BC Focus fall 2021

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BRITISH COLUMBIA Canada Green Building Council ISSUE 11, FALL 2021, CaGBC Regional Publication /

FOCUS

RCMP NATIONAL FORENSIC LABORATORY SERVICES Sustainable design meets complex requirements of state-of-the-art facility Materials selection elevates buildings: CaGBC

CaGBC Awards celebrate Canadian projects and innovators Third & Hawkins Condo Local residents band together FALL 2021 | BC FOCUS to offer high efficiency to downsizers

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Upcoming Events + Workshops CAGBC is the leading green building education provider in Canada, delivering education to over 45,000 green building professionals since 2004. Our online and in-person programs and courses are developed and delivered by expert industry professionals that can help further your career, professional development and knowledge of Canada’s vibrant green building industry.

NOVEMBER 3: INNOVATION SERIES - ACHIEVING NET ZERO WITH ENERGY AS A SERVICE Innovative technology and financing solutions are needed to support asset owners and managers as they accelerate the transition of building portfolios to net zero. Presented by Ameresco Canada, this session will explore how the EaaS model can help bridge the financing gap to achieve a net zero building and integrate advanced renewable technologies, stabilize lifecycle costs, and offload performance risk. A case study on how this model helped fund Canada’s first operationally carbon neutral school will also be presented. NOVEMBER 22: THE WELL BUILDING STANDARD WORKSHOP WELL is a performance-based system for measuring, certifying and monitoring features of the built environment that impact human health and well-being, through air, water, nourishment, light, fitness, comfort and mind. This half-day introductory workshop will introduce broad audiences to the WELL Building Standard, including its key processes. DECEMBER 6: ZERO CARBON BUILDING STANDARD WORKSHOP This live half-day workshop will review important foundational knowledge for low-carbon buildings, with an emphasis on the latest version of CaGBC’s Zero Carbon Building Standard. The requirements for both new and existing buildings will be addressed. Topics include the zero carbon balance, embodied carbon, peak demand, renewable energy, and more.

INNOVATION SERIES – PURPOSEFUL ESG Join Canadian and global ESG experts as they uncover the trends and demands that are driving corporations to not only adopt ESG policies, but implement them in a purposeful manner. Led by ESG and corporate purpose expert Faith Goodman of Goodman Sustainability Group, this three-part series will explore the drivers and principles behind Purposeful ESG, what brands are leading in this space and how, finishing with a cross panel-attendee roundtable discussion to identify current challenges, gaps and potential ways forward. Session 1: Purposeful ESG – Society and Investors demanding tangible action from firms Wednesday, November 17 1:00pm - 2:30pm EST Session 2: How Leading Brands are already moving on Purposeful ESG Wednesday, November 24 1:00pm - 2:30pm EST Session 3: Roundtable on Purposeful ESG - What does 2022 hold for us? Wednesday, December 1 1:00pm - 2:30pm EST

By choosing CaGBC Education, you can be confident that you are receiving the best possible green building education in Canada. To learn more about any of these initiatives and to register for workshops + events, cagbc.org/education

FALL 2021 | BC FOCUS

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See the digital version of CaGBC British Columbia FOCUS at 21

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http://bit.ly/28O6xsr

In this Issue 12

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Decarbonizing cement

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Third & Hawkins Condo: Local residents

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band together to offer comfort and high efficiency to downsizers

CaGBC Awards celebrate Canadian projects and innovators

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RCMP National Forensic Laboratory Services: Sustainable design meets complex requirments of state-of-the-art facility

Veil House: Design based on circular economy and indoor/outdoor living

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A joint publishing project of the CaGBC and SABMag Address all inquiries to Don Griffith: dgriffith@sabmagazine.com Published by Janam Publications Inc. | www.sabmagazine.com | www.janam.net

Printed on Domtar Husky Opaque text offset paper.

Cover: Vancouver Fire Hall No. 5 & YWCA Housing by Johnston Davidson Architecture + Planning Inc.

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G

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The annual program to recognize excellence in the design and execution of all types of sustainably-designed, high-performance Canadian residential and non-residential buildings and interiors, both new and renovated.

CONGRATULATIONS to the winning teams

BARRETT CENTRE FOR TECHNOLOGY INNOVATION, HUMBER COLLEGE - Institutional (Large) Award. Andrew Frontini representing Perkins&Will.

80 ATLANTIC BUILDING Commercial Industrial (Large) Award. Brian Prinzen representing BDP Quadrangle.

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BNP PARIBAS MONTREAL OFFICE - Interior Design Award Vincent Hauspy representing Provencher_Roy. NORTH END LANDING + JAMES NORTH BAPTIST CHURCH - Mixed Use Award. L to R: Conrado Tabunot, Kasia Wright, Sara Anderson (holding the award), Holly Young, Ted Boruta, Bryce Stonehouse, and Emma Cubitt of Invizij Architects Inc.

