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BRITISH COLUMBIA BRITISH COLUMBIA

Canada Green Building Council

ISSUE 6, FALL 2018, British Columbia Chapter - CaGBC Regional Publication /

FOCUS

CAMBIE FIRE HALL NO. 3 and RICHMOND NORTH AMBULANCE STATION: Expressing a positive civic identity Next steps for LEED: O+M the first to receive an upgrade IQALUIT INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT: Grace meets efficiency in a severe climate

ZEBx: Centre of excellence supports zero emission building in Vancouver

FALL 2018 | BC FOCUS

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Message from the British Columbia Chapter of the CaGBC Welcome to the fall/winter issue of B.C. Focus magazine produced by the Canada Green Building Council – B.C. Chapter in partnership with SABMag. We are thrilled to explore a variety of topics in this issue which showcase the rich landscape of innovation and collaboration in the B.C. green building industry. We are happy to highlight some important updates in the industry relating to zero and low carbon buildings including the BC Step Code, award winning products and some cutting edge educational workshops on tap for this fall. With an ever-growing member network of building industry professionals, we are dedicated to creating a cleaner, healthier, high-performance built environment through education, collaboration and innovation. Since our last edition we’ve been pleased to be able to offer a wide range of successful events, workshops and networking opportunities. Some highlights have included our “Zero Carbon Innovation Series” and our “End of Summer Rooftop Networking Event”. We are also proud to have delivered here in Vancouver the first Zero Carbon Building workshop in Canada.

This fall we look forward to continuing the conversation around zero carbon buildings, building the capacity of the green building workforce and the B.C. Step Code. In November, the Emerging Green Professionals (EGP) committee will also be delivering the highly successful “Inspiring Possibilities” panel event, convening students and new professionals who are passionate about green building. Please stay tuned to our website to find out about our many upcoming events and educational workshops. We hope you find this edition of B.C. Focus educational and informative. A special thank you to our volunteers, members, partners and friends in developing and providing some of this editions content, and of course our sponsors and advertisers who have helped make this publication happen. Please continue to share with us your projects, lessons and succeesses as we continue to showcase the many inspiring stories of the green building sector. This publication and your support of the Chapter greatly contribute to the strenthening, promotion and success of our green building community.

Brad Doff, MES, Env. SP, LEED Green Assoc.

Morgan McDonald

Chapter Engagement Specialist, BC Chapter

Director of Operations, Ledcor Renew

Canada Green Building Council

Chair, BC Chapter, Canada Green Building Council

FALL 2018 | BC FOCUS

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FALL 2018 | BC FOCUS

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See a digital version of CaGBC British Columbia Chapter FOCUS at http://bit.ly/28O6xsr

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In this issue FALL 2018

19 12 7. Membership Update 8. ZEBx: Centre of excellence supports zero emission building in Vancouver 9. Upcoming events and workshops 11. Iqaluit International Airport: Grace meets efficiency in a severe climate

15. Belmont Secondary School: Health, 25. Cascadia Windows & Doors: Winner of resouce conservation, and community the CaGBC Green Product of the Year connection drive the design 26. Next steps for LEED: O+M the first 18. Langara College and Okangan to receive an upgrade Child Care Centre: winners of 28. Cambie Fire Hall No.3 and Richmond national awards North Ambulance Station: ... expressing 23. BC Energy Step Code: An argument a positive civic identity for starting at Step 3

Environmental savings for this issue: Printed on Rolland Environ100 Satin, a 100% post-consumer fiber that is certified

12 trees

45,044 L water

682 kg waste

1,774 kg CO2

FSC and EcoLogo. It is processed chlorine-free, FSC-recycled and is manufactured using biogas energy.

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A joint publishing project of the British Columbia Chapter - CaGBC and SABMag. Address all inquiries to Don Griffith: dgriffith@sabmagazine.com Published by Janam Publications Inc. | www.sabmagazine.com | www.janam.net

COVER IMAGE: Cambie Fire Hall No.3 and Richmond North Ambulance Station | Architect: Assembly Architecture and S2 Architecture FALL 2018 | BC FOCUS

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GREEN INNOVATION LUNCH SERIES

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NETWORKING EVENT SPONSOR

to Our Generous Chapter Sponsors

SILVER SPONSORS

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CANADIAN DIRECTORY OF PRODUCTS AND SERVICES FOR SUSTAINABLE, HIGH-PERFORMANCE BUILDING THERMAL & WINDOWS >Cascadia Windows & Doors >Eco Insulating Glass Inc. >EuroLine Windows® >Inline Fiberglass Ltd. >Innotech Windows + Doors >LiteZone™ Insulating Glass >Pollard Windows Inc. INTERIOR FINISHES >CBR Products >Columbia Forest Products >Forbo Flooring Systems >Interface >Nora Systems, Inc. >Masonite Architectural >Shaw Contract Group ELECTRICAL | PLUMBING | HVAC | RENEWABLES >Acuity Brands >Aqua-Tech

>Elkay >KIKO Water Systems >Nova Sun Power >Simple Solar >Sloan Valve >Taco Comfort Solutions >Tate Access Floors >Tempeff North America >Uponor >Viessmann Manufacturing Company Inc. GREEN DESIGN SUPPORT + PROFESSIONALS >Canadian Precast/Prestressed Concrete Institute >Diamond Schmitt Architects >Efficiency Nova Scotia >FABRIQ architecture >Pomerleau >RJC Engineers

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FALL 2018 | BC FOCUS


CaGBC MEMBERSHIP UPDATE Keep up to date by attending one of our diverse education sessions.

Get involved with the B.C. Chapter of the Canada Green Building Council The B.C. Chapter’s network of green building professionals is a premier source for education, training and cutting-edge green building information throughout B.C. We provide support and advocacy for green building programs including LEED, WELL Building Standard, and the Zero Carbon Building Standard. Through involvement with the chapter, individuals have the opportunity to access local educational, volunteering, networking and leadership opportunities.

Join Us! Our members are key innovators and thought leaders of tomorrow’s sustainable world. If you are not already a member, join the CaGBC and our public and private sector member organizations across the country to help transform Canada with greener buildings and healthier communities. All employees of a National member company (either a Green Building Specialist or Green Building Advocate) are entitled to a free B.C. Chapter membership (or other Chapter of their choice). If you are not an employee of a national member company you can join the B.C. Chapter as an individual for $100 per year. Emerging Green Professionals can join for just $35.

Find out more about our membership structure and the many benefits available at www.cagbc.org/britishcolumbia

FALL 2018 | BC FOCUS

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Keep up to date by attending one of our diverse education sessions.

UPCOMING

EVENTS AND WORKSHOPS

in British Columbia

Private workshops are also available on topics which include: The WELL Building Standard, Introduction to LEED v4, LEED Green Associate Exam Kickstarter and Introduction to Energy Benchmarking. Please contact bdoff@cagbc.org for further information. You can also go to our website www.cagbc.org/britishcolumbia for information on our events and workshops.

