVING IN JAMES ISLAND AND FOLLY BEACH |

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Photo/Charleston County Parks

THE MUST

DO’S Photo/Vive Media

Folly festivals Folly Beach street festivals are held throughout the year. The Sea & Sand Festival, FollyGras, Taste of Folly, Follypalooza and the Follywood Oyster Roast are major events that feature live music, food and art vendors.

the holidays with more than three miles of 700 light displays, named one of the best in the country.

LOCAL

KNOWLEDGE Milton P. Demetre Park Formerly known as 'Sunrise Park' is located on James Island and has sweeping views of the harbor.

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| LIVING IN JAMES ISLAND AND FOLLY BEACH

ntures

The James Island County Park lights up for

n Outdoor Adve

Photo/Piwakawaka Photo

Holiday Festival of Lights

climbing wall, kayak rentals, picnic areas and a campground. The park’s Splash Zone water park is extremely popular with families during summer months, and the county park’s annual Holiday Festival of Lights attracts motorists on winter nights. James Island ends where Folly Road enters a marsh marked by the landmark “Folly Boat,” an abandoned hull that was deposited on the roadside by Hurricane Hugo. Locals have been painting messages on it ever since. Another treasured local landmark – Bowen’s Island Restaurant – sits on a tidal creek in a hummock of trees in the vast marsh between James Island and Folly Beach. Folly Beach calls itself “The Edge of America,” and the seven-mile island certainly seems to take the nickname seriously. The island celebrates its bars, fishing shacks, funky eateries and nefarious characters, and East Coast surfers swarm to the spot they call “The Washout” whenever an Atlantic swell pushes big waves ashore. A county-run 1,000-foot fishing pier

Photo/Charlesto

Above: James Island County Park swing. Right: A dolphin swims by the Morris Island lighthouse.

Each benefits a local non-profit.

marks the center of the island. The undeveloped eastern end of the island was the longtime site of a Coast Guard station. Morris Island, where the Union assault depicted in the movie "Glory" took place, lies across the inlet from the old station. The island has been heavily eroded, and the Morris Island Lighthouse has been surrounded by water for decades. Long described as the Lowcountry’s “poor man’s beach,” Folly’s signature shacks ceased to be affordable escapes for drifters, starving artists and beach bums a decade ago. Nonetheless, the island’s 2,300 yearround residents preserve its identity as a place where corporate homogenization hasn’t taken over – yet.


LIVING IN

Johns and Wadmalaw Islands These islands are among the Lowcountry’s last rural sea islands and where much of the area’s organic produce is grown. Photo/Liz Segrist/Charleston Regional Business Journal

J

The Angel Oak is estimated to be 1,500 years old.

The Charleston Executive Airport is a small facility that offers convenience to resort visitors and flying lessons for locals. A 16,000-square-foot library, completed in 2004, is the county’s largest branch. Much of the development on the island today is upscale, including The Preserve at Fenwick Hall. Other developments offer a mixture of affordable and luxury choices, varying from waterfront lots to Charlestonstyle urbanism to custom rural seclusion. The island’s central commercial district is located at the intersection of Main, Maybank and Bohicket roads. Johns Island is a stronghold of Gullah culture and holds a special place in the Lowcountry’s civil rights history. Native son Esau Jenkins, despite no formal education beyond fourth grade, understood in the 1950s and ‘60s that the future of the island’s black communities would depend on bootstrapping programs for their education

MOVING IN

and health. He and others founded “Citizenship Schools” that helped residents — many illiterate — qualify to vote, and their Sea Island Health Corp. brought doctors and nurses to rural corners that had never received proper care.

Photo/ Waynes View Photography

ohns Island, the Lowcountry’s last remaining rural sea island, is a vast swath of land between James Island, the mainland west of Charleston and the private barrier islands of Kiawah and Seabrook Its future is one of the most important undecided questions in the Lowcountry. The island grows much of the area’s fresh organic produce and is home to numerous farms, nurseries, packing houses and produce stands. And though its main transportation arteries are heavily trafficked, the island has miles of long, quiet, tree-lined roads that attract Lowcountry bicyclists. Traffic remains one of the island’s most pressing issues. The debate continues, as opponents don’t want to trade their rural way of life for the suburban development better roads would bring. The island boasts The Angel Oak, believed to be one of the oldest trees east of the Mississippi. Said to be an estimated 1,500 years old, the oak is a graceful giant, 65 feet tall and more than 25 feet around. Owned by the city of Charleston, it is open to the public. Another local gem is the village of Rockville at the end of neighboring Wadmalaw Island. This remote, picturesque village plays host each August to the Rockville Regatta, an event that dates back more than 100 years and marks the end of the Lowcountry’s competitive sailing season. Horses raised for work, transportation or recreation have long been a part of life on the island. The public Mullet Hall Equestrian Center at Johns Island County Park (a largely undeveloped 738-acre tract) provides facilities for horse shows, plus 20 miles of riding trails.

Charleston Tea Plantation Hundreds of thousands of tea bushes stretch out acre after acre at this working tea plantation. Tours of the tea factory and a trolley tour let guests get a peek at the America’s only tea factory and the tea-making process.

All phone numbers are 843 area code, except where noted

City of Charleston ............................................... 724-3745 www.charleston-sc.gov Charleston County School District ........937-6300 City of Charleston building permits ..... 724-7320 Charleston Water System ............................727-6800

St. John’s Water Co..............................................559-0186 S.C. Electric & Gas ....................................800-251-7234 Berkeley Electric Cooperative...................559-2458 Republic Services (trash)............................. 937-4048 Recycling (Charleston County): ..................720-7111 LIVING IN JOHNS AND WADMALAW ISLANDS |

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LIVING IN

Daniel Island

A master plan guides development of luxury neighborhoods

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| LIVING IN DANIEL ISLAND

Photos/Daniel Island Real Estate

T

he Lowcountry’s newest address is also one of its most attractive. Daniel Island has grown from an undeveloped expanse of forest and farmland into a thriving community of more than 5,000. The 4,000-acre island at the tip of the Cainhoy Peninsula was essentially uninhabited when Interstate 526 crossed it in the 1990s, linking the land between the Wando and Cooper rivers to the mainland for the first time. Development, guided by a master plan worked out in conjunction with the Guggenheim Foundation (which owned the island from 1947 to 1997), began in the late 1990s. Today, the Daniel Island community spans nine neighborhoods, a central commercial district, more than 400 acres of public parkland, two golf courses, a professional soccer stadium and a world-class tennis facility. Daniel Island is incorporated into the city of Charleston, even though it is located in Berkeley County and residents must pass through Mount Pleasant or North Charleston to reach it. Though generally considered a bedroom community, the island’s daytime population swells to an estimated 8,500, thanks to employers such as software firm Blackbaud and the 34-acre campus of Bishop England High School, which moved to the island in 1998 after more than 80 years in downtown Charleston. Home prices range from the $300,000s to more than $3 million, with select lots selling for upwards of $1 million. Condominiums are available for less than $200,000, but the island’s network of public spaces, services, shopping, education and amenities generally tends to put a premium on property values. Plans point

toward an eventual population of 15,000. Life on the island benefits from 23 miles of shoreline, much of it open to the public, and the extensive system of parks and docks give neighborhoods plenty of public spaces and room to socialize. The island’s event calendar gets more crowded every year, thanks in large part to the Family Circle Tennis Center, which hosts the world-class Volvo Car Open Women's Tennis Association tournament in April, and Blackbaud Stadium, home pitch for the Charleston Battery Soccer Club. These modern facilities are increasingly in demand for concerts and festivals.

MOVING IN

LOCAL

KNOWLEDGE

Osprey Osprey are large raptors that nest near water. Several osprey nests are located on Daniel Island, prompting The Daniel Island School to name the bird as its mascot. The Daniel Island Garden Club built an “Osprey Trail” garden oasis with an 11-foot-tall copper osprey sculpture for the community to enjoy.

All phone numbers are 843 area code, except where noted

Daniel Island/City of Charleston .............724-3765 www.danielisland.com Berkeley County School District ............899-8600 City of Charleston building permits ..... 724-7320

Charleston Water System ............................727-6800 S.C. Electric & Gas Co. ...........................800-251-7234 Trash (City of Charleston) .............................724-7364 Recycling (Berkeley County).......................719-2383


LIVING IN HISTORIC CHARLESTON |

57


Photo/Kiawah Island Resort

Kiawah Island’s Ocean Course played host to the 2012 PGA Championship and will do so again in 2021.

LIVING IN

Kiawah and Seabrook Islands Life on private islands is like vacation every day

K

iawah and Seabrook islands, two private resort communities south of Charleston, offer a quality of life that includes world-class golf, upscale homes and breathtaking views of the Lowcountry’s landscape. Pottery found on Kiawah Island dates as far back as 4,000 years. Ownership of the island changed many times through the years from the Indians to the British and then to some of the earliest “Charlestonians.” Its history is linked to names you may already be familiar with: Gibbes, Vanderhorst and Middleton, to name a few. Development of the island loosely began in the 1950s when C.C. Royal, who made his fortune in the lumber business, purchased

58

the island. He built a home for his wife and seven children and then sold 65 lots to friends. In 1974, the Kuwait Investment Co. purchased the island from Royal’s heirs and created a land plan that consisted of a resort and residential development. Kiawah Development Partners is currently the master developer of the island. Approximately 1,200 full-time residents inhabit the island, but the population swells in the spring and summer when about 600

| LIVING IN KIAWAH AND SEABROOK ISLANDS

MOVING IN

Strand feeding Bottlenose dolphin along the Kiawah River feed on mullet by herding them on to shores and sandbars. The dolphins then launch themselves on shore to feed on their catch.

All phone numbers are 843 area code, except where noted

Town of Kiawah Island .................................... 768-9166 www.kiawahisland.org Town of Seabrook Island .................................768-9121 www.townofseabrookisland.org Charleston County School District ........937-6300 Town of Kiawah building permits .......... 768-9166

Kiawah Island Utility (water)......................768-0641 Berkeley Electric Cooperative...................559-2458 Kiawah trash and recycling ....................... 768-9166 Seabrook Island building permits............768-9121 Seabrook Island Utility Commission......768-0102


Photo/Seabrook Island Club

THE MUST

DO’S Photo/Chris M Rogers Photography

Horseback riding The Equestrian Center on Seabrook Island offers a rare opportunity for visitors and

Seabrook Island is carefully designed community, offering a diverse collection of home styles with golf, marsh and luxurious oceanfront views.

has evolved into a private oceanfront community. There are more than 2,500 properties on Seabrook Island and more than 700 families live on the island year round. There is no shortage of things to do on Seabrook Island, from golfing on two private courses, to playing tennis, horseback riding and boating. There are several restaurants to choose from also. Inhabitants of both islands place a high value on the environment and have made sure that the buildings are constructed in harmony with the natural surroundings. There are also plenty of opportunities to observe and study wildlife, whether strolling on the beach or exploring the waterways via kayak or canoe. Just 30 minutes away from Charleston, the islands are close enough for a day trip into the city. However, if shopping is your pleasure, there are several opportunities for excursions on both islands, as well as at Freshfields Village on neighboring Johns Island. Freshfields Village offers a variety of stores, from sporting goods to groceries, as well as several restaurants.

beautiful trails along the beach. A full-service Equestrian Center caters to riders of all skill levels.

LOCAL

KNOWLEDGE Photo/Charleston Regional Busines Journal

of the island’s properties are rented. The island is also home to the Kiawah Island Golf Resort, which includes five public golf courses and two private courses; The Sanctuary, a AAA Five Diamond hotel; an award-winning spa; and several restaurants. In August 2012, the PGA Championship was played at the Kiawah Island Golf Resort. The PGA major brought more than $200 million of economic impact to the area, including millions of dollars worth of worldwide exposure. Outside of golf, the island also caters to tennis players and is a destination for runners each year during the annual Kiawah Island Marathon, held each December. Seabrook Island, just across the marsh from Kiawah Island, is a 2,200-acre mix of forest, salt marshes and beach. The island was discovered by settlers in 1666 and indigo and rice were its first cash crops. The island was first called Jones Island, then Simmons Island and finally Seabrook when it was purchased by William Seabrook in 1816. Originally developed in 1972 as a resort and conference center location, the island

residents to ride horseback on three miles of

Rory McIlroy won the 2012 PGA Championship.

PGA bragging rights Kiawah Island is home to five championship golf courses that draw a number of high-profile golfers. The PGA Championship will return to Kiawah’s Ocean Course in 2021. The Ocean Course is one of only four courses in the U.S. to have hosted every major PGA event.

LIVING IN KIAWAH AND SEABROOK ISLANDS |

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Photo/Provided by WestRock

Summers Corner, in the new Nexton development, features a 95-acre freshwater lake accessible to residents.

LIVING IN

Summerville

Town is alive with family friendly festivals and natural beauty

S

ummerville is a community that still gathers at Town Square to celebrate the 4th of July and a place where Friday night high school football draws a spirited crowd. In early December, the holiday season is ushered in with an annual Christmas tree lighting downtown. In this modern Southern city, progress and preservation are inextricably intertwined, making it a dynamic and diverse place to live and work. Downtown Restoration, Enhancement and Management (D.R.E.A.M.), a nonprofit group spearheaded by local residents, has done much since its inception in 1992 to bring focus and support to Summerville and its historic downtown district. The commercial area is bustling again with unique

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| LIVING IN SUMMERVILLE

shops, a local bookstore, art galleries and eateries. Guerin’s Pharmacy — the oldest still operating in South Carolina — contains antiques, a full-service pharmacy and an old-style soda fountain that serves drug store classics such as cherry and vanilla Cokes, milkshakes and chili dogs. The Summerville Dorchester Museum documents cultural and natural history with a film and exhibits of the colonial settlers, early churches and architecture. More than 700 buildings have been placed on the Na-

MOVING IN

tional Register of Historic Places. Summerville traces its roots to the 1780s, when it was known as Pineland Village to plantation owners wanting to escape the swamp fever and insects of the Lowcountry summer. After being deemed by medical specialists in 1899 as one of the best areas in the world for lung and throat disorders, the area experienced a golden era, with special lodgings and resorts springing up to accommodate pulmonary patients. The most famous was Pine Forest

All phone numbers are 843 area code, except where noted

Town of Summerville..........................................851-4201 www.summerville.sc.us Dorchester District 2 www.dorchester2.k12.sc.us

Building permits....................................................851-4220 Commissioners of Public Works............... 871-0810 S.C. Electric & Gas Co. ...........................800-251-7234 Waste Pro (trash)..................................................619-0800


Photo/Town of Summerville

THE MUST

DO’S Photo/Summerville Family YMCA

Flowertown Festival One of the largest arts and crafts festivals in the Southeast, The Flowertown Festival is held on a three-day weekend every spring

Morning light illuminates downtown’s storefronts.

with thousands of festival-goers and over 200 artists set up in Azalea Park among the blooming azaleas and wisteria. The charity festival supports the Summerville YMCA.