TSAWWASSEN FIRST NATION YOUTH CENTRE Institutional (Small) Award. L to R: Tim Lam P. Eng. Ennova Structural engineers Inc., Zhiwei Lu BCSLA, Daichi Yamashita architect AIBC (holding the office puppy, Bobo), Dr. Nancy Mackin Architect AIBC AIA LEED AP, Pearl YIP BCSLA CSLA, and Pengfei Du MLA of Mackin Tanaka Architecture.

SKEENA RESIDENCE, UBC OKANAGAN - Residential (Large) Award. Brian Wakelin FRAIC, LEED AP Principal, Architect AIBC representing PUBLIC: Architecture + Communication.


INDIGENOUS ECOLOGICAL KNOWLEDGE: A BLANKET OF WARMTH - Technical Award. L to R: Wendell Starblanket of Star Blanket Cree Nation, and Murdoch MacPherson of MacPherson Engineering, Sonia Starblanket and Aura Lee MacPherson of MacPherson Engineering.

LE GRAND THÉÂTRE DE QUÉBEC - Existing Building Upgrade Award. L to R: Eric Pelletier representing Lemay; and from Atelier 21, Christian Bernard Associate Architect, Project Manager and Manager of Project Design, and Mathieu Turgeon Architect., P.A. LEED BD+C, Manager of Project Construction.

PROTOTYPE LANEWAY HOUSING, UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO Residential (Small) Award. Jon Neuert, B.Arch., OAA, AIA, FRAIC, LEED Principal representing Baird Sampson Neuert. UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA DISTRICT ENERGY PLANT - Commercial/Industrial (Small) Award. L to R: Esteban Matheus, Architect Associate and Martin Nielsen, Partner representing DIALOG.

Thanks to our sponsors and jury Ewa Bieniecka, OAQ, PP-FRAIC, LEED AP BD+C Project Manager, Decasult.

ARCHITECTURAL National Sponsors Drew Adams, BES (planning), MArch, OAA, RAIC LGA Architectural Partners.

Category Sponsors Sean Ruthen, AIBC, FRAIC, Senior Project Architect, James KM Cheng Architects, Vancouver.

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Decarbonizing cement As we move towards 2050 targets for green building, embodied carbon is increasingly important to staying under the emissions budget and limiting global warming below 1.5 degrees Celsius. What is embodied carbon? It’s the product of the materials and construction methods we choose. This value is often stretched over the life of the building to reflect durability, the idea that a building built to last is likely better than one that will need constant repairs. However, the reality is that those emissions are all fully released up front. Like netpresent value in the financial world, a ton of carbon emissions today is worth more than a ton of carbon emissions tomorrow. Of all the opportunities to reduce embodied carbon, the most significant is in concrete. Concrete is the most widely used building material, cutting across both buildings and infrastructure. And despite strong and promising market growth of alternative low-carbon materials including wood and biomaterials, concrete will continue to be a critical material for construction. POTENTIAL AS A CLIMATE SOLUTION Reducing greenhouse gas emissions from concrete is a national priority. Natural Resources Canada and the Cement Association of Canada have committed to develop a decarbonization roadmap for the industry. For the designing construction industry, there are a few significant ways to reduce emissions today, and some very promising opportunities emerging. In the immediate term, there are two opportunities to reduce emissions from concrete. The first is simply to minimize the amount of concrete projects use. This involves looking at how much concrete is required for the project and optimizing its use. This requires designers be conscious of how design choices such as massing impact material requirements. In many cases, designers are evaluating alternative low-carbon materials like mass timber to replace concrete, but nothing is as effective as just using less material. One area in relation to embodied carbon that has been overlooked is the impact of land use planning. Infrastructure like roads, sewers, and transit require concrete. There is no realistic substitution. Low-density suburban development oriented around the automobile results in huge amounts of embodied carbon, seldom considered in any municipal carbon strategies. CaGBC has been in discussions with researchers at the University of Toronto to better understand the relative carbon impacts of different development patterns, but at present there isn’t a well-established practice for evaluation. With more research we hope to understand the impact of embodied carbon from infrastructure and the importance what we build and where we build it.

