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Imagine More

2014 Midlands Regional

Competitiveness Report TALENT | Entrepreneurial & Business Environment | Innovation | Industry Clusters | Livability

www.EngenuitySC.com


Overview Collaborate, plan, prosper. It’s a simple concept that can create a huge impact and change the place we call home. At EngenuitySC - a public-private partnership focused on enhancing our region’s economic competitiveness - we build partnerships and measure success around five indicators of competitive communities: innovative capacity, talent, entrepreneurial/business environment, livability and strong industry clusters. In keeping with our goal of measuring success in our region, EngenuitySC is excited to present the 2014 Midlands Regional Competitiveness Report. This report takes a closer look at these five indicators of competitive communities, measuring Columbia and other cities on a variety of metrics to see how we’re stacking up. We know that things don’t change overnight - for the good or bad. Columbia and her surrounding communities have made great strides in recent years to become more competitive with similar cities and regions around the country. A quick look around at our growing assets - from the redevelopment of Main Street to any of the large companies who call the Midlands home - tells a story of a re-emerging market and world-class competitor. But we still have work to do. We challenge you to pay close attention to the section in each category called “Magnifying Opportunities.” This is where, in a few succinct lines, we have recommended action. These actions become a task list for us all - as a region - to focus on over the next 12 months. Through collaboration, we will create a plan. And when we plan, we prosper.

Zoom In 1 TALENT A region’s ability to provide a skilled workforce to meet the demands of industry in its economy.

2 Entrepreneurial & Business Environment A region’s ability to commercialize innovation and to provide an environment that supports the growth of business ventures.

3 Innovation A region’s capacity to support creation of new knowledge and generate new ideas, products and processes.

4 Industry Clusters A region’s relative size, strength and density of high impact clusters and ability to grow industries that are competitive on

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an international scale.

5 Livability

Imagine More 2

2014 Midlands Regional Competitiveness Report

A region’s ability to attract and retain talent through building a dynamic live, learn, work and play environment.


Reading this Report How to read the data

Other content in this report

This report is based on data produced by various federal government agencies. Data was compiled and analyzed by economists at the University of South Carolina’s Darla Moore School of Business.

Accompanying the data in each category is anecdotal, featured content that provides context for the numbers. Those sections are:

What is considered the Columbia MSA? The data in this report is for the Columbia metropolitan statistical area (MSA), the primary MSA that covers the South Carolina Midlands. It includes Richland, Lexington, Kershaw, Fairfield, Saluda and Calhoun counties.

What is an index? This report examines many indicators of regional economic competitiveness. Each indicator is compared to the national average. For example, an index of 110 for the Columbia MSA means that our region is performing 10% above the U.S. average. Likewise, an index of 90 means our region is performing 10% below the U.S. average. (Indicator/U.S. Value) x 100 = Index Value

Coming Into Focus • Things we’re doing well: the individual metrics within a category where the Columbia MSA performs better than comparative cities, better than the U.S. average, or both • Opportunities for improvement: the individual metrics within a category where our region is performing below its comparative cities, below the national average, or both A Closer Look Spotlights a company or organization that is excelling within that particular area of focus Through Their Lens A local leader’s perspective on how we’re performing within that indicator Magnifying Opportunities A short list of things to focus on as a region over the next 12 months in order to move the needle

www.EngenuitySC.com

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Geography Columbia MSA The Columbia Metropolitan Statistical Area is an area of six counties - Richland, Lexington, Kershaw, Fairfield, Saluda and Calhoun - in central South Carolina. Its anchor city is the state capital of Columbia. As of the 2010 census, the Columbia MSA had a total population of 767,598, making it the second-largest metropolitan statistical area in the state of South Carolina.

Fairfield

Kershaw

Population: 23,956

Population: 61,697

Largest cities in Columbia MSA (by population) • • • • • • • •

Columbia Lexington West Columbia Cayce Irmo Forest Acres Camden Batesburg-Leesville

Richland Population: 384,504

Saluda Population: 19,875

Lexington Population: 262,391

Columbia Population: 129,272

Calhoun Population: 15,175

Population source: US Census Bureau; 2010 Census

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2014 Midlands Regional Competitiveness Report


