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SPECIAL ISSUE!

Issue number 43 | SPRING 2014 | PM40024961 | $6

LEED Canada

Buildings in-review James Bartleman

Archives & Library City puts best foot forward to demonstrate new-era building

Hubbard Park Enhancing life

with light Lighting for humans, not for lumens

Apartments

Community housing renovation starts at building shell sabMag - SPRING 2014

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www.sabmagazine.com For more about the articles in this issue!

6-12 Industry News, Products, People, Events 10 Viewpoint World Exchange Centre Upgrade

James Bartleman Archives & Library Materials Centre City puts best foot forward to demonstrate new-era building

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SPECIAL SECTION

44

Hubbard Park Apartments

49

CEU: Multi-trade prefabrication

55

Bluenose Academy

59

Enhancing life with light

17

SPRING

2013 LEED Canada Buildings-in-Review Community housing renovation starts at building shell

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2014

46

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Improving efficiency, economy and adaptability in complex healthcare facilities High-performance design respects historic roots Lighting for humans, not for lumens

issuE DON’T MISS next Summer 2014

A review of all the winning projects

N GR E

CA

AWARDS

2014

Sponsors

Occupant Behaviour and Performance

BUILDING

2014 Canadian Green Building Awards

IA D A

EN

N

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How occupant behaviour affects building performance

Continuing Education article: Passive Design Strategies for commercial and institutional buildings

Cover: James Bartleman Archives & Library Materials Centre. Barry J. Hobin & Associates Architects Inc. Photo: Tom Arban Photography Inc. sabMag - SPRING 2014

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editor’s note

Dedicated to high-performance building

Member Canada Green Building Council

LEED EDUCATION PROVIDER

SABMag is a proud member and media partner of the CaGBC, and works closely with them on content for each issue.

STATE

OF THE WORLD

VISIT www.sabmagazine.com Publisher Don Griffith 800-520-6281, ext. 304, dgriffith@sabmagazine.com

As an editor, I receive regular press

Editor Jim Taggart, FRAIC 604-874-0195, architext@telus.net

Some promoting a narrow corporate interest

Editorial Assistant Katherine Berry

ability, others broad in scope and dealing

releases from all kinds of organizations. that has little or nothing to do with sustainwith issues of global significance. Among the

Senior Account Manager Patricia Abbas 416-438-7609, pabbas8@gmail.com

regular communications I look out for are those from the Worldwatch Institute -

Graphic Design Carine De Pauw 800-520-6281, ext. 308, cdepauw@sabmagazine.com

an environmental research organization with a global focus that is headquartered photo: ROY GROGAN

in Washington, DC. For the most part, these press releases are

Published by

excerpts from the institute’s annual publication ‘State of the World’ - which is

www.janam.net 81 Leduc St.,Gatineau,Qc J8X 3A7 800-520-6281, ext.304, 819-778-5040 Fax: 819-595-8553

Subscription/address changes: info@sabmagazine.com, 800-520-6281, ext. 304 Subscription prices Canada: [Taxes extra] 1 year [4 issues]: $24.95 2 years [8 issues]: $46.95 3 years [12 issues]: $67.40

compiled by leading scientists and academics, and which in the case of the 2013 edition, runs to more than 300 pages. This past year I used the book as a framework for my Sustainable Design class at BCIT, with a view to giving the students the broadest possible frame of reference for evaluating their role as architects. The material makes for compelling and often alarming reading as it ranges across issues that include the depletion of fish stocks, the processing of e-waste, shrinking acquifers, our growing ecological footprint and many others. The language is accessible, and the message clear - almost all of the

ISSN 1911-4230 Copyright by Janam Publications Inc. All rights reserved. Contents may not be reprinted or reproduced without written permission. Views expressed are those of the authors exclusively.

Earth’s environmental systems are in crisis, and some have probably passed the tipping point beyond which they may never recover. In the 2013 edition at least, most chapters also still include a hopeful story

Publication Mail Agreement #40024961

of technical, social or political innovation that is successfully addressing the

Return undelivered Canadian address mail to: Janam Publications Inc., 81 Leduc St., Gatineau, Qc J8X 3A7

issue in one small corner of the world: the improved efficiency and reduced cost of photovoltaic technology for a example, or a new ecologically-based water system in Rajasthan.

The print version of SABMag uses Rolland Enviro 100 Satin, a 100% post-consumer fiber that is certified FSC and EcoLogo. It is processed chlorine-free, FSC-recycled and is manufactured using biogas energy.

I have not seen a copy of ‘State of the World 2014’ yet, and hope that it can still justify giving editorial space to stories of hope and inspiration. What must follow inspiration, however, is replication and ultimately transformation. While I clearly want my students to practice an environmentally benign architecture, they must also realize that this alone will not get us where we need to go. Professional and personal responsibilities are indivisible, and immediate and concerted action are essential if we are ever to improve the state of the world. Jim Taggart, FRAIC Editor

Environmental savings for this issue:

Visit Jim Taggart’s blog, www.abacuseditions.tumblr.com, for concise, engaging 77 Trees

275,795 litres water

4,022 kg waste

9,805 kg CO2

essays on sustainability subjects, and contribute your own comments. And, see more at http://www.sabmagazine.com/editorspickarticles.html. sabMag - SPRING 2014

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Architectural design key to making new post boxes work Architectural Canada | RAIC Report

In newer subdivisions where and Developers, advises against

the community mail boxes cur-

locating the boxes beside curb

rently exist, users are familiar

lanes that have no-stopping or

with problems such as idling

no-parking zones.

cars, flyers littering the ground, vandalism, theft and risk of injury.

ity for people with mobility chal-

Hundreds of neighbourhood

lenges [strollers, casts, canes

residents driving to a mailbox,

A CBC News investigation

and wheelchairs], or with sight

instead of one Canada Post vehi-

found Canada Post recorded

or hearing impairments.

cle making the rounds, increases

4,880 incidents involving com-

gas consumption, greenhouse

munity mailboxes, ranging from

gases and carbon footprint.

vandalism and arson to mail

As a profession, architects By Samuel Oghale Oboh,

advocate for sustainable, pedes-

Royal Architectural Institute of

trian-friendly

Canada, 2nd vice president and

Post CEO Deepak Chopra has

cities.