LOCAL

KNOWLEDGE Photo/Kim McManus/Charleston Regional Business Jounral

Largest glass of sweet tea Summerville was awarded a trademark to be considered the birthplace of sweet tea, and the town continues to attempt to break its own Guinness World Record for the largest glass of sweet tea made from scratch—more than 1,400 gallons of the drink broke the record in June 2015. The goal for 2016? 2,400 gallons.

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| LIVING IN SUMMERVILLE

Inn, which sometimes served as the Winter White House for Presidents William Howard Taft and Theodore Roosevelt. Today, Summerville is Dorchester County’s largest city with an estimated population of more than 46,000. Named one of the 50 best small towns in America by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine, Summerville offers residents the best of both worlds in terms of quality of life and housing. Known for its stately Victorian homes, the city also offers the full spectrum of new construction options attracting families, business and military personnel to the area. Dubbed “Flower Town in the Pines,” Summerville still gets high marks for natural attributes. The Flowertown Festival draws more than 200,000 people every spring for a weekend dedicated to artisans and crafts amid the profusion of blooms in Azalea Park. This event is consistently ranked one of the Top 20 events in the Southeast by the Southeast Tourism Society. Azalea Park, a 12-acre oasis of ponds, paths, fountains and tennis courts, has also been the site for one of South Carolina’s

premiere outdoor arts events, Sculpture in the South. This exhibit and sale of original sculpture typically features more than 30 artists from across the country representing a range of sculpture from Western to whimsical. During the event, patrons also can explore 22 permanent sculptures displayed in public places in Summerville. Summerville residents can take to the trails at nearby Givhans Ferry State Park, on the former site of an 18th-century ferry that once crossed the Edisto River. The park features camping, cabins, fishing, picnic areas and river access. At Francis Beidler Forest in Four Holes Swamp, shaded boardwalks wind through ancient groves of towering cypress and Pleistocene swamps. The forest — a National Natural Landmark — is protected and managed by the National Audubon Society and is the largest remaining virgin stand of bald cypress in the world. A popular destination for visitors, Summerville has nine hotels. It also has seven bed and breakfasts, including the Linwood Bed & Breakfast, built in 1883 by Julia Drayton Hastie, heiress to Magnolia Plantation. The Victorian mansion is surrounded


Photo/Provided by WestRock

The Parks Apartments at Nexton are within walking distance of corporate offices, the Brown Family Park, and the Carolina Ale House.

Photo/Provided by WestRock

by nearly two acres of award-winning landscaped gardens. The mansion itself is appointed with heart of pine floors, high ceilings, chandeliers, Victorian bays and triple sash windows, many with original glass. Summerville has plenty of fine and fun dining options. Across the board, restaurants use style and originality to create menus that appeal to an array of tastes. Summerville’s eateries include both chain and independently owned restaurants. Downtown, you’ll find an area called Short Central, a cobblestoned, pedestrian-only streetscape with shops and cafés just a block from Town Hall. For those interested in stocking up on ingredients to create a feast at home, Summerville’s farmers market is a popular event. It runs weekly on Saturdays from April to November and is located near Town Hall. The market features artisanal foods and local produce. With many established neighborhoods and communities, an up-and-coming neighborhood is Nexton, a 4,500-acre master planned community, located at Hwy 17A and I-26 in Summerville that includes offices, hotels, apartments, schools, parks and

The Corner House Cafe and Information Studio at newly-built Summers Corner provides a place for residents, newcomers, and people in the community to gather, learn about Summers Corner, and enjoy fresh, local food and beverages.

trails, and several options for dining, entertainment and shopping. The community is South Carolina's first gigabit community, which means internet speeds will be 100 times faster than the average fixed highspeed Internet connection, a plus for businesses that want to send large files quickly. Nexton was selected as the 2015 Community of the Year by the Charleston Home Builders Association. Adding to the town’s many things to do and places to go, Summerville officials have created a Sweet Tea Trail that promises an adventure in Southern hospitality through

history, food and shopping. The trail tells the story of sweet tea’s birth in Summerville. It’s said that tea plants landed in Summerville in the late 1700s by way of the Ashley River. Andre Michaux, a French explorer and botanist, imported them along with varieties of camellias, gardenias and azaleas near Charleston at what is now known as Middleton Place Plantation. In 1888, a wealthy scientific philanthropist acquired 600 acres in Summerville and established the Pinehurst Tea Plantation. The plants were eventually moved to a spot on Wadmalaw Island, which is now known as the Charleston Tea Plantation and is owned by Bigelow. Officials are in the process of planning a Sweet Tea Festival to celebrate Southern traditions and, of course, sweet tea. From its Friday night football games to its annual festivals, Summerville is a place where rich history and progress mix seamlessly. Leaders focus on stimulating economic development in and around Summerville while making sure the Flower Town in the Pines does not lose its small-town charm.

LIVING IN SUMMERVILLE |

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Photo/Ryan Wilcox/Charleston Regional Business Journal

The Old Santee Canal Park commemorates the historic canal system built from 1793 to 1800.

LIVING IN

Moncks Corner

Quiet, close-knit community also home to Google’s data center

M

oncks Corner was a colonial trading post with a history that dates back to 1735. It was founded by landowner Thomas Monck, for whom the town was named. In 1853, Moncks Corner became an official scheduled stop on the North East Railroad and two buildings were subsequently built to accommodate freight and passengers. The original train depot was destroyed by fire in 1915, and the existing building was constructed at the current site. The train depot was an important social landmark for residents in the early 1900s, just as it is today. Officials renovated the historic building in 2000 to serve as the town’s visitor and cultural center. Special events

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| LIVING IN MONCKS CORNER

are held at the depot throughout the year, including the Fourth of July Street Dance and Christmas festivities. Residents also can rent it for special events. Moncks Corner today has more than 9,000 residents and is the Berkeley County seat. The original downtown is populated with progressive shops and restaurants and the town has positioned itself for growth. Moncks Corner is home to the corporate office for Santee Cooper, a state-owned utility company. The area was selected by Google in

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2007 as the site for a $600 million investment for two data centers. Early in 2013, Google announced another $600 million investment to expand its current campus. With the area’s growth, Moncks Corner’s neighborhoods offer residents a convenient location in a quiet community. Neighborhoods include Cypress Ridge, Fairmont South, Stoney Creek and Foxbank Plantation. Foxbank Plantation was developed on a former rice plantation of the same name. It spans 800 acres and includes communi-

All phone numbers are 843 area code, except where noted

Town of Moncks Corner...................................719-7900 www.townofmonckscorner.sc.gov Berkeley County School District.............899-8600 www.berkeley.k12.sc.us Moncks Corner building permits..............719-7900

Berkeley Electric Cooperative.....................761-8200 Public Works Commission.............................719-7965 Berkeley County Water & Sanitation...572-4400 Santee Cooper Electric Utility....................761-8000 Republic Services (recycling)................... 937-4048


Photos/Palmetto Trail

THE MUST

DO’S Photo/Santee Cooper

The Lake Moultrie Passage of the Palmetto Trail offers beautiful views of the lake as well as primitive campsites for hikers and bikers to enjoy.

tour the monastery and gardens, or take part in spiritual retreats. World-class waterskiing, wind surfing, sailing, boating and fishing are popular on Lake Moultrie, as well as the state’s largest lake, Lake Marion. The Palmetto Trail, a recreational trail that stretches statewide, takes trekkers off the beaten path for a closer experience with Southern fauna and wildlife. In addition to these options, the town has built a 52-acre recreation complex opened in 2015 which now holds four lighted baseball fields, paved parking, a concession stand/ press box, event signs, paved access road, an irrigation system and walking trails. The complex is also home to the Moncks Corner Farmers Market from 3-7 p.m. Thursdays through December. The town invested $5.4 million into phase one of the center with future plans for tennis courts and a recreation center with a basketball court, swimming pool, jogging track and community rooms. Picnic areas and playgrounds are also planned for the complex. The town’s close-knit community is looking ahead by focusing on maintaining a balance between continued growth and the preservation of its cultural amenities and small town character.

This popular event includes a driving tour of dozens of holiday light displays, a Holiday Fair and “Tinsel Trot” Holiday Fun Run. A car admission fee of $5 goes to local charities. Presented by Santee Cooper, the lights are fully powered with renewable energy from Santee Cooper’s Green Power program.

LOCAL

KNOWLEDGE Photo/City of Goose Creek

ty lakes, ponds and plenty of green space. Amenities include a swimming pool, parks and walking paths. A Foxbank Elementary School is set to open in 2018. There are several options for schools in Moncks Corner. Students attend public schools within the Berkeley County School District, which received 22 Palmetto Gold and Silver awards for excellence in for the 2014-15 school year. Private schools also are available. Moncks Corner’s proximity to area attractions, parks and more make it a match for residents who enjoy outdoor living. Old Santee Canal Park commemorates America’s first summit canal, which began operating in 1800. In addition to tours of the historic site, the park features the Berkeley County Museum and Heritage Center. Exhibits and artifacts portray the region’s history, including that of Brig. Gen. Francis Marion, who was also known as the “Swamp Fox” and was born near Moncks Corner. The museum also includes the history of Native Americans, colonial life, the Civil War and the Francis Marion National Forest. Mepkin Abbey, a former plantation perched on the river’s bluffs, now serves as home to a Trappist monastery with a garden and chapel open to the public. Visitors can

Lights at Santee Cooper

Train Depot The historic train depot was once the center of the Town of Moncks Corner. Mail and news from the outside would reach the depot, then was distributed to the rest of the area. It was also a popular platform for farmers to market their foods. The building was renovated in 2000 and now houses the Town’s Visitor and Cultural Center and gift shop at 100 Behrman St. LIVING IN MONCKS CORNER |

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Photo/City of Goose Creek

The Goose Creek Fall Festival is a draw for families and benefits a local food bank.

LIVING IN

Goose Creek

New homes spring up where rice plantations once ruled

T

he magazine Bloomberg Businessweek reported in 2012, “Goose Creek is on our list of best places to raise kids for the second year in a row. There are more than a few reasons. This quiet, pretty suburb of Charleston has much to offer, from great parks to solid schools, to rolling bike trails.” Indeed, Goose Creek, located about 20 minutes outside Charleston, has become a very desirable place to live in the Lowcountry. It ranks as the state’s 12th largest municipality with more than 39,000 residents. While the exact origin of the city’s name is unknown, this area of the Lowcountry has been called Goose Creek since the late 1600s. Early settlers were planters from

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| LIVING IN HISTORIC CHARLESTON

Barbados who brought with them knowledge of various crops, including rice and indigo. These crops were successfully grown in the region for more than 100 years. Fast forward to 1961, when the city of Goose Creek was incorporated and farmlands in the area began to be sold and subdivided to accommodate the fast-growing area and subsequent housing boom. Today Goose Creek is the most densely populated city in Berkeley County. Its easy

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access to I-26 and its proximity to Charleston continue to make it a popular bedroom community in the region. Well-known housing developments include Crowfield Plantation and Cane Bay Plantation. Crowfield, a former rice plantation, spans 382 acres and includes residential housing, as well as commercial development, churches and schools. Its recreation amenities include a golf course and country club, lakes, hiking and biking trails, and recreational areas.

All phone numbers are 843 area code, except where noted

City of Goose Creek............................................ 797-6220 www.cityofgoosecreek.com Berkeley County School District.............899-8600 www.berkeley.k12.sc.us/ Building permits..............................797-6220, ext. 1100 Garbage......................................................................824-2200

Berkeley Electric Cooperative.....................761-8200 S.C. Electric & Gas......................................800-251-7234 Goose Creek water service...........797-6220, ext. 0 Berkeley County Water & Sanitation...572-4400 Charleston Water System ............................727-6800


Photo/City of Goose Creek

THE MUST

DO’S Photo/Berkeley County Chamber of Commerce

Goose Creek Fall Festival Thousands of residents and visitors attend Goose Creek is home to the Naval Weapons Station, which is part of the Lowcountry’s largest employer, Joint Base Charleston. The Naval Weapons Station employs nearly 13,500. The base is the command center for the U.S. Navy’s Nuclear Power Training program. Other major employers in Goose Creek include aluminum manufacturers Alcoa Mount Holly and JW Aluminum, and lighting manufacturer Quoizel Lighting. Quoizel, founded in 1930 in New York, relocated its headquarters to a state-of-the-art 500,000-square-foot facility in Goose Creek. Google built a $600 million data center in 2008 in Mount Holly, which is between Goose Creek and Moncks Corner. In 2013, the Internet search engine announced it would invest another $600 million to build a second data center. In addition to creating jobs, Google helped fund the city's free WiFi network that has been implemented at four locations in the county, including Central Avenue downtown. The free WiFi service complements improvements such as new sidewalks, buried power lines and street lamps downtown and encourages more growth in the area.

this popular, family-friendly event with live entertainment, vendors, a kids’ play area, climbing wall and plenty of food. Proceeds from the festival go to Helping Hands of Goose Creek. Held behind the Goose Creek municipal center on Highway 52 every October.

LOCAL

KNOWLEDGE Photo/City of Goose Creek

Cane Bay Plantation spans 4,500 acres and includes several neighborhoods — including Del Webb, an active senior living neighborhood — as well as schools, parks, playgrounds, athletic fields, hiking and biking trails, and retail centers. An up-and-coming neighborhood is Nexton, a 4,500-acre master planned development between Goose Creek and Summerville that will include offices, hotels, apartments, parks and trails, dining, entertainment and shopping. Opportunities for outdoor living in the Lowcountry are plentiful and Goose Creek is no different. The city’s recreation department has constructed several parks throughout the area featuring playgrounds, picnic areas and ball fields. Golf enthusiasts can enjoy 18 holes at Crowfield Golf and Country Club, which also has tennis and swimming. There also are plenty of activities within a short drive of Goose Creek. Soccer enthusiasts can enjoy a Charleston Battery game at Blackbaud Stadium, or tennis fans can watch the annual Volvo Car Open tennis tournament, held each spring at the Family Circle Tennis Center. Both stadiums are located on nearby Daniel Island.

