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A Approach 12–13

G R ADUATE SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE & URBAN DESIGN WASHINGTON UNIVERSIT Y IN ST. LOUIS


Contents Dean’s Introduction 2 URBANISM(S) Symposium 4 Faculty 6

Master of Architecture 18 CORE STUDIOS 20 ADVANCED STUDIOS 70 INTERNATIONAL STUDIOS 132 DEGREE PROJECT 146 Master of Landscape Architecture 194 MLA CORE STUDIOS 196 MLA ADVANCED STUDIOS 204 Master of Urban Design 208 MUD CORE STUDIOS 210 MUD DEGREE PROJECT 214 About Sam Fox School 218

GR A DUATE SCHOOL OF A RCHITECTURE & URBA N DESIGN

Public Lecture Series 14

APPROACH 12-13

New and Visiting Faculty 8


Dean’s Introduction IT’S A SMALL WORLD; BUT A BIG CIT Y

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Design practice is increasingly becoming an international practice, and our own community provides a fitting illustration. We bring the world to St. Louis through the diversity of our student body, faculty, visiting faculty, lecturers, and guests. Conversely, through our extensive international programs, we take our students out into the world. The locales are chosen specifically to offer unique urban and cultural experiences that differ from those offered in the United States, adding depth to students’ understanding of design. Our programs allow students to actively participate in the life of the city; these experiences require a compass, pencil and paper, good shoes, and an open imagination. Whether in St. Louis or abroad, we must embrace our responsibilities as architects, landscape architects, and urban designers to help create environments that are healthy, just, and beautiful. A few recent on-campus events underscored our commitment to this mission. In celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Master of Urban Design program, associate professor and program chair John Hoal organized URBANISM(S): Sustainable Cities for One Planet. This two-day event facilitated discussion and debate regarding the future of urban design education and practice in a rapidly urbanizing world—one that is increasingly complex, economically integrated, and natural resource challenged. Recognizing that the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum plays an integral role in the educational experience of each Sam Fox School student, I was heartened by the response to the fall exhibition Design with the Other 90%: CITIES, which explored the ways in which design can redress critical issues, from the most basic needs for


people living on $2 a day in developing economies, to the challenges resulting from rapid urban growth and the proliferation of informal settlements. This spring, we hosted the Landscape Architectural Accreditation Board (LAAB) visiting team as part of the process leading to the accreditation of our program. This standard procedure follows the granting of candidacy status, which we received last year. After conducting faculty and student interviews, reviewing student work, and meeting with a number of University administrators, the team provided a preliminary public response. I am happy to report that the team’s report, including their recommendations, was submitted to LAAB, where it was accepted by the board of directors. As a result, we have received initial accreditation for a term of six years. I would like to thank program chair Dorothée Imbert for her leadership during this process, assistant professor Natalie Yates for all of her hard work on the curriculum, and lecturer Justin Scherma for his dedicated efforts in writing the self-evaluation report. In a recent email, I remember reading a quote that urgently called for “… a new and more fully human paradigm for architectural education that genuinely and intimately engages with culture and society.” I can say—without reservation—that our School is striving to lead the way in this paradigm shift. The pages of this publication stand as our evidence. BRUCE LINDSEY Dean, College of Architecture, Graduate School of Architecture & Urban Design E. Desmond Lee Professor for Community Collaboration

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URBANISM(S): SUSTAINABLE CITIES FOR ONE PLANET

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Part of a series of events that celebrated the 50th anniversary of the Master of Urban Design program, discussed and debated the future of urban design education and practice in a rapidly urbanizing world. The two-day symposium focused on a wide range of topics in global urbanism and sustainable cities. Architect Thom Mayne delivered the keynote lecture. Guest speakers included: Darrick Borowski Marshall Brown Juan William Chávez Felipe Correa Teddy Cruz Mitesh Dixit Nan Ellin Gale Fulton Tim Gaidis Ken Greenberg Robert M. Lewis Constantine E. (Dinos) Michaelides Chris Reed Shawn L. Rickenbacker Kristina Van Dyke Andy VanMater Douglas Voigt Guatam N. Yadama

Faculty participants included: Carmon Colangelo Kathryn Dean Paul J. Donnelly Bob Hansman Patty Heyda John Hoal Derek Hoeferlin Ersela Kripa Seng Kuan Bruce Lindsey Kees Lokman Peter MacKeith Robert McCarter Stephen Mueller Eric Mumford Henry S. Webber Eric Zencey

The Graduate School of Architecture & Urban Design would like to recognize Anabeth and John Weil, along with the following sponsors, for their generous support of this event: Christner, Inc., HOK, SOM, Arcturis, and The Lawrence Group.


Faculty

2012 – 2013

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FULL-TIME FACULTY Kathryn Dean JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor, Director Graduate Programs

Paul J. Donnelly Rebecca and John Voyles Professor

Iain Fraser Professor Dorothée Imbert Chair Landscape Architecture Stephen Leet Professor Bruce Lindsey Dean, E. Desmond Lee Professor for Community Collaboration

Adrian Luchini Raymond E. Maritz Professor/ Director International Programs

Robert McCarter Ruth and Norman Moore Professor

Eric Mumford Professor Christof Jantzen I-CARES Professor of Practice Eric Hoffman Professor of Practice Gia Daskalakis Associate Professor Bob Hansman Associate Professor John Hoal Associate Professor, Chair Urban Design Program

Sung Ho Kim Associate Professor, Undergraduate

Chandler Ahrens Assistant Professor Andrew Cruse Assistant Professor Patty Heyda Assistant Professor Derek Hoeferlin Assistant Professor Seng Kuan Assistant Professor Kees Lokman Assistant Professor Natalie Yates Assistant Professor Christine Yogiaman Assistant Professor VISITING FACULTY Angel Alonso Ruth & Norman Moore Visiting Professor

Elena Cánovas Visiting Professor Behzad Nakhjavan Visiting Professor Rhett Russo Visiting Professor Andrew Colopy Visiting Assistant Professor Forrest Fulton Visiting Assistant Professor Justin Scherma Visiting Assistant Professor Kenneth Tracy Visiting Assistant Professor Jesse Vogler Visiting Assistant Professor

Core Coordinator

Zeuler Lima Associate Professor Peter MacKeith Associate Professor, Associate Dean of Sam Fox School

Igor Marjanovic Director Undergraduate Programs, Associate Professor

Heather Woofter Associate Professor, Chair Graduate Architecture

Janet Baum Senior Lecturer Ben Fehrmann Lecturer Catalina Freixas Senior Lecturer Valerie Greer Senior Lecturer Jana Harper Senior Lecturer Phil Holden Senior Lecturer Rich Janis Senior Lecturer George Johannes Senior Lecturer Don Koster Senior Lecturer Gay Lorberbaum Senior Lecturer Pablo Moyano Senior Lecturer Phillip Shinn Senior Lecturer Lindsey Stouffer Senior Lecturer Bill Wischmeyer Senior Lecturer


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Deepti Adlakha Lecturer Michael Allen Lecturer Robert Booth Lecturer Charles Brown Lecturer Jason Butz Lecturer Jaymon Diaz Lecturer Jim Fetterman Lecturer Carolyn Gaidis Lecturer John Guenther Lecturer Esley Hamilton Lecturer Dennis Hyland Lecturer Rick Kacenski Lecturer Elisa Kim Lecturer Ersela Kripa Lecturer Kevin Le Lecturer Nikki Liu Lecturer Albie Mitchell Lecturer Bob Moore Lecturer Stephen Mueller Lecturer Mike Naucas Lecturer Davis Owen Lecturer Andrew Raimist Lecturer Hannah Roth Lecturer Justin Scherma Lecturer Bonnie Roy Lecturer Jim Scott Lecturer Jonathan Stitlelman Lecturer Lavender Tessmer Lecturer Andy Vanmater Lecturer Eric Zencey Lecturer Catty Dan Zhang Lecturer Tomislav Zigo Lecturer

Susanne Cowan Post-Doctorate Fellow Carl Safe Professor Emeritus Leslie J. Laskey Professor Emeritus Constantine E. Michaelides Dean Emeritus Kimmo Friman Adjunct Associate Professor Sirkka-Liisa Jetsonen Adjunct Associate Professor

Pentti Kareoja Adjunct Associate Professor Matti Rautiola Adjunct Associate Professor Julie Scheu Adjunct Associate Professor Philip Tidwell Program Assistant and Lecturer Alejandra Achaval Lecturer Abroad Clara Albertengo Lecturer Abroad Jeffrey Berk Lecturer Abroad Gerardo Caballero Lecturer Abroad Gustavo Cardรณn Lecturer Abroad Fernando Williams Lecturer Abroad Daniel Kozak Lecturer Abroad Fabiรกn Llonch Lecturer Abroad


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New and Visiting Faculty 2012 – 2013

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Chandler Ahrens

Chandler Ahrens is a co-founder and director of the Los Angeles office of Open Source Architecture (OSA). The international research and design architectural practice has designed commercial and residential projects in addition to designing, fabricating, and mounting several complex installations, including The Hylomorphic Project at the MAK Center for Art and Architecture in Los Angeles, n-Natures at Rhode Island School of Design (RISD), and Evolutive Means at Pratt Institute in New York. Ahrens has worked for several international architectural firms, including nine years as a lead designer at the Pritzker Prize-winning office of Morphosis Architects, where he was responsible for notable buildings such as the New Academic Building at Cooper Union

Chandler Ahrens

Assistant Professor, Architecture

in New York; Hypo-Alpe-Adria Bank in Udine, Italy; and Caltrans Headquarters in Los Angeles. Before coming to Washington University, he served as an assistant professor at Woodbury University in Los Angeles.


Andrew Cruse

Elena Cánovas

Angel Alonso 10

Angel Alonso

Ruth & Norman Moore Visiting Professor Angel Alonso is principal of aceboXalonso architects, which he founded with Victoria Acebo in 1995 in Madrid. The firm represented Spain at the Venice Biennale in 2000, 2002, and 2006, and was featured at Rotterdam’s Biennale, at Tokyo Design Week, and at Shanghai Town Hall. Its work also was included in On-Site: New Architecture in Spain at the Museum of Modern Art in 2006 and is currently featured in Young Architects of Spain (YAS), which is traveling to several U.S. universities. Two of aceboXalonso’s projects—the Arts Center of Coruna (since refurbished as the National Museum of Science & Technology) and Vars House—were nominees for the Mies Van Der Rohe European Award in 2009, as was LC House in 2000. Other honors include a 2008 VETECO prize for best light façade, the 2007 National Young Architecture Award, and a 2000 award from the Professional Associations of Architects of Castilla and León in the single-family housing category. Since 2003, Alonso has been a project designer professor at the European University of Madrid. He is a past director of the magazine Arquitectura.

Elena Cánovas

Visiting Professor Elena Cánovas is principal of aSZ arquitectes, which she co-founded with Antonio Sanmartín in Barcelona in 1996 after several years of joint professional

and academic experiences. Projects have included the Badalona Central Library, the Santiago de Compostela Towers at the Cidade da Cultura, the Vidrá Public Housing, the Rianxo Auditorium, the Gavá seafront units, the Capuchinas Building for Huesca University, as well as urban design and public space projects such as the Illa Central in Badalona and the Strategical Residential Areas in Figueres and Argentona. In addition to her appointment as a visiting professor, Cánovas has been a lecturer abroad for the Graduate School of Architecture & Urban Design’s international summer studio in Barcelona since 2007. She has been an associate professor in design projects at Escola Tècnica Superior d’Arquitectura de Barcelona (ETSAB, UPC) since 1993, and has served as coordinator of the first-year design studio since 2009.

