BC Focus spring 2021

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BRITISH COLUMBIA Canada Green Building Council ISSUE 10, SPRING/SUMMER 2021, CaGBC Regional Publication /

FOCUS

VANCOUVER FIRE HALL NO. 5 & YWCA HOUSING LEED Gold project combines emergency services and housing needs Workforce BC Investing in a future-ready building sector

UBCO Commons Building LEED Gold project rejuvenates campus

Win-win-win-win Unlocking the potential of retrofits

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M LE

Moving forward together A message from Canada Green Building Council president and CEO, Thomas Mueller

This year’s spring BC Focus issue is an excellent reminder that we are slowly moving closer to a new normal. The global pandemic we have faced has impacted every facet of our lives. While vaccines bring new hope, there are still many miles left to go before putting this pandemic behind us. Our sector, like so many others, continues to reassess and adjust to navigating these unprecedented times. On a positive note, construction continues unabated in most regions and climate change remains at the forefront for policy-makers and, increasingly, business. Over the past year, CaGBC has used the pandemic to make significant changes. We re-invented how we deliver services to our members and adapted our structure to provide greater market support and more opportunities for engagement across the country. Recent successes have us feeling optimistic for 2021. Many federal government announcements, and indeed the 2021 Budget, recognized the work we are doing to move the needle on green building. Among our focus areas are: positioning green buildings as a climate solution that will reignite Canada’s economy, create skilled jobs ready for a low carbon future, and transform Canada’s building sector to meet the challenges caused by climate change. Now that momentum is turning toward green building as a catalyst for positive change, 2021 will see us double down on three areas critical to British Columbia’s recovery. ZERO CARBON AS THE NEW BASELINE Our Zero Carbon Building Standard is gaining momen­ tum with new registrations and certifications. The federal government has bet big on zero carbon in its Greening Government Strategy. The government of British Columbia continues to lead the nation with its ambitious climate plan that aims to slash carbon emissions in the built environment by 40 per cent by 2030. By encouraging low-carbon materials and operations for B.C.’s public sector

organizations, the province is a driving force for lowcarbon innovation, including in mass timber construction. Zero carbon performance can be achieved with readily available knowledge, skills, and technology, however, a proposed increase in carbon pricing will make the argument for zero carbon buildings even more compelling. RAMPING UP BUILDING RETROFIT Last year the Canada Infrastructure Bank announced $2B to finance large-scale retrofits. Financing through CIB has long been a CaGBC recommendation to spark the retrofit economy and put Canada on a path toward decarbonization. GBCI Canada helps remove investment risk for financing energy efficiency retrofits through its Investor Confidence Project. With two Investor Ready Energy Efficiency (IREE) certifications now complete, it is clear that interest will grow in the Arc performance platform and IREE certification. WORKFORCE TRANSFORMATION Last year we joined with stakeholders in Ontario to launch Workforce 2030, a broad coalition of organizations representing employers, educators, and workers, to help the building sector adopt the skills needed in a lowcarbon economy. Recent announcements and the 2021 Budget indicate the federal government is earmarking investment for workforce development. It highlights how critical it is to ensure the workforce has the low-carbon skill sets needed to deliver retrofits and construct zero carbon buildings to scale. I believe this issue of BC Focus showcases the growing momentum for green, low-carbon building innovation, and with each of these stories demonstrating how together we are making “every building greener.” I hope you will enjoy this issue as I have. Yours, Thomas Mueller

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See the digital version of CaGBC British Columbia FOCUS at

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http://bit.ly/28O6xsr

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In this Issue

15

Spring/Summer 2021

19 12

7 Membership Update

Fire Hall No. 5 & YWCA Housing: 15 Vancouver project combines emergency services

the potential 28 Unlocking of retrofits

and housing needs

in a future-ready 8 Investing building sector Commons Building: LEED Gold 11 UBCO project rejuvenates campus

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Tower: Preservation 22 Theand Exchange environmental enhancements drive design

budget lays out 27 Federal a new vision for Canada

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A joint publishing project of the CaGBC and SABMag Address all inquiries to Don Griffith: dgriffith@sabmagazine.com Published by Janam Publications Inc. | www.sabmagazine.com | www.janam.net

Printed on Domtar Husky Opaque text offset paper.

Cover: Vancouver Fire Hall No. 5 & YWCA Housing by Johnston Davidson Architecture + Planning Inc.

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CaGBC MEMBERSHIP UPDATE Keep up to date by attending one of our diverse education sessions.

Get involved with the Canada Green Building Council The CaGBC network of green building professionals is a premier source for education, training and cutting-edge green building information. We provide support and advocacy for green building programs including LEED, WELL Building Standard, and the Zero Carbon Building Standard. Through involvement with the CaGBC, individuals have the opportunity to access educational, volunteering, networking and leadership opportunities.

Join Us! Our members are key innovators and thought leaders of tomorrow’s sustainable world. If you are not already a member, join the CaGBC and our public and private sector member organizations across the country to help transform Canada with greener buildings and healthier communities. All employees of a National member company (either a Green Building Specialist or Green Building Advocate) are entitled to membership.