2018

TOPIC

TYPE OF EVENT

LOCATION

November 6

The WELL Building Standard

Workshop

Vancouver

November 15

EGP Green Building Industry: Inspiring Possibilities

Event

Vancouver

November 22

Green Associate Exam Kickstarter

Workshop

Vancouver

November 17

The Zero Carbon Building Standard Workshop

Workshop

Victoria

November 29

Green Professional Building Skills: Mechanical & HVAC-R Workshop

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FALL 2018 | BC FOCUS

Vancouver


Collaborative platform to support the development of Zero Emission Buildings launches in Vancouver By Jessica Williams

With buildings contributing as much as 35% of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in Canada (including consideration for upstream impacts), there is no doubt that rapid change must take place within the building industry if Canada is to meet its climate change commitments established under the 2017 Paris Agreement. Launched in July 2018, the Zero Emissions Building Exchange (ZEBx) is a centre of excellence that will increase knowledge, capacity and passion for cost-effective, attractive, low energy residential and commercial buildings. It is a catalyst for emerging industry innovation that is appearing in response to the worldleading energy policies of British Columbia. By 2025, new building projects in the City of Vancouver must have near zero emissions, as outlined in the city’s 2016 Zero Emission Building Plan. Meanwhile, British Columbia has set its own new construction guidelines, requiring all residential and commercial buildings to be designed to “net zero ready” by 2032. These policies recognize that buildings provide one of the greatest opportunities for GHG reductions when compared to other industries, as there already exists a number of building solutions to this objective, as shown by the uptake of voluntary standards that predate these policies (e.g. LEED, CaGBC’s Zero Carbon Building Standard, Passive House, Living Building, etc.). However, industry has not yet seen adoption and implementation of new building technologies and solutions at scale. While policies and standards are necessary tools for market transformation, more support is needed not only to rapidly reduce energy and emissions in buildings, but to also do so in a way that ensures the places we live and work are resilient to climate change, healthier and more comfortable for occupants, and more cost-effective to build. ZEBx is a critical tool in the market transformation landscape, catalyzing and leveraging innovation, networking solutions, and disseminating and delivering knowledge back to industry for widespread implementation. Formed by a passionate team of industry leaders, ZEBx is committed to the rapid implementation of zero emission buildings. This core mission is what guides the organization to develop engaging programming that connects industry to solutions through strategic partnerships, knowledge exchange, product demonstrations, project tours and a curated resource library. ZEBx is also home to one of Canada’s first building innovation clusters, where early adopters co-locate to collectively advance their high-performance projects through daily, open-source collaboration.

Since its inception, ZEBx has partnered with many BC organizations that are actively supporting industry to transition to a low-carbon building future. Their individual efforts are driving better building practices within their area of expertise – i.e. education, technology, construction, etc. In fact, over two million square feet of projects in Vancouver are pursuing near zero or zero emissions standards. BCIT, for example, built and launched the High Performance Building Lab and has since strategically weaved the space into the majority of its courses within the School of Construction and the Environment. This lab provides hands-on training in zero emission buildings and develops trades practitioners’ understanding of building high-performance envelope application technologies and systems. Through the commitment to create accessible trades training, industry will hopefully see improvements to the labour shortage often experienced in highperformance construction projects. Open, a social enterprise dedicated to providing open source software solutions for the building industry, is working with the provincial government to develop an easy to use mobile software tool to support designers and builders so that they can optimize both energy and construction costs when applying the new BC Energy Step Code. Still under development, this tool aims to be live by early 2019 and is an evolution to Open’s existing educational tool, Building PathFinder. Just a couple of the many excellent efforts from industry, it’s clear there exists the knowledge for achieving zero- or near zero-emission buildings in our region. ZEBx was formed as a central hub aimed at bridging the gaps through knowledge exchange so that initiatives and opportunities, such as those highlighted above, are made accessible to targeted industry audiences. Our commitment to open and collaborative communication between government, industry and academia allows for the various building industry sectors to coordinate their efforts in a way that efficiently pursues our common objectives under current climate policy, while fostering economic prosperity as market demand for lowcarbon building practices and technologies continue to grow. ZEBx is here to support industry as it navigates the many policies that are quickly challenging and transforming the status quo. In addition to connecting industry to existing resources and programs, ZEBx continuously develops its own programming and resources to fill the gaps and cater to the evolving needs of industry. We encourage all organizations – big and small – to connect with us directly to identify current capacity gaps and collectively work towards achieving zero emission buildings. Jessica Williams (jessica@zebx.org) is the Communications and Partnerships Manager at the Zero Emission Building Exchange.

FALL 2018 | BC FOCUS

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Design with community in mind Architectural and engineering services for the new airport. stantec.com/airports 10

FALL 2018 | BC FOCUS


IQALUIT INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT Grace meets efficiency in a severe climate | By Noel Best

AN ELEGANT, RED CURVE AGAINST THE SNOW. THE GLAZING IS STRATEGICALLY PLACED TO BRING THE SOUTH WINTER LIGHT DEEP INTO THE TERMINAL.

Opened in 2017, the new 10,000 m2 airport terminal building, designed by the Vancouver office of Stantec Architecture, is the first P3 terminal in North America and Nunavut’s first LEED® Silver. The form is an elegant, gestural, red curve, set against the natural winter background - a subtle response to the multiple requirements of a contemporary airport, to the environmental challenges of the severe Arctic climate, and to the history and culture of the area.

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Both energy and materials are very expensive in the Arctic, so sustainability is a necessity. Key features of the design include: • A short distance from the town centre for both vehicles and pedestrians. • A compact building form to minimize the exposed surface, and a curved roof that uses the prevailing wind to sweep it clear of snow. • Maximum building frontage for parking aircraft, making the passenger’s walk across the tarmac as short as possible. • All passenger facilities at grade level to optimize accessibility and preclude the need for stairs, escalators and elevators. • A combined heat and power system to optimize energy usage. • Strategic glazing design to minimize energy loss and to bring the precious winter light deep into the building. • A passive cooling system to keep the permafrost, on which the building rests, permanently frozen. • Multipurpose public spaces to host community events and meetings.

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Site Plan 1. Air Terminal Building 2. Apron 3. Drop Off Curb 4. Parking 5. Ungalliqpaat Crescent 6. Nunavut Arctic College

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THE AIRPORT HAS AN IMPORTANT ROLE AS A COMMUNITY MEETING PLACE, WITH A CENTRAL ROTUNDA FOR PUBLIC EVENTS, AND LOCAL ART PLACED THROUGHOUT. WHEN SYMBOLS ARE NOT SUFFICIENT FOR THE SIGNAGE, FOUR LANGUAGES ARE USED: INUKTITUT, ENGLISH, FRENCH, AND INUINNAQTUN.