Hiker biker trail A popular hiking and biking trail behind the City of Goose Creek Municipal Center draws a number of recreation enthusiasts. The trail encircles a lake behind the municipal center at 519 North Goose Creek Blvd. and connects to a trail that goes up Highway 52/ Goose Creek Blvd.

LIVING IN HISTORIC CHARLESTON |

67


Sports and Recreation O

ne of the best things about life in the Lowcountry is the myriad opportunities for outdoor activities. The weather is good most of the year, and sports and recreational activities are there for the taking. You can join an organized team or take up an individual activity, such as kayaking or paddle boarding. Every community in the Charleston area has a well- developed sports and recreation program. In the pages that follow, we tell you about the recreation offerings for each city and town, with some of the highlights of the year. There is also a listing of other recreational possibilities beyond the municipal departments, such as bocce, roller derby or rugby. So, pick your favorite and get out there and enjoy yourself!

In this section City of Charleston Recreation Department.................................. 70 Charleston County Park and Recreation Commission..............72 North Charleston Parks and Recreation.......................................73 Dog Parks...............................................................72 Mount Pleasant Recreation...........................74 Golf Courses.........................................................75 Dining Out..............................................................76 Places to Stay...................................................... 78 Alternative and Outdoor Venues................ 81 Arts Abound......................................................... 84 Attractions and Tours....................................... 88 Calendar of Events............................................ 93 Newcomer Information and Map.............. 96

Sponsored by

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| SPORTS AND RECREATION


Photo/City of Charleston Recreation Dept.

City of Charleston Recreation Department 823 Meeting St., Charleston, SC 29403 Laurie Yarbrough, director www.charleston-sc.gov check under departments tab for recreation The City of Charleston Recreation Department serves downtown Charleston, James Island, Johns Island, West Ashley and Daniel Island.

Sports offered: Soccer, tennis, football, baseball, softball, basketball, track, cross country, golf, wrestling, lacrosse, volleyball, aquatics, karate

Other activities: Cheerleading, gymnastics, double dutch, camps, dance, yoga, cooking, art, environmental education, therapeutic recreation, bocce, bowling, Ultimate Frisbee, fencing

Top three citywide events of the year

Easter Eggstravaganza: held near Easter; egg hunt, activities, games; Hampton Park

Adventure Out: free outdoor fitness events in parks and on the MUSC campus throughout the year; check out musc.edu/ohp/adventure-out for schedule

Trick or Treat in the Park: just before Halloween; wear costumes and trick or treat at decorated cars; Hampton Park

A few places to check out Park hours are dawn to dusk unless otherwise posted. Some of the city’s popular parks are:

 azel Parker Community H Center and Playground 70 E. Bay St. "Let's Play" and "Let's Create" family days

James Island Recreation Complex 1088 Quail Drive camps and classes, and sports for all ages

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| SPORTS AND RECREATION

Youth baseball and softball programs are offered in all areas.

I

n the Lowcountry, outdoor living is a special draw. You can go surfing, kayaking, fishing or biking – all in the same weekend. But outdoor recreation is just the start. When you move your family to a new community, a concern may be whether your new hometown offers the sports and recreational activities your family enjoys. In the Lowcountry, you will find most activities are available, even some you might not expect, such as lacrosse and ice hockey. This section includes a listing of the offerings by the major parks and recreation departments in the area. The largest are City of Charleston, Mount Pleasant and North Charleston, but smaller departments such as Summerville and Isle of Palms also have a lot to offer. While recreation departments are set up to serve the residents of their communities, most allow non-residents to register for programs for an added fee. Charleston County Park and Recreation Commission provides mostly indi-

vidual park-based activities, such as kayaking, climbing and water parks. The county does run team sports in some rural areas that aren’t served by other departments. Most parks offer programs for all ages, from preschool to senior adults. In general, permits are required to hold an event in a park; check with the local parks department to see what is needed. And if your interest runs to college or professional sports, the Charleston area has a lot to offer. Charleston Southern University, The Citadel and College of Charleston all have standout sports programs. The Lowcountry is home to three professional teams: the Charleston RiverDogs (baseball), a Class A affiliate of the New York Yankees; the Charleston Battery (soccer) of the United Soccer Leagues; and the South Carolina Stingrays (hockey), a member of the East Coast Hockey League affiliated with the Washington Capitals. And one more thing: Charlie is the mascot of the Riverdogs. (Photo/Charleston Riverdogs)


861 Riverland Drive, Charleston 29412 843-795-4386 Tom O’Rourke, executive director www.ccprc.com A clickable map is available at www.ccprc.com/index.aspx?NID=8 Charleston County Park and Recreation Commission provides park and recreation services but does not duplicate services provided by municipalities and other special recreation districts. The county commission has developed a countywide park system that emphasizes individual and family activities such as outdoor recreation, environmental education and public beach access. The commission runs rural recreation sports programs in areas not otherwise served at McClellanville, Johns Island and Hollywood.

Activities: Summer camps, water parks, climbing wall, geocaching, group and corporate services, nature and history programs, outdoor adventure, youth and school programs, swimming lessons and water safety

Top events Holiday Festival of Lights: family event held in November and December, James Island County Park

Charleston Sprint Triathlon Series: swim 600-yard freshwater lake; bike 12 miles; run 5K; separate dates in May, June, July and August; James Island County Park

Photo/Larry Monteith/Charleston Moves

Charleston County Park and Recreation Commission

Bird watching on Folly Beach

The Volvo Car Open tennis tournament brings women’s tennis greats to Daniel Island every spring. For outdoor fun, Folly Beach is considered a top surfing destination on the East Coast, and you can check conditions at its storied “Washout” via webcam. Kayaking in the blackwater rivers and swamps or quieter areas of Charleston Harbor is a favorite. Outfitters along Shem Creek in Mount Pleasant rent equipment. Recreational boating and sailing are local passions. Each April hundreds of sailors take to Charleston Harbor for Charleston Race Week, sponsored by the Charleston Ocean Racing Association. Deep sea fishing charters are available at Shem Creek and

A few places to check out

Dog Parks

Some of the most popular parks are:

City of Charleston

CawCaw Interpretive Center 5200 Savannah Highway, Ravenel 71 Harry Hallman Blvd.

Charleston County Photo/Charleston County Parks

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| SPORTS AND RECREATION

Ackerman Park Dog Run, 55 Sycamore Drive Bees Landing Recreation Complex, 1580 Ashley Gardens Blvd. Governor’s Park, 165 Fairbanks Oak Alley Hampton Park Dog Run, corner of Rutledge Avenue and Grove Street Hazel Parker Dog Run, 70 E. Bay St. James Island Recreation Complex, 1088 Quail Drive

James Island County Park, 871 Riverland Drive North Charleston Wannamaker County Park, 8888 University Blvd. Mount Pleasant Palmetto Islands County Park, 444 Needlerush Parkway All dogs must be up to date on vaccinations and must be under their owners’ supervision at all times.

rks

Mount Pleasant Pier

Here are some parks set up expressly for dogs and their owners.

ston County Pa

871 Riverland Drive, James Island camping, challenge course, climbing wall, water park

Photo/Charle

James Island County Park

other locations. Locals fish off piers at Folly Beach or the Memorial Waterfront Park in Mount Pleasant, or net crabs in tidal creeks. Running has grown in popularity since the founding of the Cooper River Bridge Run in 1978. The Bridge Run takes place each April, attracting world-class 10K runners and tens of thousands of amateur athletes and walkers. The race begins in Shem Creek and finishes in downtown Charleston. The area’s flat roads make for fast cycling. The Lowcountry hosts a series of popular cycling events, including group rides and races. So, test out your old favorites or try something new. It’s all here.


Photo/City of Charleston Recreation Dept.

North Charleston Parks and Recreation  2500 City Hall Lane North Charleston, S.C. 29406 843-740-5814 Ed Barfield, recreation director www.northcharleston.org North Charleston Parks and Recreation serves the city of North Charleston.

Sports offered: Softball, baseball, tennis, basketball, football, soccer, wrestling, volleyball, track and field

Activities: adult and senior fitness, after-school programs, aquatics, camps, ceramics, dance, disc golf, cheerleading

Top events Youth Pitch, Hit and Run: local competition held in April; winners advance to sectional competition The City of Charleston Swampfox Track Team hosts an annual meet each fall for school teams and individuals.

Other parks and recreation departments Isle of Palms Parks and Recreation

Hanahan Recreation and Parks 3100 Mabeline Road, Hanahan, SC 29410 www.cityofhanahan.com The department serves the city of Hanahan. Offered are basketball, football, baseball, softball, soccer, volleyball, as well as T-ball, cheerleading, tumbling, camps and fitness.

Summerville Parks and Recreation 843-851-5211 www.summerville.sc.gov

A few places to check out Among North Charleston’s gems are: Photo/City of North Charleston/Ryan Johnson

24 28th Ave., Isle of Palms, SC 29451 www.iop.net This department serves the Isle of Palms with baseball, softball, basketball, volleyball and soccer. Also offered are fitness, dance, taekwondo, gymnastics, and camps. Events include the Sand Sculpting Contest; the IOP Beach Run and the IOP Connector Run.

Among the sports offered are softball, baseball, tennis, football and cricket. The town has a major sports center, the Jerry Blackwell Sports Complex, at 515 W. Boundary St. Also unique are the Sawmill Branch Trail and a skate park.

Winter Wonderland: held in December for young children at Armory Park

Goose Creek Recreation 843-569-4242 www.goosecreekrecreation.com Goose Creek Recreation serves residents at Goose Creek Community Center and Casey Community Center, as well as a city pool and community parks. Activities offered include baseball, softball, golf, basketball, volleyball, football, cheerleading, camps, soccer and tennis.

Moncks Corner

Riverfront Park

Recreation Department 118 Carolina Ave., Moncks Corner 843-719-7900 The recreation department offers baseball, T-ball, football, soccer, cheerleading basketball and softball. The town recently opened a 52-acre recreation complex.

1001 Everglades Ave. On the Cooper River with beautiful views, a performance pavilion and meadow

Park Circle Butterfly Garden 4800 Park Circle Butterflies and plants, picnics, walking paths

SPORTS AND RECREATION |

73


Photo/College of Charleston

Mount Pleasant Recreation 3 91 Egypt Road, Mount Pleasant 29464 843-884-2528, ext. 109 Ken Ayoub, director www.tompsc.com Mount Pleasant Recreation Department serves the town of Mount Pleasant.

Sports offered: Tennis, baseball, basketball, golf, soccer, softball, track, cross country, football, lacrosse, volleyball, wrestling

Also: Camps, art, therapeutic recreation, music, aquatics, dance, skate park

Top events Spring Carnival: held in May, children’s activities; at Alhambra Hall Park

Blessing of the Fleet and Seafood Festival: held in April; blessing of the fleet ceremony, boat parade, seafood sampling, music, arts and crafts; Memorial Waterfront Park

 ld Village 5K Run, Walk, Stroller and O Dog Jog: held in November starting at Alhambra Hall Park; for all ages

Mount Pleasant Junior Regatta: late summer, Hobcaw Yacht Club

A few places to check out Some of Mount Pleasant’s best-loved parks are:

Alhambra Hall and Park 131 Middle St. Reception hall, waterfront green space, playground.

Park West Recreation Complex 1251 Park West Blvd. Lighted tennis courts, indoor pool, athletic fields, lake pavilion, walking trails.

The College of Charleston Sailing Center (www.sailing.cofc.edu) features more than 53 boats.

Other Sports and Rec Sports Event Organizers, Volunteer Groups, Training Resources and Sports Facilities

ARENA SPORTS

Arena City Soccer and Sports arenacitysoccerandsports.com

BADMINTON

Charleston Badminton Group www.facebook.com/ badmintoncharleston

BEACH VOLLEYBALL

Charleston Beach Volleyball & Social Club www.charlestonvolleyball.net

BOCCE

Chucktown Bocce League www.facebook.com/pages/ChucktownBocce-League/101115219964370

BOXING

Hurricane Boxing Club hurricaneboxing.net

DANCE

FENCING

Hyde Park Polo Club hydeparkpoloclub.com

Fencing Fight Club facebook.com/fenchingcharleston

ROCK CLIMBING (WALLS)

FOX HUNTING

Middleton Place Hounds Hunt Club www.middletonplacehounds.com

GYMNASTICS

Gymnastics Academy of Charleston www.gymnasticsacademyofcharleston. com

HIKING

West Ashley Greenway Bike/Hike Trail www.westashleygreenway.org

ICE HOCKEY /SKATING

Carolina Ice Palace www.carolinaicepalace.com.

LACROSSE

Summerville Miracle League www.summervillemiracleleague.org

DODGEBALL

| SPORTS AND RECREATION

Carolina Polo & Carriage Company www.cpcc.com/polo.htm

Charleston Shag Club www.charlestonshagclub.com

Special Olympics of the Lowcountry www.facebook.com/solowcountry

74

DOG SPORTS

Low Country Dog Agility Club www.lowcountrydogagility.com

Figure Skating Club of Charleston www.fscofcharleston.com

Charleston Miracle League www.charlestonmiracleleague.org

of Alhambra Hall.