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The second way designers can have an impact is to specify concrete with lower embodied carbon. This can be achieved by selecting concrete that uses alternatives to cement, such as fly-ash. However, cement companies are also innovating in their manufacturing process is to minimize the emissions related to fuel use. Specification of low-carbon concrete will be aided by transparency around manufacturing practices, including the publication of environmental product declarations (EPDs). One of the most promising areas is the potential to use captured carbon in concrete. A number of emerging technologies are adding carbon dioxide into cementitious materials and aggregates. This could be a potential game changer because the sheer volume of concrete used is large enough to materially impact atmospheric CO2 with widespread adoption. It would not only reduce the net CO2 emissions from concrete but, unlike carbon sequestration, it creates an economic opportunity for carbon capture. There are still issues to be clarified, particularly around calculating the life-cycle carbon impact of these new products. We need to understand how to benchmark them against traditional concrete and understand any impacts to durability and to natural carbonation in concrete. CaGBC continues to explore this area with industry partners. We are excited to how views of embodied carbon from concrete are shifting from overlooked, to a concern, to a promising climate solution.

Jeff Ranson, Senior Associate, CaGBC


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THIRD & HAWKINS CONDO Local residents band together to offer comfort and high efficiency to downsizers

1 1. The building is set at a 15-degree skew to create outdoor parkette areas. Corrugated WF-7/8” metal roofing panels, and WF-HF-4 siding wall panels, available in ribbed and flat profiles, were supplied by Westform and deliver long-term performance. 10

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2 7 2. The “pinwheel” footprint of the building and its 15-degree skew on the site allow each unit to have up to three exterior exposures for maximum natural-light penetration and mountain views. Juno Slimform™ LED surface-mounted fixtures used in this project are economical and stylish offering various accessories and customizations that work with any décor.

By Mary Ellen Read Located in Whitehorse, the six-storey condominium is the brainchild of three couples (none with previous construction / development experience) who joined forces to achieve one goal: develop a downtown community-oriented residential building, especially for seniors wishing to downsize, without sacrificing comfort and luxury to achieve a sustainable, highly energy-efficient building. Despite the challenges associated with construction in a northern climate, the group achieved their goal: a 20-unit condominium with exceptional curb-appeal and a plethora of accessible features. Most units are 1,200 square feet with two bedrooms. Aging-in-place/accessibility features include: five-foot-wide barrier-free hallways, three-foot-six-wide doorways, zerothreshold showers, grab-bars strategically placed throughout, wheelchair-friendly windows, lever handles for doors and faucets, kitchen under-counter and task lighting, and STC 60 soundproofing for increased comfort of all residents. Enthusiastically supported by the local council, the project also entices owners to return to the Whitehorse downtown core. Located in the well-established south end of town, this six-storey building is only a few blocks from the urban amenities of Main Street, three parks with playgrounds are within 0.5 km, and both the Waterfront Trail and Millennium Trail are just steps away.

DECIDUOUS TREES Betula papyrifera / Paper Birch

Site Plan

Prunus maackii / Amur Cherry Prunus virginiana / Chokecherry

The building is set at a 15-degree skew to create inviting outdoor TREES DECIDUOUS TREES parkettes on Betula twopapyrifera corners with local, low-maintenance shrubs and / Paper Birch Larix sibirica / Siberian Larch HT) plantings. ToPrunus offset the freeze/thaw that (1.75m occurs during spring maackii / Amur Cherry run-off, largePrunussections of permeable surfaces allow water to virginiana / Chokecherry percolate more naturally into the ground, thus reducing stress on TREES the local storm water system. Larix sibirica / Siberian Larch (1.75m HT)

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Non-combustible siding 1x4 vertical wood strapping Two layers 2” mineral fibre board insulation to R-20 Air/moisture barrier, taped & sealed 1/2” plywood sheathing 2x6 wood stud framing Fill stud cavity with batt insulation to R-22 6 mil poly vapour barrier, taped & sealed 2x3 horizontal wood strapping Fill cavity with batt insulation to R-8 One layer 5/8” type X GWB, taped & painted


3 3. About 20% of the façade is glazed with high-performance triple-glazed, low-e coated, argon-filled windows.

The high price of concrete in the North made underground parking prohibitive, compounded by the lack of space for a down-ramp. This limited the use of concrete and steel to the 1st level and led us to choose wood-frame construction as the logical choice for the maximum height permitted by code. Maximizing natural light penetration is more important than ever North of 60. About 20% of the façade is glazed with highperformance triple-glazed, low-e coated, argon-filled windows having a U-value of 1.16 W/m2 oC. This provides residents with exceptional cityscape and mountain views, and makes 100% of interior spaces within seven metres of an operable window. LED lighting is used throughout suites and common areas.

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The projected annual energy consumption is 105.4 KWhr/m2/year with all-electric power. A rooftop photovoltaic (PV) solar array incorporates state-of-the-art, PERC PV modules, which are 24% more efficient than conventional modules, and provide about 10% of the power requirements. Because the building is less dependent on grid infrastructure, it can sustain indoor temperatures far longer than average in the event of a power outage. The result is a building which is 35% more energy efficient than the NECB 2015 standard, while also matching market-rate condo prices. A fluid-to-air fan coil unit serves each individual suite. These units are interconnected by central controllers, creating a central loop. This system allows heat to be distributed as necessary, both between units and between floors, if there is a temperature imbalance in the building. A rooftop energy recovery ventilator system provides an air exchange rate of 0.73/hour while also transferring 86% of the sensible heat from exhausted air to the fresh incoming air.

