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YOUR FREE SUNSHINE COAST LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE

WINTER ’17


a beautiful place to live.

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FROM THE EDITOR

people

DAVE WILCOCK COVER PHOTOGRAPHER

I have an obsession for aerial and landscape photography and more recently videography. I am extremely passionate about Mother Nature. I find looking down onto the coast so mesmerising; it’s such a thing of beauty to witness the ocean constantly changing its form, creating a perpetual dance of light and shadows. Photography fills my soul but it is an appetite very rarely satisfied – I am always hunting for that next moment waiting to be caught in time. If you are interested in discovering more of my work, visit davewilcock.com ON THE COVER This was taken on my first trip to Fraser Island. I was obsessed with this tree on the west coast and returned for several consecutive mornings hoping to get a colourful sunrise. It rained but I think the mood works well for this shot. Captured using a Canon 5D mark2 with 24-70mm 2.8, 24mm, iso 200, 1/80th sec, f 7.1

EDITORIAL ENQUIRIES editorial@saltmagazine.com.au ADVERTISING & SUBSCRIPTIONS info@saltmagazine.com.au GENERAL ENQUIRIES 0412 210 281 PO Box 528 Noosaville QLD Australia 4566 © Copyright 2017 salt is a free quarterly magazine published by ATD Management P/L. Distribution area between Bribie and Fraser Island and inland to Kenilworth and select areas throughout Brisbane. 2

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power

The Sunshine Coast has so much more to offer than beautiful beaches, enviable weather and pretty countryside. Sure, for us lucky locals and those who flock to our region for holidays, our natural beauty is a delight and inspiration. However, I think what makes us special, really special, is the people who call this wonderful region home. We boast some incredible artists, selfless individuals, talented creative minds and determined entrepreneurs. Sunshine Coasters have a fascinating history and a bright future, and in each issue of salt we capture that by celebrating a handful of individuals and groups, unsung heroes and rising stars, and share their stories with our readers. Who are my favourites this issue? Well, of course, I don’t have favourites, but there are a few special people who make me proud to be salt’s editor. Take SevGen founder and Eumundi local Terri Waller (page 6), an entrepreneurial indigenous educator who is changing lives, and making pretty good coffee into the bargain. Then there’s Saara Roppola (page 90), an artist whose work delights, challenges and entertains. Saara is a true bold visionary, a local girl with a global outlook and talent in spades. I am also delighted to share restaurateur Danielle Gjestland’s story with our readers. On page 50, you’ll learn how Danielle and her team at Wasabi Restaurant & Bar and The Cooking School Noosa are helping local foodies connect with the farm, one delectable dish at a time. I also love the story of Coolum’s Emily Boyd, whose passion for the rights of food producers has taken her to the Philippines and back. Emily helped train hearing-impaired locals grow and sell their own produce and she tells us all about it on page 30. It’s our 12th birthday issue and to celebrate we’re giving away a gift. We’ve teamed up with Sofitel Noosa Pacific Resort to offer an incredible prize of two nights at the resort. Head to page 71 to find out more, then jump on the WIN page at saltmagazine.com.au to go into the draw. Good luck!

JEMMA PEARSON EDITOR

CONTRIBUTING TALENTS: WHAT WAS YOUR FAVOURITE ‘BEHIND THE SCENES’ MOMENT THIS EDITION? THANKS GO TO OUR OTHER CONTRIBUTING TALENTS TOO: LYNNE DELANY PUBLISHER JANE TODD PROOFREADER BRISEIS ONFRAY DESIGNER, WRITER

JOLENE OGLE WRITER

XANTHE COWARD WRITER

My favourite moment was trying to look serene without letting water get in my ears while Hing Ang snapped photos of me enjoying the flotation pool at Noosa Springs. I now have a new appreciation for what models do. It was hard! But as soon as Hing had his photos I was able to relax and let the heavily salted water carry me off into a blissful state of relaxation. Heaven!

I see a lot of live theatre, but seeing Saara Roppola’s extraordinary work and hearing about the intense creative process behind it has been inspiring. Saara applies ancient knowledge and imagination to her contemporary practice, creating original performance art. When I saw Saara perform at Woodfordia I was captivated. To gain any sort of insight into a creative mind is fascinating.

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HING ANG PHOTOGRAPHER KRISTA EPPELSTUN PHOTOGRAPHER ANASTASIA KARIOFYLLIDIS PHOTOGRAPHER KATIE MACKENZIE SOCIAL MEDIA MIKE BENNIE WRITER KARINA EASTWAY WRITER LILJANA FREY WRITER LINDA READ WRITER PENNY SHIPWAY WRITER


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CONTENTS

winter

FEATURES

’17

6 CHANGE IS COMING

Terri Waller’s SevGen philosophy is changing the lives of indigenous locals.

16 SHINING BRIGHT

Performer Naomi Price can’t wait to head our way for NOOSA alive!

PEOPLE

22 PURSUIT OF PASSION

Grace Kovak from Professional Beauty Clinic knows that real beauty comes from inside.

24 LOOK AT ME

Local author Gregg Dreise continues the indigenous storytelling tradition.

26 SHOOTING STARS

salt catches up with local actor and writer Chelsea Ingram on her way to the top.

28 YOUNG ENTREPRENEUR University of the Sunshine Coast student Callum Gordon is a natural-born communicator.

30 FOR A CAUSE

Emily Boyd digs deep to help teach sustainable farming practices.

34 ROLE MODEL

Macushla Montell uses her experience to help local businesses thrive.

90 BOLD VISIONARIES

Performance artist Saara Roppola’s work is challenging and entertaining.

94 UP AND COMING

TASTES

38 TABLE TALK

salt settles in for afternoon tea at Elements at Montville.

42 NOSH NEWS

Foodie news for every palate from all around the Sunshine Coast.

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CULINARY CREATIONS

Andrea Ravezzani from Noosa Waterfront shares one of the restaurant’s most popular dishes.

46 PRODUCE PEOPLE

From humble beginnings, Kunara Organic Marketplace is still growing.

50 PADDOCK TO PLATE

Women from all around the world have fallen in love with Salita Matthews jewellery.

Restaurateur Danielle Gjestland doesn’t mind getting her hands dirty at her Honeysuckle Hill Farm.

104 ARTIST

54 RELAXED RECIPES

Despite her gypsy past, artist, illustrator and author Caroline Magerl has settled happily on the Sunshine Coast.

108 OFF THE WALL

Montville Art Gallery’s Wayne Malkin paints dream-like landscapes.

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It’s time to add some Asian heat to your meals, thanks to Spicers Tamarind.

58 SALT CELLAR

We flew salt wine writer Mike Bennie to the Granite Belt for a blind tasting, and he is in awe of the wines on offer.

IS BORN OF THE PUREST PARENTS, THE SUN & THE SEA. PYTHAGORAS

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72 LOVESTRUCK 64 KEEPING IT REAL

A long engagement was worth the wait for Brooke Stirton and Chris Jarvis.

68 MAGIC MAKER

Photo Simon J Coulson

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Photography and cake are a natural combination for Tome’s Matt O’Brien and Alita Johnson.

72 TO HAVE AND TO HOLD Treats and tips to get ready for the big day.

STAPLES 12 SIX SENSES

124

LIFE

74 FASHION

Face the colder weather with these hot new-season pieces.

96 PAMPER AND PREEN

A selection of items based on the special powers that humans use to experience their world – touch, see, hear, smell, taste and feel.

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SECRETS ONLY A LOCAL WOULD KNOW

New discoveries and hidden gems from around the Sunshine Coast.

20 CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Karina Eastway forgets about her hectic life for a moment at Kansha Natural Therapies.

Get out and about during winter with a selection of hand-picked events on the Sunshine Coast.

99 BEAUTY

32 BOOKS & BLOGS

Nurture and nourish with these seriously indulgent beauty products.

100 HEALTH

Curl up with one of these great stories.

36 A DOSE OF SALT

Jolene Ogle heads to Noosa Springs and discovers the joys of a flotation pool.

Barbara and Allan Pease have been around the world, but it’s the Sunshine Coast they have chosen to call home.

118 ON THE INSIDE

112 ART DATES

122 HOMEWARES

117 ART & ANTIQUES TRAIL 126 TOURIST INFORMATION

Di Henshall is running out of wall space for the plethora of awards she keeps winning for her stunning design work. Live a little, with these luxury items for the home.

124 GREAT OUTDOORS

It’s up, up and up away with Maroochydore’s Paradise Seaplanes.

The Sunshine Coast has some of the best art galleries in the nation. Find out what will be on show over winter.

Essential info for all visitors to the Sunshine Coast, including travel times, surf safety and market details.

128 MAP saltmagazine . com . au

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FEATURE

Patrick Sloan (consultant), Terri Waller and Steven Lloyd (barista) 6

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CHANGE IS COMING WORDS KARINA EASTWAY PHOTOS ANASTASIA KARIOFYLLIDIS

CAN YOU HEAR the cool whisper of change? It’s in the disconnection we feel, despite being more connected then ever before. It’s in the rush of everyday life, despite advances in technology that make our lives easier. It’s echoed in the worldwide movement to be more selfless, to simplify, to live sustainably, and to embrace environmental stewardship. >

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The change embraces the wisdom of seven generations’ thinking – an indigenous way of being, reflecting our interconnectedness to future generations as well as our past ones. It asks us to act and think in ways that will benefit, not hinder, future generations, as well as draw from previous generational wisdom. Eumundi’s Terri Waller is telling one such intergenerational story. A DTulua woman from Queensland’s Coral Coast, Terri, 52, founded the charitable organisation SevGen (short for seven generations) five years ago. The organisation runs projects across a ‘3E’ vision of enterprise, education and entrepreneurship, all designed to create community wellness through connection and relationships and opening the spiritual portal between ancient wisdom and the modern world. “Indigenous concepts are part of SevGen thinking,” says Terri. “When you’re thinking seven generations ahead you can’t be anything but more conscious and conscientious in what you say, think, and do. “We are coming back to that. Humanity is starting to feel like we’re at a crisis point – indigenous ways have so much more to offer than yearning or that fear that is so prevalent in our experience nowadays.” Terri says some of SevGen’s social-good activities address critical needs in areas such as youth incarceration, adult incarceration, school suspension and primary health. But the organisation also works to increase knowledge of indigenous ways, including emerging industries such as cultural and spiritual tourism. She says it’s a big vision, but there’s also core practical and urgent things that need to be done. 8

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WHEN YOU’RE THINKING SEVEN GENERATIONS AHEAD YOU CAN’T BE ANYTHING BUT MORE CONSCIOUS AND CONSCIENTIOUS OF WHAT YOU SAY, THINK, AND DO.

At its heart, SevGen is pioneering a new approach to learning, based on SevGen’s trademark PAPPA approach: Play Autonomously in your Passion with Purpose Always. Terri sees the education model as offering an authentic pedagogy that gives ‘SevGen SEECCERS’ (socially, emotionally, ecologically, culturally, creatively, educationally solid individuals) the space to master their individual passions with a view to achieving success as cultural and creative entrepreneurs.

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Boasting bachelor of education and bachelor of arts qualifications (plus tertiary qualifications in project management, community services and small business management), years of practical teaching experience and numerous awards and scholarships, Terri is no stranger to the educational status quo. But she says it’s an outdated, industrial-based system that does not serve well a large percentage of children who are creative and sensates, and who are physically intelligent and not necessarily academics. “Some people succeed because they’re designed that way to pursue academia, but 75 per cent of students are under-evaluated, undercelebrated, under-recognised. And that’s a shame; it’s so easy to celebrate people,” she says. After raising six children (with her husband David who she describes as her “bodhisattva”) and seeing their experiences in the current system, Terri started to imagine a different way. She says while the industrial education system has a role to play, she imagined a system that honoured everybody’s dreaming around indigenous ways of being: place-based, nature-based and relationship-based. “Stepping outside the education model we have is a pretty bold move. But if everyone was to develop their life around their passion, then how would that look in the world? They would know their potential, believe they’re intelligent, be motivated and feel unstoppable. “We’re used to semester by semester reporting and indicators that you’re progressing in a set scope and sequence. I get so worked up about it because you could achieve so much in two years let alone 12 years of learning when you’re crafting experience around someone’s passion.” For the past five years, Terri has been working to develop the 3E model, proving the methodologies, developing approaches and demonstrating outcomes. But she also needed to figure out a way it could be sustained and supported, so she created enterprise projects, which, in themselves, have also provided educational opportunities. “Everything we do has an income-producing concept so it can sustain itself and also contribute to the collective,” Terri says. >

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Cafe chef Stevie Blacklock

Deadly Espresso in Eumundi is one of SevGen’s current success stories: an ethos-filled cafe that delivers positive social benefits to the community, in addition to food and top-notch coffee. While the cafe teaches young people hospitality skills, it’s the support and personal connection they receive that can be life changing. “At the cafe we talk all the time about PAPPA; it’s our educational approach,” says Terri. “Young people come here if they’re not getting along in mainstream schools to spend some time with us. By the time we get to have anything to do with them, it’s a crisis situation so we start thickening the story for them so they can hear there are other options. We let them know that they’re okay, that life’s a journey and it validates them in a time when they need that the most. It’s conducive to them having a ‘well’ story instead of heading in a downward spiral. If we can provide more and more of these conditions for people that are finding it difficult, we’re going to cushion that.” Cafe chef Stevie Blacklock (who is a Biripi and Ngarabal descendant) is just one recipient of this unique environment. At 32, he’s a qualified French chef who’s worked in top restaurants but has a very typical story in indigenous people’s most recent history, which has not served his life outcomes well. Stevie had a turbulent start to life. Abandoned by his family by 13 years of age, he lived alone on the streets of Sydney and by 15 was being forced to sell drugs at school. At the age of 17, a horrific accident killed his close friend and, while not Stevie’s fault, his feelings of blame led to subsequent incarcerations. At age 18, Stevie was moved to Woodford prison where he met Garnett Allan Mickelo, a Wakka Wakka man who taught him Murri ways for the first time, giving him his first experience and feelings of connection to tribe and culture. 10

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HUMANITY IS STARTING TO FEEL LIKE WE’RE AT A CRISIS POINT – INDIGENOUS WAYS HAVE SO MUCH MORE TO OFFER THAN YEARNING OR THAT FEAR THAT IS SO PREVALENT IN OUR EXPERIENCE NOWADAYS.

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Despite incomprehensibly difficult times and ongoing struggles, Stevie’s come to a space now at SevGen that supports his passion and purpose and has given him a way to celebrate his culture, including a vision of developing the first Aboriginal cheffing course. He also has a vision to go out to the elders and bring back recipes to share.

ORIGINAL ART DECO SAPPHIRE & DIAMOND PENDANT

“The vision keeps me positive,” Stevie says. “SevGen has given me stability. That stability is everything, and without it I would be on the streets.” In time, the cafe is set to become a franchise model, which already includes a partnership with supplier Jasper Coffee (which is certified organic, fair-trade and carbon neutral), and Deadly Espresso’s own boutique blend ‘Golden Sands’. There are also plans to create bush tucker specialty coffee (such as using wattle seeds) and food.

TOURMALINE & DIAMOND DRESS RING

“It’s how we celebrate country by infusing all the bush tucker ingredients we can into the menu to showcase seasonal flavours,” Terri says. Hand-in-hand with the cafe is the “do good” Boomerang Bus initiative, which can act as a mobile cafe at festivals and gatherings, as well as travel to more remote communities to demonstrate positive social solutions. Terri’s also passionate about SevGen’s Our Kanyini project, which provides housing for vulnerable and fragile people. Kanyini is a Yankunytjatjara (Central Desert) concept of unconditional love, and the sanctuary model allows for healing fragmentation caused through past trauma. Another inspiring initiative already underway is the Modern Songline project “singing back-up ancient songlines”, which is an education and justice solution activity. Nominated for a 2016 Australian of the Year Award, current member in the Queensland Government’s Minister for Science, Innovation and Small Business advisory committee and recipient of this year’s Paul Ziebarth Memorial Executive Leaders Scholarship, Terri’s list of accomplishments is already long. But while there’s still a lot to achieve, the vision is strong. “The seed of our humanity is within us,” says Terri. “It hasn’t stopped for 80,000 years and, with indigenous ways, we’ve got a gem of an example to draw from.”

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If you would like to support or partner with any of SevGen’s projects, contact Terri at terri@sevgen.com.au or 0431 454 333. You can visit Deadly Espresso at 79 Memorial Drive, Eumundi. sevgen.com.au

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SIX SENSES

TASTE We always knew the team at Carole Tretheway Design had impeccable taste in interiors, but it’s not just bespoke furniture you’ll find in its Noosa Heads store. Carole Tretheway also stocks beautiful French linen loungewear from Andrea & Joen. The simplicity of the design, flattering silhouettes and quality fabric mean you can be stylishly comfortable all day. Find Carole Tretheway Design at Shop 8b, 14 Arcadia Walk, Noosa Heads. 5447 3255 or ct-design.com.au

FEEL Illustration courtesy of TWIGSEEDS STUDIO, twigseeds.com.au

six senses

Life is all about experiences, so salt offers these sensory delights to entertain and inspire us to see, hear, smell, taste and touch and feel.

SMELL We can almost smell the hops in the air at Eumundi! Lion has announced a new partnership with the town’s Imperial Hotel and will revive the much-loved local craft beer, Eumundi Lager. While the prep and building has been underway, the brewers have been busy refining recipes and hosting a number of test sampling sessions with locals over the past few months – using feedback to fine tune the brews. The test samples have been brewed by Brewmaster Dr Chuck Hahn, who is overseeing the brewery project. Chris Sheehan, who was the head brewer for James Squire at Sydney’s Malt Shovel Brewery, has also joined the team to take on the role of head brewer. Cheers to that! 1 Etheridge Street, Eumundi. 5442 8811 or imperialhoteleumundi.com.au 12

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SEE Some people love the latest Netflix Original series Girlboss. Perhaps because they recognise themselves in the selfobsessed 23-year-old Sophia, who wants to grow up without becoming a “boring adult”. She moves through San Francisco with the supreme confidence of the youth of the new millennium. She steals, she curses, she shows her employers who’s boss, gets fired, fined and then becomes determined to work out the secret to life. I’d like to tell her that it’s to stop complaining. Britt Robertson puts in a fine performance, and producer Charlize Theron is clearly aiming to get a ‘strong’ female lead in front of a new audience of young women. REVIEW XANTHE COWARD


HEAR The Afterlove is James Blunt’s fifth studio album. He’s an artist that divides – you either love him or you love to hate him. I love him. And I love his updated sound, which is the result of collaborations with the likes of Amy Wadge, Ryan Tedder and Ed Sheeran. Blunt moves between sweet sentiment, sadness and boldness without losing his sense of humour, which has him crooning, “Saw you standing outside a bar. Would’ve said ‘you’re beautiful’, but I’ve used that line before.” With this nod to his biggest hit, Love Me Better sets an open, self-deprecating pop/rock tone before Bartender insists, “if we keep on drinking we’re gonna fall back in love”. Don’t Give Me Those Eyes is the anguish in resisting temptation, California the onenight stand behind that dilemma, and Heartbeat the lament. The Afterlife grows on you and it might leave you yearning for more. REVIEW XANTHE COWARD

TOUCH Lighting is too often an after-thought in the home decoration or renovation process. But it shouldn’t be. Lighting has a lot of influence over our emotions and mood. While lighting adds that final touch, it should be one of the first things you shop for. The team at Noosa Lighting says if your lighting design is well considered, it will create individual spaces of ambience in the home, resulting in the perfect atmosphere for work, rest, and play. For more advice drop in and talk to the Noosa Lighting team at 168 Eumundi Road, Noosaville. 5449 8422 or noosalighting.com.au

Free Kids Mornings in Centre Come down and enjoy free fun for your little ones every Wednesday! Time: 10am Location: Playground next to Subway No need to book, just turn up! New and exciting activities every week. Full details up on our website.

GPS search: 28 Eenie Creek Road, Noosaville Queensland Big W � Woolworths � 100 specialty stores

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SECRETS

Need something soulful for your wardrobe or home? After years of travelling around the country and around the world, Cindy Lidington has taken stock in Yandina with the small bohemian collective STAY WILD. The shop sells products created by local crafters plus upand-coming clothing labels. There is plenty of handmade jewellery as well as other pieces sourced ethically from around the globe. Cindy says she has a bohemian, hippy, surf, gypsy style and now you can too. 2 Stevens Street, Yandina. 0438 136 562 Map reference L15

secrets

ONLY A LOCAL WOULD KNOW

If it’s been a while since you ventured out to Woombye, it’s time to pay the hinterland town a visit. The salt team has recently discovered KIMNAT LITTLE MARKET AND CAFE, which offers a huge range of yummy vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free breakfast and lunchtime treats. After you’ve had your fill in the cafe, check out Kimnat’s Little Market, which sells homewares, clothing and jewellery from countries such as India and Nepal. It’s a great place to pick up a birthday present. And speaking of birthdays, Kimnat Café makes whole raw, vegan cakes to order. 14 Blackall Street, Woombye. 5442 2388 or kimnat.com.au Map reference L17

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Building is now complete on the SPIRIT HOUSE’s new bar and private dining room, complete with its own kitchen and chef. Staff have spent time in Thailand checking out the bar and restaurant scene there to get inspiration for the menu and new building, which features custom artwork, lighting and a stunning wall of 576 Buddhas. The private dining room caters for groups of up to 24 people. 20 Ninderry Road, Yandina. 5446 8994 or spirithouse.com.au Map reference L15


Looking for something different? The salt team has just stumbled across another gem of a cafe, this time in Yandina. This little town is full of surprises, and one of those is a little place called 1828. If you’ve got a sweet tooth this cafe is the perfect spot for an afternoon tea, with homemade cakes and fudge on offer. 18 Stevens Street, Yandina. instagram.com/1828. confectionary Map reference L15

Musician and singer Kim Kirkman knows the power of music. Kim, who runs Maleny’s Lift gallery and was one of the internationally successfully Ten Tenors, offers instruction and inspiration through the CALOUNDRA COMMUNITY CHOIR. Anyone with an interest in singing is invited to come along every Wednesday morning. It’s a casual group that anyone can join – you don’t need previous singing experience. Kim says he specialises in helping people who don’t think they can sing, and the choir is a great place to gain confidence. He says singing has therapeutic benefits because it requires singers to think and challenge themselves, thus keeping the brain active. If you can’t get to Caloundra, Kim also runs a regular choir in Maleny. If you feel like stepping out of your comfort zone, you can contact him on 0431 560 929. Map reference N19

For a coffee with a view in a charming setting, check out THE ORANGERY at Maleny. The service is great, the prices are reasonable and there are plenty of gluten-free options on the menu. Some customers claim the burgers are the best you’ll find on the Coast – our pick is the Aussie Burger – but there are plenty of vegetarian options too. This is hearty, homemade food in a great spot. Definitely worth the trip up the mountain. 10 Mountain View Road, Maleny. 5435 2545 Map reference J19

FOR MAP REFERENCES SEE MAP ON PAGE 128

Ph: 5477 7192 Monday to Friday 7:30am – 4:30pm


FEATURE

SHINING WORDS XANTHE COWARD

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“IF TIME IS CIRCULAR and our stories have already been told, then maybe we can’t change the ending,” muses Naomi Price. The NOOSA alive! festival ambassador is contemplating the mysterious woman featured in her new show, Lady Beatle, The Little Red Company’s third and final pop-culture cabaret. Naomi says this show is the most complicated and the most challenging work the company has created. A kaleidoscopic soundtrack of The Beatles’ most monumental hits, Lady Beatle showcases Naomi in a role she’s been busy creating from scratch. Who is the character? “She’s anyone you want her to be,” says Naomi. “She’s from Liverpool because that’s where The Beatles are from, but with a new character you have total free range.” Lady Beatle comes hot on the heels of the shows Wrecking Ball and a sold-out national tour of Rumour Has It. Naomi says that of all her shows, written and produced with the Sunshine Coast’s Adam Brunes, Rumour Has It was probably the least collaborative. “Adam and myself did a lot of that writing ourselves.” Naomi admits that when they first wrote what has affectionately become known as “the Adele show” on a balcony in Brisbane over a bottle of gin, it was more of a satirical show about the British singer. But since then it has become a generous tribute to Adele’s amazing musical talent, and the ideal vehicle for Naomi, one of the country’s brightest stars. At the time, The Little Red Company, new on the scene, couldn’t afford to pay the band. She loves having the musicians in the rehearsal room, involving them in every stage of the creative process. She says, “You have one idea and then you have another 20, and then you delete 20, and you have to keep apologising to the creative team. It’s new work so it’s just the way it goes. The band is really amazing.” Naomi has always valued a collaborative approach to the creative process. She admits it’s intense, but during the making of a show she and Adam thrive on 24/7 collaboration, acting as sounding boards for each other. “You both have to live and breathe the same oxygen. You have to be ready for inspiration to strike at any moment.”

courtesy Lady Beatle Production. photo Dylan Evans Photography

Even when they’re on the road, the two talk about work every day. Naomi says of Adam, “He’s my eyes. As a writer and performer I have to trust him implicitly. I have to trust his instincts.” Adam adds, “Because we’ve been working together for many years across multiple projects, the individual band members are very much our equal co-creators on the work. Musical reinterpretation is key; we always look to present known and loved material in a new light. “The trademark of our pop culture cabarets to date is that they provide a vehicle for a strong, sole female voice. In our early research for the project, we were fascinated to learn the real stories behind the music and were introduced to so many real-life women who inspired some of The Beatles’ most iconic songs.” Naomi moved from the UK to Brisbane in 2003 and assumed that she could live and work in the river city. She was met with some scepticism. “I didn’t realise that people weren’t living and working here as artists.” People would ask her when she was moving to Sydney. “I’m really happy that I didn’t have that precondition for failure. For me, I always wanted to live here. I moved across the world to live here.” Naomi says one of the best things about living and working as an artist in Queensland is the encouragement and support offered by other Queensland artists. She says life as an artist can be lonely. “But I have amazing allies. I love that about the industry >


FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN TICKETS TO NOOSA ALIVE EVENTS THE FABULOUS BAKER GIRL, HOLD THE PICKLE AND MATTHEW MITCHAM’S

photo Maitland Picozzi

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courtesy Lady Beatle Production. photo Dylan Evans Photography

I HAVE AMAZING ALLIES. I LOVE THAT ABOUT THE INDUSTRY IN QUEENSLAND. WE’RE SUPPORTIVE AND GENUINELY SO PROUD. LIVING HERE IS THE BEST.