Find out more about our membership structure and the many benefits available at www.cagbc.org/membership

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Investing in a future-ready building sector Canada’s building sector has a unique opportunity to strengthen its workforce. Even before the pandemic, the labour market forecasts were anticipating a signi­ ficant shortage of workers. BuildForce Canada indica that over the next 10 years, the anticipated retirement of 44,200 workers would require British Columbia’s construction sector to maintain a heightened focus on recruitment and training. The pandemic has not changed these long-term trends. At the same time, the sector itself is transitioning to low-carbon. For example, British Columbia has made significant investments in low-carbon buildings and infrastructure through initiatives such as the Net-Zero Energy-Ready Challenge (NZERC) and rebate and financing programs offered through Better Buildings BC. It also has advanced key regulatory levers, such as the

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BC Energy Step Code, with new requirements for the design of buildings and homes. These shifts demand urgent investment in worker upskilling for energy-efficient building retrofits and new low-carbon construction – the kind of buildings needed to meet climate targets. Without this investment, B.C. risks losing its competitive advantage in a global context that is rapidly and irrefutably transitioning towards a low-carbon economy. “British Columbia needs a strategy to meet the training needs precipitated by this transition to low carbon,” said Akua Schatz from the Canada Green Building Council (CaGBC). “A cornerstone of the province’s CleanBC plan is the recognition that a growing clean economy will result in new jobs and professions. A CleanBC workforce readiness plan is the next logical step to ensure B.C. has the training in place for workers in the low-carbon economy.” CaGBC’s recent report, Canada’s Green Building Engine: Market Impact and Opportunities in a Critical Decade, showed that in 2018, British Columbia’s green building sector employed 80,000 people and contributed an estimated $9 billion to the economy.


With government investment in a green recovery and progressive policies, by 2030, B.C.’s green building sector is expected to provide almost 190,000 direct green building industry jobs and contribute $30 billion toward the province’s GDP. As governments look to bring people back to work after the pandemic slow-down, investments in building sector training and reemployment are significant opportunities. COVID-19 has deeply impacted hospitality and manufacturing, putting thousands of Canadians out of work, especially among low-wage workers, young people, and women. Could the building sector be the opportunity needed to acquire future-proof skills and resilient, low-carbon employment? The Workforce 2030 coalition thinks so. It was formed in 2020 to accelerate building sector low-carbon workforce capacity, help meet Canada’s climate goals, and create jobs that prioritize equity and inclusion. Workforce 2030 includes Ontario employers, educators, unions, and community organizations focused on ensuring the building workforce has the skills and size required to deliver building retrofits and new low-carbon construction at scale. It’s a model that is attracting attention across the country, including in B.C.

In the province, numerous individual educational efforts have begun. Unions, universities, utilities, government, and non-profits offer training, information, and resources for the construction sector related to low-carbon buildings. These include the BC Energy Step Code Communications and Capacity Building subcommittee, the BC Institute of Technology’s program for zero-emissions buildings, the Zero Emissions Building Exchange, and BC Hydro’s Electrification Roadmap. However, the activities are typically fractured and uncoordinated. A new low-carbon buildings workforce governance committee could collaboratively advance low-carbon building workforce development with participation from education, industry, workers, government, and employers. “Without strong investment in workforce development that coordinates among government, industry, worker, and educator needs, B.C.’s low-carbon building policies risk outpacing its workforce capacity,” said Schatz. “The coalition model piloted in Ontario has the potential to help unify stakeholders to quickly and meaningfully advance the low-carbon workforce B.C. needs to meet its climate goals.”

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The University of British Columbia Okanagan Campus (UBCO) Commons facilities, making it a major centre of student experience.

is the main connector between the north residences and the south campus

UBCO COMMONS BUILDING LEED Gold project centres campus | By Ben Feldman The University of British Columbia Okanagan Campus (UBCO) Commons project in Kelowna fulfills a critical student need for a multipurpose, technologicallyenhanced, learning and research facility. An addition to the school’s existing library, the transformation of the facility establishes it as the new heart of the campus. Complete with new Library Archive spaces, The Commons also provides a wide range of programming including informal collaborative study spaces, quiet study areas, administrative facilities, a digital technology centre, and the campus’ largest lecture theatre with 400-seats. Beyond increasing the campus’ available study spaces twofold, the building is targetting LEED Gold and completes UBCO`s vision for sustainability. The Commons’ informal study spaces occupy the first two storeys of the facility, which are both accessible from grade. This program organization allows the active and welcoming informal study spaces to be highly transparent to passersby, and for students within to benefit from views of both the bustling campus and the intricate rainwater garden system and plantings. To that end, glazing provides over 90% of the building’s occupied spaces with daylight views.