Charleston Polo Club charlestonpoloclub.com

Ballroom Dance Club of Charleston www.ballroomdancecharleston.org

DISABLED SPORTS

The view from the porch

POLO

Arena City Soccer Sports arenacitysoccerandsports.com

Charleston Sports & Social Club www.charlestonssc.com

Charleston County PRC ccprc.com Coastal Climbing coastalclimbing.com

ROLLER DERBY

Lowcountry Highrollers Women’s Derby team www.lowcountryhighrollers.com

RUGBY

Charleston Outlaws Rugby Football Club www.charlestonrugby.com Charleston Hurricanes Women's Rugby www.charlestonwomensrugby.org

STAND UP PADDLE BOARDING www.charlestonsupsafaris.com

Charleston Hurricanes Men’s Lacrosse Club facebook.com/CharlestonHurricanesLAX Lowcountry Lacrosse Youth League www.lowlax.com

SURFING

MARTIAL ARTS

Charleston Ultimate Players Association www.charlestonultimate.com

OCEAN RACING

WAKEBOARDING & WATERSKIING

Charleston Martial Arts http://chas-ma.com Charleston Ocean Racing Association www.charlestonoceanracing.org

Southern South Carolina/ Eastern Surfing Association ssc.surfesa.org

ULTIMATE FRISBEE

Trophy Lakes Watersports Center www.trophylakes.com

Source: Charleston Area Sports Commission


Golf Courses Berkeley

Berkeley Country Club at Exeter Plantation 772 Exeter Plantation Road Moncks Corner, SC 29461 843-761-4653 www.berkeleycc.com Semiprivate with event facilities Crowfield Golf Club 300 Hamlet Circle Goose Creek, SC 29445 843-764-4618 www.crowfieldgolf.com Public Redbank Plantation Golf Course 2316 Redbank Road Goose Creek, SC 29445 843-764-7802 www.facebook.com/ redbankplantationgolfcourse Private Yeamans Hall Club 900 Yeamans Hall Road Hanahan, SC 29410 843-747-8855 www.yeamanshallclub.com Private

Charleston

Beresford Creek course at Daniel Island Club 600 Island Park Drive Daniel Island, SC 29492 843-971-3555 www.danielislandclub.com Private with event facilities Bulls Bay Golf Club 995 Bulls Bay Blvd. Awendaw, SC 29429 843-881-2223, ext. 14 www.bullsbaygolf.com Private Cassique 100 Old Cedar Lane Seabrook Island, SC 29455 843-768-5752 www.kiawahislandclub.com Private Charleston Municipal Golf Course 2110 Maybank Highway Charleston, SC 29412 843-795-6517 www.charleston-sc.gov/golf Public

Charleston National Country Club 1360 National Drive Mount Pleasant, SC 29466 843-884-3673 www.charlestonnationalgolf.com Charleston National Golf Club 1360 National Drive Mount Pleasant, SC 29466 843-884-4653 www.charlestonnationalgolf.com Semiprivate Coosaw Creek Country Club 4110 Club Course Drive North Charleston, SC 29420 Semiprivate with event facilities 843-767-9000 www.coosawcreek.com Cougar Point Golf Club, Kiawah Island Golf Resort 1 Sanctuary Beach Drive Kiawah Island, SC 29455 843-266-4020 kiawahresort.com Public resort with event facilities

Oak Point at Kiawah Island Golf Resort 4394 Hope Plantation Drive Kiawah Island, SC 29455 843-266-4100 kiawahresort.com Resort with event facilities

Turtle Point at Kiawah Island Golf Resort 1 Turtle Point Drive Kiawah Island, SC 29455 843-266-4050 www.kiawahresort.com Public resort with event facilities

The Ocean Course at Kiawah Island Golf Resort 1000 Ocean Course Drive Kiawah Island, SC 29455 843-266-4670 kiawahresort.com Public resort with event facilities

Wild Dunes Resort Harbor Course 5881 Palm Blvd. Isle of Palms, SC 29451 843-886-2004 www.wilddunes.com Resort with event facilities

Ocean Winds Golf Course 3772 Seabrook Island Road Seabrook Island, SC 29455 843-768-2529 www.discoverseabrook.com Private with event facilities Osprey Point at Kiawah Island Golf Resort 1 Sanctuary Beach Drive Kiawah Island, SC 29455 843-266-4640 www.kiawahresort.com

Country Club of Charleston 1 Country Club Drive Charleston, SC 29412 843-795-2312 www.countryclubofcharleston.com Private

Patriots Point Links 1 Patriots Point Road Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 843-881-0042 www.patriotspointlinks.com Public

Crooked Oaks Golf Course 3772 Seabrook Island Road Seabrook Island, SC 29455 843-768-2529 www.discoverseabrook.com Private with event facilities

Ralston Creek at Daniel Island Club 600 Island Park Drive Daniel Island, SC 29492 with event facilities 843-971-3555 www.danielislandclub.com Private

Dunes West Golf & River Club 3535 Wando Plantation Way Mount Pleasant, SC 29466 843-856-9000 www.duneswestgolfclub.com Semiprivate with event facilities The Golf Club at Briar’s Creek 4000 Briar’s Creek Lane Johns Island, SC 29455 843-768-3050 www.briarscreek.com Private The Links at Stono Ferry 4812 Stono Links Drive Hollywood, SC 29449 843-763-1817 www.stonoferrygolf.com Semiprivate

RiverTowne Country Club 1700 RiverTowne Country Club Drive Mount Pleasant, SC 29466 843-849-2400 www.rivertownecountryclub.com Semiprivate with event facilities Shadowmoss Plantation Golf Club 20 Dunvegan Drive Charleston, SC 29414 843-556-8251 www.shadowmossgolf.com Semiprivate with event facilities Snee Farm Country Club 1200 Club Drive Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 843-884-8571 www.sneefarmcc.com Private with event facilities

Wild Dunes Resort Links Course 1 Sundial Circle Isle of Palms, SC 29451 843-886-2002 www.wilddunes.com Resort with event facilities Wrenwoods Golf Club 100 Cusabee Trail, No. 601 Joint Base Charleston, SC 29404 843-963-1833 www.jbcharleston.com/wrenwoods-home Semiprivate

Dorchester

Candlelite Pavilion at Summerville Country Club 400 Country Club Blvd. Summerville, SC 29483 843-873-2210 www.summervillecountryclub.com Semiprivate The Golf Club at Wescott Plantation 5000 Wescott Club Drive Summerville, SC 29485 843-871-2135 wescottgolf.com Public with event facilities Legend Oaks Golf Club 118 Legend Oaks Way Summerville, SC 29485 843-821-4077 www.legendoaksgolf.com Semiprivate with event facilities Pine Forest Country Club 1000 Congressional Blvd. Summerville, SC 29483 843-851-1193 www.pineforestcountryclub.com Semiprivate Summerville Country Club, Miler Golf Course 400 Country Club Blvd. Summerville, SC 29483 843-873-2210 www.summervillecountryclub.com Semiprivate with event facilities

SPORTS AND RECREATION |

75


Photo/Poe’s Tavern

Nothing caps off a day on Sullivan’s Island like a burger from Poe’s Tavern.

» DINING OUT C harleston loves to eat well. The view is beautiful, the things to do are fun, the beach beckons – but soon after you get here (maybe even before), you’ll find yourself hungry. And luckily, there’s a world of good food to choose from. The signature dish of Charleston may be shrimp and grits. It’s so popular that most every restaurant has its own version, sometimes in a tomato sauce, other times in a cream sauce. The shrimp will be fresh from the sea and the grits ground in a nearby mill. It makes a filling meal that marries the two flavors perfectly. If grits aren’t on your menu of likes, then you might like to try Lowcountry boil. This hefty stew generally includes shrimp, sausage, corn and potatoes, but once again, everybody has their own version. Some

76

| DINING OUT

recipes include oysters, fish or mussels, depending on the season. In any event, when the concoction is turned hot and steaming out onto a sideboard, you’ll find your mouth watering. Speaking of oysters, there’s no better season of the year than oyster season – late fall through March – in our opinion. The plump bivalves roasted outside are the food of the gods. There’s just enough work involved to get them out of the shell. Immediately, you feel a connection to the sea. Seafood not your favorite? Then head out for barbecue. South Carolinians lay claim to originating mustard-based sauce, but many places offer a variety including vinegar-based and tomato-laden. The slowsmoked meat is the most important factor anyway.

If your passion is fried chicken, then you’re in luck. Southern home cooking restaurants and even pickup places pride themselves on the tastiness of their chicken. And you’ll want to pair it with fresh biscuits and sweet tea. Charleston is home to dozens of topnotch restaurants. Eating out or meeting friends for drinks is treated with reverence here. Whenever there’s a contest for the best city for food, Charleston is in the running. If you’re feeling like something more casual, we’ve got that too. There’s no shortage of bar and grill, coffee shop and drive-in eateries. And you won’t have to look far for food-related events. The Charleston Wine and Food Festival and Taste of Charleston are just two of many.


Photo/Edmunds Oast

Photo/Leon’s Fine Poultry & Oysters

The kitchen at Edmunds Oast opens right into the dining room. They also have 48 taps of craft beers, including some that are brewed on premises.

Chicken at Leon’s Fine Poultry & Oysters, a new favorite on upper King Street.

Photo/Liz Segrist/Charleston Regional Business Journal

Photo/Chrys Rynearson

People head to EVO Pizza in North Charleston for their award-winning pizza.

Carrie Morey sold her biscuits online for nine years before opening Callie’s Hot Little Biscuit on Upper King Street. DINING OUT |

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» PLACES TO STAY

C

harleston is a top travel destination – and that means plenty of places to stay the night when you’re visiting. You’ll find rooms available at historic inns and bed and breakfasts, beachfront resorts and everything in between. Wake to the sound of the ocean or the sight of yachts in the harbor.

Hotels

The Charleston area has the perfect accommodations for you and your family, whatever your needs. And should you want to plan your wedding in Charleston, as hundreds of people do every year, there’s a whole list of possible venues awaiting you. They are also available for family reunions, meetings

or conferences. In these pages, we give you a comprehensive list of hotels in the area, starting with those with the largest number of rooms. You’ll also find a list of the area’s alternative and outdoor venues for events. For more lists subscribe to:

Properties in the Charleston Area, Ranked by No. of Guest Rooms Phone / Website Email

General Manager/ Year Founded

Kiawah Island Golf Resort 1 Sanctuary Beach Drive Kiawah Island SC 29455

843-768-2121 www.kiawahresort.com reservations@kiawahresort.com

1976

Wild Dunes Resort 1 Sundial Circle Isle of Palms SC 29451

888-845-8880 www.wilddunesmeetings.com wilddunesmeetings@destinationhotels.com

Belmond Charleston Place 205 Meeting St. Charleston SC 29401

843-722-4900 www.belmond.com/charlestonplace -

Charleston Marriott 170 Lockwood Blvd. Charleston SC 29403

843-723-3000 www.marriottcharleston.com mhrs.chsmc.sales@marriott.com

Charleston Plaza Hotel 4770 Goer Drive North Charleston SC 29406

843-747-1900 www.thecharlestonplaza.com slynam@jhmhotels.com

Embassy Suites Airport/Convention Center 5055 International Blvd. North Charleston SC 29418

843-747-1882 www.embassysuitescharleston.com wade.bryant@jqh.com

The Sanctuary at Kiawah Island Golf Resort 1 Sanctuary Beach Drive Kiawah Island SC 29455

Property

www.CharlestonBusiness.com

# of Rooms # of Meeting Rooms Corporate Rate Hotel Amenities 1,500 20 $295

Terry Treuting, Brendon Bashford

525 15 $229

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, fitness center, spa, business center

Samantha Martin

435 32 $220

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, 24-hour room service, fitness center, spa, business center

Jessica Smithson

344 13 $179

On-site restaurant, pool, fitness center, business center

Younesse Alami

289 14 $119

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, airport shuttle, fitness center, business center

-

255 28 $169

On-site restaurant, pool, airport shuttle, fitness center, Joanie Cole free breakfast, business center

843-768-6000 www.kiawahresort.com reservations@kiawahresort.com

1972 1986 2007 1983 2000 2004

255 15 $383

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, 24-hour room service, airport shuttle, fitness center, spa, business center

Brendon Bashford

Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St. Charleston SC 29403

843-722-0600 www.francismarioncharleston.com info@thefrancismarion.com

1924

235 14 $159

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, fitness center, spa, business center

Caroline Bean, Jessica Cheney, Gillian Crum, Laney Talbert, Brittany O'Shaughnessy, Jennifer Jessup

The Mills House Wyndham Grand Hotel 115 Meeting St. Charleston SC 29401

843-577-2400 www.millshouse.com -

1853 843-577-2644 www.charlestondouebletree.com 1998 843-414-4900 www.hyattplacecharlestonhistoricdistrict.com -2015 843-722-7229 www.marriott.com/chscy chscy@jhmhotels.com 1997 843-556-7100 www.holiday-inn.com/chs-riverview rguinn@hiriverview.com 1971 843-556-5200 www.lq.com iqfdsrriverview@gmail.com 2007 843-308-9330 www.charlestonairport.hgi.com kelly.marhoefer@hilton.com 2002

216 10 $200

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, fitness center, business center

Sara Whitfield, Melissa Joseph

212 10 $0

-

Kate Neville

191 3 $379

Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, Kelsey Stoffel, Lauren Smith free breakfast, business center

179 1 $139

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, fitness center, business center

-

178 3 $149

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, fitness center, business center

NaDene Horry

175 $85

Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center

168 7 $129

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, airport shuttle, fitness center, business center

DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel & Suites Charleston, SC - Historic District 181 Church St. Charleston SC 29401 Hyatt Place Charleston - Historic 560 King St. Charleston SC 29403 Courtyard Charleston Waterfront 35 Lockwood Drive Charleston SC 29401 Holiday Inn Charleston Riverview 301 Savannah Highway Charleston SC 29407 La Quinta Inn Riverview 11 Ashley Pointe Drive Charleston SC 29407 Hilton Garden Inn Charleston Airport 5265 International Blvd. North Charleston SC 29418

Because of space constraints, only the top-ranked companies are printed. For a full list of participating companies, visit www.scbiznews.com/data. Although every effort is made to ensure accuracy, errors sometimes occur. Email additions or corrections to lists@scbiznews.com, fax to 843-849-3122 or go to www.tinyurl.com/joinourlists.