NOOSA IS NOT JUST A TOURIST DESTINATION, IT’S A REAL COMMUNITY, AND UNLESS YOU CONTRIBUTE TO THAT COMMUNITY, YOU DO GET THE FEELING THAT YOU’RE JUST PERPETUAL TOURISTS. in Queensland. We’re supportive and genuinely so proud. Living here is the best.” And what about the Sunshine Coast? Naomi says, “It’s the best coast, obviously. Where else in the world do you have this tropical rainforest that bleeds into mountains? It’s so stunning. You can have the city feel but you can also have the beach feel; it’s super relaxing. Every time I’ve been up there it’s just gorgeous, an outdoor living celebration.” She and her partner Luke Kennedy love coming here. “We’ve always visited the Sunshine Coast for some down time. We stay right on the beach. You open up your room and literally, you’re on the beach.” Noosa Long Weekend festival founders David and Kristin Williamson discovered the same irresistible natural beauty when they came to Noosa in 1996 and decided to stay. They invited a group of dedicated friends, including violist and composer Brett Dean and restaurateur Leonie Palmer-Fisher, to help them establish Noosa as a destination of cultural excellence. The rest, as they say, is history. David says, “Noosa is not just a tourist destination, it’s a real community, and unless you contribute to that community, you do get the feeling that you’re just perpetual tourists.” Naomi is excited to be returning to the region as this year’s NOOSA alive! ambassador. Noosa Long Weekend festival director of 10 years, Ian Mackellar, says the star of stage and screen represents all the qualities that NOOSA alive! aligns with. “She is a modern-day star,” he says. During the 10-day arts festival (which runs from July 21 to 30), Naomi will attend events, mingle with artists and audiences, and perform Lady Beatle. She is thrilled to be bringing the show to Noosa. “I’m excited because usually we premiere our work and

it takes eight to 12 months to take it somewhere else. The Noosa audience will see the original version of the work. They’ll be able to say they were among the first to see it.”

The new-look festival this year honours the high calibre of local, national and international artists that have made it a favourite on the festival circuit, and offers a smorgasbord of events to audiences. Naomi is looking forward to joining the audience and experiencing other artists at the festival. “I love Lior and I also think he’s insanely talented. I love him as a storyteller.” She’s also keen to check out “all these amazing pockets of inspiration. I’m going to feel very topped up with creativity. The arts really does enrich every day; it’s like having an amazing buffet. I’ll be full by the end of it!” After enjoying 10 full days of rich culture in Noosa, Naomi will go on to feature in the national touring production of Beautiful: The Carole King Musical. She will also be busy representing brands and causes she believes in. She and Luke are also ambassadors for Wildlife Hospital Foundation and National Trust Queensland, protecting the tangible assets that are historically important. To have a stake in the legacy that’s left for the next generation is important to Naomi. “Something we’re able to give Luke’s daughter, Olivia, is the Queensland we know now.” She says proudly, “NOOSA alive! is a legacy project too. Arts is another thing we have to be fiercely protective of.” There’s no doubt that Naomi Price has her heart in the performing arts. As one of the country’s most captivating and versatile performers, her story has only just begun to be told. noosaalive.com.au

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19


CALENDAR OF EVENTS

QUEENSL AND GARDEN EXPO

DREAM

DISCOVER

EXPLORE

JULIUS CAESAR

AUGUST

JUNE

MARY VALLEY ART FESTIVAL The festival offers an opportunity for artists to showcase their talents and attracts entries from throughout the south-east corner of the state. Visitors can buy the art on display and vote for the People’s Choice award, which is presented at the festival’s closing ceremony. when June 29 to July 2 where Imbil Public Hall, Edward Street, Imbil cost $3 maryvalleyartslink.com.au

JULY QUEENSLAND GARDEN EXPO It’s time to pull on the gardening gloves and head to Nambour for this annual gardening extravaganza. There will be more than 120 presentations and demonstrations across eight stages, as industry experts share their insights and tips. A great day for the family. when July 7 to 9 where Nambour Showgrounds, Coronation Avenue, Nambour cost $18 (single) $16 (concession) free (children under 15) qldgardenexpo.com.au 20

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VELOTHON SUNSHINE COAST Thousands of keen bike riders are expected to flock to the Sunshine Coast for this series of races. Velothons are already well established in Europe but this will be the first time one will be held in the southern hemisphere. Every ride starts and finishes in and around Mooloolaba. when July 13 to 16 where Mooloolaba cost contact 5430 6700 velothonaus@ironman.com

ROCKWIZ LIVE! The RocKwiz Gang is leaving the small screen and hitting the road. You can now enjoy your favourite segments – such as Who Can It Be Now, Million Dollar Riff and The Furious Five – live. Join Julia, Brian, Dugald and the RocKwiz OrKestra for a night of music shenanigans. You might even end up on the stage. when July 18 where The Events Centre, 20 Minchinton Street, Caloundra cost $89 (adult) $79 (concession) theeventscentre.com.au

OUR SUNSHINE COAST CONCERT Produced by former Ten Tenor Kim Kirkman and Friends of Lift, this special event is being held to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the naming of the Sunshine Coast. Dancers will join a 100-piece orchestra and 200-piece choir, plus 70-piece children’s choir and soloists. The concert will be held from 2pm to 4pm and gates open at 1pm for this free event. when August 6 where Sunshine Coast Stadium, 31 Sportsmans Parade, Bokarina cost free sunshinecoast.qld.gov.au/ Experience-Sunshine-Coast/ Events/Fiftieth-Anniversary/ Calendar-of-Events-and-Activities

CAMP AFRO FOLI DRUM AND DANCE RETREAT This is Rhythm Culture’s first annual drum and dance retreat. The camp will run over three days in the beautiful natural surroundings of Maranatha Recreation Camp, where there is dormitory-style accommodation, a communal kitchen, basketball courts, a pool and bushwalking paths to the falls. when July 14 to 16 where Maranatha Recreation Camp, 275 Wappa Falls Road, Yandina cost see website for details rhythmculture.com.au

NOOSA ALIVE! 2017 Presented by The Noosa Long Weekend Festival, NOOSA alive! offers 10 days and nights of theatre, music, dance, film, food, literature, workshops and more. Highlights include Mozart’s The Marriage of Figaro by Opera Australia, Naomi Price’s new show Lady Beatle, festival favourite An Evening with Queensland Ballet and the fabulous Rococo Beach Marquee. when July 21 to 30 where various locations around Noosa cost see website for details noosaalive.com.au

INTERNATIONAL READERS & WRITERS FESTIVAL This fantastic festival provides a platform for our creative locals to promote their work, and for locals to see creatives from around Australia and the world showcase their work. Catch up with poets, novelists, journalists, singer-songwriters, graphics artists, illustrators and filmmakers. when August 12 and 13 where Coolum Civic Centre and various locations around Coolum Beach cost See website sunshinecoastreaders andwritersfestival.com


HORIZON FESTIVAL OF ARTS & CULTURE

FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN FOUR TICKETS TO THE FLYING DOWN TO RIO EVENT AT NOOSA ALIVE!’S ROCOCO BEACH CLUB MARQUEE GO TO THE WIN PAGE AT SALTMAGAZINE.COM.AU

JULIUS CAESAR Shakespeare’s tale of loyalty, power and betrayal is brought to Caloundra with a cast of local actors and directed by Jo Loth, the head of drama at the University of the Sunshine Coast. when August 12 to 19 where The Events Centre, 20 Minchinton Street, Caloundra cost $35 (single), $25 (student and concession) theeventscentre.com.au GYMPIE MUSIC MUSTER Come along and celebrate the 36th year of the Gympie Music Muster. This year’s line-up is led by the beautiful Jessica Mauboy, who will be joined by headliners Adam Brand, Busby Marou and Graeme Connors. Other artists include Caitlyn Shadbolt, Adam Eckersley Band, Reece Mastin, Kirsty Lee Akers, Hillbilly Goats and Chad Morgan. when August 24 to 27 where Amamoor Creek State Forest cost see website for details muster.com.au

HORIZON FESTIVAL OF ARTS & CULTURE This wonderful festival crams 200 events into 10 arts-fuelled days. Enjoy visual art, film, literature, performance, street art, comedy, music, theatre and new media. The curated program of events celebrates local, national and international artists, building the capacity of local creative talent and exposing the audience to unique arts experiences. when August 25 to September 3 where various locations around the Coast cost see website for details horizonfestival.com.au MAROOCHY MUSIC AND VISUAL ARTS FESTIVAL Celebrating contemporary music and visual arts on the Sunshine Coast, this year’s event promises to be a big one. Festival-goers can catch the music of Bernard Fanning, The Presets, Alice Wonderland, Gang of Youths and so much more. There will be a cash and payWave bar, champagne and oyster garden plus larger-than-life art installations. when August 26 where The Old Horton Park Golf Course, entry via Dalton Drive, Maroochydore cost see website for details mmvaf.com

SEPTEMBER TOUCH FOOTBALL AUSTRALIA NATIONAL YOUTH CHAMPIONSHIPS This event features the under 18 Touch Football Championships and The Harvey Norman National School Cup. The Touch Football Australia Alliance Cup and the Masters Trans Tasman Test Series between Australian and New Zealand are also taking place. So if you like touch footy this is the place to be. when September 13 to 17 where Sunshine Coast Stadium, 31 Sportsmans Parade, Bokarina cost see website for details sunshinecoaststadium. sunshinecoast.qld.gov.au/ events MITCHELL CREEK ROCK N BLUES FESTIVAL Escape to the bush for a weekend of rock, blues and roots. There are limited tickets so you won’t have to fight the crowds, plus this is a disabilityfriendly event with easy access to performance venues and a reserved camping area with disability-friendly hot showers and toilets. Artists include The Radiators, Chain, Whiskey & Me, Tapestry and lots more. when September 15 to 18 where Lot 3 Mitchell Creek Road, Upper Kandanga cost see website for details mitchellcreekrocknbluesfest. com.au

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21


PURSUIT OF PASSION

SKIN DEEP WORDS PENNY SHIPWAY PHOTOS ANASTASIA KARIOFYLLIDIS

INSPIRED BY A DEEP empathic desire to lift the self-esteem of her school peers experiencing teenage acne and skin breakouts, Grace Kovak embarked on a career that would ensure those around her could be their best selves.

“I had acne of my own and I wanted to find a better way to fix it than having the acne lanced, be given drugs, or put under UV lights. I prefer a more holistic approach. If things are right internally it’s going to shine on the outside.”

Grace says she knew from a young age that pharmaceuticals, or a certain face cream for a period of time, couldn’t be a long-term solution for beautiful, healthy skin. “I realised something internally had to be done as well,” she says. “I knew it couldn’t be that someone was using the wrong face cream; it had to come from within as well, considering factors such as diet and hormones.

Grace also uses herbal microdermabrasion, oxygen treatments, natural enzyme peels and LED (light emitting diode) therapy. “I have moved from a high-end spa background in Sydney to a more holistic medical centre where I can recommend a naturopath and acupuncturist. I try to help people inside and out.”

“In my teenage years a lot of my friends hated their freckles and were plagued with horrible cystic acne. It’s really disfiguring and really destroyed their self-esteem. 22

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Grace has owned Noosa’s exclusive Professional Beauty Clinic for 15 years. The clinic takes a scientific and natural approach to skin care, using up-to-date techniques and technology such as medicalgrade laser hair removal, micro skin needling, herbal peels, hydra facials, and acne/scarring repair.

But a real stand-out point for the salon is Grace’s success in honing her 30 years in the industry to modify her products and techniques to be tailored to Queensland skin. “While I brought from Sydney a lot of my innovative ideas, what I also realised is


correctly. I just think it’s best to avoid the sun where you can. Some people think sunscreen is also bullet proof, but it’s not. However, if you’re in the sun surfing in the middle of the day it’s better than nothing.” Grace was a beautician pioneer of sorts on the Coast when she brought one of the first IPL (intense pulsed light) and laser machines to Noosa. She initially worked out of medical practices – predominately for doctors who performed skin cancer checks – and some pre and post-operative work for plastic surgeons. A licensed laser and safety officer, studying anti-aging medicine, Grace soon felt it was time to tap back into healing those with awful skin conditions, by combining her past beauty and skin knowledge with her new set of scientific-based skills. “I wanted more freedom to do my own thing. I expanded into the skin-care range and really dug deep to design treatments specific to the locals, even completing modules in chemistry. Our methods have gone from basic to using the most incredible anti-age machinery and products.” And now as an advanced aesthetician and anti-age medical student, Grace is proud to say there really is a procedure for nearly every skin condition, from pigmentation to calcium spots and stretchmarks. “There’s little reason why we can’t look and feel the best we can be.”

that skin care is completely different up here,” she says. “A lot of my European treatments I did in Sydney weren’t helping in the climate conditions of the Coast. A lot of products were heavily perfumed too and I felt it just wasn’t helping.” While European skin-care products may sound top of the range to most people, Grace has a different view. “Parisian women have a different climate to those in Queensland. Here we need something very light, easily absorbed, that doesn’t clog the skin.” In the past couple of years Grace has taken this concept further by developing her own skin-care range, Ocean Muse, specifically suited to her clients’ needs. “It’s a fusion between science and natural with nourishing and firming ingredients,” she says. “It’s very light and easily absorbed. With the humidity a lot of people find ingredients such as lanolin, widely used in Europe, make their skin sweat.” Grace says sunscreen has been a big contributor in clogging our skin, though used sparingly when required is still very important. “Sun block is heavily congested and will clog if it’s not removed

While Grace attends annual conferences in the United States to keep up to date with the latest in technology, she says she is very good at “separating what’s fashionable and what isn’t”. “I also look at what will enhance what Australian women need. Not all technology is what we need on the Sunshine Coast.” By providing more lightweight products, Grace has received tremendous feedback from her customers. “Clients say after they’ve had a session with me they feel really clean, as opposed to wanting to go home and wash it all off.” Grace is currently working with Austrade in the hope her products will soon be available on Asian shelves, due to our shared humidity and environmental similarities. But while the future holds some big changes for Grace, she will never forget why she does what she does. And that is to not just change a person’s skin for the better, but to bring forth a confidence from within that has often been buried for years. “If I have a girl with acne I usually get her straight on to oxygen treatments, look at her diet, and check hormone levels and her history. “Lifting their self esteem is priceless.” professionalbeautyclinic.com.au

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23


LOOK AT ME

STORY

TIME WORDS LILJANA FREY PHOTOS KRISTA EPPELSTUN

FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN A COPY OF GREGG’S BOOK MAD MAGPIE GO TO THE WIN PAGE AT SALTMAGAZINE.COM.AU

ON AN ACREAGE property at the foot of Mount Cooroora, surrounded by fragrant eucalypts and blossoming banksias, author and illustrator Gregg Dreise is writing his next children’s book. His characters dance across the page in dazzling colour: kookaburras and magpies cajole in tree canopies; frogs bathe in trickling creeks; and eagles soar high above the landscape.

While Gregg’s books reflect the abundance of native wildlife in his own backyard, the Sunshine Coast’s flora and fauna are not his only inspiration. A proud Kamilaroi and Yuwalayaay man with a firm handshake and a warm smile, Gregg’s lineage plays an important part in his storytelling. His knack for exploring tales of indigenous cultural significance has struck a chord with Australian readers, and his mounting industry awards are testament to his popularity and talent. “My favourite part of what I do is the age-old art of storytelling,” Gregg says. “When storytelling, the music and laughter is the most important part. The fact that people, both adults and kids, learn things while they are there is just a bonus.” Gregg’s books interweave ‘extinct’, ‘endangered’ and ‘safe’ Dreaming stories – concepts that relate to the prevalence and preservation of stories specific to different indigenous tribes. ‘Safe’ stories are those which are still passed between generations, and therefore they are not in need of retelling through print.

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‘Extinct’ stories are those that have been lost to time. The traditional paintings have been destroyed and the songs and dances are no longer performed. ‘Endangered’ stories – such as the bird stories prominent in Gregg’s books – belong to tribes who no longer retain their traditional paintings or dances, but who remember fragments of their Dreaming stories. “I use my skill with words and storytelling to breathe new life into them,” Gregg says of the traditional stories he works with. “I’m doing my part in story conservation.” Like any good yarn, Gregg’s picture books carry powerful messages. Silly Birds, which won the Speech Pathology Australia Book of the Year in 2015, is based on the Elders’ wisdom that it’s “hard to soar like an eagle when you’re surrounded by turkeys”. The tale follows an eagle named Maliyan, who becomes intrigued by newcomer Wagun, a turkey. Together they run amok across their billabong home, leading to chaos in their habitat. When Maliyan recognises how destructive their behaviour is, he must learn to lead by example in order to restore their home. “Silly Birds has a very important message,” Gregg says. “Always surround yourself with positive people who allow you to follow your dreams. With the help of family and a few good friends, it is never too late to reshape your life and achieve something wonderful.” Gregg’s subsequent books are also grounded in Elders’ wisdom. Kookoo Kookaburra, which won the Australian Book Industry Award (ABIA) Reader’s Choice Award last year, explores the lesson that “kindness is like a boomerang: if you throw it often, it comes back often”. His most recent work, Mad Magpie, teaches children to “stay calm like the surface of the water, yet strong like the current”. Like those before it, Mad Magpie is also longlisted for an ABIA award. When it comes to the moral overtones of his books, Gregg does more than talk the talk. A qualified teacher, he has spent a lifetime conscientiously surrounding himself with other inspired, motivated people – a seed that was planted when he was a child. The youngest of eight children to a poet mother and a painter father, Gregg always felt supported to pursue his passions. “I grew up with parents and siblings who were taught the power of reading and writing,” he says. “My mother worked very hard to raise her children to value education.” While 12 of his immediate family members now work alongside him in education, Gregg has never lost his love for the creative arts. Along with teaching primary school and writing children’s books, Gregg is a performer, musician and songwriter. He credits the latter with igniting his writing career. As a young man growing up on the Sunshine Coast, most of the other musicians in Gregg’s circle were drawn to the art of sound. Gregg, however, was always drawn to lyrics, and spent many hours penning his own songs. That’s as far as his writing endeavours went, until he started creating homemade picture books for his children. “People enjoyed them and suggested I should try to get them published,” Gregg says. “So I sent my manuscript, Aussie Bush Bedtime, to Scholastic, and it was accepted.” Many years on, Gregg has five published books, another two are due for release later this year, and more than a dozen others are “patiently waiting their turn”. Along with his commitment to the craft and his natural ability to spin a good yarn, Gregg is grateful to his family for helping him get where he is today. “It is so hard to reach your potential without support,” he says. “My family and friends have helped me to believe in myself and work hard. It now makes it easier to look at my next goal and begin the hard work to overcome the challenges ahead.” greggdreise.com

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SHOOTING STARS

ACT

ONE WORDS XANTHE COWARD

CHELSEA INGRAM, ACTOR and writer, says she’s a gypsy. While she still calls the Sunshine Coast home, like many artists she migrates to wherever the work is.

So her base will be New York City for the next few months, before returning home to Queensland to complete her final project for the year. “I try not to get too attached to one place,” she says. Chelsea has always loved the serenity and sense of community on the Sunshine Coast but she also loves everything about working in the US. “There is such a passion that thrives in the artistic community,” she says. “Artists are so open and welcoming.” She recently worked with actor Paul Calderon (who has appeared in many movies and TV series including Pulp Fiction and Boardwalk Empire), to create Primitive Grace Theatre Ensemble, a New York-based group producing original and established work designed to create a shift in the audience’s experience of reality. “That’s normal in the States,” she says. “All actors on any level are happy to work together and create.” Some experiences have been more challenging, and have taught Chelsea to trust her instincts as an actor. “Acting in the web 26

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series, The Loft, I had to create a character that is completely opposite to myself. I was also extremely nervous to work with a Cannes-nominated director, but in the end it is always so rewarding!” Writing has been less stressful for Chelsea. “I find it relaxing and somewhat therapeutic.” Her down time is normally spent at brunch with her best mates. “Brunch is my favourite time of day.” As a coffee drinker, she enjoys New York’s amazing boutique cafes, but is quick to note that “nothing beats Aussie coffee. I miss it every time I am abroad.” Chelsea has been performing since high school and says, “I had an amazing drama teacher who opened me up to the world of truth in performance.” Chelsea in her original play Keep Calling


EVEN FROM A YOUNG AGE, I BELIEVED YOU ONLY LIVE ONCE, SO DO WHATEVER IT IS THAT WILL MAKE YOUR LIFE WORTHWHILE.

Photo Steven Walsh

N O O S A S P RIN GS S PA

Robyn Ernst, founder and director of Buderim Youth Theatre of Excellence (BYTE) says Chelsea is an exciting and inspirational performer. “She was always such a vibrant and emotionally involved performer.” While Chelsea’s father wanted her to be a nurse, she was determined to pursue a path that would make her happy. “Even from a young age, I believed you only live once, so do whatever it is that will make your life worthwhile.” She also believes family support is important. “Artists are sensitive beings and we need our families to hold us up when things get rough.” Studying at New York’s Lee Strasberg Institute challenged Chelsea and landed her in the middle of an impressive pool of talent, alongside artists such as George Loros (from The Sopranos). “A typical day at Strasberg is basically like living in a movie,” she says. “There are so many unique and extraordinary individuals. You have to understand that everyone is opening themselves up for an intense training period; the actors in that building are experiencing their own unique journey. It’s an emotional roller coaster but if you are up for the ride you will have the time of your life.” Chelsea feels strongly about the place of women in the arts industry. “Australia needs to start supporting more female directors and writers; we are making progress slowly.” Last year, her original play, Keep Calling, was produced at the Sydney Fringe, selling out the entire season. “The one thing I noticed was that everyone involved was male – they were amazing, but it made me realise you have to be strong in this industry, especially if you are a female. We need more networking, collaboration and opportunities for women working creatively together.”