Andrew Cruse

Assistant Professor, Architecture Andrew Cruse, AIA, NCARB, LEED AP, previously served as a visiting assistant professor in the Sam Fox School. His research focuses on cultural, social, and energy issues around the topic of building reuse and modernization. He is working on an interdisciplinary teaching and research initiative called Quadrangle exploring these issues as they relate to multifamily housing in St. Louis. Previously Cruse was an associate at Machado and Silvetti Associates in Boston, where he was


Behzad Nakhjavan

Kees Lokman

11

project manager for a number of cultural and institutional projects, including the Center for Academic and Spiritual Life at New York University; the Mint Museum in Charlotte; the Provincetown Art Association and Museum in Massachusetts; Citadel Square in Beirut, Lebanon; and Sewoon District Four in Seoul, South Korea. He also has worked at Office dA (Boston), Lutsko Associates and Sasaki Associates (both San Francisco), and other design offices in New York and Tel Aviv, Israel. Cruse has taught at Northeastern University, the Rhode Island School of Design, and the Boston Architectural College.

Kees Lokman

Assistant Professor, Landscape Architecture Kees Lokman has over five years of professional experience, including design work at the office of plantsman Piet Oudolf and at Terry Guen Design Associates (TGDA). With TGDA, he oversaw projects ranging from largescale master plans to the design of intimate urban spaces, including Aurora River Edge Park, a master plan for a 70-acre site along the post-industrial Fox River shoreline in Aurora, Illinois, that received a 2007 Illinois ASLA Honor Award. Working with collaborators from a variety of specialties, Lokman has received honors in several international design competitions, including first prize in Transiting Cities - Low Carbon Futures for Reassembling Flows (2012). Foregrounding the interconnectedness

among ecology, economy, and geography, he conducted research for Pierre Bélanger/OPSYS and the Third Coast Atlas, a research platform led by urbanists Charles Waldheim, Mason White, and Clare Lyster that explores the historic and contemporary developments of Great Lakes Megaregion. Before coming to Washington University, Lokman was an adjunct assistant professor at the Illinois Institute of Technology and a faculty member of Archeworks.

Behzad Nakhjavan Visiting Professor

Behzad Nakhjavan is professor and chair of the architecture program at Auburn University, where he has taught for the past 25 years) and principal of Behzad Nakhjavan Studio. Over the past two decades, his small critical practice has received numerous regional and national AIA Design Awards. Previously, Nakhjavan was involved in full-time practice in various offices, including as a design associate at HOK’s London office. In addition to his work at Auburn, Nakhjavan has held visiting faculty appointments at the University of Arkansas, University of Florida’s Vicenza Institute of Architecture, and The Center For Architectural Studies, Rome Center, as part of a consortium of five American schools of architecture. He has received numerous teaching awards, an Auburn University Creative Research and Scholarship Award, and a fellowship at the American Academy in Rome.


Rhett Russo

Ripley Rasmus 12

Ripley Rasmus

Ruth and Norman Moore Visiting Professor Ripley Rasmus is the design principal for HOK’s North Central region. He leads the firm’s design strategy and coordinates the work of other senior designers in HOK’s St. Louis, Chicago, and Denver offices. As director of design, he has played an instrumental role in the firm’s design approach and sustainable design strategies by guiding new interpretations of building programs and urban sites defined by sustainable building technologies. He has produced award-winning designs for significant corporate, commercial, and public buildings in the United States and abroad, including the Accident Fund Holdings National Headquarters Renovation and Addition (Lansing, Michigan), CMA Tower (Riyadh, Saudi Arabia), Col. H. Weir Cook Terminal at Indianapolis International Airport, Williams Technology Center (Tulsa, Oklahoma), and Edificio Malecon (Buenos Aires, Argentina).

Rhett Russo

Visiting Professor Rhett Russo is an associate professor at New Jersey Institute of Technology’s College of Architecture and Design and principal of Specific Objects in New York. The sustainably oriented design practice is focused on delivering integrated design solutions that bring, art, product design, and architectural services together. Russo’s work is inspired by the transmissive capacities

of matter and the ecologies of form that are part of the natural world. This approach parallels his interest in alternative modes of craft and their role in the development of complexity within architecture and design. Honors include the SOM Fellowship, the Van Alen Institute Dinkeloo Fellowship at The American Academy in Rome, and the Young Architects Forum from the Architectural League of New York. Russo was one of five U.S. architects and designers chosen to represent the East Coast in the 2010 Beijing Biennale. In 2012 his ceramic prototypes were featured by the European Ceramic Workcenter at the international fair OBJECT Rotterdam.

Oliver Schulze

Visiting Professor Architect Oliver Schulze is a partner at the urban design studio Schulze + Grassov based in Copenhagen. His work focuses on the relationship between the built environment and people’s quality of life. Project experience spans a diverse portfolio of international commissions, ranging from strategic urban frameworks at the scale of cities and regions to the completed delivery of public spaces. Recent projects include the vision for regeneration of major urban corridors in San Francisco and Los Angeles; the design of public spaces in Oman; and the award-winning refurbishment of New Road in Brighton, one of the few shared-surface, multimodal, non-residential streets in the United Kingdom. Schulze is a founder


Jesse Vogler

Oliver Schulze

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of Citymakers, an international urban research and development group based in Moscow, and a founding member of the German Sustainable Building Council.

Jesse Vogler

Visiting Professor Jesse Vogler is an artist and designer whose work sits at the intersection of spatial practices, material culture, and political economy. Drawn to questions that attach themselves to the periphery of architectural production, his projects take on themes of work, law, property, expertise, and perfectibility. Recent projects include a series of exhibits on the administrative landscape with The Center for Land Use Interpretation (CLUI), a performative land survey with Mildred’s Lane, and a site-specific installation at PLAND. Vogler’s work has been supported by two Graham Foundation grants and has been exhibited at the Venice Architecture Biennale, the CLUI, the Center for Contemporary Arts Santa Fe, and the Urban Institute for Contemporary Arts. Publications featuring his writings and work include [bracket], Thresholds, Artforum, Domus, and the Los Angeles Times. In addition to his art practice, Vogler is a land surveyor, co-directs the Institute of Marking and Measuring, and teaches architecture, landscape, art, and urbanism.


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Public Lecture Series 2012 – 2013

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Jon Kolko 9.13.12

Susan Rodriguez, FAIA 10.1.12

Founder and director, Austin Center for Design

Founding partner and design principal,

Interaction Design Initiative Lecture

Ennead Architects, New York AIA St. Louis Scholarship Trust Lecture

Cynthia E. Smith 9.14.12 Curator of Socially Responsible Design,

Rachel Hinman 10.4.12

Cooper Hewitt, National Design Museum

Senior research scientist, Nokia Research Center Interaction Design Initiative Lecture

Kate Fletcher 9.19.12 Founder of the design for sustainability

James Siena 10.8.12

consultancy Slow Fashion; Reader in Sustainable

Artist

Fashion, Centre for Sustainable Fashion,

Arthur L. and Sheila Prensky Island Press

London College of Fashion

Visiting Artist Lecture

Frank Barkow 9.24.12

Peter Stutchbury 10.15.12

Co-founder, Barkow Leibinger Architects, Berlin

Principal, Peter Stutchbury Architecture, Australia Harris Armstrong Fund Lecture


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Adriaan Geuze, IR., RLA, OALA 10.17.12

Callie Neylan 11.15.12

Founder, West 8urban design and landscape

Interaction designer, researcher, and writer

architecture, New York

Interaction Design Initiative Lecture

Landscape Brands Lecture for Landscape Architecture

Anthony Elms 11.19.12 Associate curator, Institute of Contemporary Art

Chris Sickels 10.22.12

at the University of Pennsylvania; Editor,

Creative force behind Red Nose Studio

WhiteWalls Inc.

Ed Chan-Lizardo 10.24.12

Tatiana Bilbao 11.26.12

Chief development and partnerships officer,

Founder, Tatiana Bilbao S.C.

KickStart International

Coral Courts Lecture

Ian Curry 10.25.12

Nicholas Kahn & Richard Selesnick

Interaction designer, FiftyThree

1.28.13

Interaction Design Initiative Lecture

Collaborative artist team

Hal Foster 10.29.12

Stanislaus von Moos 2.4.13

Townsend Martin Class of 1917 Professor of Art

Vincent Scully Visiting Professor of Architectural

and Archaeology and professor of architecture,

History, Yale University

Princeton University

Eugene J. Mackey Jr. Lecture

Abend Family Lecture

Georgeen Theodore 2.11.13 Anne Rorimer 11.7.12

Founding partner and principal, Interboro,

Freelance curator and independent scholar

New York; Associate professor, New Jersey Institute of Technology’s College of Architecture

Thom Mayne 11.9.12

and Design

Founder, Morphosis

Coral Courts Lecture

Fumihiko Maki Lecture Keynote Lecture: URBANISMS: Sustainable Cities

Nina Katchadourian 2.18.13

for One Planet

Artist Arthur L. and Sheila Prensky Island Press Visiting Artist Lecture


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Patricia Favero 2.27.13

Uwe Fleckner 4.3.13

Associate Conservator, The Phillips Collection,

Professor of Art History, Hamburg University

Washington, DC

Stanley Saitowitz 4.5.13 Angel Alonso 3.6.13

Principal, Stanley Saitowitz/Natoma Architects,

Principal, aceboXalonso architects, Madrid

San Francisco

Ruth and Norman Moore Visiting Professor Lecture

Cannon Design Lecture for Excellence in

Rahul Mehrotra 3.18.13

Architecture and Engineering

Founder and principal, RMA Architects, Mumbai,

Graduate Architecture Open House Lecture

India; Professor and chair of the Department of Urban Planning and Design, Graduate School of Design, Harvard University

Kate Orff 3.20.13 Founding principal, SCAPE, New York Anova Lecture for Landscape Architecture

Robbert de Koning, Dale Morris, & Steven Slabbers 3.22.13 Workshop Keynote Lecture: MISI-ZIIBI: Living with the Great Rivers Climate Adaptation Strategies in the Midwest River Basins Co-Sponsored by the Royal Netherlands Embassy, Washington, DC

Daniel Liebskind 4.2.13 Founder and principal, Studio Daniel Libeskind, New York Assembly Series Lecture Supported by WUSTL Student Union


M Master of Architecture

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The Master of Architecture (MArch) program focuses on the critical role of architects in society and culture and on the synthetic activity of design. Fundamental to the graduate curriculum, therefore, is the architectural design studio sequence. Following the three-semester core studio sequence, students select from a range of advanced studio options organized around projects and topics offered by different design instructors. These studios emphasize the development of strong conceptual abilities, thoughtful integration of technical information, and convincing representations of architectural ideas in two- and three-dimensional form, and through a variety of media. The ultimate goal is for each student to develop clear design principles, strong technical resources, and an independent, critical position on the making of architecture in the world. The independent character of a student’s abilities is demonstrated and tested in the final semester through the Degree Project.


