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February/March 2015

Protecting What Matters Since 1945, Cherry Insurance has helped get families and businesses back on their feet when disaster strikes


Train the employees you need The Canada-Saskatchewan Job Grant helps you train people to meet your requirements and provides the skills they need to achieve their career goals. The Governments of Saskatchewan and Canada are offering this program to provide funding – up to $10,000 per trainee – to train new or existing employees for available jobs.

Receive up to

10 ,000 per trainee

$

Program Features: • You select the people you want to train and the training program.

• You pay at least one-third of the cost and the program funds the rest.

• You provide a job at the end of training.

Visit economy.gov.sk.ca/job-grant to learn more about program criteria and how to apply.

Funding provided by the Government of Canada through the Canada Job Grant.

This program is part of the Government of Saskatchewan’s commitment to keep our economy growing.


Table of Contents

Featured Articles President’s View Pg. 4 In support of Daylight Savings Time

Cover Story: Protecting what matters Pg. 5 Since 1945, Saskatchewan-owned Cherry Insurance has helped get families and businesses back on their feet when disaster strikes

Values and vision Pg. 7 A living hinge for business success

Looking ahead: a message from the Executive Director Pg. 19

Promotional Features Invest in your future president Pg. 10 2 Web Design Pg. 12

Saskatchewan-owned Cherry Insurance has been in business since 1945 (Image: Grant Romancia Photography)

BUSINESS View­is a bimonthly publication of the Greater Saskatoon Chamber of Commerce 104-202 4th Avenue North, Saskatoon, SK S7K 0K1 Phone: (306) 244-2151 Fax: (306) 244-8366 Email: chamber@saskatoonchamber.com Website: www.saskatoonchamber.com Twitter: @stoonchamber Reproduction of any material contained in Business View is permitted provided credit is given to the Greater Saskatoon Chamber of Commerce. Articles and criticisms are invited, but views expressed in Business View are those of contributors and are not necessarily endorsed by, or are policy of, the Greater Saskatoon Chamber of Commerce. We encourage you to support the business leaders whose names and products you see advertised in this issue as well as throughout our entire membership. The Board reserves the right to edit submissions.

Your 2015 roadmap to digital transformation

Introducing The Myriad - Phase 2 Pg. 16

STAFF

Cover image by Grant Romancia

Kent Smith-Windsor, Executive Director Derek Crang, Sales & Membership Director Terry Lawrence, Administrator Roz Macala, Executive Secretary Kevin Meldrum, Marketing Director Linda Saunders, Bookkeeper Ryan Wig, Communications Director

BUSINESS VIEW SASKATOON FEBRUARY/MARCH 2015

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President’s View

In support of Daylight Savings Time Is it time for Saskatchewan to adopt a change in policy?

Image: Bohbeh/Shutterstock.com

As the days get longer and spring approaches, Canadians will soon move their clocks one hour forward to enjoy longer evenings in the sun. All Canadians except residents of Saskatchewan, that is. Saskatchewan remains the only jurisdiction in Canada that does not apply Daylight Savings Time. There is no logical reason to continue with this policy – in fact, the following are only some of the compelling reasons to apply Daylight Savings Time: 1) Energy Savings. Studies have shown that Daylight Savings Time actually reduces energy consumption through the lower use of artificial light. Because most Saskatchewan people are sleeping when the sun rises in the summer, but are awake until after the sun has set on even the longest day, it is estimated that energy savings would average 1% for each day that Daylight Savings Time is in use. This may sound trivial, but with climate change advocates calling for significant

reductions in emissions, and our province having the majority of its power generated by coal-fired plants, reducing emissions is a critical issue for Saskatchewan. A reduction of 1% in energy consumption is significant. 2) Global Business. It would simplify doing business globally for Saskatchewan companies. Saskatchewan has more exports per capita than any other province in Canada, yet we are the only province that does not adhere to Daylight Savings Time. This simply does not make sense. How many times have you asked yourself “are we two hours behind Toronto, or one hour? Seven hours behind Europe, or eight hours?” And if this is confusing for us, think of how confusing it is for our business partners in Toronto or Paris. 3) Improved Health. It may actually improve the overall health of Saskatchewan people, via increased evening daylight time for outdoor activities and exercise for both children and adults. For a province with high rates of obesity and Type II diabetes and health care costs growing much faster than the growth rate of the overall economy, anything we can do to improve the health of our citizens is critical. 4) Increased Economic Activity. It would encourage development and increased economic activity through increased revenue for outdoor

recreation facilities such as golf courses, both from local residents and tourists, as people are more likely to utilize such facilities at 9:00 PM rather than 5:00 AM. 6) Cost Effective: It would cost the government nothing. How many things can the government do that improves the lives of their citizens at no cost? The policy of both current and past provincial governments has been to survey Saskatchewan citizens on whether or not they want Daylight Savings Time, and hide behind the results of such surveys to say there is no consensus for change. Did Tommy Douglas have a consensus for change when his government brought in Medicare? Of course not – but he did it anyway, because it was the right thing to do for the people of Saskatchewan. Governments are elected to make decisions that improve the lives of their citizens. Implementing Daylight Savings Time will reduce our emissions, improve our quality of life, and send a message to the rest of the country (and the world) that Saskatchewan is not only ready for business, but that we mean business. The time to implement Daylight Savings Time is now.

Tony Van Burgsteden President Greater Saskatoon Chamber of Commerce

2014-15 Board of Directors for the Greater Saskatoon Chamber of Commerce President Tony Van Burgsteden - AREVA Resources Canada Inc. 1st Vice-President Tanya Knight - MNP LLP. 2nd Vice-President Jason Yochim - Saskatoon Region Association of REALTORS ®. Past President Tracy Arno - Essence Recruitment. Barry Berglund - Lawson Heights Pentecostal Assembly. Kelly Bode - WMCZ Lawyers & Mediators. Bill Cooper - PotashCorp. Rich Gabruch - Gabruch Legal Group. Peggy Koenig - Koenig & Associates. Silvia Martini - Interlink Research Inc. Karl Miller - Meridian Development. Julian Ovens - BHP Billiton. Kristy Rempel - Saskatoon Community Foundation. Sanj Singh - AdeTherapeutics Inc. Brian Skanderbeg - Claude Resources Inc. Chris Woodland - MacPherson, Leslie and Tyerman LLP.