Canada

The

Royal

Architectural

theft, between 2008 and 2013.

Institute of Canada [RAIC], which

The RAIC urges careful, con-

regional director for Alberta

suggested that a brisk walk to

advocates for a livable built

sultative planning and design

and the Northwest Territories

the mailbox would be good for

environment, has warned of the

before launching these unwelcome boxes.

seniors’ health. As admirable

negative impact of group mail-

Canada Post’s decision to

as this may sound, for many

boxes on the urban landscape

replace home delivery with

people, navigating through ice,

and quality of life of Canadians.

community

snow, or traffic to the collective

mailboxes

runs

counter to advances in sociallyresponsible design. In recent years, we have seen

Creative

and

innovative

urban design and architectural

It shares public concerns

solutions will be key to making

about placement in built-up

the post boxes and the spaces

In reality, people tend to

areas, city parks and homeown-

around them look and function as well as possible.

boxes will not be easy or safe. drive to these boxes instead

ers' lawns. There's no informa-

significant effort made in the

of walking. Canada Post even

tion that shows how this will be

A good design solution will

design of buildings and streets -

seems to encourage drive-by

done in a way that conforms to

ensure best value, sustainabil-

in communities across the nation

pickups; its Delivery Planning

good urban design principles

ity and avoidance of additional

– in order to improve accessibil-

Standards Manual for Builders

or that's acceptable to anyone.

financial burden to taxpayers.

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news Downtown Calgary’s green future Calgary’s new downtown land use district, part of Calgary’s nextCITY planning vision, is exciting, refreshing, and forward looking. The planning document of the new downtown district features several sections that outline sustainability features and glimpses into the possibilities of innovative design. Incentives include sustainability features such as: • green roof / blue roof, • green walls, • bio-retention structures, • district energy connection, • onsite co-generation facility, • electric vehicle charging stations, and • additional bicycle parking stalls. Adaptive reuse [requiring retention of 75% of gross floor area and proper removal and recycling of materials], includes: • incentives for the reuse of existing building structures, and • density transfer options. Transit • public bicycle parkade with change rooms, lockers and showers • supporting older buildings without parking Enhanced transit stations • public transit shelters

• high-design quality, and • climate-controlled in winter. See more details by searching "calgary next city".

CaGBC celebrates 574 LEED certifications in 2013 – the highest to date The Canada Green Building Council [CaGBC] LEED-certified more Canadian projects in 2013 than in any prior year - a total of 574 – bringing the total projects certified in Canada to 1,484. In addition, 598 projects registered to pursue certification, bringing the total registered and certified projects to 4,685. 2013 saw the highest number of LEED Gold certifications to date at 173, and it was another strong year for LEED Platinum certifications, the most rigorous level of LEED certification, with a total of 32 projects certified. Projects were certified across the country, with the highest number of certifications taking place in Ontario [221], Quebec [121], British Columbia [87], and Alberta [78]. A searchable list with further detail on all LEED projects can be viewed on the CaGBC LEED Project Profiles webpage.

New online tool helps to specify insulated wood walls The Wall Thermal Design Calculator, designed by buildABILITY for the Canadian Wood Council and found at www.cwc. ca/wtd, provides prescriptive insulated wall assembly solutions that comply with the energyefficiency requirements of the National Building Code of Canada. Over 150 wall assemblies were developed, each with a hygrothermal and energy analysis performed. The electronic catalogue portion of the tool includes assembly components, energy and thermal performance, and notes that address ease of construction, affordability, aesthetics, and potential moisture concerns. "The Calculator lets users explore options, compare features, and determine the exact wall assembly that can perform across the range of Canadian climates," said Michael Lio, President of buildABILITY.

new LEED v4 to arrive in canada The CaGBC has announced the next generation of the LEED rating system, LEED v4, in Canada. Canadian LEED v4 projects will

be certified by CaGBC using LEED Online in collaboration with the Green Building Certification Institute. To ensure LEED v4 will meet the expectations of the Canadian marketplace, CaGBC is participating in the LEED International Roundtable and leading development of Alternative Compliance Paths [ACPs], which allow Canadian projects to demonstrate compliance with credit requirements. “LEED v4 presents the next generation of building rating systems with increased emphasis on energy efficiency and reducing carbon emissions, building performance and material lifecycle assessment. Introducing Environmental Product Declarations [EPDs] is an important first step toward reducing environmental impacts from materials and enhancing public health,” says Thomas Mueller, President and CEO of the CaGBC. Canadian projects will still be able to register under the current rating system, LEED Canada 2009, until June 1, 2015. LEED v4 and the Canadian ACPs will be officially launched in Canada at Building Lasting Change 2014, the CaGBC’s annual national conference taking place in Toronto from June 2-4.

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pEOPLE

Green Building Pioneer Stephen Carpenter Wins Order of Canada

products RAIC honours Peter Busby with 2014 Gold Medal

New service assists integrated design Inktronic is an online collaboration, workflow, and markup solution that accelerates information sharing between project members by providing a central project portal to access and markup drawings using a digital pen or tablet technology. Inktronic has the ability to merge markups from any input seamlessly, archive them, and notify all team members. Inktronic eliminates scanning and automatically maintains version control. Custom client workflow and additional modules including Inktronic’s Tender and RFI modules are also available. Info: www.inktronic.ca

Peter Busby

Stephen Carpenter

Green building pioneer Stephen Carpenter, P.Eng has been named a Member of the Order of Canada “for his visionary leadership in the development and stewardship of Canada’s green building industry.” Since 1981, Enermodal’s early work focussed on developing Canada’s first energy modelling software. Mr. Carpenter’s “cracked the code” for the mathematical modelling of energy loss through building components such as windows, and this allowed for the development of sophisticated computer modelling tools used in the design of energy-efficient buildings. Carpenter and Enermodal designed the Waterloo Region Green Home in 1992, and then their first purpose-built headquarters, Green on the Grand, in Kitchener in 1996, Canada’s most energy-efficient office at the time. In the early 2000s, Mr. Carpenter became involved in creating the Canadian version of the LEED rating system, and has taught more than 50 advanced courses in building design and construction to over 2,000 professionals. Most recently, he led the design and construction of the new Enermodal head office in Kitchener, A Grander View, to take the title of Canada’s most energy-efficient office.