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Keep Calling tells the story of siblings growing up in rural Queensland and will debut in New York later this year. “As an Australian, I do feel it’s important to tell our own stories. We are such a young country but we have so much beautiful and empowering history.” One day Chelsea would like to see herself in the director’s chair, but she has a single goal she is trying to reach. She says, “I focus on the journey rather than the outcome.” She acknowledges that being a full-time artist requires hard work, and she’s prepared to keep working solidly to achieve success across her field. Her tips for aspiring actors and writers reflect her unwavering passion and dedication to forging a sustainable career in the arts. “It is so important to be versatile, to be open to every script that is thrown your way. Be strong, patient and most importantly, be open. Continue to study your craft and empower yourself with knowledge.” That sounds like the secret of Chelsea’s success.

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WALKING THE TALK WORDS KARINA EASTWAY

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photo Maitland Picozzi

YOUNG ENTREPRENEUR


BEING THE OUTSIDER is a double-edged sword. The acute sense of isolation can give you a unique perspective on the world – the tendency for an open mind, rather than a narrow one; a more inclusive world-view, rather than a prejudiced one. Local entrepreneur and journalist Callum Gordon, 21, understands how to turn being the ‘outsider’ into a strength. “I never liked high school,” he says. “I just felt socially anxious. I was bullied and felt like the outsider. “I had a lot of anxiety, which has now become a core issue in my writing: it reflects back on [my time in] high school. I used to hate it when I saw people being treated differently. Everyone walks under the sun. You don’t realise how much inequality there is until you’re on the receiving end.” The anxiety levels contributed to Callum leaving school at the end of year 10 to chase a (short-lived) apprenticeship as a pastry chef: a decision made even more significant by the fact he was leaving his twin brother, Tremayne, to complete years 11 and 12 alone. But Callum has recently turned all that on its head, completing a Bachelor of Communication this year with a focus on journalism and PR through the University of the Sunshine Coast. He even completed a bridging course to get up to speed on what he’d missed. All well worth it, he feels.

Callum with Shannon Fentiman, the state Minister for Communities, Women and Youth

“Not graduating from high school has led me to this path. By not doing 11 and 12, I had to persevere more in what I needed to do to reach the career that I wanted. “My underlying goal is to reach and connect with people, but I try to focus on a younger audience. Young people are so often misrepresented within society: we always focus on the bad things like drugs and alcohol, mental health, and self image. We need to do something to recognise all the good things [young] people are doing within the community.” Callum says that if he can use his voice as a journalist to help shine light on young people’s issues which need to be addressed, that will be rewarding enough. He understands the impact that real, raw stories can have to spark a conversation for change within the community. “Everything has to start somewhere. If not me, then who?” he says. “Journalism comes down to providing a service which is telling stories. When you’re drilling down on an issue it can affect so many other people, so you’re really reaching people. I get really passionate about it.” And he’s already walking his talk. As a media-savvy entrepreneur, he’s building a story-telling niche with a focus on using social media to reach as many people as possible. Callum’s established his own Sunshine Coast-based online talk show, Conversations with Cal, designed to tell people’s stories in a real way: a once-a-week in-studio chat about significant social issues such as mental health or domestic violence. “Social media is such a big driving force. As a Millennial, social media is a big playing card.” He says he concentrates on issues that he believes need more attention, “but in a fun, engaging way”. “We have so many local people with stories to tell. I look at Humans in New York and transcribe that into a Sunshine Coast-

based platform that tells people’s stories through video, while also covering events and lifestyle. All still with a focus on young people. “We’re the future leaders of this country – if we can do things to change society now, it’s one more thing off the agenda.” Callum was recently awarded semi-finalist (online achievement) at Queensland’s Young Achiever Awards for his work as a freelance reporter for Channel 7’s online initiative, 7Scoop. And you can catch more of his work as presenter/host at this year’s NOOSA alive! festival in July. He’s already chalked up interviews with festival ambassador Naomi Price and Home and Away’s Lisa Gormley (who is performing in David Williamson’s Odd Man Out), launched via Facebook broadcast. On the morning I catch up with Callum (instantly recognisable with his signature hair style and glasses), he’s philosophical about all he’s achieved so far. “As a Millennial, you’re judged quite harshly by society and by people who already have a career. They think that we feel we’re entitled, but when I see stories about ‘avo on toast’ it makes me mad. It’s hard as a young person to get a career; you have to create your own opportunities. It makes us all entrepreneurs.” Callum’s sage advice is that young people should do whatever they can to get a foot in the door, building up a portfolio of work, chasing opportunities and using social media to increase reach. We can’t wait to see what you’ve got in store for us next Callum. You can reach Callum at callumgordon.com or @CallumGordonMedia

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FOR A CAUSE

A HELPING

HAND WORDS JOLENE OGLE PHOTO KRISTA EPPELSTUN

FOR 27-YEAR-OLD Emily Boyd, nutrientrich soil runs in her blood. Her mother is a horticulturist and her grandfather a tomato farmer, so it was only natural Emily would find a life on the land. But this socially conscious young woman would never have been content farming her own plot. After studying food sovereignty and politics at university, Eumundi-based Emily realised she wanted to do what she could to improve farming practices and fight for the rights of food producers around the world. “What greater issue is there than food and food production and the rights of farmers?” Emily asks. “It links to our health and vitality and that is what drove me in this direction. “There is so much inequality involved in food and food production so I thought ‘Right, I’m going to try and do something about it.’” 30

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When an opportunity came up to work with the non-government organisation Welcome Home Foundation for 12 months, Emily jumped at the chance to try something new. Emily’s role was to train deaf locals in the Bacolod region of the Philippines to grow their own produce, which they could then sell to local restaurants and at markets. “It was a training space for the deaf, but anyone was welcome to come and join our program to learn sustainable and organic agricultural techniques,” she says. The aim of the program is to offer deaf community members a means of creating their own income. The produce grown at the small farm ranged from lettuce to local vegetables, and the farmers faced a range of challenges including the tropical climate and having to pump water by hand for irrigation. “The majority of what we grew were leafy greens because that gets a high price with restaurants and can create a good income stream,” Emily says. “That being said, it is very hard to grow lettuce in such a hot climate. It took a lot of tender love and care. A lot of effort goes into it and that’s why leafy greens get a high price.” Emily got stuck into intensive sign language classes as soon as she landed in her new home. She says her deaf friends would help her learn as she went. “If I didn’t know a word I would spell it and then they would teach me the sign. It was a beautiful exchange,” she says. “That’s something I really loved about my experience. The deaf community was absolutely incredible. They are so giving and such fun-loving people. They really want you to succeed.” Like her preferred farming practices, the Welcome Home Foundation program is sustainable so the community can now carry on farming the small plot of land that sits next to a cafe, which is also run by members of the deaf community. “It was a train-the-trainer situation,” Emily says. “The idea is that you want something sustainable for the community so you empower them to learn all about it rather than doing it for them.” For Emily, adjusting to a new lifestyle and learning to communicate with the deaf community wasn’t the hardest thing she experienced while in the Philippines. She says seeing food waste was difficult in a world where so many are starving. “I travelled to a village in the north and learned that farmers will harvest their crops and start a treacherous walk to market before dawn even breaks. They take their crops to a trader who sells it to market,” she says. “But sometimes they get a call when they’re on the way that the trader doesn’t need anything else. There’s already enough stock at market so they just dump their crops on the side of the road because there’s no point in taking it all the way back. It’s common to see tonnes of food just dumped on the side of the road. “It happens a lot here in Australia, too, but I guess we’re not so exposed to it unless you look in a supermarket dumpster.” Since her return to the Sunshine Coast, Emily has continued her mission to change the way we farm. She has joined a Yandina-based business that works with local farmers to develop sustainable and organic farming methods, but she says there are many ways everyone can have an effect on food waste and production, starting with the youngest family members. “Even on a small scale, growing something in your own backyard is such a good learning tool and so much fun for the kids,” she says. “They get exposure to farming and once it’s grown they get to pick it. It’s really exciting and you can link it back to cooking with it that night. It creates that connection you don’t get when just going to a supermarket. You have your hands in the soil and you’ve made something from that. It’s a natural connection.”

Step into a world of original design at the best art & craft market in Australia ...and meet the artisans face-to-face Every Wednesday 8am-1.30pm and Saturday 7am-2pm @originaleumundimarkets @eumundimarkets eumundimarkets

To find out more about Welcome Home Foundation go to whfi.ph

eumundimarkets.com.au


BOOKS & BLOGS

SEE WHAT I HAVE DONE Sarah Schmidt | Hachette | $33 “Lizzie Borden took an axe, and gave her mother 40 whacks. When she saw what she had done, she gave her father 41.” This 19th century rhyme was inspired by a true murder case when, in August 1892, Lizzie Borden was accused of murdering her father and stepmother in a particularly brutal attack. The public was surprised that such a crime was committed in such a highly regarded family, and even more so when Lizzie was subsequently acquitted of the murder. Sarah Schmidt has taken the known elements of the Borden tale and woven them into a chilling crime novel. The story is told from four perspectives – Lizzie herself, her sister Emma, the maid Bridget and the shadowy Benjamin, a dark character whose life intersects with the Bordens’. More than a whodunit, this book delves into the minds of the characters, not in order to solve the crime, but to understand some of the elements that led to the event. Lizzie is a particularly agitated and possibly deranged little girl – a triumph of characterisation – and the house itself is a threatening, claustrophobic presence hanging over the occupants, all of whom are repressed and trapped. This book is guaranteed to make you uncomfortable and horrified, but fascinated too. UNDERSTORY: A LIFE WITH TREES Inga Simpson | Hachette | $33 Inga Simpson is a nature writer who lives on the Sunshine Coast. She is the author of three very successful novels, and we were thrilled when we found out about her new memoir. “I see the world through trees. Every window and doorway frames trunks, limbs and leaves. My light is their light, filtered green. My air is their exhalation.” Thus begins the story of Inga’s lifelong connection with her environment. This is a love story, and like most love stories has moments of pain and tragedy as well as bliss and contentment. Inga describes her domestic relationships, but her true love lies in her 10 acres of sacred bushland, which is home to a growing family of trees. Inga’s story is broken into chapters that each focus on a specific type of tree, and this takes the reader from Inga’s earliest discovery of her love of nature through the rocky landscape of love and family to the present. Creeping through are many references to Middle Earth, and, indeed, Inga’s patch of bushland could easily fit into a Tolkien tale. This is the story of a tree woman, driven and passionate despite her many setbacks to hang on to her piece of paradise; and parallel to the story of Inga’s backbreaking work to maintain her sanctuary is the story of Inga the writer from the earliest seeds of her creative writing through to the wonderful fruits which are her three novels.

FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN A BOOK PACK THANKS TO ANNIE’S BOOKS ON PEREGIAN GO TO THE WIN PAGE AT SALTMAGAZINE.COM.AU 32

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OUT

Grab a hot chocolate, turn off your phone and curl up under the doona with one of these great stories.

THE CRYING PLACE Lia Hills | Allen & Unwin | $30 Saul and Jed have been close friends for years, sharing many wild adventures and experiences together. But after some time living in different Australian cities, Saul is told that Jed has taken his own life. He is devastated and shocked. While going through Jed’s possessions, Saul finds a photograph of an Aboriginal woman from a community west of Alice Springs. Saul immediately begins his search for Nara, a Pitjantjatjara woman with whom Jed obviously had a deep connection. Saul meets a number of memorable characters on his quest, from the German woman in a Coober Pedy bar to the white sage Thaddeus who lives in Nara’s community. The author writes evocatively and vividly of the western desert. Her prose shimmers like the sun on red sand, and it’s easy for the reader to walk beside Saul as he immerses himself in the indigenous culture and folklore, and discovers his own connections with Australia’s heartland. This is one of my favourite novels of recent months.


BLOG ROLL — THINGS WE LOVE BLOGS TO

STARS ACROSS THE OCEAN Kimberley Freeman | Hachette | $30 This is the seventh novel from Queensland author Kimberley Freeman, who also writes under her birth name Kim Wilkins. Agnes Resolute is a foundling, given up by her mother when she was born. She has no idea of her background, but she has a unicorn button, supposedly belonging to her mother, which Agnes believes belonged to Genevieve Breckby from a local noble family. Most of the story revolves around Agnes’ search for her mother, who she believes is Genevieve Breckby, and who she is sure will welcome her with open arms. The journey takes her across the world – a dangerous and difficult adventure for a young girl, particularly in the 19th century. Running parallel to Agnes’ tale is a present-day story of Victoria and her mother, a professor of history, who is suffering from early onset dementia. Victoria agonises as her mother’s moments of lucidity become less frequent. Both stories are about strong women, seemingly undaunted by their missions to connect with their mothers. This is an immensely enjoyable, moving and enchanting novel.

BOOKMARK A FORK & PENCIL Do you crave simple, honest and hearty recipes that you can create at home? This blog’s for you. Yum. aforkandapencil.com LAURA HOOPER CALLIGRAPHY Laura offers tips and tricks for students of calligraphy, plus inspiration for those who simply love this ancient, illustrative art form. lhcalligraphy.com/blog MY DARLING LEMON THYME Want vegetarian, wholefood and gluten-free recipes plus tips on organic gardening presented with stunningly simple photography? You’ve come to the right place. mydarlinglemonthyme.com THE COOL HUNTER A popculture staple since it launched in 2004, this is still the definitive blog for all things original in the world of design, art, architecture and travel. thecoolhunter.net Book reviews by Annie’s Books On Peregian, 8 Kingfisher Drive, Peregian Beach. 5448 2053 or anniesbooksonperegian.com.au The blogs were selected by salt HQ.

The street fair is a must-do experience offering live music, locally-made art and craft, home wares, gourmet street food, delicious sweets, fresh produce, fashion and entertainment for children. See you there!

FOOT NOTES Benjamin Allmon | self-published | $25 There are possibly millions of great works of writing and music that have never been read or heard by the public. It’s one thing to compose, but quite another to get your product to the people. When Benjamin Allmon wrote and recorded a new album of songs, he chose to emulate the old bluesmen who strolled out of the cane fields and brought their music to the people. Ben walked the coast (literally) of New South Wales, from Pottsville to Sydney doing exactly that. This was an adventure, in no uncertain terms, with all the elements of much larger feats of exploration, including hunger, penury, depression and danger – yes, there were many hairy situations for Ben during his pilgrimage. But he lived to tell the tale, and it is a brilliantly written work of suspense, excitement, surprise and plenty of humour, as Ben connected with memorable characters and experienced shattering moments of selfdiscovery. Full of wonderful descriptions of the Australian bush and coastline, this eloquent and entertaining book will delight readers of any age.

Bulcock St, Caloundra ` Caloundra Street Fair www.caloundrastreetfair.com.au


ROLE MODEL

MIND YOUR BUSINESS WORDS JOLENE OGLE

MACUSHLA MONTELL WAS born into business. Her entrepreneurial parents ran a range of businesses and were one of Australia’s first Lycra manufacturers, so at just 16 years old Macushla decided to head to Sydney alone and open her own business. For Macushla the idea of starting a business at 16 was a normal, logical step in her life when she left school at just 14. “I left school early because I have visual dyslexia,” she says. “I loved school and I loved learning, but I had problems with punctuation and grammar and I found it quite frustrating. “When I left school my parents asked me to come into the family business and then when I was 16 I decided to take my business plan and go to Sydney and open my own dance studio.” Two years later Macushla sold the studio and joined the airline industry, while developing and building her property portfolio and opening her first restaurant. The sudden closure of Ansett led to the start of Macushla’s career as a business coach and mentor supporting entrepreneurs and business owners. 34

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“There used to be a lot more certainty within corporations, but it’s changing and I learnt it the hard way,” she says. “I used to be a flight attendant for Ansett and when I was on maternity leave I woke up one day and my job was gone. Hundreds of people lost their jobs. Now, who would have thought Ansett would have been gone?” Macushla says business today is more volatile than ever and that’s why she loves to work with entrepreneurial and start-up businesses to help people create their own income and jobs through her executive coaching, media and marketing business Mindsherpa. She is an expert in human behaviour and has a master’s degree in Gestalt psychotherapy. With her team of business experts, Mindsherpa is able to combine the best of business psychology, data analysis and creativity to offer business intelligence. “This is where the right-hand side of the brain meets the left-hand side,” Macushla says. “Business intelligence is about using data, along with creativity. Digital is the way of the future and we use data to create strategic plans with our clients. This helps them grow their business.” The Mindsherpa team also maintains a strong focus on the mindset of business owners to make sure the leader of the business is in a positive, adaptive and innovative headspace.


BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE IS ABOUT USING DATA, ALONG WITH CREATIVITY. DIGITAL IS THE WAY OF THE FUTURE AND WE USE DATA TO CREATE STRATEGIC PLANS WITH OUR CLIENTS.

“A lack of planning is a major factor in businesses that fail, but I always say you have to be innovative, flexible and agile to succeed,” Macushla says. “You have to adapt to the changing business environment. Like anything in nature, if you become stagnant, your business will die.” The team at Mindsherpa works to make sure all the parts of the business organism are operating smoothly and Macushla says this is the key to growing a business from an idea to a thriving company. “People come to us for a few different reasons,” she says. “We offer a holistic approach where we specialise in business intelligence. We make sure all the parts of the business, which I look at like an organism, are all working smoothly. We minimise dysfunction so businesses can grow and thrive.” Taking the first step to business ownership can be scary, but Macushla’s top tip for starting your own company is to just go for it. “A lot of people wait for the perfect day to start a business,” she says. “But that is just a lot of excuses. There is never a perfect day. Anyone can be in business and they can fit their business around the lifestyle they want, the hours they want to work. You just have to do it.” mindsherpa.com.au

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A DOSE OF SALT

A world away

WE TRAVEL AROUND three months of every year, mostly to the Middle East, Europe and Russia.

WORDS BARBARA AND ALLAN PEASE ILLUSTRATION AMY BORRELL

we flew to Sydney and hired an Avis car and drove that route, checking out properties all the way.

We had been living in England for some time when we ruminated on where the best place in the world would be to live. With our business of writing books and running seminars, we figured we could live anywhere, so we purchased a ÂŁ5 world map, placed it on our lounge room floor and stood over it.

We decided that Mooloolaba was the place for us!

In terms of climate, finances, living conditions and safety, we decided it had to be Australia, and somewhere on the beach between Terrigal Beach in New South Wales and Noosa. So

For us, the Sunny Coast and Buderim is like living in heaven. Every time we land at Maroochydore Airport it feels like we are going on vacation and even flying Jetstar to here is bearable!

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We lived there for 12 months then purchased a large rainforest acreage in Buderim and have been there ever since, writing our books, running our seminars and making more than 100 music albums at our Heliport recording studios.


AS KIDS, WE LAMENTED THAT AUSTRALIA WAS SO FAR AWAY FROM EVERYTHING – BUT NOW THAT’S ITS BIGGEST ADVANTAGE.

We recently had 15 interstaters attend one of our live-in seminars in Buderim and several are now seriously considering moving to the Sunny Coast. That’s the impact it has on visitors. But after returning from a trip in Western or Eastern Europe, we also quickly become aware that Sunny Coasters live in a bubble and are somehow immune from the rest of the world. Most of the Coast’s residents are escapees from the southern states (68 per cent in fact) and the balance are locally born Queenslanders who you can spot on roads because they refuse to let you merge. When you live abroad you are constantly aware of everyone and every thing around you because of terrorism. There are bombs everywhere, guns abound, street muggings are common and our favourite spots like Istanbul and Paris have become scary places.

But back on the Sunny Coast it’s ‘business as usual’ with locals seemingly detached from the advancing dangers abroad. In many ways, we like it like this because in Buderim, there’s no one in a tree aiming a gun at us, our kids are safe to go to the beach and because most Coasters moved here for lifestyle they are happy people. As kids, we lamented that Australia was so far away from everything – but now that’s its biggest advantage. But hang on a minute, North Korea has just released a map of its long-distance missile range and it looks like Buderim is a target! Maybe we’ll join the locals in their bubble. To see more illustrations by Amy Borrell visit amyborrell.com


TABLE TALK

tea time

WORDS LINDA READ PHOTOS KRISTA EPPELSTUN

Black sesame, almond and orange cake with decorative white chocolate 38

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Sticky date and walnut cake with butterscotch sauce

MANY ELEMENTS GO INTO creating a meal to remember.

visit. The glass-walled teahouse-cafe, jutting out into the iconic lush green, boasts a glorious view over hillsides and valleys at the end of the road to Kondalilla Falls.

Of course, there has to be excellent food, great service, and, preferably, pleasant surroundings. But the very best dining-out occasion also possesses something a little more indefinable – that special something that sets it apart, turning the meal into an experience and the occasion into a lasting memory.

While Elements has grown busier and busier since it opened seven years ago, it retains the warm, country-style vibe that makes it so popular. If you asked the steady stream of regulars and tourists who flock to this hinterland gem of an eating space exactly what it is that keeps them coming back, they would no doubt have a long list of answers.

Elements at Montville, the teahouse that is oh-so-much-morethan-a-teahouse, seems to have found that ‘something’ in spades. Although Elements primarily specialises in high tea, it also serves breakfast, lunch, morning tea and afternoon tea to an often-packed house. A thriving home interiors and gift store and a beauty and wellness section complement the picture. Situated against the sublimely beautiful backdrop of the Kondalilla Falls National Park, Elements’ setting alone makes it well worth a

Top of the list would probably be the delectable house-baked cakes and other baked goodies, created daily on site by head chef Angela James, which have made quite a name for themselves in Sunshine Coast food-loving circles. Owner Sarah Hallam praises Angela as “an amazing chef and an amazing woman” whose special talent for baking gives Elements a delicious point of difference. >

restaurant . weddings bar . functions

With exclusive river views, Tantalising modern Italian cuisine and exceptional service, the noosa waterfront restaurant & bar is one of the premier RESTAURANTS AND WEDDING VENUES on the Sunshine Coast

open for lunch & Dinner tuesday to sunday

www.noosawaterfrontrestaurant.com.au

(07) 5474 4444

142 Gympie terrace, noosaville, qld, 4567

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WE’RE EXTREMELY CONSCIOUS OF OFFERING A WIDE VARIETY, SO WE CAN TRY AND FULFIL MOST PEOPLE’S NEEDS. OBVIOUSLY WE CAN’T PLEASE EVERYBODY BUT WE CERTAINLY TRY.

“Our cakes are our specialty,” says Sarah. “They are a big passion for Angela. We make everything on site, from beautiful orange poppy seed cakes to pear and coconut, and chocolate expresso gluten-free cakes as well as delicious friands. We have fresh scones daily – today our scones were fig, orange and ginger. The scones are always very popular.” But it’s not only the baked goods that shine on this menu. The breakfast and lunch menus, which change seasonally and feature fresh local produce primarily from Sunshine Coast growers and producers (sourced personally by Sarah from the markets), aim to satisfy many tastes and cater amply for a range of dietary requirements, including a range of vegetarian and coeliac options. 40

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Avocado on sourdough with cracked pepper, lemon and grilled haloumi

“We do vegetarian stacks, zucchini and haloumi fritters, salads in the summer months and vegetable dishes in the winter,” says Sarah. “There is definitely a huge expansion I think with regards to the health side of things. “We don’t sprout that we’re organic or anything in particular, but we can cater for it. We try and use as much organic produce as we can, or at least spray-free produce. We use good-quality meats and good-quality eggs and local produce. “I think what inspires our menu most is fresh food and what is seasonal. I’ve always had a passion for food, but I love good quality and things that are affordable. We’re so lucky [on the Sunshine Coast] that we’re able to get our hands on good quality produce in the area. It’s amazing. “At the moment we do offer almost everything you could possibly poke a stick at with regards to coeliac and other dietary requirements. But we’ve still got a lot of people that just like to have bacon and eggs for breakfast. We’re extremely conscious


CELEBRATE

escaping the everyday in the Hinterland

of offering a wide variety, so we can try and fulfil most people’s needs. Obviously we can’t please everybody but we certainly try.” Some of the options on offer for breakfast include a layered breakfast trifle of toasted muesli, yoghurt, seasonal fruit and cinnamon; buttermilk pancakes with berry compote, cinnamon, maple syrup and fresh cream; and French toast with bacon, grilled banana, maple syrup and cream. For lunch, you could try a savoury pot pie; one of Angela’s gourmet quiches or tarts; or the delectable Ploughman’s, which is a selection of local cheeses, meats, pickled vegetables, chutney, bread and biscuits. Of course, with Elements’ teahouse status, the high tea on offer is not to be trifled with – think tiers of petite scones, finger sandwiches, miniature mouth-watering cakes and tarts – and brings a touch of vintage glamour to the scene. With 150 teas also on offer (as well as very good coffee) everyone’s tastes are sure to be catered for. The high tea offering is particularly popular in conjunction with the beauty and wellness treatments for wedding parties and special occasions. “The beauty and high tea packages are a bit of a haven for women,” says Sarah. “They’ll have a gorgeous high tea and they can relax and feel really looked after. We’re not just a normal ‘come and have a quick cuppa’ place.”