5 4. Kohler supplied several types of plumbing fixtures. Its Simplice faucet combines elegant design with exceptional functionality and Sweep spray that delivers a forceful blade of water for superior cleaning. 5. A spacious, ground-floor lounge/party room with catering kitchen is ideal for establishing and expanding social networks and for hosting social events. FALL 2021 | BC FOCUS

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6 6. The rooftop photovoltaic solar array incorporates state-of-the-art PERC PV modules which provide about 10% of the power requirements.

To withstand the harsh winter temperatures and lack of sunlight, an enclosure-first design was critical to reduce energy consumption and improve both thermal performance and air tightness. Split-insulated assemblies were used for the exterior walls and roof, offering insulation values of R-40 and R-60, respectively. A uniform layer of rigid insulation over the sheathing minimizes thermal bridging, while an interior service cavity prevents penetrations of the interior vapour barrier. Together, these assemblies achieve an air leakage rate of 0.25 L/s/m2 at 75 Pa.

The developers occupy three of the four penthouses, while the remaining units were sold at fair market value to finance construction: an elegant, innovative solution that addressed lack of residential inventory and an enticement to choose downtown living. Mary Ellen Read is a principal at Northern Front Studio.

The compact design/form of the building further helps to minimize heat loss while the structure’s 15-degree skew plus substantive overhangs maximize solar gain in winter and solar shade during warmer months. The projected water consumption from the municipal supply is 69,947 litres/occupant/year, 16% less than NBCC 2015 baseline. Each unit has an individual, 100%-efficiency electric hot water tank. Fixtures are low flow, with at least 20% reduction of water use for all showerheads, lavatory and sinks. Landscaping uses drought-resistant, local plant species to reduce irrigation requirements. Since construction recycling is limited in Whitehorse, precision calculations to minimize on-site construction waste were a priority. Exterior materials consist of non-combustible cement fibreboard and metal siding, chosen for their ability to perform in the Yukon’s extreme seasonal temperature swings.

PROJECT CREDITS Architect: Northern Front Studio Inc. Owner/Developer: 536261 Yukon Inc. General Contractor: NGC Builders Ltd. Landscape Architect: Van Der Zalm + Associates Inc. Civil Engineer: Boge & Boge (1980) Ltd.

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7 7. Interior spaces have wheelchair-friendly halls and doorways, zero-threshold showers and grab-bars, and high-contrast edges between walls and floors to assist residents with diminished vision.

Mechanical and Electrical Engineer: SMS Engineering Ltd. Structural engineer: Boge & Boge (1980) Ltd. Sustainability Consultant: Chris Mitchell (Sustainable Tech Inc.) Acoustics Consultant: FFA Consultants in Acoustics and Noise Control Ltd. Building Envelope Specialist: RDH Building Science Inc. Photos: Martin Knowles Photo/Media


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CaGBC Awards celebrate Canadian projects and innovators

British Columbia winners include Vancouver’s Arman Mottaghi, MEC Vancouver, and the Zero Energy Buildings Learning Centre at the British Columbia Institute of Technology.

CaGBC recently announced the winners of the 2021 CAGBC Awards. The annual awards celebrate the projects and leaders transforming Canada’s building sector by accelerating and scaling buildings with exceptional performance across environment, carbon emissions and human health factors.

GREEN BUILDING LEADERSHIP AWARDS:

“This year’s submissions speak volumes about the passion, dedication and innovation of the green building sector,” said Thomas Mueller, President and CEO of CaGBC. “Considering the challenges of the past 18 months, the achievements they represent show what we can do when we move forward together. As the pandemic continues to weigh on us, the green building projects and people we honour today demonstrate how together we can action on climate change, resiliency, adaptation, and environmental and human health.” THE WINNERS OF THE 2021 CAGBC AWARDS ARE: Vivian Manasc, Principal Architect, Reimagine – CaGBC’s 2021 Lifetime Achievement Award winner is Vivian Manasc for her contributions to green building in Alberta and across Canada. For the past 35 years, Vivian has led integrated sustainable design teams with Reimagine (formerly Manasc Isaac, which she co-founded) for a wide variety of projects, frequently working in partnership with First Nations, Métis, and Inuit communities. Vivian’s trailblazing nature helped the firm score Alberta’s first LEED Certified building, and the first LEED Gold building in the Arctic. Her work beyond the firm has included serving as President of the Royal Architecture Institute of Canada and helping launch the CaGBC. She was recognized for her leadership in green building with the Alberta Order of Excellence in 2017. This award is sponsored by Mitsubishi Electric Canada.