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Cover Story

Protecting what matters

Since 1945, Saskatchewan-owned Cherry Insurance has helped get families and businesses back on their feet when disaster strikes Article by Jeff Davis Scott Cherry, like his father and grandfather before him, has made a career for himself in the insurance business. As head of Cherry Insurance, the province’s largest Saskatchewan-owned insurance broker, the industry has been kind to him. But that doesn’t mean insurance is the easiest product to sell. “It’s something most people don’t want to buy,” Cherry says. “A lot of people don’t see value in it, and they’re trading money for paper and a promise, and nobody likes to do that,” he says with a chuckle. “It’s nice to put a key in something and drive it away!” Cherry Insurance was launched back in 1945 by Scott Cherry’s grandfather, who started selling policies out of his home on Temperance Street, near the university. The CCF was in power, and having just launched Saskatchewan Government Insurance (SGI), it decided to give grandfather Cherry one of the first SGI vendor appointments. He was already 65 at the time. Scott Cherry’s father got involved in 1951, and operated the business until his death in 1984. At that point Scott, who had built up about 12 years’ experience in the industry, took the reins. Cherry says he took a work-to-learn approach to his education, and began his career working at SGI headquarters in Regina. “Working for a few years down there really helped to get some knowledge and experience, before coming back here to start with the agency,” he says. “To see a different side of our industry, as a broker not an insurance agency, proved very valuable.” Cherry Insurance now has six locations, four in Saskatoon, plus one in Prince Albert and one in North Battleford. It has a total of 24,000 customers who own policies ranging from business, car and home insurance to more exotic things like kidnapping insurance. While home and car insurance are mainstays of the industry, new trends in society often produce new insurance products. These days Cyber Risk policies are trending, Cherry says, as identity theft becomes an ever-

Scott Cherry, President, with daughter Robyn Cherry, Vice President of Cherry Insurance (image: Grant Romancia)

larger problem. “It covers expenses you would incur in recreating your documents if someone stole your identity, or was using your charge cards, it can pay those back to a certain level.” “Businesses can buy it too,” he adds. “Big companies like banks are getting hacked, and their reputations can be harmed by this. These policies send people in to try to mend that reputation, with advertising programs and things like that, and they are becoming quite popular as hacking is getting more and more frequent.” Unfortunately, Cherry has seen far too often what happens when a home or businesses is lost due to fire. While this can be heartbreaking, he says he feels good having people’s backs when the unthinkable happens. “It’s nothing you can change,” he says. “You just try to make it as easy as possible for people.” One major benefit of Cherry Insurance’s success is the company’s growing capacity for charitable giving, Cherry says. “I think its win-win,” he says. “It’s a good public relations approach, and there is a benefit to the community.” “We’re frequent supporters of the Saskatoon Community Foundation, we’ve done work

with STARS air ambulance, SPCA, New Hope Dog rescue, READ Saskatoon, Care and Share,” he says. “We like to mix it up.” The 60 employees of Cherry Insurance play an active role in selecting which charities to support, and the company matches monies donated by staff. “We talk to our employees and ask for their input on things that are special to them, and we generally get a pretty good response,” he says. “Most times its things that near and dear to people’s hearts, because of family problems, or things that happen… animals and kids are the popular ones.” The advice Cherry offers to businesspeople in Saskatoon is to really dig in and learn more about their insurance policies. Not all policies are created equal, and it’s important to ensure your policy suits your specific needs. “Each business’ operations can be radically different,” he says. “It could be a retailer, manufacturer, distributer and all they have different needs as far as risk is concerned.” The most commonly overlooked policy type is business interruption insurance, which can mean the difference between a business’ life or death when calamity strikes. “In case of major loss, business interruption insurance pays profit, salaries, added expenses and so on until you are back in operation,” he says. “A lot of people don’t necessarily buy that, but it is an important coverage – it’s part of a disaster plan.” “If it’s a 12 or 15 or 18 month window before you get back into business, where do your earnings come from, your salaries, who is paying for your lodging?” he says. “In some cases you have highly skilled tradespeople and other talent, and if they don’t have work or some kind of compensation, you’re losing that skill.” Cherry Insurance - Main Branch Downtown 350 3rd Ave S Saskatoon, SK Phone: 306.653.2313

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Business News

A new year and a new look for the Chamber of Commerce

The Greater Saskatoon Chamber of Commerce is pleased to announce the launch of our newly re-designed visual identity. Developed by Roger Denis of Denis Design Works, the designed was created to reflect the optimism, confidence and "can-do" attitude of the Saskatoon business community.

BREAKING NEWS! YOUR CAB IS NOW A TOUCH OF YOUR SCREEN AWAY!

United Cabs NEW Mobile APP! Now Available United Cabs is pleased to announce its Mobile App is now available. You can download our App from; Apple App Store, Google Play Store or from our website: www.unitedgroup.ca. You can book a cab from your current location, select a different location or book for a later date. You will see an email confirming your reservation and a notification which cab # has accepted your trip. A map will pop up and let you track the cab to your doorstep! A text message will let you know when it arrives! Make your next cab order as easy as touching your screen. DOWNLOAD UNITED CABS APP TODAY!

THE UNITED GROUP 225 Avenue B North Saskatoon, SK. S7L 1E1 Office; 306-244-3767 Fax; 306-652-0348 Website; www.unitedgroup.ca Cabs; 306-652-2222/306-653-3333/ 306-657-7777 Prestige Car Service; 306-664-2222 Atomic Auto Service; 306-244-6144 Railway Gas; 306-244-6145

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BUSINESS VIEW SASKATOON FEBRUARY/MARCH 2015

As we look forward to an exciting year ahead, we felt this was the perfect time to unveil our new look. Be sure to watch for the announcement of our new website, coming early 2015! The Greater Saskatoon Chamber of Commerce: Building the Best Business Climate in Canada.