Student

Courses in architectural history and theory, building technology and structural principles, urban design, professional practice, landscape design and sustainability, and representational and digital media studies inform and enrich the studio experience. Great emphasis is placed on a student’s ability to integrate and synthesize the information in these courses into appropriate architectural form in the design studio.

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C Core Studios

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FALL 2012 – SPRING 2013

Core studios introduce students to experimentation and expression in a three-semester sequence that provides a foundation in design research. Students are exposed to a broad range of issues in preparation for the advanced studios, with the goal of developing methods that continuously pose questions that might expand practices of contemporary architecture. Core I studio uses a strategic three-project sequence to ground students in the articulation of material systems and the organization of architectural formations. The first project uses geometry and complex order in the iterative making of a complex system. In the second project, site and human scale are additional parameters for a horizontal dynamic terrain in an urban landscape. In the final project, program that requires interior space develops a fully threedimensional proposition for a vertical urban site. In Core II studio, students engage a full-semester project through inclusive and cyclical processes of investigation. They begin by looking at the geometry and climatic response of natural systems


21

Liu Yunqing

to build formal and operative logics. Three landscapes with widely varied topographies, climates, and material conditions are studied, both analytically through their microclimates and expressively in response to their horizons. Students reengage the cultural conditions that are the basis of strong urban construction for Core III studio. Through the design of a housing project, students are asked to pose questions of identity for both the individual and the collective in the urban context. Students learn to uncover cultural knowledge through analytical investigations of the architectural precedent; in the process, they discover that strong architectural ideas are often a set of choices about what is valued, what is privileged, and what is ignored.


C

Andrew Colopy Catalina Freixas Kenneth Tracy Natalie Yates

Visiting Assistant Professor

Senior Lecturer, Coordinator

Visiting Assistant Professor

Assistant Professor

Material Organization

Complexity has always been a part of our environment, inducing many scientific fields to deal with complex systems and phenomena. Indeed, some would say that only what is somehow complex—what displays variation without being random—is worthy of interest. The use of the term complex is often confused with the term complicated. Complex is the opposite of independent, while complicated is the opposite of simple. The scientific method uses the experiment, a set of actions concerning phenomena, to understand complexity. The experiment is a cornerstone in the empirical approach to acquiring deeper knowledge about the physical world. In the field of psychology, heuristics are simple, efficient rules, hardcoded by evolutionary processes or learned, that have been proposed to explain how people make decisions, come to judgments, and solve problems, typically when facing complex issues or incomplete information.

Chun Liu

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CORE STUDIO I FALL 2012


Chun Liu

Joseph DiBella

CORE I F12

Joseph DiBella

M ATERI A L ORGA NIZ ATION

Rachel Savris

Colopy 23


Rachel Savris

24

Chun Liu

Colopy


Chun Liu

M ATERI A L ORGA NIZ ATION

Joseph DiBella

CORE I F12

Chun Liu

Colopy 25


Ilnam Park

Glenn Park

Ilnam Park

26

Ilnam Park

C Freixas


Glenn Park

M ATERI A L ORGA NIZ ATION

Youngjae Lee

CORE I F12

Glenn Park

Freixas 27


Glenn Park

28

Glenn Park

Freixas

Youngjae Lee

C


Lynn Sitachitt

M ATERI A L ORGA NIZ ATION

Jeffrey Lee

Jeffrey Lee

CORE I F12

Lynn Sitachitt

C Tracy 29


Jeffrey Lee

Lynn Sitachitt

30 Jeffrey Lee

Tracy

Lynn Sitachitt


Lynn Sitachitt

M ATERI A L ORGA NIZ ATION

CORE I F12

Lynn Sitachitt

Tracy 31

Jeffrey Lee


Micah Stanek

Huo Siting

Micah Stanek

32

Micah Stanek

C Yates


Huo Siting

M ATERI A L ORGA NIZ ATION

CORE I F12

Huo Siting

Yates 33

Huo Siting


Micah Stanek

34

Liu Yunqing

Liu Yunqing

Yates

Liu Yunqing

C


C

Chandler Ahrens Catalina Freixas Pablo Moyano Christine Yogiaman

Assistant Professor

Senior Lecturer

Senior Lecturer

Assistant Professor, Coordinator

CORE STUDIO II SPRING 2013

Michael Halls

35

CORE II S13

In the second semester of the three-semester core studio sequence, environmental complexity is expanded to address larger natural systems. The interplay among geometry, climate, and site conditions is studied through an initial investigation of pattern formation in nature. Constructed drawings that extract the essence of these patterns are developed into sectional strategies. This pattern strategy is linked to site conditions found in one of three sites, each of which has very different climate and ground conditions. Students respond with a second constructed drawing that addresses the latent qualities of the physical construction. They mine this drawing to uncover topographic response. Simultaneously, analytical drawings are used to address environmental conditions that articulate climatic possibilities. Finally, program is introduced. As a vehicle for students to expand this understanding of the relationships between geometry/site and program/climate, the studio uses Washington University’s International Center for Advanced Renewable Energy and Sustainability (I-CARES), which encourages and coordinates University-wide and external collaborative research into alternative energy applications. Students are asked to create a joint facility that suits I-CARES’ programmatic needs.

SYSTEMIC SECTIONS

Systemic Sections


Jonathan Bryer

Joe DiBella

36

Caitlyn Sander

Ahrens


Lynn Sitachitt

Caitlyn Sander

SYSTEMIC SECTIONS

CORE II S13

Joe DiBella

Ahrens 37

Joe DiBella


Caitlyn Sander

38 Joe DiBella

Ahrens

C


Jeffrey Lee

SYSTEMIC SECTIONS

CORE II S13

Micah Stanek

Jeffrey Lee

C Freixas

39


Chun Liu

Micah Stanek

40

Chun Liu

Freixas

Caitlin Milligan


SYSTEMIC SECTIONS

Chun Liu

CORE II S13

Freixas 41

Chun Liu


Youngjae Lee

Can Fu

42

Michael Halls

C Moyano


Youngjae Lee

SYSTEMIC SECTIONS

CORE II S13

Youngjae Lee

Moyano 43


Michael Halls

44

Youngjae Lee

Moyano

Michael Halls

C


Colby Perrine

Michael Stinnett

Zhang Lingfeng

SYSTEMIC SECTIONS

CORE II S13

Zhang Lingfeng

C Yogiaman

45


Michael Stinnett

Colby Perrine

46 Zhang Lingfeng

Yogiaman


Zhang Lingfeng

SYSTEMIC SECTIONS

CORE II S13

Colby Perrine

Zhang Lingfeng

Yogiaman 47


C

Robert Booth Andrew Cruse Forrest Fulton Valerie Greer Ersela Kripa Pablo Moyano Stephen Mueller

Lecturer

Assistant Professor, Coordinator Visiting Assistant Professor

Senior Lecturer

Lecturer

Senior Lecturer Lecturer

Urban Housing in St. Louis CORE STUDIO III FALL 2012 The third semester of the three-semester core studio sequence is a counterpoint to the knowledge base and skills acquired during the previous year. The goal is to introduce the students to the traditional concerns of modern architecture and allow them to make choices for their trajectory as they encounter the increasing expectations and complexities of the upper-level studios. This studio investigates the contemporary situation of urban housing, determined by the increasingly dominant demands of technology and economics, the inherited typologies of dwelling form, the constantly changing definition of housing as a program, and the unchanging nature of humankind in their dwelling. The studio emphasizes the intertwining of personal and collective identity as students undertake the design of urban housing sites in St. Louis. Students learn to identify strong concepts early in their design, through research and analysis of divergent concepts in housing and by their own design decisions and intentions. Students begin with an abstract formal organization that identifies issues of the collective project. They then inhabit the idea, asking how it affects the individual. Finally, they explore what collective spaces express the idea, and how responses to the setting (site) reinforce the idea. The program of urban housing advocates density over dispersal—a density that contributes to the social life of neighborhoods and cities, and attempts to reverse the increasingly detrimental consequences of horizontal dispersal and shrinking cities. Each student designs a project for a unique site in concert with students assigned to surrounding sites, resulting in the design of a neighborhood.

Yu Xin

48


Fan Wu

Brooke Helgerson

URBA N HOUSING

CORE III F12

Joe Lomas

Brooke Helgerson

Booth 49


Joe Lomas

Brooke Helgerson

50

Joe Lomas

Booth

Joe Lomas


Joe Lomas

Brooke Helgerson

Fan Wu

URBA N HOUSING

CORE III F12

Brooke Helgerson

Booth 51


Maude Wagner

Yue Peng

Yue Peng

52

Yue Peng

C Cruse


Maude Wagner

URBA N HOUSING

Maude Wagner

CORE III F12

Maude Wagner

Cruse 53

Yue Peng


Yue Peng

Maude Wagner

Yue Peng

54 Yue Peng

Cruse

C


Lixing Feng

URBA N HOUSING

Bryan Bogaards

CORE III F12

Bryan Bogaards

C Fulton 55


Bryan Bogaards

56

Hao Wu

Fulton


Bryan Bogaards

Hao Wu

URBA N HOUSING

CORE III F12

Lixing Feng

Fulton 57


Yao Xia

Gabee Cho

58

Mengfei Wu

C Greer


Gabee Cho

Yao Xia

URBA N HOUSING

CORE III F12

Mayur Patel

Greer 59

Yao Xia


Mengfei Wu

Mayur Patel

Mengfei Wu

60

Yao Xia

Greer

Mayur Patel

C


Yu Xin

Yu Xin

Yu Xin

URBA N HOUSING

Yu Xin

CORE III F12

Yu Xin

C Kripa 61


Bin Feng

Yu Xin

Kripa

62 Yu Xin


Nash Waters

Bin Feng

Nash Waters

URBA N HOUSING

CORE III F12

Bin Feng

Kripa 63

Bin Feng


Haosheng Zhang

Haosheng Zhang

64

Michelle Hauk

C Moyano


Grace Goldstein

URBA N HOUSING

Haosheng Zhang

CORE III F12

Moyano 65

Haosheng Zhang


Grace Goldstein

66 Haosheng Zhang

Grace Goldstein

Moyano

Michelle Hauk

C


Chad Fisk

Su Zhang

URBA N HOUSING

CORE III F12

Shiyun Yu

C Mueller 67


Chad Fisk

Chad Fisk

68 Su Zhang

Su Zhang

Mueller

Su Zhang


Chad Fisk

Su Zhang

Su Zhang

URBA N HOUSING

CORE III F12

Chad Fisk

Mueller 69

Chad Fisk


A

Advanced Studios Prof

The advanced semesters center on the design studio as the site for synthesis and integration of conceptualization, research, and development through technology and media. Advanced studios support a variety of scales, issues, and methodologies, presenting a wide range of opportunities for students to experiment and/or specialize. These studios use multiple means of representation, from the scale of the metropolitan landscape to that of the detail, and from an emphasis on physical model-making to an emphasis on design development in digital media. The full-scale fabrication studios provide students expanded opportunities to engage in the empirical investigation of architectural detail and material. Each advanced studio is instructed by permanent faculty and by renowned visiting professors. Student