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Lisa Bate, Global Sustainability Lead + Advance Strategy, Principal at B+H Architects is the Green Building Champion Award winner – One of Canada’s global sustainable design ambassadors, Lisa has for decades brought her diverse expertise to a number of organizations. At B+H she has led pioneering projects like the Zero Carbon Building Standard-certified Joyce Centre for Partnership & Innovation. She has also been featured in media coverage regarding topics from the ROI of green building practices and advancing carbon neutrality, to gender parity and building resilient cities and structure in a post-COVID world. Additionally, she has served as Chair for both the WorldGBC and CaGBC and was a representative to the UN’s Environment Programme—Sustainable Buildings and Climate Initiative. This award is sponsored by Oxford Properties Group. mcCallumSather, Green Building Pioneer winner – mcCallumSather exemplifies the definition of a pioneer, breaking new ground and helping grow a broader understanding of sustainable building practices. Over 25 years, the firm has built an impressive Southern Ontario portfolio, with both lower-profile projects which were often the first LEED-certified building in a municipality, to more prestigious projects that to this day push the boundaries of sustainable and efficient design. This award is sponsored by Enwave Arman Mottaghi, Emerging Green Leader winner – Co-founder and CEO of Lambda Science, a Vancouver start-up that uses artificial intelligence to help homebuilders create cost- and energy-efficient building designs, Arman is already a thought leader and innovator in the green building space. Through Lambda, he has developed partnerships with five B.C. cities and helped more than 200 builders build more energy-efficient homes. This award is sponsored by DIALOG. Ben Henderson, City of Edmonton, Government Leadership Award winner – As Council Chair of the Green Municipal Fund (GMF) program of FCM, City of Edmonton Councillor Ben Henderson has provided exceptional leadership and guidance during a time of significant growth for funding allocations to green building capital projects and municipal capacity building. During his tenure, Ben has facilitated the provision of millions of dollars to Canadian communities, enabling investments in green initiatives, and been a stabilizing force as the liaison between GMP council and FCM’s Executive committee. This award is sponsored by Stantec.


Left to right: Zero Energy Buildings Learning Centre at BCIT, 25 York Street, and the AMPED Sports Lab and Ice Complex.

Zero Energy Buildings Learning Centre at the British Columbia Institute of Technology, Inspired Educator winner – Created to support the construction industry’s transition to the new BC Energy Step Code and new City of Vancouver Zero Emissions Building bylaws, ZEBLC provides a full suite of training courses that are short and hands-on. This past year as part of the pandemic response, they transitioned from their unique classroom with 25 fullscale building assemblies to an online offering. Despite this disruption, more than 500 individuals have benefited from live construction demonstrations and lectures broadcast by the Centre since March 2020. Susan Kapetanovic-Marr, Ed Lim Technical Expertise Volunteer Award winner – Susan is a long-standing, dedicated volunteer who goes the extra mile to provide the expertise needed to continually advance sustainable buildings in Canada. Director of Sustainability with Canderel and a professional engineer in Alberta, she has been an active CaGBC volunteer for a decade, starting with the SitesWater Technical Advisory Group in 2011, a committee that she continues advise to this day. Susan also provides her extensive knowledge to the USGBC’s Water Efficiency TAG and their Location and Transportation TAG. Additionally, she recently joined the International WELL Building Institute’s Water Advisory Group and joined the LEED Canada Steering Committee in 2020 to provide broader market and technical insight for CaGBC’s green building programs.

GREEN BUILDING EXCELLENCE AWARD WINNERS: MEC Vancouver, New Construction Award winner – This mixed-use mass timber building at the gateway of Vancouver’s Olympic Village embodies the values of MEC and its customers. In addition to impressive water reuse and conservation elements, the project’s thoughtful design means that it contributes nearly twice as much energy to the Neighbourhood Energy Utility as it consumes. Photo Michael Elkin Honourable mention, Humber College, Barrett Centre for Technology. This award is sponsored by Morguard. 25 York Street, Toronto, Existing Building Award winner – This LEED EB:O+M Platinum building in downtown Toronto not only sets an exceptionally high bar in greenhouse gas, energy and water performance, it goes the extra mile in committing to the well-being of its occupants and in empowering tenants to help the building achieve its sustainability goals. The Confluence, Summer Village of Waiparous, Alberta, Inspiring Home winner – This residence on a previously developed site helped push the residential marketplace towards environmentally friendly products and manufacturer transparency. Its net positive energy and water performance is especially impressive given the location’s extreme climate. Photo Pavel Hajek This award is sponsored by Enbridge. Ottawa’s AMPED Sports Lab and Ice Complex, Zero Carbon Award winner – The AMPED project provides a shining example of how even a commercial building with an energy-intensive use in an extreme climate can lower its greenhouse gas emissions by almost 90 per cent. AMPED achieved this by using an advanced predictive learning software, a building and ice plant automation system, energy retrofits, custom build and design strategies, the removal of combustion fuels through electrification, and renewable energy generation technologies. This award is sponsored by Entuitive. Lindsey Kent, University of Calgary, Andy Kesteloo Memorial Student Project Award winner - This fourth year Civil Engineering student project focuses on the redevelopment of Rundle Manor, an affordable housing complex in northeast Calgary. Judges noted the project’s technical sophistication, especially the depth of engineering considerations, designed with a practical eye to today’s construction industry and code framework, as well as the community’s need.