Developed in conjunction with UBCO’s Master Plan, The Commons was actively integrated into the campus’ longterm vision. Situated on UBCO’s main throughway, the project transformed the primarily motorized University Way into a lively, pedestrianized environment. Universal accessibility, overhangs, and covered walkways further encourage pedestrian access to the site, while interventions such as lowering the facility’s porous ground floor to meet the Master Plan’s new adjacent campus plaza further encourages visitors to explore the tight-knit campus. Working with UBCO’s Student Union, The Common’s is a ‘catch-all’ facility that strengthens connections to the school’s north and south campuses, reinforcing the public realm. The Commons implemented a variety of strategies to support the physical and psychological health, some of which include: -Glazing: over 90% of the building’s occupied spaces have daylight scenic views, -Versatile Common Seating Areas: encourages social interaction with reconfigurable seating of various sizes, -Study Style Options: a range of study options offered throughout the building, from individual study to interactive group study, and -Physical Activity: treadmills and ellipticals in quiet study areas encourage physical activity, and all four levels of the building can be accessed by stairs and ramps.

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A

University Way

Alumni Avenue

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Site Plan 1. UBC Okanagan EOI 2. UBC Okanagan Library

View of the Galleria where high-performance glazing gives views to the campus and surrounding landscape.

Potable water conservation through low-flow fixtures and water re-fill stations is further improved by a new rainwater management installation which directs rainwater from the facility’s roof into a rain garden filled with droughtand flood-resistant plantings. Once full, the rain garden’s terraces release excess water into a series of concrete rills, and then to a storm water retention pond. The rainwater management system will handle the climate variations of the Okanagan Valley, which fluctuate between drought-like conditions to heavy rain, and will serve as the model for similar installations elsewhere on campus. Potable water consumption is reduced by 62% with an annual use of 10,035 litres/occupant/year based on 600 occupants. Occupancy sensors and LED lighting reduce the lighting energy significantly. The Lecture Theatre uses an underfloor displacement ventilation system to decouple the ventilation and space conditioning load. A customized VAV system reduces the reheat energy required and enables zone-level cooling while also introducing more fresh air and free cooling in the summer. The exhaust energy recovery system reduces the heat loss from exhaust air and improves project performance such that energy intensity is 110.6 kwh/m2. 12

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The Quiet Study Commons.

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All four levels of the building can be accessed by stairs to provide physical

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activity.

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Section 6

1. Collaborative Study Area 2. Staff Work Area 3. Office 4. Meeting Room

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Teaching Lab Quiet Study Commons Lecture Theatre Galleria

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C OKANAGEN LIBRARY UBCO EOI

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Energy Intensity: 110 KWhr/m2/year Reduction in energy intensity: 48% based on ASHRAE90.12007. Recycled materials content: 21% by value Water consumption from municipal source: 10,035 litres/occupant/year Reduction in water consumption: 62% Construction materials diverted from landfill: 52% Regional materials by value: 28%

Study Commons

re Theatre ia ontrol

PROJECT CREDITS Architect Moriyama & Teshima Architects in joint venture with MQN Architects Civil engineer CTQ Consultants Ltd. Structural engineer Bush, Bohlman & Partners LLP Electrical engineer Smith and Andersen Consulting Engineering Mechanical engineer Williams Engineering Construction Sawchuk Developments Landscape architect Plant Architect Inc. Photos Riley Snelling Photography

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teaching lab.

Most

of the interior uses recycled and low-VOC

materials such as carpet tile and large format ceramic tiles.

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First Floor Plan 1. Entry 2. Lobby 3. Cafe 4. Universal Washroom 5. Comm Room 6. Collaborative Study Area

Second Floor Plan 1. Lobby 2. IT Support 3. Tech Lab 4. Digital Media Studio 5. Media Lab

7. Immersive Theatre 8. Teaching Lab 9. Quiet Study Carrels 10. Quiet Study Commons 11. Meeting Room

6. Washroom 7. Quiet Study 8. Commons/Galleria 9. Vestibule 10. Lecture Theatre N

Other energy conservation measures (ECMs) include: - six-pipe water source heat pump to provide heat recovery during simultaneous heating and cooling, - high-performance glazing and building insulation, - radiant slab heating and cooling system, and a - fully electric building. Constructed of concrete, steel and glass, The Commons has the durability required of a high-use building. Meeting rooms, study carrel areas, and the lecture theatre use recycled and low-VOC materials such as carpet tile, large format ceramic tiles, and alder wood veneer acoustic

The Lecture Theatre has an under-floor displacement ventilation system and alder wood veneer acoustic panels.

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panels. On the exterior, reflective metal cladding with areas of solid masonry at the base of the building display the colours of the everchanging cloudscapes over the valley, mimicking the reflective surfaces of nearby lakes. With an eye to future adaptability, the walls within the free-spanning concrete structure can be adapted and demounted, and the high ceiling spaces allow the building services to be manipulated so that the interior can be transformed for new uses. Ben Feldman, OAA, PMP, LEED GA is a principal at Moriyama & Teshima Architects.

Rainwater

from the roof is directed to a rain garden with the excess going to

a storm water retention pond.


The first facility of its kind in Canada, the Fire Hall No. 5/YMCA project combines

affordable housing with protective services to address densification.