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Sales Manager

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, 24-hour room service, airport shuttle, fitness center, spa, free breakfast, business center

| LIVING IN HISTORIC CHARLESTON

Ellen Dutton

Researched by Business Journal staff


Hotels

For more lists subscribe to:

Properties in the Charleston Area, Ranked by No. of Guest Rooms Phone / Website Email

General Manager/ Year Founded

Radisson Hotel Charleston Airport 5991 Rivers Ave. North Charleston SC 29406

843-744-2501 www.radisson.com/charlestonsc_airport dosradisson@nvnhotels.com

1974

Holiday Inn Express Charleston Downtown Ashley River 250 Spring St. Charleston SC 29403

843-722-4000 www.charlestonhiexpress.com gm@charlestonhiexpress.com

Residence Inn Charleston Airport 5035 International Blvd. North Charleston SC 29418

843-266-3434 www.marriott.com/chsno erin.whitsitt@jqh.com

The Village at Wild Dunes 1 Sundial Circle Isle of Palms SC 29451

866-499-7142 www.wilddunesmeetings.com wilddunesmeetings@destinationhotels.com

DoubleTree by Hilton - Charleston Airport 7401 Northwoods Blvd North Charleston SC 29406

843-518-6200 www.charlestonairportsuites.doubletree.com connie.hess@hilton.com

Property

Holiday Inn Charleston Airport & Convention Center 5264 International Blvd. North Charleston SC 29418 Aloft Charleston Airport & Convention Center 4875 Tanger Outlet Blvd. North Charleston SC 29418 Hilton Garden Inn Charleston/Mt. Pleasant 300 Wingo Way Mount Pleasant SC 29464

# of Rooms # of Meeting Rooms Corporate Rate

Hotel Amenities

Sales Manager

159 7 $99

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, airport shuttle, fitness center, business center

Sheldon Williams

2013

153 1 $189

Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center

-

150 4 $144

843-576-0300 www.holidayinn.com/chastnairport chsfrontdesk@lch-sc.com

2004 2008 2013 2006

142 5 $134

Free Wi-Fi, pool, airport shuttle, fitness center, free breakfast, business center, in-room kitchen Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, fitness center, spa, business center, in-room kitchen Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, airport shuttle, fitness center, business center Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, airport shuttle, fitness center, business center

843-566-7300 www.alofthotels.com/charleston sales@aloftcharlestonairport.com

2008

136 1 $129

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, airport shuttle, fitness center, business center

-

843-606-4600 www.charlestonmtpleasant.hgi.com Jennifer.maxwell@hilton.com

133 7 $139

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, fitness center, business center

-

132 5 $189

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, fitness center

Blair Stegall

130 5 $159

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, fitness center, business center

Jules Shores

130 $117

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool

-

129 1 $70

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, airport shuttle, fitness center, business center

Freda Holback

129 6 $105

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, fitness center

Stephen Clarke

128 2 $119

Free Wi-Fi, pool, airport shuttle, fitness center, free breakfast, business center

-

127 2 $119

843-571-1711 www.marriott.com/chssh julie.gerthoffer@fowlerhospitality.com

2015 1985 2007 1981 2003 1984 2001 2010 1997 1999

123 2 $139

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, airport shuttle, fitness center, free breakfast, business center Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, 24-hour room service, fitness center, Georgia DiOrio business center Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center, in-room kitchen

843-744-4202 www.charlestonairportconventioncenter.home2suites.com chscc_ds@hilton.com

2011

122 0 $149

Free Wi-Fi, pool, airport shuttle, fitness center, free breakfast, business center, in-room kitchen

Tides Folly Beach 1 Center St. Folly Beach SC 29439

843-588-6464 www.tidesfollybeach.com -

Courtyard by Marriott Mount Pleasant 1251 Woodland Ave. Mount Pleasant SC 29464

843-284-0900 www.marriott.com/chscm juliana.shores@marriott.com

Days Inn Patriots Point 261 Johnnie Dodds Blvd. Mount Pleasant SC 29464

843-881-1800 www.daysinn.com mtpleasantdaysinn@hotmail.com

Charleston Grand Hotel B 3640 Dorchester Road North Charleston SC 29405

843-554-4140 www.choicehotels.com gm.sc480@choicehotels.com

Town & Country Inn and Suites 2008 Savannah Highway Charleston SC 29407

843-571-1000 www.thetownandcountryinn.com sales@thetownandcountryinn.com

Hampton Inn Daniel Island 160 Fairchild St. Charleston SC 29492

843-216-6555 www.charlestondanielisland.hamptoninn.com brittany.mckie@hilton.com

Hyatt Place Charleston Airport/ Convention Center 3234 W. Montague Ave. North Charleston SC 29418

843-302-8600 www.charlestonairport.place.hyatt.com -

Charleston Harbor Resort & Marina 20 Patriots Point Road Mount Pleasant SC 29464

843-856-0028 www.charlestonharborresort.com reservations@charlestonharborresort.com

SpringHill Suites by Marriott Downtown/ Riverview 98 Ripley Point Drive Charleston SC 29407 Home2 Suites by Hilton, Charleston Convention Center 3401 West Montague Ave. North Charleston SC 29418

www.CharlestonBusiness.com

Because of space constraints, only the top-ranked companies are printed. For a full list of participating companies, visit www.scbiznews.com/data. Although every effort is made to ensure accuracy, errors sometimes occur. Email additions or corrections to lists@scbiznews.com, fax to 843-849-3122 or go to www.tinyurl.com/joinourlists. B previously Clarion Inn & Suites

150 15 $229 149 6 $129

125 9 $129

-

Jeff Payne

Dorothy Grady

Kayla Brown

-

Researched by Business Journal staff

LIVING IN HISTORIC CHARLESTON |

79


Hotels

For more lists subscribe to:

Properties in the Charleston Area, Ranked by No. of Guest Rooms Property Wyndham Garden Charleston Mount Pleasant 1330 Stuart Engals Blvd. Mount Pleasant SC 29464 Residence Inn by Marriott Charleston Riverview 90 Ripley Point Drive Charleston SC 29407 Holiday Inn Express & Suites Mount Pleasant 350 Johnnie Dodds Blvd. Mount Pleasant SC 29464 Hampton Inn & Suites N. Charleston University Blvd 2688 Fernwood Drive North Charleston SC 29406 Hyatt House Charleston - Historic District 560 King Street Charleston SC 29403 Suburban Extended Stay Hotel 4620 Dorchester Road North Charleston SC 29405 Quality Inn & Suites at Patriots Point 196 Patriots Point Road Mount Pleasant SC 29464 Fairfield Inn & Suites Charleston Airport/ Convention Center 4841 Tanger Outlet Blvd. North Charleston SC 29418 Holiday Inn Express & Suites CharlestonAshley Phosphate 7670 Northwoods Blvd. North Charleston SC 29406 Wingate by Wyndham Charleston University Blvd. 9280 University Blvd. North Charleston SC 29406

Phone / Website Email

Hotel Amenities

Sales Manager

843-352-5100 www.wyndhamgardenmtpleasant.com jparsons@wyndhamgardenmtpleasant.com

2014

120 3 $119

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, fitness center, business center

Susan Johnson

843-571-7979 www.marriott.com/chsri julie.gerthoffer@fowlerhospitality.com

2000

119 1 $137

Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center, in-room kitchen

-

843-375-2600 www.hiemountpleasant.com slavelle@charlestownehotels.com

2009

116 1 $89

Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center

-

8437357505 www.northcharlestonuniversityblvdsuites.hamptoninn.com stephanie.habersham@hilton.com 2009 843-207-2299 www.hyatthousecharlestonhistoricdistrict.com rachel.frost@hyatt.com 2015 843-747-7500 www.choicehotels.com gm.sc480@choicehotels.com 1988 843-856-8817 www.choicehotels.com qisales@hgmhotels.com 1999 843-300-3100 www.marriott.com/chscs 2010

115 2 $124

Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center

-

113 5 $239

Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center, in-room kitchen

Lauren Smith, Kelsey Stoffel

104 $80

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, in-room kitchen

-

103 2 $100

Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center

-

102 2 $119

Free Wi-Fi, pool, airport shuttle, fitness center, free breakfast, business center

Jill Lovins

843-553-1600 www.hiexpress.com/chastni-26 gm@hiexpressnorthwoods.com

1999

98 1 $109

Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center

-

843-553-4444 www.charlestonwingate.com info@charlestonwingate.com

2008 2006 1960 2002 1982 1997 1975 2000

97 3 $109

Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center

Alyssa Ruiz

93 15 $229

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool

Jeff Payne

91 $200

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, fitness center, business center

-

90 1 $179

Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center, in-room kitchen

-

87 $79

Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center

-

84 1 $89

Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center

-

84 1 $189

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, business center

Hope Johnston, Alex Crall

81 0 $99

Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center

-

80 $119

Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center

-

80 2 $59

Free Wi-Fi, pool, free breakfast, business center

-

The Boardwalk Inn at Wild Dunes Resort 1 Sundial Circle Isle of Palms SC 29451

888-845-8880 www.wilddunesmeetings.com wilddunesmeetings@destinationhotels.com

King Charles Inn 237 Meeting St. Charleston SC 29401

843-723-7451 www.kingcharlesinn.com reservations@kingcharlesinn.com

Residence Inn by Marriott Mount Pleasant 1116 Isle of Palms Connector Mount Pleasant SC 29464

843-881-1599 www.marriott.com/chsmp ashley.miller@marriott.com

Best Western Sweetgrass Inn 1540 Savannah Highway Charleston SC 29407

843-571-6100 www.thesweetgrassinn.com brichards@charlestownehotels.com

Moncks Corner Inn 505 Rembert C. Dennis Blvd. Moncks Corner SC 29461

843-761-5900 www.monckscornerinn.com monckscornerinn@homesc.com

The Vendue 19 Vendue Range Charleston SC 29401

843-577-7970 www.thevendue.com info@thevendue.com

Comfort Suites at the Isle of Palms Connector 1130 Hungryneck Blvd. Mount Pleasant SC 29464 Holiday Inn Express Charleston U.S. 17 & I-526 1943 Savannah Highway Charleston SC 29407 The North Charleston Inn 2934 W. Montague Ave. North Charleston SC 29418

843-216-0004 www.choicehotels.com/sc198 KaseyKing@StaySuburban.com 843-402-8300 www.hiexpresscharleston.com 843-744-8281 www.northcharlestoninn.com jsiebold@charlestownehotels.com

1995 1973

Because of space constraints, only the top-ranked companies are printed. For a full list of participating companies, visit www.scbiznews.com/data. Although every effort is made to ensure accuracy, errors sometimes occur. Email additions or corrections to lists@scbiznews.com, fax to 843-849-3122 or go to www.tinyurl.com/joinourlists.

80

www.CharlestonBusiness.com

General Manager/ Year Founded

| LIVING IN HISTORIC CHARLESTON

# of Rooms # of Meeting Rooms Corporate Rate

Researched by Business Journal staff


Alternative Alternativeand andOutdoor OutdoorEvent EventVenues Venues

www.CharlestonBusiness.com

Ranked Ranked by byMaximum MaximumCapacity Capacity Company Company

Exchange Park Exchange Park 78 9850 U.S. Highway 9850 U.S. Ladson, SCHighway 29456 78 Ladson, SC 29456 Blackbaud Stadium Blackbaud Stadium 1990 Daniel Island Drive 1990 DanielSCIsland Charleston, 29492Drive

Phone / Website Phone / Website Email Email

843-572-3161 843-572-3161 www.exchangepark.org www.exchangepark.org denise@exchangepark.org denise@exchangepark.org 843-971-4625 843-971-4625 www.charlestonbattery.com - www.charlestonbattery.com

Michael Carney, DeniseMichael MasseyCarney, 1979 Denise Massey

1979

Andrew Bell 1999 Andrew Bell

1999

50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 14,000 5,100 14,000 5,100 -

Venue buildings, open land with pond, N buildings, land 70 acres Venue of outside meetingopen space andwith pond, Y of space outside meeting space and Y 100 acres70ofacres parking 100 acres of parking space Y Home of the Charleston Battery, 1,400 Home of theoverflow Charleston Battery, 1,400 Y parking spaces plus available parking spaces plus overflow available Y

14,000 2,000 14,000 7,600 2,000

Coliseum - 13,000 ppl NCPAC - 2,341 Y Charleston Area Convention - 3 - 2,341 N Coliseum - 13,000Center ppl NCPAC exhibit halls 79,960 sq ft N Charleston Area Convention Center - 3

Mariah Fleming, 843-529-5035 Les Crooks, MariahFrank Fleming, www.northcharlestoncoliseumpac.com Lapsley, 843-529-5035 LesWes Crooks, Frank mfleming@northcharlestoncoliseumpac.com Dickerson www.northcharlestoncoliseumpac.com Lapsley, Wes 1993 Dickerson mfleming@northcharlestoncoliseumpac.com

Hyde Park Farm & Polo Club 6763 Hyde Davis Park Rd. Farm & Polo Club Ravenel, SC 29470 6763 Davis Rd.

704-609-6866 www.hydeparkpoloclub.com 704-609-6866 info@hydeparkpoloclub.com www.hydeparkpoloclub.com

Amy Vann Flowers Amy Vann 2009 Flowers

8,000 8,000 8,000 5,000 8,000

Joseph P. Riley Jr. Park 360 Fishburne St. Joseph P. Riley Jr. Park Charleston, SC 29403

843-723-7241 www.riverdogs.com - 843-723-7241

Melissa Azevedo 1997

6,000 5,000 1,000 6,000

10 Wharfside St. CharlestonSC Maritime Charleston, 29401 Center

www.cmcevents.com 843-853-3625 atchisonb@charleston-sc.gov

Alysia Olshinski, Atchison Bob 1997 Alysia Olshinski,

North Charleston, SC 29418

Ravenel, SC 29470

360 Fishburne St. Charleston, Maritime SC 29403Center Charleston

10 Wharfside St. Charleston, Harbor SC 29401 Charleston Resort & Marina

20 Patriots Point Road Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 Charleston Harbor Resort & Marina

20 Patriots Point Road

Mount Pleasant, Middleton Place SC 29464 4300 Ashley River Road Charleston, 29414 Middleton SC Place

info@hydeparkpoloclub.com

www.riverdogs.com 843-853-3625

www.cmcevents.com atchisonb@charleston-sc.gov 843-856-0028

www.charlestonharborresort.com reservations@charlestonharborresort.com 843-856-0028

www.charlestonharborresort.com

In-house In-house Catering?Catering? Outside Cater Outside Cater OK? TentsOK? OK?Tents OK?

Top Local Capacity / Outdoor Top Local Max. Max. /Capacity / Outdoor Official(s)/ Capacity Reception Official(s)/ Capacity / Reception YearYear Founded Capacity Description Founded Capacity Description

North Charleston Coliseum and Performing Arts Center North Charleston Coliseum and 5001 Coliseum Drive Performing Arts Center North Charleston, SC 5001 Coliseum Drive29418

Charleston, SC 29492

For more lists subscribe to:

1993

2009

Melissa Azevedo 1997 Atchison Bob 1997

Oliver Rooskens 1997

Oliver Rooskens 1997

reservations@charlestonharborresort.comCharles H. Duell, 843-556-6020 www.middletonplace.org M. Tracey Todd info@middletonplace.org 1741 Charles H. Duell, 843-556-6020

www.middletonplace.org M. Tracey Todd 4300 Ashley River Road View this listSConline at www.scbiznews.com/data. Although every effort is made to ensure accuracy, info@middletonplace.org 1741 errors sometimes Charleston, 29414

-

7,600

5,000

5,000 4,000 1,000 1,500 450 4,000

1,500 2,500 450 2,500 2,000 2,500

2,500

2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000

occur. Email additions or corrections to lists@scbiznews.com or go to www.tinyurl.com/joinourlists.

View this list online at www.scbiznews.com/data. Although every effort is made to ensure accuracy, errors sometimes occur. Email additions or corrections to lists@scbiznews.com or go to www.tinyurl.com/joinourlists.