70

FALL 2012 – SPRING 2013


Shi Jingwen M ATERI A L ORGA NIZ ATION N

ADV CORE V-VII F12

Student

Prof 71


A Don Koster

72

Senior Lecturer

North Side Regeneration Community Housing ADVANCED STUDIO V-VI FALL 2012 In six decades, the City of St. Louis has lost nearly two-thirds of its population, with the north side suffering from the greatest decline and disinvestment. Once vibrant, walkable neighborhoods fell victim to decades of decay and eventual demolition, leaving behind block upon block of vacant and underutilized land. In many cases where recent redevelopment has occurred, the once dense neighborhoods of largely red brick construction have been replaced by banal, vinyl-clad suburban models with two-car garages that privilege anonymity over community. In 2009, McEagle Development announced the $8.1 billion North Side Regeneration Plan, which envisions the redevelopment of 1,500 blighted acres of the near north side. The plan proposes dense, mixed-use office, retail, and residential developments anchored by four business campuses. The scope includes the construction of two highway interchanges; miles of green streets; sewer, water management, and utility infrastructures; and increased mobility and connectivity through expanded public transportation options. It also includes a network of parks and green spaces and acknowledges the investments in education, healthcare access, and public safety necessary to sustaining growth. The goal is to reenergize the city’s urban core by attracting new businesses and residents while enhancing the city’s long-term economic sustainability and competiveness. A portion of this ambitious plan is the focus of this comprehensive design studio. Working closely with design, development, and construction partners, students determine the appropriate housing models (single-family, two-family, multifamily) as they develop a detailed, sustainable residential neighborhood design, with the goal of having a model home constructed in the future. The focus is on progressive, ecologically sound, and affordable home designs that support developers in making wise investments that promote sustainable urban development. Students study and propose energy-efficient, low-impact housing units with low- to no-cost utilities employing LEED, Energy Star, and/or Passive House principals.


Wassef Dabonssi

NORTH SIDE REGENER ATION COMMUNIT Y HOUSING

Shua Bin

ADV V-VI F12

Wassef Dabonssi

Koster 73


Shua Bin

Shua Bin

Wassef Dabonssi

Koster

74 Wassef Dabonssi


Mingu Jang

NORTH SIDE REGENER ATION COMMUNIT Y HOUSING

ADV V-VI F12

Wassef Dabonssi

Koster 75

Shua Bin


A Behzad Nakhjavan

Visiting Professor

In Search for Essence

Essence is defined here as the unchanging quality of a thing. This studio develops the argument that certain conditions must exist in an artifact in order for an observer to perceive, appreciate, and perhaps ultimately understand some portions of the essence therein. A sense of essence is precipitated in the observer by artifacts that provide simultaneously the known presence of a priori (familiar) and a posteriori (un-familiar). The studio is organized around three thematic modules. The initial stage, SEEING, focuses on a series of precise rendered drawings, with an emphasis on a disciplined of seeing the characteristics of both architectural and natural phenomena in buildings. Students begin with a study of a spatial edge as the most significant plane of the building envelope. The facade as vertical plain of political representation embodies elements and ideas essential to the composition of both architectural phenomena—whether they are formal (i.e. the resolution of axes and centers) or functional (i.e. structure and egress)—and natural phenomena. The second module, MAKING, focuses on obstacles to imagination: the material limitation and technical aspects of building the building, its permanence, and phenomenal nature. Materials and materiality are examined for poetics of assemblage, tectonic resolution, structural limitations, and formalistic gestures in building surfaces with deep awareness of the role of natural light. The final module, DOING, focuses on obstacles to invention in construction, with emphasis on the durability of artifacts in both memory and experience. The intention is to provide design space for careful invention following meticulous observation in the previous stage. Students’ final design projects—a small building with a program of their choosing, located on an urban site—illuminate the conditions posited above for the search for essence.

Zhexiong Chai

76

ADVANCED STUDIO V-VI FALL 2012


Trent McGugin

IN SE A RCH FOR ES SENCE

Matthew Carlson

ADV V-VI F12

Matthew Carlson

Nakhjavan 77


Zhexiong Chai Matthew Carlson

Trent McGugin

Nakhjavan

78 Matthew Carlson


IN SE A RCH FOR ES SENCE

Zhexiong Chai

Trent McGugin

ADV V-VI F12

Matthew Carlson

Nakhjavan 79


A Rhett Russo

Visiting Professor

Soulard Marketplace

Wei Kou

80

ADVANCED STUDIO V-VI FALL 2012

The studio project focuses on the redesign of St. Louis’ Soulard Farmers Market, built in 1841. The new market will be a significant public building that operates four days per week, year-round. It will offer a temporary place for shoppers to congregate and for farmers to sell local fruits, meats and vegetables, while serving as a significant tourist destination with shops and restaurants. The current demands of the market and the configuration of the block present significant opportunities to reconsider the interspersing of pedestrian access, vehicular distribution, parking, and the integration of public space. The current zoning also encourages greater density along with mixed-use development, though a more dense development presents a challenge to the viability and iconography of the historic market and its nineteenth century industrial shed. The studio considers how the attributes of dynamic models—specifically the role of variability and its effects on time—and material organization can bring greater fidelity to the design of the market, its use as a temporary structure, and its consolidation into the existing block. These dynamic models are concerned with the physical and material interactions between objects in both virtual and analog environments, and the exploration of the merits of models in relation to design optimization and the production of excess. How can dynamic models be employed to consolidate the heterogeneous spatial characteristics that comprise public space, infrastructure, and architecture? What representational methods might be developed to visualize physically excessive forms of organization, especially clusters of objects that do not behave or aggregate in a uniform manner? In general terms, dynamic systems self-organize in the presence of disequilibrium, are subject to contingency, and exhibit multi-scalar properties that recur across a range of scales. How might the artifacts of these behaviors be reconsidered as foundations for a new type of market?


Shi Jingwen

SOUL A RD M A RK E TPL ACE

Leslie Wheeler

ADV V-VI F12

Wei Kou

Shi Jingwen

Russo 81


Wei Kou

Yu Rong

Leslie Wheeler

Russo

82 Shi Jingwen


Yu Rong

Wei Kou

SOUL A RD M A RK E TPL ACE

ADV V-VI F12

Leslie Wheeler

Russo 83

Leslie Wheeler


A Christine Yogiaman

Tentative Rigidity

Assistant Professor

ADVANCED STUDIO V-VI FALL 2012

Situated within a large loop of the Alabama River, removed and isolated, Gee’s Bend is an unlikely place to have provoked a discourse on both the need to blur distinctions between art and craft and the need to emphasize their differences. Yet a decade after The Quilts of Gee’s Bend debuted at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, this studio revisits the small Alabama community and the collective of AfricanAmerican women who created these quilts. Drawing from the exhibition, students study the material contingency that allows for a form of expression that is at once solitary and collaborative. Each quilt was first conceived by an individual piecing together scraps of used and found fabrics, then worked on intermittently by groups of women in between chores. This division allowed for an unselfconscious approach to the act of making, permitting the individual to make snap decisions about a quilt and move on. The laborious act of completing a quilt together encouraged a call and response, and a feedback loop that cultivated this unique form of “material language” over the span of four generations of quilters. This studio mines the resultant material language of the quilts for its aesthetic temperament: “The quilts pulsate with a disciplined beauty that is rooted in both symmetry and a conscious decision to deviate from that order.” Used to line the walls of homes as a form of insulation, the quilts’ lines and colors transformed the space, creating a unique domesticity particular to the community’s identity. For their final project, students explore an altered domestic condition by proposing a hotel in Selma. Also located along the Alabama River, the city confronts both deindustrialization and the diminished agricultural economy. As much as it is an unlikely place to connect to a network of hotel chains, this studio speculates on the type of travel economy that would bind the city to the particular identity of its land.

Xuey Rui

84


Paraskevi Stasi

Paraskevi Stasi

Xuey Rui

TENTATI V E RIGIDIT Y

ADV V-VI F12

Xuey Rui

Yogiaman 85


Bingbin Zhou

Paraskevi Stasi

86 Xuey Rui

Yogiaman

Paraskevi Stasi


Bingbin Zhou

TENTATI V E RIGIDIT Y

Xuey Rui

ADV V-VI F12

Yogiaman 87

Bingbin Zhou


A Robert McCarter

Ruth and Norman Moore Professor

A Retreat for Painters

88

ADVANCED STUDIO V-VI FALL 2012

The studio program involves the design of a Retreat for Painters, as an addition to the (unbuilt) Meeting House of Louis Kahn’s Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, California. The Salk Institute, commissioned from Kahn by Jonas Salk, the inventor of the polio vaccine, provides laboratories for Nobel Prize-winning biologists who are pursuing the cures for the most devastating human diseases (such as AIDS, for which the Salk biologists are closest to finding the cure). Salk commissioned Kahn with the request that, in addition to laboratories, he design “a place where I can bring Picasso to meet my scientists,” for Salk believed that radical breakthroughs in science often are stimulated by exposure to fundamentally different ideas and ways of thinking. To fulfill this request, Kahn designed the Meeting House, to be built closest to the sea on the site overlooking the Pacific Ocean. The Meeting House was the first element of the Salk Institute designed by Kahn in 1959, and—for purposes of this project—it is presumed that the Meeting House was built, along with the other two components of the plan, in 1965. Students begin with a sketch project that allows them to develop their own interpretation of the concept of a retreat for painters, followed by a field trip to La Jolla. They then undertake a second sketch project, engaging the program for the final project in the landscape; both sketch projects deploy contemporary paintings as inspirational starting points. In parallel with the second sketch project, students undertake disciplinary research by reconstructing Kahn’s project for the Salk Meeting House, building a site model and making drawings for subsequent additions of the their individual designs for the artists’ retreat, the primary project for the semester.by Tod Williams and Billie Tsien, the Beth El Synagogue by Stanley Saitowitz, and the UCSD Price Center East by Mehrdad Yazdani. As a comprehensive options studio, particular emphasis in evaluation will be placed on 1) design process, 2) degree of development of interior space, and 3) exploration of experiential qualities. For each student, the expected result of the studio will be a highly resolved comprehensive building design presented in sketches, physical and digital models, and orthographic and perspectival drawings.


David Boynton

A RE TRE AT FOR PA INTERS

Ruotian Cai

ADV V-VI F12

Ruotian Cai

McCarter 89


David Boynton

Ruotian Cai

McCarter

90 Ruotian Cai


Ruotian Cai

Xi Chen

A RE TRE AT FOR PA INTERS

ADV V-VI F12

David Boynton

McCarter 91

Hui Shi


A Ripley Rasmus

92

Ruth and Norman Moore Visiting Professor

KCI: Redefining the Contemporary Air Terminal ADVANCED STUDIO V-VI FALL 2012 The air terminal remains one of our most important public building types. Great air terminals serve as gateways to the cities and regions they represent. They connect us, both physically and symbolically, to the greater world while presenting local aspirations and culture to that world. For better or worse, these civic buildings represent the first and last impression of our cities to millions each year. As global air passenger totals reach 3 billion annually, the contemporary air terminal is challenged by a host of new technologies, ever-evolving security regimes, and reductions in passenger support as airlines reduce staff and service. These factors combine to diminish the quality of passenger service as outmoded facilities struggle to adapt. The Kansas City International Airport exemplifies these maladies; thus, the city plans to replace this ineffective facility with a new air terminal designed to support a 21st-century level of passenger service and experience. For this studio, students are asked to define new terminal concepts that meet Kansas City’s aspirations for a new gateway capable of supporting its growth and evolution through the mid-21st century, working off the vision for the new terminal shared by the airport’s director. In addition to lectures and precedent studies that advance understanding of the building type, students undertake analyses of site and climate, building program, and building technologies with a focus on understanding the implications for creating a fully integrated, performance-driven, environmentally conscious air terminal for the 21st century.