VANCOUVER FIRE HALL NO. 5 & YWCA HOUSING LEED Gold project combines emergency services and housing needs By Kimberly Johnston Feldman Located in Vancouver’s Killarney neighbourhood, Vancouver Fire Hall No. 5 has served the Champlain Heights and East Fraser Lands communities since 1952. As the building reached the end of its service life, both programmatically and seismically, the replacement of the hall was overdue.

Aiming for LEED Gold, the new fire hall’s design not only combines key concepts of sustainable architecture with the specific programmatic needs of the Vancouver Fire & Rescue Services, it also brings increased density to the area and creates effective use of City land through the addition of four storeys of two- and three-bedroom homes for women-led families.

The first of its kind in Canada, the new building provides the community with an innovative, colocation facility to serve the needs of residents safely and effectively.

The 21,000 sq. ft fire hall includes three apparatus bays and supporting spaces such as Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) storage, a hose tower, offices, a lounge/day room, kitchen, dormitory, washroom facilities, fitness room, and a community room which doubles as a training room. (Continued on page 18.) SPRING/SUMMER 2021 | BC FOCUS

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Client City of Vancouver Architect: Johnston Davidson Architecture + Planning Inc. Structural Engineer: Herold Engineering Ltd. Mechanical Engineer: Flow Consulting Group Inc. Structural Engineer: Roy Campbell Ltd. Civil Engineer: Core Group Consultants Commissioning Agent: CES Group Building Envelope Commissioning: RDH Building Engineering Ltd. General Contractor/Construction Manager: Mierau Contractors Ltd. Landscape Architect: Greenway Landscape Architecture LEED + energy modeller: Kane Consulting Partnership

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2. The 21,000

sq. ft fire hall includes three apparatus bays and

supporting spaces such as

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

storage, a hose tower, offices, a lounge/day room, and other related rooms.

3. The 36,000 sq. ft of housing within the project contains 31 suites along with amenity rooms and communal rooftop outdoor spaces with urban agriculture opportunities, picnic tables and a play area. Tech-Crete Processors Ltd. supplied its composite insulating panels to the project consisting of STYROFOAM™ brand foam insulation with a factory-applied, latex-modified concrete coating. 4. The

main entrance.

The

residential section has a completely

separate entrance, providing the housing occupants with their own identity and security.

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EL. 118.515 U/S OF STRUCT. ROOF - STAIR #3

EL. 115.950 T.O. STRUCT. ROOF

EL. 115.865 U/S STRUCT. ROOF - STAIR #4

EL. 115.950 T.O. STRUCT. ROOF

EL. 113.200 FIN. FL. 6TH FLOOR

EL. 113.200 FIN. FL. 6TH FLOOR

EL. 110.400 FIN. FL. 5TH FLOOR

EL. 110.400 FIN. FL. 5TH FLOOR

EL. 107.600 FIN. FL. 4TH FLOOR

EL. 107.600 FIN. FL. 4TH FLOOR

EL. 104.800 FIN. FL. 3RD FLOOR

EL. 104.800 FIN. FL. 3RD FLOOR

EL. 115.950 T.O. STRUCT. ROOF

EL. 113.200 FIN. FL. 6TH FLOOR

EL. 113.200 FIN. FL. 6TH FLOOR

EL. 110.400 FIN. FL. 5TH FLOOR

EL. 110.400 FIN. FL. 5TH FLOOR

EL. 107.600 FIN. FL. 4TH FLOOR

EL. 107.600 FIN. FL. 4TH FLOOR

EL. 104.800 FIN. FL. 3RD FLOOR

EL. 104.800 FIN. FL. 3RD FLOOR

EL. 100.900 FIN. FL. 2ND FLOOR

EL. 100.000 FIN. FL. MEZZANINE

EL. 97.000 FIN. FL. MAIN FLOOR

EL. 96.800 FIN. FL. APPARATUS BAYS

EL. 96.800 FIN. FL. APPARATUS BAYS

EL. 93.235 FIN. FL. PARKING / BASEMENT

EL. 96.800 FIN. FL. APPARATUS BAYS

EL. 93.235 FIN. FL. PARKING / BASEMENT

EL. 93.235 FIN. FL. PARKING / BASEMENT

Section A

Section B B

DN

DN

UP

UP

DN

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A UP

A UP

UP

UP

UP UP

UP

First floor, Fire and Emergency Services

DN

Second floor, Fire and Emergency Services

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UP

Roof level, YMCA residential Third floor, YMCA residential SPRING/SUMMER 2021 | BC FOCUS

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5 The community room serves as an interface between Vancouver Fire Rescue Service and the community, allowing for potential booking opportunities for community groups and activities such as CPR and first aid courses.

6 Throughout

the building, accessibility to natural lighting, exterior

7 The kitchen and living area of a two-bedroom suite.

views and operable windows were key aspects in the design to improve livability.