2,000 2,000

exhibit halls 79,960 sq ft

Unlimited parking. 400 acres 17 miles dt charleston. Openparking. air pavilion Unlimited 400 acres 17 miles Y fireplace,dtbeautiful barn Open with brick Y charleston. air pavilion floors, bridal suite. Only polo Y fireplace, beautiful club barninwith brick Charleston! floors, bridal suite. Only polo club in Y Charleston! Outdoor picnic areas available as well Y as the stadium's sky suites Outdoor picnic areas available as well Y aswaterfront the stadium's Downtown eventsky andsuites N conference venue with space available Y waterfront for indoorDowntown and outdoor receptionsevent and and conference venue with space available Y ceremonies; free parking available for indoor and outdoor receptions and Indoor meeting space and covered Y ceremonies; freeCharleston parking available outdoor areas overlooking N Harbor; conference planning team andcovered Indoor meeting space and Y wedding outdoor specialistareas are available. overlooking Charleston Harbor; conference planning team and 18th-century plantation, America's Y wedding specialist are available. oldest landscaped gardens, house N museum 18th-century and plantationplantation, stableyardsAmerica's Y with indoor and landscaped outdoor reception siteshouse oldest gardens,

museum and plantation stableyards Business sites Journal staff with indoorResearched and outdoorbyreception

N Y Y Y Y Y Y N N Y Y Y Y Y Y N Y Y Y N Y Y N Y

Researched by Business Journal staff

LIVING IN HISTORIC CHARLESTON |

81


Alternative Alternativeand andOutdoor OutdoorEvent EventVenues Venues

www.CharlestonBusiness.com

Ranked Ranked by byMaximum MaximumCapacity Capacity Company Company

Exchange Park 9850 U.S. Highway 78 Ladson, SC 29456 Charleston Gaillard Center 95 CalhounStadium St. Blackbaud Charleston, SC 29401 1990 Daniel Island Drive Charleston, SC 29492

Phone / Website Phone / Website Email Email

843-572-3161 www.exchangepark.org denise@exchangepark.org 843-724-5212 www.gaillardcenter.com 843-971-4625 bookings@gaillardcenter.com www.charlestonbattery.com -

843-724-7174 Charleston Visitor Center & Bus Shed 843-529-5035 North Charleston Coliseum and www.charlestoncvb.com Performing 375 MeetingArts St. Center www.northcharlestoncoliseumpac.com 5001 Coliseum binderr@charleston-sc.gov Charleston, SCDrive 29403 mfleming@northcharlestoncoliseumpac.com North Charleston, SC 29418

Michael Carney, Denise Massey 1979

Kevin T. Carlon Andrew2015 Bell 1999

50,000 50,000 50,000 1,800 14,000 5,100 -

MariahRussell Fleming,A. Binder, Les Crooks, Frank Taylor Lapsley, Wes Harris 1991 Dickerson 1993

14,000 2,000 1,500 7,600 300

1,500

843-779-7533 704-609-6866 www.ksacharleston.org www.hydeparkpoloclub.com KSACharleston@gmail.com info@hydeparkpoloclub.com

Amy Vann J. Wallace FlowersMay 31, 1801 2009

8,000 1,500 8,000 2,000 5,000 800

Joseph P. Riley Jr. Park 360 Fishburne St.Aquarium South Carolina Charleston, SC 29403 100 Aquarium Wharf

843-723-7241 www.riverdogs.com 843-579-8501 - www.scaquarium.org

Melissa Azevedo 1997 Kevin Mills

6,000 5,000 1,500 1,000 500

Charleston Maritime Center 10 Wharfside St. Memminger Charleston, SCAuditorium 29401

843-853-3625 www.cmcevents.com 843-724-1196 atchisonb@charleston-sc.gov

Alysia Olshinski, Atchison Bob 1997 Spoleto Festival

4,000 1,500 450 1,000

Oliver Rooskens 1997

2,500 2,500 2,000

Blanton CharlesBufort H. Duell, 2009 M. Tracey Todd 1741

2,000 2,000 2,000

56 Beaufain St. Charleston, Harbor SC 29401 Charleston Resort & Marina 20 Patriots Point Road Mount Pleasant, SC 29464

Candlelite Pavilion at Summerville

Country Club Middleton Place 400 Country Club Road Blvd. 4300 Ashley River Charleston, SCSC 29414 Summerville, 29483

www.scaquarium.org

www.memmingerauditorium.com info@memmingerauditorium.com 843-856-0028

www.charlestonharborresort.com reservations@charlestonharborresort.com

843-873-2210

843-556-6020 www.summervillecountryclub.com www.middletonplace.org sblanton@knology.net info@middletonplace.org

2000

2008

1,300 250 600

800 800 500

View this list online at www.scbiznews.com/data. Although every effort is made to ensure accuracy, errors sometimes

Summerville CountryorClub, occur. Email additions corrections to lists@scbiznews.com 843-873-2210 or go to www.tinyurl.com/joinourlists. Bo Blanton Jr. Miler Golf Course www.summervillecountryclub.com 1925 400 Country Club Blvd. sblanton@knology.net Summerville, SC 29483

Susan Nave, Lindsey Monroe, Perry Green 2000

800 800 500

The Golf Club at Wescott Plantation 5000 Wescott Club Drive Summerville, SC 29485

843-871-2135 wescottgolf.com wescottgolfshop@gmail.com

The Grand Pavilion 1 Sundial Circle Isle of Palms, SC 29451

888-845-8880 Jody Harris www.wilddunesmeetings.com wilddunesreservations@destinationhotels.com 1972

600 800

Wild Dunes Resort 1 Sundial Circle Isle of Palms, SC 29451

888-845-8880 www.wilddunesmeetings.com wilddunesmeetings@destinationhotels.com

Jeff Payne 1972

600 500 600

Lowndes Grove Plantation 266 St. Margaret St. Charleston, SC 29403

843-853-1810 www.pphgcharleston.com info@pphgcharleston.com

Jennifer Goldman 2007

560 560

Beresford Creek course at Daniel Island Club 600 Island Park Drive Daniel Island, SC 29492

843-971-3555 www.danielislandclub.com -

Greg Keating 1999

500 500

Blackbeard's Cove 3255 U.S. Highway 17 N. Mount Pleasant, SC 29466

843-971-1223 www.blackbeardscove.net contact@blackbeardscove.net

Brian N. Lee 2006

500 500

Daniel Island Club 600 Island Park Drive Daniel Island, SC 29492

843-971-3555 www.danielislandclub.com info@danielislandclub.com

Greg Keating 1999

500 500

Harborside East 28 Bridgeside Blvd. Mount Pleasant, SC 29464

843-606-2718 www.harborsideeast.com chelsea@harborsideeast.com

Chelsea Banias 2006

500 500 500

View this list online at www.scbiznews.com/data. Although every effort is made to ensure accuracy, errors sometimes occur. Email additions or corrections to lists@scbiznews.com or go to www.tinyurl.com/joinourlists.

82

| LIVING IN HISTORIC CHARLESTON

In-house In-house Catering?Catering? Outside Cater Outside Cater OK? TentsOK? OK?Tents OK?

Top Local / Outdoor Top Local Max. Capacity Max. Capacity / Outdoor Official(s)/ Capacity / Reception Official(s)/ Capacity / Reception Year Founded Capacity Description Year Founded Capacity Description

Scottish Center Hyde ParkRite Farm & Polo Club 1051 Davis Sam Rittenberg Blvd. 6763 Rd. Charleston, SC 29407 Ravenel, SC 29470

Charleston, SC 29401

For more lists subscribe to:

600 500 500

Venue buildings, open land with pond, N The 1,800-seat Martha 70 acres of outside meeting space and and John M. Y Performance Hall creates an Y 100 acresRivers’ of parking space inviting setting where artist and audience come together and connect. Y Home of the Charleston Battery, 1,400 Y State-of-the-art ballrooms parking spaces plus overflow availableand Y meeting rooms are also available.

Y Y -

Coliseum - 13,000 ppl NCPAC - 2,341 usable space CharlestonOpen, Area covered Convention Center -3 exhibit halls 79,960 sq ft

N Y N

Auditorium: 500+ Plush Seats, Stage/

Y N N

Floor,17 Tiled Dance Floor, Unlimited Presentation parking. 400 acres miles Full Audio/Video Control Booth dt charleston. Open air pavilion Y Banquet Hall & Prep Kitchen: Tables Y fireplace, beautiful barn with brick andsuite. Chairs included, Raised floors, bridal Only polo club in Stage Y Charleston! Lectern/Audio, Kitchen/Prep Area Included. Y Outdoor picnic areas available as well Receptions, conferences and meetingsY as the stadium's sky suites can be hosted in the executive suite, Y hall orevent riverside Downtowngreat waterfront and terrace N conference venue with space available Multi-use space available year-round Y for indoorfeaturing and outdoor receptions 2,500 square and feet of storage Y ceremonies; free catering parking available space, setup and backstage Indoor meeting and covered needs;space banquet room-style partition Y outdoor areas Charleston wall overlooking available and six dressing rooms N Harbor; conference planning team and Y Outdoor covered pavilion, prep wedding specialist are available. kitchen, lighting, portable bars, 18th-century plantation, America's wireless PA system, dance floor, Y oldest landscaped gardens, house tables, chairs; new outdoor patio N museum and plantation stableyards extension suitable for oyster roasts, Y with indoor and outdoor reception sites

fundraisers Covered outdoor pavilion with pull-Journal staff Researched by Business down curtains if needed; large outdoor patio suitable for oyster roasts and weddings with 40' x 40' tent available; tables and chairs on site Antebellum-style clubhouse with wraparound porch, hardwood floors, twin fireplaces, vaulted ceilings; 6,000-square-foot tented patio for outdoor events Ocean-front space in the heart of Wild Dunes Resort with sweeping views of the Atlantic; ideal for casual corporate gatherings, cocktail parties, dinners or receptions Indoor and outdoor meeting, event facilities; custom events; accommodations, catering services, team-building exercises; wellness programs Waterfront views of the Ashley River; 1786-era architecture and period furnishings; expansive piazza; grand lawn framed by live oaks and private dock Nationally ranked Tom Fazio layout available on a limited basis for member-sponsored charity and corporate events when course is closed for member play (Tuesdays). Corporate meetings, corporate events, team building, birthday parties, Character Dinners Private country club featuring two championship golf courses; 7,100 sq. ft. ballroom, dividable; private board room; outdoor venues; full-service catering options. Popular for weddings, corporate events and fundraising events. One of Charleston’s premier venues located minutes from downtown at Patriot’s Point, Harborside East offers a spacious interior reception space and a stunning waterfront patio with breathtaking view of the Ravenel Bridge and downtown Charleston.

Y Y Y N Y Y N Y N

Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N N Y Y Y N Y Y N Y Y N Y Y N Y

N Y Y

Researched by Business Journal staff


Photo/Julia Lynn Photography

Conductor Steven Sloane beams during the festive final moments of 40th-Season Celebration Concert for the Spoleto Festival at the Charleston Gaillard Center.

» ARTS ABOUND The depth and breadth of Charleston’s arts scene may surprise you. From established galleries and historic theaters to funky festivals and improv comedy, the Holy City and surrounding areas have much to offer. The following is just a small selection of what’s available to satisfy your artistic cravings.

Visual arts Charleston Renaissance Gallery fineartsouth.com Focusing on fine art of the American South, the Charleston Renaissance Gallery has offerings ranging from 18th century portraits and engravings to contemporary paintings and sculpture. 103 Church St., Charleston; 843-723-0025

84

| ARTS ABOUND

Charleston Gallery Association www.charlestongalleryassociation.com The Charleston Gallery Association is made up of more than 40 galleries showcasing local, regional and national artists’ work. The association holds art walks four times a year, on the first Friday of March, May, October and December.

City Gallery at Waterfront Park citygalleryatwaterfrontpark.com The City Gallery presents several exhibits each year focusing on contemporary visual arts created by local, regional, national and international artists. 34 Prioleau St., Charleston; 843-958-6484.


Photo/Julia Lynn Photography

Porgy, played by Lester Lynch, and the cast and chorus during the 2016 Spoleto Festival performance of Porgy and Bess.

Gibbes Museum of Art www.gibbesmuseum.org As Charleston’s only visual arts museum, the Gibbes also offers educational programs, group tours and art discovery walking tours. The museum recently completed extensive renovations and is now open. 135 Meeting St., Charleston; 843-722-2706. Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art halsey.cofc.edu Administered by the School of the Arts at the College of Charleston, the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art was created to

Photo/Ryan Wilcox/Charleston Regional Business Journal

Gallery Chuma www.gallerychuma.com Specializing in the works of the Gullah people of coastal South Carolina, Gallery Chuma features Gullah art, books, crafts, storytelling, tours and food. 188 Meeting St., #N1, Charleston; 843-722-1702.

advocate, exhibit and interpret visual art, with an emphasis on contemporary art. 161 Calhoun St., Charleston; 843-953-4422. MOJA Arts Festival www.mojafestival.com Started in 1984, the annual MOJA Arts Festival is a celebration of African American and Caribbean arts and features music, visual art, storytelling, performances, crafts, children’s activities and more. 843-724-7305. North Charleston City Gallery www.northcharleston.org/arts and culture tab Located in the commons area at the Charleston Area Convention Center, the North Charleston City Gallery features exhibits that are rotated on a monthly basis. 5001 Coliseum Drive, North Charleston; 843-740-5854.

Hometown favorites, Shovels and Rope, play a concert at the Charleston Music Hall.

Piccolo Spoleto www.piccolospoleto.com Piccolo Spoleto was created in 1979 to coincide with the international Spoleto Festival USA and primarily features artists from the Southeast. Held at a variety of locations in downtown Charleston. 843-724-7305. ARTS ABOUND |

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Spoleto Festival USA www.spoletousa.com Held each spring since 1977, this 17-day festival features visual art exhibits and more than 120 performances from opera to jazz music. 843-579-3100.

Performing arts The Actors’ Theatre of South Carolina www.actorstheatreofsc.org Founded in 1995 and headquartered in Charleston, the Actors’ Theatre has members who travel the state presenting a full season of performances as well as acting classes. 843-588-9636. American Theater www.pphgcharleston.com/venues/ the-american-theater The American Theater opened in 1942 as one of Charleston’s premier movie houses. It closed in 1977 but was revitalized and reopened in 2005 as a state-of-the-art meeting and conference facility. It also hosts a variety of performances, including Spoleto activities. 446 King St., Charleston; 843-853-1810. Charleston Ballet Theatre www.charlestonballet.com The Charleston Ballet Theatre has achieved national recognition for its artistic and professional presentations of a range of works from classic to eclectic. 547 Long Point Road, Ste. 11, Mount Pleasant; 843-469-2080. Charleston Music Hall www.charlestonmusichall.com Said to offer some of the best acoustics in Charleston, the Charleston Music Hall welcomes a variety of performers throughout the year from bluegrass to blues. 37 John St., Charleston; 843-853-2252. Charleston Stage www.charlestonstage.com Charleston Stage, which calls the renovated Dock Street Theatre home, was founded in 1978 and is the state’s largest professional theater company. 843-577-5967.

