Discover Germany, Issue 81, December 2019

Page 56

Photo: © Switzerland Tourism, swiss-image.ch/Ivo Scholz

Festive season for foodies: Top-ten Christmas market treats ‘Tis the season to be jolly – and indulgent! After all, Christmas just wouldn’t be Christmas without visiting a gorgeous seasonal market at least once. Luckily, almost all European towns host their own little markets these days but if you seek to get the most authentic experience possible, you should head to Germany, Austria or Switzerland. Here, visitors can browse festively lit stalls and indulge in some awesome culinary treats that you can only find around Christmas. We explored the DACH region’s markets to find out more. TEXT: NANE STEINHOFF  I  PHOTOS: PIXABAY

You probably associate Christmas with some sort of smell or taste. Depending where you’re from, this could include the smell of goose or duck that is sizzling away in the oven, a hot cup of mulled wine or the scent of distinctive spices such as cinnamon. It is well-known that the Christmas season is the one for indulging and treat56  |  Issue 81  |  December 2019

ing yourself to culinary delights which you wouldn’t usually eat throughout other months of the year. According to research by Wren Kitchens, on average, Brits will eat almost 6,000 calories over the course of Christmas Day, which is three times the recommended daily intake of calories for adults. Pretty impressive, right?

But don’t think about your figure just yet – after all, you’ve got the entirety of January to get back into the gym. For now, be sure to indulge in some awesome Christmas market treats that will make you feel merry inside and out! And to help you manage the abundance of food choices that Christmas markets have to offer, we introduce the top-ten treats below. 1) Lumumba You have obviously heard of mulled wine before but have you heard of Lumumba? It’s a great alternative to mulled wine and is served at many Christmas markets throughout Germany, Austria and Switzerland. In German, it is also sometimes called ‘Tote Tante’, which translates