The community room serves as an interface between Vancouver Fire Rescue Service and the community, allowing for potential booking opportunities for community groups and activities such as CPR and first aid courses, blood pressure clinics, and training for volunteer emergency groups. The 36,000 sq. ft of housing within the project is in partnership with the YWCA and provides strategic key colocation opportunities with City civic buildings. There are 31 suites provided along with amenity rooms and communal rooftop outdoor spaces with urban agriculture opportunities, picnic tables and a play area that work in conjunction with a completely separate entrance, providing the housing occupants with their own identity and security. A programmatic challenge Architecturally combining two extremely different user groups on a small site and providing each of them with their own identity was one of the largest challenges that faced the design team. Issues around security, privacy, shared facilities and combined services were some of the complications which were addressed during the design.

Additionally, protective services facilities need to be designed to post-disaster standards, and as a result the entire building must be able to withstand seismic forces 1.5 times those required for a regular structure. Sustainability has been key in the conceptual stage of design and the project is aiming for a LEED-NC Gold rating with a strong focus on energy efficiency. Throughout the building, accessibility to natural lighting, exterior views and operable windows were key aspects in the design to improve livability for users and reduce energy demand. The housing component of the building is constructed in light wood frame which adheres to the BC Wood First Act and is harvested locally from sustainably-managed forests. Bright colours and natural lighting feature heavily throughout the building, and are integrated to work to improve the wellbeing of fire crews. Co-locating the fire hall with housing on a small site already owned by the City offered exceptional value and kept the cost per square foot down in comparison to similar facilities in Vancouver. This successful combining of needs and increased value frees up and allows for improved allocation of citywide resources. Kimberly Johnston is principal and lead designer at Johnston Davidson Architecture.

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We believe wood is the most natural and healthy product to build with. We have 25 years experience in mass timber, having worked on development of DLT in Europe in the 1990’s. We are now proud to be pioneering both stacked and cross laminated DLT in Canada. We design, engineer, manufacture and install Wood100® DLT, a 100% wood, no glue DLT. Architects, engineers and builders are realising the potential of Wood100® DLT as a healthy, sustainable and energy efficient building product.

Wood100® DLT is Truly Sustainable Our 100% wood DLT contains no glues or other chemicals, making it 100% recyclable. It can be disassembled and reused or composted at the end of its life. The energy consumption during manufacture is roughly 3.5 times lower than other mass timber products, significantly lowering product emissions.

Wood100® DLT is Energy Efficient Our cross laminated Wood100® DLT product holds records for heat insulation in structural material and therefore minimal operating costs. Tests of 3 wall systems with the same R-value showed the supremacy of cross laminated DLT. An average 100% wood DLT home needs 1/3 of the heating system compared to traditional framed homes with the same R-value. It’s like having air conditioning and heating systems with zero energy consumption.

Wood100® DLT is Healthy WIth no off-gassing from glues or contamination from chemicals, Wood100® DLT offers a significantly healthier indoor environment, particularly for those with allergies and hypersensitivity. 100% wood DLT regulates the indoor climate much better because moisture can be transferred freely between the entire wall system. Radium Community Centre and Library is a past winner of the Canadian Green Building Award. International Timberframes was excited to collaborate with Urban Arts Architecture and other building partners on this project, one of the first in Canada to use DLT. We prefabricated and installed the Wood100® DLT variegated roof panels, integrating the design with other wood elements in the building. Collaborating with architects on detail solutions across the design process guarantees quality control from start to finish.

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G

C

AWARDS

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G RE E N B N A UI DI LD A N 2021 I A

The annual program to recognize excellence in the design and execution of all types of sustainably-designed, high-performance Canadian residential and non-residential buildings and interiors, both new and renovated.

CONGRATULATIONS to the winning teams

BARRETT CENTRE FOR TECHNOLOGY INNOVATION, HUMBER COLLEGE - Institutional (Large) Award. Andrew Frontini representing Perkins&Will.

80 ATLANTIC BUILDING Commercial Industrial (Large) Award. Brian Prinzen representing BDP Quadrangle.

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BNP PARIBAS MONTREAL OFFICE - Interior Design Award Vincent Hauspy representing Provencher_Roy. NORTH END LANDING + JAMES NORTH BAPTIST CHURCH - Mixed Use Award. L to R: Conrado Tabunot, Kasia Wright, Sara Anderson (holding the award), Holly Young, Ted Boruta, Bryce Stonehouse, and Emma Cubitt of Invizij Architects Inc.

TSAWWASSEN FIRST NATION YOUTH CENTRE Institutional (Small) Award. L to R: Tim Lam P. Eng. Ennova Structural engineers Inc., Zhiwei Lu BCSLA, Daichi Yamashita architect AIBC (holding the office puppy, Bobo), Dr. Nancy Mackin Architect AIBC AIA LEED AP, Pearl YIP BCSLA CSLA, and Pengfei Du MLA of Mackin Tanaka Architecture.

SKEENA RESIDENCE, UBC OKANAGAN - Residential (Large) Award. Brian Wakelin FRAIC, LEED AP Principal, Architect AIBC representing PUBLIC: Architecture + Communication.


INDIGENOUS ECOLOGICAL KNOWLEDGE: A BLANKET OF WARMTH - Technical Award. L to R: Wendell Starblanket of Star Blanket Cree Nation, and Murdoch MacPherson of MacPherson Engineering, Sonia Starblanket and Aura Lee MacPherson of MacPherson Engineering.