From the Board

Values and vision A living hinge for business success

By Silvia Martini, Vice-President Interlink Research Group and Member of the Board, Greater Saskatoon Chamber of Commerce

Emblazoned in my memory is the meeting when decades earlier, as industry pioneers and newly minted entrepreneurs, we found ourselves at a major crossroad. As assuredly as the Silvia Martini, beautiful Saskatoon Vice-President sky shone cloudless Interlink Research and bright that day, a Group storm of uncertainty was brewing on the horizon; our future was being threatened. As we deliberated our decision, a seminal moment occurred; we recognized it as a test to the carefully articulated values and vision for our business. Naiveté was unceremoniously thrown out the window. Our values and vision were no longer just well crafted words on paper; they were challenging us squarely. We suddenly saw our decision as one that would either uphold or, conversely, contradict our values; either support our vision, or eventually alter our course. The challenges were an important testament to our character and brand. Aligning at points of stress and strengthening with use, values and visions work together like a living hinge -trusting and fatigue resistant contributors to the sturdy framework on which strategies are designed and supported. They are most often widely flexed during strategic planning or branding sessions, but best integrated in the very DNA of the organization, and witnessed in daily practice. Own it. Respect it. Protect it. Work It. I can site numerous scholarly articles on the power and importance of upholding one’s organizational vision, and its values. Simplifying this, I can promise you that as long as you are in a leadership position

you will face many difficult decisions, and that your staff will determine nuances on direction by your behaviour and decisions. These will serve as an unofficial guide for their decisions and actions, despite stated policies.

Aligning at points of stress and strengthening with use, values and visions are like living hinges; trusting and fatigue resistant contributors to the sturdy framework on which strategies are supported. The vision and values are often tested; some through small and seemingly inconsequential independent daily decisions, others much more obvious. It is often the latter, wherein lengthy deliberations ensue that are seen as pivotal. However, do not discount the former, with its potential for independent surreptitious decisions, which can result in a surprise avalanche of negative consequences (ergo the now often-cited bankrupt, then giant Enron Corporation, and its disgraced auditors, one of then top Big-5 accounting firms, Arthur Anderson LLP). When a leader integrates and exercises daily the behaviours that support the organization’s values and toward realizing its vision, employees and stakeholders gain greater clarity; expectations and directions support long-term sustainable success, and not just short-term outcomes. This is done through owning, protecting, respecting and working the organization’s values and vision – always. Taking the time to review and reflect upon the vision and values before one begins the business day helps to instill these as a living hinge for decisions and behaviours. If this

is not possible, taking the time to at least vet decisions against whether they support the organization’s vision and values, and if they are on mission are crucial. • Will the decision help you get closer to the expressed organization’s vision? • Can it be fully supported by your organization’s clearly stated and supported values? • Can the decision be supported, if challenged on ethics? • Is it on mission? If you cannot confidently answer affirmatively to these questions, carefully consider other options that affirm congruency between stated intention and behaviours. Owning or leading a business is as much a journey of personal evolution and courage, as it is about business success; the latter, in fact, depends greatly on the former. Considering the values and vision of the organization as a living hinge will help maintain focus and equilibrium. Flexing it daily will assuredly support success. Silvia Martini, Vice-President – Interlink Research Inc., is a Director of the Board for the Greater Saskatoon Chamber of Commerce, and past Chair of its Governance and Executive Committees. She is a Board Director of the Board SaskWater Corporation, and a member of its Governance Committee. She is a mentor for the Edwards School of Business Betty-Ann Heggie Womentorship Program, and a professional advisor with the Raj Manek Mentorship Program. In business since 1982, she is a strategist and entrepreneur, writer and speaker. Silvia can be reached at martini.interlink@sasktel. net, or at (306) 281-9019.

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Celebrate Success!

Nominate a business today for a 2015 SABEX Award Nominations are now open for the 2015 Celebrate Success! Awards. Nominate a deserving business today. Why should you nominate a business? Here are what some past nominees and winners have to say:

“Being at Celebrate Success was a great night! It provided the chance to mingle and see what other companies are providing as services and really just to get our name out there. Go2Guys Inc, since being a finalist for a SABEX Award, has become noticed by other companies that may not have known we were around. Go2Guys Inc is a smaller company so being at the SABEX Awards got us noticed by other companies which in turn have sent us business. Being a SABEX Finalist has also allowed us to use the SABEX logo in our advertising which also brings awareness to the Go2Guys.” Michele Go2Guys Inc.

“Over the past year, I have proudly displayed the SABEX Finalist logo on marketing materials. People recognize the logo right away and it really reinforces to the public

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that we are a reputable company. I have displayed the trophy at trade shows and people take second look, impressed with at what we have on the table. It means a lot as a new, small business owner to receive this kind of recognition.” Chris Wood Wood’s Body Goods

“Winning the 2014 SABEX Award for Marketing has enhanced the profile of my company and certainly opened up doors that until this recognition happened, were pretty firmly closed. “As a relatively new Saskatoon company, it was important for us to build trust and a good reputation. We applied 3 years in a row, made the finals twice and were overjoyed to eventually win in 2014. For the Chamber to recognize us as Saskatoon’s best marketers was a huge deal for us; we are proud to be members of such a forward thinking Chamber and encourage all new companies to join and apply for the SABEX Awards.” Sara Wheelwright S&E Trusted Online Directories Inc

“Wiegers Financial & Benefits was proud to receive the Community Involvement award for SABEX in 2014. We were absolutely honoured when many of our clients reached out and congratulated us on winning the event. Not only did we receive positive comments, but also many clients sent us congratulatory notes about our involvement in SABEX, which we greatly appreciated. The entire Wiegers team embraced our efforts to make a difference in the community, and was a driving force behind receiving the award. We recommend anyone who is considering applying for a SABEX award to go ahead and do it. It’s great for your clients, as well as your entire team.” Cliff & Deb Wiegers Wiegers Financial & Benefits

This year’s event will be held on May 14th 2015. For more information on how to nominate a business today, visit the official site at www.celebrate-success.ca.


