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ISSUE NUMBER 57 | FALL 2017 | PM40024961 | $6

UNIVERSAL DESIGN Advancing social sustainability Steelcase Worklife Showroom Walks the sustainability talk

Engineering Student Centre Compact LEED Gold building celebrates structure

Humber River Hospital State-of-the-art design centres on better patient care

First Avenue Residence Infill rejuvenates established Montreal neighbourhood SABMag - FALL 2017

1


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AWARD WINNER INTERNATIONAL EXCELLENCE IN BUSINESS-TO-BUSINESS PUBLISHING

For more about the articles in this issue!

Industry News, Products 11 CEU Article: Universal Design

6

25

as Social Sustainability

15

Engineering Student Centre Compact LEED Gold building celebrates structure

20

Steelcase Worklife Showroom

25

Humber River Hospital

30

First Avenue Residence

Walks the sustainability talk

37

State-of-the-art design centres on better patient care

FALL 2017

High efficiency, comtemporary style rejuvenate established Montreal neighbourhood 34

30

The best Tiny House we've seen so far

Architecture student introduces digital design and fabrication into the mix 37

Salus Clementine Building A study in PassiveHouse

45

Viewpoint

The story of an LCA pioneer 46

Interview

With Jeff Addison

44

ISSUE DON’T MISS NEXT WINTER 2017/18 Bois Ellen Cooperative Housing Tower Robust and energy-efficient on a budget

Brock Commons/TallWood Building Better planning practices for streamlined construction

Solar Technology

Review of solar technologies for the Canadian climate

Annual Special Supplement:

2018 Directory of Products and Services for Sustainable Building Bois Ellen Tower SABMag - FALL 2017

3


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SABMag - FALL 2017


Dedicated to high-performance building

WHAT A DIFFERENCE A YEAR CAN MAKE

Member Canada Green Building Council

SABMag is a proud member and official media partner of the Canada Green Building Council.

Just a year ago, the World Architecture Festival, the annual celebration of international architectural excellence, and a global forum for the exchange of progressive ideas, got a little more publicity than

VISIT www.sabmagazine.com

the organizers had bargained for.

PUBLISHER Don Griffith 800-520-6281, ext. 304, dgriffith@sabmagazine.com

In his keynote address on the future of cities,

EDITOR Jim Taggart, FRAIC 604-874-0195, architext@telus.net

Patrik Schumacher, Principal of Zaha Hadid Architects argued [among other things] for the priva-

MARKETING MANAGER Denis Manseau 800-520-6281, ext. 303, dmanseau@sabmagazine.com SENIOR ACCOUNT MANAGER Patricia Abbas 416-438-7609, pabbas8@gmail.com GRAPHIC DESIGN Carine De Pauw 800-520-6281, ext. 308, cdepauw@sabmagazine.com

photo: Roy Grogan

tization of public space, the elimination of social housing programs and the dismantling of social safety nets. In short, he concluded that

architects have no obligation to consider, or care about, the social implications of their work. Protests broke out in the audience, to be followed by protests in the street. Architects and others demonstrated outside the offices of Zaha Hadid Architects until both the firm and the trustees of Hadid’s estate issued

Published by

statements denouncing Schumacher’s remarks.

www.janam.net 81 Leduc St.,Gatineau,Qc J8X 3A7 800-520-6281, ext.304, 819-778-5040 Fax: 819-595-8553

Subscription/address changes: info@sabmagazine.com, 800-520-6281, ext. 304

Fast forward one year, and the WAF has emphatically affirmed its own position by launching a new manifesto, and with it the WAFX Prize. This new prize will be awarded to future projects that identify and address key challenges that architects will face over the next ten years.

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Through this manifesto, WAF organizers intend to generate research funding to support work in universities and architectural practices investigating key issues facing the industry. These challenges span diverse topic areas, including climate, energy and carbon, water, aging and health, re-use, smart cities, building technology, cultural identity, ethics, power and justice.

ISSN 1911-4230

That this broad range of interconnected issues will now be considered together

Copyright by Janam Publications Inc. All rights reserved. Contents may not be reprinted or reproduced without written permission. Views expressed are those of the authors exclusively.

on a global stage may mark the beginning of a new era in architecture; one in

Publication Mail Agreement #40024961 Return undelivered Canadian address mail to: Janam Publications Inc., 81 Leduc St., Gatineau, Qc J8X 3A7

which complexity of form gives way to complexity of function; singular visions are enriched by multiple perspectives; and progress is measured, not by the distance our leaders have advanced, but by how few people have been left behind.

Jim Taggart, FRAIC, Editor

Printed on Rolland Enviro 100 Satin, a 100% post-consumer fiber that is certified FSC and EcoLogo. It is processed chlorine-free, FSC-recycled and is manufactured using biogas energy.

Environmental savings for this issue:

77 Trees

275,795 litres water

4,022 kg waste

9,805 kg CO2 SABMag - FALL 2017

5


NEWS REPORT OF THE ROYAL ARCIHTECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA Designing for Better Eldercare

The Sustainable has been slow. Out-dated regulations hold it back. Vestiges of the medical model remain. Doors are kept locked, and residents have a minimal connection with the community. Since each household usually has 10 to 12 residents, the scale is not that of a familiar family home. Residents visit with guests in their bedrooms. This is an abnormal envi-

By Rudy P. Friesen, FRAIC

SFI GRANTS FIRST CHAIN-OF-CUSTODY CERTIFICATION TO A CROSS-LAMINATED TIMBER MANUFACTURER

ronment. We can do better. As designers, we know how

Initiative announced

Inc.

Forestry

[SFI]

that

has

Structurlam

the first Canadian manufacturer of cross-laminated timber [CLT]  to be certified to the SFI 2015-2019 Chain-ofCustody Standard. Based in BC, Structurlam has manufactured CLT for six years and supplied the product to over 350 projects in North America. Wood products sold as certified under the SFI Chain-of-Custody Standard earn LEED credits through the

Path, or credits through the

LEED Alternative Compliance

Green Globes Rating System.

For too long, eldercare has

to solve problems and cre-

been corrupted by the view that

ate healthy environments that

aging is a medical problem. The

help people flourish. We also

language is medical and facili-

know how to challenge regu-

ties are like hospitals. Anything

lations and norms, understand

to make eldercare more efficient

their purposes and objectives,

and expedient. Elders are ware-

and develop creative and alter-

housed and, when they become

native ways to achieve them.

agitated, they are managed

So, let’s put our heads together

The Canada Green Building

champion the move to lower-

with drugs. No wonder they feel

and solve the problems facing

Council [CaGBC] has launched

carbon commercial, institutional

lonely, bored, and worthless. No

eldercare.

Canada’s

Carbon

and high-rise residential build-

Age-Friendly

Building Standard, which applies

ings in support of Canada’s

The recognition that elders

Housing Task Force will pres-

to many types of new and exist-

efforts to reduce greenhouse

deserve better, and that aging

ent an education session, called

ing buildings and makes

gas emissions by 30% by 2030.

is contextual and individual,

Innovative Design for Healthy

bon reductions the key indicator

has given rise to the household

Aging, on November 30 at

for building performance.

model. Facilities are more home-

IIDEX 2017 in Toronto. I will be

The Zero Carbon Building

bon. Project registration for the

like. Elders are placed in compat-

presenting along with Betsey

Standard is part of a larger

Standard will open September

ible groupings. Dining is family-

Williamson, FRAIC.

CaGBC Zero Carbon Building

5, along with full pricing and

Initiative that was created to

additional program details.

wonder they lash out.