Cold climate design In a P3 competition, energy efficiency is a critical factor in success, especially in Arctic conditions. But there is also the need for natural light, thus the project brief mandated a minimum of 20% glazing. This was met by strategically placing the glazing to bring the south winter light deep into both the public and the administrative spaces. Energy-efficient buildings are critical here as Iqaluit’s electricity system is served by generators that run on imported fossil fuels. The terminal incorporates a number of key energy-efficiency measures: reduced sources of air infiltration, including double overhead rolling doors where service vehicles enter the building; a building envelope which includes well insulated metal panel assemblies and high-performance glazing; high-efficiency interior and exterior lighting; two combined heat and power (CHP) generators that run on fuel oil, allowing waste heat to be captured and directly used for heating the building; and fresh air supplied to the building through a high-efficiency heat recovery system, with the volume of air modulated based on CO2 demand.

CLERESTORY WINDOWS AT THE HIGHEST POINT OF THE ROOF. IQALUIT MEANS “PLACE OF MANY FISH” IN INUKTITUT. WATER-CONSERVING FIXTURES, SUCH AS THE SLOAN DECK MOUNTED LAVATORY FAUCETS (1.9 LPM), WERE USED THROUGHOUT.

Overall, the LEED® model results project the annual energy consumption to be 408 kWh/m2/year. The actual energy use is tracked, and ongoing efforts are made to review actual operations relative to the modelled performance.

ART BY LOCAL ARTISTS REFLECT THE HISTORY AND CULTURE OF THE REGION.

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Site ecology and construction waste A passive system of ‘thermosyphons‘ prevents the heat radiating from the building melting the underlying permafrost. Close-spaced horizontal pipes containing CO2, the ‘evaporators’, are located beneath the slab and connected to vertical ‘radiators‘ around the building perimeter. Any heat from the building emanating downward is captured by the evaporators, turning the CO2 to gas, which then flows to the radiators where the cold ambient air condenses the gas, which then flows back to the evaporators. The cycle repeats. Most of the community’s supplies and building materials are brought in by sealift from Montreal in the few months the harbour is ice free. Consequently, the logistics, the volume and weight, and the resultant shipping costs are an integral part of the design process. Many of the systems, such as the Combined Heat and Power, were assembled and tested in the south before being shipped – a full year in advance of the onsite installation. With no recycling systems and the exorbitant cost of shipping waste south, the established local culture of ‘mending and reinventing’ saw much of the construction waste ‘rescued’ by the locals for personal use.

Hybrid ventilation diagram Noel Best is the Design Principal for this project at Stantec Architecture in Vancouver. Architecture: Stantec Architecture Ltd Engineering: Stantec Consulting Ltd Construction: Bouygues Construction Canada Photos: Fred Lemire & Brian Tattuinee

THE BUILDING ENVELOPE INCLUDES WELL INSULATED METAL PANEL ASSEMBLIES AND HIGH-PERFORMANCE GLAZING. BENSON STEEL LIMITED, UNDER THE GUIDANCE OF BOUYGUES CANADA AND STANTEC ENGINEERING, WAS CHOSEN TO BE THE DESIGN ASSIST STRUCTURAL STEEL, METAL DECK AND GLULAM TIMBER PARTNER FOR THE SUPPLY AND INSTALLATION OF THE TERMINAL AS WELL AS THE SUPPLIER AND INSTALLER OF THE COMPLETE PRE-ENGINEERED COMBINED SERVICE BUILDING.

Landside Elevation

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The Thermosyphon System To protect the underlying permafrost, CO2 in the horizontal evaporator pipes below the slab captures heat from the building in a process which converts the CO2 to a gas that flows to the vertical radiators around the building. The CO2 condenses in the cold outdoor air and flows back to the evaporators to repeat the process.

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FALL 2018 | BC FOCUS

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THE SCHOOL ALSO SERVES AS A COMMUNITY HUB WITH A CAPACITY TO PROVIDE CHILDREN AND FAMILY SUPPORT SERVICES.

Belmont Secondary School

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Health, resource conservation, and community connection drive the design By Lee Blanchard

The new Belmont Secondary School houses 1,200 grade 9-12 students, and serves as a community hub with a capacity to provide children and family support services as well as cross generational programs. The site constraints required innovative design to accommodate the secondary and postsecondary educational programs, community services and recreational requirements. The project is located on a brownfield redevelopment site, near an established community on Vancouver Island, with Langford Lake located to the north and Glen Lake located to the southeast. Both lakes are approximately 250 metres from the project property line. To the west, a forest covers a rocky hill and residential buildings border the site situating the school at the heart of the community.

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The sustainable design strategies important to the success of the project are: 1. moveable walls and overhead doors to adapt to needs of occupants 2. minimizing energy consumption 3. passive daylighting 4. passive ventilation


2) The principal academic learning spaces or “Learning Communities” are organized along a three-storey atrium which brings natural light and ventilation opportunities deep into the building core. Vertical circulation is organized from the atrium at regular modules, including main convenience stairs. Operable windows are also provided throughout for passive ventilation. The mechanical system is based on air source heat pumps and displacement ventilation. 3) The building design supports current and forward-thinking education best practices in the Sooke School District. The principal academic spaces or “learning communities” are each home to approximately 150 students. These smaller units personalize learning, assist collaboration and cross-curricular teaching as well as reducing student isolation. The physical environment is designed to transform with adjustments in educational delivery by means of overhead doors and moveable walls. 4) A nature trail begins at the south end of the property with access from the street, offering students fresh air and exercise as they follow it along the elevated forest to the northwest corner of the building to the other side of the property. THE INTER-CONNECTED ATRIUM SPACE FACIL­ITATES EASY ORIENTATION TO ALL LEVELS OF THE SCHOOL WHILE BRINGING NATURAL LIGHT AND PASSIVE VENTILATION DEEP INTO THE BUILDING CORE. THE PROJECT USES A HIGHLY EFFICIENT CREST® CONDENSING BOILER BY LOCHINVAR WITH VARIABLE SPEED PUMP, AND MODBUS AND BACNET PROTOCOLS.

The school provides community connectivity with its close proximity of 800 metres to many basic services; convenience store, park, Community Centre, Fitness Centre, a library and restaurants. Within the school, many services are provided for the community such as a wellness centre, medical examination facilities, a daycare with an extensive play facility, community use multipurpose room with a self-contained serving kitchen and a Post-Secondary and Adult Education Centre (partnership with Camosun College). Other shared facilities within the school are an over-sized, four-court gymnasium for district and community functions, the multipurpose “Great Room”, a kitchen and adjacent server and drama room.

5) The overall building energy consumption is projected at 1,357,082 kWh/year (for a building area of 15,347 m = 88.4 kWh/m/year) to produce an energy savings of 49%. Space heating of the building was reduced from 1,504,856 kWh/year to 125,516 kWh/year for a 92% savings based on MNECB. 1,137,260 kWh/year of electricity is consumed, and 230,678 kWh/year of natural gas is consumed. Of the electricity, 70.8% is sourced by renewable energy provided by a third-party for a minimum of two years. 6) During construction, 85% of waste was diverted from the landfill, a total of 316 metric tonnes. The recycled content used on the project was 20.5% (based on manufacturer’s product declarations). Adhesives, sealants, coatings and paints with a low Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) content were specified.