Your business needs are diverse. Our solutions are flexible.

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306.653.9772

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Promotional Feature

Invest in your future president Great companies think long-term; not just in years, but in decades. At Golder Associates Ltd., succession planning goes beyond company walls and into the classroom. “From the day our company started in 1960, we have always thought in terms of being multi-generational,” says Phil Bruch, a Principal and Senior Geotechnical Engineer at the Saskatoon office. “We believe in long-term planning. That’s one of the reasons we decided to support students at the University of Saskatchewan through the Building Futures Campaign.” Brad Novecosky, Managing Associate at Golder Associates Ltd. points out that at its Saskatoon office, “the vast majority of our employees have been born, raised and educated in Saskatchewan.” Many of those employees are graduates from the U of S. Both Brad and Phil believe the University plays an important role in the development of the province’s economy, and in preparing the best and brightest from our province for leadership roles here at home. “The U of S not only educates our young people; it also helps keep them here,” adds Bruch. Business support through the Building Futures Fund and other giving opportunities through the Business Annual Giving Program such as named awards, can have a far-reaching impact. Currently only one out of every three students who apply for a bursary or award is successful. For many hard-working, deserving students who are not as fortunate, their potential could be at risk – and that is something Saskatchewan does not want to see. Supporting students helps to sustain and develop a pool of exceptional professional talent ready to work for Saskatchewan companies. While donors have the option to keep their gifts confidential, companies can use their generosity as an opportunity to increase recruitment success by developing a higher profile at the University. Business named awards do exactly that. Businesses

Golder Associates Ltd. employees Steven Sands and Stacie Walker are both recent University of Saskatchewan Engineering Alumni (supplied photo) can establish an annual student award in their company’s name, by contributing a minimum of $1,000 per year for five years as either a bursary or a scholarship. Students who receive these awards often comment on the importance of the donor’s generosity and how it inspires students to work even harder, and to someday emulate their benefactors. There are many ways to provide this much-needed support, spreading a larger gift through a monthly giving schedule. But any amount is appreciated. Perhaps most importantly, being a corporate donor strengthens the connection between the University of Saskatchewan and our thriving business community. The partnership benefits not only students, but also our community, our province, and beyond. “As a company, we want to be known as caring and giving,” says Phil. “Donating is part of our culture, and donating to the University of Saskatchewan shows our commitment to education.”

Canada Revenue Agency Charitable Registration Number 11927 9313 RR0001

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For more information, or to make your business donation to help students today, please contact: Namarta Kochar Development Officer, Leadership Annual Giving 306-966-2402 namarta.kochar@usask.ca Sandra Lazar Associate Director, Annual Giving 306-966-7910 sandra.lazar@usask.ca


Member News

Vikram Vij to fire up entrepreneurs at the 19th annual Raj Manek Memorial Banquet Restaurant tycoon, celebrity chef and entrepreneur Vikram Vij will be the keynote speaker at the 19th Annual Raj Manek Banquet on Thursday, February 26th, 2015. The Raj Manek Foundation will be celebrating the contributions of mentors and protégés to the Saskatchewan business community and welcoming new program partners the Regina and Warman Chambers of Commerce. The Raj Manek Foundation will also be honouring the 2015 Above & Beyond Award winner. Nominations are still being accepted. Tickets can be purchased online at www. manekmentorship.sk.ca We sat down with the food industry titan to talk about entrepreneurship, community, and family life. Q. What impact did your upbringing have on your desire to be an entrepreneur? A. As a child and teen, I was always making deals with friends and family, usually ones that benefited me but not always! When I was younger, when I set my mind to something, I gave it my all. I’ve made sure to keep that trait as I’ve gotten older. Q. Have you ever felt that your ethnic background has ever been a help or hindrance in your entrepreneurial development? A. My ethnic background is definitely not a hindrance. I’m a proud Indian and a proud Canadian. I’m extremely passionate about bringing knowledge, acceptance and education about Indian food to Canada. If anything, I’d say my background has given me a voice and weight that I might not have otherwise had. Q. What do you use to motivate yourself each day particularly when you are faced with challenges?

have supported me and I’m grateful for that. It’s hard being children of restaurant owners, but they are smart, wonderful people and I’m very proud of them. Q. Do you have a succession plan in place and if so, what process did you go through to develop this? A. I have a couple of people who I trust completely in the business and they would take over seamlessly. I’ve worked with them over many, many years. I’m happy that many of my staff have been with me a long time. Getting great people to stay with you is so important to running a successful business. Q. How has your community aided your business development? A. Well, I’m definitely busy - and that motivates me. But I also make sure to have “me” time, so I try to have an afternoon nap, and I do yoga, which helps me regain my mental balance. Q. What types of financial and personal risks have you had to take on in order to be an entrepreneur? A. I’ve taken many risks over the years both financial and personal but that’s what you do when you are passionate about something. The success comes when you have a great plan and good people in place who can help make those risks become reality. Q. What roles have your family played in the development of your businesses and how important was their involvement?

A. I’ve been so lucky in that the communities near my restaurants and my factory have been so welcoming and kind to me. I was also honoured recently to win the Surrey Entrepreneur of the Year award. I’ve opened a restaurant, My Shanti, in Surrey in the past year, and the factory where my Vij’s At Home frozen meals are made, is also in Surrey, but I was genuinely surprised and delighted to receive such a wonderful accolade. Q. What advice would you have for Saskatchewan to grow its entrepreneurial resources? A. Be proud of your culture, of your surroundings, and your roots. Whatever your brand or product, market it as though it’s the best thing out there.