The

RAIC

CAGBC LAUNCHES CANADA’S FIRST ZERO CARBON BUILDING STANDARD

first

Zero

car-

The Standard can be downloaded at cagbc.org/zerocar-

style. Schedules are flexible, and

Rudy Friesen is the found-

routines are familiar. The quality

er and Partner Emeritus of ft3

of care is higher. The use of sup-

Architecture Landscape Interior

pressants to manage behaviour

Design in Winnipeg. He has

is significantly reduced. Capital

been spearheading innovative

and operating costs are lower.

solutions for elder housing for

Residents, staff, and families all

decades, and recently founded

Prestressed Concrete Institute

seem happier.

ELDERing.ca, an organization

released the Fifth Edition of the

dedicated to healthy aging in

CPCI Design Manual which is

the community.

now available as a free down-

While the household model is a great improvement, its uptake

CPCI FIFTH EDITION DESIGN MANUAL The

Canadian

Precast/

load. The CPCI Design Manual – Fifth Edition is the authorita-

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tive source of information about precast and prestressed con-

Inline Fiberglass Owens Corning Sustainable Forestry Initiative Legalett IIDEX

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crete, written in accordance with NBCC 2015, A23.3-14, Design of concrete structures and A23.4-16 Precast concrete – Materials and construction. Free download at: www.cpci.ca/en/resources/ design_manual_offer/

6

SABMag - FALL 2017


NEWS CASE STUDY: CREST® MODULATINGCONDENSING BOILERS CUT ENERGY INTENSITY AT SHERIDAN COLLEGE

AMBER TRAILS COMMUNITY SCHOOL IN WINNIPEG IS THE 2017 GREENEST SCHOOL IN CANADA The CaGBC and the Canada

A new one-page case study describes

how

the

Coalition for Green Schools has

Hazel

announced the 78,000 sq.ft.

McCallion Campus expansion at

Amber Trails Community School

Sheridan College is projecting

in Winnipeg as the the winner

an annual energy intensity of

of the annual CaGBC Greenest

96 kWh/sq.m, among the low-

School

est for academic institutions in

tion. Located in the heart of

the country, which will be partly

a new neighbourhood in North

achieved through the use of

in

Canada

competi-

Winnipeg, the school received

CREST® modulating-condens-

Read the Case Study: www.sab-

LEED® Platinum certification

• Use of geothermal heating

ing boilers by Lochinvar.

magazine.com/casestudies.html

in 2016, and won the CaGBC’s

and cooling, radiant floor heat-

Excellence in Green Building for

ing, low-flow fixtures and other

New Construction award in May

initiatives,

SOBERING LESSONS FROM ONTARIO’S GREEN ENERGY POLICIES After eight years, Ontario’s

2017. It also won the Institutional

• Emphasis on fresh air, out-

Award in the 2017 Canadian

door views and natural light for

Green Building Awards, an annu-

all classrooms, and

al program of SABMag and the

was only about 9% of total emis-

CaGBC. [bit.ly/2yjnA3u].

have

sions. The focus on electricity

Highlights include:

environ-

is out of proportion with the

• Awn ENERGY STAR score of

mental gains while drastically

areas of the economy that are

92, and overall energy savings

increasing energy prices, says

most in need of closer scruti-

of 68 %.

a report published in August

ny. Transportation, for example,

from the C.D. Howe Institute.

contributed 34% of greenhouse

In

gas emissions in Ontario in 2012.

green

energy

yielded

policies

moderate

“Ontario’s

Green

Energy

Experience: Sobering Lessons

Finally, Professor Trebilcock

for Sustainable Climate Change

notes that while the Ontario

Policies”

government

author

Michael

claims

that

its

Trebilcock, a law and economics

green energy policies have cre-

expert, measures the success

ated over 30,000 jobs, this

of the Green Energy and Green

number does not distinguish

Economy Act based on its envi-

between temporary and perma-

ronmental outcomes, its effects

nent jobs or between low-paid

on energy prices, and its impact

service jobs and higher-paid

on employment in the province.

skilled jobs, and more impor-

“These policies have had a dra-

tantly, does not take account of

matic impact on electricity costs

jobs lost through higher elec-

in the province, but they have

tricity prices.

generated very limited environ-

As an alternative, the report

mental benefits and have had a

suggests that Canada impose

negligible to negative effect on

a revenue-neutral national car-

economic growth and employ-

bon tax that promotes econo-

ment,” states Professor Trebilcock.

my-wide cost-effective emission

Rising costs are one problem.

reductions, with revenues rebat-

For example, the on-peak price

ed to the provinces from which

rose from 9.3 cents per kilo-

they originate. This should be

watt hour in November 2009,

supplemented by limited, well-

to 18 cents per kilowatt hour in

targeted subsidies for research

November 2016, representing a

and development.

compound annual increase of

Professor Trebilcock concludes

9.9%. Moreover, the electricity

with a warning. "It is crucial that

sector’s share of greenhouse

Canada’s private sector not bear

gas emissions in Ontario in 2012

a large overall fiscal burden."

• A student-run organic vegetable farm,

• 50% reduction in water use. The runners up were: • Dewdney Elementary School in Dewdney, BC. •Windermere

Secondary

School in Vancouver, BC. Info: www.cagbc.org/greenestschool2017

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SABMag - FALL 2017

7


NEWS

FUJI KINDERGARTEN WINNER OF THE 2017 MORIYAMA RAIC INTERNATIONAL PRIZE DISSOLVES INDOOR-OUTDOOR BOUNDARIES

1

Established in 2014 by Canadian architect Raymond Moriyama along with the RAIC and RAIC Foundation, the biennial 2017 Moriyama RAIC International Prize consists of a monetary award of $100,000 and a sculpture designed by Canadian designer Wei Yew. It celebrates a single work of architecture that is judged to be transformative within its societal context and expressive of the humanistic values of justice, respect, equality and inclusiveness.

Site plan A B C

They climb the three pre-existing zelkova trees that grow through the structure and can descend from the roof to the ground on a slide. There is not a single piece of play equipment on the roof. The rooftop itself becomes the play equipment.

N

Existing building Nursery Staff room

A

B C

B External faucet and wet area

B

Mount

A

SABMag - FALL 2017

The building is designed to support the Montessori education method which encourages independence and freedom. The key to Fuji Kindergarten is spaces being open environments. Between April and November, the sliding doors are completely open. The distinction between where outside stops and inside starts doesn’t apply. There are no walls between spaces and, therefore, no boundaries. There are only boxes that are used as furniture to indicate areas.

THE ROOF MAKES A LARGE PLAY AREA WHICH STUDENTS CAN EXIT USING A SLIDE OR STAIRS [1]. A SHEET UNDERLAY PROTECTS THE TREE ROOTS FROM DAMAGE [2]. THE FLOOR SLAB AREA NEAREST TO EACH ZELKOVA TREE WAS EXTENDED BETWEEN THE FOUNDATIONS IN ORDER TO REDUCE THE HEAVY LOAD THAT WOULD OTHERWISE INTERFERE WITH THE BASE ROOTS [3].

Slide

B

8

The 2017 recipient, the 1,419 sq. m Fuji Kindergarten in Tokyo by Tezuka Architects, is a one-storey oval-shaped kindergarten with an enrolment of 600 children, aged two to six, located in the Tokyo suburb of Tachikawa. The rooftop encloses an internal courtyard and serves as an open-air play deck where children are free to run in circles, some covering six kilometres a day.