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RCMP NATIONAL FORENSIC LABORATORY SERVICES Sustainable design meets complex requirements of state-of-the-art facility By Clarence Nery Situated on a 14-hectare site in the historic Green Timbers Urban Forest of Surrey, this state-ofthe-art policing facility is home to one of the largest Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) Divisional headquarters in Canada. The LEED® Gold landmark complex incorporates campus-wide infrastructure and consolidates office and support spaces for 2,700 RCMP personnel.

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Located within the existing complex site, the Forensic Lab is a new stand-alone building which reflects the RCMP’s operational strategy of grouping all laboratory functions separately from office, and support spaces and continues the pursuit of LEED Gold certification for expansion projects undertaken at the complex. The Surrey location replaced the 45-year-old lab in Vancouver and complements RCMP labs in Edmonton and Ottawa. Bird construction worked with Glotman Simpson for structural,


1. Horizon Landscape Contractors worked closely with the PD Group (Landscape Architect) in creating the rain gardens and other outdoor storm water management landscape components while also using mobile watering efforts to limit the amount of water required to establish the plant material. The project uses three roof-mounted YORK® YLAA chillers from Johnson Controls which reduce energy consumption and emissions, while creating a more comfortable interior environment.

Integral for Mechanical, Stantec for Electrical and Kasian Architecture as Prime Consultant to deliver the project in the summer of 2019. In the 79,975 sq. ft. Forensic Laboratory, all program components are arranged along a central circulation spine. The building siting and design allow for future linear expansion with the laboratory block to the north and the administrative block to the south of the corridor. While the purpose of the facility is to conduct high-security lab and research work, the design of the building complements both the existing RCMP Headquarters facility and the surrounding landscape. The building massing best supports biocontainment requirements along with the secure movement of evidence and staff. The tall central corridor allows for clerestory windows along the south side of the second floor to bring natural light into the building’s common spaces. The administrative block S I T Eareas. PLAN makes best use of the natural daylighting for the work

Site Plan FALL 2021 | BC FOCUS

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Envelope Detail

“TPO” roof membrane

Spray foam insulation Insulated metal panel wall

Alum flashing w/drip edge Curtain wall glazing

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Insulated metal panel soffit


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2. and 3. The Lab has been designed as a stand-alone structure to meet stringent programmatic guidelines to accommodate firing ranges, sensitive chain-of-custody security requirements, and other issues surrounding the nature of forensic science. 4. The double-height entrance lobby. 5. The project committed to enhanced indoor air quality through the selection of low-emitting furniture products, the avoidance of lighting containing mercury, and by adopting a green cleaning and green equipment program. 6. Occupancy and daylight sensors control much of the lighting. Acuity Brands Inc., the North American market leader and one of the world’s leading providers of innovative, intelligent and integrated solutions, supplied lighting to this project. Richmond-based Green Image Tech supplied LED panel lighting, strip lighting, and vapour proof luminaires.

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PROJECT CREDITS Architect: Kasian Architecture Interior Design & Planning Construction: Bird Construction Structural engineer: Glotman Simpson Mechanical engineer: Integral Electrical engineer: Stantec LEED Consultant: Morrison Hershfield Landscape architect: PD Group Landscape Architec Photos: Shane O’Connor Photography

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SENSING THE FUTURE OF THE RESTROOM. TO DAY.

Sloan’s sensor-operated products are leading the way toward the future of the integrated commercial restroom. With touch-free solutions for greater hand hygiene and cohesive design, that future is now. Learn more at sloan.com/touch-free Shown above: ST-2469 Water Closet with CX-8158 Flushometer in Graphite, Sloan ® XLERATOR ® EHD-501 Hand Dryer in Graphite, Designer Series™ DSG-83000 Gradient Sink with laminated cabinet-style vertical enclosure, BASYS ® EFX-250 Faucet and ESD-500 Soap Dispenser in Graphite, SU-7419 Designer Urinal with CX-8198 Flushometer in Graphite

Distributed in Canada by Dobbin Sales dobbinsales.com 2

SABMag - SUMMER 2021

FALL 2021 | BC FOCUS

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7 7. Clerestory windows bring natural light into the building’s common spaces. Potable water use reduction in excess of 40% savings was achieved through the utilization of low-flow fixtures, including Sloan and Chicago Faucets supplied by Dobbins Sales.