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Charleston Symphony Orchestra www.charlestonsymphony.org Founded in 1936, the Charleston Symphony Orchestra is known for its Masterworks and Pops series. The CSO also offers holiday performances and family concerts throughout the year. CSO makes its home at the newly renovated performance hall at the Gaillard Center. 843-723-7528. Dock Street Theatre The historic Dock Street Theatre reopened after undergoing a three-year, $20 million renovation. It originally opened in 1736 and was the first building in America built specifically for theatrical productions. It is a performance venue for Spoleto Festival USA and home of Charleston Stage. 135 Church St., Charleston; 843-577-7183. Flowertown Players www.flowertownplayers.com This community theater presents a range of productions from musicals to serious dramas as well as performances and classes for children. 133 S. Main St., Summerville; 843-875-9251. Footlight Players Theatre www.footlightplayers.net Since 1931, the Footlight Players Theatre has presented a variety of stage productions and has become known as one of the top community theaters in the South. A typical season includes six performances. 20 Queen St., Charleston; 843-722-4487. The Gaillard Center www.gaillardcenter.com Recently renovated and reopened, the $142 million Gaillard Center is a world-class performing venue. It hosts a multitude of events and performances from Charleston Symphony Orchestra concerts to rock-‘n’roll. 95 Calhoun St., Charleston; 843-242-3099.

The Have Nots! Comedy Improv www.theatre99.com Called the longest-running show in Charleston, The Have Nots! cast has been together for 16 years. Local shows are held at Theatre 99, the group’s own theater, as well as at other locations throughout the area. 280 Meeting St., Charleston; 843-853-6687. Memminger Auditorium memmingerauditorium.com Built in the 1930s as an auditorium for Memminger High School, the building had stood vacant since the 1960s and was severely damaged by Hurricane Hugo in 1989. Spoleto Festival USA played a large part in the building’s recent $6 million renovation and the facility reopened in 2008. Now used for a variety of performances from international artists performing as part of Spoleto, to local school groups. 56 Beaufain St., Charleston; 843-724-1196. North Charleston Coliseum and Performing Arts Center www.northcharlestoncoliseumpac.com The North Charleston Coliseum and Performing Arts Center have hosted events from hockey games to Broadway shows throughout the year. The coliseum seats more than 13,000 for concert performances. The Performing Arts Center seats 2,300. 5001 Coliseum Drive, North Charleston; 843-529-5000. PURE Theatre www.puretheatre.org PURE Theatre has gained respect as a small professional theater focusing on the works of contemporary playwrights. 477 King St., Charleston; 843-723-4444. Sottile Theatre sottile.cofc.edu The Sottile Theatre opened in 1927 as the Gloria Theater and hosted the premiere of Gone With the Wind in 1939. It’s now the home of various events, including Charleston Comedy Festival performances. 44 George St., Charleston; 843-953-6340.


Photos/Ashley Heffernan/Charleston Regional Business Journal

South of Broadway Theatre Company southofbroadway.com The South of Broadway Theatre Company produces a season of seven shows plus PlayFest, showcasing local playwrights and actors. The theater also offers classes and Summer Theatre Camp. 1080 E. Montague Ave., North Charleston; 843-745-0317. Woolfe Street Playhouse Woolfestreetplayhouse.com The 200-seat Woolfe Street Playhouse is home to the Village Repertory Company, which brings bold productions of new and established works. The company moved into a century-old meatpacking warehouse in the former industrial center of the Charleston peninsula. 34 Woolfe St., Charleston; 843-856-1579.

•

The Gibbes Museum of Art recently completed extensive renovations and is now open to the public.

For more about arts events in the area, visit www.charlestonarts.org.

ARTS ABOUND |

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Photo/Charleston County Parks

Edwin S. Taylor Folly Beach Fishing Pier

Âť ATTRACTIONS AND TOURS

Aiken-Rhett House

Angel Oak Park

Avian Conservation Center

Boone Hall Plantation

48 Elizabeth St. Charleston, SC 29403 843-723-1159 www.historiccharleston.org/aiken-rhett Single Adult Admission: $12 Intact mansion and associated outbuildings demonstrating urban life in antebellum Charleston

3688 Angel Oak Road Johns Island, SC 29455 843-559-3496 www.angeloaktree.com Admission: Free 65-foot-high live oak tree provides 17,000 square feet of shade; estimated by some to be more than 1,500 years old

American Military Museum

Avery Research Center for African American

4872 Seewee Road Awendaw, SC 29429 843-971-7474 info@avianconservationcenter.org www.thecenterforbirdsofprey.org Single Adult Admission: $15 Encounters with raptors from around the world during walking tours, flight demonstrations and natural history discussions

1235 Long Point Road Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 843-884-4371 www.boonehallplantation.com Single Adult Admission: $24/$21 seniors and military members One of America’s oldest working, living plantations, still growing fruits and vegetables; interprets plantation life in the 1800s

Berkeley County Museum & Heritage Center

Calhoun Mansion

2070 Sam Rittenberg Blvd., Unit 216 Charleston, SC 29407 843-577-7000 info@americanmilitarymuseum.org www.americanmilitarymuseum.org Admission: Free Hundreds of uniforms, artifacts and military miniatures covering all periods of U.S. history

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History & Culture 125 Bull St. Charleston, SC 29424 843-953-7609 seharrel@cofc.edu http://avery.cofc.edu Admission: Free, donations accepted Archival repository, small museum, and cultural center for public programming relating to African-American Lowcountry history and Gullah culture

950 Stony Landing Road Moncks Corner, SC 29461 843-899-5101 visitberkeleycounty.com/berkeleymuseum/Admission Free with park admission ($3 per person) Exhibits displaying Lowcountry culture and natural history; located in Old Santee Canal Park

14-16 Meeting St. Charleston, SC 29401 843-722-8205 calhounmansion@yahoo.com www.calhounmansion.net Single Adult Admission: $16 The largest privately owned house museum on the Charleston peninsula


Photo/Charleston County Parks

Carolina Ice Palace 7665 Northwoods Blvd. North Charleston, SC 29406 843-572-2717 www.carolinaicepalace.com Single Adult Admission: $7-$10 Two National Hockey League-size ice skating rinks, sports lounge, meeting rooms, pro shop, birthday party rooms, catering, figure skating, hockey

Caw Caw Nature & History Interpretive Center 5200 Savannah Highway Ravenel, SC 29470 843-889-8898 www.ccprc.com Single Adult Admission: $2 654-acre site with intact rice fields, interpretive trails, exhibit center, wildlife

Charles Pinckney National Historic Site 1254 Long Point Road Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 843-881-5516 www.nps.gov/chpi/index.htm Admission: Free Country estate of Charles Pinckney;

Charleston International Antiques Show 56 Beaufain St. Charleston, SC 29401 843-722-3405 www.historiccharleston.org Single Adult Admission: $15 Held in March, more than 30 of the nation’s exhibitors represent American, Asian and European antiques from the 17th to early 20th centuries

The Charleston Museum

Caw Caw Nature & History Interpretive Center. Constitution history, archaeology, African-American history

Charles Towne Landing State Historic Site 1500 Old Towne Road Charleston, SC 29407 843-852-4200 ctlandingsp@scprt.com

www.charlestownelanding.travel Single Adult Admission: $10; $6.50 for S.C. seniors Site of first permanent English settlement in the Carolinas, Rivers and marsh views, trails, history trails and an animal forest exhibit with bison, puma, black bear, otters, various shore birds, wild turkey and more.

360 Meeting St. Charleston, SC 29403 843-722-2996 www.charlestonmuseum.org Single Adult Admission: $12 America’s first museum, showcasing a variety of cultural and natural history artifacts relating to the South Carolina Lowcountry

Charleston RiverDogs 360 Fishburne St. Charleston, SC 29403 843-723-7241 www.riverdogs.com Single Adult Admission: $10-$21

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Photo/Coleman Photography

Minor league baseball; facility also hosts numerous non-baseball events, fundraisers and concerts

Charleston Tea Plantation 6617 Maybank Highway Wadmalaw Island, SC 29487 843-559-0383 jknight@rcbigelow.com www.charlestonteaplantation.com Single Adult Admission: Factory tour free; trolley ride $10 Tea plantation with informational tours of the on-site factory and trolley rides designed to educate the public on the growing and processing of tea

1214 Middle St. Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482 843-883-3123 www.nps.gov/fosu/planyourvisit/ fomohqdirections.htm Single Adult Admission: $3 History of American seacoast defense from 1776 to 1947; visitor center with museum exhibits, film and bookstore

9850 U.S. Highway 78 Ladson, SC 29456 843-572-3161 office@coastalcarolinafair.org www.coastalcarolinafair.org Single Adult Admission: $8 Fair that runs for 11 days starting the last Thursday in October

Fort Sumter National Monument

Colonial Dorchester State Historic Site

Dock Street Theatre 135 Church St. Charleston, SC 29401 843-720-3968 www.charlestonstage.com Single Adult Admission: Varies Site of America’s first theater, houses the state’s largest professional acting company and is the centerpiece of Spoleto Festival USA

Drayton Hall 3380 Ashley River Road Charleston, SC 29414 843-769-2600 info@draytonhall.org www.draytonhall.org Single Adult Admission: $22

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1100 W. Ashley Ave. Folly Beach, SC 29439 843-588-2426 www.ccprc.com Single Adult Admission: $8 per vehicle/$10 Saturday and Sunday MayLabor Day Beach park with chair and umbrella rentals available. Visit CCPRC.com for more information.

Fort Moultrie

Coastal Carolina Fair

300 State Park Road Summerville, SC 29485 843-873-1740 www.southcarolinaparks.com/parkfinder/state-park/725.aspx Single Adult Admission: $2; $1.25 for S.C. seniors Archaeological park on the site of Dorchester, an inland trading town on the Ashley River that flourished from 1697 through the Revolutionary War

Folly Beach County Park

The climbing wall at James Island County Park. Circa 1738, America’s oldest unrestored plantation house open to the public and documented 1790s African-American cemetery still in use

Edisto Island Serpentarium 1374 S.C. Highway 174 Edisto Island, SC 29438 843-869-1171 www.edistoserpentarium.com Single Adult Admission: $14.95 Reptile zoo, new Edisto visitors center, fossil room

Edmondston-Alston House 21 E. Battery St. Charleston, SC 29401 843-722-7171 www.edmondstonalston.com Single Adult Admission: $12 Built in 1825; contains furniture, silver, books, paintings and documents that remain in place much as they have for 150 years

Edwin S. Taylor Folly Beach Fishing Pier 101 E. Arctic Ave. Folly Beach, SC 29439 843-588-3474 www.ccprc.com Admission: $5-15 per car to park; $8 fishing fee/$5 Charleston County resident Fishing pier, gift shop, restaurant, rental equipment available, tournaments, special events

Exchange Park 9850 U.S. Highway 78 Ladson, SC 29456 843-572-3161 denise@exchangepark.org www.exchangepark.org Single Adult Admission: Varies per event 170-acre multipurpose event complex hosting a wide variety of special-event programming

340 Concord St. Charleston, SC 29401 843-577-0242 www.nps.gov/fosu/index.htm Adult Boat Fee: $19.50 Ferries depart daily from Charleston and Mount Pleasant to tour the site of the opening battle of the Civil War

Gibbes Museum of Art 135 Meeting St. Charleston, SC 29401 843-722-2706 www.gibbesmuseum.org Single Adult Admission: $12 Art collection, principally American works with a Charleston or Southern connection, on display; special exhibitions

Heyward-Washington House 87 Church St. Charleston, SC 29401 843-722-2996 www.charlestonmuseum.org Single Adult Admission: $12 Built in 1772; home to Thomas Heyward Jr., signer of the Declaration of Independence; rented by George Washington in 1791


Isle of Palms County Park 1 14th Ave. Isle of Palms, SC 29451 843-886-3863 www.ccprc.com Single Adult Admission: $8 per vehicle/$10 Saturday and Sunday MayLabor Day Dunes, boardwalk, showers, restrooms, lifeguards, vending, 350 parking spaces

James Island County Park 871 Riverland Drive Charleston, SC 29412 843-795-7275 www.ccprc.com Single Adult Admission: $2 643-acre park with crabbing, fishing, biking, lagoon boating, dog park, playgrounds, shelters, climbing wall, cottages, campsites and challenge course

James Island County Park Challenge Course 871 Riverland Drive Charleston, SC 29412 843-762-2172 www.ccprc.com/challengecourse

Single Adult Admission: varies High and low ropes course for teambuilding; customized programs for all ages and abilities

James Island County Park Climbing Wall 871 Riverland Drive Charleston, SC 29412 843-795-4386 www.ccprc.com/wall Single Adult Admission: $12-$14 50-foot climbing wall and 1,000-squarefoot bouldering wall for supervised climbing

James Island County Park Splash Zone 871 Riverland Drive James Island, SC 29412 843-795-7275 www.ccprc.com/1659/Splash-Zone Single Adult Admission: $9.99-11.99; Under 48�: $8.99 Two 200-foot slides, lazy river, Caribbean play structure, concessions, kiddie pool, lockers, lifeguards, vending

Joseph Manigault House

Kiawah Beachwalker Park

350 Meeting St. Charleston, SC 29403 843-723-2926 info@charlestonmuseum.org www.charlestonmuseum.org Single Adult Admission: $12 Example of Adam-style or Federal architecture, collection of American, English and French furnishings circa 1800, built in 1803

8 Beachwalker Drive Kiawah Island, SC 29455 843-768-2395 www.ccprc.com Single Adult Admission: $8 per vehicle/ $10 Saturdays and Sundays May-Labor Day Beach access park with 300 feet of ocean frontage, dressing areas, outdoor showers, restrooms and seasonal lifeguards

Karpeles Manuscript Museum Library

3550 Ashley River Road Charleston, SC 29414 843-571-1266 www.magnoliaplantation.com Single Adult Admission: $15 Pre-Revolutionary War plantation house with early American antiques, biblical garden, antebellum cabin, train tour, nature boat tour, slave cabin tour