The design of the school also incorporates connectivity through a three-dimensional sun-filled environment of interconnected and overlapping spaces which encourage casual socialization and a sense of community. The interconnected atrium space facilitates easy orientation to all levels of the school, culminating at the two-storey multi-purpose space located at the crossroads at the heart of the school. Design for wellness and resource conservation Several design elements contribute to the mental and physical wellness of the occupants while cutting energy and water use: 1) The natural daylighting in the student and teacher areas minimizes the use of artificial light which, studies suggest, can adversely effect well-being, productivity and overall satisfaction of occupants. With the building orientation and the strategically placed fenestration, views of the Langford and Glen Lakes are also visible through the second-floor classrooms along the north and east, from the learning commons, and from the landings at the glass stairwells – the latter becoming socializing and study areas for many students.

THE DESIGN ENCOURAGES STUDENT COLLABORATION AND INTERACTION WITH TEACHERS. THE GLAZED STAIRWELLS HAVE BECOME SOCIALIZING AND STUDY AREAS FOR MANY STUDENTS.

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THE DRAMATIC, OPEN LIBRARY IS ONE EXAMPLE OF HOW NATURAL LIGHT IS USED TO PROMOTE WELL-BEING, PRODUCTIVITY AND OVERALL SATISFACTION OF OCCUPANTS. ALUMICOR SUPPLIED SLIMMER PROFILE CURTAIN WALL PRODUCT, VERSAWALL 2500 (2-1/2” PROFILE) AND VERSAWALL 2200 (2” PROFILE), WHICH CONTRIBUTED TO MAXIMIZING THE NATURAL DAYLIGHTING.

7) Potable water use in the building was reduced by using low flush and flow urinals, lavatories, showers and faucets. Daily uses were calculated for each flush and flow fixture. Potable water consumption was reduced for landscaping by using climate-tolerant, native plants and by favouring native grass and wildflowers over conventional turf grass. The annual volume of potable water consumption is projected as 3,574,007 litres, representing a 35% reduction. And lastly, carpooling is encouraged by providing nine preferred parking carpool spaces, and the installation of six refueling stations for electric vehicles. Also, 152 bicycle storage and racks are available for 20% of the FTE occupants and 11% of the remaining building users. Students and staff have access to dedicated change rooms and showers, and bus stops are also routed for ease of accessibility.

CROSS SECTION SHOWING NATURAL LIGHTING AND VENTILATION

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Lee Blanchard is a project architect with Thinkspace Architecture & Planning Inc. Architect: Thinkspace Architecture & Planning Inc Civil engineer: KM Civil Consultants Ltd Electrical engineer: Jarvis Engineering Consultants Mechanical engineer: MAB Engineering Inc Landscape architect: Foresite Landscape Architecture Inc Commissioning agent: Applied Green Consulting Construction: Yellowridge Design Build Photos: Barry Calhoun


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LANGARA COLLEGE SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY BUILDING VANCOUVER Institutional [Large] Award winner in the 2018 Canadian Green Building Awards Jury Comment: This project is notable for its planning, with a six-storey atrium that functions not only as a light and ventilation well, but also as a social incubator that reinforces the academic program. The quality and quantity of natural light is extraordinary for a laboratory building of this type, and the energy performance is also exemplary. The project also creates a striking new landmark for the college.

FRONTING WEST 49TH AVENUE, THE SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGYBUILDING IS THE NEW ‘GATEWAY’ TO THE LANGARA COLLEGE CAMPUS

This 14,600m2 Science & Technology building creates a striking new gateway into the Langara College campus in south Vancouver. Science laboratories and classrooms are located on the top three levels, which frame the main driveway with a bold cantilever. The lower levels consolidate essential student services and connect to adjacent lounges, study and meeting spaces. As an architectural statement, cantilevering the laboratories and classrooms presents student activity as the face of the College, and allows a large program to be accommodated on a limited footprint. Inside and out, the spatial experience is defined by visual and physical interconnectivity designed to draw students together in a collaborative environment. Certified LEED Gold, the cost-effective design achieves exceptional efficiency through the integration of a high-performance envelope, thoughtfully deployed passive lighting and ventilation measures. The façade includes a custom louvre system on the upper floors, designed based on a sun path analysis, On 18

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the lower floors a translucent polycarbonate wall-panel system provides diffuse lighting to balance glare mitigation and thermal performance. A six-storey lightwell brings light deep into the floorplate [and also facilitates natural stack effect ventilation]. Photocell sensors are installed in occupied perimeter spaces to reduce lighting when sufficient daylight is present. Heating loads were reduced by the building’s high-performance envelope, including a thermally broken rainscreen system, while lighting loads were reduced via extensive daylighting, mediated by insulated translucent assemblies and custom louvres. The innovative mechanical system employs the locally developed Thermenex energy management system. Thermenex goes beyond traditional heat recovery in that no external source of heat is added or required until all the building’s latent and waste heat has been utilized, enabling the building to share and distribute heating and cooling energy effectively in the building, eliminating redundant and counteracting sources of heat and cold. “Thermenex in a Box” [TIAB] combines all components of the energy transfer system in a single unit, which is manufactured off-site and craned into place on the roof, requiring less than two days of installation. With its bold architecture, creative planning and exemplary energy performance, the project helps to transform a parking-focused commuter campus into an inspiring, vibrant and sustainable indooroutdoor learning environment.


VIEW OF GROUND FLOOR STUDENT LOUNGE

THE CANTILEVERED UPPER STOREYS ENABLE THE LARGE PROGRAM TO FIT ONTO A TIGHT SITE

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Energyrecovery recoveryand andtransfer transfer Energy

Maindriveway driveway Main

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Sunlight Sun light Natural air air path path Natural

PROJECT CREDITS Architects: Teeple Architects Inc. Joint Venture Architect: Proscenium Architecture + Interiors Structural Engineer: Weiler Smith Bower Consulting Structural Engineers Mechanical engineer: AME Group Consulting Professional Engineers Mechanical Specialty: TC Thermenex Inc. Electrical Engineer: Applied Engineering Solutions Ltd. Sustainability Consultant: Zon Engineering Code Consultant: LMDG Code Consultants Ltd. Envelope Consultant: Read Jones Christoffersen Ltd. Landscape Architect: PFS Studio General Contractor: Bird Construction Photos: Andrew Latreille

PROJECT PERFORMANCE Energy intensity [building and process energy] = 138.7kWh/m2/year Energy intensity reduction relative to reference building under ASHRAE 90.1 [2007] = 63% Potable water consumption from municipal sources = 613.8L/occupant/year Reduction in potable water consumption relative to reference building = 44.3% Recycled materials by value = 14.88% Regional materials [as defined by LEED] by value = 8% Construction materials diverted from landfill = 90.6%

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OKANAGAN COLLEGE CHILD CARE CENTRE PENTICTON Institutional [Small] Award winner in the 2018 Canadian Green Building Awards Jury Comment: As a structure designed to the rigorous Passive House standard, this building is notable for the beauty and simplicity of its environmental systems. The building relies mostly on local materials and very economical passive design strategies, yet also addresses cross-cultural issues and creates a symbolic new gateway to the college campus.