Forensic Labs are very specialized buildings due to mechanical requirements, specific construction of functions such as firing ranges, sensitive chain-of-custody security requirements, and other issues surrounding the nature of forensic science. The Lab has been designed as a stand-alone structure to meet stringent programmatic guidelines, isolate the specialized function, facilitate ease of construction, and minimize disturbance. It also follows the campus precedent of utilizing rainwater as a means to eliminate the need for irrigation by infiltrating stormwater on site and directing excess flows to planting areas with drought-tolerant native species. Inside the building, water use reduction in excess of 40% savings was achieved through the utilization of low- flow urinals, highefficiency toilets, faucets, and campus showers. The mechanical systems were designed to meet the current needs of the facility while also accommodating a future building expansion. The project includes LED lighting, as well as occupancy and daylight sensors. Additional energy savings were achieved through variable air volume systems, heat recovery, and higher efficiency air-cool scroll chillers and condensing boilers. The project includes advanced energy and metering systems which will allow comparisons of building energy performance on a month-to-month and year-to-year basis. The project selected refrigerants for mechanical systems which lowered global warming potential associated with their use. A green power purchase for the project means a substantial portion 24

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of the building energy usage for the first two years is offset by off-site renewable energy systems. Concerning materials and resources, part of the entry lobby is clad with certified wood, showing the project’s commitment to supporting rigorous sustainable wood harvesting practices. The project diverted 75% of all related construction waste from the landfill, outfitted the building with regionally-located building materials, and selected materials which contained a cumulative total of 30% recycled content. For indoor environment quality, the project includes additional outdoor air supplied to occupied areas which are monitored by carbon dioxide sensors. The design team has provided an effective work environment for the employees through better ventilation, reducing or eliminating potentially irritating chemicals from building materials and office furniture, providing source control of pollutants, and flushing the building with fresh air after construction completion to negate any remaining pollutants that may have off-gassed during construction. The journey to secure LEED certification was made possible through thoughtful leadership from the RCMP and a committed design team that responded to many challenges. The project achieved all available LEED regional priority points by addressing credit requirements which were of particular importance in the project’s geographic location. Clarence Nery is Senior Project Manager and Senior Associate at Kasian.


Bird Construction’s chosen landscape specialist that created the rain gardens, the storm water management landscape system, and the mobile watering efforts for the RCMP National Forensic Laboratory. horizonlandscape.ca

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YORK® YLAA Air-Cooled Scroll Chiller A true plug and play system that provides the highest efficiency for its operation, the YORK® YLAA Air-Cooled Scroll Chiller, used in the RCMP National Forensic Laboratory, allows you to reduce your energy costs while being friendlier to the environment. Brazed evaporators and microchannel condensers in the YLAA Chillers enable more efficient heat transfer, providing lower life-cycle costs.

• Reduce your energy costs as much as 40% – get the best efficiency at all operating conditions and lower your annual energy consumption. • Be friendlier to the environment – become a leader in environmental design with zero-ODP HFC-410A refrigerant and up to 50% less refrigerant charge. • Operate your own way – choose from a variety of energy, sound, and mechanical configurations to suit your many application needs. • Lower your cost of ownership – minimize your installation cost, maximize your usable space, lower your electric bills and reduce your service expenses by choosing a lighter, smaller, more efficient, low maintenance chiller.

604 220 4616 | james.spooner@jci.com | www.johnsoncontrols.com FALL 2021 | BC FOCUS

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VEIL HOUSE Design based on circular economy and indoor/outdoor living By Measured Architecture Our client, a family of four, wanted to root themselves in an established charismatic neighbourhood on Vancouver’s east side. They asked for a single-family residence that, while modern, would conform with the pitched roof silhouettes of neighbouring houses. They also envisioned the house to be built using sustainable practices as much as possible. In addressing the needs of the clients, a circular economy approach became an important part of the design. The build began with the original house being ‘unbuilt’ or disassembled, with a 93.67% recycling rate achieved. In total, almost 74,000 kg of material was recycled while over 9,000 kg were salvaged and donated to

1 1. The street view of the stained cedar-clad house.