Our Comparative Locations

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7 5 2

1

1. Raleigh, NC MSA* Population: 1,130,490

6. Charleston, SC MSA Population: 664,607

2. Knoxville, TN MSA Population: 837,571

7. Winston-Salem, NC MSA Population: 640,595

3. Greenville, SC MSA Population: 824,112

8. Lexington, KY MSA Population: 472,099

4. Columbia, SC MSA Population: 767,598

9. Tallahassee, FL MSA Population: 367,413

5. Greensboro, NC MSA Population: 723,801 *Raleigh is an aspirational metro, meaning it serves as a target for the Midlands as opposed to a peer metro

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Population source: US Census Bureau; 2010 Census 4

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How were the comparative locations chosen? The metro areas were chosen based on a diverse set of economic assets comparable to the Columbia MSA. These assets vary across the metros, with all metros having at least one of the following similar assets to Columbia: • State capital • Major university in region • Strong higher education system (2-year and 4-year) • Comparable population • Entrepreneurial environment • Strength in technology • Similar geographic situation and landscape

www.EngenuitySC.com

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Talent

A region’s ability to provide a skilled workforce to meet the demands of industry in its economy

The Index

The Indicators

100

Tallahassee

125

Raleigh

122

Worker Productivity: Measures a regional workforce’s productivity to support robust industries STEM Degrees: Percentage of degrees awarded in science, technology, engineering and math

107

Lexington (KY)

98

Charleston Columbia

96

Greenville

96

Knowledge Workers: Percentage of population employed in knowledgeintensive (STEM) occupations Educational Attainment: Percentage of population with: • Associate’s degree • Bachelor’s degree or higher

95

Greensboro

93

Knoxville

Global Talent: Percentage of population that is foreign-born

91

Winston-Salem

U.S. Average

Zooming In

Percentage of population with 2 year degree U.S. Average

6.58% 122.3

Percentage

6.31% 117.2

5.94% 110.4

Index Value

5.91% 109.9

5.57% 103.5

5.29% 98.3

Why focus on this? Graduates with 2 year degrees have applied skills that are in demand by many high tech industries. The availability of their skills is often a factor in attracting new business.

4.83% 89.9

Knoxville

Columbia

Raleigh

Charleston

Greenville

Greensboro

Tallahassee

4.75% 88.3

WinstonSalem

4.53% 84.1

Lexington (KY)

Source: : US Census Bureau; American Community Survey

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2014 Midlands Regional Competitiveness Report


Coming Into Focus Things we’re doing well • Educational attainment is impressive: 6.31% of population has an Associates degree; 9.27% has a Bachelors degree or higher (higher than the US average and most comparison metros) • Percentage of degrees awarded in STEM fields is higher than the US average Opportunities for improvement • Employment in STEM occupations is below the US average • GDP per worker ranks lower than all but 2 comparative metros • Foreign-born population is just 4.73% (versus 13.22% of the US population) ○

A Closer Look Midlands Technical College (MTC) collaborates with local industries, creating academic and Corporate and Continuing Education programs to meet their workforce needs. MTC partners with Michelin to build a pipeline of skilled highly technical, hard-to-find employees. MTC also partners with SCANA to create the only program in South Carolina that trains nuclear systems technicians who operate and maintain power plant equipment. The Business Accelerator on the MTC Enterprise Campus accommodates and supports emerging technology businesses that have left the research and development stage - Trulite Inc., Space Metals Fabricators, Direct Measurements Inc. and DPX Labs - and are ready for start-up production.

Through Their Lens “We are committed to preparing our students to be 21st century graduates who will be successful in college, career and life. We do not know what their world will look like years into the future. We do know we can predict that their world will be constantly changing driven by globalism, the demand for knowledge, and creativity and technology changes. Our graduates will need to be prepared to adapt rapidly to meet new demands and acquire new capabilities as the need arises.” – Dr. Karen Woodward, Superintendent, Lexington School District One “Over the past three years, Lower Richland High School has turned a corner many never expected. Once a failing school, Lower Richland is now climbing in the district rankings for test scores, scholarships and both student and teacher performance. How have we done it? Collaboration. In 2013 Lower Richland High School launched an innovative publicprivate partnership that focuses on STEM career opportunities, underscores the power of collaboration and sets a new standard for student achievement. By showing these students what success looks like, they’re finally starting to believe what I always knew - the sky’s the limit.” – Kelvin Wymbs, Principal, Lower Richland High School