Young-il Pyun

KCI: REDEFINING THE CONTEMPOR A RY A IR TERMIN A L

Seth Bartlett

ADV V-VI F12

Jinfan Chen

Rasmus 93


Jinfan Chen

Young-il Pyun

94 Young-il Pyun

Nike Cao

Rasmus

Seth Bartlett


Nike Cao

KCI: REDEFINING THE CONTEMPOR A RY A IR TERMIN A L

Young-il Pyun

ADV V-VI F12

Seth Bartlett

Rasmus 95

Young-il Pyun


A Andrew Colopy

Assistant Professor

Studio Confluence

96

ADVANCED STUDIO V-VI SPRING 2013

Confluence: A flowing together of two or more rivers; The coming together of people or things Studio Confluence will design, fabricate and build an avian observatory at the Riverlands Bird Sanctuary in West Alton, Missouri, in collaboration with the Audubon Society and Army Corps of Engineers. Riverlands provides 3,700 acres of protected prairie marsh and forest at a critical juncture along the Mississippi Migratory Flyway. Home or stopover to more than 300 species of songbirds and waterfowl, visitors convene from around the globe to experience this unique migratory ecosystem stretching from Patagonia to the Arctic Circle. The surrounding region is also home to a rich local history of agrarian and industrial activities along the rivers. This cultural and environmental interaction presents a unique opportunity for education, recreation, outreach, and conservation; goals the observatory will help to make a reality for the Audubon Center at Riverlands. It is in this spirit that students will research local, regional and global ecologies; documenting relevant environmental, social, technological and economic systems. The intent will be to expand the conceptual and effectual territory of the site through the reconstitution of space as an ecological medium. Students will engage that medium through the development of computational strategies of analysis, design and fabrication, and will be challenged to leverage the distinct potentials of digital practice to define a broader ecological agenda from the realization of a unique architectural artifact. Studio Confluence is funded by the Sam Fox School, the Audubon Society of Missouri, the US Army Corps of Engineers and a Grant from the Gephardt Institute for Public Service in support of a community based approach to teaching and learning.


Students

STUDIO CONFLUENCE

ADV V-VI S13

Colopy 97


Colopy 98


STUDIO CONFLUENCE

ADV V-VI S13

Students

Colopy 99


A Patty Heyda

100

Assistant Professor

Manufactured Landscapes: Augmented Architectures ADVANCED STUDIO V-VI SPRING 2013 This studio explores augmented architectures—innovative, multi-scalar architectural forms and practices—that address today’s context of emergent, radically transforming urban landscapes that are the products of global industrial processes. These urban conditions often defy categorization and exist peripherally in studies of urban form. Examples include massive manufacturing warehouse campuses or logistical distribution centers; data centers; erased environments that paradoxically “enable growth” elsewhere or on site; environmentally degraded landscapes resulting from natural resource extractions; and the informal settlements that emerge spontaneously on the margins of mainstream urban policy. While these sites may be considered predictable outcomes of globalization’s economic pressures and competition, they can also remain places of extreme environmental and social degradation, demanding design’s attention. These are sites where economic operating systems and discourses of efficiency determine form, over concerns of livability, aesthetics, and public interest. This studio pursues alternative architectures that complicate the idea of “architecture as object” by networking insights and practices from across the allied design fields to effectively engage the complex dynamics and urban realities of these demanding sites. Students conduct extensive research and analysis across a range of scales on three global sites—including one in St. Louis—where contemporary industrial practices are transforming the landscape in radical ways, and are involved in the specific building program development. Working on more than one site and on multiple processes of urbanization allows for comparative learning across the studio. Students are guided through drawing, mapping, and design assignments that decipher the complex processes shaping these environments, before they test architecture’s possibilities for critical intervention on the site. The goal is to equip students with the analytical tactics and the transdisciplinary design approach necessary to reposition themselves as effective agents in these challenging (but often ignored) contexts.


Su Zhang

M A NUFACTURED L A NDSCA PES

ADV V-VI S13

Byron Bogaards

Su Zhang

Heyda 101


Byron Bogaards

Kevin Li

Byron Bogaards

102

Su Zhang

Heyda

Su Zhang


M A NUFACTURED L A NDSCA PES

Byron Bogaards

ADV V-VI S13

Su Zhang

Heyda 103

Su Zhang


A Derek Hoeferlin

104

Assistant Professor

Misi-Ziibi Aberrations…Too Much, Too Little, Too Polluted ADVANCED STUDIO V-VI SPRING 2013 The title of Augusta Goldin’s 1983 book “Water: Too Much, Too Little, Too Polluted?” foreshadowed the current aberrations of the Mississippi River, its tributaries, and its watershed. The 2011 Mississippi and Missouri River floods, followed by the 2012 Midwest drought, demonstrate that increased climate variability and weather extremes across the St. Louis region, within compressed timeframes, are a fact. Such diverse weather events directly impact natural resources, economies, and communities. Architects can bring a unique spatial perspective to this important multidisciplinary debate; as architects, we have a responsibility to engage these complex circumstances with innovative design alternates to current practices of dredging, dynamiting, and leveeing. This comprehensive studio conceptualizes a new integrated regional eco-industry along St. Louis’ rivers. Students design “adaptive architectural aberrations” that spatiotemporally harness the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers’ current realities of “too much, too little, too polluted” waters. They consider these three extremes as ecological, economic, and cultural resources, not as unintended, antagonistic, and dangerous crises. Working both in groups and individually, students oscillate between citizen-engaged international collaboration and introspective radical speculation, engage multiple disciplines, will operate across multiple scales, ranging from the watershed, to the region, to the site, to the building, to the detail. Students’ analytical research into multiple fluvial zones of varied use types along the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers in the region will form the base information for MISI-ZIIBI: Living with the Great Rivers, a four-day workshop investigating climate adaptation design strategies. The Royal Netherlands Embassy of Washington D.C. is cosponsoring the workshop, bringing experts from The Netherlands’ “Room for the River” program. Throughout the semester, students conduct rigorous field work, engage research tools such as GIS, work with research assistants for the workshop, and meet with hydrologists, ecologists, geologists, landscape architects, economists, and engineers to develop comprehensive architectural designs.


Emily Chen

MISI-ZIIBI A BERR ATIONS

ADV V-VI S13

Emily Chen

Hoeferlin 105


Thuy-Tien Mac

Tiffin Thompson

Hoeferlin

106 Emily Chen


Thuy-Tien Mac

MISI-ZIIBI A BERR ATIONS

Tiffin Thompson

ADV V-VI S13

Emily Chen

Hoeferlin 107

Thuy-Tien Mac


A Philip Holden

Senior Lecturer

Instigating Place

108

ADVANCED STUDIO V-VI SPRING 2013

Place in architecture is often mentioned in passing, and sometimes in earnest: that buildings should be of their place or of their culture. The challenge becomes one of engaging and extending the possibilities of architecture in a way that is, or becomes, meaningful in those places for those people. This studio investigates the dynamic of place and attempts to expose the complexity of this subject, preparing students to use it effectively to instigate the design of meaningful places. To do this, the studio focuses on a place, a region, that perhaps remains a mystery to many: the middle of America, the Midwest. The basis for the project is a theater and its extensions that support the needs of an educational institution’s drama programs while also serving to help the institution interact with its larger community. The program includes a public foyer, a 350-seat main stage theater, a 150-seat studio theater, a 60-seat choral recital/ rehearsal room, classrooms, and other support spaces. There are four different scenes by which students might consider a response to place, each with its own timeframe and potential significance: the stage and the stage set design; the space where the audience can respond to the place of the stage and the stage set; the pre-function/foyer space; and the relationship of the entire project place to its community. The baseline social structure is a proposed relationship between an educational institution, high school, or small college, and its community. One baseline site is in downtown Owatonna, Minnesota, hosting the nearby high school’s drama program; another is in downtown Grinnell, Iowa, hosting the adjacent Grinnell College’s drama program. While the studio works from this baseline set of social programs and specific sites, students have the latitude to propose an alternative social structure and/or an alternative site situation.


Steven Jones

Mark Mangapora

Mark Mangapora

INSTIGATING PL ACE

ADV V-VI S13

Steven Jones

Holden 109


Steven Jones

110

Yuye Peng

Holden

Yuye Peng


Trent McGugin

Mark Mangapora

INSTIGATING PL ACE

ADV V-VI S13

Yuye Peng

Holden 111


A Don Koster

Senior Lecturer

Intelligent Transformation

ADVANCED STUDIO V-VI

SPRING 2013

The goal of this comprehensive studio is to embrace sustainable design as an interface between history and contemporary culture, architecture, urbanism, and place-making. To successfully create meaningful and lasting places for clients and society, architects must have an intimate knowledge of the site and its context. Within the last fifty years, the architectural community has fully embraced the power, utility, and value in our existing structures. Underutilized and/or vacant buildings are common in the postindustrial landscapes of North America and represent enormous resource expenditures and embodied energy; therefore, the recycling of these buildings, in most cases, is prudent for the stewardship of the planet and a sustainable future. While arguments over preservation remain, it has been demonstrated numerous times that conversion and not merely preservation alone can have a transformational effect on the sustainability and vitality of cities. This studio focuses on the adaptive reuse of the 500,000-sqaure-foot former Magic Chef manufacturing and warehousing complex, constructed in 1910. The site is The Hill neighborhood of St. Louis, which remains the center of the city’s ItalianAmerican heritage. Students meet with community stakeholders and the building owner to inform strategies for redevelopment, in order to create a positive dialogue about the future of this vacant, deteriorating site. Through forensic research on the building, students document the existing built condition thoroughly to develop an intimate knowledge of the site and context. They are challenged to re-imagine the former manufacturing facility with a new programmatic use(s) that contributes to the vitality and sustainability of the neighborhood and the city. Students are asked to think and work at the regional, urban, neighborhood, building, and detail scales. Emphasis is placed on the successful creation of place-making, with landscape and public spaces significantly valued.