1 - FRONT ELEVATION SHOWING THE LANTERN

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The physical form of the building was developed to maximize natural ventilation. South-facing windows have low operable air intake vents, and a double-height lantern at the centre of the building, with automatic opening clerestory windows to exhaust stale air. The lantern opens north to shield from summer heat gain, but also to capitalize on a venturi effect from prevailing winds. During the heating season, air is provided through a super-efficient heat recovery ventilator.

Mechanical room Multi-purpose room Storage Nap

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Washroom Preschool, aftershool Observation room Three to five years old Infants

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Kitchen Hall Outdoor play space Solar walkway

The Okanagan College campus straddles the boundary between the City of Penticton and the Penticton Indian Reserve. The college and the En’owkin Centre, the cultural centre of the Syilx nation, are located directly across the river from one another. To acknowledge the cross-cultural nature of the community it serves, the Child Care Centre has bilingual signage.

A desire to connect indoor and outdoor spaces was at the core of the design. Each of the four Child Care rooms has large windows which provide constant visual and physical connection to the outdoor play areas. With the opening windows, accessible transitions, and large doors, there is no clear distinction between outdoor and indoor – rather, the entire child care space is a healthy, clean, safe island in the meadow. As a certified Passive House project, the building uses a strategy of super-insulation, airtight construction, and efficient mechanical systems to reduce energy consumption to less than 44 kWh/m2 annually. In addition, the roof of the building has been oriented to the south and angled for optimal photovoltaic performance. The material strategy for the building was a regional one, selecting materials that were locally produced and materials appropriate to the Okanagan climate. This focus on local materials not only reduces transportation emissions, it fosters the development of a sustainable regional economy. As the first Passive House Certified commercial building in Canada, regular tours are being given to utility companies, elected officials, and green building professionals.

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PROJECT CREDITS Architect: Landform Architecture + Design Build Structural Engineer: Aspect Engineers Mechanical Engineer: Butler Engineering Electrical engineer: Associated Engineering Building Envelope and Energy Consultants: BC Building Science Passive House Consultant: Chris Snyder General contractor: Ritchie Custom Homes Photos: John Adrian PROJECT PERFORMANCE Energy intensity [building and process energy] = 43.84 kWh/m2/year Energy intensity reduction relative to reference building = 46 % See all of the winning projects at https:// sabmagazine.com/awards/winners2018/

2 - THE ENTRY CANOPY AND EXTERIOR WALLS WIHT COMPOSITE CLADDING

Vapour retarding membrane + air barrier Intello Plus lapped and sealed with Tescon Vana

Double stud wall all joints in plywood taped insulation not shown for clarity

Concrete slab 150mm

Weather resistant barrier Solitex Mento 1000 lapped and taped w/ Tescon Vana

EPDM airsealing gasket Roflex Gasket around plumbing penetrations taped with Tescon Vana

Detail at slab to wall

Self adhered membrane Extoseal Encors Exterior plywood taped joints holes for vapor permeability Thermal barrier EPS Insulation 4 layers x 75mm

Air sealing tape Tescon Vana

Adhesive caulk Air barrier 10 mil polyethylene taped and sealed with Tescon Vana

3 - THE LANTERN-LIT HALLWAY

Protective metal barrier Galvalume Flashing

Structural insulating formwork Insulspan EPS Foundation System

4 - LARGE WINDOWS PROVIDE NATURAL LIGHTAND A VISUAL CONNECTION TO THE EXTERIOR

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CATEGORY SPONSORS

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Visit http://sab.ydsinc.ca/awards/ winners2018 for complete details. For details on sponsoring the Canadian Green Building Awards contact dgriffith@sabmagazine.com. 4

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winning projects G IN

ARCHITECTURAL

AWARDS

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NATIONAL SPONSORS NATIONAL SPONSORS

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EN BUIL

The Awards presentation of the 2018 Canadian Green Building Awards, the annual program of Sustainable Architecture & Building [SABMag], took place in Toronto on June 4, 2018 where the winning firms were recognized. We especially thank our sponsors who make the Awards possible.

ADIAN

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The winners of the 2018 Canadian Green Building Awards

N CA

1 Normand Deschênes [left] of National Sponsor Masonite Architectural presents the Institutional [Small] Award for the Centre de découverte to Daniel Smith of Smith Vigeant Architectes. 2 Rebecca Mallinson [third left] of Category Sponsor Enbridge presents the Commercial/ Industrial [Large] Award for the One York Tower to [l to r] : Phil Bastow of The Mitchell Partnership Inc., Alan Murphy of Green Reason, and John Gillanders, Dermot Sweeny, David Copeland, and Peter Kurkjia, all of Sweeny &Co Architects Inc. 3 Normand Deschênes [centre] of National Sponsor Masonite Architectural presents the Commercial/Industrial [Small] Award for the UBC Campus Energy Centre to Charles Marshall [left] and Raul Dominquez of DIALOG. 4 Normand Deschênes [second left] of National Sponsor Masonite Architectural presents the Commercial/Industrial [Small] Award for the Ecology Action Centre Headquarters to [l to r] : Jordan Willett of Solterre Design, Maggy Burns of the Ecology Action Centre [Managing Director Emeritus], Emma Norton of the Ecology Action Centre, and Patrick Jardine of Tekton Design + Build. 5 Bob Prince [centre] of Invizij Architects Inc. receives the Existing Building Upgrade Award for the Harvey Woods Lofts from Category Sponsor Inline Fiberglass represented by Gary Mackin [left] and Victor Kowalczyk. 6 SABMag publisher Don Griffith [second left], representing National Sponsor the Canadian Precast Prestressed Concrete Institute, presents the Institutional [Large] Award for the Langara College Science & Technology Building to [l to r] Wes Wilson, Tomer Diamant, Mahsa Majidian, and Aidan Mitchelmore of Teeple Architects. 7 L to r: Andrew Arifuzzaman of the University of Toronto Scarborough, and Nigel Tai and John Featherstone, both of Diamond Schmitt Architects, receive the Institutional [Large] Award from SABMag publisher Don Griffith, representing National Sponsor the Canadian Precast Prestressed Concrete Institute. Unable to attend were: DIALOG, winner of the Commercial/Industrial [Small] Award for the UBC Campus Energy Centre; and Landform Architecture, winner of the Institutional [Small] Award for the Okanagan Child Care Centre. Photos: Vuk Dragojevic.


BC Energy Step Code

two-thirds of all new construction will exceed current BC Building Code energy efficiency requirements. (Note: Not all are planning to start at Step 3.)