68 Spring St. Charleston, SC 29403 843-853-4651 KMuseumChr@aol.com www.rain.org/~karpeles/chasfrm.html Admission: Free Displays historical manuscripts on a wide variety of cultural, scientific, social, intellectual, economic, historical subjects

Magnolia Plantation & Gardens

Mepkin Abbey 1098 Mepkin Abbey Road Moncks Corner, SC 29461 843-761-8509 www.mepkinabbey.org Single Adult Admission: $5 Gardens are open to the public

ATTRACTIONS AND TOURS |

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Photo/Charleston County Parks

Middleton Place 4300 Ashley River Road Charleston, SC 29414 843-556-6020 info@middletonplace.org www.middletonplace.org Single Adult Admission: $28 18th-century plantation, America’s oldest landscaped gardens, house, stableyards, Middleton Place Restaurant, museum shop, garden market and nursery

Sewee Visitor & Environmental Education Center 5821 U.S. Highway 17 N. Awendaw, SC 29429 843-928-3368 www.fws.gov/seweecenter Admission: Free Center features tourist information on recreational opportunities available in the Francis Marion National Forest Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge

Mount Pleasant Pier

South Carolina Aquarium

71 Harry Hallman Blvd. Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 843-762-9946 customerservice@ccprc.com www.ccprc.com Single Adult Fishing Fee: $8/$5 Charleston County resident 1,250-foot-long pier at the foot of the Ravenel Bridge featuring covered pavilion, cafe, gift shop, fishing equipment rentals, seating, restrooms

100 Aquarium Wharf Charleston, SC 29401 843-577-3474 sales@scaquarium.org www.scaquarium.org Single Adult Admission: $24.95 Aquarium featuring S.C. native species and other animals as well as traveling exhibits; works to inspire conservation of the natural world

Mullet Hall Equestrian Center 2662 Mullet Hall Road Johns Island, SC 29455 843-768-5867 customerservice@ccprc.com www.ccprc.com Single adult admission fee: $1 perwalker; $5 per person on horse A 738-acre host site for competitive horse shows, festivals, events, exhibitions, and trail riding, with 20 miles of riding trails for horse owners

The Nathaniel Russell House 51 Meeting St. Charleston, SC 29401 843-724-8481 www.historiccharleston.org/russell Single Adult Admission: $12 Plasterwork ornamentation, geometrically shaped rooms, free-flying staircase, garden

North Charleston & American LaFrance Fire Museum & Educational Center 4975 Centre Pointe Drive North Charleston, SC 29418 843-740-5550 info@legacyofheroes.org www.legacyofheroes.org Single Adult Admission: $6 The fire museum houses antique fire

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| ATTRACTIONS AND TOURS

Mullet Hall Equestrian Center. equipment and vehicles, an indoor play area and driving simulator

Old Exchange Building 122 East Bay St. Charleston, SC 29401 843-727-2165 www.oldexchange.org Single Adult Admission: $10 Revolutionary War museum completed in 1771, featuring historical artifacts from Charleston’s Colonial, Revolutionary and Civil War periods

Old Santee Canal Park 900 Stony Landing Road Moncks Corner, SC 29461 843-899-5200 parkinfo@santeecooper.com www.oldsanteecanalpark.org Single Adult Admission: $3 195-acre park on America’s first canal; boardwalks and trails lead through Biggin Creek; 11,000-square-foot interpretive center

Palmetto Islands County Park 444 Needlerush Parkway Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 843-884-0832 www.ccprc.com Single Adult Admission: $2 943-acre nature-based park with playgrounds, trails, boating, biking, shelters, water park, special events

Palmetto Islands County Park Splash Island 444 Needlerush Parkway Mount Pleasant, SC 29464

843-884-0832 www.ccprc.com/1660/Splash-Island Single Adult Admission: $6.99-7.99; under 48”: $5.99 200-foot slide, Cyclone swirling water ride, 16-foot otter slide, kiddie pool, sprays, waterfalls, geysers, vending

Patriots Point Naval & Maritime Museum 40 Patriots Point Road Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 866-831-1720 www.patriotspoint.org Single Adult Admission: $22 Home of Patriots Point Naval and Maritime Museum, the USS Yorktown, Cold War Memorial and the only Vietnam Support Base Memorial in the U.S.

The Powder Magazine 79 Cumberland St. Charleston, SC 29401 843-722-9350 www.powdermag.org Single Adult Admission: $5 Oldest public building between Virginia and Florida, circa 1713, stored gun powder in the early 1700s

PURE Theatre 477 King St. Charleston, SC 29403 843-723-4444 info@puretheatre.org www.puretheatre.org Single Adult Admission: $15-$30

Spring Festival of Houses & Gardens 108 Meeting St. Charleston, SC 29401 843-722-3405 www.historiccharleston.org Single Adult Admission: Varies Series of tours showcasing Charleston architecture

Wannamaker County Park 8888 University Blvd. North Charleston, SC 29406 843-572-7275 www.ccprc.com Single Adult Admission: $2 1,015-acre park, two playgrounds, 20-foot play hill, picnic sites with grills, open meadows, paved trails, boat rentals, water park, meeting space

Whirlin’ Waters Adventure Waterpark 8888 University Blvd. North Charleston, SC 29406 843-572-7275 http://www.ccprc.com/1658/WhirlinWatersSingle Adult Admission: $19.99; under 48”: $14.99 27,000-square-foot wave pool, lazy river, treehouse play structure, kiddie pool area, seven-story multislide complex, racer slides, vending, birthday parties


Photo/Greater Charleston Restaurant Association

The Lowcounty Oyster Festival is the world’s largest oyster festival and takes place in January at Boone Hall Plantation.

» CALENDAR OF EVENTS Charleston is a busy city – there’s always a race, festival or tour of homes going on. If it’s January, there must be oysters; if it’s spring, there must be a race over the bridge. You can count on it. Here are some of the main events that shape our year.

JANUARY Happy New Year, Charleston This is a time to celebrate as only the Lowcountry knows how. There will be crowds everywhere as Charlestonians and visitors welcome the New Year at venues all over the area. Folly Beach and Sullivan’s Island both have popular “polar bear” plunge events on New Year’s Day and hundreds of people run from the beach into the freezing ocean water to celebrate the new year.

Lowcountry Oyster Festival www.charlestonrestaurantassociation. com Each January, two tractor trailer loads of oysters – more than 65,000 pounds – are brought in for the annual Lowcountry Oyster Festival at Boone Hall Plantation. Contests, live music and other activities are scheduled throughout the day, including an oyster shucking contest, oyster eating contest and a contest among local chefs for the best oyster recipe.

FEBRUARY Southeastern Wildlife Exposition www.sewe.com Known for its world-class original art, diverse exhibits and animal demonstrations, the annual Southeastern Wildlife Exposition brings 120 artists and more than 350 exhibitors to venues throughout Charleston for a long weekend. Conservation exhibits, birds of prey and retriever demonstrations, and Dock Dogs are among the highlights.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS |

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Photo/Paul Mulkey/Southeastern Wildlife Exposition

Birds of prey flight demonstrations at the annual Southeastern Wildlife Exposition.

Charleston Wine and Food Festival www.charlestonwineandfood.com Starting in late February and continuing into early March, this festival celebrates the culinary history and culture of the Lowcountry. Foodies can enjoy dozens of events during the four-day event. Marion Square is the center of the action.

MARCH Charleston Fashion Week www.charlestonfashionweek.com This week showcases emerging designers and modeling talent under the tents on Marion Square. More than 30 runway shows are featured. The latest trends from local designers and boutique owners are featured.

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| CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Charleston Antiques Show www.historiccharleston.org Each year in mid-March, collectors and enthusiasts are treated to an array of English, European and American antiques from dealers across the country. Visitors can learn through educational presentations and purchase furnishings, decorative and fine art, architectural elements, garden furniture, vintage jewelry and silver. Held at Memminger Auditorium, 56 Beaufain St. Spring Festival of Houses and Gardens www.historiccharleston.org Starting in late March, this monthlong event opens some of Charleston’s finest historic gardens and houses for touring. Let the Historic Charleston Foundation be your guide for one of the tours that give a rare chance for a glimpse inside private homes.

APRIL World Grits Festival www.worldgritsfestival.com Who could resist a festival that’s all about grits? This family-oriented festival in St. George celebrates all forms of coarsely ground hominy and crowns a winner in the official Grits Rolling Contest. Summerville Flowertown Festival www.flowertownfestival.org The three-day event showcases the beautiful blooming azaleas, wisteria and dogwood in Summerville, a northern suburb of Charleston. The festival brings a host of artisans, food vendors, children’s activities and musical performances. It is organized by the Summerville Family YMCA.


Photo/Ryan Wilcox/Charleston Regional Business Journal

Fourth of July fireworks shot from Patriot’s Point are one of many displays that can be enjoyed around the Lowcountry.

Cooper River Bridge Run www.bridgerun.com Start in Mount Pleasant and run across the Cooper River on the expansive Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge. You’ll wind up in downtown Charleston. Held in late March or early April each year, the event features a popular world-class 10K run as well as a walk. Volvo Car Open www.volvocaropen.com In 2015, the week-long Charleston women's professional tennis tournament became the Volvo Car Open. Home to the tournament is the Family Circle Tennis Center, built through a partnership between the city of Charleston and Family Circle magazine. The tournament is held at the Daniel Island center each April. Watch the stars play, then come back to attend concerts and events held throughout the year.

Piccolo Spoleto USA www.piccolospoleto.com This festival, running concurrently with Spoleto Festival USA, focuses primarily on artists from the Southeast, offering theater, music, visual arts, dance, ethnic culture presentations, comedy, crafts and film. It takes place at a variety of locations around Charleston.

JULY Fourth of July www.patriotspoint.org Fireworks launched from the flight deck of an aircraft carrier at Patriots Point and a shoreside party with beach music make Independence Day in Charleston fun. Communities all over the area have their own celebrations. Sit on the beach and watch fireworks all around.

MAY & JUNE

SEPTEMBER

Spoleto Festival USA www.spoletousa.org Each year since 1977, dozens of music, dance and theater performances as well as visual arts exhibits have come to the Charleston area for Spoleto USA. The 17day festival begins in late May and continues into June. It fills Charleston’s historic theaters, churches and outdoor spaces with more than 120 performances

Taste of Charleston www.charlestonrestaurantassociation.com In late September, Boone Hall Plantation in Mount Pleasant becomes the place to eat, as 50 of the Lowcountry’s favorite casual and fine dining restaurants serve sample-sized portions and beer and wine. There’s also live entertainment, a waiters’ race and a special children’s area.

MOJA Arts Festival www.mojafestival.com In late September through early October, the MOJA Arts Festival celebrates African American and Caribbean arts. Featured are music, visual arts, storytelling, performances, crafts and children’s activities at various locations.

OCTOBER Fall Tour of Homes and Gardens www.preservationsociety.org Charleston’s historic homes and gardens welcome visitors on a rotating basis, starting in late September through most of October. Over five weeks, you can experience history close up while helping the Preservation Society raise funds.

NOVEMBER & DECEMBER Holiday Festival of Lights www.ccprc.com Experience the spirit of the holidays with millions of sparkling lights at James Island County Park. The display opens the second week of November and continues through New Year’s. There are more than 600 light displays, many reflected in the park’s waterways.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS |

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17

26

78

17A

Berkeley County

78

Dorchester County

Summerville

Goose Creek

17A

17A 52

61

17

165

Hanahan

33 41

North Charleston

17 7

642

Daniel Island

26

526

Mt. Pleasant

517

17

Ravenel

West Ashley

17

162

Isle of Palms

Charleston 30

Charleston County

699

703

Sullivan's Island

James Island

Atlantic Ocean

164 700

Johns Island

171

Meggett Folly Beach Kiawah Island

174

Seabrook Island

» NEWCOMER INFORMATION TELEPHONE AT&T 855-258-1471 www.att.com Home Telephone Company 843-761-9101 www.homesc.com WOW! 843-225-1000 www.wowway.com

CABLE

ELECTRICITY AND NATURAL GAS Berkeley Electric Cooperative 843-761-8200 www.becsc.com Edisto Electric Cooperative 800-433-3292 www.edistoelectric.com Santee Cooper 843-761-8000 www.santeecooper.com

Comcast 800-266-2278 www.comcast.com

South Carolina Electric & Gas 800-251-7234 www.sceg.com

WOW! 843-225-1000 www.wowway.com

GARBAGE

Time Warner Cable 866-892-7201 www.timewarnercable.com

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City of Charleston 843-724-7364 www.charleston-sc.gov City of Goose Creek 843-824-2200 www.cityofgoosecreek.com

| NEWCOMER INFORMATION

City of Hanahan 843-529-3413 www.cityofhanahan.com

Town of Summerville 843-619-0800 www.summerville.sc.us

City of Isle of Palms 843-886-8956 www.iop.net

WATER AND SEWER

James Island Public Service District 843-795-9060 www.jipsd.org Town of Moncks Corner 843-719-7900 www.townofmonckscorner. sc.gov Town of Mount Pleasant 843-884-8518 www.tompsc.com City of North Charleston 843-745-1026 www.northcharleston.org Town of Sullivan’s Island 843-883-3198 www.sullivansisland-sc.com

James Island Public Service District 843-795-9060 www.jipsd.org

Berkeley County Water & Sanitation Authority 843-572-4400 www.bcwsa.com

Town of Moncks Corner 843-719-7900 www.townofmonckscorner. sc.gov

Charleston Water System 843-727-6800 www.charlestonwater.com

St. John’s Water Co. 843-559-0186 www.stjohnswater.com

Dorchester County Water and Sewer Dept. 843-563-0075, 843-832-0075 www.dorchestercounty.net

Town of Sullivan’s Island 843-883-5733 www.sullivansisland-sc.com

City of Folly Beach 843-588-2447 www.cityoffollybeach.com City of Goose Creek 843-797-6220, ext. 1 www.cityofgoosecreek.com City of Isle of Palms 843-886-6148 www.iopwsc.com

Summerville Commissioners of Public Works 843-871-0810 www.summervillecpw.com Mount Pleasant Waterworks 843-884-9626 www.mountpleasantwaterworks. com

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Charleston 2016  

The Litchfield Company Charleston proudly presents, “Charleston.“ The comprehensive guide to relocating to the Charleston, SC area. Publishe...

Charleston 2016  

The Litchfield Company Charleston proudly presents, “Charleston.“ The comprehensive guide to relocating to the Charleston, SC area. Publishe...

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