A. Meeru, my wife, is my business partner at both Vij’s and Rangoli and we have written two books together as well, so you could say we’ve played a role in the development of those sides of the business. My daughters

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Promotional Feature

Your 2015 roadmap to digital transformation By Mouneeb Shahid, CEO, 2 Web Design

We see and experience everyday the speed at which we are adopting new communication technologies. Through our smartphones and social media profiles, we are in some way “always connected”. High performing businesses understand the leverage these engaging platforms provide and by making use of digital marketing they are proactive in gaining market share. However, most organizations don’t have a strategy for digital transformation and as a consequence their online marketing efforts are not managed well or executed properly. A lack of direction and management culminates into unforeseen losses and inefficiencies that eat away the returns on their investment, not to mention the negative footprint that can result if time sensitive actions are not performed. The solution and therefore the purpose of this article is to help you develop a digital transformation roadmap for your organization. According to Wikipedia, “Digital Transformation” refers to the changes associated with the application of digital technology in all aspects of human society. It is a phase only possible after digital competence and digital literacy. For businesses this means improvements in people, processes and platforms used for digital marketing. Successful implementation of a digital transformation strategy depends on many factors; the main ones being the size of the organization, industry type, resources and culture. Larger organizations can be sluggish when it comes to adopting change so their direction is usually to create a new department dedicated to digital marketing or to work with a digital marketing agency. Small to medium sized businesses tend to be more agile in applying change and can be highly effective with the

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right strategy and direction. The following are five important questions to ask yourself when planning for digital transformation: 1. What is the long-term vision for attaining organizational goals through digital marketing? Get key stakeholders involved to identify goals you want to achieve in each milestone. Keep in mind that it takes time, money, skill and a high level of commitment to allow digital transformation to be successful. 2. What are the Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) that align with the organizational goals? These could be aspects like brand awareness, customer engagement and market share gains. However the more specific you can get, the better. 3. What is going to be your organizational structure to manage the workflow with internal departments and external parties? Delegating responsibilities to the right people and tracking performance for accountability is crucial to understand which aspects of your digital marketing efforts are working. 4. What is the process to plan, manage and optimize your digital transformation? If you already suffer from process paralysis, you are in luck because there are some sophisticated platforms you can use to do most of the legwork. More information is available on these platforms on www.digitaltransformation.ca 5. What technology platforms and resources will you use to monitor and maintain the transformation? With so many different platforms it is important to invest in the one that aligns with your organizational goals and allows you to track your KPIs. During your planning, understand that

the end result is ever-evolving. Technology and user behavior will continue to change and organizations that are quick to act will gain the most benefit as early adopters. The more you wait, the more difficult it gets to break through the noise and get noticed. This trend is common with almost every online platform and technology. The marketplace gets crowded and more competitive as the number of players increase. It also becomes more expensive over time since more businesses are competing for the same space. By being proactive in your digital strategy you can have an edge in the marketplace that can position your organization as leaders. Being a leader in your industry should be on your organization’s agenda. This article does no justice to the scope of what is involved in planning for digital transformation. To help you further, I have created a free resource packed with great information so you can start creating your own digital transformation roadmap for your organization. Go to www.DigitalTransformation.ca to download this free guide and please share any feedback with me at mouneeb@2webdesign. com As always, following is a tribute to our recent clients who have put their trust in our services: www.saskwheatcommission.com - Saskatchewan Wheat Development Commission www.caverestaurant.ca - The Cave www.smileysbuffet.com - Smileys Buffet www.siit.ca - Saskatchewan Indian Institute of Technology


Business News

Saskatchewan Research Council launches volatile materials expansion project The Pipe Flow Technology Centre™ at the Saskatchewan Research Council (SRC) is now one of Canada’s first research facilities equipped to test conditions with volatile materials such as crude oil in a high pressure and high temperature (HPHT) physical model. SRC expanded an existing specially-designed building at the Centre to accommodate research on light and heavy crude oils and refined petroleum products, all of which are flammable and require special equipment for safe storage and handling. The facility has been equipped with a 100 millimeter diameter pipe flow loop designed to simulate industrial conditions. The loop will be used to research the flow of complex mixtures in pipes under HPHT conditions. “Congratulations to the Saskatchewan Research Council on the completion of the expansion of the Pipe Flow Technology Centre,” said the Honourable Michelle Rempel, Minister of State for Western Economic Diversification. “Our Government’s investment in the upgraded Centre will result in economic benefits through job creation, increased productivity, and technological advancements in the oil and gas industry.” “SRC is committed to benefiting Saskatchewan through its products and services and this project is no different,” said the Honourable Jeremy Harrison, Minister of Innovation and Minister Responsible for SRC. “We expect the expansion will facilitate several research projects to improve efficiency and business productivity for oil, gas and mining companies in our province and around the world.” With the new research capabilities that the expansion has provided, the Centre can now test a wider range of substances and help the provincial, and national, oil and gas industry enhance oil recovery, reduce

operating costs and improve processes. on a range of ground-breaking pipeline and “The expansion to SRC’s Pipe Flow fluid mechanics applications. Technology Centre will enable industry to test new ideas and solve current problems SRC is one of Canada’s leading providers with effectively designed solutions,” said of applied research, development and Dr. Laurier Schramm, President and CEO demonstration (RD&D), and technology of SRC. “The Centre has been in business commercialization. With more than 350 for over 55 years now and it’s well-known employees, $59 million in annual revenue for providing world-class service offerings. and 67 years of RD&D experience, SRC This expansion has increased the Centre’s provides services and products to its 1,400 capabilities even further.” clients in 20 countries around the world. The expansion will formally be known as the Shook-Gillies HPHT Test Facility in honour of two pioneers in the area of slurry testing and research who were cornerstone contributors to SRC’s Pipe Flow Technology Centre over the past 55 years, Dr. Clifton Shook and Dr. Randall Gillies. The federal and provincial WCBC’s published surveys offer access to information on current governments jointly salaries, bonuses, group insurance, retirement benefits and invested $1,730,000 compensation best practices. through the Canada-