Magnifying Opportunities Emphasize K-12 STEM programs and broaden curriculum to engage future workforce at a young age Develop a strategy to attract a more globally diverse workforce to better prepare the region to meet the needs of a global economy Align curriculum with business needs and retain the talent developed in the Midlands Increase state funding for public higher education to help keep the cost of a college education affordable and increase the number of college graduates to meet the demands of business and grow our economy

www.EngenuitySC.com

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Entrepreneurial & Business Environment The Index

A region’s ability to commercialize innovation and to provide an environment that supports the growth of business ventures

The Indicators

100

Proprietors’ Income Share: Percentage of income in a region generated by business ownership

109

Knoxville Charleston

102

Tallahassee

102

Raleigh

101

Business Churn: Percentage of establishment births of the total establishment activity (businesses with 20-499 employees) Business Density: Number of establishments per 1,000 employees

93

Lexington (KY)

91

Greenville

Business Services: Share of population employed in professional and technical services occupations

88

Columbia

87

Winston-Salem

75

Greensboro

U.S. Average

Zooming In

Business Churn (20-499 Employees)

Why focus on this? Businesses must be able to get off the ground to generate new jobs and new growth; the higher this rate, the more success entrepreneurs are enjoying.

U.S. Average

59.1% Percentage

113.8

56.9% 109.5

Index Value

Knoxville

Columbia

55.3% 106.5

Tallahassee

53.3% 102.7

Charleston

51.2% 98.5

WinstonSalem

49.6% 95.6

Raleigh

48.9% 94.3

Greenville

48.6% 93.5

Lexington (KY)

44.9% 86.4

Greensboro

Source: US Census Bureau; County Business Patterns

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2014 Midlands Regional Competitiveness Report


Through Their Lens

Coming Into Focus Things we’re doing well • Business Churn is high, indicating that the region effectively supports its entrepreneurial environment

Opportunities for improvement • Proprietor’s share of income, business density and share of employment in professional and technical services are below the national average

A Closer Look ○

The Columbia Region’s Entrepreneurial Ecosystem The Midlands has a robust offering of resources and programs for small businesses, startups and entrepreneurs. This is just a snapshot of the thriving and growing support system, which also includes research and technology commercialization, local government support, investment capital resources and connectivity opportunities. University Startup Resources • USC’s Startup Resource Center • Faber Entrepreneurship Center, Darla Moore School of Business Consulting, Education & Mentorship • South Carolina Small Business Development Center - Columbia • SC Manufacturers Extension Partnership • SCORE • Kauffman FastTrac Programs Startup Facilities & Programs • Tminus6 Startup Accelerator • USC IdeaLabs • USC/Columbia Technology Incubator • SOCO - The Columbia Cowork • SCRA Columbia Innovation Center, SC Launch Program • The Business Accelerator at Midlands Technical College • Benedict College Incubator

/ USC/Columbia Technology Incubator www.usccolainc.org The USC/Columbia Technology Incubator houses more than 40 early stage technology startups with access to USC’s Startup Resource Center and shared resources. It was recently named a “top 3 incubator program to watch” by Inc Magazine. The U.S. Economic Development Administration recently awarded $1.91M in funds for the construction of a new facility. Beginning in 2015, the project involves construction of a 50,000 sf facility on 3.62 acres as part of the USC Innovista Innovation District in the heart of downtown Columbia.

“As athletes and coaches, we witnessed the evolution of fabrics from cotton to performance fabrics in athletic apparel and recognized that sheets made of performance fabrics could provide amazing comfort. After our initial idea was born, we found incredible resources through USC’s Darla Moore School of Business to help develop a business plan. A few years later, we’re operating a multimillion-dollar business with a corporate office in Irmo, which provides strong benefits like low cost of living and the ability to attract talent. In 2013, SHEEX sold $70 million in products, and we’re proud to call the Midlands home.” – Susan Walvius, SHEEX Co-Founder/Co-CEO and former USC Women’s Basketball Coach – Michelle Brooke-Marciniak, SHEEX Co-Founder/Co-CEO and former WNBA athlete

Magnifying Opportunities Ensure a favorable regulatory climate for business growth and support Continue to invest in and grow the region’s incubators, accelerators and co-work spaces Connect entrepreneurial resources to small businesses and startups Increase collaboration among organizations that support entrepreneurial activity to reduce duplication

Source: Evolution Partners

www.EngenuitySC.com

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Innovative Capacity The Index

A region’s capacity to support creation of new knowledge and generate new ideas, products and processes