A


2

3

4 5

The ceiling heights are 2.1 metres creating a close relationship between the ground level and the rooftop. A slender balustrade encircles the roof with a maximum spacing of 110 mm – too small for a child’s head, but big enough for feet to dangle through. An adult can reach up and touch dangling feet above. Playful details include outdoor taps for children to wash up and skylights that offer views between the rooftop and classrooms. There are five gargoyles at the eaves of the courtyard from which collected rainwater falls into the five large basins in the courtyard below. On rainy days, children gather around the waterfalls that flow from these gargoyles. In what is one of the largest kindergartens in Japan, the principal reports that the school’s approach encourages calmness and focus, including in children with behavioural disorders. The structure is randomly arranged to accommodate the preservation of the zelkova trees. The roof appears smooth but is actually a three-dimensional curved surface of a delicately changing hyperbolic shell. Final welds were not made until after the roof was fully completed in order to ensure the structural moment was finalized securely.

6

The architects said: “Our scheme for Fuji Kindergarten is the 'end of an era'. Modern conveniences have deprived children of basic sensation, and the treasures once found in this era have now been abandoned. What we want to teach through this building is “common sense”. Common sense comprises those values of human society that are unchanging, even across eras. We want the children raised here to grow into people who do not exclude anything or anyone. We think Fuji Kindergarten will be unchanged even after 50 years have passed.”

THE ZELKOVA TREES PENETRATING THE ROOF MAKE, WITH PROTECTIVE NETTING, PLAY AREAS FOR THE CHILDREN [4]. THE STEEL FRAMING FORMS A A THREE-DIMENSIONAL CURVED ROOF SURFACE [5]. THE STEEL FRAMING FORMS A A THREE-DIMENSIONAL CURVED ROOF SURFACE [6].

SABMag - FALL 2017

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SABMag - FALL 2017


UNIVERSAL DESIGN as Social Sustainability

1 Read this article and take the quiz at: WWW.SABMAGAZINE-EDUCATION.INFO to receive 1 Core Learning Unit.

Universal design is for everyone. Informed by the preferences of as many people as possible, rather than retroactively adapting spaces for those who face barriers to access, universal design is an optimized, conceptual approach to development. But for universal design to flourish and spread, it needs to be recognized not just as optional, but rather as essential and even desirable. Shedding light on the catalysts for success, and exploring examples of how accessible design complements environmental sustainability and social sustainability, we can demonstrate to governing bodies, the general public and architects and designers the benefits meeting the accessibility needs of everyone. BY SUSAN RUPTASH

Parallels can be drawn between the mainstream success of the environmental sustainability movement—once considered an outlier campaign that was a hindrance to development—and the increasing awareness in universal design and its principles. Environmental sustainability was once considered too costly, or too time consuming to be implemented into everyday design practices. Yet once championed by figureheads such as Al Gore with his

Take approved SABMag continuing education courses for LEED AP credential maintenance.

documentary ‘An Inconvenient Truth’ and his subsequent speaking tour, the core principles of sustainability became obvious elements to embed into everyday design standards. Such a singular catalyst to increase the presence of accessibility and frame universal design as a movement has not yet occurred. However, there is an urgent need for a global focus on universal design on the horizon, as a result of baby boomers and the aging population. A significant portion of the population is going to need to begin to navigate their homes, places of work and entertainment, and essentially entire cities in a brand new way. Most buildings have not been outfitted in accessible ways complementary to this shift. Also, reliance on accessible public transportation will continue to increase. While some of these concerns are being addressed at present, the full weight of change has yet to be felt by municipalities, and if accommodations are delayed until the strain is more acute, most solutions will have to be stop gap measures rather than ones that are thoughtfully planned for the long term. The aging population will also greatly affect the rental market in urban areas. As boomers consider downsizing their homes and transitioning to rental units, the real-estate landscape will need to evolve to meet such a demand with accessible options.

SABMag - FALL 2017

11


The Canadian Precast/Prestressed Concrete Institute (CPCI), the National Precast Concrete Association (NPCA) and the Precast/Prestressed Concrete Institute (PCI) recently released Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs) in three key precast concrete product categories. The EPDs will allow architects, engineers, building owners, and other specifiers to better understand the environmental impacts of precast and prestressed concrete products. An EPD is an ISO-compliant and third-party verified, standardized and internationally recognized comprehensive tool for providing information on a product’s environmental impact. The precast concrete industry wide EPDs are now available for Architectural and Insulated Wall Panels, Structural Precast Concrete Products and Underground Precast Concrete Products. Download the precast concrete EPDs: www.sustainableprecast.ca | precast.org | pci.org

The members of CPCI, NPCA and PCI are proud partners of these two North American industry sustainability initiatives:

ENVIRONMENTAL PRODUCT DECLARATIONS FOR PRECAST CONCRETE NORTH AMERICAN PRECAST CONCRETE SUSTAINABLE PLANT PROGRAM

.ca

CPCI – Canadian Precast/Prestressed Concrete Institute 14

@CPCI_Canada

CPCI_Canada

SABMag - FALL 2017

.ca


UBC ENGINEERING STUDENT CENTRE COMPACT LEED GOLD BUILDING CELEBRATES STRUCTURE

The University of British Columbia Engineering Student Centre [ESC] is a home away from home for the students, a place to meet, collaborate, and build a community. The vision was to create an iconic building that celebrates the science and art of engineering, while providing an inviting place for groups from two persons to 400 to socialize and study. BY SHELLEY CRAIG AND NICOLE JAHRAUS

THE ESC IS LOCATED IN A COURTYARD WITHIN THE ENGINEERING PRECINCT, AND ITS PASSIVE DESIGN STRATEGIES RESPOND TO THE UNIQUE MICROCLIMATE [1 AND 2].

Completed in 2015, the project team designed the ESC to align with UBC’s ambitious sustainability mandate – to create a learning environment that stimulates and fosters student leadership. The building has been designed as a “living lab” to showcase innovative engineering strategies. Key design concepts, developed in collaboration with the students, included pushing the limits of wood construction; implementing passive design strategies, demonstrating building systems through their absence, and creating a healthy, inclusive and welcoming social space for all students. Since its completion in 2015, ESC has received LEED Canada Gold certification, and a British

1 2

Columbia WoodWorks! Design Award. Located in an existing courtyard and surrounded by two to six storey concrete buildings, ESC is sited to take advantage of the unique microclimate. The building uses the shading from the existing buildings and optimizes the use of localized wind patterns. Solar modelling was used to determine the extent of overhangs and the location of glazing within the building. The cantilevered NLT roof and upper floor structures address the seasonal sun paths, permitting winter solar gains while limiting solar exposure in the summer.

SABMag - FALL 2017

15


Site plan

A B C D E F G

A

N

Bikes East walk North walk Commons Stage Courtyard Bioswale

B E D

C

F

G

7 LOCATED BETWEEN THE TRUSSES, ON THE SECOND LEVEL, THE STUDY ZONES FILTER VIEWS THROUGH THE WARM WOOD STRUCTURE TO THE ATRIUM BELOW AND OUT TO THE COURTYARD [7 AND 8].