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Member Announcements

Saskatoon Open Door Society makes it easier for you to hire newcomers “There have been no more exciting times to be in employment services than now in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan,” say Maria Magno and Mirjana Mandaric, Employment Counsellors with the Employment Services Unit (ESU) of the Saskatoon Open Door Society. Ever since the city’s largest settlement agency launched Employer Connections, its newest employment program, last spring, the agency has received all sorts of inquiries from local businesses, community partners and out-of-province recruiters in search of skilled immigrants to fulfill labour shortages in booming western industries. “We get phone calls from Fort McMurray, Waskesiu, Warman, CN Rail, Michael’s Canada, Loraas Disposal, SGI, Tim Horton’s, GardaWorld, to name a few. The employers

are impressed with the candidates we supply,” Mirjana says. “It’s a step-by-step recruitment process where everyone is on the winning side,” Maria says. “The employers come to us with their needs. We develop occupation-specific training and workshops, pre-screen candidates, and polish up their resumes and interview skills. After they are hired, we follow up with the employers to provide ongoing support for the new hire’s workplace integration.” Since the start of the Employer Connections Program, the agency has developed more than 30 partnerships with businesses looking to hire immigrants in the fields of hospitality, fast food services, customer service, financial services or general labour. The annual “WEconnect” job fairs are

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BUSINESS VIEW SASKATOON FEBRUARY/MARCH 2015

another excellent opportunity for employers to find new employees. In 2014, over 30 employers participated in three “WEconnect” job fairs and networked with over 1,000 jobseekers at each event. The next job fair will be in May 14th, 2015. For more information please contact Employment Services Unit, Saskatoon Open Door Society, at 100-129 3rd Ave N, Saskatoon SK S7K 2H4 or call (306) 653-4464 and ask for Maria (ext. 367) or Mirjana (ext. 328).

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Promotional Feature

Introducing The Myriad - Phase 2 MA Developments, though a relative newcomer to the Saskatoon development scene, has made a big splash in the market with their latest project “The Myriad – Phase 2”. Entrepreneur Michael Ma started MA Developments in 2012. Ma, a recent immigrant from China, came to Canada and Saskatoon to invest and grow his business. “In the past, Saskatoon was overlooked but that is no longer the case as businesses and people from all over the world have been flocking here daily,” says Ma. “Saskatoon is growing at a rate greater than we dreamed of and is seeing new neighbourhoods being planned and developed on a consistent basis. This is truly an economy that bodes well for entrepreneurs and investors alike.” “The Myriad” started as a design competition from the City for a new type of development idea in Saskatoon. Ma’s proposal, which he partnered with local architects AODBT on, was a mixed-use residential and commercial development based on a Chinese-style market. This type of development can be seen in larger cities like Vancouver or Toronto but it is the first of its kind here. Boasting over one-hundred retail stores and open market food court where one can experience products and wares from around the globe, with residential condos on the third level. With Phase 1’s Grand Ceremonies on July 21, 2013, construction is now underway. “We

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BUSINESS VIEW SASKATOON FEBRUARY/MARCH 2015

are proud to have pre-sold 95% of Phase 1 and the owners of these places join with us in the anticipation of one day soon working and living in this great building,” says Ma. “From the exterior architect to the interior design we at MA Land Developments are proud of what will soon come into being. Even now, we are tirelessly working to ensure that each detail is attended to with excellence. “ In addition to property development, the company also has other divisions which

provide services to Chinese business owners in the city including Xin Hua Press, a new Chinese business and community paper to help integrate the local community in Saskatoon, as well as a warehousing and logistics company for the Myriad called Central Shining International (Co.) Ltd. The concept behind this model is the O2O (online to offline) concept that is gaining momentum in China right now. For more information visit http:// themyriad.ca/


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Executive Director’s Message

Looking ahead: a message from the Executive Director By Kent Smith-Windsor, Executive Director, Greater Saskatoon Chamber of Commerce Our Chamber was recently honored with the opportunity to help unveil the Praxis Group’s 2015 Saskatchewan Economic Outlook, a survey which confirmed many of our initial premises concerning economic prospects for the year ahead. We tend to be fact driven when it comes to economic prospects, so we take attitudinal surveys such as the Praxis study as a confirmation of market signals rather than as a leading indicator. Our Chamber’s next look at regional attitudes will be a business focused survey in collaboration with MNP this spring. Both of these surveys will add colour commentary to our view of the 2015 Saskatoon business landscape. Our fact base concerning Saskatoon’s near and longer term business prospects begins with construction projects. Let’s take a look at several projects which are now heavily in the planning phase or at the start of construction: K+S Potash Canada: This $3.8 Billion project is now well underway, meaning that major industrially-driven capital projects remain an important part of the Saskatoon and Saskatchewan business environment. In view of the mine’s location, the fact that the company chose Saskatoon for its headquarters is a strong signal concerning the long-term prospects of our region. Children’s Hospital of Saskatchewan: This project is now underway with construction jobs today - and future employment prospects to follow. Along with exciting new initiatives at the Canadian Light Source and the nearby Cyclotron project, the project will help build Saskatoon’s capacity as a knowledge generator for the world market of health care – a market which is among the biggest global industries and offers a growth trajectory certainty that is unmatched by any industry

other than food. Our Chamber considers health service-based businesses with export potential to be a very sound diversification strategy for Saskatoon. We’ll continue to help build the best business climate in Canada for these organizations through our “Getting to Great” Health Conference in the fall - details to follow. Bridges (Two…count ‘em, two): One for downtown and one for the north end may get into the ground (water?) this fall. This means business prospects today, a more competitive transportation system for Saskatoon in the near future, and the prospect of enough time for families to get from a hockey practice to a music recital on time - how good is that? Civic Operations Centre: This project in and of itself will contribute over $150 million to our local economy as a construction project, but more importantly, it lays the groundwork for the relocation of city services from the northwest edge of downtown. From the Chamber’s viewpoint, that relocation cannot happen soon enough as it will lead to exciting new offerings in the freed up redevelopment area. The completed relocation will mean a more competitive downtown, better infill, and new experience offerings for visitors to our city so they come more often, stay longer, and spend more. Looking at the rest of the Saskatoon and region economy, the strengthening of the U.S. market means more business and better margins for Saskatoon businesses selling into the largest and richest consumer market in the world. The agricultural scene is strong. While crop prices have slipped, they are still above 2010 levels. The India market is gaining strength, livestock prices are very good and