The Indicators

100 349

Raleigh

179

Lexington (KY)

119

Knoxville

98

Winston-Salem

86

Charleston

72

Columbia

71

Greenville Greensboro

Intellectual Property Creation: patents per 10,000 workers

135

Tallahassee

41

Innovation Awards: Small Business Innovation Research Awards per 100,000 residents

Why is Raleigh’s index so high? The Raleigh area’s Research Triangle Park has been in existence for decades, and has served as a model for research parks in other areas, including Innovista in Columbia. Drawing on the intellectual and innovative power of the University of South Carolina, Innovista’s Innovation District is an urban plan to transform portions of the downtown and waterfront areas in the heart of the city into a vibrant commercial and residential region where technical and creative talent can live, learn, work and play.

Research & Development: R&D expenditures per 1,000 people Academic Achievement: Percent of population aged 25 years and older holding a graduate degree

U.S. Average

Zooming In

Share of Population Aged 25 and older Holding a Graduate Degree

Why focus on this? Over time, employees with a graduate degree earn more, are less likely to be unemployed and are more likely to contribute to innovation, research and development in a region.

More than one in 10 people in Columbia have a graduate degree

Index Percentage Value Tallahassee 15.5% 142.2 Lexington (KY) 14.6% 133.9 Raleigh 14.4% 132.1 Knoxville 11.3% 103.7 United States Average 10.9% 100.0 Charleston 10.5% 96.3 Columbia 10.4% 95.4 Greenville 9.1% 83.5 Winston-Salem 8.8% 80.7 Greensboro 8.5% 78.0 Source: US Census Bureau; American Community Survey

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2014 Midlands Regional Competitiveness Report


Through Their Lens

Coming Into Focus Things we’re doing well • R&D expenditures are 40% higher than the national average • The region has a higher percentage of residents holding a graduate degree than three of its peer regions

Opportunities for improvement • The number of SBIR Awards and the number of patents awarded are below the US average

A Closer Look A&Q Nano Vaccines are one of the most effective technologies used to prevent or even eradicate debilitating diseases across the globe, however, they come with a major limitation—strict temperature sensitivities. Too hot or too cold and the valuable vaccines are rendered useless. A&Q Nano is a spin-off company from University of South Carolina discoveries made by Dr. L. Andrew Lee and Prof. Qian Wang utilizing nanotechnology to circumvent vaccine temperature and storage issues to enable these life-saving vaccines to remain effective for longer periods of time at a wide range of conditions. With backing from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and lab space at USC,

“After earning Computer Engineering degrees at USC, we founded IDV in 2000 in Columbia. IDV started out providing simulation and visualization software services, and launched SpeedTree, a virtual vegetation software product, in 2002. Since then, we’ve licensed SpeedTree for use in hundreds of top-tier video games and blockbuster movies like Avatar and Pirates of the Caribbean. And as our headquarters are in Lexington, we still call the Midlands home.” – Chris King and Michael Sechrest, Co-Founders, Interactive Data Visualization, Inc. (IDV)

Magnifying Opportunities A&Q Nano is working on vaccine stabilization technology for measles and malaria that could revolutionize healthcare in developing countries.

Support innovative activity through R&D funding and patent filings Leverage institutions of higher education for research and innovation Develop knowledge-based and STEM workforce pipeline Maximize programs that help turn intellectual property into innovative technologies such as SC Launch, Capital Angels and SC Angel Network

www.EngenuitySC.com

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High Impact Clusters The Index

A region’s relative size, strength, and density of high impact clusters and ability to grow industries that are competitive on an international scale

The Indicators

100

High Impact Density: Share of regional employment in traded clusters

270

Raleigh

Employment Diversity: Concentration of employment in top 5 occupations

185

Charleston

172

Lexington (KY)

Employment per square mile High Wage Employment: Concentration of jobs in high wage occupations (annual pay of $43,500+ per year)

164

Knoxville

158

Greenville

High Impact Growth: Establishment growth rates in traded clusters

142

Greensboro

129

Winston-Salem

Columbia and all metros are well above the U.S. average, demonstrating strong industry clusters in all 9 metros.

122

Tallahassee

120

Columbia U.S. Average

Zooming In

Employment Diversity

Why focus on this?

(Concentration of Employment in Top 5 Occupations)

A lower diversity percentage reflects stronger industry clusters.

Employment diversity measures the impact of the top industry clusters and their ability to provide workforce opportunity.