Leslie Wheeler

112


Brooke Helgerson

Leslie Wheeler

INTELLIGENT TR A NSFORM ATION

Brooke Helgerson

ADV V-VI S13

Leslie Wheeler

Koster 113


Brooke Helgerson

114 Leslie Wheeler

Haley O’Brien

Koster Haley O’Brien


Grace Goldstein

INTELLIGENT TR A NSFORM ATION

Haley O’Brien

ADV V-VI S13

Haley O’Brien

Koster 115

Grace Goldstein


A Robert McCarter

A Museum for the Works of Richard Diebenkorn ADVANCED STUDIO V-VI SPRING 2013 The studio program involves the design of the Richard Diebenkorn Museum, to be sited directly to the north of the University of California campus in Berkeley. The city has raised the funds to build this museum dedicated to the works of a single artist, Richard Diebenkorn (1922-1993), one of the most important Abstract Expressionist painters. Diebenkorn was unusually responsive to the settings of his studios, and his most important works carry the name of the city in which he was living at the time he painted them: Albuquerque, Berkeley, and Ocean Park. The studio program follows precedents of the museums dedicated to a single artist, most importantly the recently completed Clyfford Still Museum in Denver. The large collection of paintings in the Diebenkorn estate, along with a selection of paintings donated by other collections, will constitute the new museum’s collection. The museum will also provide a venue for exhibitions of the work of the San Francisco Abstract Expressionist school and the artists who taught them (including Still and Mark Rothko), as well as contemporary work on painting and architecture inspired by Diebenkorn’s works. Students begin with a sketch project that allows them to develop their own interpretation of an appropriate room for exhibiting selected works by Diebenkorn. In a second sketch project, they engage the program for the final project in a structured landscape; both projects deploy Diebenkorn’s paintings as inspirational starting points. During the second exercise, they undertake a field trip to San Francisco/Berkeley. Following the site visit, they construct a site model before moving on to the design of their individual solution for the Richard Diebenkorn Museum.

Nicholas Brow

116

Ruth and Norman Moore Professor


Nicholas Brow

A MUSEUM FOR THE WORK S OF RICH A RD DIEBENKORN

Ashley Morgan

ADV V-VI S13

McCarter 117

Wei Kou


Jingwen Shi

118

Nicholas Brow

Ashley Morgan

Jingwen Shi

McCarter

Nicholas Brow


A MUSEUM FOR THE WORK S OF RICH A RD DIEBENKORN

Jingwen Shi

ADV V-VI S13

Nicholas Brow

McCarter 119

Ashley Morgan


A Ángel Alonso

Conditions

Paraskevi Stasi

120

Ruth and Norman Moore Visiting Professor

ADVANCED STUDIO V-VI SPRING 2013

The goal of the studio is to learn how to develop the creative potential of conditions in architecture. Far from paralyzing creativity, working with imposed conditions stimulates creativity, changing the idea of an architect who invents shapes into an architect who discovers shapes. The first condition of the program is to work on only one concept. For the first part of the studio, the concept is shape, while matter is the concept for the second part. The second condition is to operate on each concept with a single reference. For the first part, the reference is nature; for the second part, it is process. The third condition is to work only with the hard thing, avoiding the virtual. Models are the “real thing” for the first part, while technical, measurable drawings with black lines only are the hard thing for the second part. For this studio, shape is viewed as a sensitive translation of the environment, using extreme environmental conditions as an opportunity to develop radical solutions that express the way the object is related to the landscape. This shape is derived from a deep knowledge of the particular environmental problems, and must be structurally un-scalar. No measures or features may be taken into account beyond the solicitations of each climate and each place. The concept of matter provides an opportunity to evolve the evocations of the shape toward a livable space. When modifying the scale of their references to suit the human being, students build a new structural relationship, with which they will comply without modifying the original concept. In addition, the matter of men’s constructions is not the same as that of nature; the processes are quite different. The objective is to design even the smallest details, as far as students can reach.


Bronwyn Charlton

CONDITIONS

ADV V-VI S13

Bronwyn Charlton

Alonso 121


Paraskevi Stasi

Paraskevi Stasi

122

Paraskevi Stasi

Yi Jung Lo

Alonso

Paraskevi Stasi


Bronwyn Charlton

CONDITIONS

Yi Jung Lo

ADV V-VI S13

Yi Jung Lo

Alonso 123


A Andrew Cruse

124

Assistant Professor

Of Donks and Dyads: the Quadrangle Experiment ADVANCED STUDIO V-VI SPRING 2013 This options studio joins the three themes of sustainability, building reuse and housing. Students will address the historical and theoretical underpinnings of these themes, and their practical applications, in the design of student housing in the Parkview Gardens neighborhood, north of the Danforth Campus. The historical and theoretical work will result in a book. The practical work will result in designdevelopment-level drawings for two university-owned buildings slated to undergo “deep energy retrofits.” The university is seeking to have these drawings developed into construction documents over the summer and leading to construction beginning next fall. This studio expands on research begun during the fall 2012 semester, and coincides with the second year of the university’s seven-year plan to renovate 850 housing units. This research project, entitled Quadrangle: A Green Rehab Experiment, was developed by me, Christof Jantzen and Phil Valko (Director of the university’s Office of Sustainability) as an opportunity for building-scale research related to the topic of energy. This semester students and faculty from the School of Engineering and Applied Science, the Olin School of Business, the School of Arts & Sciences and the landscape department of the Sam Fox School will be conducting their own research and will interact with students in the studio. The title Of Donks and Dyads underscores the studio’s desire to stimulate provocative design and research. Donks are standard American sedans customized to give them a new urban identity, one that is simultaneously old and new, familiar and unexpected. Dyads refer to the experimental structure which compares results between control and experimental cases in order to quantify improvements in performance. Our design approach to existing buildings will combine the inventiveness of donking with the rigor of the scientific method. The studio will be held in 702 Westgate, a former six-family apartment building converted into a studio space, where we will conduct building-scaled experiments. During the semester, students will be encouraged to work largely with BIM software as a design tool. There will be an optional studio trip during spring break to the Netherlands where we will interact with faculty from the Delft University of Technology.


unConventional

OF DONK S A ND DYA DS

Communal Group

ADV V-VI S13

Malia Kalahele

Cruse 125


unConventional

Communal Group

126 Malia Kalahele

Cruse Malia Kalahele


Malia Kalahele

OF DONK S A ND DYA DS

Communal Group

ADV V-VI S13

Malia Kalahele

Cruse 127

unConventional


A Christof Jantzen Heather Woofter

I-CARES Professor of Practice Associate Professor

The City Yards Studio

For more than 60 years, the City of Santa Monica, California, has owned and operated the 10-acre Corporation Yard Facility located at 2500 Michigan Ave. The divisions within the Yard have outgrown its facilities, with the functional uses gradually becoming impaired due to space limitations, regulatory requirements, and facility conditions. Santa Monica is an advocate of the Sustainable City Concept and has established specific goals for meetings its principles through resource conservation, transportation, pollution prevention, public health protection, and community and economic development. This studio brings together architecture and urban design to deliver comprehensive urban spaces, much as practitioners in these disciplines would do. The studio engages holistic approaches to the spatial and performative nature of urban life, and touches upon landscape strategies of remediation and design as inspiration for poetically and technically integrated design projects. Students collaboratively interface to develop integrated design proposals in which buildings and open spaces work together to create high-quality urban environments. The urban design students are challenged to create “livability, lively cities, public life, and other concepts describing inviting, vibrant, and stimulating urban environments� through the design of a public open space. The architecture students, meanwhile, engage the building dimension of the studio through the design of an integrated urban building. In addition, they spatially develop one additional program element (housing, museum, etc.) that integrates into the corresponding urban design scheme, and zoom in on a critical juncture within the project in order to resolve a detailed assemblage within the work.

David Hamm

128

ADVANCED STUDIO V-VI SPRING 2013


Allison Conley

THE CIT Y YA RDS STUDIO

Matthew Carlson

David Hamm

ADV V-VI S13

David Hamm

Woofter | Jantzen 129


Allison Conley

130

Allison Conley

Allison Conley

Woofter | Jantzen Allison Conley


Matthew Carlson

THE CIT Y YA RDS STUDIO

Allison Conley

ADV V-VI S13

Woofter | Jantzen 131

David Hamm


A 132

Advanced International Studios FALL 2012 – SPRING 2013

The School’s international programs provide an extraordinarily rich learning environment for students, who can take advanced studios in Buenos Aires, Seoul, Helsinki, and Barcelona. These world cities offer unparalleled urban experiences not available in the Midwest, as well as a deeper understanding of the relationship between culture, climate, and the construction of urban and architectural space. The urban design found in these locales, as well as the intensity of use by their inhabitants, enhance students’ perceptions of the city as a cultural artifact where architecture is a fundamental component of its identity. These international experiences offer visions of reality that increase an architect’s capacity to learn and to work more responsibly as professionals and citizens.


Student


A Fabián Llonch Gerardo Caballero Gustavo Cardon

Lecturer Abroad

Buenos Aires International Studio

Inspiration In The Margins: The School + Project Breaking the cycle of poverty through education “The desire to know is natural to good men.” – Leonardo da Vinci Argentina is a land of extremes. Buenos Aires, the capital of Latin America’s third-largest economy, is a sprawling megalopolis. With more than 13 million inhabitants, it is the political, economic, and cultural capital of Argentina. The gridiron of formal residential and commercial areas is interrupted by large urban spaces. In between, marginal, undefined parcels, have been settled by impoverished, migrant populations. These spaces, often called “villas de emergencia,” are decades old, operate outside a formal market economy, and are subject to questionable political exchange. This studio will work in Villa 31 in the Retiro Area, where the population has better and cheaper access to transportation, public spaces, and services. Because of its visibility and proximity to wealthy areas, its presence accentuates sharp social contrasts. In this studio, we will design a school. But, more than that, we will design a hybrid space for learning. We will create: a school + a theater, or a park, or a sport facility. Students will be immersed in the complexity of the Buenos Aires urban fabric, to gain a deep understanding of what will most benefit the Villa 31 population. The work produced will require precise material and technological definition. To inform this process, all work will be focused on the production of architecture in the region characterized by a particular technological and tectonic culture. Ultimately, the studio will provide an insight on the challenges and opportunities of the designing culture in Latin America.

Ashley Morgan

134

FALL 2012


Laura Wang

Ashley Morgan

BUENOS A IRES

INTL F12

Raymond Chau

Caballero | Cardon | Llonch 135


Raymond Chau

Raymond Chau

Raymond Chau

Caballero | Cardon | Llonch

136 Raymond Chau


Laura Wang

Laura Wang

BUENOS A IRES

INTL F12

Raymond Chau

Caballero | Cardon | Llonch 137

Laura Wang


A Matti Rautiola

Lecturer Abroad

Helsinki International Studio

138

SPRING 2013

Learning From Helsinki: Designs For Identity And Environment The ethos of architectural design in Finland and the Nordic countries can be understood by their attention to issues of cultural identity, environmental responsiveness, material substance, and democratic intentions. Taking cues from these emphases and from the precepts of a range of Nordic architects, this advanced graduate design studio in Helsinki, Finland, will seek to transfer this sensibility to the individual student at large, through a series of researched visual investigations, scaled material constructions, and tectonic architectural designs.  The semester will consist of a range of projects, with a variety of durations, scales, sites, materials and programs. A rapid succession of overlapping research projects will occur in the beginning weeks, leading to the focused consideration first of a one-room public pavilion structure for the city of Helsinki, and then to much more complex sites and program-based project in the center of the city.  The final project will be the design of Finnish Film Archives and Media Center, a building open to Helsinki citizens, scholars, prospective students interested in films and culture, tourists, and the public. The sites, located either in Kasarmitori in the Kaartinkaupunki neighborhood or at Baana, proximate to the Kamppi Center, are both located in central Helsinki. The program contains the Finnish Film Archives and Media Center. There are three alternative material and structural systems determined for each student: wood, concrete or steel. 