Saskatoon’s position as among the world’s leading agriculture technology and knowledge centers is strengthening. This position for Saskatoon sets our city apart from others in Canada as up to one billion more people will move from food sustenance to quality nourishment over the next 10 years. Saskatoon’s information technology scene is beginning to find itself, and is now growing to the point where the hunt for talent will be the primary constraint for growth prospects in coming years. IT presents a market where the world can be your customer tomorrow if the right mix of service, talent, and marketing is found. On the tourism side, our hoteliers are building and investing in marketing at a pace that hasn’t been seen in Saskatoon for twenty years. Two important agriculturallybased international conferences and Tourism Saskatoon’s aggressive capture of STEMFEST 2015 are the early rewards for the hotel industry’s marketing leadership to support the efforts of the tourism industry in Saskatoon. In summary, our Chamber sees growth in 2015, although at a more measured pace than 2014. More importantly, we see Saskatoon as the best positioned city in Canada to take on the first half of the 21st century with confidence and enthusiasm. Do these bright prospects mean that business people can take it easy and let success come to them? A resounding “NO” is our Chamber’s answer. Business success and “Getting to Great” rely on the thing which we prairie folk excel at most - honest hard work. “Go Saskatoon Go”.

BUSINESS VIEW SASKATOON FEBRUARY/MARCH 2015

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Canadian Chamber of Commerce

Advocacy update from the Canadian Chamber of Commerce Commitment to Innovation In a report published December 17th, the Canadian Chamber of Commerce argues that the only way for Canadian companies to compete and win in modern manufacturing is through a strong commitment to innovation. Today, however, Canada’s innovation rank—a key component of competitiveness—is troublesome. Ranked 22nd in the world by the World Economic Forum for its capacity for innovation and given a “D” grade in innovation by the Conference Board of Canada for most of the last decade, Canada has not had a company on the Boston Consulting Group’s list of top 50 global innovators since 2010. “Manufacturing remains the largest sector of the Canadian economy, but competition has never been more aggressive,” said Perrin Beatty, President and CEO of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce. “In order to remain on top, our companies need to be more innovative and adopt disruptive technologies at a pace never experienced before. It’s the only way to stay in the game!” Throughout 2014, the Canadian Chamber of Commerce held a number of consultations with its members from across the country to identify the barriers that are currently confronting manufacturers when it comes to harnessing technology and innovation in Canada. Our discussions led to three overall recommendations: Manufacturers can, and should, leverage best practices in overcoming barriers that currently prevent them from broader and faster adoption of disruptive technologies. Canada’s innovation policy framework must be structured to acknowledge and support business investment in R&D. Government should consider new incentive options, such as adopting an “innovation box” approach to R&D funding that reduces taxes and promotes

domestic intellectual property activity. A policy framework that rewards collaboration, recognizes product cycles across various industries, acknowledges that the milestones for innovation incentives cannot be generic across industries and moves beyond a bias for breakthrough technology research is essential to improving Canada’s innovation scorecard. The Canadian Chamber will build on these recommendations in a subsequent report on the value of government incentives in Canadian manufacturing.

Natural Resource Production Natural resources are essential to our quality of life; they help build, fuel and feed the world. While natural resource production is needed to support growing global prosperity, it is also clear that there are implications for the environment. In a report published December 23rd, the Canadian Chamber of Commerce examines the ways in which Canadian industry and governments are addressing the environmental challenges of resource production, specifically within the forestry, mining, and oil and gas sectors. “The struggle to strike a balance between economic development fueled by natural resource production and protecting our environment is one of the most critical challenges of our time,” said Perrin Beatty, President and CEO of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce. “This report examines some steps Canadians are taking to achieve this, and also brings some international context to Canada’s performance.” For each type of resource, the report provides a brief summary of the harvesting/ extraction process and outlines the main environmental challenges posed by each stage of the process. It then describes some of the key strategies industry is using to address

that particular environmental impact. “What emerges from this report is a clear sense that industry and governments have been taking these problems seriously, putting into place new technologies, practices and regulations that are at least equal to, and in some cases better than, other natural resource-producing nations,” added Beatty. In conclusion, the Canadian Chamber offers a number of recommendations for action by the federal government to help support the continuous improvement in the environmental performance of Canada’s resource sectors: Implement an economy-wide, marketbased approach to climate mitigation that includes all greenhouse gas emitters. Among the broad issues which will need to be faced in the coming years, Canada should focus attention on water management issues by introducing a national water strategy developed in concert with relevant stakeholders. Technological development and innovation are crucial to addressing industry’s environmental impacts. Support for research and development and commercialization of novel approaches should remain a government priority The Canadian Chamber of Commerce is the vital connection between business and the federal government. It helps shape public policy and decision-making to the benefit of businesses, communities and families across Canada with a network of over 450 chambers of commerce and boards of trade, representing some 200,000 businesses of all sizes in all sectors of the economy and in all regions. News and information are available at Chamber.ca or you can follow us on Twitter @CdnChamberofCom.

BUSINESS VIEW SASKATOON FEBRUARY/MARCH 2015

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CHAMBER VOLUNTEER COMMITTEES COMMITTEE CHAIRS Agribusiness Opportunities Bert Sutherland - BERTradioonline.com Loran Forer - BMO

Meetings: 2nd Monday of the month - 3:30-5:00 pm

Business Growth Elise Hildebrandt - The Mortgage Centre

Meetings: Last Tuesday of the month - 8:00 am

Business of Science & Technology Raj Nayak - University of Saskatchewan

Attend a Chamber Networking Event The Greater Saskatoon Chamber of Commerce puts on a number of great networking events each month, such as “Shaken with a Twist” - Proudly Cohosted with Women Entrepreneurs of Saskatchewan - at CUT Casual Steak and Tap the third Thursday of the month at 5:00 pm. Sponsored by S&E Trusted Online Directories. “Chamber on Tap” is at Hudson’s Tap House the first Wednesday of the month. Come down at 4:30 pm for appetizers and drinks. Some recent guests are showcased below. Sponsored by Sutton Financial Group and Jeff Rask & Associates - Chambers Group Insurance Plan Representatives. Both events are free, with no registration needed. Bring your business cards!