U.S. Average

101.9 Index Value

56.0%

98.3

58.0%

Percentage

96.8

58.9%

96.1

59.3%

94.9

60.1%

93.3

61.2%

92.5

61.7%

91.5

62.3%

84.63 67.4%

Raleigh

12

Columbia

WinstonSalem

2014 Midlands Regional Competitiveness Report

Greenville

Lexington (KY)

Charleston

Knoxville

Greensboro

Tallahassee

Source: US Census Bureau; County Business Patterns


Through Their Lens

Coming Into Focus Things we’re doing well • The region has low employment diversity, meaning there is a higher concentration in certain occupations, contributing to stronger clusters • Employment per square mile is nearly double the US average, creating a climate conducive to clusters

Opportunities for improvement • Share of employment in regional clusters and concentration of employment in high wage occupations are below the national average and many comparative regions • Growth rate in traded clusters is slightly below the US average

A Closer Look Traded economic clusters represent one of the best opportunities to move Columbia into a prosperous and vibrant economy. Here are three of the actively managed, traded clusters in the Midlands.

“Most people probably don’t think of Columbia when they think of world leaders in insurance technology, but that’s what the region has become. When BlueCross BlueShield of South Carolina moved to Columbia in 1957, it joined an existing community of insurance companies and became the cornerstone of the local insurance tech ecosystem. Now the area boasts more than 20 companies in this industry, making it a stronger and more competitive place to do business for all of us. At the same time, as this sector continues to grow, it provides a solid economic infrastructure for the community and good jobs for thousands of people.” – David Pankau, President and CEO, BlueCross BlueShield of South Carolina

Nuclear

Hydrogen Fuel Cells

nuhubsc.com NuHub is a collaborative group of public, private, higher education and workforce development stakeholders seeking to maximize economic and job creation opportunities for the nuclear industry in the Midstate region of South Carolina and establish the Midstate as a hub and global leader for nuclear energy innovation. Managed by EngenuitySC.

fuelcellcollaborative.com The Fuel Cell Collaborative was formed to attract private sector partners, top fuel cell scientists, entrepreneurs and innovators to the Columbia region. The group collaborates with private sector leaders from all areas of the market to discover, develop and deploy fuel cell technologies into city, university and commercial applications throughout the region. Managed by EngenuitySC.

Insurance Technology & Services its-sc.com iTs|SC represents more than 20 companies and 15,000 employees in the Midlands. The cluster includes insurance providers, technology and service providers and higher education partners. Its mission is to foster an environment of opportunity where talent, innovation, collaboration and a shared vision ignite a worldclass industry. Managed by the SC Council on Competitiveness.

Magnifying Opportunities Support workforce development strategies to attract new talent and retain local talent important to existing clusters Ensure development efforts are coordinated and include collaboration from existing cluster members Develop a shared Midlands vision and action plan for economic development that emphasizes regional collaboration amongst local Chambers, nonprofits and other economic development entities Develop tactics to attract nationally and globally impactful headquarter firms

www.EngenuitySC.com

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Livability

A region’s ability to attract and retain talent through building a dynamic live, learn, work and play environment

The Index

The Indicators

100

Arts and Entertainment: Compound annual growth rate of the share of employment in arts, entertainment and recreation (2007-2011)

142

Winston-Salem

122

Charleston

Healthcare Access

107

Columbia

Commute Time

98

Tallahassee Raleigh

96

Vitality: Percentage of population 18-40 years old

Greensboro

96

Volunteer Rate

Lexington (KY)

95

Cost of Living Index Crime: Violent crime rate per 100,000 inhabitants

93

Greenville

91

Knoxville

Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index U.S. Average

Zooming In

Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index U.S. Average

69.4 104.8

66.6 100.6

Percentage

66.6 100.6

66.5 100.5

Index Value

66.3 100.1

Why focus on this? This measures the well-being of residents in an area based on six domains. The happier a region’s residents, the less likely they are to leave; a higher index can also help recruit talent and businesses to an area.