Pucheng Sun

Michelle Hauk

HEL SINK I

INTL S13

Emily Rosa

Rautiola 139


Pucheng Sun

Emily Rosa

140

Michelle Hauk

Rautiola

Emily Rosa


Michelle Hauk

Pucheng Sun

HEL SINK I

INTL S13

Emily Rosa

Rautiola 141

Michelle Hauk


A Adrian Luchini Elena Cánovas Anna Puigjaner

Raymond E. Maritz Professor Lecturer Abroad

Barcelona International Studio

142

SUMMER 2013

SIGHT/SITE The nature of public space has changed radically in the last 50 years. With the advent of the automobile, the highway, and the Internet, the boundaries of what defines a space for gathering have greatly expanded. While we increasingly rely on other arenas to express ideas, the most intense forum for exchange is still one which allows for face-to-face interaction, where the sensorial experience of being there and not elsewhere creates a palpable specificity of place. In Europe, public space has remained stabler than in the New World, perhaps because the old city remains a strong parameter, blurring public and private boundaries in ways not typically seen in the USA, particularly in the Midwest. The street, the sidewalk, the plaza, the terrace, the balcony, the gate—all become a single space in flux. The pulse of the city registers with maximum intensity, and the polis—the plural—supersedes, but does not exclude, the individual. This space adapts to the particulars of its contemporary context—its economy and culture— making it democratic, dynamic, and flexible. This capacity of public space to adapt to this duality, where the space-in-flux is the host and the receptor, will be the point of departure for our studio. The active experience of the site—what your senses register—in addition to the hard data of dimensions and setting, will be the palimpsest from which your project originates.


Bryan Bogaards

Emily Rosa

BA RCELON A

INTL SU13

Nash Waters

Luchini | Cรกnovas | Puigjaner 14 3


Emily Rosa

14 4

Nash Waters

Mike Owens

Luchini | Cรกnovas | Puigjaner

Nash Waters


Emily Rosa

BA RCELON A

INTL SU13

Bryan Bogaards

Emily Rosa

Luchini | Cรกnovas | Puigjaner 145

Bryan Bogaards


A Degree Project

146

FALL 2012 – SPRING 2013

In this final semester studio, each student develops a comprehensive design project that conveys an independent, critical position on the making of architecture in the world. This includes development of program spaces and relationships, development of structural and environmental systems, building envelope systems, life-safety issues, and technical construction sections and assemblies, along with experiential renderings and a focus on telling a critical project story. Based on the product of the preceding Design Thinking Degree Project Preparation—an individually initiated programmatic, intentional, and situational framework—each student develops an aspiring and compelling conceptual framework, progresses to a convincing development of all aspects of the project (formal, spatial, experiential, organizational, structural, and technical), and creates a clear, full, and persuasive presentation of their work.


Vivian Cheng

147


Anita Hsieh 14 8


Visiting Professor JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor Professor

Elena Canovas Kathryn Dean Ben Fehrmann Eric Hoffman Philip Holden Adrian Luchini

Professor of Practice Senior Lecturer

DEG F12

149

DEGREE PROJECT

Raymond E. Maritz Professor


Chris Moy 150


Visiting Professor JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor Professor

Elena Canovas Kathryn Dean Ben Fehrmann Eric Hoffman Philip Holden Adrian Luchini

Professor of Practice Senior Lecturer

DEG F12

151

DEGREE PROJECT

Raymond E. Maritz Professor


Kyle Fant 152


Visiting Professor JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor Professor

Elena Canovas Kathryn Dean Ben Fehrmann Eric Hoffman Philip Holden Adrian Luchini

Professor of Practice Senior Lecturer

DEG F12

153

DEGREE PROJECT

Raymond E. Maritz Professor


Vivian Cheng 15 4


Visiting Professor JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor Professor

Elena Canovas Kathryn Dean Ben Fehrmann Eric Hoffman Philip Holden Adrian Luchini

Professor of Practice Senior Lecturer

DEG F12

155

DEGREE PROJECT

Raymond E. Maritz Professor


Benjamin Stephenson 156


Visiting Professor JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor Professor

Elena Canovas Kathryn Dean Ben Fehrmann Eric Hoffman Philip Holden Adrian Luchini

Professor of Practice Senior Lecturer

DEG F12

157

DEGREE PROJECT

Raymond E. Maritz Professor


Saori Yamane 158


Visiting Professor JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor Professor

Elena Canovas Kathryn Dean Ben Fehrmann Eric Hoffman Philip Holden Adrian Luchini

Professor of Practice Senior Lecturer

DEG F12

159

DEGREE PROJECT

Raymond E. Maritz Professor


Amber Organtini 160


Visiting Professor JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor Professor

Elena Canovas Kathryn Dean Ben Fehrmann Eric Hoffman Philip Holden Adrian Luchini

Professor of Practice Senior Lecturer

DEG F12

161

DEGREE PROJECT

Raymond E. Maritz Professor


Lauren Harrison 162


Visiting Professor JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor Professor

Elena Canovas Kathryn Dean Ben Fehrmann Eric Hoffman Philip Holden Adrian Luchini

Professor of Practice Senior Lecturer

DEG F12

163

DEGREE PROJECT

Raymond E. Maritz Professor


Joshua Canez 164


Visiting Professor JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor Professor

Elena Canovas Kathryn Dean Ben Fehrmann Eric Hoffman Philip Holden Adrian Luchini

Professor of Practice Senior Lecturer

DEG F12

165

DEGREE PROJECT

Raymond E. Maritz Professor


Sarah Kott 166


Visiting Professor JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor Professor

Elena Canovas Kathryn Dean Ben Fehrmann Eric Hoffman Philip Holden Adrian Luchini

Professor of Practice Senior Lecturer

DEG F12

167

DEGREE PROJECT

Raymond E. Maritz Professor


Carlos Planchart 168


Visiting Professor JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor Professor

Elena Canovas Kathryn Dean Ben Fehrmann Eric Hoffman Philip Holden Adrian Luchini

Professor of Practice Senior Lecturer

DEG F12

169

DEGREE PROJECT

Raymond E. Maritz Professor


Michelle Park 170


Visiting Professor JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor Professor

Elena Canovas Kathryn Dean Ben Fehrmann Eric Hoffman Philip Holden Adrian Luchini

Professor of Practice Senior Lecturer

DEG F12

171

DEGREE PROJECT

Raymond E. Maritz Professor


Reid Caudill 172


Kathryn Dean Paul J. Donnelly Ben Fehrmann Adrian Luchini

JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor Rebecca & John Voyles Professor Professor

Raymond E. Maritz Professor

DEGREE PROJECT

DEG S13

173


Kirsten Akerman 174


Kathryn Dean Paul J. Donnelly Ben Fehrmann Adrian Luchini

JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor Rebecca & John Voyles Professor Professor

Raymond E. Maritz Professor

DEGREE PROJECT

DEG S13

175


Seth Bartlett 176


Kathryn Dean Paul J. Donnelly Ben Fehrmann Adrian Luchini

JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor Rebecca & John Voyles Professor Professor

Raymond E. Maritz Professor

DEGREE PROJECT

DEG S13

177


Chris Quinlan 178


Kathryn Dean Paul J. Donnelly Ben Fehrmann Adrian Luchini

JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor Rebecca & John Voyles Professor Professor

Raymond E. Maritz Professor

DEGREE PROJECT

DEG S13

179


Ruotian Cai 180


Kathryn Dean Paul J. Donnelly Ben Fehrmann Adrian Luchini

JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor Rebecca & John Voyles Professor Professor

Raymond E. Maritz Professor

DEGREE PROJECT

DEG S13

181


Zhe Sun 182


Kathryn Dean Paul J. Donnelly Ben Fehrmann Adrian Luchini

JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor Rebecca & John Voyles Professor Professor

Raymond E. Maritz Professor

DEGREE PROJECT

DEG S13

18 3


Jinfan Chen 18 4


Kathryn Dean Paul J. Donnelly Ben Fehrmann Adrian Luchini

JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor Rebecca & John Voyles Professor Professor

Raymond E. Maritz Professor

DEGREE PROJECT

DEG S13

185


Raymond Chau 186


Kathryn Dean Paul J. Donnelly Ben Fehrmann Adrian Luchini

JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor

Raymond E. Maritz Professor

187

DEG S13

Professor

DEGREE PROJECT

Rebecca & John Voyles Professor


Laura Ju Wang 188


Kathryn Dean Paul J. Donnelly Ben Fehrmann Adrian Luchini

JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor

Raymond E. Maritz Professor

189

DEG S13

Professor

DEGREE PROJECT

Rebecca & John Voyles Professor


Nicholas Berube 190


Kathryn Dean Paul J. Donnelly Ben Fehrmann Adrian Luchini

JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor

Raymond E. Maritz Professor

191

DEG S13

Professor

DEGREE PROJECT

Rebecca & John Voyles Professor


Ivy (Xingzhu) Wang 192


Kathryn Dean Paul J. Donnelly Ben Fehrmann Adrian Luchini

JoAnne Stolaroff Cotsen Professor

Raymond E. Maritz Professor

193

DEG S13

Professor

DEGREE PROJECT

Rebecca & John Voyles Professor


M Master of Landscape Architecture

194

As heirs to design, ecological, and urban traditions, landscape architects are uniquely suited to articulate a spatial vision for today’s environment. The Master of Landscape Architecture (MLA) degree program is distinguished by a commitment to design excellence, regional and international perspectives, and interdisciplinary studies. The program is in the final stage of the accreditation process. We focus on the subjects of design, ecology, and urbanism, using St. Louis as a laboratory for understanding and testing theories at the local and regional scales. The transformative process of design— linking cultural, historical, and technological investigations—forms the pedagogical basis for research. Ecology informs design practice to address a multiplicity of scales and systems within the environment. Finally, urbanism serves as a terrain for contemporary landscape practice. The curriculum is centered around studio teaching and supported by instruction in technology, natural systems, history/theory, and representation. The core studios examine a series of landscape


Joanie Walbert

problems—spatial, ecological, social, infrastructural—that increase in scale and complexity, from site to region. Instruction builds on skill sets such as hand and digital representation and landscape technology to subsequently explore advanced topics such as remote sensing and innovative materials. Following the core sequence, students are encouraged to develop their own research interests through offerings in landscape architecture, architecture, urban design, and other Washington University programs.

195


M Kees Lokman

Visiting Assistant Professor

Disturbed Sites – Beyond Reclamation ML A CORE STUDIO III FALL 2012

Exploring the connections between public space, infrastructure and ecology, this studio focuses on the planning, design and reclamation of a brownfield site in Saint Louis. Situated along the Mississippi River amidst the historic St. Louis Stamping Company buildings, the Cotton Belt Freight Depot and Laclede Power Station, the goal of the studio is to redefine the relationships between site, river and surrounding urban fabric. As part of a larger de-industrializing and ecologically sensitive zone along the Mississippi River, course members will explore the environmental, economic and socio-cultural processes underlying the transformation of contemporary waterfronts. Capitalizing on current interests and efforts to renew the image of St. Louis’ Riverfront, including The City+The Arch+The River 2015 International Design Competition, students are challenged to envision a public landscape that balances program, circulation and infrastructural elements with topography, hydrology and vegetal strategies. Through a series of exercises, lectures and readings, the studio examines the relations and tensions between city and river, between nature and technology; between activation and abandonment, between past and future uses, and between fixed and dynamic landscapes. To these ends, students are challenged to develop design proposals that are decisive and concrete, yet incorporate operational strategies that work across multiple scales and set in motion both near-term and long-term spin-offs.