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The Royal Architectural Institute of Canada [RAIC] has named Peter Busby as the 2014 recipient of the RAIC Gold Medal, the highest honour RAIC can bestow. It recognizes a significant and lasting contribution to Canadian architecture. A five-member jury unanimously selected Mr. Busby, FRAIC, C.M., LEED® Fellow. His award-winning portfolio embodies his philosophy of social responsibility and commitment to sustainable design, such as the goundbreaking Dockside Green in Victoria. Since opening his Vancouver practice in 1984, Mr. Busby’s body of work has gained a reputation for design excellence and innovation, becoming a powerful catalyst in the growth of the green architecture movement in North America and abroad. “His pioneering work in sustainable design and his international influence in this regard has ensured a permanent place for Mr. Busby in Canadian architectural history, for both design and innovation,” the jury wrote. In 2013, he was elevated to LEED Fellow, a designation of the U.S. Green Building Council, which recognizes exceptional contributions to the green building community. The Gold Medal will be presented at a ceremony at the RAIC Festival of Architecture which takes place in Winnipeg May 28 to 31.

Semi-underground containers beautify waste The EnviroWirx™ 7 cu, yds semi-underground deep waste container is clean, innovative and it wirx! No special equipment required, as the unit can be emptied with a standard front end garbage truck. With 40% of the unit being underground, the earth temperature keeps the garbage cooler and reduces odours. It is available with a garbage or recycling lid, which are both secure to keep unwanted waste and pests out. Info: www.rtscompaniesinc.com

Heat exchanger for drains works in the horizontal EcoDrain™ efficiently transfers heat from shower drain water to fresh cold water thereby saving energy. Installed directly in the shower drain line, it has a double wall of separation between fresh and waste water to eliminate the possibility of mixing, plus an interior non-stick coating to prevent soap, hair or debris collecting inside. It’s the only one of its kind specifically designed to be efficient in horizontal or minimum slope applications. Info: www.ecodrain.com

Building Envelope Consultation Passive House Design Construction Management www.hamiddesignbuild.com

[604] 603 3142

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2014-01-03 8:21 AM


Viewpoint

Existing Building Upgrade

Caring for, understanding and nurturing existing buildings is central to improving our industry and key to its health and growth into the future.

By Brandon Malleck and Paula Partner

Buy-in of tenants the sweet spot of holistic building performance

In October 2012, after a three-year pursuit to improve the building performance and community presence of the world exchange Plaza [WEP] achieved leed gold certification through the leed for existing Building: Operations and Maintenance [LEED EBO&M] Program. The building management team at the 20-year old WEP pushed beyond attaining LEED EB or BOMa Best certification, beyond recycling bins, beyond light bulbs, and beyond looking ‘the part’ to focusing on the whole. They have been ahead of the green curve by etching out their own curve. for this group of engaged and enthusiastic individuals, it’s about more than jargon and a certification plaque; it is about living real, measured actions and collaboration. WEP is located in the heart of Ottawa’s downtown core, steps from parliament hill. It includes two Class-A office towers, a multi-level retail concourse, an open-air amphitheater and five levels of underground parking. The most distinctive feature of the site is the amphitheatre where visitors can enjoy extensive natural gardens, seating and a sheltered stage, all of which contribute to the urban caché of the Plaza.

1

It’s been over a year since World Exchange Plaza achieved LEED Canada EB Gold. Five years earlier the project began with conversations between the building owner [bc-IMC Realty

2

Corporation] and building management [Bentall Kennedy] with a focus on performance and a mandate to achieve green building certification. Brainstorming and excitement quickly accelerated from what if…to why not? And from there the work began. Some of the building’s greatest achievements over that time included a 30% reduction in energy consumption [now World Exchange Plaza is in the top 10% of similar buildings as benchmarked in the Energy Star program], a 78% waste diversion rate, and one of Canada’s first rainwater harvesting retrofit systems. This reduction is supported by a sophisticated utility management tool which tracks energy, water, greenhouse gases and waste consumption. This tool compiles aggregate data [daily, monthly and annually] and 15-minute interval data. It compares performance to other buildings in Bentall Kennedy’s portfolio. World Exchange Plaza created and implemented a comprehensive wellness program and a tenant engagement council to discuss key environmental issues and inspire action. That council continues to embark on innovative tenant-landlord programs, led by both the tenants and building management.

Over 17% of the total site area of the World Exchange Plaza [excluding the building footprint] is vegetated with shrubs, perennials and over 40 medium-sized trees [1]. the World Exchange Plaza is located just steps from Parliament Hill [2].

sabMag - SPRING 2014

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Viewpoint Ecotracker provides real time analysis and historical trending capacity Historical analysis - All utilities 45 O'Connor, ON Electricity 60 40 20 0

2007 2008 2009 2010

Water $3.50 $3.00 $2.50 $2.00 $1.50 $1.00 $0.50 $0.00

Annual consumption [ekWh/sq.ft.]

There are many other initiatives underway including three car share parking spots in the parkade [including an all-electric Nissan Leaf], aggressive procurement/disposal tracking, and the elimina-

Natural gas

tion of up-lighting. Focusing on long-term strategies occasionally means taking two steps back for one leap forward. For example, the rainwater harvesting system has a payback period that wouldn’t tempt the greenest of green. The system includes a series of 76 tanks which collects and stores 215,000 litres of water, which is reused for irrigation and cooling tower make-up water. This saves 3,530,000 litres of water annually. The system is considered a success as it continues to inspire other

2007 2008 2009 2010

Annual cost [$/sq.ft.]

building managers, tenants and the general public [in addition to the obvious environmental benefits]. It proves that retrofit solutions are possible, that major landlords are making ‘deep green’ investments,

20.000 15.000 10.000 5.000

Annual consumption [eMwh]

$1.400

and that there is a shift from payback to longevity.