VISIT THE TAMARIND AND TRY THE SPEC TACUL AR NEW MENU We invite you to come and try The Tamarind’s tantalising new menu inspired by Head Chef Daniel Jarrett’s love for bold, fresh, modern Asian flavours.

And the tea element is making its way into other parts of Elements’ menu as well, with the addition of different tea blends into other recipes providing yet another point of difference.

Open for lunch 12-2pm Friday to Sunday and dinner 5pm-late Tuesday to Sunday.

With plans to expand the beauty and wellness centre to include a herbal dispensary, Sarah, who is also a qualified naturopath, sees the future for Elements as including an extension of the idea of ‘food as medicine’ into the menu. But there are no plans to change the winning formula that is working very well so far – as indefinable as that may be.

Why not linger a little longer and enjoy

“We pride ourselves on keeping our business to a smaller minimum, so we can give that really personalised service,” she says. “It’s cosy and it’s friendly. Most of our clients walk out very happy and with full bellies.”

$145 per person for a 60 minute treatment.

elementsmontville.com.au

Booking essential.

some rejuvenation at our onsite day spa, Spa Anise? Ask about our Thalasso Therapy Performance Facial - our latest seasonal skin treatment harnessing advanced cosmeceuticals to redefine your skin.

To visit The Tamarind or Spa Anise phone 5420 5420.


NOSH NEWS

NOOSA BEACH HOUSE BAR’s a la carte breakfast is simple and fresh with a global twist. Chef Peter Kuruvita has cleverly worked Sri Lankan favourites into the menu, which includes street food staples such as egg hoppers and crab omelettes. Breakfast is available daily from 7am to 10.30am. 16 Hastings Street, Noosa Heads. 5449 4754 or noosabeachhousepk.com.au

We’ve always loved BOHEMIAN BUNGALOW for its fresh, seasonal and wholesome food with a boho twist, but now there are more reasons to visit the Eumundi restaurant. Thanks to the markets the town is a great place to visit on a Saturday, but for locals, Wednesday night is the real winner with the Boho Locals deal of two main meals and a bottle of selected wine for $50. Available from 5.30pm every Wednesday. 69 Memorial Drive, Eumundi. 5442 8679 or bohemianbungalow.com.au

The best way to dine is with family and friends. That’s why we love the NOOSA BOATHOUSE four-course shared feast. Grab a posse and head out for lunch or dinner – the feast includes a starter, entrees, mains and dessert, for $59 per person. It’s a great way to taste a range of the restaurant’s yummiest dishes, and for large groups it takes the hassle out of deciding what to order. Easy. Chef Shane Bailey’s popular feast menu is always evolving with the seasons, so if you’ve had the feast before you’ll have to try it again. 194 Gympie Terrace, Noosaville. 5440 5070 or noosaboathouse.com.au 42

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nosh news

Dining has never played a bigger part in our lives, so here salt shares news, information and products that enhance our passionate consumption.

Our region is celebrated for its near-perfect weather, beautiful beaches and pretty hinterland, but as locals we sometimes forget the incredible wine industry we have on the Coast. Montville’s FLAME HILL produces some outstanding wines, and the winery’s owner, Tony Thompson, says that while the rest of the country has discovered just how special our region’s wines are, it’s taking a little longer for locals to drink up. Flame Hill produces an array of award-winning red, white and sparkling wines, but Tony says the Flame Hill 2016 Barbera is a particularly outstanding drop, and the Traprock merlot and shiraz are proving popular with buyers. Cheers to that! 249 Western Avenue, Montville. 5478 5920 or flamehill.com.au


Noosa Springs’ RELISH restaurant has long been recognised as one of the region’s finest. And one of the secrets of Relish’s success is the use of local ingredients – think Mooloolaba prawns, Noosa hinterland sirloin steak, Coral Coast barramundi, Gympie green beans and Woombye cheese. The menu changes with the seasons, and the focus for winter is on hearty, delicious dishes. We love the $25 lunch special, which includes a glass of wine. Links Drive, Noosa Heads. 5440 3317 or noosasprings.com.au

Head along to 10 HASTINGS STREET for a night of sangria, songs and simply stunning food. Every Wednesday to Saturday evening the Noosa eatery holds a Spanish evening with tapas, sangria and live music. Olé! 10 Hastings Street, Noosa Heads. 5455 3350 or 10hastingsstreet.com.au

Think it’s getting too cold for smoothies? It’s time to try VANILLA FOOD’s Winter Smoothie – made with lots of love plus coconut and charcoal powder, then topped with fruit and seeds. This healthy treat is $13 and is available for breakfast at Vanilla Food from Monday to Saturday. Located in Belmondos Organic Market, 59 Rene Street, Noosaville. 0427 466 977 or belmondos.com


CULINARY CREATIONS

WINTER

WARMER

photo Anastasia Kariofyllidis

CHEF ANDREA RAVEZZANI RESTAURANT NOOSA WATERFRONT RESTAURANT

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BRAISED VENISON SHOULDER WITH ROAST VEGETABLES Serves up to 6 Cooking and preparation time 5 to 6 hours

Ingredients:

Met hod

Heat the oven to 180°. In a large enamelled cast-iron pot, heat the oil over medium-high. Season the venison all over with salt and pepper and add to the pot and cook, turning as needed, until golden brown on all sides, (about 18 minutes). Transfer the venison to a plate and add the celery, onions and garlic to the pot. Cook, stirring, until the vegetables are soft and beginning to caramelise, (about 8-10 minutes). Pour the wine into the pot and cook, stirring, until reduced by half (about 6 minutes). Return the venison to the pot, along with the stock and carrots and bring to a boil. Tie the parsley and thyme together with kitchen twine and with the mustard, add to the pot. Cover and bake until the venison is very tender (about four hours). Bring a large pot of salted water to boil and add the potatoes, artichokes, carrots and onions and cook until part boiled (around 6-8 minutes). Strain and put on an oven

photo Hing Ang

3tbsp vegetable oil 1 (about 1 kilo) boneless venison shoulder, tied into a roast Kosher salt Freshly ground black pepper 8 stalks celery, finely chopped 2 large yellow onions, finely chopped 4 cloves garlic, finely chopped 2 cups red wine 4 cups veal or vegetable stock 2 medium carrots, finely chopped 12 sprigs flat-leaf parsley 1 bunch thyme 1 tbsp dijon mustard 4 medium-sized potatoes 6 jerusalem artichokes 6 baby carrots 2 spanish onions

dish, then roast until soft and golden. To serve, remove the venison from the pot and cut into bite-sized pieces. Divide the venison among serving bowls and ladle the vegetables and cooking liquid on top. CHEF’S NOTE Don’t forget to spend time on presentation. Andrea says presentation is key and Noosa Waterfront customers appreciate the effort that goes into presenting a feast for the eyes as well as the mouth. PHILOSOPHY Andrea says dish testing is very important at the restaurant and much time is spent designing the meal. The team tests every dish first before introducing it to customers, who are asked for feedback on the dish. Available at Noosa Waterfront Restaurant, 142 Gympie Terrace, Noosaville. 5474 4444 or noosawaterfrontrestaurant.com.au

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PRODUCE PEOPLE

SELECTION WORDS PENNY SHIPWAY PHOTOS KRISTA EPPELSTUN

Marketing manager Erin Pyers 46

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WHAT WAS ONCE a fruit stall on the side of the road has now grown into the largest organic supermarket in the southern hemisphere. And it’s right here on our doorstep. Kunara Organic Marketplace, at Forest Glen, has become one of the Sunshine Coast’s most innovative and iconic businesses, featuring 95 per cent certified organic or organic products. Adding to its grocery store is a superior cafe stocking foods for every preference from vegan to paleo, and a garden centre featuring plentiful native species.  But it’s not just the meticulous barrels of the best local produce – and nuts, legumes and fruit of every kind presented exquisitely throughout. Kunara has gone to the next level when it comes to educating its customers. Marketing manager Erin Pyers says the store has two naturopaths, so there’s always someone to answer you health questions. Kunara also offers school tours and environmentally informative fundraiser nights. “Our naturopaths offer free advice and are always available on the floor,” Erin says. “You don’t even have to book in. If you are a parent with a sick child or you’ve had to take the day off work, instead of going to the pharmacy you can come in here to get naturopathic advice and they will happily whip up a natural remedy. “Whether it’s a severe head cold or chest infection, they will mix their herbs for a remedy to suit you. If it’s something emotional they’ll make something up with camomile that is calming. “The skills and qualifications of our staff are incredible – we have skin-care specialists who can help you with chemical-free, vegan, cruelty-free make-up and the right cleansing regimes. We have people who are experts in organic fresh produce and bulk wholefood specialists, we have a qualified horticulturist in our Garden Centre and our organic cafe is filled with marvellous creators of food.” “The journey that some of our staff have been on with their own health and wellness brings to Kunara a wealth of knowledge and information to be shared with our customers. >


“We find people visiting us with all sorts of questions about products, ailments, dietary requirements, food-related products and more. This is why Kunara is more than a barrel of nuts; we are an information hub for our customers. We encourage the community to come in and ask us any questions they may have, and one of our specialists will assist.” Shirley Date brings 25 years’ industry experience to her role as one of Kunara’s two naturopaths. She worked in and owned pharmacies before realising nature’s true potential. Just one subject short of finishing her naturopathy degree, Shirley says she loves nothing more than seeing her customers reach their health goals the natural way. “I am passionate about natural medicine and assisting people with their health needs.” Kunara’s other naturopath is Amy Gilbert, who finished her studies two years ago and enjoys communicating and supporting people with their wellness goals.  School tours have also been hugely popular at Kunara, educating a host of local children about the benefits of organic and sustainable shopping. “A lot of the schools don’t know that we do tours, and many of the children who come through aren’t even aware of the products we have,” Erin says. “We want to make more schools aware that we offer free school tours to 48

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KUNARA HAS MADE SUCH A HUGE IMPACT ON THE ORGANIC COMMUNITY AND WE WANT TO EDUCATE.

Handmade cakes & pastries

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help educate the kids about the importance of organics and sustainability.

“Kunara has made such a huge impact on the organic community and we want to educate. We teach them about the sustainability aspects as well and about low mileage, because a lot of the produce that is delivered to us is very close to us. It comes straight from local certified organic farms to Kunara’s doorstep.” Erin says the kids sample coconut yoghurt, camel milk or “something quirky” and can watch the pure peanut butter being made. “We give them a jar to take home and we make the tours fun and ask them questions. We explain that the food tastes so much better without the chemicals. And there’s also the biodegradable packaging aspect where we explain how much easier it is to break down.” Kunara’s fundraising events are just another way the company shows it means business when it comes to informing its customers. “We really are passionate about being leaders in education in this industry,” Erin says. “So often we team up with Sea Shepherd Australia for a seasonal film night. We held one for the film Why Just One? in the garden centre with canapes, and cello player Rob Knaggs played the most incredible whale sounds. All proceeds went to the foundation.”

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That Sugar Film was also popular and supported the The Mai Wiru Sugar Challenge Foundation, a program that helps indigenous Australians improve their health through better nutrition. Stink!, a movie that examined dangerous chemicals in products, was also shown with all proceeds supporting the Mindd Foundation. Mindd, which stands for metabolic, immunologic, neurologic, digestive and developmental conditions, promotes food as healing. “This is a really important foundation because they focus on paediatric disorders such as ADHD, asthma, allergies, autism, chronic illness, depression, learning and language delay, and digestive and behavioural disorders,” Erin says. “All of the foundations we support mean so much to us and the way in which we can fundraise for them through educational film night means so much to us.” With so many children coming from families with a history of “brain-immuno-gut disorders”, which are triggered by toxins, malnutrition and infections, starting early is so important, she says. “The rise in childhood diseases just shows the need for preventative healthcare that focuses on optimising nutrient and minimising toxins.  “We always have a Q&A panel after the movies because people generally have a lot of questions. And questions are so important in learning about our health. The films spark huge conversations that need to be had so that we continue to challenge and educate ourselves as a whole.” kunara.com.au

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PADDOCK TO PLATE

WORDS LINDA READ PHOTOS ANASTASIA KARIOFYLLIDIS

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Ninjin - baby heirloom carrots, pumpkin seed, black and white sesame furikake, Honeysuckle Hill soft leaves and herbs and a sauce of genmai cha tea and smoked pumpkin

IT’S EASY TO SEE why Noosa – that ubiquitous symbol of everything beautiful on the Sunshine Coast – is famous for so many things. There are the beaches, the surf, the river and the rainforest. Plus the eclectic treasure trove of designer shopping destinations and stylish galleries. But trumping all, perhaps, is the glorious array of food the region offers, through its lush subtropical farmlands and fresh water that yield some of the world’s finest produce. This is precisely why restaurateur Danielle Gjestland, founder and co-owner of the renowned Wasabi Restaurant & Bar in Noosa Heads, created The Cooking School Noosa. There is no shortage of cooking classes on the market, but The Cooking School Noosa, which opened in November last year a few doors down from Wasabi, is not your average how-to-cook venue. As well as offering exclusive collaborative cooking experiences led by Wasabi’s executive chef and co-owner Zeb Gilbert, it aims to shine a bright light on the delectable produce and ingredients of the region and connect people to their food. The school grows much of its own produce on its seven-acre Honeysuckle Hill Farm in nearby Pomona, as well as drawing from several other regional producers. Harvesting at the farm is done twice a week to ensure optimum freshness and minimum food miles.

“Our point of difference, we feel, is that hands-on relationship people have with their cooking and knowing about where the ingredients came from and what it took to grow them,” says Danielle. “The town is known for fantastic food and we have such a great offering, but I think there is still a bit of a lack of connection between all these beautiful producers that grow these amazing things. And unfortunately they send a lot of it interstate. “The focus [at the school] is definitely on regional growers. The world is full of generic products – things you can buy in every place, every town, every city. So we really wanted to make something where people really had a sense of place when they came here.” Some of the producers The Cooking School Noosa showcases are Noosa Reds tomatoes, phoenix and pink oyster mushrooms from Noosa Earth, and luscious fruits such as plums, figs and persimmons from Sunshine Coast Farm Foods, which delivers produce gathered from local farmers. “We can grow just about anything here; we’re blessed in Queensland,” says Danielle. “Our farm started originally to feed >

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Danielle Gjestland and Zeb Gilbert

THE WORLD IS FULL OF GENERIC PRODUCTS – THINGS YOU CAN BUY IN EVERY PLACE, EVERY TOWN, EVERY CITY. SO WE REALLY WANTED TO MAKE SOMETHING WHERE PEOPLE REALLY HAD A SENSE OF PLACE WHEN THEY CAME HERE. the restaurant, and we’ve extended and added ingredients that we wouldn’t normally grow for the restaurant. For example, the French class needs European herbs.” The Classic French Experience – led by Wasabi’s sous chef Clement Vachon, a French native from Lyon – is only one of the classes offered at the school. Others include the Contemporary Japanese, Modern South East Asian, and the Noosa Regional Experience, all conducted by Zeb. Then there are experiences with visiting high-profile chefs from Sydney such as the Pasta Masterclass with Giovanni Pilu from Freshwater, and the Northern Italian Feast with Alessandro Pavoni, owner of Ormeggio. These experiences generally run for five to six hours, with a maximum of 10 guests in each class (although they also run some ‘mini’ classes for people who have less time). “The classes are structured so every guest works on separate elements of the dish,” says Danielle. 52

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“Some will be working on entrees, some on the main, some on the dessert. But we wanted it to feel collaborative; so, rather than breaking people up into separate work stations, we have everyone around a big central table so although you’re working on something that’s your own creation and you still get that lovely sense of completion and achievement, you also feel as though you’re part of a team. Which is how a kitchen, as we know it from the restaurant side of things, really works. “It turns out to be quite a dynamic and interesting format for the day as well because people get to know each other, they work together, share a meal and meet new people.” There is also a focus at the school on encouraging people to be able to recreate what they have learnt at the class when they get home, making the classes very hands-on and practical, rather than taking a demonstration-style approach. “From our research, we found that in a lot of other cooking schools you spend a lot of time watching the chef and we really wanted to have people


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get their hands in and realise that they can do it and it’s not that hard; with a couple of little tricks and a tiny bit of guidance, you’re on your way and before you know it, you’ve made something amazing,” says Danielle.

FRESH SEASONAL LOCAL SUSTAINABLE

So far, The Cooking School Noosa is attracting people with a wide variety of cooking skills, including those who have minimal or no experience. They all, however, have one thing in common – a love of the Noosa region and the beautiful food it produces.

Celebrating 15 years

“There is a really mixed type of guest coming to the school,” says Danielle. “There are the people who aren’t the cook of the household but are interested; people who are using it as a social occasion; and couples using it as a way to spend the day together having fun and getting to eat some great food on the way.

Breakfast, lunch, dinner, coffee, fresh baked pastries, wine, pizza.

“It’s just the experience of not just eating lunch, but getting involved and making a memory.”

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Tues + Wed 8am-4pm Thurs, Fri, Sat 8am-late www.hungryfeel.com.au

thecookingschoolnoosa.com

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RELAXED RECIPES

SOME LIKE IT

PHOTOS ANASTASIA KARIOFYLLIDIS

Add some spice to the dining table with these Asian-inspired dishes.

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SPICY BEEF SALAD (NAHM DTOK) < HOT AND SOUR PRAWN SALAD

Ingredients Salad Pinch sea salt 6-8 medium green prawns, shelled with tail on and de-veined 1/ 4 cup coriander leaves, loosely packed 1/ 4 cup mint leaves, loosely packed 1/ 4 cup green onion, finely sliced 3-4cm long 1 tbsp garlic chives, cut 3-4cm 1tbsp red shallots, sliced thinly lengthways 1 tsp lemongrass, finely sliced or shaved ringlets 1 tsp kaffir lime leaves, finely sliced 1/ 4 tsp ground roasted sticky rice Dressing 1 coriander root (medium) 1 whole birdâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eye chilli (medium) 2 small cloves garlic 20ml lime juice 15-20ml fish sauce

Met hod

Salad In slow simmering water with the sea salt, plunge the peeled prawns for 1-11/2 minutes (depending on size) until cooked. Strain and allow to rest. If prawns are bigger than bite size, slice on an angle into bite-sized pieces. In a bowl, combine the salad herbs, then add prawns to the side of the herbs. Spoon the dressing over the prawns and gently combine with the herbs. Serve in the centre of a plate and sprinkle with ground roasted sticky rice. Dressing For the dressing, pound the coriander root, chilli and garlic in a mortar and pestle to a robust paste. Add lime juice, then the fish sauce. Adjust to taste and set aside. (Should be hot, sour and slightly salty.)

Ingredients

120g trimmed beef rump 4 cherry tomatoes, halved 1 red shallot, finely sliced lengthways 1/ 4 cup coriander leaves 1/ 4 cup Chinese green shallots, finely sliced lengthways 1/ 4 cup mint leaves 1 small pinch roasted chilli flakes 1 tsp ground roasted rice 10ml lime juice 20ml thin soy sauce

Met hod

On the chargrill or in a wok, cook the rump to medium rare. Remove and allow to rest. Slice the beef thinly (2-3mm) and retain all the juices. In a bowl, combine the tomatoes, red shallot, coriander leaves, Chinese green shallots, mint leaves, roasted chilli flakes and three-quarters of the ground roasted rice. Add the meat and juices and the lime juice and thin soy sauce. Combine and serve. Garnish with the remaining ground roasted rice. >

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STIR FRY OF ASPARAGUS AND SNAKE BEANS WITH ROASTED CHILLI JAM

Ingredients

1 tbsp vegetable oil 1 bunch asparagus, sliced into thirds 1/ 2 cup sliced snake beans 1 tbsp roasted chilli jam 1/ 2 cup Thai basil leaves 1 tbsp water

Met hod

In a wok over high heat, add vegetable oil, asparagus, snake beans and roasted chilli jam and fry for 1-2 minutes. Add Thai basil leaves, tossing to incorporate. Add a small amount of water â&#x20AC;&#x201C; this will also help form a small volume of sauce. Remove from heat and serve.

YELLOW CURRY OF CHICKEN (GAENG LEUNG GAI)

Ingredients Yellow Curry 50ml vegetable oil 1-2 tbsp yellow curry paste (see recipe below) 1 tsp palm sugar 2 tbsp fish sauce 400ml coconut milk 3 red shallots, halved 4-6 kaffir lime leaves 1 whole red chilli, sliced 2 snake beans, sliced 250g chicken thigh 2 tbsp fresh bamboo, sliced 4 cherry tomatoes, halved 1/ 2 cup Thai basil leaves Yellow Curry Paste 3 tbsp garlic cloves, chopped 2 tbsp red shallots 1 tbsp ginger, chopped 1 tbsp lemongrass, finely chopped Pinch sea salt 1/ 2 tbsp ground coriander seeds 1 tsp ground cumin seeds 1/ 2 tsp fennel seeds 1/ 2 tbsp turmeric powder 1 tbsp chilli powder 1 tsp shrimp paste

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Met hod Yellow Curry Warm vegetable oil in a pan over low heat. Add curry paste and fry until fragrant. Add palm sugar and fish sauce and stir continuously until sugar is dissolved. Add coconut milk and bring to a slow simmer. Add red shallots, kaffir lime leaves, sliced chilli, snake beans and chicken, and simmer for 5 minutes. Add bamboo, cherry tomatoes and Thai basil leaves. Adjust seasoning with fish sauce. It should taste sweet, salty and aromatic. Simmer for 2 minutes, to finish cooking chicken. Remove from heat and serve.

Friendly, Fresh, Fantastic

Yellow Curry Paste Using a mortar and pestle, pound garlic, shallots, ginger, lemongrass and salt to a paste. Dry roast the whole spices over a medium heat for 5-8 minutes and grind to a fine powder. Stir the rest of the ingredients into the paste and mix well.

• Breakfast • LUNCH • Dinner •Tapas

Recipes are courtesy of Spicers Tamarind Retreat, 88 Obi Lane South, Maleny. 5420 5420 or spicerstamarind.com FOR EXTRA SALT visit saltmagazine.com.au for an extra recipe. 257 Gympie Terrace Noosaville | p: 5445 6688 | www.sirocconoosa.com.au

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SALT CELLAR

BELT WORDS MIKE BENNIE

UP!

OFTEN MALIGNED, FREQUENTLY MISUNDERSTOOD, the Granite Belt has lurked in the shadows of Australian fine wine. It’s a region curiously tarred with the Sunshine State brush – assumed to be a part-time wine region, supposed to be dappled in blaring sunlight and lacking seriousness due to an impression that Queensland is capable of growing only pineapples and mangoes. How far from the truth this is. The Granite Belt has to be one of Australia’s most exciting, all-rounder wine-growing areas. A dedicated community of innovative, headstrong and determined vignerons lead a charge for diversity, with quality. It’s a picture-perfect wine region with Tom Roberts landscapes of undulating hills, thatches of native bush, a smattering of livestock, sprawling farms and the ubiquitous granite boulders and crags that jut from the ground at variegated angles. A lack of proximity to major centres outside Brisbane hampers the Granite Belt cause as much as the misjudged image of what the region 58

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is capable of. Wine growers seem to service Brisbane, the Gold and Sunshine coasts well, but reluctantly stick their head above the parapet in other significant Australian markets.

