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Scan Magazine | Feature | Scandinavian Everyday Heroes

Scandinavian Everyday Heroes:

Summiting the streets of Oslo It started as an idea he just could not shake. Adventurer, film maker and photographer Petter Nyquist had filmed a light-hearted project in Las Vegas when he befriended two men living on the streets of the prosperous city. Despite Nyquist’s 11 expeditions to the Poles and two to Mt Everest, the idea scared him more than anything he had done before. In November 2014, he left his family, home and possessions behind to live on Oslo’s streets for 52 days. The subsequent TV series, Petter Uteligger, is an ode to his most challenging adventure and the friends he made along the way. By Julie Lindén | Photos: Peter Nyguist

“We met a couple of guys who lived in the tunnels under the city, and they let us stay with them for a few nights,” says

the 37-year-old when recalling the Vegas trip he embarked on with a colleague four years ago. “We spent a Friday gambling and sharing laughs, having an absolute blast. We just wanted to hang out on their terms. I got more and more curious about how these people were able to create a meaningful existence without having their basic needs – proper shelter, food, care – met. I realised I could find answers to those questions a mere half hour from my home in Norway.”

Overcoming fears of the unknown Midnight, 12 November 2014. Nyquist has 108 | Issue 84 | January 2016

read his two-year-old daughter a good night story, kissed his girlfriend goodbye and closed the door to his west-ofOslo house. He is wearing a few layers of clothing, carrying two cameras and 30NOK for the metro ride into central Oslo – substantially less than what is normally required for his expeditions, which are planned for months and to the utmost detail. In a few days, the familiar mental toil of reaching the summit of the world, or the coldest corners of the planet, will seem minuscule. “A few days in I got quite paranoid,” says Nyquist. “The lack of sleep does that to you. It’s a well-known form of torture, I guess.” Sleeping on benches, on floors, and – after some time – a small concrete ‘cave’ behind Oslo Central Station, his sleep was interrupted more often than not. “I always felt like I was being watched, like I was on somebody’s radar. I wouldn’t say there was one time when my fear peaked, despite hearing stories of rough sleepers being hit with bats and

Profile for Scan Group

Scan Magazine, Issue 84, January 2016  

Promoting Brand Scandinavia. Featuring interview with Ace Wilder.

Scan Magazine, Issue 84, January 2016  

Promoting Brand Scandinavia. Featuring interview with Ace Wilder.