Conceived as a celebration of building engineering, didactic moments are layered throughout the project: Nail-Laminated Timber [NLT] panels are left visible to reveal their orientation and bearing on the structure, and the lounging platform puts an NLT component at the students’ fingertips. The trusses showcase connections and provide a clear structural diagram of how tension and compression forces are carried through the space. The whole rewards the curious with an opportunity to unpack the structural “magic” that makes the upper floor float and the roof soar. Wood was selected as the primary building material to demonstrate the use of renewable local resources, create healthy and compelling spaces, and to display engineering prowess. The warmth of the wood structure creates a welcoming environment

8

particularly important in this small pavilion that is open 24/7. Glulam columns recycled from the former Engineering clubhouse are reconfigured as stair treads and concrete was also salvaged, ground up and reused as aggregate in the new foundations. The inclusion of the students as active project partners instilled ownership, facilitated social connections and resulted in a finished building that reflects the ingenuity, inspiration and imagination of the students themselves. The building has been designed to be robust and flexible to permit change in the future, allowing the students to create their own place, yet also allow it to adapt to the needs of future generations.  SHELLEY CRAIG IS A PARTNER AT URBAN ARTS ARCHITECTURE. NICOLE JAHRAUS IS DESIGN ASSISTANT AT URBAN ARTS ARCHITECTURE.

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Architecture – Construction – Design Engineering – Property – Renovation

Principal Supporting Associations

2017

November 29-30 Metro Toronto Convention Centre North Building

Keynote Speakers: • • • • •

iidexcanada.com thebuildingsshow.com

Assemble (London) Form Us With Love (Stockholm) Marc Kushner (New York) Rick Hansen (Vancouver) SO–IL (Brooklyn)

Image Courtesy of Assemble SABMag - FALL 2017

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STEELCASE WORKLIFE

SHOWROOM Walks the sustainability talk

Global furniture manufacturer Steelcase has developed a broad sustainability program with economic, social and environmental targets. A special steering committee provides direction on achieving these targets, which include a commitment to a 25% reduction in greenhouse gas and VOC emissions, water use and waste by the end of 2020. Social sustainability goals include increased corporate volunteerism, philanthropy, and the promotion of employee diversity and inclusion. These goals are supported by the company’s ongoing implementation and development of a wide variety of metrics and policies that include sustainable procurement and end-of-use strategies, a code of conduct for the company’s global suppliers regarding human rights, labour practices, environmental impact and community involvement, and a robust investment in renewable energy. A VIEW OF THE STEELCASE WORKLIFE SHOWROOM CAPTURES THE ESSENCE OF THE BRAND THROUGH THE EXPANSIVE CEILING HEIGHT, OPEN WORKSTATIONS, AND GROUP SEATING THAT ENCOURAGES INTERACTION AND EXCHANGE [1]. THE ARCHITECTURAL ELEMENT OF THE OASIS POD FLANKING ENTRY INTO THE SHOWROOM ARTICULATES A LOUNGE AREA CONDUCIVE TO INFORMAL MEETINGS [2].

1 2

PROJECT PERFORMANCE Lighting power density reduction relative to reference building under ASHRAE 90.1 [2005] = 15% Potable water consumption from municipal sources = 3,389L/occupant/year Reduction in water consumption relative to LEED reference standard = 35% Reclaimed and recycled materials [by value] = 27% Regional materials as defined by LEED [by value] = 65% Construction material waste diverted from landfill = 71% PROJECT CREDITS OWNER/DEVELOPER Steelcase Inc. ARCHITECT superkül STRUCTURAL ENGINEER Blackwell ELECTRICAL ENGINEER Smith + Andersen MECHANICAL ENGINEER Smith + Andersen GENERAL CONTRACTOR Marant PHOTOS Ben Rahn/A-Frame

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3

Located on the 24th floor of a Downtown Toronto office building, the Steelcase WorkLife showroom was designed to embody a deep commitment to sustainability. The 920m2 space is the new hub for the company’s Canadian operations, and replaces a much larger suburban predecessor. The decision to locate Steelcase in the city centre, along with a design strategy that blends showroom and workplace, has significant benefits. The negative environmental impact of the company’s previous suburban location has been substantially mitigated. Now situated much closer to its clientele and employees and occupying half the area it used to, Steelcase has drastically reduced its environmental footprint in Toronto. Capitalizing on the unusual height and dimensions of the space, innovative design gestures establish a dramatic new presence for the company. WorkLife is designed as an open office rather than a traditional showroom, a revolutionary strategy that reduces space needs significantly: sales team members operate from the very same workstations shown to clients as demonstration models. As a result, all but 180m2 of back-of-house space is shared by staff and clients in an immersive experience that encourages interaction and fosters creativity. ENTRY FROM THE FOYER IS DEFINED BY THE RHYTHMIC CADENCE OF VERTICAL FINS ON THE WHITE OAK WALL LEADING TO THE SHOWROOM [3].

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HUMBER RIVER HOSPITAL

State-of-the-art design centres on better patient care

1

C

B

F A

Site plan

D

E

JERRY J. JETER, AIA, ACHA, EDAC, LEED AP BD+C

N

A West parkade B LL Services

C Healing gardens D South Piazza

Humber River Hospital is one of Canada’s largest acute care hospitals, serving a catchment area of over 850,000 in northwest Toronto. The hospital, though long praised for its commitment to patient care, was increasingly constrained by the limitations of its aging physical and technology infrastructure. With an inflexible design, the hospital was unable to fully capitalize on the many recent advances in healthcare delivery proven to improve both operational efficiency and patient outcomes in new facilities.

E Portals of care F East parkade

REFLECTING THE HOSPITAL’S ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONS: AMBULATORY BLOCK; DIAGNOSTIC AND TREATMENT PODIUM; AND INPATIENT TOWER, THE FAÇADE IS COMPRISED OF FOUR PRIMARY MATERIALS: ALUMINUM AND GLASS CURTAINWALL; PRECAST CONCRETE PANELS IN TWO FINISH TYPES; METAL PANELS AND MASONRY [1].

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Typical inpatient floors

N

Main floor

Floor plans

Typical inpatient floors 1 Semi circulation 2 Private room 3 Semi-private room 4 Nurse station 5 Public core 6 Elevator Main floor 1 Portal of care 2 Allée 3 Public elevator 4 Service core 5 Orthopaedics clinic 6 Specialized geriatric 7 Bariatric clinic

8 Pre-administration 9 Respiratory and neurodiagnostic services 10 Cardiac services 11 Cancer program Second floor 1 Public areas and staff facilities 2 Medical daycare 3 Ambulatory procedure unit 4 Day surgery unit 5 Operating rooms 6 Medical imaging 7 Laboratory 8 Service core 9 Public elevators

Second floor

[2] CELEBRATING HUMBER’S ETHNICALLY DIVERSE COMMUNITY, COMMITMENT TO CARING AND DETERMINATION TO OVERCOME FEARS AND DOUBTS, THE ICONIC 9,500 SF ‘ASPEN GROVE’ GRAPHIC GLASS INSTALLATION IS PROMINENTLY DISPLAYED ALONG THE HOSPITAL’S MAIN ENTRY [2]. THE COLOURS OF THE STYLIZED ‘ASPEN GROVE’ ARTWORK REFLECT THE STRENGTH OF HUMBER’S COMMUNITY UNITED IN A COMMON PURPOSE [3]. AN INPATIENT CARE ROOM OVERLOOKS THE VEGETATED ROOF [4]. DIALYSIS CLINIC PATIENTS ENJOY NATURAL DAYLIGHT DURING TREATMENT [5].

2

3 Opened in late 2015, the new Humber River

Programmatically, this analysis led to the creation of on-stage and off-stage areas

Hospital incorporates evidence-based design princi-

inside the facility: on-stage areas for the public; off-stage areas for staff and physician

ples to fully integrate clinical, operational and facility

use. Clinic and inpatient areas were designed to ensure, wherever possible, standard-

planning. The goal was to create a flexible, state-of-

ized room layouts to minimize confusion when searching for equipment and supplies.

the-art ‘Lean, Green, Digital’ facility.