High Performance Building Alliance Calls Step 3 the Right Place to Star

Every citizen of the province—and the world—will benefit from Step 3 construction, because the resulting homes will emit fewer greenhouse gas emissions. That’s one of the reasons the Province of BC is thinking about requiring this level of energy-efficiency performance in all new homes across the province in 2022 as part of its Clean Growth Strategy.

Costs are minimal, benefits are significant, and catching up later could cost a bundle. That’s why Three For All is urging local governments to bring in the BC Energy Step Code at Step 3—and you can help.

If higher standards are coming anyway, why not get a jump on them today? That key point catalysed the launch of Three for All, the informal alliance of companies and organizations that I coordinate. Three for All is calling for judicious local-government leadership on energy-efficient buildings via Step 3 of the BC Energy Step Code.

By Jenna McNeil Almost all provinces are taking action to improve building energy efficiency (*cough cough Ontario*), but last year British Columbia set a high bar for the bunch when it rolled out the BC Energy Step Code—arguably Canada’s most innovative building regulation and standard. Local governments can use the BC Energy Step Code, if they wish, to incentivize or require a level of energy efficiency performance that goes above and beyond current code requirements. Though the BC Energy Step code is called a “code,” its actually a set of technical performance metrics, such as airtightness, that a given building must reach to meet with the requirements of a given step. The higher the “step” a given community requires, the more efficient its buildings will be. For homes, the energyefficiency staircase tops out at Step 5. Such a home is considered net-zero energy-ready—healthier, quieter, more durable, and more affordable to heat than a home built to the bare-minimum requirements of code. The province will require all new homes to perform at a Step 5 level by 2032. That seems like a ways off, but B.C.’s builders need some time to learn new techniques. Step 1, at the other extreme, is like giving the industry training wheels to try out, and the impact on building energy efficiency if quite minimal. It turns out there is a sweet spot—halfway up the stairs. When it comes to new homes, Step 3 is the right place for many communities to start. The most cost effective time to invest in energy efficiency is when a home is first built, and recent BC Housing studies suggest that in the majority of the province, a Step 3 home carries a construction cost premium of 1-2 percent above a house built to the existing energy efficiency requirements of the building code. And as more communities start using the BC Energy Step Code, these modest cost premiums will come down. If all the communities that are thinking of putting the BC Energy Step Code to work choose to do so, more than

Our members include The Canada Green Building Council, Integral Group, OPEN, Passive House Canada, The Pembina Institute, and Recollective Consulting. We´ve been providing evidence-based information about BC Energy Step Code to municipal staff and councils around the province. Given that the costs of starting at Step 3 so are minimal—and catching up later can be expensive—we are reaching out to local governments and urging them to not only take up the BC Energy Step Code, but do so starting there. With local governments and regional districts hitting “refresh” on their leadership on October 20, now is an exciting time to jump aboard. To find out how you can help, check out the chart on this page. To learn more, check out the Three for All site (threeforall.ca) and follow us on Twitter via @threeforallBC. To join our alliance of professionals supporting progressive policy for a bright future for British Columbia, reach out to me at jenna@opengb.com.

If you are a...

Then you can...

Building professional • • • •

Tell us your story of building to higher than required standards for your municipality, and we’ll help to get the word out about your exemplary work Provide a quote of Step Code support for us to share on social media Partner with us to draft an op-ed for publication in your region Let us know you would be willing to speak to staff and /or council in your municipality when Step Code adoption is being considered

Citizen • •

Chat with us about what you want to see in the built environment and we´ll make sure that your vision is shared Let us know you would be willing to speak to staff and /or council in your municipality when Step Code adoption is being considered

Municipal staff • Invite us to present to your municipality or council person • Ask us to provide research and support materials for Step Code, as needed

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Building Up the BC Energy Step Code

alternatives exist, and could yield a legacy of new buildings that will still need to undergo deep energy retrofits to meet our climate targets.

Communities that issue 45% of all building permits have stepped up.

Several industry certification programs already focus explicitly on carbon reduction, such as the Canada Green Building Council’s Zero Carbon Building Standard, Architecture 2030’s ZERO Code, and the International Living Future Institute’s Zero Energy standard. The City of Vancouver includes a greenhouse gas emissions intensity (GHGi) target in its Zero Emissions Buildings Plan.

24%

31%

45%

A number of local governments would likely support the idea of including such a metric in the BC Energy Step Code. But others would not; politically speaking, at this point it might be a challenging addition—given that adoption is still just getting off the ground.

• Consulting with industry • Referenced in bylaws or policies • Neither The BC Energy Step Code has an Achilles Heel: Carbon The BC Energy Step Code is a nimble, powerful, and generally welldesigned standard. But it does have one serious shortcoming: It does not account for carbon. This oversight is disappointing, as it leaves a powerful potential climate action tool on the table, just as the province is poised to increase its ambition on global warming with the release of its Clean Growth Strategy, expected in December. The BC Energy Step Code focuses on reducing energy waste, but it is “fuel neutral.” It offers no incentive for developers and utilities to invest in local low-carbon heating systems. This leaves us at risk of locking in carbon-intensive natural gas heating systems when cost-effective

0.7

At Three for All, we’re watching this one closely. Our team believes that GHGi is an essential metric to track and target, and we’re looking forward to seeing where the province lands when it releases its Clean Growth Strategy in December.

Business as Usual

0.6 0.5 GHG emissions (Mt CO2)

Even the provincial government has GHGi on its radar. In its recent built-environment Intentions Paper, the province proposed to work with stakeholders to determine the best tools to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions intensity in buildings. None of the three options offered include directly grafting the target onto the BC Energy Step Code.

Step Code Current Fuel Mix

0.4 0.3 0.2

JENNA MCNEIL IS WITH THREE FOR ALL BC, AN INFORMAL ALLIANCE OF COMPANIES AND ORGANIZATIONS CALLING FOR LOCALGOVERNMENT LEADERSHIP ON ENERGY-EFFICIENT BUILDINGS VIA THE BC ENERGY STEP CODE: THE CANADA GREEN BUILDING COUNCIL, INTEGRAL GROUP, THE OPEN GREEN BUILDING SOCIETY, PASSIVE HOUSE CANADA, THE PEMBINA INSTITUTE, AND RECOLLECTIVE CONSULTING.

Step Code All Electric

0.1 0.0 2015

2020

2025

2030

2035

2040

2045

2050

Year

Improvement over BCBC-2012 r2

Homes

Multi-unit residential

2022

20% more efficient

Step 3

Step 2

2027

40% more efficient

Step 4

Step 3

2032

Net-zero energy ready

Step 5

Step 4

Does GHGi belong in the Step Code? Why or why not? Tweet us your thoughts via @ThreeForAllBC.