LE GRAND THÉÂTRE DE QUÉBEC - Existing Building Upgrade Award. L to R: Eric Pelletier representing Lemay; and from Atelier 21, Christian Bernard Associate Architect, Project Manager and Manager of Project Design, and Mathieu Turgeon Architect., P.A. LEED BD+C, Manager of Project Construction.

PROTOTYPE LANEWAY HOUSING, UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO Residential (Small) Award. Jon Neuert, B.Arch., OAA, AIA, FRAIC, LEED Principal representing Baird Sampson Neuert. UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA DISTRICT ENERGY PLANT - Commercial/Industrial (Small) Award. L to R: Esteban Matheus, Architect Associate and Martin Nielsen, Partner representing DIALOG.

Thanks to our sponsors and jury Ewa Bieniecka, OAQ, PP-FRAIC, LEED AP BD+C Project Manager, Decasult.

ARCHITECTURAL National Sponsors Drew Adams, BES (planning), MArch, OAA, RAIC LGA Architectural Partners.

Category Sponsors Sean Ruthen, AIBC, FRAIC, Senior Project Architect, James KM Cheng Architects, Vancouver.

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THE EXCHANGE TOWER Preservation and environmental enhancements drive design By James Emery Recognized with an American Architecture Prize and City of Vancouver Heritage Award of Honour, the Exchange Tower in Downtown Vancouver involved the rehabilitation of the 1929 Old Stock Exchange Building (OSEB), the retention of its heritage status and the incorporation of a new 31-storey office tower. The cultural and historical significance of the OSEB drove the decisions to ensure its preservation, environmental enhancements, and its dominance in the overall design. Described as a “tuned façade,” the project’s form and material choices were made to maximize its energy performance.

THE VIEW FROM WEST PENDER STREET. THE INTERIOR RECEIVES HIGH LEVELS OF DAYLIGHTING THROUGH FLOOR TO CEILING GLAZING.

Roof plan 1. Extensive green roof 2. Elevator 3. Mechanical penthouse 4. Roof at level 30 5. Roof at level 31 6. Roof at level 32 7. Water collection 8. West Pender Street 9. Howe Street 10. Lane 11. Catwalk for BMU

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Vancouver’s

first

LEED Platinum Heritage Conversion and Canada’s eighth largest LEED Platinum Building, the Exchange Tower 1929 Old Stock Exchange Building (OSEB) and the incorporation of a new 31-storey office tower.

involved the

rehabilitation of the

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Radiant heating/cooling panels Integrated LED lighting

Vertical fins and triple glazing with frit pattern reduces heat gain for maximum comfort

Raised floor plenum for fresh air distribution and data/electrical distribution Adjustable floor mouted fresh air diffuser provides enhanced user control

The project is certified LEED Platinum, and is Vancouver’s first LEED Platinum Heritage Conversion and Canada’s eighth largest LEED Platinum Building. Designed in conjunction with Harry Gugger Studio of Switzerland, our firm was the architect of record and prime consultant for architecture, construction administration and sustainability. We also provided space planning, master planning, heritage rehabilitation and LEED facilitation services. Ecologically, the project meets several environmental objectives required by the Client and the City. Water use is reduced by over 40%, energy use is reduced by 54%, and Green House Gas emissions are reduced by 85%. Economically, the project creates much needed office space in the City’s Financial district for over 1,800 workers. Socially, the project provides amenities, including social gathering, public art, fitness, and business spaces. The old and new lobbies are linked, and the new Pender Street entry provides a setback and covered area for those waiting for buses. The new lobby entrance floor displays local public art, which extends out to the public realm. The central downtown location allows the users to be within walking distance to most amenities, services, residences, and public transit. The project also successfully petitioned for 20% relaxation of the mandated number of parking spaces, which later was adopted by the City as the new standard for required parking.

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The limited footprint was maximized to benefit environmentally the building users and larger community. Solar panels cover the tower roof to capture energy to provide supplemental heat for the domestic hot water. The project incorporates a rainwater harvesting system and non-potable water distribution to reduce water use within the building. Rainwater is collected from roofs and is stored and treated in a central tank in the parkade. This water is then distributed through the building for non-potable water end uses including low-flow toilet/ urinal flushing and irrigation. The project’s overall water savings is 41.5% over a LEED base case model. Lower accessible green roofs contain patios for occupant use and enjoyment. Areas not populated with required mechanical equipment are paved with high-albedo pavers to reduce the heat island effect. The radiant heating and cooling system and underfloor fresh air provides a highly efficient HVAC system. A high-performance envelope, building orientation and architectural details, such as triple glazing, and ceramic frit help control thermal gains and heat loss, and solar shading helps to reduce energy consumption. Geoexchange, HRV system, air source heat pumps, and solar thermal panels reduce the reliance on systems powered by natural gas and reduces GHGs by 85%.