2 2. 95% of the building lies within 7m of an opening. Combined with an operable skylight, light and air permeates every habitable room in the house. 26

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Site Plan

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Basement Level Plan 1. Guest Bedroom 2. Hallway 3. Laundry

Transverse Section

4. Mech/Storage 5. Master Ensuite 6. Master WIC

7. Master Bedroom 8. Bathroom

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Main Level Plan 9. Living Room 10. Boot Room

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Second Level Plan 11. Kitchen 12. W/C

13. Entry 14. Dining Room 15. Deck

16. AV Room 17. Storage 18. Study

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3 Habitat for Humanity. While this process took two extra weeks to complete, once provincial tax incentives were factored in, the “unbuild” actually cost our clients less than a conventional demolition. The re-purposed materials for Veil House can be seen by our clients every day: outside their lower-level bedroom window in the gabion retaining wall filled with pieces of concrete from the demolition of the original house making, in effect, a textured piece of art; in the reclaimed oak stair treads leading to both the upper and lower house levels; as well as the site hoarding repurposed as artwork in the garage. The clients asked that the house be veiled from the street. Thus, through effective design and landscaping, passersby can see only the office and dining room feature windows; even the front door is hidden behind the primary wall so it can be opened with complete privacy. Bedrooms were purposely placed in the basement to ensure yearround cool air flow, decreasing the need for air conditioning, with concrete floors providing radiant heating. However, the design allows the children to move to separate bedrooms on the second floor as they mature; this is in keeping with the desire of the clients that the house adapt to the family’s changing needs. The main floor gives the real sense of the house, which the clients requested be designed for both indoor and outdoor living. One distinct space flows easily into the next and finally onto a rectangular cedar deck on the west side, and a terrace on the shaded north side.

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4 3. and 4. Good-one-side Douglas fir plywood, finished with a white-washed stain, adds warmth to the interior.


1. Western Red Cedar T&G - Tertiary Roof Cladding 2. Concealed Gutter to mediate Roof of Wall Cladding 3. Western Red Cedar T&G - Wall Cladding 4. P.T. Cross Strapping on 2 ply SBS Roof Membrane 5. Structural Steel Hold Down Anchors 6. Diagonal P.T. Strapping on Vapour Permeable Sheathing Membrane 7. Plywood Sheathing 8. 2x8 Studs C/W Batt Insulation 9. Whitewashed Douglas Fir Rotary Ply Interior Cladding

Project Credits Architect: Measured Architecture General Contractor: Powers Construction

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Landscape Architect: Measured Architecture Structural engineer: Entuitive Structural Engineers Photos: Ema Peter Photography

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5. Filled with the foundation fragments of the original house, the gabion wall is located on the south side of the house opposite the basement bedrooms. 6 and 7. Unlike the status quo where demolition companies throw away usable, renewable resources and charge their customers to do so, the existing house was carefully un-built to preserve these resources. FALL 2021 | BC FOCUS

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8 8 .The rear yard flows seamlessly into the living room, providing cross ventilation into the space. Harp Specialty Lumber Inc. supplied the custom manufactured cedar siding. Sustainably harvested, its numerous advantages – natural resistance to decay and insects, low energy to manufacture vs. competing products, light weight, workability, ease of finishing, and natural beauty – make it the environmental and practical choice of architects and builders.

The main floor dining room was isolated from the living room and kitchen for acoustic separation. The importance of the spatial divide was heightened with the onset of the pandemic, as the room now operates as an additional station for remote learning and work meetings. Sliding doors are placed in both the living and dining rooms, promoting cross-ventilation in the warmer months for passive cooling. In total, 95% of the build is within seven metres of a window opening. Throughout the interior, good-one-side Douglas fir plywood —a low-grade construction material elevated by a whitewashed stain—was used through careful curation to add warmth to the walls by displacing long runs of drywall and reducing the material footprint of the site. On the exterior, Veil House was designed to age gracefully by using a silver stain on the cedar to help expedite its eventual

patina and to lower the footprint of maintenance to the building. This also served to achieve a timeless “it’s always been there” look to the residence. The process of construction and the ultimate results of this residential project have reinforced our view that the most significant role as a designer today is to design through the lens of a green mandate and to seek choices that, while cost equivalent to traditional building practices, have a greener outcome. The re-purposing and reusing of materials has become emblematic of our paradigm shift to consider new ways to achieve design goals without the crutch of landfills. In practising these principles, we designed the house so that one day in the distant future, it too can easily be dismantled and recycled at the end of its lifecycle. Clinton Cuddington is with Measured Architecture.

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Wood.

Growing better buildings in BC.

JUST RELEASED: Wood in Low-Rise Commercial Buildings – A case study wood-works.ca/bc Courtesy: Fast + Epp | Credit: Mathias Fast Photography

Technologically advanced engineered wood products and building systems, including mass timber, are being used in new building types and sizes, while increasing construction efficiency and reducing carbon impacts. Call Wood WORKS! BC today to find out how wood can benefit and enhance your next commercial project.

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