TABLE 1. EQUIVALENCIES BETWEEN THE PROPOSED B.C. BUILDING CODE EFFICIENCY INCREMENTS AND THE BC ENERGY STEP CODE

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CaGBC Green Product of the Year

Univeral Series by Cascadia Windows in Langley named 2018 CaGBC Green Product of the Year Cascadia Windows & Doors of Langley has received the 2018 CaGBC Green Building Product of the Year Award for its Passive House-certified Universal Series fiberglass window product line. The presentation by Joseph Hosey, General Manager at UL Canada, the sponsor of the Award, was made at the CaGBC Building Lasting Change 2018 Gala Dinner on June 7 in Toronto. Product submissions are assessed based on four key areas: sustainability, transparency and verification, innovation, and application. Cascadia’s Universal Series was chosen by the jury because of its solid construction fiberglass and long life span rated at 50+ years. They also noted that it’s a great Canadian success story – with most comparable windows coming from Europe – this is the first product line of its kind to be manufactured in Canada. Fiberglass windows offer an 85% improvement on the thermal performance of aluminum windows, which translates to a substantial reduction in heat loss through the building envelope. Studies have shown that windows have the potential to influence up to 50% or more of the total energy used in buildings, making window improvements one of the easiest ways to reduce energy use and environmental impacts of buildings. LEED-certified buildings using Cascadia Windows have been located everywhere from San Diego to Nunavut, including projects directly adjacent to the ocean – demonstrating their applicability in both extreme cold and extreme hot climates. “I congratulate Cascadia Windows on winning the 2018 CaGBC Green Building Product of the Year Award,” says Thomas Mueller, President and CEO of the CaGBC. “Since it was founded in 2008, Cascadia has consistently pushed the boundaries of traditional manufacturing, innovating windows and doors that can improve efficiency. Their Universal Series pushes the envelope and should make their peers take note: made-in-Canada green building products are the future of our lowcarbon economy.”

[L TO R] JOHN SAWATZKY, VICE PRESIDENT AND CHIEF TECHNOLOGY OFFICER AND MICHAEL BOUSFIELD, TECHNICAL DIRECTOR AND OPERATIONS MANAGER, BOTH OF CASCADIA WINDOWS & DOORS, RECEIVING THE 2018 CAGBC GREEN PRODUCT OF THE YEAR AWARD FROM JOSEPH HOSEY, GENERAL MANAGER, UL CANADA, THE AWARD SPONSOR.

BUILDING AT SFU UNIVERSITY. PHOTO: PAUL GRDINA PHOTOGRAPHY

The runners-up for the 2018 Green Building Product of the Year Award are: • Just BioFiber Structural Solutions Corp. for their Just BioFiber SSR block wall system. • Greenstone Brandon Plant Ltd. for their Greenstone ICE Panel. “Cascadia Window’s team is very grateful for the fantastic acknowledgement from the CaGBC for naming our Universal Series windows and doors Product of the Year,” says Michael Blousfield, Technical Director and Operations Manager at Cascadia. “It’s a great made-in-Canada moment, and we are proud to be the first company in North America to be offering this innovative, leading-edge technology.” The panel of judges for this year’s Product of the Year Award were: • Julie-Anne Chayer, Director, Business Relations, Corporate Responsibility Services at Groupe AGÉCO

RESIDENCE IN WASHINGTON STATE

• Kevin Stelzer, Principal, B+H Architects • Shyam Ramrekha, Senior Bilingual Program & Site Manager, UL Environment • Darryl Kasun, LEED Reviewer, Canada Green Building Council As the winner of the Award, Cascadia Windows has the right to use a CaGBC Product of the Year crest on its marketing materials and product website. This crest is only available to the winning product, making it an exclusive signifier of a truly green product. It should be noted that no product can be pre-approved as contributing to LEED credits regardless of designation; products contribute to LEED projects on a case-by-case basis.

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Canada’s green building industry is evolving, and LEED certification is once again proving that it can too By Mark Hutchinson, Vice President of Green Building Programs, Canada Green Building Council (CaGBC)

Heightened focus on energy and carbon emissions reductions has changed expectations and priorities for Canada’s green building industry. The CaGBC has kept pace by introducing our Zero Carbon Building Standard in 2017 and bringing new certification programs and tools to Canada through our GBCI Canada launch earlier this year. LEED also continues to evolve to meet rising expectations. As Canada’s oldest and most successful green building rating system, LEED has 13 years of proven success and has produced more than 3,800 certified projects across the country. The cumulative impact of these projects is remarkable: a reduction in GHG emissions of 2.49 million carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) tonnes, which is like taking 530,000 cars off the roads for a year; energy savings of 12.9 million eMWh, which is enough to power 435,000 homes in Canada for a full year; and water savings of more than 24 billion litres – equivalent to three hours of water coursing over the Canadian Horseshoe of Niagara Falls. Canadian project teams continue to successfully leverage LEED to drive market transformation with the latest version of LEED, with 600 registrations under LEED v4. Next steps for LEED LEED’s holistic view is largely responsible for its success, with an emphasis on providing healthier indoor environments for occupants while reducing emissions, maximizing energy efficiency, reducing waste and powering innovation. However, within this framework, continuous improvement is necessary. That is why we have begun rolling out LEED v4.1, with the promise of making the world’s most popular green building rating system a more powerful tool than ever for project teams. Project teams will be able to take advantage of the updated rating systems as soon as they are released, and balloting is expected to occur in 2019. Focused on streamlining, clarifying and strengthening requirements, LEED v4.1 will offer key refinements to serve the ultimate goal of enhancing the experience of projects pursuing LEED certification. It will incorporate valuable insights from Canadian project teams and the experience gleaned from working on thousands of LEED certified projects. Upgrades to the rating system are being released as drafts (“beta” updates) over the course of 2018, with the March 2018 rollout of LEED v4.1 O+M being the first of these. 26

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The CaGBC is working with stakeholders, its Energy and Engineering Technical Advisory Group and the LEED Canada Steering Committee to identify the best approach for tackling greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from building operations in the Canadian context. UBC Campus Energy Centre. DIALOG.Photo: Ema Peter.