G-value Glaizing 0.19 Silk Frit Reduces G-value: approx. 0.05 Light Transmittance: 0.50 66-75% Unobstructed Vision Glass 25-34% Percentage of Frit on Layer 2

Aluminium Spandrel Panel Triple-Glazed Glass Unit 0.19 SHGC Manual Blinds Top: 2’6” Gradient Frit 100% - 0%

Bottom: 2’6” Gradient Frit 100% - 0%

Facade Performance with Frit Treatment

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Energy Intensity, base building: 89.5 KWhr/m2/year Energy Intensity, process energy (plug loads only): 23.5 KWhr/m2/year Reduction in energy intensity: 54% based on ASHRAE 90.1 2007. Reduction in water consumption: 40% Construction materials diverted from landfill: 90%

THE NEW WEST PENDER STREET ENTRY PROVIDES A SETBACK AND COVERED AREA FOR THOSE WAITING FOR BUSES, AND THE LOBBY FLOOR DISPLAYS LOCAL PUBLIC ART, WHICH EXTENDS OUT TO THE OUTSIDE.

Client SwissReal Investments / Credit Suisse Architect Iredale Architecture in conjunction with Harry Gugger Studio Structural engineer RJC Engineers Electrical engineer MCW Consultants Mechanical engineer Integral Group Construction PCL Constructors West Coast Landscape architect PWL Partnership Commissioning Agent Stantec Heritage Consultant Donald Luxton Code Consultant GHL Consultants Building Envelope Consultant RDH Building Engineering Ltd. Photos Michael Sherman (page 20), all other photos by Martin Tessler

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rainwater collection from combined rooftops

treated water is redistributed for non-potable uses

rainwater treatment and storage cistern

4.High-quality floor and wall coverings, such as natural stone, were used as much as possible for superior environ­mental air quality. 5.The view from Howe Street. Rainwater is collected and distri­buted for non-potable water end uses resulting in overall water savings of 41.5% over a LEED base case model.

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The structure, which was pulled away from the building perimeter, maximizes light penetration and achieves daylighting through floor to ceiling glazing. The 8m deep plates allow for deep light penetration. Custom LED fixtures are used throughout and are connected to occupancy and light harvesting sensors. The project combines a raised floor pressurized displacement ventilation for the office tower portion and an overhead ventilation system for the lower hotel portion. Both systems operate on 100% outdoor air to minimize contaminants inside the building. The design and building systems were chosen to maximize exposure to natural light and fresh air, access to outdoor spaces, and use of low-VOC materials and no added urea formaldehyde. Materials used, including natural stone, exposed concrete, Venetian Plaster, and other high-quality floor and wall coverings, meet LEED standards for environmental air quality. We also specified locally sourced products and materials, and where possible, locally extracted and manufactured. Materials were specified based on the level of recycled content and recyclability, although targets were not set. During construction, 90% of materials were diverted from landfills. James Emery is a principal at Iredale Architecture. 26

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Federal budget lays out a new vision for Canada

Environment, economy, and inclusivity central to the new budget Last year the Canada Green Building Council (CaGBC), along with a core group of industry members, called for a green recovery that would prioritize green building. But, more importantly, it asked decision-makers to take this unprecedented oppor­t­u­nity to re-engineer a more inclusive, equitable, and climate-forward Canada. The federal 2021 budget indicates that the government is on that path. It sets out the government’s plan to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and get on a trajectory to net-zero emissions by 2050. Here are three ways the budget recognized CaGBC priorities.

Workforce transition A green recovery that prioritizes green buildings needs more skilled workers. CaGBC research indicates the potential for 1.5 million green building jobs by 2030 if Canada meets its emission targets. However, existing workers will need to upskill to deliver low-carbon buildings at scale. The budget prioritizes workforce training programs around highgrowth sectors and employer demand. Green building should benefit from this, as government programs like the Canada Infrastructure Bank’s Commercial Building Retrofits Initiative and Infrastructure Canada’s Green and Inclusive Communities increase demand for green building and low-carbon skills. The budget announced programs to help transition COVID-19 impacted workers and attract youth, women, Indigenous, and racialized workers into these high-growth sectors. They include $250 million to Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada to scale up industry-led, third-party reskilling approaches, $1.15 billion for Employment and Social Development Canada as well as $470 million for apprenticeship programs.

The Retrofit economy For Canada to meet its carbon emissions targets, the building sector will need a continuous pipeline of projects, especially building retrofits, with stringent carbon emissions targets. The fastest way to meet the building sector’s carbon reduction targets is to focus on retrofitting mid-size and large commercial and institutional buildings. In keeping with CaGBC recommendations, the federal government has rolled out programs designed to trigger the growth of shovel-ready low-carbon projects. “Even before the budget, $3.66 billion in funding was announced for building retrofits between the Canada Infrastructure Bank, and programs with Infrastructure Canada and the Green Municipal Fund,” said Thomas Mueller, President and CEO of CaGBC. “With a

range of 10 per cent to 30 per cent carbon emissions reduction, the projects funded and financed by these initiatives will help kick start the green recovery.” The retrofit program outlined in the 2021 budget goes beyond commercial buildings to also focus on homes. The Deep Home Retrofits program will see $779 million deployed over five years ($414 million in subsequent years with a maximum of $4.4 billion) to the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation to help homeowners complete deep home retrofits through interest-free loans worth up to $40,000. In addition, it includes a dedicated stream of funding to support low-income homeowners and rental properties serving lowincome renters, including cooperatives and not-for-profitowned housing.