$1.200 $1.000 $800 $600

Key lessons Our infrastructure’s future lies in working with existing building stock, making smart changes and updates. Here are some of the key lessons from this green journey at the WEP:

$400 $200

â In addition to engaging the right consultants, education for participants is equally as important. Regardless of a consultant’s

Annual cost [$ thousands]

experience, they will not be able to understand the intricacies of a sophisticated building and potential impact of actions on build-

3

ing occupants and systems. The key role of a [sustainability, green, LEED] consultant should be to educate, not to implement. â LEED [and BOMA BESt to a lesser extent] should be regarded as a verb rather than a noun. Traditionally, buildings pursue LEED for recognition rather than used as a guidebook as it was intended. LEED is a powerful framework that should be used to improve performance rather than only to certify buildings. While arguably both approaches achieve similar benefits, the former will improve the longevity as it creates a mindset, not a label. â Inspiration is critical. LEED is intended for the top performing buildings. Every building can exhibit LEED performance in different areas but could use inspiration and ideas at the onset. Managers of every LEED building must take on the responsibility to share their path to certification [challenges and successes], the simple steps which could be emulated at all buildings. Bentall Kennedy has done this through information on the building’s website, newsletters and tours hosted by the local CaGBC chapters.

4

The people who use, operate and work each day within the walls of a building can make the most impact and the greatest change. Through tenant engagement and education lies the sweet spot that building mangers must strive for – inspiration. Inspiring tenants, operators and other buildings through engagement is where existing buildings are elevated from competent management to excellence.  Brandon Malleck is Manager, Technical Services and Projects, Real Estate Services at Bentall Kennedy [Canada] LP. Paula Partner is General Manager of the World Exchange Plaza.

Building tenants and the public gathered in the amphitheatre [3]. Rainwater harvesting system; 76 of the tanks are located in the parking garage [4].

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sabMag - SPRING 2014


CONCRETE BUILDINGS ARE MODELS OF SUSTAINABILITY Energy efďŹ cient, resilient, durable and versatile, concrete plays an essential role in building safer, more sustainable communities. Learn more at rediscoverconcrete.ca

sabMag - SPRING 2014

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James Bartleman Archives & Library Materials Centre City puts best foot forward to demonstrate new-era building On the edge of Tallwood Forest at the intersection of two arterial roads, the James Bartleman Centre creates a public courtyard linking to a future transit station. The new building houses two separate and complementary functions: a new home for the City of Ottawa’s archival collection and a new location for the Ottawa Public Library’s Technical Services and Materials Management department. BY Steve Clifford 1 2

3 1

6 5 6

4

2

N

1 2 3

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sabMag - SPRING 2014

Site plan James Bartleman Centre Future expansion Landscape forecourt and public art installation

4 Loading bays 5 Future transit station 6 BIcycle parking


South elevation, View of new building from Woodroffe Avenue [1]. Detail of frit pattern on glass curtain wall [2].

Four vaults with high-density shelving are environmentally con-

• The storey-high green wall reduces the perceived height of the

trolled to protect the Archives’ collection of historic photographs,

three-storey building mass, especially where the building is closest to

documents, records and artwork Meanwhile, the Library department

the street edge and neighbouring homes

processes 70 tonnes of books each week through the loading and processing areas for distribution to the City’s 33 public branches In an initiative to create new energy-saving facilities which pro-

• It serves as a public demonstration of the building’s sustainability and communicates with high visibility The City of Ottawa’s commitment to energy and the environment.

duce lower greenhouse gas emissions, use less water and other resources, and provide high quality indoor working environments, the City of Ottawa mandated that the new facility would be LEED Silver certified. The resulting building achieved LEED Gold and meets the City’s 2030 Challenge for reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

Grow Wall and Landscaping

Passive Design Strategies To maximize occupant comfort and reduce energy demands, the building incorporates a number of passive design techniques. In the public and staff work areas there are expanses of glass which provide natural light and create an open, inviting appearance. Ceramic frit within the glazing, displaying excerpts from some of the oldest and

Native and adaptive ground level plantings that are tolerant to

most unique items in the Archives holdings, reduces the heat gain

drought are used throughout the site. The public forecourt front-

from the sun while providing diffuse natural light deeper inside the

ing onto Tallwood is elegantly landscaped and contributes to a

building. Regularly occupied spaces are positioned along north and

pedestrian quality that was previously lacking along the street.

south-facing facades to capitalize on daylighting.

Nearly a third of the perimeter walls at the ground floor are cov-

The concrete structure contributes to more consistent and easily

ered with a grow wall system which, at maturity, will offer significant

controlled humidity and temperature levels when compared to steel

ecological contributions in addition to energy and aesthetic benefits:

frame construction.

• The monoculture of vines will reduce air pollution and its root system will provide natural filtration of ground and storm water • It will restore a natural habitat for beneficial organisms such as birds and butterflies

The majority of roof area is covered with a solar-reflective coating which minimizes the building’s contribution to global warming while reducing thermal heat transmission to the interior, improving the quality of the environment for its users.

• The dense leafy growth is held away from the wall surface by a grid system, enclosing an air space and enhancing the insulative value of the wall

sabMag - SPRING 2014

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BUILDING BIG – AND ENERGY EFFICIENT – IN BURNABY BEING POWER SMART MAKES BUSINESS SENSE Developer Jim Bosa is set to transform a major corner in Burnaby into a hub of residential, office and commercial activity – all of it built to very high standards of energy efficiency. While always interested in sustainability, Bosa has never before specifically targeted energy efficiency as a goal in his developments. But for the Solo District, located at the corner of Lougheed Highway and Willingdon, engineering firm Integral Group recommended he look at incorporating energy-saving measures from the ground up. The result for just the first building, revealed through an energy-modeling study funded by BC Hydro’s New Construction Program, is an estimated energy savings of 1.16 million kWh per year – which means it will use about 26 per cent less energy than a similar building built without those energy-saving measures. “The engineers pulled out elements I wouldn’t have thought of,” Bosa says. “I thought I knew quite a bit, but they found more savings than I would ever have on my own. I’ve recommended the New Construction Program to other developers. I’ve told them, you need energy efficiency for marketability, so you might as well take advantage of the incentives BC Hydro offers to do an energy study and install the energy-saving measures.” Are you looking for new ways to build better? Visit bchydro.com/construction or call 1 866 522 4713.