Support spaces, such as medication rooms, soiled utility rooms and clean rooms, are located at the core of each unit to decrease the walking distance to patient care areas.

LEAN DESIGN IMPROVES WORKFLOW EFFICIENCY Based on the philosophy of form follows function, Humber’s design enhances clinical workflow

In order to expedite the healing process, 80% of inpatient beds are in private rooms. These rooms feature specific zones for patients, caregivers, and hygiene as well as special alcoves for visiting family members. Patients and visitors benefit from expansive windows offering daylight, views of rooftop gardens and outdoor green spaces.

with technologies promoting efficient use of staff

A ‘Portals of Care’ concept, similar to an airport terminal, was used to break down

and resources. This facilitates smooth movement of

the scale of the building and to create clear and direct routes for patients and visitors.

patients, staff and visitors while reducing waiting

This concept affords many of the outpatient clinics a distinct entrance and limits the

times. Computer modelling and workflow analysis

walk to nine metres from the drop-off to the clinic entry. Patients and visitors access

using the Lean Six Sigma approach increased work-

all areas of the hospital via the Concourse and Allée, which serve to organize the main

flow efficiency and reduced non-value-added tasks

floor into manageable Neighbourhoods and link Humber’s ambulatory and inpatient

in order to maximize caregiver time at the bedside.

services and programs.

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GREEN: LEED CERTIFICATION AND TIER 1 GREEN STANDARD Humber’s design reinforces the connection between health, wellbeing and the environment and achieved both CaGBC LEED Gold Certification and the City of Toronto’s Tier 1 Green Standard. The building incorporates: •Passive design strategies responsive to climate conditions, including prevailing winds, site orientation, seasonal sun paths and precipitation, surface water drainage and solar gain;

South-west aerial view

•The facility is supplied with 100% outdoor air for infection control, using low-pressure ductwork to

PROJECT CREDITS OWNER Humber River Hospital DEVELOPER Plenary Group Canada Ltd. ARCHITECT HDR STRUCTURAL ENGINEER Halsall Associates / WSP MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL ENGINEER Smith and Andersen Consulting Engineering CIVIL ENGINEER AM Candaras Associates Inc. LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT John Quinn and Associates GENERAL CONTRACTOR PCL Constructors Canada Inc. COMMISSIONING AGENT MMM Group / WSP PHOTOS HDR

reduce fan energy, and extensive heat recovery from the exhaust air stream; •The central plant features highly efficient boilers and heat recovery chillers; •There are 2,415 sq.m [26,000 sf] of View Dynamic Glass located in the windows of every patient room to manage solar load—patients can temporarily override controls from the bed if they choose. This was also an infection control strategy as it allowed them to eliminate interior blinds; •Landscape elements such as pastoral gardens, patios and a piazza featuring native and droughtresistant plants; •Lighting strategies to improve views and maximize

PROJECT PERFORMANCE Energy Use Iintensity 145 kBtu/sf/year, currently commissioning to bring down to target of 115 Reduction in potable water consumption relative to reference building = 33% Construction materials diverted from landfill = 75%

daylight capture for interior spaces; •Vegetated green roofs [50% of total roof area] to help manage storm water, reduce the heat island effect, improve air quality and beautify the views from inpatient rooms. Roofs without gardens are painted

View Dynamic Glass used in the patient rooms is a new generation of digitally connected, architectural glass that intelligently tints to control glare and heat, while eliminating blinds and maximizing natural light. viewglass.com

white to help reduce heat island effect; •Highly efficient plumbing fixtures, including lowflow toilets, faucets and showers; and •Low-emission materials for adhesives, sealants,

See metal cladding options, of the type used on this project, at the Metl-Span [bold] one-page case study: www.sabmagazine.com/casestudies

paint, coatings and carpet.

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Metal coping beyond Prefinished sheet metal

Wall line beyond

Vegetated roof

Lap air barrier with air/vapour barrier Reglet cast into conc. panel C/flashing cast into reglet Line of metal panel upstand beyond

Precast concrete

Canopy steel support Fire stop sealant

Continuous air barrier on 13mm exterior sheathing Galvalume shelf to support through wall flashing

Semi-rigid mineral fibre insulation wrap around steel cantiliver

Galvalume flashing with drip edge

Weeps, 300mm o.c.

13mm gypsum board thermal barrier

13mm exterior sheathing Metal liner

Steel diagonal brace

Caulk for water thightness Metal panel canopy

Interior

Continuous galvalume flashing with sealed joints

Horizontal and vertical steel stud framing

Mineral fibre insulation around steel member Canopy steel support

Aluminum comp. u trim with weep holes Roof detail and canopy at south elevation - For details on the vegetated roof installed by LiveRoof Ontario Inc., see the one-page case study at: www.sabmagazine.com/casestudies.html.

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Aluminum spline and rigid insulation


DIGITAL DESIGN IMPROVES PATIENT CARE Digital design permeates every aspect of the hospital

Digitalization continues into the off-stage areas of the facility featuring inno-

allowing the facility to support the latest medical tech-

vations such as pharmacy automation, total laboratory automation, automated

nology in a completely digital environment. The ability

guided vehicles and pneumatic chute systems. Pharmacy and laboratory automa-

to access data and information enables users to ‘con-

tion systems minimize time-consuming tasks and help eliminate the opportunity

nect’ from points such as kiosks situated throughout the

for medication and testing errors.

hospital or on mobile devices anywhere in the building.

Total Laboratory Automation increases workflow efficiency to reduce cost and

In patient rooms, Integrated Bedside Terminals allow

maximize through-put of clinical tests. Pharmacy automation systems streamline

patients to control their environment from adjusting the

pharmacy workflow by packaging and dispensing medications efficiently, increas-

lighting level, room temperature or the shading coeffi-

ing patient safety by decreasing human touches in the process.

cient of the electro-chromatic window glass in addition

Pneumatic chute systems use vacuum technology to transport trash, recy-

to ordering their meals, reviewing test results and com-

clables and soiled linens from loading stations strategically located throughout

municating with caregivers and loved ones via video.

the hospital directly to the back-of-house operations, minimizing the exposure

Doctors and nurses use voice recognition software

of staff, patients and visitors to airborne pathogens. While all this is happening,

to complete charts verbally, and smart bed technology

Automated Guided Vehicles deliver supplies and equipment to units and clinics,

monitors patients’ vital signs and updates electronic

allowing caregivers to devote more time to patient care.

medical records immediately. Lab work specimens are

With a dramatic civic presence and surrounded by beautiful gardens, the new

delivered via pneumatic tubes with results returned to

Humber River Hospital establishes the facility as a centre for excellence and acts

hand-held mobile devices within minutes.

as a magnet for the best talent, innovation and investment. It has been a catalyst for residential, retail and other development in the surrounding area, giving a

Humber is one of the first hospitals in Canada to use

much needed boost to a challenged community in Toronto. 

a special ultraviolet cleaning device to kill potentially deadly superbugs in patient rooms and other areas.

JERRY J. JETER, AIA, ACHA, EDAC, LEED AP BD+C IS A VICE PRESIDENT AND

Through a pre-programmed remote control, ultravio-

HEALTHCARE PRINCIPAL WITH HDR ARCHITECTURE, INC. AND PROJECT PRINCIPAL

let light is delivered to surfaces and the air to reduce

FOR THE HUMBER RIVER HOSPTIAL.

disease-causing pathogens.