Meetings: Last Tuesday of the month - 3:00 PM

Celebrate Success! Lynn Nastiuk - Sask. Health Research Foundation Meetings: Depending on need - closer to event

Environmental Sustainability Colleen Yates - Equinox3 Consulting Ltd.

Cam Ewen and Heather Williams - Prairie Sun Brewery

Meetings: Last Monday of the month - 3:30-5:00 pm

Future Opportunities Committee

Bill Brooks - Eclecthink International

Meetings: 1st Tuesday of the month - 7:30-8:30 am

First Nations and Métis Opportunities Committee

Chris Sicotte - Affinity Credit Union

Meetings: 1st Tuesday of the month - 9:00-10:30 am

Going Global Ken Ziegler - Robertson Stromberg Pedersen LLP Monica Kreuger - Global Infobrokers

Josh Ens - Ens Auto

Meetings: Last Thursday of the month - 3:30-5:00 pm

Government Affairs Michael Chudoba - Innovative Residential

Meetings: 2nd Wednesday of the month - 4:00-5:30 pm

Health Opportunities Dave Dutchak - MD Ambulance Care Ltd. Sanj Singh - AdeTherpeutics Inc. Corey Miller - Saskatoon Health Region

Mark Loepkky - FFUN Group of Companies

Meetings: First Monday of the month - 2:30-3:30 pm

Knowledge & Youth Development Jeff Wandzura - Phenomenome Discoveries Meetings: 2nd Wednesday of the month - 5:00 pm

Membership Development Evan Drisner - Nu-Fab Building Products

Meetings: 2nd Thursday of the month - 11:45-1:30 pm

More information available online at www.saskatoonchamber.com under Committees. 22

BUSINESS VIEW SASKATOON FEBRUARY/MARCH 2015

Steve Hogle President CEO of the Saskatoon Blades


For membership information contact Derek Crang

(306) 664-0702 dcrang@saskatoonchamber.com Visit saskatoonchamber.com today under Member Services for more details

Boyd, Ramon Individual Members Chuback Consulting Ltd. Gas / Oil Companies AND Home-Based Business 122 Blackstock Cove, Saskatoon Phone: (306) 715-4376 Jason Chuback Con-Tech General Contractors Ltd. Construction AND Contractors 324 Packham Ave, Saskatoon Phone: (306) 653-4046 Mike Lawton / Duane Shapka Confederation Inn Hotels / Motels 3330 Fairlight Dr, Saskatoon Phone: (306) 384-2882 Lynne Davidson Custom Trenching Ltd. Construction 5675 Clarence Ave S, Saskatoon Phone: (306) 931-4719 Judith Zaleschuk Dave Tarry Enterprises Ltd. Consultants Phone: (306) 371-6190 Dave Tarry Desai, Utsang Individual Members Engineering for Kids Education / Training 712 1st St E, Saskatoon Phone: (306) 978-4186 Bill Lewis Great Western Brewing Company Limited Breweries AND Beverages 519 2nd Ave N, Saskatoon Phone: (306) 653-4653 Michael Micovcin

New Members

Hay Group Ltd. Consultants 314-1914 Hamilton St, Regina Phone: (306) 359-0183 Leah Reid

Pure Power Electrical Services Electrical Contractors / Equipment / Services AND Home-Based Business Phone: (306) 230-1710 Colin Popoff

Highway Blues Transport Transportation Industry 742 Hargreaves Cres, Saskatoon Phone: (306) 491-8199 Amardeep Kahlon

Row 5 Distributors Inc. Health Care - Services / Supplies 122 Sinclair Cres, Saskatoon Phone: (206) 244-7695 Cathy Edwards

Ingu Solutions Inc. Contractors 211 Wheeler St, Saskatoon Phone: (306) 500-4984 John van Pol Jenkins, Evan Individual Members Mac & Sons Plumbing & Heating Plumbing / Heating / Air Conditioning AND Water Softening Equipment / Service / Supplies 454 Langevin Cres, Saskatoon Phone: (306) 261-8576 Kimberly Couperthwaite Pearson, Dylan Individual Members Pinehouse Medical Clinic Consultants - Medical / Disability AND Health Care - Services / Supplies 147-211 Pinehouse Dr, Saskatoon Phone: (306) 668-6333 Yvonne Mozwa Pro IT Inc. Computers - Sales / Services / Supplies 1915 Kenderdine Rd, Saskatoon Phone: (888) 776-4828 Steve Kemp

RoxDar Supply Chain Solutions Consultants - Business Phone: (306) 370-1172 Darnell Therres SkinSense Dermatology Health Care - Services / Supplies 101-39 23rd St E, Saskatoon Phone: (306) 664-7546 C. Nicole Hawkins Triple L Burgers Ltd. Restaurants 130-115 Betts Ave, Saskatoon Phone: (306) 229-9443 Blake LeBras Van Pul, Phil Individual Members Vern Selinger Contracting Ltd. Contractors AND Property Management 1106A Central Ave, Saskatoon Phone: (306) 361-8993 Vern Selinger Wine 4 You Retail AND Beverages 260-2600 8th St E, Saskatoon Phone: (306) 955-4455 Shirley Voldeng Wirt, Gina-Marie Individual Members

BUSINESS VIEW SASKATOON FEBRUARY/MARCH 2015

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Saskatoon Golf and Country Club 865 Cartwright St. W., Saskatoon Doors Open at 6:30 p.m. Presentation 7:00 -9:00 p.m.

Let’s create your plan! LIMITED SEATING – Call to register now! Terri Peterson 306.651.4515 or Terri.Peterson@conexus.ca conexus.ca

Profile for Greater Saskatoon Chamber of Commerce

BusinessVIEW February March 2015  

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BusinessVIEW February March 2015  

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