A13-508

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sabMag - SPRING 2014


BUILDINGS in review

THE Annual SUPPLEMENT OF

& sabMag - SPRING 2014

17


PROJECT NAME

LOCATION

LEED PLATINUM

PROJECT TYPE | OWNER TYPE 2013

Centre for Interactive Research on Sustainability

Vancouver, BC

CaGBC LEED - NC and Major Renovations

Other

Centre of Excellence for Clean Energy and Technology

Dawson Creek, BC

CaGBC LEED - NC and Major Renovations

Laboratory

CIC/PWGSC Office Fit-up at 180 Kent St.

Ottawa, ON

CaGBC LEED - CI

Office building

Efficiency Nova Scotia Corporation

Dartmouth, NS

CaGBC LEED - CI

Office building

Energy Environment Experiential Learning Building, University of Calgary

Calgary, AB

CaGBC LEED - EB:OM

Laboratory

Maison du développement durable

Montreal. QC

CaGBC LEED - NC and Major Renovations

Office building

MIP CanmetMATERIALS/CanmetMATÉRIAUX

Hamilton, ON

CaGBC LEED - NC and Major Renovations

Laboratory

MMM Group Limited

Toronto, ON

CaGBC LEED - CI

Office building

NS Power Office 130227

Halifax, NS

CaGBC LEED-NC and Major Renovations

Office building

Opresnik Engineering Consultants Inc. Office

Toronto. ON

CaGBC LEED - CI

Office building

30 Reliable Controls Headquarters Annex

Victoria, BC

CaGBC LEED - NC and Major Renovations

Office building

Shaw Tower Office7

Vancouver, BC

CaGBC LEED - EB:OM

Office building

UNBC Bioenergy Plant

Prince George, BC

CaGBC LEED-NC and Major Renovations

Industrial / Manufacturing

Vancouver Island University Deep Bay Marine Field Station

Bowser, BC

CaGBC LEED-NC and Major Renovations

Other

LOCATION

LEED GOLD

PROJECT TYPE | OWNER TYPE

PROJECT NAME

2013

100 Yonge Street

Toronto, ON

CaGBC LEED - EB:OM

Office building

105 Hotel De Ville

Gatineau, QC

CaGBC LEED - EB:OM

Office building

1075 West Georgia

Vancouver, BC

CaGBC LEED - EB:OM

Office building

111 Richmond W Revitalization

Toronto, ON

CaGBC LEED - CS

Office building

150 Commerce Valley Drive

Markham, ON

CaGBC LEED - EB:OM

Office building

150 Slater Street, Ottawa

Ottawa, ON

CaGBC LEED - CS

Office building

2 Research Drive Redevelopment

Regina, SK

CaGBC LEED - NC and major renovation

Office building

20 Queen St. West

Toronto, ON

CaGBC LEED - EB:OM

Office building

246/252 Sackville Street, Toronto

Toronto, ON

CaGBC LEED -EB:OM

High-rise multi-unit residential [>10 storeys]

250 Yonge St.

Toronto, ON

CaGBC LEED - EB:OM

Office building

455 de la Carrière

Gatineau, QC

CaGBC LEED - CS

Office building

5000 Yonge St.-Transamerica Tower

Toronto, ON

CaGBC LEED - EB:OM

Office building

Toronto, ON

CaGBC LEED - EB:OM

Office building

7125 Mississauga Road

Mississauga, ON

CaGBC LEED - CS

Office building

9 TRIPLE 8 JASPER

Edmonton, AB

CaGBC LEED - EB:OM

Office building

Fort McMurray, AB

CaGBC LEED - NC and major renovation

Office building

Perth, ON

CaGBC LEED - NC and major renovation

Lecture Hall / Classroom

35 70 University Avenue

32 Acden Corporate Headquarters Algonquin College - Perth Campus

20

sabMag - SPRING 2014


see page indicated for project profile PROJECT NAME

LOCATION

LEED GOLD

PROJECT TYPE | OWNER TYPE 2013

Artscape Wychwood Barns

Toronto, ON

CaGBC LEED - NC and major renovations

Mixed-use

BC Assessment Authority Head Office

Victoria, BC

CaGBC LEED - CI

Office building

Vancouver, BC

CaGBC LEED - NC and Major Renovations

Office building

Bentall 5

Vancouver, BC

CaGBC LEED - NC and Major Renovations

Office building

Bessie Nichols School

Edmonton, AB

CaGBC LEED - NC and Major Renovations

K-9 School

Bow Valley Square Redevelopment

Calgary, AB

CaGBC LEED - CI

Retail

BP Centre

Calgary, AB

CaGBC LEED - EB:OM

Office building

Calgary Board of Education Centre

Calgary, AB

CaGBC LEED - NC and Major Renovations

Office building

Calgary Board of Education Centre Safran North

Calgary, AB

CaGBC LEED - NC and Major Renovations

Office building

Camas Gardens

Victoria, BC

CaGBC LEED - NC and Major Renovations

Mid-rise multi-unit residential [>3<10 storeys]

CAMH Phase 1B

Toronto, ON

CaGBC LEED - NC and Major Renovations

Hospital / Clinic

Captain Nichola Goddard School

Calgary, AB

CaGBC LEED - NC and Major Renovations

K-9 School

Cara Operations Head Office Relocation

Vaughan, ON

CaGBC LEED - NC and Major Renovations

Office building

Cascades Groupe Tissu Lachute

Lachute, QC

CaGBC LEED - NC and Major Renovations

Industrial / Manufacturing

Centre for Digital Media

Vancouver, BC

CaGBC LEED - NC and Major Renovations

Mixed-use

Centre Québécois de formation en maintenance d'éoliennes

Gaspe, QC

CaGBC LEED - NC and Major Renovations

Other

Centre sportif de Notre-Dame-de-Grâce

Montreal, QC

CaGBC LEED - NC and Major Renovations

Sports Facility

Citigroup Place, 123 Front Street West

Toronto, ON

CaGBC LEED - EB:OM

Office building

City of Regina Fire Station 4

Regina, SK

CaGBC LEED - NC and Major Renovations

Public Safety [firehall, police station]