Junni Zheng

196


Junni Zheng

DISTURBED SITES – BE YOND RECL A M ATION

Bronwyn Charlton

ML A CORE III F12

Junni Zheng

Lokman 197


Bronwyn Charlton

198

Xiao Zhong

Lokman

Bronwyn Charlton


Junni Zheng

DISTURBED SITES – BE YOND RECL A M ATION

Bronwyn Charlton

ML A CORE III F12

Bronwyn Charlton

Lokman 199

Junni Zheng


M Dorothée Imbert

Professor

Superquads and Hyperlinks

ML A STUDIO SPRING 2013

Using the Danforth Campus as a laboratory, this studio investigates the intersection of landscape design, architecture, and planning in the making of spaces within a campus. Students explore the possibilities for landscape architecture to define a campus’ structure and identity. By testing designs against the immediate spatial environment, students will explore landscape architecture at both site and urban scales. They will consider the effects of construction and ground manipulation on the perception and experience of space. And, they will test the possibilities of layering, transparency, enclosure, adjacencies, and in between spaces and connectors. The planners of Washington University, Cope and Stewardson, intended to provide a “growth model” for the campus, one that could maintain architectural integrity over time. Neo-classical architecture and Beaux-Arts axial symmetry evoked perfection and finality. Conversely, buildings in the (revised) Collegiate Gothic style were arranged in a system of quadrangles to establish a historical connection while allowing for expansion and variation. The clarity and flexibility of the quad structure has eroded over time by the demands of modern education and transportation. Recent construction of the adjacent School of Engineering’s Brauer Hall and planned construction of the Brown School’s new building will guide and ground the final project. Through the semester, students will test landscape concepts for defining outdoor spaces, connecting the campus to its greater context, establishing a design system, and a circulation scheme.

Ylan Vo

200


Yunqing Liu

SUPERQUA DS A ND H Y PERLINK S

ML A CORE I S13

Siting Huo

Siting Huo

Imbert 201


Siting Huo

202

Yunqing Liu

Imbert

Siting Huo


Ylan Vo

SUPERQUA DS A ND H Y PERLINK S

ML A CORE I S13

Siting Huo

Ylan Vo

Imbert 203


M Jesse Vogler

Visiting Assistant Professor

Charting the American Bottom ML A ADVANCED STUDIO V-VI SPRING 2013

Cordelia Kotin

204

They who control the levees, control the territory—or so suggest the range of preparatory and protective operations of the hydraulic societies of the Middle Mississippi region. From the revetments of the Corps of Engineers to the causeways of Cahokia, the region extending from river mile 117 to 202 known as The American Bottom has seen a succession of ways-of being with the consistent fluctuations in the rivers level and course. Inclusive of the Missouri and Mississippi river confluence, the pre-contact Mississippian mound complexes, the industrial flats of East St. Louis, and extending south through alluvial agricultural land to the onetime capitol of Illinois, Kaskasia, the American Bottom has been a testing ground for diverse settlement types and alluvial technologies that continue to the present. In this studio, The American Bottom will serve as a geographical frame to investigate questions of the design, management, and preservation of landscape at a range of spatial and temporal scales. We will begin the semester by visiting numerous regional archives and project sites in order to map the architectural, administrative, archeological, industrial, ecological, urban, and agricultural systems of e American Bottom. rough this initial fieldwork, we will develop a taxonomy of landscape types and river technologies that will culminate in an exhibition mounted in conjunction with e Center for Land Use Interpretation. We will then consider the future of this region through a series of landscape scenarios that propose programmatic, administrative, and formal approaches to current shifts in climate and related flood/drought patterns. Students will develop a clear position for negotiating the diverse political and ecological pressures of the region as they focus in on a set of uvial prototypes organized around a series of character tropes--the barge captain, the hunter, the naturalist, the farmer, the insurance salesman, etc. Through finer-grained design proposals, both hard and soft, students will address the various landscape scenarios from a planned as well as an opportunistic standpoint. Throughout, research and design will be extensively supplemented by a bibliography from landscape/architectural theory, art, literature, history, and science.


Joanie Walbert

Joanie Walbert

CH A RTING THE A MERICA N BOT TOM

Kelly Corcoran

ML A ADV V-VI S13

Kelly Corcoran

Vogler 205


Joanie Walbert

Laura Barrett

Joanie Walbert

206

Cordelia Kotin

Vogler Kelly Corcoran


Kelly Corcoran

CH A RTING THE A MERICA N BOT TOM

Kelly Corcoran

ML A ADV V-VI S13

Joanie Walbert

Vogler 207


M Master of Urban Design

208

Urbanization is an increasing and constantly changing condition of contemporary society, one that presents enormous opportunities for—and challenges to—the creation of resilient, livable, and healthy urban habitats for a sustainable world. To this end, the Master of Urban Design (MUD) program addresses urbanizing conditions and environments occurring in cities nationally and internationally by considering a full range of scales, from region to metropolitan district, from district to blocks and streets of neighborhoods, and ultimately to the design of the public realm where the vibrancy of urban and community life unfolds. This innovative post-professional program allows students to pursue advanced design and research work of the urban environment while acquiring the theoretical and professional foundation for urban design practice. The curriculum is centered on the core sequence of urban design studios. Through these intensive design experiences, students develop the skills to make design proposals for a diverse range of conditions within the metropolitan landscape. The first studio introduces


students to sustainable urban design concepts through theoretical and speculative exercises that explore metropolitan conditions in and around St. Louis, focusing on the regional scale and the development of projects down to the district scale. Students then take an “actionresearch” studio that engages in urban sustainable development issues from the scale of the district to understanding and shaping public space while more fully engaging the policy, cultural, economic, and real estate conditions of cities. The core studio sequence culminates with an international summer studio located in a rapidly growing “Hyper-City,” which serves as the Degree Project for the Master of Urban Design.

Haley O’Brien

209


M Patty Heyda Bonnie Roy

Assistant Professor, Coordinator

Lecturer

Elements of Urban Design

MUD FALL 2012

This studio addresses the complexity of urbanized landscapes as interconnected ecological systems characterized by a diversity of physical conditions. Along any given metropolitan transect, a spectrum of typologically distinct urbanisms exists where natural systems, infrastructures, open spaces and buildings and blocks vary in their formal organization and in the ways they articulate and interact with each other and with other flows. Developing skills and techniques in urban design requires understanding the complexity of these environments at nested ecological scales, and through expanded perspectives from architecture, landscape architecture, city and regional planning, economic development, sociology and environmental sciences. This course provide students with the foundational concepts and skills to engage diverse conditions of the contemporary city formally while negotiating criteria of design quality, sustainability, and human use patterns, with in-depth knowledge of the systemic and inter-scalar relationships characterizing the metropolitan landscape. Working in groups and individually, students rotate between two of five distinct sites along the St. Louis metropolitan transect during the semester. Analysis and design work reflects the intensive range of scales in view at all times: the regional to local to block scales. The final project is an urban design proposal for one of the five sites that reflects students’ understanding of—and a clear position toward—the site and its ecological, spatial, and programmatic identities and needs. The studio is co-taught by an architectural/urban designer and a landscape architect/urban designer in order to reinforce the idea of urban design as a systems-based, crossscalar, cross-disciplinary construct.

Yang Shi

210


ELEMENTS OF URBA N DESIGN

Yang Shi

MUD F12

Haley O’Brien

Jennifer Wong

Heyda | Roy 211


Yang Shi

212 Grant Hromas

Jennifer Wong

Heyda | Roy Jennifer Wong


Grant Hromas

Yang Shi

ELEMENTS OF URBA N DESIGN

Grant Hromas

MUD F12

Jennifer Wong

Heyda | Roy 213

Yang Shi


M John Hoal Oliver Schulze Jonathan Stitelman

Professor, Director of MUD Program Visiting Professor

Lecturer

The City Yards Studio

MUD ADVANCED STUDIO V-VI SPRING 2013

For more than 60 years, the City of Santa Monica, California, has owned and operated the 10-acre Corporation Yard Facility located at 2500 Michigan Ave. The divisions within the Yard have outgrown its facilities, with the functional uses gradually becoming impaired due to space limitations, regulatory requirements, and facility conditions. Santa Monica is an advocate of the Sustainable City Concept and has established specific goals for meetings its principles through resource conservation, transportation, pollution prevention, public health protection, and community and economic development. This studio brings together architecture and urban design to deliver comprehensive urban spaces, much as practitioners in these disciplines would do. The studio engages holistic approaches to the spatial and performative nature of urban life, and touches upon landscape strategies of remediation and design as inspiration for poetically and technically integrated design projects. Students collaboratively interface to develop integrated design proposals in which buildings and open spaces work together to create high-quality urban environments. The urban design students are challenged to create “livability, lively cities, public life, and other concepts describing inviting, vibrant, and stimulating urban environments� through the design of a public open space. The architecture students, meanwhile, engage the building dimension of the studio through the design of an integrated urban building. In addition, they spatially develop one additional program element (housing, museum, etc.) that integrates into the corresponding urban design scheme, and zoom in on a critical juncture within the project in order to resolve a detailed assemblage within the work.

Jennifer Wong

214


Jennifer Wong

Jennifer Wong

THE CIT Y YA RDS STUDIO

MUD S13

Ying Sun

Hoal | Schulze | Stitelman 215


Jennifer Wong

216 Jingyu Lin

Hoal | Schulze | Stitelman Jingyu Lin


Ying Sun

Jingyu Lin

THE CIT Y YA RDS STUDIO

MUD S13

Jingyu Lin

Hoal | Schulze | Stitelman 217

Jennifer Wong


Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE & URBAN DESIGN

COLLEGE OF ART

DEPARTMENT OF ART HISTORY & ARCHAEOLOGY

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF ART

MILDRED LANE KEMPER ART MUSEUM

KRANZBERG ART & ARCHITECTURE LIBRARY

The Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts is an interdisciplinary and diverse community of architects, artists, and designers dedicated to excellence in learning, creative activity, research, and exhibition. The School’s unique structure allows it to build on the strengths of each unit—Architecture, Art, and Museum—and to draw on the resources of the University to create new knowledge and address the social and environmental challenges of our time. As a result, students have access to expanded opportunities for critical dialogue and collaboration, and are singularly positioned to shape 21stcentury culture. The Graduate School of Architecture & Urban Design is engaged in architecture in all its manifestations of discourse and practice, from building technologies and professional standards to drawing, painting, and sculpture; from digital media to full-scale fabrication; from architectural history to critical theory. Our graduate programs offer vision and demand commitment

Graduate School of Architecture & Urban Design Washington University in St.Louis

throughout a variety of options and terms of study. These programs are interconnected and integrated sequences of design studios and parallel course work that move between values of technology and craft, emphasizing both theory and practice, and taking into consideration questions of site, material, assembly, and purpose. International semesters expand the physical reach of both the undergraduate and graduate programs, connecting them to diverse educational settings in Europe, South America, and Asia.

Campus Box 1079 One Brookings Drive St. Louis, MO 63130

314.935.6227 phone 800.295.6227 continental US 314.935.7656 fax wuarch@wustl.edu samfoxschool.wustl.edu

Approach 12 13  

Graduate School of Architecture & Urban Design, Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts, Washington University in St. Louis

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