DIRT AND SKY

The Granite Belt wine region is nestled in the Great Dividing Range and wedged between the verdant farmlands of Queensland’s Darling Downs and the sepia-toned sprawl of New However, the tide is changing. A recent immersion in the region surprised and delighted England in New South Wales. The town of with a swathe of new-release wines that showed Stanthorpe is the beating heart of the wine area, a high standard of grape growing, a stellar grape but it’s the countryside that shapes the landscape variety mix and an inherent high quality in recent- of wine culture here. release wines. This quality, alongside a select Among the undulating hills and dales, farmland group of winemakers now breaching the border and vines, there are spectacular national parks and sweeping vistas across Queensland’s vast south, is causing the fortune and reputation of southerly ranges. Those granite outcrops and the Granite Belt to rise.


SIX TO TRY Drink a bucketload: ROBERT CHANNON ROSÉ 2016 ($20) – Curiously, this is a blend of pinot noir and pinot gris, with the sum of the parts an incredible value wine, and seriously delicious. It has this electric garnet look to it and offers rose petal and pot pourri scents. It’s mouth watering, tangy with cranberry fruitiness, finishes with a savoury edge. Awesome. Pizza/pasta night: RAVENS CROFT TEMPRANILLO 2016 ($28) – A youthful expression that’s joyously fresh and vibrant, showing loads of macerated cherries and cherry cola character, spice and graphite-textured tannins. Delicious drinking. For the cellar: BALLANDEAN ESTATE OPERA BLOCK SHIRAZ 2014 ($30) – Loads of dark berry and plummy fruit character, with savouriness of black olive and a big shake from the black pepper mill through the wine. Tannins are classic and reminiscent of black tea. Serious stayer that could go a couple of decades. All class: 2016 WITCHES FALLS WILD FERMENT VIOGNIER ($34) – Light apricot scents, faint floral notes, a touch of honey in the bouquet. The palate is succulent and the length of flavour is superb. Texture is a key element to the wine; it’s seductive and moreish. It’s a wild wine and has so much appeal. photo Tourism and Events Queensland

Fancy night out: RIDGEMILL ESTATE WYP CHARDONNAY 2015 ($35) – A stellar chardonnay punching so far above its weight. It shows beautifully in the glass with stone fruit and flinty fragrance, feels minerally, crisp and fine to drink. Ludicrously good wine.

imposing stone obtrusions give the region its name, though the underlying soils for vineyards are a mix of granite, basalt and Permian sedimentary rock. While the science between soil type and flavour profile in wines is shaky, I like to think the rugged, hungry earth and imposing monoliths find their way into the shapely yet firm tannins of the region’s wines. In addition to unique soil profile, there’s significant elevation. Vineyards are found in a patchwork of parcels and intrusions onto land, mostly set between 800 and more than 1000 metres above sea level – it makes the Granite Belt one of the highest wine regions in Australia, and comparable with many in Europe.

Serious shiraz: FLAME HILL TRAPROCK SHIRAZ 2014 ($45) – A wine with depth of flavour, slender ropes of tea-like tannins, and floral and spicy perfume. It’s a wine that makes an immediate impact in the glass, gulpable and delicious, but with a bit of grunt behind it that makes it more serious.

The location and elevation make it the coldest part of Queensland. Indeed, snow has been seen in winter, and a jacket is recommended for nightfall even in the twilight days of summer. Spring frosts and below-zero nights in winter are par for the course, while summer offers relatively low humidity and late-season rainfall in an almost ideal climate mix for grape growing. The conditions make it idyllic for a vast selection of grape varieties.

DRINKING GRANITE

Few regions in Australia manage to excel at so many varieties and styles, and few regions have a culture of innovation, and, importantly, a willingness to let the region speak clearly through Long, even growing seasons with warm days and cold nights are features of the region too. Diurnal its wine. Notable in the Granite Belt is the breadth of temperature, the difference between day and grape varieties available to winemakers. Indeed, night, is dramatic, which brings about refreshing experimental plantings are well documented natural acidity and an evenness to the flavour of grapes when fully mature. in the region, and a historical connection to

Italian grape varieties has been established through stalwart migrant families and pioneering vignerons. Granite Belt shows a willingness to use given resources, and a distinct lack of interest in following a worrying trend in Australia of mimicking wines from other regions, particularly European benchmarks. This copycat culture is a continuous casualty for many wine regions that don’t sit in the upper echelon of prestige or consciousness in Australia. Most regions in Australia don’t seem to have the inherent confidence in the breadth of grape varieties and wine styles either. Granite Belt producers seem content with their lot and individual personality of wines – local producers prefer to just get on with the job of making highquality wine from what they’ve got, and how the season and sites dictate. Drinkers of Granite Belt wines also get a mainline to the nuances of the places grapes are grown, saltmagazine . com . au

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photo Tourism and Events Queensland

Italian red varieties translate to wines that are bright, vibrant, high in drinkability and etched with fine tannins. They are typically loaded with red berry fruitiness, and dusted with spice with ideal ripeness. The best drops seemed to come from the juicy, simpler wines produced from crunchy textured nero d’avolas and barbera, though savoury sangiovese, pitch perfect for as many winemakers seem satisfied to produce Savina Lane Millennium and Flame Hill Traprock pizza night, and a couple of tannin-driven but their wares with ‘a gentle hand’, allowing grapes Shiraz. While all unique in their own way, the warm-hearted nebbiolos all starred. to express themselves more transparently. A DNA of the region’s black pepper and firm Meanwhile, cabernet sauvignon was a weaker can-do attitude from local winemakers seems tannin pucker were on show. grape, with a greenery/herbal character and over to reject the idea that you need to throw the Shiraz from Granite Belt is unreal. It slots ripeness apparent in many examples. While most whole winery, its science, masking oak and right into the cellar next to Canberra District, of the red wines of the Granite Belt feel relatively additives to adjust and shape wines to an idea. Hunter Valley, northern Rhone Valley and gentle in oak presence, cabernet sauvignon was Wines feel, generally, unadorned, bright in Great Southern in Western Australia, all home often excessively oaky, masking fruit flavours. acidity, seasoned with oak rather than lavished to elegant, medium-bodied, fragrant, peppery Tempranillo, however, is gaining ground. The with it, and driven by high-quality fruit – styles. It’s a bargain for the most part from medium-bodied Spanish red variety has a something many other, if not just about all wine Granite Belt. They’ll cellar for a decade with good following in the region, with a variety of regions in Australia, could use as a manifesto. ease, for those inclined to. styles presented from ‘joven’ young, vibrant It’s a region that is captivating to visit as much as what’s in the glass. Wine styles are broad and expressive, but there are distinctions too – take the peppery shiraz, the wildly personable verdelho and viogniers, and increasingly spicy, slurpable tempranillo. And those are just the mainstays. Excitement should be palpable here; we’re unearthing a modern classic, with a stellar future ahead.

PEPPER SPICE AND ALL THINGS NICE, THAT’S WHAT SHIRAZ IS MADE OF Shiraz from the Granite Belt is distinct and excellent. While most people assume wines from the region will be full flavoured, they are conspicuously medium bodied, and imbued with an almost omnipresent peppery spice. Red and black berry fruits jostle in shiraz wines, but another distinct Granite Belt character is the black tea or Earl Grey tea-like tannins that are found in much of the region’s shiraz.

ANYTHING BUT CHARDONNAY Australia calls grape varieties that aren’t your classics, ‘alternate varieties’, but there’s nothing alternate about sangiovese, fiano, vermentino, nebbiolo or barbera to the Italian migrant community in the Granite Belt. Wines produced from grapes from ‘back home’ make sense to people like Golden Grove winemaker Ray Costanzo: “They’re often tough and hardy in the vineyard, but they also provide a point of difference in the glass. I also tend to think some of these Italian grape variety wines work a bit better with food – [they’re] savoury and with good natural acidity.”

Members of Costanzo’s family were early grape growers in the Granite Belt, establishing their vineyards in the late 1940s, and their winemaking endeavours in the 1980s. “We’re pretty pleased with how a spread of different grape varieties work here,” he The best examples come from many producers, says. “Sangiovese, nebbiolo, vermentino and tempranillo are probably the ones I have my but from recent releases the standouts were Ballandean Estate Opera Block, Just Red Wines’ eye on the most to go forward.” That’s the Nikki’s Vineyard, Ridgemill Estate’s The Lincoln, insider knowledge. 60

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expressions through to more serious, oakmatured, heftier styles. The star examples offered joyous fruit character, sarsaparilla and liquorice spice influence, subtle tannins and a touch of savouriness. Track down Symphony Hill Wines Reserve Nebbiolo, Ravens Croft Petit Verdot and Flame Hill Traprock Merlot. Tempranillo is a valuable commodity, and there are many standouts found in the region, though Summit Estate Wines Tempranillo and Ravens Croft Tempranillo worked a sexier mojo.

WHITE KNIGHTS In the white department, vermentino is worklike in its neutral, bright and refreshing way, though Granite Belt producers seem to be doing an overall excellent job with their examples reminiscent of Italian styles. The elevated offerings from viognier, verdelho and fiano are the wines to lock your tractor beams on, however. They’re imbued with layers of texture, good grape flavour, refreshment factor and loads of personality. While they might not be everyone’s cup of tea, a couple of wine producers are experimenting


photo Hing Ang

ABOUT MIKE

photo Hing Ang

When Mike Bennie isn’t wandering vineyards on the four corners of the globe, he is a freelance wine and drinks writer, journalist and presenter. His work appears in the highly regarded Australian Gourmet Traveller Wine magazine, and he is wine/drinks editor for delicious. magazine. He is editor-at-large and contributor/writer to Australia’s most interactive wine commentary website, WineFront. His work is regularly found in The Sun-Herald Style magazine, Virgin Australia airline’s Voyeur magazine, The Sydney Morning Herald Good Food section, Men’s Style magazine, Wine Business Magazine and various other publications. Mike is a wine judge in Australia and overseas, and a graduate of the prestigious Len Evans Tutorial. He is a co-founder and co-director of the artisan and sustainability focused Rootstock Sydney food and wine festival. He is prolific with his wine work, is a regular presenter at corporate and industry events, and between travels to exotic vineyards around the world, enjoys long walks on the beach with a bottle of wine (or sour beer).

with orange wines. These are the white wines produced like red wines that end up looking a bit like a tannic rose style. Among a few of the region’s winemakers there are thrilling examples, curious for their unusual spectrum of flavours and texture, but executed remarkably well. A willingness to experiment and play with grapes finds good cheer from the Granite Belt community. Keep an eye out for Witches Falls Wild Ferment Viognier and Golden Grove Estate Vermentino as elevated examples off a very high base.

CHARDONNAY REVOLUTION Chardonnay is a bit of a regional hero in the Granite Belt. While most Australian chardonnay fanciers will content themselves with a lifetime of Yarra Valley, Margaret River or Tasmania wines, there’s a serious argument to shift the gaze north and into the Granite Belt. Wines produced from chardonnay in the Granite Belt are by and large very consistent, and very high in quality. They tend to be full flavoured in grapiness without overdoing oak influence, or the creamy-buttery nuances found in wines that have undergone malolactic fermentation. Expressions of chardonnay seem

vibrant and imbued with crisp natural acidity, with summery styles sitting easily alongside some of the fuller-figured versions. Ridgemill Estate winemaker Peter McGlashan works doggedly at improving his chardonnay each vintage. “I didn’t want the wines to look like they came from somewhere else, so we’re going pretty gentle on the winemaking,” he says. “Fruit is coming in from beautiful parcels, flavoursome, fresh and just-ripe right. I’ve long seen the potential for Granite Belt chardonnay – fine and elegant examples – and it’s now being realised.” The best examples of new-release wines come from many producers, though Ridgemill Estate WYP is consistently a regional leader. Alongside there are seriously good wines under the labels Jester Hill Wines Touchstone, Witches Falls Wild Ferment, Flame Hill Traprock, Golden Grove Estate and Robinson’s Family.

SHINING BRIGHT Granite Belt represents some 60-plus per cent of all wine produced in Queensland and is home to around 50 winery cellar doors. A visit there is a wealth of opportunity to explore and experiment, all the while filling up the car boot

with treasures. While typically unfair to single out unique producers, and any list is always morphing and incomplete, to make a call on singular impressions there’s a mix of stalwart and experimental producers worth identifying for excellence. These are courageous, dedicated, clever winemaking folk and the collection is worth jotting down and working through. I can’t state again how much good drinking there is to have from this region, but Ballandean, Robert Channon, Witches Falls, Ridgemill Estate, Symphony Hill, Ravens Croft and Golden Grove Estate are currently on the medal dias. With looks more like Kosciusko than Kirra, the Granite Belt is a stunning place to visit. Visitors will be taken by the vistas, the people and the general collegiate spirit and interest in making wines that speak loudly of the place and people they come from, and hang what they assume the market wants. The Granite Belt is firmly one of Australia’s most exciting wine regions, with a wealth of delicious, amazing wines and wine styles. For more of Mike’s tasting notes head to winefront.com.au and to find out more about the Granite Belt head to granitebeltwinecountry.com.au saltmagazine . com . au

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A WEDDING FEATURE WITH

64 KEEPING IT REAL A long engagement was worth the wait for Brooke Stirton and Chris Jarvis. 68 MAGIC MAKER Photography and cake are a natural combination for Tome’s Matt O’Brien and Alita Johnson. 72 TO HAVE AND TO HOLD Treats and tips to get ready for the big day.

M.AU IMAGE COURTESY OF MATT ROWE AT MATTROWEPHOTOGRAPHY.CO

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WINTER ’17


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KEEPING IT REAL

TRAVEL

companions WORDS JOLENE OGLE

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IT’S NOT OFTEN you find love at the mechanics. Many of us leave with just a bill and a healthier car, but for Brooke Stirton sparks flew when she finally listened to her dad’s advice and took her car to Chris for a service. “Chris was my mechanic,” Brooke says. “My dad had been telling me to get my car fixed for a while. He said I should go see Chris, so I went there.” Following their first meeting, Brooke took a sudden interest in the condition of her car. She admits she kept finding things wrong so she could return to see Chris. The story of their early days is now a funny memory for the pair and their family. Chris, 37, and Brooke, 35, are now based in Coolum and after dating for a few years Chris surprised Brooke with a romantic waterfront dinner at Noosa restaurant Rickys before proposing under a full moon at Noosa’s First Point. “That’s why we got married on a full moon,” Brooke says. “That’s why we chose the 19th of August.” After becoming engaged in 2008, the pair decided to wait until 2016 to wed. Having both grown up in Noosa, it was fitting they found their special ceremony location while gliding along the Noosa River on their stand-up paddle boards. Culgoa Point is tucked away at the end of Quamby Place in Noosa Heads. It’s quiet, private and offers exceptional views over the water. Brooke, a plain-clothes officer in the local criminal investigation branch, says she knew August was the perfect time to wed because the water would be still, turning the often busy waterway into a sparkling mirror reflecting the blue winter sky. It would be impossible to find a better backdrop for an intimate wedding. “I stand-up paddle past Culgoa Point quite a bit and I’ve always loved it,” she says. “It really is just beautiful with a stunning outlook.”

Brooke Stirto n & Chris Jarvis 19 August 20 16

The rest of the planning flowed logically after the decision to wed on the foreshore of the Noosa River. Noosa’s iconic MV Catalina collected the wedding party and guests from Culgoa Point’s private jetty before coasting along Noosa River for a two-hour cruise. “The weather was stunning. It was such a great day,” Brooke says. The 80 guests were then dropped off at the floating restaurant, Noosa Boathouse, where a Hamptons-inspired luxe tropical hideaway awaited guests. “The Boathouse is in such a beautiful location overlooking the water,” Brooke says. “Chris works overseas as a service engineer, so I did most of the planning myself but I had Nicole from Splash Events help me. She was fantastic. She helped with a lot of the decor and styling. There was a lot of greenery and a lot of flowers.” When it comes to planning a wedding, many brides can become stressed or anxious, but for Brooke she says knowing Chris for so long made it easy to plan their special day. “The whole experience of planning was nice and relaxing and I guess because we’ve been together for so long, 13 years, we know each other’s style and what we wanted,” she says. “We both had input on everything and it worked out really well.” It was important for the couple that intimate and personal details were sprinkled throughout the day. One detail was Chris’s suit. Often it is the bride who takes such care with their outfit for the day, but Brooke says Chris wanted to wear something special. “He really wanted something different, something that was him,” she says. “We decided to get his tailor-made.” >

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WEDDING DAY ROLL CALL RECEPTION & CATERING Noosa Boathouse 194 Gympie Terrace, Noosaville 5440 5070 noosaboathouse.com.au STYLING Splash Events splashevents.com.au CEREMONY Culgoa Point Beach Resort culgoapoint.com.au PHOTOGRAPHY Life and Love Photography lifeandlovephotography.com.au

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RINGS Bensonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s The Jewellers bensonsthejewellers.com


ABOUT THE VENUE You can’t get much more waterfront than Noosa Boathouse, a stunning three-level bistro and bar perched over the water in Noosaville. Perfectly placed for an event, the venue offers panoramic water and sunset views and a seasonal modern Australian menu. The award-winning Noosa Boathouse is home to Little Boaty coffee bar and fish and chip takeaway window on the front deck. The 120seat bistro is on the ground level, the River Room function space is on the middle level, while on the top deck you’ll find the Sunset Bar. With this choice of spaces, the venue can cater for weddings of all types and sizes.

WEDDING DAY ROLL CALL CAKE Sweetness Contained sweetnesscontained.com.au FLORIST Willow Bud Flowers willowbudweddingflowers.com.au DRESS Marilyn Crystelle Bridal marilyncrystelle.com.au SUIT Tailors Mark tailorsmark.com.au

Chris and Brooke also made an effort to use local businesses, including Noosa-based jewellers, a local baker for their three-tiered chocolate and salted caramel cake and a local florist for their beautiful floral arrangements. “I tried to use pretty much everyone here from Noosa and the Coast,” says Brooke, who grew up in the region. “The only thing that wasn’t local was Chris’s suit, which was made in Melbourne.” When their wedding day arrived, neither Chris nor Brooke suffered from nerves; both were just excited for their big day. “Everything went very well. Everything on the day was just perfect,” Brooke says. “I wasn’t nervous at all. I was quite relaxed.”

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MAGIC MAKER

TALK WORDS JOLENE OGLE

IN AN INSTAGRAM WORLD with an insatiable appetite for food photography, one entrepreneurial couple has combined a passion for photography and baking to become one of the most sought-after cake creators on the Sunshine Coast. Photographer Matt Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien and baker Alita Johnson have created Tome â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a must-try for anyone who loves coffee, cakes and art culture. After returning from Morocco disillusioned with the photography industry and determined to reinvent the local coffee scene, Matt and Alita decided to open their own cafe. The opening of Tome, in September 2014, happened quickly. Matt had recently left his job and Alita was working in retail, but a fight in the car ultimately led to the birth of Tome. Matt urged Alita to give up her job in retail and follow her passion and skill into the world of baking sweet treats.

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“Alita needed to do baking because she is so bloody good at it,” Matt says. “So we had a big fight about her not pursuing it. I believed she was too good at baking to be working in retail. I literally drove her to a cafe and made her hand in her resume. She needed to be baking. I knew she could cook at home, but she needed to show people what she could do.” Alita now shares her baking with their many customers as well as up to 40 brides per week through Tome’s signature cakes. Tome cakes are now the essential, on-trend wedding accessory for brides in the know, but Alita will never admit she’s a trendsetter. “Alita is the most modest person in the world,” Matt says. “She would never admit she started a trend. Alita puts so much love and care into each cake. Each one is like a little piece of art. She’s a great cook and baker and I’m a good cleaner. Alita can just throw ingredients into a bowl and it works. She’s a magician.” Matt recalls the earlier days before Alita had the help of a junior baker, when he would try to help in the kitchen. “Before we had help it was getting insanely busy. We would get in at 4am and I would be out the back trying to help Alita do brownies and cakes, but with me needing everything to be so precise, it was taking so long,” he says. “Alita would be losing her mind. When she goes to make a brownie, she knows what she’s doing. She can feel it and understands it. Her understanding of composition is amazing. The way she can make the cakes look. I can understand composition in photography, but I don’t know how she does it with cakes and flower toppers. But I’ve learnt we both do things so differently, and maybe that’s why it works.” >

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ALITA PUTS SO MUCH LOVE AND CARE INTO EACH CAKE. EACH ONE IS LIKE A LITTLE PIECE OF ART. SHE CAN JUST THROW INGREDIENTS INTO A BOWL AND IT WORKS. SHE’S A MAGICIAN.

Matt says he is in awe of Alita’s talent. “When we set up a wedding, she will be given flowers from the florist or she provides her own. Everything is different, but no matter what she is given, she can make it work. It’s amazing. “Because she can do that and because her cakes also taste so good, I believe that’s why they’ve become so popular.” Tome now has a whopping 62,500 followers on Instagram and is known throughout the Sunshine Coast for its cakes and coffee, but it wasn’t an easy ride for this entrepreneurial pair. After beating other business owners to secure their tenancy on Ocean Street, the couple then begged and borrowed to fit out and set up Tome. Even after the opening, Matt and Alita faced new challenges. The couple had to learn how to run a cafe while operating the venue and have learnt to take on board all feedback from customers. Introducing a clean, minimal style of cafe (and a little bit of Melbourne street culture) to the Sunshine Coast was also a challenge. “A lot of people thought we were pretentious hipsters, but we’re not. This is just what we like,” Matt says. “We’re trying to foster a culture of art, anything that is not a pandanus, sunset or beachy. We love to put together shows and they’re going to be about street and travel photography.” Indeed, the edgy and emotional work of Amity Affliction’s frontman Joel Birch currently hangs on the white walls of the cafe. “We know this type of artwork doesn’t typically sell well on the Coast, but we do it for the love of it and to show young people what is out there,” says Matt. “We can bring in artists from all over the world and have their works on the wall so everyone can see it.” Since opening, many Coast cafes have followed Tome’s lead and now offer clean, minimal lines in their decor as well as art pieces 70

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reminiscent of the funky cafe culture found in the alleyways of Melbourne. The word Tome means a volume within a large book, but Matt sheepishly explains Tome for them is a new chapter. “The cheesy way of explaining the name is to say Tome is the new tome of our lives,” he says. “I left a career and we started this and created our own little tome within life.” It’s clear to see the magic makers of Tome are Matt and Alita, but the cafe itself is a living, breathing art piece that is constantly evolving, challenging the norm of cafe culture and offering the people of the Coast a place to explore art and coffee. Not surprisingly, Tome’s future is looking as sweet as the cakes Alita bakes, with Matt and Alita both working hard to future-proof their business. They are careful to not put a face to their brand, so it can easily be recreated when they expand to other cities, taking with them the sweet, decadent cakes and brownies Tome has become famous for. Head to Instagram for more cake inspiration.


12th

It’s birthday and we’re inviting YOU to celebrate with us! WIN A TWO-NIGHT ACCOMMODATION PACKAGE AT SOFITEL NOOSA PACIFIC RESORT, INCLUDING BUFFET BREAKFAST AND COMPLIMENTARY AQUA THERAPY AT THE AQUA DAY SPA.