Clef des Champs Val David

Val David, QC

CaGBC LEED -NC and Major Renovations

Industrial / Manufacturing

Vancouver, BC

CaGBC LEED - EB:OM

Office building

Cranston School

Calgary, AB

CaGBC LEED - NC and Major Renovations

Lecture Hall / Classroom

Czorny Alzheimer Centre - Phase 2

Surrey, BC

CaGBC LEED - NC and Major Renovations

Nursing home / Extended care facility

Darlington Energy Complex

Clarington, ON

CaGBC LEED - NC and Major Renovations

Office building

Dentons Canada LLP - Vancouver

Vancouver, BC

CaGBC LEED - CI

Office building

Desjardins Securities 25 York Street, Toronto

Toronto, ON

CaGBC LEED - CI

Office building

District Education Centre

Surrey, BC

CaGBC LEED - NC and Major Renovations

Office building

Donald Cameron Centre

Banff, AB

CaGBC LEED - NC and Major Renovations

Office building

Douglas Jung Building

Vancouver, BC

CaGBC LEED - EB:OM

Office building

Duffin Creek WPCP – Stage III Dewatering Building

Pickering, ON

CaGBC LEED - NC and Major Renovations

Industrial / Manufacturing

Dunbar Apartments

Vancouver, BC

CaGBC LEED - NC and Major Renovations

Mixed-use

Dynamic Funds Tower

Toronto, ON

CaGBC LEED - EB:OM

Office building

Ecole Au coeur de l’Ile

Comox, BC

CaGBC LEED - NC and Major Renovations

Other

Ecole Secondaire de Windsor

Windsor, ON

CaGBC LEED - NC and Major Renovations

High School

Ernst & Young Tower

Calgary, AB

CaGBC LEED - EB:OM

Office building

32 BC Children’s & BC Women’s Redevelopment Project Clinical Support Building

35 Commerce Place

sabMag - SPRING 2014

21


2013

Reliable Controls® Headquarters Annex | Victoria Reliable Controls® Headquarters Annex is a LEED® Platinum certified facility, home to Reliable Controls’ corporate departments, research and development, and technical support. With two storeys of offices above ground and two levels

Trickle Vents

Operable Windows [monitored]

of underground parking, the facility is annex to the existing manufacturing facility, and achieved LEED Platinum certification, earning 56 out of 70 possible points. The Reliable Controls headquarters Annex includes rain gardens and an extensive bioswale system at the centre of the structure’s stormwater management and soil erosion strategy. The system yields a 54% reduction in stormwater runoff from the LEED boundary. Before entering the bioswales, rain is first captured in two 7.5 m2 cisterns and stored for flushing toilets and irrigation. No potable water is used for irrigation, and the building consumes

Radiant Floor Heating & Cooling

60% less potable water than a baseline building. This exemplary achievement earned the facility an innovation credit. 99% of all construction waste was diverted from landfill or incinerators. Over 56% of the wood used in constructing the facility was Forest Stewardship Council certified. Lighting for the building consists of modulating interior florescent

fixtures

with

wireless

control

and

daylight

harvesting, as well as LED lighting in corridors, lobbies, and exterior lighting. For more information: www.reliablecontrols.com/greenfacility

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sabMag - SPRING 2014

LEED Score Card - Platinum Sustainable Sites Water Efficiency Energy & Atmosphere Materials & Resources Indoor Environmental Quality Innovation & Design Process TOTAL

12/14 5/5 12/17 8/14 14/15 5/5 56/70


Interior concrete, wood, and glass

Rain garden courtyard and bike shelter

Wind tower The naturally vented building design relies on 57 trickle vents close-connected to the radiant flooring hydronic heating and cooling system to keep the occupants thermally comfortable and the overall energy consumption low. The facility achieves a 54% reduction in design energy costs compared to conventional standards. BACnet® integration of the HVAC, lighting, and security systems allow occupied comfort settings to be enabled, maximizing energy savings. Individual control of temperature, light, exterior sunshades, and occupancy is provided via LAN or wireless mobile device access using the myControl app. In addition to the facility’s energy-saving capabilities, Reliable Controls also focuses on social responsibility, with a positive impact on occupants’ health, happiness, and community well-being. In this regard, the company promotes sustainable transportation with a carpooling program, a secured courtyard with bicycle racks, and shower facilities. The measurement, verification, and controllability of the mechanical and electrical systems are a critical aspect in the design and operation of any sustainable building. As a manufacturer of Internet-connected, green building controls, Reliable Controls is uniquely positioned and ideally suited to deliver

PROJECT TEAM Owner Reliable Controls Prime Consultant Integral Group (Cobalt Engineering) Architectural D’ambrosio Architecture + Urbanism LEED Consultant Integral Group (Cobalt Engineering) Interior Designer Ariane Phillips Structural Read Jones Christoffersen Consulting Engineers Mechanical Integral Group (Cobalt Engineering) Electrical Integral Group (Cobalt Engineering) Civil Associated Engineering Landscape Architecture Murdoch de Greeff, Inc. Energy Engineering Avalon Energy Management Commissioning Agent Avalon Energy Management Construction Manager Campbell Construction Ltd. Controls Houle Electric Other Ryzuk Geotechnical

long-term solutions to these important sustainability requirements. The Reliable Controls HQ Annex is a demonstration of the company’s collective commitment to sustainability and resilience, and effectively demonstrates leadership and a lasting benefit to the community.