Leadership on zero carbon construction Before the budget, the government announced that the Treasury Board Secretariat would prioritize zero carbon for all federally-funded buildings and building projects as part of the updated Greening Government Strategy. This shift aligns with CaGBC recommendations that asked the federal government to take a leadership position to achieve zerocarbon performance. The new budget solidifies this focus by continuing to use and expand federal procurement to support the Greening Government Strategy and prioritize public dollars for use on lower-carbon materials, fuels, and processes. The budget also drives low-carbon building construction in the private sector by advancing climate-based investment decisions and strengthening Canada’s supply chain of lowcarbon materials, products, and services. They will accomplish this through programs such as the Net Zero Accelerator.

Looking ahead To achieve its climate goals, and in the process, improve people’s lives, the Canadian government must ensure that climate is front and centre in all government decisions. Every investment must consider climate change, and we must be vigilant to ensure that climate is not regulated only to specific programs or ministries. Budget 2021 provides a new vision of a future Canada. To realize that vision, climate solutions, and carbon emissions must be the focus – for every sector of our economy and every government decision and investment.

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Unlocking the potential of retrofits

1 By Akua Schatz, VP of Advocacy and Market Engagement, CaGBC

1, 2 and 3: MicrosoftTeams, 401 West Georgia St. in Vancouver, Certified LEED Gold, owned by Oxford Properties.

Canada’s green building sector is on the rise, and that’s great news for the country’s embattled economy. According to recen­tly released num­ bers from the Canada Green Building Council, Canada’s green building sector saw 55 per cent more jobs in 2018 over 2014. But that impressive growth will pale in comparison should federal and provincial governments invest in recovery spend­ ing that prio­ritizes green building improvements and innovation. The building sector has always been a pillar of any economic recovery, and now – faced with looming carbon reduction targets—green building provides Canada with a path out of this economic downswing and into a new low-carbon economy. CaGBC predicts that a green recovery and proactive policy could result in 1.5 million direct green building jobs and $150 billion in GDP by 2030. Such numbers would go a long way in the federal government’s strategy to add a million jobs, and meet its carbon reduction targets. However, we can’t build our way out of a climate or economic crisis. We have to focus on engineering a better future for all Canadians. One way to help achieve Canada’s goals is by positioning existing building retrofits at the same level as new low-carbon construction activity. Canada can cut building sector GHG emissions 17 per cent below 2005 levels by constructing all new, large buildings to zero carbon standards. Still, Canada could slash carbon emissions by a further 51 per cent through completing deep retrofits of existing buildings.

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4 4. Airport Square, Vancouver. Recertified under LEED Existing buildings, owned by Colliers International.

v4

O+M:

But that’s just the first step. To build the confidence of lenders to invest in retrofits, private sector lenders need to incorporate energy efficiency and GHG reductions into their underwriting criteria.

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Win-win-win-win Retrofitting existing buildings to zero carbon is a win-winwin-win scenario. It creates jobs, cuts carbon emissions, drives sector innovation, and better protects investments from the rising costs of carbon. Despite all these benefits, retrofits have traditionally been a hard sell. While it is relatively simple to access funding for a flashy new building with all the bells and whistles a new tenant might want, getting financing for an HVAC upgrade doesn’t have the same allure. CaGBC’s 2020 pre-budget recommendations suggested the federal government leverage the Canada Infrastructure Bank to build confidence in retrofits. The idea was that if the CIB could normalize retrofit financing, its influence would help build market infrastructure and attract private investment. Late last year, the government answered the call with a $2 billion fund designed to kickstart Canada’s retrofit economy.

To help mitigate risks for investors, CaGBC introduced the Investor Confidence Project (ICP) to Canada. The ICP protocols help to de-risk investments in retrofits by bringing together existing standards and practices into a consistent and verifiable process for underwriting, developing, and measuring energy efficiency retrofit projects. These protocols help verify that the core elements are in place to ensure project success right from the start. By assembling existing standards and practices into a transparent process, investors and owners gain the confidence that a project will achieve its stated energy efficiency or carbon reduction targets, while reducing transaction costs and facilitating a more efficient market. Already the ICP protocol is being used on retrofit projects here in Canada. Efficiency Capital used the funding model to finance energy retrofits at six community housing sites in Toronto, and EDESCO and Vancity Community Investment Bank funded a retrofit at a strata-owned condominium building. Both case studies demonstrate how validated energy cost savings can help secure financing for much-needed retrofits. The model works and can help encourage a significant increase in retrofit investment. The resulting job creation – and carbon reductions – will be welcome news for our sector and for Canada as a whole. SPRING/SUMMER 2021 | BC FOCUS

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