JUST VISIT THE WIN PAGE OF SALTMAGAZINE.COM.AU TO ENTER YOUR DETAILS AND ALSO FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM AND/OR FACEBOOK. In celebration of salt’s 12th birthday edition, the team at Sofitel Noosa Pacific Resort is giving away a very special treat. The lucky winner will receive two nights’ accommodation for two people in a river or pool-view room, PLUS a welcome local cheese platter and French champagne on arrival. You’ll enjoy a full hot buffet breakfast each morning at the Noosa Beach House restaurant, PLUS complimentary aqua therapy in the AQUA Day Spa. Total Prize value $1600 thanks to our friends at Sofitel Noosa Pacific Resort. To discover ultimate luxury at Sofitel Noosa Pacific Resort visit sofitelnoosapacificresort.com.au * For your chance to win simply enter your details on the WIN page at saltmagazine.com.au and then follow us on Instagram and/or like us on Facebook. @SALTMAG

SALT-MAGAZINE


TO HAVE AND TO HOLD

While your diamond ring symbolises commitment, Krystle Knight’s Rose Quartz range of jewellery symbolises unconditional love, forgiveness, infinite peace and compassion. It’s the perfect piece to add for a day which celebrates all the above. Rose quartz is believed to create harmony in relationships and teaches us about the true essence of love. It purifies and opens the heart, allowing us to express our emotions. It reduces stress and tension, allowing us to express love, sensitivity and compassion towards ourselves and others. The crystal also brings a deep inner healing, enhancing self-love, selftrust, self-worth and self-confidence. Basically, wearing one of these crystals around your neck will bring nothing but love, not only on your wedding day, but for the rest of your happily-everafter. krystleknightjewellery.com

The bohemian babes of Byron Bay have cast a spell on brides far and wide with the stylish boutique Spell & The Gypsy Collective. Imagine walking barefoot down some daisy-peppered steps of an ancient castle or stepping over the crunching leaves of a majestic forest somewhere in the hinterland. Now imagine being wrapped in a ’70s-inspired vintage dress draping divinely as you make your way down the aisle. The Gwendolyn Wrap Gown is just that. A striking and theatrical dress, it is light and flowing. It’s a show-stopping yet playful and carefree gown and we have fallen in love with the intricate detailing on the sleeve, back and front. A spell this strong is unbreakable, so just say yes to the dress and embrace the boho beauty. The Gwendolyn Wrap Gown is $1,195. shop.spelldesigns.com

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E V A H O T AND TO HOLD

Here are our picks of fashionable, must-have products for that loved up event.

Balmy

love

They might act tough, but blokes need to stay warm over winter too. That gives them permission to keep the beard. However, come the big day, makes sure it’s a grooming good one. The three rules for a polished-looking beard include washing, nourishing and styling, and Milkman Grooming Co has some wicked beard gear to do the job. From beard oils to shampoos and conditioners, our pick is the Coco-Fresh Beard Balm. Alleviate beard itch, split ends and dryness while adding a tropical scent of coconut to invigorate his (and her) senses. milkmanaustralia.com


exquisite handcrafted jewellery & wares from outstanding artists

Chances are you are never going to wear your wedding dress again (at least, not in public). So why not add an everyday accessory to your wedding outfit that you can wear for years to come? Wolf & Rosie has the perfect addition for boho brides. Illustrator Rosie Harbottle hand paints leather jackets to create beautiful, bespoke pieces of edgy wedding day glam. Specialising in botanical designs with a touch of bohemian on a bad-ass leather canvas, this piece of clothing is the perfect mix of funk and floral for a fabulous wedding day and for the many days that follow. wolfandrosie.com

SALTY SAVIOUR

Winter skin looking a little lacklustre? Bring back that summer glow and nourish with some salty goodness from SALT Skincare. This Australian-made, bioactive and vegan skincare range is perfect for those bridesto-be who wish to nourish their bodies. Our salty pick from the product range? The white willow bark and lime hydrating facial cream. Formulated with limes’ natural vitamin C content, this bioactive moisturiser is for normal to oily skin types and actively works throughout the day to dissolve dead skin cell build-up to transform skin texture and help stop the signs of ageing. White willow bark and aloe vera work together to soothe and hydrate, leaving you a glowing bride with radiant skin. the-saltstore.com

A^ SIP

ABOVE When you’re thinking about that wedding bod but also craving some bubbles in the lead-up to the big day, think CocoCoast. The maker of natural coconut water sourced from 100 per cent juicy green coconuts, CocoCoast is now bringing Australia’s first natural sparkling coconut water to the Sunshine Coast. Pure hydration meets fizzy fun. It’s the pre-wedding drink of choice for glowing skin, hair, nails and, of course, a healthy figure. Cheers to that! cococoast.com.au

OPEN 6 DAYS 10—5 (closed Wed) 07 5442 9598 www.opalcutter.com.au Shop 4 ‘The Pottery’ 171-183 Main St Montville


FASHION

FASHION EDITOR BRISEIS ONFRAY

WHATEVER YOUR STANCE THIS SEASON, BE SURE TO GEAR UP FOR A COOL SCENE AHEAD. THERE’S A PLAYFUL MIX OF INSPIRATION TO LIFT WINTER-BLUE MOODS AND WARM UP ANY SOCIAL OCCASION. 76 REBELS WITH A CAUSE Layer up in style with durable winter faves. 78 BABY BLOOMERS Mix-n-match with rich textures and longer lengths. 80 STYLE SETTERS It’s all in the quality of the designs, fabrics and finishes. 82 SEASONAL STYLE Who Invited Her. 83 WILD LITTLE LOVES Go wild baby! 84 MAGNETIC ATTRACTION There’s a magnetic colour mix of metallic and minerals..86 CHILD’S PLAY Funk up total cuteness with a playful mix of style and prints. 88 LABELS & STOCKISTS. Amsterdams Blauw 74

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Jump

THE LIFESTYLE BOUTIQUE IN CALOUNDRA

We all love an excuse to gear up for a party. So whatever the occasion, be sure to have your mode ready to go-go. Think stars, stripes and anything that sparkles.

FOR LABELS AND STOCKISTS REFER TO PAGE 88

FA S H I O N ACCESSORIES HOME DÃ&#x2030;COR

To Hold and To Have 18ct yellow gold hook earrings with golden baroque pearls

GIFTS Shop 1, 10 Ormuz Avenue Caloundra QLD 4551 07 5491 8890 www.villaverdeliving.com.au Carolina Lifestyle

Klouds

! e l y t s r u o y Live


Amsterdams Blauw

Ottodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Ame

RM Williams

Scotch & Soda

REBELS WITH A CAUSE

FOR LABELS AND STOCKISTS REFER TO PAGE 88

Winter under a Queensland sun is not a call for snow gear, but when those southerly winds hit with chill factor, brrrrr. Layer up in style with durable denim, leather and wool that holds its shape. Of course, a leather jacket will always be on point, so invest in a goodie that will last the distance.

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OP ER A AU ST RA LIA

PR ES EN TS

T HE M A RRIAGEO OF FIGA R

250 artists 130 events

Book Now! L‘HIUS VOKICEE’ K ENNEDY

Noosa Long Weekend proudly presents NOOSA alive!, a new name for our lively new festival, that’s bigger than ever.

M AT T H E W m I T C

CA BA RE T / ‘T W

IS TS AND TU RN

S’

THE RE TU RN OF THE

QUEENSL A ND BALLE T

Our full program is out now and tickets are selling fast. For full details and bookings, go to

www.noosaalive.com.au Or book direct at The J Theatre www.thej.com.au phone (07) 5329 6560 NAOMI PR IC E

IN

L A D Y B E AT L E

F ood,mogrel! orious f ood & so mu ch

21 - 30 JULY 2017

HAM


For the free spirits, young-at-hearts and sophisticates, now is the right time to mix-n-match with rich textures and longer lengths. Wool, velvet, silk and tulle create an alluring story. Flirting with block-print patterns, layers and frills makes this a fun mode to be around.

Maison Scotch Hubble and Duke

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Chie Mihara salt

Baum und Pferdgarten


Elk

Boom Shankar

FOR LABELS AND STOCKISTS REFER TO PAGE 88 Love Stories

Birkenstock | Crocs | Skechers | ECCO | Sperry | Klouds | Aetrex | Tsonga Noosaville - 230 Gympie Tce 5447 1755 getset_winter2017.indd 1

Mens Ladies

Caloundra - 82A Bulcock St 5492 7185 Shop Online - @getsetfootwear.com.au

5/05/2017 4:14 PM

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PQ Collection

Desigual

STYLE

To Hold and To Have 18ct white and rose gold diamond ring

SETTERS Behold the eye for style (and detail). Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all in the quality of the designs, fabrics and finishes. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something confident about classic fashion mixed with a sophisticated twist of class that will have heads turning.

Opals Down Under 18ct yellow gold earrings with crystal opals and diamonds

NY2K 18ct white and yellow gold cognac and white diamond pendant 80

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RM Williams

Status Anxiety RM Williams

CHALICE ARMOIRE MODA IMMAGINE HUMIDITY CHALICE DESIGUAL BLEUBLANC BLANC ROUGE BLEU BLANC ROUGE BLEU ROUGE WILLOW & ZAC DESIGUAL HUMIDITY CHALICE ARMOIRE DESIGUAL TIRELLI LTB HUMIDITY CHALICE 2/56 Burnett Street Buderim BLEU BLANC ROUGE BLEU BLANC ROUGE p :: 5445 6616 WILLOW & ZAC DESIGUAL w :: gingersboutique.com.au DESIGUAL LTB e :: gingers@gingersboutique.com.au


SEASONAL STYLE

FEATURED STOCKIST WHO INVITED HER BY ZOE WEST

THIS SEASON WE REVISIT OLD-SCHOOL GLAMOUR – HEMLINES DROP BELOW THE KNEE IN FLOWING PRINTED FABRICS. LAYERING A SPARKLY CARDIGAN OVER A PATTERNED BLOUSE IS A STYLISH LOOK, WHILE THIS SEASON’S COLOURS ARE RICH AND EARTHY – WARM AMBER, MUSTARD, RUST, AND JEWEL TONES OF EMERALD GREEN EVOKE THE CHARM OF THE 1940s, AND 1970s. RETRO PASTELS AND WHIMSICAL PATTERNS OFFER THIS SEASON’S INTERPRETATION OF BOHEMIAN LUXE. BE BRAVE AND HAVE FUN THIS SEASON.

AVAILABLE AT:

Who Invited Her, Shop 12, Bay Village, 18 Hastings Street, Noosa Heads. 5474 5941 or whoinvitedher.com

Baum und Pferdgarten

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Opals Down Under 9ct yellow gold ring with Queensland boulder opal and diamonds

Carolina Lifestyle

Phoenix and the Fox

www.giddyandgrace.com facebook.com/giddyandgrace

home body living

Shop 2, 1 Maple St Maleny Phone 07 5494 3636 Open 7 days

WILD LITTLE

LOVES Go wild baby! It will add warmth to your look in an instant. Animal with floral block print on little ones is an adorable mix. Accessorise like a wild child. And whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not to love about the natural beauty of a wild Queensland opal. FOR LABELS AND STOCKISTS REFER TO PAGE 88

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Bianca

Tirelli

MAGNETIC

ATTRACTION Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a magnetic colour mix made up of metallic and mineral tones this season. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s simple and refined. There are some alluring designs and elegant fabrics. All it takes is some sparkly accessories to really attract attention. The Opalcutter sterling silver jewellery by Daniel Bentley

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Louenhide

Avenue J art deco diamond drop earrings

NY2K 18ct white gold Argyle pink diamond ring

Crocs

FOR LABELS AND STOCKISTS REFER TO PAGE 88

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childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

PLAY Funk up total cuteness with a playful mix of style and prints. There are so many gorgeous childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s labels that make dressing up for kids ridiculously sweet. Little party dresses or play suits with a pair of long socks and boots. These adorable little people are officially the leaders on the fashion field.

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Milk and Masuki

FOR LABELS AND STOCKISTS REFER TO PAGE 88

Hubble and Duke

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FASHION STOCKISTS

Provides a beautiful, inspiring place for your jewellery to be created, repaired and cared for...

LABELS AND STOCKISTS

Ph 5477 0561

98 King Street, Buderim shop@toholdandtohave.com.au toholdandtohavejewellers www.toholdandtohave.com.au

AMSTERDAMS BLAUW Threads 4556, Shop 8, The Hub, 45 Burnett Street, Buderim, 5476 7686 or threads4556.com AVENUE J Shop 14, Zanzibar Resort, 47-51 Mooloolaba Esplanade, Mooloolaba, 5444 4422 or avenuejcouture.com.au BAUM UND PFERDGARTEN Who Invited Her, Shop 12, Bay Village, 18 Hastings Street, Noosa Heads, 5474 5941 or whoinvitedher.com BIANCA Giddy and Grace, Shop 2, 1 Maple Street, Maleny. 5494 3636 or giddyandgrace.com BOOM SHANKAR Villa Verde Living, Shop 1, 10 Ormuz Avenue, Caloundra, 5491 8890 or villaverdeliving.com.au CAROLINA LIFESTYLE Giddy and Grace, Shop 2, 1 Maple Street, Maleny. 5494 3636 or giddyandgrace.com

CHIE MIHARA Who Invited Her, Shop 12, Bay Village, 18 Hastings Street, Noosa Heads, 5474 5941 or whoinvitedher.com CROCS Get Set Footwear, 82A Bulcock Street, Caloundra, 5492 7185 or 230 Gympie Terrace, Noosaville, 5447 1755 or getsetfootwear.com.au DESIGUAL Gingers Boutique, Shop 2, 56 Burnett Street, Buderim, 5445 6616 or gingersboutique.com.au ELK Evolve, 5/10 Grebe Street, Peregian Beach, 5448 2077 or evolvembh.com.au HUBBLE AND DUKE Evolve, 5/10 Grebe Street, Peregian Beach, 5448 2077 or evolvembh.com.au JUMP Gingers Boutique, Shop 2, 56 Burnett Street, Buderim, 5445 6616 or gingersboutique.com.au KLOUDS Get Set Footwear, 82A Bulcock Street, Caloundra, 5492 7185 or 230 Gympie Terrace, Noosaville, 5447 1755 or getsetfootwear.com.au


RM Williams LOUENHIDE Signature on Hastings, 18A Hastings Street, Noosa Heads, 5474 9400 or signatureonhastings.com LOVE STORIES Threads 4556, Shop 8, The Hub, 45 Burnett Street, Buderim, 5476 7686 or threads4556.com MAISON SCOTCH Threads 4556, Shop 8, The Hub, 45 Burnett Street, Buderim, 5476 7686 or threads4556.com MILK AND MASUKI Evolve, 5/10 Grebe Street, Peregian Beach, 5448 2077 or evolvembh.com.au NY2K Rovera Plaza, King Street, Cotton Tree, 5443 1955 or ny2k.com.au OPALS DOWN UNDER 11 Ballantyne Court, Palmview, 5494 5400 or opalsdownunder.com.au OTTODâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;AME Who Invited Her, Shop 12, Bay Village, 18 Hastings Street, Noosa Heads, 5474 5941 or whoinvitedher.com PHOENIX AND THE FOX Evolve, 5/10 Grebe Street, Peregian Beach, 5448 2077 or evolvembh.com.au

PQ COLLECTION Villa Verde Living, Shop 1, 10 Ormuz Avenue, Caloundra, 5491 8890 or villaverdeliving.com.au RM WILLIAMS Threads 4556, Shop 8, The Hub, 45 Burnett Street, Buderim, 5476 7686 or threads4556.com SCOTCH & SODA Threads 4556, Shop 8, The Hub, 45 Burnett Street, Buderim, 5476 7686 or threads4556.com STATUS ANXIETY Villa Verde Living, Shop 1, 10 Ormuz Avenue, Caloundra, 5491 8890 or villaverdeliving.com.au THE OPALCUTTER Shop 4 The Pottery, 171-183 Main Street, Montville, 5442 9598 or opalcutter.com.au TIRELLI Gingers Boutique, Shop 2, 56 Burnett Street, Buderim, 5445 6616 or gingersboutique.com.au TO HOLD AND TO HAVE 98 King Street, Buderim, 5477 0561 or toholdandtohave.com.au

stockist for SCOTCH & SODA R.M.WILLIAMS MAISON SCOTCH LOVE STORIES AKUBRA

8, THE HUB, 45 BURNETT ST, BUDERIM 4556 | (07) 5476 7686

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BOLD VISIONARIES

Body and Soul WORDS XANTHE COWARD PHOTOS ANASTASIA KARIOFYLLIDIS

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SAARA ROPPOLA IS a new breed of performing artist. She is a performing visual artist who designs and constructs her own costumes and characters, then shares them with audiences of all ages and backgrounds. The universal themes and dynamic nature of Saara’s performance art allow her to move fluidly from gallery spaces to nightclubs to festivals, including Woodford Folk Festival, and for the first time this year, the Sunshine Coast’s Horizon Festival. You probably won’t recognise Saara when you see her perform – she will be clad in a stretchy, spiky, LED-lit bodysuit and a full facial mask, or something just as fantastic to capture her audience’s imaginations. Saara specialises in immersive installation performances, which can be funny or confronting, or both, often eliciting mixed emotions and reactions from the viewer. “I don’t like to impose anything on people but I do think there’s massive value in people having an awareness of themselves that includes not just what’s socially acceptable but acceptance of our own nature,” she says. “We’re so much more than what we’re led to believe we are. There’s this hope for humanity that underlines things, although things might seem quite subversive.”

HAIR

Saara grew up in Buderim and attended Mountain Creek State High School. “I wanted to do music, art and drama, but I was told to choose only one of those. I hated high school because I couldn’t do what I wanted to do. It took me 10 years to end up performing anyway, because I love it.”

B O DY

Specialists in Ammonia Free Colouring with Oway

After graduating from high school and moving to Brisbane, Saara started a visual arts degree at Queensland University of Technology, but she wanted to learn about the world, “so I quit uni and went travelling around Europe”. (She returned to university some years later to complete an honours degree in visual art.) >

SHOP 3/1 KING STREET • COTTON TREE 5451 1300 • ECO-ORGANIC.COM

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IN A GALLERY CONTEXT I’LL TAKE THE OPPORTUNITY TO UNRAVEL THE CHARACTERS MORE FULLY AND TEST THE BOUNDARIES OF WHAT PEOPLE WILL ACCEPT OR NOT ACCEPT.

She moved to Amsterdam in 2012 to study Okido Yoga with Masahiro Oki and butoh, the ancient Japanese dance art, with Stefano Taiuti. “I knew what butoh was after a Brisbane workshop,” Saara says. “Butoh is in the cells of your body and it’s like you’re tapping into an energy or a connection with the environment around you, and you’re also affecting the environment, and the bodies in the space.” After extensive butoh training, she has retained a sense of authenticity in her approach to the way she works. “This idea of authenticity is the sense that everybody should have their own butoh dance, and in another sense, a butoh dancer’s body has to be empty enough to receive other dances.” She likens the idea of the body as an empty vessel to a painter’s blank canvas and palette of colour. “In butoh you have the ‘hijikata’, the poetry and imagery the dancers put into their bodies to inspire their movement. In the 92

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same way, I posture myself in a certain way to create a character evoked by the costume.” When she started making her own beautifully sculpted costumes, Saara also began to generate movement that would go with those newly imagined and created forms. Sometimes it would work the other way around; a dance would inspire an act or a costume. But Saara was beginning to see the limitless potential of a unique imaginative process, not bound by materials or conventional form. She says this process involves a sort of body augmentation. “I see a form that excites me and I want to put it on my body. My arts practice was based around actions of the body so it became my performance practice. I was performing actions, opening the channels and possibilities for the work to manifest, and keeping those possibilities open for individual expression.” Through this work, Saara was also making spaces available for people to meet together in a public place, without the conditions


of what’s socially, culturally and politically acceptable. She says the architecture and the atmosphere of a performance space informs a performance just as much as the ideas that led to its manifestation, and often intensifies the affect it has on audiences. “A big part of my work is the interface between me and what it is I’m presenting to the audience, so I’m aware of the edges. In a gallery context I’ll take the opportunity to unravel the characters more fully and test the boundaries of what people will accept or not accept.” Ever the learner, in July Saara will travel to Hakuba near Tokyo to undertake an intensive training program with the world’s most respected butoh company, Dairakudakan, and perform at its annual festival on stage with the company and other students of the University of the Sunshine Coast’s Masters of Professional Practice (Performing Arts). It’s a new course created for the university by Lynne Bradley, the founder and director of Australia’s leading physical theatre company Zen Zen Zo.

Saara says the eight-day program in Japan is an opportunity to dive in deeply; a chance for the artists to immerse themselves in the form and technique, and in the cultural traditions of the dance. Despite being seen as Japan’s “dark dance”, Saara notes there is lightness and extraordinary beauty in butoh, as well as humour, which is reflected in her own performance work. She sees the absurdity of the humour in her characters’ actions that gives people permission to watch her performances from a position of acceptance and play. “Often my work will combine the creepy and the beautiful, the scary and the funny, and the dark and the light.” She says the juxtaposition of light and shade is what’s human, and it’s the reason her dynamic form of performance art, like any other art form, holds in it something everyone can appreciate. saararoppola.com/kimera-visual-theatre.html

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photo Bonnie Jenkins

UP AND COMING

exotic couture WORDS XANTHE COWARD

Laxmi anklets

DESIGN IS IN Salita Matthews’ blood. A bowerbird from a long line of leather and silk artisans, Salita flits between continents to collect semi-precious stones, natural materials, found objects and antiquities; tiny exotic treasures that she uses to create covetable couture jewellery pieces. Salita’s Ara earrings were seen at the Harvey Weinstein pre-Oscars event on Sue Brierley, the woman Nicole Kidman brings to life on screen in the award-winning film Lion. Salita is humbled to have her jewellery worn by high-profile people. “A little feather in my cap was having my jewellery at the Oscars,” she says. “It’s exciting. I don’t send my stuff out. I’ve been so busy and I’m not one to toot my own horn.” With the advent of social media, Salita’s jewellery is seen and snapped up by customers all over the world. “As soon as I put something up, it sells,” she says. Salita travels four times a year, and destinations include her mother’s homeland Thailand, and Japan, Mexico, Spain, India and Cuba. “I was inspired by the colours and textures in India,” she says. “I was blown away by how majestic it was. And the colours, sounds and rhythms of Cuba – subconsciously, it comes out in the collection.” Salita works long days. She doesn’t get out of bed or answer the phone before 9am, “but I just knuckle down and start making jewellery for the day. I work until midnight. I really like the evenings because no one disturbs you.” She values the integrity of her jewellery because it is made in Australia, and she does all the production work herself, even after five years in the business. “People gravitate towards something that’s locally made.” 94

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Underwater Love Earrings

Striking the line between fine jewellery and costume jewellery means the quality of Salita’s limited-edition pieces allows her to retain a point of difference. It’s rare to find locally designed handmade highend costume jewellery. “It’ll last a bit longer than the mass produced stuff.” Salita started out in fashion, studying for a diploma, and working as a stylist in New York and Los Angeles for a freelance photographer. After a stint in fashion manufacturing and production, she moved into making jewellery in 2007. She says, “I miss fashion. I get such joy from designing clothes but jewellery doesn’t discriminate. You don’t even have to try it on – it’s going to fit. It’s something that has greater reach.” Salita is always thrilled to see someone wearing her jewellery. She sees it as an incredible compliment, and the selection process and transaction is a very personal exchange of trust. A recent focus has been the design and manufacture of exquisite handmade pieces for brides. “I work with pearls; a perfect fit for bridal jewellery.” Salita’s classic interpretation becomes beautifully contemporary on a bride’s special day. A pair of heavily embellished Laxmi anklets, featuring baroque pearls on an oversized diamante chain, is one of Salita’s best sellers for brides who want something special and allows them to go barefoot on their wedding day. A lot of Salita’s work is bespoke. The pieces are often ordered with a special occasion in mind, and designed to complement a wardrobe choice. “Custom made is usually an extension of something I’ve already made, a little tweak on something I already have,” she says. “I get brides contact me from around the world, and girlfriends get together to buy a present for their friend.”

She admits the business side wasn’t her strong point until recently. “I do the accounts, I do the design, I do the photography, I do the website. Out of necessity I’ve had to do that, but it’s a great learning curve to learn about your business.” She also feels fortunate to be supported. “I feel like the Sunshine Coast is a really strong network of women and that’s probably another reason why my jewellery is so well received in south-east Queensland.” Salita is happy to continue to build her business slowly, and keep it local. “I just bought a place in Moffat Beach, a 1930s fibro beach shack. It might become my studio; an atelier.”

Another distinguishing feature of the jewellery is that it’s not seasonal. Salita’s pieces are classics, able to be worn time after time, reflecting the style of the woman who wears them.

Incredibly, the house once belonged to the Flavelles, a family of quality jewellers in the 1800s who had stores in Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane. It’s a sign she’s in the right place.

The designer is determined to keep her jewellery a boutique brand. “I want to keep the beauty, the uniqueness about it.” She says she’s in a good place because she’s still learning every day. “I built my business so slowly. I didn’t make too many mistakes.”