STORMWATER MANAGEMENT & WATER EFFICIENCY

Harvesting Rainwater

Green Roof Hallowell Rd Curbside Bioswale

Bioswale

Potable Water Efficiency

Toilets

Irrigation

Courtyard Water Feature

Outlook Place Bioswale

Hallowell Road Rain Garden

sabMag - SPRING 2014

31


MULTI-TRADE

Read this article and take the quiz at: WWW.SABMAGAZINE-EDUCATION.INFO

to receive 1 Core Learning Unit

PREFABRICATION

Take approved SABMag continuing education courses for LEED AP credential maintenance.

In partnership with: www.lunchboxconsulting.ca

Improving efficiency, economy and adaptability in complex healthcare facilities By Tim Fishking and Ryan Hullinger

Monad by LWPAC

Winnipeg Condominium by 5468796 Architects

Why prefabrication Our interest in prefabrication was sparked by a desire to bring efficiency and quality into a complex process, which we knew would bring value to our healthcare clients. We sought to lower construction costs and decrease construction time, while at the same time increasing the performance of intricate building systems. We know that through prefabrication we can improve functionality and aesthetics, and ultimately we can bring order to what has historically been a chaotic process. Specific to sustainability, we have found that prefabrication offers a number of advantages over conventional construction because it significantly reduces construction waste. In addition, it allows for increased adaptability throughout a hospitalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lifespan, which reduces lifecycle disruption, demolition and waste.

Why healthcare is an ideal fit for modular construction

WEB exclusive!

Market-driven movement toward increased efficiency We are finding that in the US, downward pressures on healthcare spending are driving a need for efficiency and cost reduction. This is compounded by increased demands on healthcare facilities due to deferred construction as well as a potential influx of new patients resulting from the Affordable Care Act. Likewise in Canada, we are seeing continued demand for new facilities that are designed and built with increased speed and efficiency. All of these dynamics require innovative solutions. Our experience shows that the component-based construction approach addresses cost and speedto-market concerns without sacrificing quality: in fact, it enhances quality

Owner-driven movement toward standardization

Almost a century ago, the Modern Movement began with a strong social agenda and the belief that the new technology of mass production could be harnessed to improve the circumstances of ordinary people. For the last several decades, technology in architecture has become an end in itself. However, we are beginning to see a resurgence of interest in prefabrication as a means to realizing the artistic and social ambitions of architects. This time around, much attention is being given to prefabrication in wood. Many of the new six storey wood-frame buildings under construction in BC are turning to pre-

The hospitals we work with are consistently moving toward more systematic

fabrication for reasons of economy, speed and quality

practice models and more standardized care environments. For instance, the

control. However, some architects have rediscovered

Miami Valley Hospital Heart and Orthopedic Center [MVH] bed tower contains

prefabrication as a way to improve the quality of life

178 identical rooms on five identical floors. This degree of standardization pro-

for urban apartment dwellers.

vides flexibility, allowing functions to shift from floor to floor and reducing the need for patient transfers. The inpatient room dimensions, infrastructure and environmental attributes are designed to support the broadest possible range of patient types and

In Vancouver, LWPAC has completed a prototype urban infill project called MONAD; while in Winnipeg 5468796 Architects have used similar methods to reinvent the market-driven condominium.

clinical activities, making each room capable of flexing from low-acuity use for

â See how in our exclusive online

general Med-Surg functions, to maximum-acuity use for Cardiac ICU. Prefabrication becomes an increasingly logical approach as more and more

article found in the SPRING, 2014 issue at www.sabmagazine.com

projects are driven by this kind of standardized, flexible model. Jim Taggart, Editor

sabMag - SPRING 2014

49


Case Study 2: OhioHealth Riverside Methodist Hospital Neuroscience Center Our current prefabrication project is the OhioHealth Riverside Methodist Hospital Neuroscience Center. For this project we spent

6

a great deal of time with our Design/Build partner, Whiting-Turner, reviewing the process and results from Miami Valley, and planning a process that would leverage our earlier lessons and experience. In many ways, the Riverside project can be thought of as Prefabrication 2.0.

Expanded prefabrication scope On Riverside, the scope of prefabricated room types and components is greatly expanded from the previous project. In addition to the elements prefabricated at Miami Valley, we are currently prefabricat-

For the OhioHealth Riverside Methodist Hospital Neuroscience center the scope of prefabricated room types and components was greatly expanded from the Miami Valley Hospital project [6]. Just-in-time shop fabrication minimized the size of the fabrication shop and the length of time needed to lease it [7]. Design and construction were completely integrated which helped greatly with logistics, cost and schedule [8]. Prefabrication will bring value to nearly every building type, especially to those which are highly repetitive and complex [9].

ing exam rooms, perioperative spaces, holding bays and toilet rooms. In addition to the fabrication of repetitive rooms and spaces, there is a long list of complex, multi-system components throughout the 410,000-square-foot tower being prefabricated: the inpatient head-

Likewise during construction, the co-location of multiple subcon-

walls, as well as the above-ceiling engineering racks in the inpatient

tractors in the prefabrication shop led to better cross-trade integra-

wings and ORs.

tion because the subcontractors were working in a more coordi-

Improved prefabrication processes: Just-in-time delivery of components We planned shop fabrication in a just-in-time manner in order to minimize the size of the fabrication shop, and the length of time needed to lease it. At Miami Valley, the prefabrication process went so quickly that the modular units began filling up the off-site shop, as the on-site

nated way, and were not forced to compete for limited resources on the jobsite.

Opportunities for the future Miami Valley was the first hospital in the U.S. to extensively use

structure was not yet ready to install them. That was the first time a

multi-trade prefabrication, but the employment of this process has

process like this was employed to such an extent, so the logistics deci-

grown since thenâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;that was precisely our goal in sharing the story. In

sions could not be based on any known precedent. This led to additional

our opinion, the value will increase when designers and constructors

cost in leasing a second fabrication site. We have worked through a

adopt the approach as the new standard for healthcare construc-

more precisely managed timeframe with the Riverside sub-contractors

tion practice. The more experience we have in fabricating shop-built

in order to avoid this issue.

components, the more overall efficiency will increase, further driving

Team integration through co-location

down costs and improving building performance.