SIMILAR TO AN AIRPORT TERMINAL, THE AMBULATORY CLINICS LOCATED ON THE MAIN FLOOR CONCOURSE ARE ORGANIZED BY FOUR ‘PORTALS OF CARE’ [6]. SERVICE CORE WITH AUTOMATED GUIDED VEHICLES [7]. HEALING GARDENS LOCATED ALONG WILSON AVENUE [8].

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First Avenue RESIDENCE High efficiency, comtemporary style rejuvenate established Montreal neighbourhood In order to provide durable, long-term architectural solutions that are adapted to their context, our firm, Microclimat, brings together the required design and construction expertise under one roof. Inspired by the design/build process, we believe that expertise in construction enables us to bring a project from its embryonic stage to delivery by ensuring continuity, consistency and cohesion. The First Avenue Residence in Montreal is the result of this integrated process. By Microclimat and Odile HĂŠnault.

CONTEXT The dense residential neighbourhoods of the city, laid out during the early decades of the 20th century, are dotted with tiny freestanding houses, inserted here and there in the urban fabric. When these houses come up for sale, often in a state of disrepair or dilapidation, they offer architects a new field of practice. These properties provide an opportunity to integrate contemporary lifestyles into traditional streetscapes in the heart of the city.

DOUBLE ENTRANCE [HOUSE AND APARTMENT] [1].

Pool

1 New house

Neghbours 2-storey

Front porch

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Site plan

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Skylight


2

3

Pre-paint flashing, stapled and not screwed

Roof membrane under flashing Parapet - Clay brick - Air space, 1" - House wrap - Plywood panels, 1/2" - Framing, 2X6 - Low density mineral fibre insulation, 5-1/2'' - Plywood panels, 1/2" - Sub layer membrane - White-finish membrane

Wood blocking

Vented roof Rear elevation Exterior wall - Clay brick - Air space, 1" - House wrap - Plywood panels, 1/2" - Framing, 2X6 - Expanded low density mineral fibre insulation, 5-1/2'' - Thermofoam 20 [Polyform] expanded polystyrene, 1-7/8" [R7.5] - Continuous vapour barrier, 6 mil. - Horizontal furring @ 16" o.c. - Gypsum board,​​5/8" Type x

Impermeable membrane, 16", on masonry lintel The lot, located in the borough of Rosemont, was previously occupied by a small single-family house built in 1911. Unocccupied for seven years, the house was poorly maintained, and the materials used to repair or replace certain original elements, including the cornice, the porch, the awnings and the brickwork, were ill-chosen and of poor quality. With its architectural value lost, the only practical option was demolition.

Insulation panel, 3/4 "

Impermeable membrane, 8", at window perimeter Aluminum extrusion and drip

Caulking CHALLENGE

3/4" urethane around the window

Integrated pine baseboard

Our challenge was to use the land to its full potential, designing a building with the maximum floor space permitted by the municipality, and to insert a building that would be contemporary in its expression, yet respectful of the context of this historic neighbourhood. The project was also designed to meet the clients’ need for open, welllit, well-ventilated spaces that would support connected living inside, and which at the same time would have a strong relationship to the outside.

Caulking

Waterproof membrane Joist insulated with urethane insulation

Integrated roller shade

KITCHEN SPACE [2]. DINING ROOM [3].

Box in with pine, painted

Wall construction

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PERMEABLE

WITHOUT COMPROMISE

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PROJECT: Milwaukee Domes Mitchell Park Conservatory Milwaukee, WI DESIGN: Milwaukee County Parks PRODUCT: Eco-Priora™

Permeable means rain water naturally flows between the specially-designed pavers and into the designed sub-base,

Eco-Optiloc™

Eco-Priora™

Thornbury™

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Eco-Promenade™

City Park Paver™

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Contact your Unilock Representative for samples, product information and to arrange a Lunch & Learn for your team. 36

SABMag - FALL 2017

UNILOCK.COM 1-800-UNILOCK


case study Salus Clementine Housing, Ottawa The Salus Corporation is a Canadian charity that provides housing and support services for clients with mental health needs. The Corporation has more than 100 dwelling units in several buildings in Ottawa. The recently completed Salus Clementine project is a 42-unit residence for people suffering from mental illness.

By Anthony Leaning 1

N

Site plan

VIEW OF COVERED PATIO AT REAR GARDEN [1]. FRONT VIEW [2]. VIEW OF COVERED PATIO AT REAR GARDEN [3].

The recently completed Salus Clementine project is a 42-unit residence for people suffering from mental illness. The residence was constructed in an established inner suburb of Ottawa, near public transport and local shopping. The project is ground breaking because it is a community-based initiative to provide “housing first” to people who would otherwise be homeless and on the street. As New York ‘Times journalist Malcolm Gladwell illustrated in his essay “Million Dollar Murray”, it has been proven that the most cost-effective way to solve homelessness is to provide safe, low-cost housing…first. This stabilizes the person’s life so that underlying causes of homelessness can be addressed, and the longterm cost of support services reduced. Extending this logic to the construction of the building

2

itself, Ottawa Salus understood that funding was available for capital projects but that operating expenses are chronically underfunded. It therefore made good business sense to build an energy efficient, healthy and durable building, paying slightly more for the initial construction, in order to reduce ongoing operating costs dramatically. Even with the incremental cost of financing the increased expenditure required to attain the higher standard, the cost of operating the building over its lifetime is lower than it would be for conventional construction. These savings begin to accrue from day one. The building was designed to reduce energy consumption related to heating by up to 66% compared to the 2012 Ontario Building Code that was in effect at the time of design. To achieve the required energy savings, extraordinary efforts were taken to simplify the exterior form, provide high insulation values, achieve airtightness, reduce thermal bridging and to provide the highest possible standard of indoor air quality. 3 SABMag - FALL 2017

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N

B

A B C D E

B

D

Floor plans Typical unit Universally accessible unit Community space Laundry Elevator

E

B

AIR BARRIER INSTALLED OVER INSULATED PANELS [4]. THE CONCRETE FOUNDATION WALL WAS INSULATED WITH EPS INSULATION WHICH SAT ON THE OUTER 12” EPS INSULATED EDGE OF THE LEGALETT GEO-PASSIVE SLAB PROVIDING A CONTINUOUS INSULATED ENVELOPE WITHOUT ANY THERMAL BRIDGING [5].

C

Ground floor

Each apartment operates both winter and summer on an extremely low energy budget, while providing a comfortable A

A

living space with natural light and views. The residents share

A

community meeting space on the ground floor and a communal garden in the back yard. The result is a building that sets a new standard for environmental stewardship, meeting the Passive House Standard and achieving LEED for Homes Platinum certification. A

E

measure of this accomplishment is that the space heating cost per dwelling unit is reduced to about $25/year, with

A

A

the space heating load of the entire 42-unit building being

A

similar to that of a typical single-family residence in the Ottawa neighbourhood. Ottawa Salus anticipates greatly reduced maintenance and operating costs. These savings

Levels 2-4

will be turned directly back into rehabilitation programs and support services for the clients. 4

The specific strategies used to meet the Passive House standard at Salus Clementine are: • A super-insulated exterior enclosure consisting of insulated wall panels with wood I-joist vertical members, EPS insulation and OSB sheathing secured to the exterior of the building frame, and providing a total RSI of 9.8 [R-56] at exterior walls • High-performance triple-glazing with two low-E coatings, argon-filled air spaces, low solar heat gain coefficient, and warm-edge spacers set into insulated frames. This provides an average whole window U-value of 0.65 W/m2 °K, taking into account heat losses through the glass, and at the spacer bars, frame and the window/wall junction. • Thermal-bridge-free design with almost total elimination of heat conducting elements penetrating the exterior envelope. • A continuous air-tight layer around the building from the underside of the foundations to the roof, including all penetrations [windows, doors, ducts, wiring, structure] with a system of membranes, special tapes, and gaskets that exceeded the most stringent airtightness performance standard [0.34 air changes per hour at a pressure differential of 50 Pa]. This is three times the air tightness set by the R-2000 program.