Salita’s extensive travels also confirm her belief that the Sunshine Coast is one of the best places in the world in which to live and work. “I love my lifestyle, I wouldn’t have it any other way.” salitamatthews.bigcartel.com

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PAMPER AND PREEN

BALANCING

ACT WORDS KARINA EASTWAY PHOTOS KRISTA EPPELSTUN

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I DON’T KNOW about you, but my life is pretty crazy. I race from one end of the day to the next and, consequently, each week is a blur. The stress of it all? Reccurring shoulder and neck pain that should be treated with deep breathing, meditation, a balanced diet and plenty of sleep. But hey, to be honest, that ain’t going to happen anytime soon. Instead, professional and holistic treatment is definitely required to restore some balance – and by holistic, I mean whole. To treat my shoulder and neck pain, I’m starting with my feet. And when it comes to holistic practices on the Sunshine Coast, Kansha Natural Therapies is top of mind. As soon as I step from the outside world into the Kansha sanctuary, I’m welcomed by an ambience more spa-like than expected: relaxing music, essential oils and complimentary Ayurvedic tea. Ahh, it’s here where the de-stress process starts and I’m only at reception. Kansha owner Richelle Barker has 20 years’ experience in healing. A chiropractor and acupuncturist, she is a big believer in relaxation

rituals to create a restorative environment, knowing that this affects the overall experience. “We try to create an ambient space so people have a sense of relaxation, leaving the outside world behind and connecting more with themselves,” Richelle says. The beauty of Kansha is the range of therapies and services available, with all the practitioners working together to create wellness and wellbeing for clients. “We’re not just a clinic,” says Richelle. “The idea was to have a strong, integrated team that had the client at heart. We stick to core therapies – massage, reflexology, chiropractic and acupuncture – which stem back to ancient traditions. We don’t go with trends.” On the day of my visit I am met by reflexologist Margie Thomson. Her calm and knowledgeable manner makes me immediately relax as we discuss the issues I’ve been experiencing and previous health history. It’s not long before I’m lying comfortably on the massage >

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WE TRY TO CREATE AN AMBIENT SPACE SO THAT PEOPLE HAVE A SENSE OF RELAXATION, LEAVING THE OUTSIDE WORLD BEHIND AND CONNECTING MORE WITH THEMSELVES.

bed, plumped up by soft cushions and warming towels, and invited to smell the essential oils Margie has selected for me. Divine! Margie tells me a little about reflexology as she prepares – it’s a healing therapy she’s been studying for 13 years and she’s obviously passionate about it. The traditional Chinese practice has been around for thousands of years, and works with the nervous system through the feet or hands (I find out there are more than 200 nerve endings in one foot alone!). These correspond with every organ, system and structure of the body. The pathways between pressure points are said to be connected via the nervous system, so manual massage of these areas stimulates blocked pathways caused by ‘dis-ease’, and realigns energy channels. In essence, reflexology works by allowing the body to heal itself, and bring itself back into balance by keeping the energy flowing. Although blockages don’t necessarily mean disease, they can indicate areas of sluggishness that could eventually lead to problems if left untreated. Clients find reflexology assists by relieving stress and tension (something I’m particularly keen on), improving blood supply and achieving a feeling of centeredness. 98

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WHERE IS IT? Kansha Natural Therapies, 6 Mary Street, Noosaville. 5473 0724 or kansha.com.au WHY IS IT SPECIAL? Kansha Natural Therapies is a restorative haven combining ancient and modern therapies all under the one roof. Services range from chiropractic and acupuncture to massage, physiotherapy and counselling. WHICH TREATMENT WAS ENJOYED? A 90-minute treatment ($140), including reflexology to both feet and lower legs using Young Living pure essential oils. The total treatment was enjoyed over two hours including discussion with my practitioner around my general health and wellbeing. FINAL TIPS? Build on the body reconnection experience by bringing your mind into balance too. Kansha offer counselling and life coaching services so it’s a great opportunity to take some time to make sure your mental health is in top shape as well.

“We can see people with chronic and acute illnesses and although non-diagnostic, the beauty of the treatment is that it is safe and non-invasive,” Margie says. “We work the whole body through the feet, but it works on the emotional realm as well. Where there are blockages physically there can also be underlying emotions attached. So releasing the physical points may also help move or process ‘stuck’ emotions. “And the essential oils too,” Margie says. “They’re an absolutely powerful side of the whole healing process.” I’m fascinated by the process and I’m full of excited questions, but Margie encourages me to relax and experience the results for myself. And I have to admit to having amazing feelings of balance and centeredness that last long after the treatment has finished. It’s as though I’ve been a spinning top that Margie has gently massaged into stillness. And for that, my body and mind are eternally grateful.


BEAUTY

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HEALTH

DRIFT AWAY

photo Anastasia Kariofyllidis

WORDS JOLENE OGLE

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Have you ever wondered what it would feel like to float in space? To drift weightlessly in a pool of darkness while gazing at an eternal galaxy of stars? Anyone who has ever wanted to feel like an astronaut can now enjoy an almost zero-gravity experience thanks to the growing population of flotation pools. Neuropsychiatrist Dr John Lilly is the man to thank for this sensory deprivation experience. In the 1950s he developed isolation tanks filled with heavily salted water where subjects would float for long periods of time. The tank was used to test the effects of sensory deprivation on creativity and concentration. The therapy grew in popularity throughout Europe and the US in the 1970s and was then known as restricted environmental stimulation technique, or the very fitting acronym of REST. Today, in the world of alternative therapy there is a resurgence in the demand for the sensory deprivation experience with the pods and pools now making their way into traditional day spas and health centres. Float tanks, flotation pools and isolation tanks are all variations of Dr Lilly’s idea from the 1950s, offering an almost weightless experience with no stimuli for those seeking health benefits or just an hour away from the bustle of everyday life. In an isolation pod, floaters experience almost no sight, sound, smell or touch. Most isolation tanks and float pods pay homage to their clinical foundations – they are space-like in their shape with a hatch that opens to allow entry. But others, like Noosa Springs Spa’s flotation pool, are more about a holistic experience than a clinical one. With pillars, sandstone flooring and a curved ceiling, the flotation room is more like an exclusive Romaninspired spa. There are no indications of this therapy’s clinical foundation; instead, this is a space for rejuvenation, relaxation and healing. Guests are first treated to the spa’s signature welcome drink before being shown to the change room and relaxation space where they can enjoy a lovely leafy outlook and the calming sounds of gently flowing water. When the body is relaxed, a smiling spa attendee will come and whisk the guest into the warm, private and dimly lit flotation room. For buoyancy, the water is saturated with more than a tonne of magnesium salt. The use of magnesium to create buoyancy offers its own range of benefits – it is said to help increase energy, calm nerves and anxiety, and relieve muscle aches. For ultimate comfort, the water is heated to skin temperature. It is recommended guests put in ear plugs before submerging themselves and allowing the heavily salted water to gently embrace them and hold their body just above the water. Guests can choose to float naked or in their swimwear and in either complete darkness for the ultimate sensory deprivation experience or under the twinkling starry lights. The 55-minute float experience is said to be the equivalent of five to six hours of deep sleep and many use the floating experience to help with a range of health issues. From cardiovascular conditions to improving cognitive learning and injury rehabilitation, enhancing the immune system, reducing chronic pain and aiding the digestive system, float tanks are said to help a range of ailments. Most commonly, REST therapy is said to help with a variety of emotional issues including stress, anxiety and fear. It is also believed to help improve psychological and emotional conditions, and it’s easy to see why. Almost an hour of floating in complete silence in a dark room deprived of all senses is a >

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photo Hing Ang

IT CAN BE HARD TO SWITCH OFF AND LET THE HUNDREDS OF THOUGHTS AND TODO LISTS LEAVE THE MIND, BUT ONCE THEY DO THERE IS NOTHING LEFT TO THINK ABOUT AND ONLY TOTAL RELAXATION AWAITS.

photo Hing Ang

new experience for many. It can be hard to switch off and let the hundreds of thoughts and to-do lists leave the mind, but once they do there is nothing left to think about and only total relaxation awaits.

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Some users say the deprivation of stimuli has led to “psychedelic experiences” and “spiritual awakenings”, plus emotional breakthroughs and an enhanced clarity of mind. Recent research published in the Journal of Complementary and Behavioural Medicine suggests sensory deprivation, as experienced in a float tank, reduces the body’s stress response, inducing deep relaxation and quieting mental chatter.


photo Hing Ang

WHERE IS IT? Noosa Springs, Links Drive, Noosa

Heads. 5440 3355 or noosasprings.com.au/spa WHY IS IT SPECIAL? The spa at Noosa Springs is set in beautiful subtropical surrounds. The stunning location is matched with highly qualified therapists and world-class facilities.

WHICH TREATMENT WAS ENJOYED?

A 55-minute float experience ($70 single or $120 for double or couples) in the flotation pool. It’s one of the few flotation pools in Australia. FINAL TIPS? Try the spa’s Dead Sea Ritual ($185 for 120 minutes), where you can enjoy 55 minutes in the pool, followed by an exfoliation and then a relaxation in the steamy thermal capsule after being smothered in Dead Sea mud.

Experts claim that turning off the body’s natural fight or flight response evokes a relaxation considered to be an effective remedy for stress-related symptoms, as well as lowering cortisol levels, and calming the nervous system. These effects are said to help lower the heart rate, normalise blood pressure and digestive functions and restore normal breathing rates. It is clear that an hour of solitude, floating peacefully and weightlessly beneath a blanket of stars, is exceptionally good for the whole mind, body and soul.

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ARTIST

BIRDS OF A FEATHER WORDS PENNY SHIPWAY PHOTO HING ANG

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SWIMMER AT BLUE HOLE

INTERNATIONALLY ACCLAIMED ARTIST, illustrator and author Caroline Magerl has perhaps spent more of her life on water than she has on land. And while sailing the high seas as a gypsy from a young age could seem enviable to others, it came with many challenges. “My folks built a yacht in Sydney in the backyard and I got aboard when I was seven years old,” Caroline says. “We went up to Cairns and back down to Sydney. I went to 10 different schools because we kept moving. There was also some home schooling. “For me it was difficult, I was a migrant and my life experience was so different to others, so it was hard for others to relate. We didn’t have furniture. I didn’t have a garden or a pet or a phone. I used to hang out with other ‘yachtie’ kids. I had a very good friend who lived on another boat, so that part was cool. It was just a very different life.” Considering the experiences she has had, it’s no wonder Caroline has spent her life telling stories and bringing imagery to life. Caroline, who now lives in Buderim, says her parents came from “difficult circumstances” in post-war Germany, which greatly affected their way of life in Australia. “I always felt in some way that through my parents’ experience in Germany, I was emotionally impacted by what was a very traumatic time for them. “That taught me that the human world is quite frail and you can’t take it for granted. It was a very broken world that my parents came from.” So in a move to escape the horrors of their past, Caroline’s parents took her on an adventure. “In a sense they didn’t want to be a part of society. In Australia at that time people were welcoming, but people had different experiences. I didn’t have a suburban, normal life. So I made up stories.” Caroline has illustrated picture books for several authors, the first of which won the Children’s Book Council of Australia’s Crichton Award, and her art work has sold in numerous galleries across Australia. She is represented by literary agent Ronnie Herman in New York, and by Chris Beetles Gallery in London for her illustrations. The first book she wrote and illustrated was Hasel and Rose, published by Penguin Australia in 2015, and republished in the United States. “I am interested in folktales, and my writing can roughly be described as magical realism.” Caroline’s fine art will be featured in Box of Birds at Buderim’s Art Nuvo from August 12. Caroline says the exhibition, which will explore her extraordinary life, is reminiscent of a box she kept as a child at sea which she would fill with bird feathers, as her family traversed Australia’s eastern shores. “I kept feathers in a box from when I was eight or nine and I still have it. I had a real craze with birds. I think later I began to understand the meaning. Collecting the feathers was a way of keeping track. Ironically it was a way of touching ground; collecting memories and emotions, and connecting me with times and places. I could look in the box and remember the places I’d been to. “When I was a kid that’s how my head functioned. Connecting objects was like a diary and was a very important thing to me. That box, I hung onto it.” Caroline says many years ago she had a dream that the box of feathers had a story to tell and now she is telling it. The exhibition – which features six large oils and other smaller works, some in watercolour – sets the scene of her somewhat haunting fairytale life, almost mirroring the water’s own ebbs and >

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TWO COATS

SEABATH AND TEA CUP

flows. With no strict theme, Caroline says she likes to create a story you can walk through. “It’s like an Alice in Wonderland thing; you have your life then your imagination that runs alongside it and you need to process that so that people can understand this other story.” The works also represent stories, ideas and images attached to the box of feathers. “It’s as if someone wrote a story of my life from another perspective. And it’s like I am watching something that is strange and familiar at the same time. It’s lyrical, absurd and whimsical, telling the story of my life and people around me; family and friends.” Caroline discovered how different memories could be, depending on how they are told, with the language of imagery and words being only two examples of means of communication. “And it’s kind of nice to note that birds are a symbol of communication.” Caroline was originally inspired by the German picture books her grandmother would send her at sea. “The books I read as a child were in a language that could speak of things that were otherwise hard to describe. Imagery had such an effect on me.” Caroline stepped off the boat in her early teens and decided to pursue some time ashore working as a chef in Brisbane. But the itch for life above water returned and Caroline sailed to New Zealand from the age of 17 until she was 28. It was in this time she began her formative work as a cartoonist. “Through those years I transitioned into wanting to do art. I helped a friend build a yacht and we kept sailing. I was very practical. “I met a man who was writing and I did the cartoons for him, and it got published in a boating magazine. I got paid and decided I could do this.” Soon after, Caroline forged a successful career at The Bulletin magazine and Mad magazine, among others. As she found her 106

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Judith Laws &

Rex Backhaus-Smith RIVER MOUTH

More than Boats - Judith Laws

Rhythms of a Dragonfly - Rex Backhaus-Smith

‘Diversity of Land & Spirit’ July 8 to 30, 2017

market in the illustrative/cartoon world, she then began working for The Courier Mail and later as an illustrator for picture books, all while she lived on her yacht and worked from a caravan studio office. But when Caroline married and moved with her husband to Bulimba her work “kicked off a different phase”. “When our daughter Jen was born, there was an eruption of new art, and storytelling. It was like stumbling on something, a way of seeing things I did not know I had. I started painting very different things which led me away from illustrating. I had no idea where these paintings were going to go.

Splash - Judith Laws

“A woman in Eumundi came and saw them and said she wanted to sell them. I gave her some paintings and then I did some shows for her. After 10 years in Brisbane we moved to Eumundi and I delved into painting heavily.” Caroline thinks of her unusual childhood as a “metaphorical journey”. “I feel like my dad building his boat was part of a physical adventure. But I took a different path – I took a mental journey. The images of sea and travel go through my work a lot.” Caroline finds it difficult to describe why she loves to create. “It’s very hard to pinpoint what is driving me, but it can come from a place that words can’t describe. It’s not intellectually driven and there’s always a thread.

Menindee Waters Rising - Rex Backhaus-Smith

Art on Cairncross

“I do draw on my own life experiences and I use my landscape around me, and my physical world, to project this theatre upon. And what I love about that is that it gives a place for these events to unfold.

3 Panorama Place, Cairncross Corner Maleny, Qld. 4552 07-54296404 admin@artoncairncross.com.au

“I’m playing.”

Open Tuesday to Sunday 10.00am to 5.00pm

www.artoncairncross.com.au

Find Caroline’s work at Art Nuvo, 25 Gloucester Road, Buderim. artnuvobuderim.com.au

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OFF THE WALL

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LIVING THE

dream WORDS JOLENE OGLE PHOTOS ANASTASIA KARIOFYLLIDIS

WITH BROAD BRUSHSTROKES and an array of fresh colours, artist Wayne Malkin paints the world as he wishes to see it. Featuring crashing waves, shaded gumtrees and pretty English gardens, his paintings capture pure and moving moments of nature. Wayne’s subject matter covers a wide range of scenery from the bush to the ocean, country gardens, Sunshine Coast sunsets and serene lakes. Each is as individual as the next, but all are alive with colour, light and atmosphere. Wayne was born in England and had been painting for a long time, but it was in the first week of moving to Australia in 1986 that he first painted with oils. “I had always been an artist in watercolour, but I had never actually tried oils,” he says. “Moving to Australia was a turning point in life, so I thought I would try something new.” Fast forward to June 2016 and Wayne is now the new co-owner of the Montville Art Gallery with his wife Tracey. “We came to Montville for a weekend away and because I’m an artist we always call into all the galleries,” Wayne says. “We love Montville and we saw the gallery was for sale so we said yes, this is what we want to do. We were at a point where we really wanted a change, a tree change. So we decided Montville was a great place to live and work. It ticks all our boxes.” Wayne and Tracey have been operating the gallery since May, with many of Wayne’s works adorning the gallery walls beside other local artists. “We’re going to put our own stamp on the place. We’re making some minor changes and will bring the place up-to-date over the next few months.” Long-time fans of the Montville Art Gallery needn’t worry, as Wayne and Tracey say they will keep most of the current artists on hand as well as introduce new ones, plus add some features such as art tuition and a focus on print making. Wayne says he embraces all types of art and he loves to either paint on site at a particular location where a landscape has caught his eye or recreate the scene from a photograph or drawing. While he has been commissioned for a number of portraits, he says he is always drawn to landscapes with interesting lighting. “The landscapes I paint are all places I’ve been, seen, photographed or drawn. “They all have one thing in common. They all have a point of interest, usually the light. It’s not the subject I’m most interested in, but the light. If you look carefully through my works you’ll see one way or another there’s an atmosphere. The atmosphere is created by different types of light conditions.” >


HIGH SUMMER

IF YOU LOOK CAREFULLY THROUGH MY WORKS YOU’LL SEE ONE WAY OR ANOTHER THERE’S AN ATMOSPHERE. THE ATMOSPHERE IS CREATED BY DIFFERENT TYPES OF LIGHT CONDITIONS.

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A piece from the Turbulence series

Through the use of colour and broad, dab-like strokes, Wayne is able to capture a moment and not only portray the light but the feeling of what it might be like to stand in that moment and take in the vista. Works such as English Farm feature fresh colours and a playful use of light to convey to the viewer a sense of coolness as if you too are standing next to Wayne in the shade of a tree on dewy grass, experiencing the landscape for yourself, smelling the fresh morning air and the expectation of a new day. Wayne’s works offer a sense of location to its viewers; a dream-like interpretation of what it would really feel like to experience the moment for yourself. That’s why Wayne’s series Turbulence is so different to his usual dream-like oil paintings. The photo-realistic paintings portray the turbulent sea with foamy waves rising and crashing or the moment of deep pull when the water is sucked back out to the greater ocean. Anyone can be

forgiven for taking a moment to wonder if these works are a photo or indeed an oil painting. For Wayne, it’s hard to explain why he created the Turbulence series; he simply paints what he feels like. “I can’t tell you why I paint one subject that way and the other another way,” he says. “I am guided by what I want to paint and what I feel I need to paint. It’s very much like that.” It seems his works are fast becoming much appreciated and sought-after. Within the same month of taking over the Montville Art Gallery, Wayne also won the Best Oil Painting award for the Rotary Art Spectacular. It’s the second time he has won in three years. Wayne first won the award for a painting from the Turbulence series, but this year’s award-winning art piece was titled The Bathers and is a more traditional depiction of the Australian bush landscape. Find Wayne’s work at Montville Art Gallery, 138 Main Street, Montville. 5442 9211 or montvilleartgallery.com.au

August - We are proud to showcase a special exhibition collaborating with Brisbane’s Lethbridge Gallery featuring new artists including Jan Jorgensen

September - introducing Steve Tyerman

July - Nicole Condon

Montville Art Gallery

138 Main Street, Montville (Opposite the Village Green)

www.montvilleartgallery.com.au

Open 10-5 daily

07 5442 9211

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ART DATES

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PINK PEONIES BY SIMON BARLOW

Limited-edition giclee on paper or canvas, from $700

1

ART

DATES

Take a moment to peruse some of the finest works from some of the best galleries on the coast.

ONGOING 1 ART ANTIQUES ANTLERS

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This hinterland gallery features an array of contemporary and antique art from the Victorian Era to the modern-day Sunshine Coast. when ongoing where Art Antiques Antlers, corner Obi Obi and Post Office roads, Mapleton. 0414 782 079 or artantiquesantlers.com.au

2 ART NUVO

Art Nuvoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s diverse range features a variety of artists working in an assortment of mediums and genres from paintings to sculptures and ceramics. when ongoing where Art Nuvo Buderim, 25 Gloucester Road, Buderim. 5456 2445 or artnuvobuderim.com.au

3 WINTER EXHIBITION

Hearts and Minds Art showcases a range of works by Australian artists including Beatrice Prost, Susan Schmidt, Maree Welman, Peter Kordyl, Jan Carlson, Jane Ericksen, Richard John, Steve Graham and Jenni Kelly.

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NORMAN LINDSAY (UNTITLED) POA

when ongoing where Hearts and Minds Art, 1 Hastings Street, Noosa Heads. 0418 108 299 or heartsandmindsart.com.au


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SUNSHINE COAST NEWSPAPERS’ CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER TED ROBERSTO WITH MODELS, CIRCA 1980, PHOTOGRAPHER IAN MURRAY

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JUNE 4 BRONZED AUSSIES

Chris Gavins skilfully creates bronze sculptures of native birds and wildlife, from small lizards to birds in flight, with some pieces including boulder opal. when now to June 25 where Art on Cairncross, Cairncross Corner, 3 Panorama Place, Maleny. 5429 6404 or artoncairncross.com.au

5 FANULA MUNDI

Rosalind Woodward’s dupion silk works are 15 years in the making. With their restricted palette and minimal design, these works hint at national costumes or period pieces. when now to July 23 where Noosa Regional Gallery, Level 1, Riverside, 9 Pelican Street, Tewantin. 5329 6145 or noosaregionalgallery.com.au

6 THE 50TH ANNIVERSARY

OF THE NAMING OF THE SUNSHINE COAST This exhibition tells the story of the past 50 years of Noosa’s history and is part of a range of activities planned to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the naming of the Sunshine Coast. when now to July 23 where Noosa Regional Gallery, Level 1, Riverside, 9 Pelican Street, Tewantin. 5329 6145 or noosaregionalgallery.com.au

Image courtesy of Noosa Library Service/Picture Noosa

8 PASSING THROUGH:

PROJECT ANOTHER COUNTRY Husband and wife FilipinoAustralian artists Alfredo and Isabel Aquilizan explore issues of community, migration and transience, reflecting their own diasporic existence. This exhibition will feature a selection of their recent artworks. when now to August 13 where Caloundra Regional Gallery, 22 Omrah Avenue, Caloundra. 5420 8299 or gallery.sushinecoast.qld.gov.au

9 UNEARTHED

Karan Hayman is well known for her warm and highly personalised paintings, which combine images such as animals, seascapes, layered mountains and childhood memories.