65.9 99.6

65.7 99.2

65.5 98.9

64.6 97.6

Raleigh

Columbia

Greenville

Lexington

WinstonSalem

Charleston

Greensboro

Tallahassee

Knoxville

Source: American Community Survey

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2014 Midlands Regional Competitiveness Report


Through Their Lens

Coming Into Focus Things we’re doing well • The region is growing its arts, entertainment and recreation offerings as indicated by a high growth rate in these occupations • The average commute time is 22.7 minutes - 3 full minutes below the US average • Over 30% of the population is made up of 18-40 year olds, contributing to a young and vibrant culture • Cost of living is well below the national average and competitive with many peer regions

Opportunities for improvement • Volunteer rate is slightly below national average and lower than many comparative regions • While violent crime rate is better than other in-state MSAs (Charleston and Greenville), it is higher than the national average

“As the Mayor of Cayce, I am so proud that we’ve been able to create a sense of community and place for our residents. This success is a result of our interconnectedness to the larger region - from our seamless Riverwalks weaving together neighboring cities to large industry partners like Amazon and Nephron locating at our borders for water and sewer services. I believe we rise and fall together in the Midlands, and as the Reality Check effort underscored, embracing a vision beyond our geographical borders is key to our regional strength and competitiveness. l will continue advocating for richer partnerships across city and county lines and hope that this collaboration will lead to a more prosperous, more liveable Midlands.” – Elise Partin, Mayor of Cayce

Magnifying Opportunities Support the Reality Check – Midlands Action

A Closer Look

Collaborative that is focused on improving

The Midlands boasts an array of attractions that offer something for everyone: from idyllic shopping districts and museums to festivals and events. Here are just a few of the attractions and assets that make the region so “liveable.”

prioritizing the efficient development of green space

• Annual Lexington Wine Walk • Artista Vista • Carolina Cup at the Springdale Race Course in Camden • Colonial Life Arena • Columbia Metropolitan Airport • Congaree National Park • Famously Hot New Year • Historical Tours through Homes, Cemeteries and Churches

• Indie Grits Festival • Lake Murray • Regional Museums like the Columbia Art Museum, Cayce Historical Museum and Lexington County Museum • Riverbanks Zoo and Gardens • Rosewood Crawfish Festival • Saluda Shoals Park • Soda City Market

transportation around existing cities and towns,

• • • • •

South Carolina Philharmonic South Carolina State Fair South Carolina State House St. Pat’s in Five Points The State Museum and EdVenture Children’s Museum • University of South Carolina and Gamecock Athletics • Vibrant Local Theater Scene • World Beer Festival

and enhancing key economic drivers in the Midlands Combat crime through increased collaboration and shared responsibilities among law enforcement entities Promote volunteer activities and opportunities that appeal to diverse audiences Support community-focused philanthropic organizations that are working on key livability issues, like the United Way of the Midlands

www.EngenuitySC.com

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TM

Imagine More 1000 Catawba Street, Suite 130, Columbia, SC 20201 803.354.5720 | engenuitysc.com About EngenuitySC

EngenuitySC Executive Committee

Headquartered in Columbia, S.C., EngenuitySC is a public-private partnership focused on enhancing our region’s economic competitiveness and prosperity. Through collaboration with business, government, higher education and community leaders, EngenuitySC builds partnerships and measures success around five indicators of competitive communities: innovative capacity, talent, entrepreneurial/business environment, livability and strong industry clusters. Through our innovative process, unique vision and ability to create a plan and deliver results, EngenuitySC is working to build a more competitive and prosperous Midlands region.

• Co-Chair: Dr. Harris Pastides, University of South Carolina • Co-Chair: Mayor Steve Benjamin, City of Columbia • Mike Brenan, BB&T • Lee Bussell, Chernoff Newman • Holt Chetwood, Wells Fargo • Councilwoman Tameika Isaac Devine, Columbia City Council • Steve Hall, Ovation Partners, LLC • Chairman Norman Jackson, Richland County Council • Chairman Johnny Jeffcoat, Lexington County Council • Bill Kirkland, University of South Carolina • Councilman Paul Livingston, Richland County Council • John Lumpkin • Dr. Terry Michalske, Savannah River National Lab • Senator Nikki G. Setzler, South Carolina Senate • Dr. Keith Shah, BlueCross BlueShield of South Carolina • Dr. Sonny White, Midlands Technical College • Larry Wilson, FirstMark Capital

For more information, visit www.engenuitysc.com.

Designed and published by: SC Biz News, publisher of the Columbia Regional Business Report

2014 Midlands Regional Competitiveness Report - EngenuitySC  

Collaborate, plan, prosper. It’s a simple concept that can create a huge impact and change the place we call home. At EngenuitySC - a public...

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