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Outside

Fire protection Air barrier Weather barrier Thermal insulation Inside Plan: Typical window jamb detail - Insulated wall panels with wood I-joist vertical members, EPS insulation and OSB sheathing secured to the exterior of the building frame, and providing a total RSI of 9.8 [R-56] at exterior walls.

Plan: Junction column at insulated floor

5 GEO Passive Slab for difficult soils Legalett provided a unique GEO Passive Slab solution for the Salus Clementine project which had extreme soil conditions including the slab being 8� from the water table on a soil bearing capacity of 65 kPa with an elevator pit, integral to the slab design, which went below the water table. The GEO Passive Slab both insulates the underside of the concrete to isolate it from the surrounding earth avoiding moisture issues, and it spreads the bearing load across the surface allowing the slab to also act as a footing.

A SUPER-INSULATED EXTERIOR ENCLOSURE CONSISTING OF A GEO PASSIVE SLAB FROM LEGALETT WITH R52 [RSI 9.1] BELOW THE SLAB AND R46 [RSI 8.1] VALUE AT THE SLABS EDGE. READ THE ONE-PAGE CASE STUDY ON THE USE OF THE LEGALETT SLAB IN THIS PROJECT AT: WWW.SABMAGAZINE.COM/CASESTUDIES [6].

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• High-performance heat recovery ventilators that ensure a high level of air quality while recovering latent energy and humidity from exhaust air. The design and construction process for Salus Clementine provided several lessons for the project team: • Exceptional performance can be achieved using conventional construction methods and off-the-shelf products. At the time of construction, light steel framing was the most cost-effective building system. Light steel framing would not normally be considered for a high-perfor-

7

mance exterior wall system because of thermal

8

bridging inherent in the steel framing. However, in this project, all insulation was installed as SIP panels, outboard of the light steel framing. The building assembly was designed to put the structure on the warm side of the wall, thus eliminating thermal bridging from the steel. • At the time of construction, exterior windows and doors were imported from Europe because Canadian components could not be found to meet the stringent Passive House requirements. As the Canadian industry responds, it is becoming easier to find local products and suppliers for key components to meet Passive House standards. • Existing construction practices and norms are not enough to ensure high performance. Quality assurance protocols and control are key to success. The Salus project was successful due to the dedication of the owner, contractor, construction trades and the consultant team to achieving the required quality. • Thorough pre-installation training ensured that the tradespeople understood the intent of the design and the standard of workmanship required. With this training, all team members could contribute their skills and knowledge to solve the inevitable problems that arise during construction. • Full-scale mockups were successfully used

COMMON SPACE FOR RESIDENTS [7]. TYPICAL STUDIO SUITE. CSV ARCHITECTS HAVE EMBARKED ON ANOTHER PASSIVEHOUSE APARTMENT PROJECT IN OTTAWA WHICH AGAIN USES THEGEO PASSIVE SLAB SYSTEM – A POSITIVE SIGN OF THE GROWING INTEREST IN VERY HIGH ENERGY-EFFICIENT DESIGN [8].

OWNER Salis Corporation ARCHITECTS AND SUSTAINABILITY CONSULTANTS CSV Architects STRUCTURAL ENGINEER Cleland Jardine Engineering Ltd. MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL ENGINEER Smith + Andersen

CIVIL ENGINEER Capital Engineering Group LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT Lashley + Associates ACOUSTICAL ENGINEER Integral DX Engineering GENERAL CONTRACTOR Taplen Construction PHOTOS Gordon King Photography

to communicate the design intent and establish the standard for the job.

In-progress testing,

such as blower door tests, were carefully scheduled to give feedback to the construction team and to address deficiencies before they were covered over and made inaccessible for deficiency repairs. By careful selection of readily available building systems, and a focus on passive and lowcost strategies, the premium on the construction cost was kept to a minimum, and provided a

The additional premium on financing was covered by energy cost savings. The Passive House approach also demonstrates a viable and attractive solution to the challenge of reducing the impact of buildings on climate change. As ever more rigorous building codes close the gap between what is required and what is possible, the Passive House Standard and the techniques used in projects like Salus Clementine are at the forefront of a transformation in building design and construction. Bearing witness to this, Salus Clementine was the recipient of the 2017 CHRA Sustainability Award and the 2016 GCAO Award of Excellence, Buildings $5M - $15M. 

return on investment within the amortization

ANTHONY LEANING, OAA, FRAIC, LEED® AP BD+C, GGP IS A PRINCIPAL WITH CSV

period of a standard mortgage.

ARCHITECTS, AND PROJECT TEAM LEADER FOR SALIS CLEMENTINE.

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YOUR LEED V4 QUICK-REFERENCE

CANADIAN DIRECTORY OF PRODUCTS AND SERVICES FOR SUSTAINABLE, HIGH-PERFORMANCE BUILDING

Visit our on-line Directory to see hundreds of listings of companies which supply products and services for sustainable, high-performance building. Listings are organized by Product Category and by LEED v4 Category. Our LEED v4 Directory is created with the help of our partner:

OUR 2017 PARTNERS SITE | LANDSCAPING | RAINWATER HARVESTING >Catec Rainwater Harvesting Systems >Langley Concrete Group >Molok® Deep Collection™ System >Unilock >Wishbone Industries Ltd. STRUCTURE & EXTERIOR ENVELOPE >Alumicor Building Excellence >Bailey Metal Products Ltd. >Dryvit Systems Canada >Euroshield® >Hydrotech >LiveRoof >StoneRox >Tremco THERMAL & WINDOWS >Cascadia Windows & Doors >Eco Insulating Glass Inc. >EuroLine Windows® >Inline Fiberglass Ltd. >LiteZone™ Insulating Glass >Pollard Windows Inc. >View Dynamic Glass INTERIOR FINISHES >Baillargeon Doors Inc. >CBR Products >Columbia Forest Products

>Forbo Flooring Systems >Interface >Nora Systems, Inc. >Shaw Contract Group >Tectum ELECTRICAL | PLUMBING | HVAC | RENEWABLES >Acuity Brands >Aqua-Tech >Duravit >Simple Solar >Sloan Valve >Taco Comfort Solutions >Tate Access Floors >Termobuild >Uponor >Ventacity Systems >Viessmann Manufacturing Company Inc. >Zehnder America Inc. GREEN DESIGN SUPPORT + PROFESSIONALS >Canadian Precast/Prestressed Concrete Institute >Diamond Schmitt Architects >FABRIQ architecture >Pinwheel Building Supplies >RJC Engineers

http://sabmagazine.com/2017directoryv4.html

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CA

National Sponsors

The National Program brought to you by Sustainalbe Architecture & Building Magazine and The Canada Green Building Council Category Sponsors

BUILDI N G

ARCHITECTURAL

EN

>> Thank you to IAN GR our sponsors D A2017 AWARDS E N and jury! >>

>>> WWW.SABMAGAZINE.COM Visit the Awards section of our website for complete details on the winning projects. For details on sponsoring the Canadian Green Building Awards contact dgriffith@sabmagazine.com

JURY

Photo: Roy Grogan

Keith Tufts, RAIC, NSAA, AANB, LEED® AP, BCOMM Principal in charge, LYDON LYNCH ARCHITECTS

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Johanna Hurme, MAA, AAA, OAA, SAA, SAFA, FRAIC, LEED AP Founding partner of 5468796 Architecture

Steve Kemp, M.A.Sc., P.Eng, LEED® AP BD+C Principal, Senior Energy and Sustainability Specialist, RDH Building Science

Rodney Wilts, JD, LEED AP Partner, Windmill Development Group, Ltd.