This exhibition by David Suters Timbercraftsman features handcrafted bespoke furniture and designer homewares, and showcases mouth-blown glass, clay, metal, textiles, wood and visual mediums created by featured guest artisans.

when now to July 31 where Stevens Street Gallery, 2 Stevens Street, Yandina. 0448 051 720 or stevensstreetgallery.com.au

when now to late August where Artisans Gallery Eumundi, 43 Caplick Way, Eumundi. 0409 848 098 or artisanseumundi.com >

7 SENTIO

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BEACH MONTAGE BY STEVE GRAHAM

JULY 10 NICOLE CONDON

A pioneer in the use of unusual media, Nicole has used nail enamel to create a unique series of colourful paintings inspired by nature and the world around her. when July 1 to 31 where Montville Art Gallery, 138 Main Street, Montville. 5442 9211 or montvilleartgallery.com.au

Acrylic on canvas, 1200mm x 900mm, $3000

11 DIVERSITY OF LAND & SPIRIT

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This is a major exhibition by Rex Backhaus-Smith and Judith Laws, two leading Queensland artists. Inspired by their travels near and far, these are fascinating contemporary artworks of skill and depth. when July 8 to 30 where Art on Cairncross, Cairncross Corner, 3 Panorama Place, Maleny. 5429 6404 or artoncairncross.com.au

12 CULTURAL JEWELS

Internationally respected Tasmanian indigenous artist Lola Greenoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s award-winning talent in shell working is magnificently displayed in this solo exhibition of 50 highly visual and textual works. The works champion the traditions and culture of the women of Tasmaniaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cape Barren and Flinders islands. when July 27 to September 3 where Noosa Regional Gallery, Level 1, Riverside, 9 Pelican Street, Tewantin. 5329 6145 or noosaregionalgallery.com.au

13 NOOSA OPEN

STUDIO 2017 Noosa Open Studios 2017 is a unique experience for creative and visual art lovers to engage with and view professional artists in their place and time of creativity. The event features more than 35 artists and artisans in 30 personal studios. when July 27 to September 3 where Noosa Regional Gallery, Level 1, Riverside, 9 Pelican Street, Tewantin. 5329 6145 or noosaregionalgallery.com.au 114

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LORIKEETS IN PARADISE BY NICOLE CONDON

Mixed media on canvas, 41cm x 31cm, $590


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DETAIL OF RISING TIDE CONSOLE BY DAVID SUTERS TIMBERCRAFTSMAN

African tulip tree and black wattle with resin and pebble inlay 1200mm x 300mm x 720mm, $1600

AFTERNOON SWIM BY BARRY BACK

Oils, 31cm x 46cm, POA

AUGUST

15 NOW AND THEN

August heralds the collaboration between Montville Art Gallery and Lethbridge Gallery in Brisbane. Montville Art Gallery will be showcasing some of the sensational artists represented by this leading city gallery.

Three of the Sunshine Coast’s most treasured plein air painters, Tricia Taylor, Garry Dolan and Barry Back, will celebrate our people, beaches and hinterland. The artwork will explore scenes that, from the artists’ point of view, interpret ‘what makes the Sunshine Coast’.

when August 1 to 31 where Montville Art Gallery, 138 Main Street, Montville. 5442 9211 or montvilleartgallery.com.au

when August 2 to September 30 where Stevens Street Gallery, 2 Stevens Street, Yandina. 0448 051 720 or stevensstreetgallery.com.au >

14 LETHBRIDGE GALLERY

Painting and sculptures by Mark Howson

STEVENS STREET GALLERY 2 Stevens Street, Yandina QLD 4561 +61 448 051 720 contact@stevensstreetgallery.com.au W stevensstreetgallery.com.au H Wed to Sat 9am - 1pm or by appointment P E

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TENNIS BY MICHAEL COOK

Digital photograph inkjet on photo rag, 80cm x 120cm

SEPTEMBER 18 STEVE TYERMAN

MUSIC OF THE SOUL BY NATHALIE BASTIER

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36 x 53cm, $490

17 SUNSHINE COAST Nathalie Bastierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s collaged works of finesse and beauty are made from recycled metals, found objects and lace to create surprisingly gentle and engaging artworks.

ART PRIZE 2017 This award is presented by Sunshine Coast Council and the 40 finalists will be selected for an exhibition at the Caloundra Regional Gallery. The winning work will be added to the Sunshine Coast Art Collection.

when August 12 to September 16 where Art on Cairncross, Cairncross Corner, 3 Panorama Place, Maleny. 5429 6404 or artoncairncross.com.au

when August 17 to October 8 where Caloundra Regional Gallery, 22 Omrah Avenue, Caloundra. 5420 8299 or gallery.sushinecoast.qld.gov.au

16 RUST & LACE

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A renowned landscape artist, Steve is compelled to artistically respond to and interpret his most familiar and immediate surroundings, resulting in paintings that are convincing and intriguing. when September 1 to 30 where Montville Art Gallery, 138 Main Street, Montville. 5442 9211 or montvilleartgallery.com.au

19 LIVING ON THE EDGE

Nicola Mossâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; works on paper explore the fabric of Noosa Biosphere Reserve, using processes of en plein painting, expanded drawing, conversation and site visits. when September 8 to October 15 where Noosa Regional Gallery, Level 1, Riverside, 9 Pelican Street, Tewantin. 5329 6145 or noosaregionalgallery.com.au


antiques

art &

TRAIL STOCKIST CODE

antiques art

1 NOOSA HEADS

ENIGMATIC DRAWINGS HEARTS AND MINDS ART ISABELLAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S FINE & ANTIQUE JEWELLERY JIVE POETA HERFORD ON HASTINGS

2 NOOSA JUNCTION

FINE ART GALLERY ENIGMATIC DRAWINGS

3 NOOSAVILLE

ARTVISION

4 TEWANTIN

HEARTS AND MINDS ART NOOSA REGIONAL GALLERY

5 POMONA

POMONA RAILWAY STATION GALLERY

12 MOOLOOLABA 6 COOROY

THE COOROY BUTTER FACTORY ARTS CENTRE

7 EUMUNDI

STEVENS STREET GALLERY

13 SIPPY DOWNS

14 MOFFAT BEACH

ANTIQUES & FLASH TRASH ART NUVO PATSY KIMBALL ANTIQUES

CALOUNDRA REGIONAL ART GALLERY

16 GLENVIEW

GO ARTY

11 BUDERIM

HOLLOWAY GALLERY SEAVIEW ART GALLERY

15 CALOUNDRA

MIDMODOZ

10 MAROOCHYDORE

UNIVERSITY OF THE SUNSHINE COAST GALLERY

9 PEREGIAN BEACH

AVENUE J ANTIQUE JEWELLERY DAVID HART GALLERIES GALLERY BENEATH

ARTISANS GALLERY DAVID SUTERS TIMBER CRAFTSMAN RED DESERT GALLERY

8 YANDINA

OPALS DOWN UNDER

17 LANDSBOROUGH 

LANDSBOROUGH GALLERIES

18 CAIRNCROSS CORNER

ART ON CAIRNCROSS

19 MALENY

BEN MESSINA GALLERY DAVID LINTON GALLERY HOLDENS GALLERY MALENY ART DIRECT PEACE OF GREEN GALLERY

20 MONTVILLE

ARTIQUE AUSTRALIS OF MONTVILLE ANTIQUES MAIN STREET GALLERY MONTVILLE ART GALLERY THE OPALCUTTER

21 MAPLETON

ART ANTIQUE ANTLERS saltmagazine . com . au

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ON THE INSIDE

WORDS KARINA EASTWAY PHOTOS ANASTASIA KARIOFYLLIDIS

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DAVID SUTERS Timbercraftsman

THE ANCIENT ART of alchemy is alive and well. It’s thriving, in fact, in the heart of Noosa. Here, the chemistry between form and function, materials, space and lighting is melded with an eye for beauty, knowledge, skill and state-of-the-art technology.

“Understated Excellence”

At the helm is Di Henshall, whose list of design accomplishments, awards and range of projects – from residential dwellings to restaurants and hotels – is testament to not only her unquestionable talent, but also her passion to constantly learn and grow, both personally and professionally. Already something of a rarity as a qualified kitchen, bathroom and interior designer, Di is also a licensed builder who is about to raise the bar again, taking on a post-graduate executive masters in business administration through the University of the Sunshine Coast. “One of the good things about life is learning,” Di says. “By learning you not only get better at something, but you also draw passion from it.” Her palpable enthusiasm for learning and lust for life creates a huge reservoir of knowledge to draw from, although she says the greatest inspiration comes from the clients themselves, who she describes as “the most amazing people”. Di’s grateful they allow her to push them out of their comfort zones, something she sees as a reflection of their own expansive thought. In fact, Di says that although she can instil certain elements of design into a project, she prefers that people not recognise her work at all.

Bespoke timber furniture designed and handcrafted in Eumundi

“I want my work to be diverse,” she says. “I try not to have a particular, recognisable style but rather for me to act as a conduit for the client, based on what their desires are. It’s their life, their home, office or restaurant, not mine. “The reality is, we all live in interior design every day. If you’re inside a building, you are dealing with interior design and if your interior doesn’t suit your lifestyle or reflect your personality in some way, it’s got to have an adverse effect on your life generally. I tap into my clients to find out what they love, what they feel comfortable with and what energises them. If I can create an environment so they come to that space feeling calmer or more invigorated, that’s fantastic.” Di has also taken on board advice she once received from international designer Martyn Lawrence Bullard, who suggested designers and architects owed it to their clients to travel as much as possible. “Travel is a huge influence; you can’t help but be moved when you’re looking at iconic buildings. You can’t expect to recreate anything, but you can get the essence of what you’ve seen, felt and experienced, and that inspires me,” Di says. Originally from the UK, Di worked as an export designer for Hygena kitchens before moving to Australia and subsequently Noosa with her husband John almost 30 years ago. Over that time, the Di Henshall brand has gone from strength to strength, hand-in-hand with accolades including a Master Builders Sunshine >

Exclusive to

Artisans Gallery eumundi

43 Caplick Way, Eumundi Q Cindy: 0409 848 098 David: 0413 509 482 Follow us on Facebook e: gallery@artisanseumundi.com w: artisanseumundi.com


After

Before

THERE ARE VERY FEW JOBS IN THE WORLD WHERE YOU CAN START WITH AN A5 PIECE OF PAPER AND A FEW YEARS LATER SEE A COMPLETE BUILDING IN A 3D FORM WITH HUMANS LIVING IN IT. WE LITERALLY CHANGE PEOPLE’S LIVES. 120

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Coast Women in Business Award and the Housing Industry Association’s 2016 People’s Choice Award for Interior Design and 2016 Professional Woman of the Year. What started as a small shopfront for Di’s design work expanded into manufacturing as she began to create simple, occasional pieces to service her well-travelled, design-savvy clients. John would build these pieces in the family garage. Last year, both the interior design studio and manufacturing sides of the business combined into an impressive purpose-built facility in Noosa’s industrial estate. Under the brand name Resident Hero, the kitchen, furniture and cabinetry manufacturing side (run by son Mark) features the latest in computerised technology and stateof-the-art equipment. It’s the art of creation that Di describes as one of the most exciting aspects of the business. Her thoughts on a building’s design will often start from an initial hand-drawn sketch. “There are very few jobs in the world where you can start with an A5 piece of paper and a few years later see a complete building in a 3D form with humans living in it. We literally change people’s lives. “Inspiration comes from finding the synergy between form and function. Neither one should precede the other; otherwise it’s not going to work. You need to get the two elements entwined together, take inspiration from your clients and surroundings, be sympathetic with the architecture and try to do it all with most the beautiful form possible.” Di explains that with so much thought, heart, research and sourcing of materials going into any great design, there’s a lot of responsibility to get it right. “I don’t spend a lot of time on trends and there is no such thing as ‘timeless’. There are very few new ideas. As designers, we are gathering from history and looking to the future and then spinning it into something that looks new, is refreshing and that suits the moment in time.” And that, after all, is the magic of alchemy. dihenshall.com.au

NOOSA LIGHTING LIGHTING PROFESSIONALS

brilliant ideas in light. RESIDENTIAL | COMMERICAL | LANDSCAPING

168 Eumundi Road, Noosaville Q 4566 • 07 5449 8422 • noosalighting.com.au

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HOMEWARES

Cubist wall display, $99.95, Artes pendant light, $189.95, and Nordic concrete dome pendant, $149.95. Available at Domayne, Maroochydore Homemaker Centre, 11-55 Maroochy Boulevard, Maroochydore. 5452 1400 or maroochydorehomemakercentre.com.au

Handcrafted Arc lamp, $525. Available at Hearts and Minds Art, 1 Hastings Street, Noosa Heads. 0418 108 299 or heartsandmindsart.com.au

the

luxe life

LIFESTYLE EDITOR BRISEIS ONFRAY

CHASE AWAY WINTER WOES WITH A COSY TOUCH OF THESE LIFESTYLE LUXURIES.

Woven storage solutions, from $17, and artificial tulips, $14.95 a bunch. Available at Villa Verde Living, Shop 1, 10 Ormuz Avenue, Caloundra. 5491 8890 or villaverdeliving.com.au

African tulip tree and black wattle console table by David Suters Timbercraftsman, $1600. Available at Artisans Gallery Eumundi, 43 Caplick Way, Eumundi. 0409 848 098 or artisanseumundi.com

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L&M Home Darjeeling kitchen towels, $15 each. Available at Giddy and Grace, Shop 2,1 Maple Street, Maleny. 5494 3636 or giddyandgrace.com


Bamboo and glass diffuser, $99. Available at Kunara Organic Marketplace, 330 Mons Road, Forest Glen. 5445 6440 or kunara.com.au

Bonito pendant light, from $325.90. Available at Noosa Lighting, 168 Eumundi Noosa Road, Noosaville. 5449 8422 or noosalighting.com.au

Lumira Cuban tobacco candle, $59.95. Available at Evolve, 5/10 Grebe Street, Peregian Beach. 5448 2077 or evolvembh.com.au

YOUR DREAM HOME IS WHERE OUR HEART IS At New Designer Homes, personalised service, superior quality and a hands-on approach are the hallmarks of our brand. We offer affordable style, believing that highest quality service and results shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t cost a premium. Every home receives the same dedicated service and attention to detail that our reputation is built on.

COST-EFFECTIVE CUSTOM-DESIGNED PERSONALISED SERVICE Elitis linen rug, various sizes, from $715. Available at Carole Tretheway Design, Shop 8b, 14 Sunshine Beach Road, Noosa Heads. 5447 3255 or ct-design.com.au

PHONE 07 5437 8766 Shop 1, 2 Main Drive Warana Qld 4575 newdesignerhomes.com.au


GREAT OUTDOORS

THE

HIGH LIFE WORDS KARINA EASTWAY PHOTOS KRISTA EPPELSTUN

AIR TRAVEL IS just so 1903. I’ve been in big aeroplanes, and I’ve been in small ones. I’ve even been in a 1930s Tiger Moth. But nothing comes close to the thrill of taking off and landing on the water, for sheer out-of-the-box novelty alone. Let me introduce you to Wilga Warbird, affectionately known as Willy. She’s the absolute beauty of a seaplane you’ve probably driven past a hundred times along Bradman Avenue, in Maroochydore – the one with wings outstretched as the river’s reflection glistens underneath her. Although she looks like something from the 1950s, she was actually built in the ’80s and has since had a major six-month rebuild with new interior, new radial engine, new prop, all new flight control systems and new glass. In fact, Willy has more glass than a helicopter. Co-owner and chief pilot Shawn Kelly is smitten with her ways – she’s strong, stable and ultra quiet. “When I came across this aircraft, I went ‘tick, tick, tick’ – every single box, she just ticked,” Shawn says.

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“She does all the things I want her to do really, really well, and for adventure flights, she’s absolutely perfect. The workmanship on her is phenomenal and completely suited to the Sunshine Coast’s saltwater conditions.” The morning I arrive for a flight with Paradise Seaplanes could not have been more picture perfect – with blue skies and a crystal clear, glassy Maroochydore River. Shawn runs me through a brief safety induction including what to expect, and when (which is way more enjoyable than pointing out the exit doors and aisle lighting), before giving me the best news of all – today we’re flying with doors off altogether. Yep, we’ll be completely open to the elements, both the ocean and the sky and with even better visibility from every angle. And I’m pumped. Radio headsets on and all buckled up, Shawn radios for permission to take off. Willy offers a unique perspective of the river as we taxi down our watery runway, as fishermen and boaters wave happily to Shawn as we pass by – faster and faster – and then gently, gently, we’re airborne. Woohoo! It’s an unsurpassed view of the Sunshine Coast from the south to the north and inland to the Glass House Mountains. And without doors, it’s a completely immersive experience. Shawn’s right. Willy is strong and stable and obviously enjoys the thrill of flying as much as any of us. The plane heads keenly towards Point Cartwright before banking smoothly to the north.

WINGED WAYS HOW MUCH? There are three main flights including a 10-, 20- and 30-minute flight, from $149 per person. All flights are based on a minimum of two people, and Paradise Seaplanes is more than happy to pair you with another passenger if you’re on your own. The most popular flight is the one that soars over the beach at Maroochydore before taking in the sights of Mooloolaba harbour and down to Caloundra and back (20 minutes and $225 per person). There’s also a round trip to Noosa, and one that goes up to Rainbow Beach and back. HOW TO BOOK? You’ll find Willy ready for a flight Thursday to Monday, 9am to 3pm (weather permitting). Walk-up bookings are welcome or book online (where you can also purchase gift certificates). Shawn and wife/co-owner Sandra Groundwater are happy to get in on the surprise too, and will help with coordinating your own signature flight for special occasions. CONTACT Paradise Seaplanes is located at Bradman Avenue, Maroochydore (opposite Minti Street). 0437 719 088 or paradiseseaplanes.com.au

touch down but, either way, I’m ready to go straight back up again.

“That’s Noosa and Double Island Point in the distance,” Shawn points out over the radio. “It’s amazing to be able to see that far, almost to the southern tip of Fraser Island.”

“Something that I really enjoy about this job, is that people have come up to me on a regular basis and say ‘20 years ago on the Gold Coast we went for a ride in a seaplane and it was amazing’,” Shawn says. So this is something that 20, 25 years from now, people are still going to be talking about. When you look at it from a value perspective, where else can you spend 150 bucks on something that somebody’s going to talk about for the rest of their lives?”

All too soon, we’re heading back towards the Maroochy River. The landing is so super smooth that I can’t even tell when we

I have to agree. And memorable moments (they say) are the stuff that life is made of. Willy, you’ve swept me off my feet.

Colourful surfers dot the fringes of the deep-blue blanket beneath us, as familiar landmarks create reference points and I am reminded just how beautiful our own special piece of paradise is. The whole experience is spectacular.

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SALT FEED

MOFFAT BEACH

MALENY

Dear salt-y readers, We hope you enjoyed your winter dose of salt. Follow us @saltmag and share your Sunny Coast moments via #saltmag for your chance to WIN a year’s subscription to salt magazine.

photo surfshots.com.au

COTTON TREE

The team at salt. xx NOOSA HEADS

@SALTMAG #wintergiveaway

TOURIST INFORMATION

CLIMATE No wonder it’s called the Sunshine Coast, with an average of seven hours of sunshine every day (this is one of the highest amounts in the world). Winter (June to August) days are almost as popular with visitors as summer, with an average winter temperature between 13°C and 20°C and an ocean temperature of 19°C. Temperatures in the hinterland can be several degrees cooler. MARKETS Blackall Range Growers Market, 316 Witta Road, Maleny, third Saturday of the month (except January), 7am to noon. Caloundra Country Markets, 17 Buderim Street, Currimundi, every Sunday, 6am to noon. Caloundra Street Fair, Bulcock Street, Caloundra, every Sunday, 8am to 1pm. Cotton Tree Street Market, King Street, Cotton Tree, every Sunday, 7am to noon. Eumundi Courtyard Village Market, 76 Memorial Drive, Eumundi, every Saturday, 8am to 2pm, Wednesday 8.30am to 1pm. Fishermans Road Sunday Markets, Fishermans Road, Maroochydore, every Sunday, 6am to noon. Kawana Waters Farmers’ Market, Sportsmans Parade, Bokarina, every Saturday, 7am to noon. Maleny Market, Maple Street, every Sunday, 8am to 2pm. Marcoola Market, 10 Lorraine Avenue, Marcoola. Every Friday evening 4pm to 8pm. Nights On Ocean, Ocean Street, Maroochydore, second Friday of the month from 5pm. Noosa Farmers’ Market, AFL Grounds, Weyba Road, Noosaville, every Sunday, 7am to noon. Noosa Junction Twilight Markets, Arcadia Street, Noosa Heads, third Friday of the month, from 5pm. 126

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SCHOOL HOLIDAYS June 24, 2017 to July 9, 2017. EMERGENCY TELEPHONE NUMBERS Ambulance, Fire Brigade, Police, Coastguard, Rescue......................000 Poisons Information Centre...............131 126 Ambulance Transport........................131 233 TRAVELLING DISTANCES Brisbane to Caloundra........................ 100km Brisbane to Mooloolaba...................... 105km Brisbane to Nambour......................... 110km Brisbane to Noosa ............................. 148km Noosa to Montville............................. 56 km Mooloolaba to Maleny........................ 41km Caloundra to Kenilworth..................... 77km SURF SAFETY PATROLS (Times vary between 7am – 5pm) Year round 7 days/week Noosa Heads, Sunshine Beach, Peregian Beach, Coolum Beach, Twin Waters Resort, Maroochydore, Alexandra Headland, Mooloolaba, Dicky Beach, Kings Beach. TO STAY SAFE AT THE BEACH REMEMBER: Too much exposure to the sun can cause serious damage to your skin. Make sure whenever you are going in the sun that you take adequate precautions. SLIP, SLOP, SLAP, SEEK AND SLIDE Slip on a shirt (preferably a long-sleeved shirt). Slop on the sunscreen (+30 reapply as needed). Slap on a hat. Seek some shade. Slide on wrap around UV protective sunglasses. It’s also a good idea to avoid direct exposure to the sun during the hottest part of the day – between the hours of 10am and 3pm – and try to take advantage of shade when possible.


DIRECTORY

USEFUL INFORMATION

WHEN VISITING THE SUNSHINE COAST MEDICAL

MEDICAL

SKIN

Peregian Springs Doctors Open 8am to 5pm Monday to Friday Coles Peregian Springs Shopping Centre, 1 Ridgeview Drive, Peregian Springs, 1st floor above Amcal Pharmacy. 5471 2600 lookingafteryourhealth.com.au

General Practice and Skin Check Clinic Open 7am - 6pm Monday to Friday and 8am - 5pm Saturday and Sunday. Coolum Village Shopping Centre 8-26 Birtwill Street, Coolum Beach. 5471 6333 lookingafteryourhealth.com.au

Early skin cancer detection. Scan QR code with smartphone for details

Children under 16, pension concession and DVA card holders. Bulk bill.

Surgical and non-surgical treatments. Suite 1, Kawana Private Hospital, 5 Innovation Parkway, Birtinya. 5438 8889 skinsurveillance.com

Children under 16, pension concession and DVA card holders. Bulk bill. *

*

IS YOUR AVIATION MEDICAL DUE? DR HEATHER PARKER OAM, BA, MD, FRACGP, ACCAM.

Aviation Examiner for Australian, New Zealand, Canadian, USA and South African medicals. Phone 5471 2600 for an appointment 1 Ridgeview Drive Peregian Springs Sunshine Coast Queensland 4573 lookingafteryourhealth.com.au

Would you like to advertise in our directory? Contact salt magazine 0412 210 281 ADVERTISE WITH SALT FOR FREE* Each edition salt gives away a third page advertisement worth $1100 to a worthy non-profit organisation that tugs on our salt strings. This edition we’re proud to donate a third page advertisement to Bloomhill Cancer Care. If you know or are a part of a non-profit organisation that needs to spread the word, please let us know. To find out more visit saltmagazine.com.au and click on the free ad link.

Don’t delay, Bloomhill needs your donations today! Drop off your quality unwanted items at any Bloomhill Op Shop or at our Centre at 58 Ballinger Road, Buderim. • Clothing • Linen • Bric a brac

• Whitegoods • Electrical • Jewellery

• Kitchenware • Furniture • Toys/Games

We will gratefully accept all good sale-able items for our Op Shops. Ring 5445 5794 for more info or free pick up of larger items 20 years strong!

www.bloomhill.com.au

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minor road N airport

N

minor airport road

minor road

ON THE COVER: Fraser Island

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salt

Map Disclaimer: This map was not created to any scale, and no claim is made to its accuracy. Most natural features are eliminated, as are changes in elevation. This map does provide a starting point for finding your way around. Map depicted is subject to change.

gol

airp N


21ST - 30TH JULY 2017

NOOSA FOUR DAYS OF BEACHFRONT EVENTS

ROCOCO BEACH CLUB MARQUEE

noosaalive.com.au rococonoosa.com.au

thej.com.au


IS BORN OF THE PUREST PARENTS, THE SUN AND THE SEA” PYTHAGORAS

Profile for salt magazine

salt magazine winter 2017  

salt magazine is a quarterly tourism and lifestyle publication based on the Sunshine Coast of Australia.

salt magazine winter 2017  

salt magazine is a quarterly tourism and lifestyle publication based on the Sunshine Coast of Australia.

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