During the Riverside predesign, design and documentation phases, we co-located the construction team with the design team. Every day for two years designers, engineers and builders sat alongside one another in an open studio environment. This face-to-face adjacency allowed for daily integration of design with logistics, cost and schedule. Another benefit of this co-located relationship is a building information model developed on a single platform, which is shared amongst the designers, engineers, construction manager and sub-contractors. The same model used in design is the model used by the sub-contractors

We are currently exploring opportunities for translating the advancements from our prefabricated healthcare projects to other building types. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s especially interesting to consider how component-based prefabrication could revolutionize the way we design and build our research labs because, as with hospitals, these are systemsintensive facilities that require a high degree of adaptability. We are convinced that prefabrication is eventually going to bring value to nearly every building type, but will be particularly beneficial to those which are highly repetitive and highly complex. ď ´

today. This degree of integration was another lesson we took from

Tim Fishking, AIA, and Ryan Hullinger, AIA, are principals at NBBJ.

Miami Valley.

photos courtesy nbbj.

7

52

sabMag - SPRING 2014

8

9


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1

BLUENOSE ACADEMY High-performance design respects historic roots

Targeting LEED Gold, the design team for the Bluenose Academy focused its attention on creating a contemporary high-performance building that also paid homage to the significant built heritage of the town, much of which is a UNESCO World Heritage site. By John Crace

2

The new building, designed to replace four existing schools, including the historic Lunenburg Academy, draws on both the characteristic deep red colour that can be seen in so many of the townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s waterfront buildings; and on the white paint and black trim typically seen in the townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s churches and civic buildings. The large classroom windows are an abstraction of the bay window forms that are a common feature of Lunenburg architecture.

3

the BLUENOSE academy takes its COLOUR cueS from the white walls and black trim common to the historic institutional buildings of Lunenburg [1]. Lunenburg's historic waterfront district where commercial buildings are commonly painted a distinctive red [2]. Former High School AND THE historic Lunenburg Academy ON THE HILL [3].

sabMag - SPRING 2014

55


INTERVIE

WITH

John Jansen President of Wishbone Site Furnishings [www.wishboneltd.com] in Langley, John Jansen was an early adopter of incorporating recycled materials into attractive, durable outdoor furnishings.

â SABMag: The mid-90s were early days in the green building movement. What prompted you to start making products from recycled materials back then? á The industry that I was in was going through a lot of transition. It was changing from being focused on people to more about achieving numbers. I needed to find a new career that provided an opportunity to make a difference. Two products were getting some interest in the media at that time. Pressure treated lumber and recycled plastic lumber. My thinking was that the benefits of recycled plastic lumber would out-weigh the negative impact of using pressure treated lumber and that this would make a good business opportunity. â SABMag: Was it difficult to get customers to accept your products? á Unbelievable!! At the consumer level it’s all about price. Using recycled plastics as an alternative to treated lumber makes sense when you talk about saving trees, reducing toxins from leaching into the water table, reducing plastics from going into landfills, and cutting maintenance cost. But, it seems not to make sense when you have to pay more for it. At the municipal government level it was shocking at how long it took to make decisions and how replacing wood in site furnishings was looked upon as taking away jobs since the recycled plastic required very little maintenance. â SABMag: There are more products around now with recycled content. How have you differentiated yours? á The recycled content of the product is important. What’s more important though is determining the primary environment your products are going to be exposed to and then matching the recycled materials to create the best fit. In our particular case a co-mingled combination of 100% recycled plastics works best. What sets us apart is that we clearly understand the advantages of the materials and design around the deficiencies. Most companies fail to figure out the deficiencies in the early stages of product development. Products get misrepresented and consumers don’t get what they thought they we buying.

62

sabMag - SPRING 2014

â SABMag: In the spirit of thinking globally and acting locally, private companies changing how they do things can have a positive effect on the environment. Have you tried to improve your manufacturing operations to use fewer resources? á We are continually looking for ways to use fewer resources and yes this will have a positive effect on the environment. To be honest, we are motivated by the bottom line first, and then by environmental considerations. If we can figure out how to use fewer resources we can reduce costs and, in turn, be more competitive. It’s strange but the global market seems to think that the Canadian market is as big as its landmass. They all seem to want to be here, and are bringing their competitive advantages with them. For us it’s all about figuring out how to survive in our market. â SABMag: Do you anticipate including other types of recycled content, or introduce other products using your current recycled materials? á Introducing different types of recycled content creates challenges, as you really don’t know how the products are going to perform in the long term. We have figured out what has worked and the limitations, and are now exploring how these products can best be used in other applications. â SABMag: Do you feel more companies will include recycled content in products that we use everyday? Will it become commonplace? á I believe companies will use more recycled content in their products if the cost of the material does not severely affect the bottom line. Although recycled content appears to be important to people, it’s another story when they have to pay more for it. There needs to be incentives at both the manufacturing level and consumer level to really make a difference.


EnvironmEntal Product dEclaration

EPD PrEcast concrEtE

In accordance with ISO 14025

Place de l’Escarpement, Quebec City, QC – LEED Gold Certified Architect: Pierre Martin Architecte

EPDs are third party verified (certified) reports published by product manufacturers that provide quality assured and comparable information regarding environmental performance of their products or system. The CaGBC LEED v4 Rating System and Architecture 2030 are emphasizing the demand for EPDs, by addressing transparency in environmental lifecycle impacts and the selection of building products with improved lifecycles. North American Precast Concrete associations are working together with ASTM International and Athena Sustainable Materials Institute to achieve a third party- verified EPD; providing comprehensive, uniform, and transparent details about a product’s composition and environmental impact throughout its lifecycle. Available in the fall of 2014.

ask insightful questions before making decisions. Expect transparency. For your free copies of the Life Cycle Assessment of Precast Concrete and the CPCI Sustainable Plant Program contact CPCI at: info@cpci.ca or (877) 937-2724 or visit www.cpci.ca/publications.

196 Bronson Avenue, Suite 100 Ottawa, ON K1R6H4 sabMag - SPRING 2014

63


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