CANADIAN GREEN BUILDING AWARD WINNERS RECOGNIZED AT CaGBC CONFERENCE The 2017 Canadian Green Building Awards winning projects were recognized during the Welcome Reception at the Canada Green Building Council [CaGBC] National Convention in Vancouver with the presentation of Awards certificates by our sponsors. 1

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[1] Lindsay Oster of Prairie Architects Inc. receives the Institutional [Large] Award for Amber Trails Community School from National Sponsor the Canadian Precast Prestressed Concrete Institute represented by Managing Director Brian Hall. [2] Koen de Waal of De Waal Developments Ltd. receives the Technical Award for the De Waal Net Zero House from National Sponsor Masonite Architectural represented by General Manager Canada Jennifer McGill. [3] Maxime Turgeon [centre left] and Marc Letellier [centre right] of Gagnon Letellier Cyr Ricard Mathieu & Associé Architectes receive the Institutional [Small] Award for the Gare fluviale [Ferry Station] de Lévis from Institutional Category Sponsor Altex represented by John Lowe, Architectural Sales Consultant [far left] and Mark Lim, Technical Representative [far right]. [4] Mark Thompson Brandt, MTBA Associates Inc. [left] and Glenn Burwell NORR Architects & Engineers receive the Existing Building Upgrade Award for the Sir John A. Macdonald Building from National Sponsor Masonite Architectural represented by General Manager Canada Jennifer McGill. [5] Ryan Bragg of Perkins+Will [left] receives the Mixed Use Award for the Marine Gateway Development from National Sponsor the Canadian Precast Prestressed Concrete Institute represented by Managing Director Brian Hall. Other winning projects: Interior Design Award: Eva’s Phoenix, Toronto by LGA Architectural Partners; Commercial/ Industrial [Large] Award: Queen Richmond Centre West, Toronto by Sweeny&Co Architects Inc.; Residential [Large] Award: River City Phase 1 & 2, West Don Lands, Toronto by Saucier+Perrotte Architectes and ZAS Architects; and Residential [Small] Award: Lockeport Beach House, Nova Scotia by Nova Tayona Architects.

ENTER THE 2018 PROGRAM>>>

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interview with Jeff Addison

Jeff Addison, Managing Director, Kiko Water Systems [www.kikowatersystems.com] is riding high after Kiko received the 2017 Green Building Product of the Year Award from the Canada Green Building Council for its Water Systems Cartridges, a nanotechnology that is green and not chemical.

WHAT DO YOUR WATER SYSTEM CARTRIDGES DO? Our cartridges change the behaviour and improve the efficiency of water. In HVAC systems, thermal energy is transferred through water and our cartridges allow for a more efficient delivery system, much like the way fibre optic cable now delivers information to your computer faster than was the case with the old dial up system. This occurs as a result of our cartridges weakening the hydrogen bonding between H2O molecules which reduces the surface tension of water and lowers its specific heat capacity. This contributes to reduced energy consumption, improved system performance and quicker system

THE KIKO CARTRIDGES IMPROVE HVAC EFFICIENCY BY 20%.

response times. Our cartridges also help to extend equipment lifespans due to reduced run times. Specific equipment performance and operating costs can be analysed in WHERE ARE THE CARTRIDGES INSTALLED AND WHAT

depth, and trends can be observed and adjusted as required. In the near future,

RESULTS DO THEY DELIVER?

Kiko InSight will allow our clients to control their BMS systems remotely as well.

Our clients realise approximately a 20% reduction in

Providing our clients with a greater knowledge of their HVAC system’s overall

HVAC operating costs and all of our results are normal-

operations not only allows them to observe the savings and performance improve-

ized to account for the myriad of variables in HVAC

ments in real time, it provides them with a deep level of knowledge to allocate

operations. Installed into pot feeders, make up water

costs and maximize efficiencies while reducing harmful emissions.

tanks, feed lines and sumps of open and closed loop systems, our installations require no system shutdowns

WHAT IS THE ACCEPTANCE IN THE MARKET?

or project management. Equipment run times, delta T,

As with all new technologies, there are early and late adopters. From 2012

approach temperatures, and system response times are

to 2016 our growth had been generated through new clients and expansions

some of the many operating conditions that are greatly

throughout their portfolios. In 2017, we have been recognized by Canada’s Clean

improved from using Kiko. Equipment wear and tear is

50 as one of the nation’s top 15 sustainability projects of the year and by the

also reduced and system operations are simplified.

CaGBC as the 2017 Green Building Product of the Year. These honours recognized our results, our transparency and that in every case our clients save substantially

HOW DO RESULTS GET MEASURED?

more than our monthly costs. They also recognize that the delivery of the tech-

All of our results are established from our customer’s

nology to our clients are without capital costs or system disruptions and produce

data and are normalized based on contributing factors

results quickly. Minimal risks to our clients have helped ensure our growth which

such as weather, occupancy rates, operating conditions,

has accelerated greatly over the past year and continues into the future.

etc. We have also developed Kiko InSight – our realtime monitoring system that isolates HVAC equipment

HOW FAR CAN YOU TAKE THIS TECHNOLOGY?

performance and energy consumption. Designed to pro-

Our delivery system with no capital costs or long payback periods coupled

vide system operators and management comprehensive

with our quickly realised results and low-risk commitments, provide the easiest

knowledge of HVAC operations and costs, best practices

entry into the energy efficiency/reduction market available today. With the envi-

can be established to ensure optimal performance while

ronmental issues that we are watching our planet cope with now, along with the

also showing the detailed performance improvements

inevitable rising energy costs, Kiko provides a logical and responsible solution. We

and savings that using Kiko generates. Data is streamed

are currently installed in many cities across North America and there is a need for

via the 24/7 on-line dashboard which also has the ability

us in every building with a water-based HVAC system to not only help our client’s

to enable custom notifications and alerts.

bottom lines, but to help the environment as well.

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SABMag - FALL 2017


PRECAST CONCRETE Builds on... Resiliency

The key attributes of enhanced architectural & structural resiliency are:

· · · · · ·

Resistance to disasters Short-term recovery from a crisis Longevity (long service life) Life safety Durability Adaptability for reuse

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WILLIAM’S COURT, Kanata, Ontario Owner: Groupe Lépine | Architect: Alcaide Webster Architects | Engineer: CIMA+ CPCI 2017 Real Estate Development Award of Excellence Winner Groupe Lépine

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Visit www.cpci.ca/publications to download your free copies of the Meeting and Exceeding Building Code Thermal Performance Requirements and High Performing Precast Concrete Building Enclosures – Rain Control Technical Guides

TF: 877.937.2724

Member

Authored by: John Straube, Ph.D., P. Eng., RDH Building Science Corporation

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