LEED v4.1 Operations + Maintenance: Streamlining certification by focusing on outcomes In order to reduce environmental impacts and improve the health and wellness of occupants, we must always consider the critical role of existing buildings. The operations of our buildings must be substantially decarbonized by 2050 in order to avoid the worst impacts of climate change, and over 50 per cent of the building stock in 2050 will consist of buildings that already exist today. LEED v4.1 O+M addresses this issue by putting the focus on assessing emissions from building operations as well as transportation. A project’s energy performance score is determined in part by its GHG emissions per capita and unit area, while its transportation score is determined by per-capita emissions. LEED v4.1 O+M’s updates were introduced to better enable teams to optimize operations and achieve significant reductions in emissions from existing structures, while building upon v4’s emphasis on improved energy performance, human health and integrative design. By focusing on performance outcomes such as reduced energy and water use, and not on prescriptive measures to improve performance, this update dramatically streamlines and greatly simplifies certification. Fully 90 per cent of the points available in LEED v4.1 O+M are based on simple key performance outcomes such as energy and water use, providing broad flexibility in choosing how to achieve performance objectives. The certification process has also been improved in LEED v4.1 O+M. By introducing annual recertification, LEED can now be integrated more seamlessly into annual performance objectives and budgets. This also reduces the likelihood of gaps in data tracking due to changes in personnel, equipment or processes. Leveraging the Arc benchmarking platform across entire portfolios A key aspect of the streamlined LEED v4.1 O+M rating system is its leveraging of the Arc platform, which is an online tool


that helps collect, manage and benchmark building data and improve sustainability performance. On the Arc platform, data is assessed in five categories: energy, water, waste, transportation and human experience. The performance metrics correspond to those that represent 90 per cent of the points available in LEED v4.1 O+M, which allows Arc to serve as an on-ramp to LEED certification. Operations can be monitored and improved over time, and certification can easily be pursued when performance warrants. It also enables building owners to use one platform to track performance across their portfolio of LEED and other buildings, globally. This allows for performance to be compared based on a consistent set of key metrics, while highlighting opportunities to improve performance, and possibly also identifying additional buildings for LEED certification.

TRUE TRIPLE GLAZING DOESN’ T STOP AT THREE

Use of the Arc platform is provided free to LEED projects for a period of five years, making it easier for LEED Building Design + Construction (BD+C) projects to monitor performance against design expectations, comply with LEED requirements to provide energy and water use data, and determine the feasibility of O+M recertification. Tackling emissions It is anticipated that LEED 4.1 for Building Design and Construction (BD+C) will include updates to challenging Materials credit options, daylighting and acoustics. There will also be greater alignment and integration of the various rating systems for homes and multi-family buildings. Perhaps most interesting will be the updates to how energy performance is assessed. Standards and practices have evolved since LEED v4 was first balloted, and version 4.1 is an opportunity to ensure LEED continues to drive change to address the most pressing environmental issue of our time: climate change. The CaGBC is working with stakeholders, its Energy and Engineering Technical Advisory Group and the LEED Canada Steering Committee to identify the best approach for tackling greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from building operations in the Canadian context. In recognition of the climate change imperative, a metric that assesses efforts to reduce GHG emissions is being considered. This metric would encourage careful evaluation of energy efficiency measures, the selection of energy sources (particularly for heating and hot water), and onsite renewable energy generation options. Equal weighting could be provided to overall building energy efficiency in recognition of its particularly complicated and critical role. Consideration is being given to a new, clear measure of energy performance based on assessing energy savings relative to a baseline with a fixed energy source for heating; historically, cost savings has been used rather than energy savings, and the energy source has changed as a function of the energy source chosen in the proposed design. A better LEED for a better tomorrow It’s clear we cannot forge a greener future without ensuring the sustainability of both our new and existing building stock. The latest update to the LEED O+M rating system, and the upcoming changes to other LEED rating systems, will simplify and streamline this endeavour and provide helpful tools and technology to aid the process, making it easier for the industry to demonstrate leadership and be recognized for these achievements. To participate in the LEED v4.1 O+M beta or to learn more, visit cagbc.org/leedv4-1

The Defender 76TS System offers more than three panes of glass. It is an advanced window system with highquality components that are engineered to work together to deliver superior performance and proven durability for LEEDÂŽ, net-zero and Passive House single family, multi-family and commercial projects.

Look beyond the glass: innotech-windows.com/triple

beautiful living : for generations FALL 2018 | BC FOCUS

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The front (North) elevation where the stair tower acts as a beacon for the neighbourhood.

Cambie Fire Hall No. 3 and Richmond North Ambulance Station Precedent-setting first responder facility expresses positive civic identity By Robert Lange

The new LEED Gold facility is built to post-disaster standards and will remain operational following a seismic event to provide community response and to act as a Department Operations Centre (DOC). Some of the post-disaster design elements include the building structure, tie-ins for concrete aprons at the front, and an on-site emergency generator. Locating both fire and ambulance services together in a single purpose-built facility with shared common spaces allows for operational and financial efficiencies while further strengthening the relationship between the two agencies. The design of the building evolved through numerous discussions with RFR and BCEHS about their respective key values and the importance of how the image of the building reflects each organization Location Plan: The are in red is the building site.

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12 10

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Cross section 1. Work bench 2. EVT bay 3. Suppression bay 4. Washroom 5. Corridor 6. Ambulance bay

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7. EVT mezzanine 8. Outdoor courtyard 9. Sleeping dorm 10. Training office 11. Captain office 12. Training/hose tower

The three-storey facility includes two suppression bays for fire rescue vehicles, two emergency vehicle technician bays for repair of fire apparatus, and two bays for up to six ambulance vehicles. The orientation of the offices, kitchen and dining room around an extensively glazed outdoor patio serves to maximize natural daylighting while providing an efficient flow via a central corridor. The training classrooms at the south-west of the building are also bathed in natural light, and look out to the site training area and to neighbouring green spaces. Approach to sustainability Because of how they are used, fire halls are difficult to design for high energy efficiency. It was helpful that we were able to tap into a City of Richmond’s District Energy System just alongside the site. The building design takes a no-nonsense approach to sustainability, one that seems to resonate with our clients. The approach is best described as: - Well designed wall assemblies with robust, and durable materials and construction, - Using tried and true technologies, rather than untested ones, - Ensuring building maintenance will not be complicated, - Following good design practice with respect to building location, orientation, and protection from the elements, - Designing for energy efficiency, as much as possible, - Looking for opportunities to tap into to the local site surroundings, and - Working closely with clients to determine the best fit with their sustainability comfort level.

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Civic landmark To achieve a strong civic identity for the City of Richmond, the building employs a roof form which folds on both sides of the building to express protection and the collaboration between the RFR and the BCEHS. To enliven the façade, the use of red cladding on the upper level punctuates the building while employing a common signifier in fire hall station design. Soft light emanating from the north stair tower through translucent fiberglass panels produces a lantern effect. Reinforcing the significance of transparency at the street level, the landscaped public entry and linear positioning of the bays creates an effective civic presence while providing a layout that contributes to help speed response times in an emergency. The new station responds to the site’s residential neighbourhood, anchoring the local area and residences and serving as a landmark for the larger region. This approach aligns with the City of Richmond as a strong proponent of city building that supports contemporary expression and signature buildings for a positive civic identity and a more attractive and sustainable urban environment. Robert Lange is the partner-in-charge of the project at Assembly Architecture. Architects: Assembly Architecture and S2 Architecture Civil engineer: Aplin Martin Electrical engineer: AES Mechanical engineer: MCW Landscape architect: PFS Studio Commissioning agent: AIRMEC Systems Construction: Stuart Olson Construction Photos: All photos by Sunny Jhooty Photography, except photo 1 by Lobby, Liam Wake

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MAIN FLOOR PLAN

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Main floor plan 1. Vestibule 2. Foyer 3. Stair 4. Elevator 5. Oxygen storage 6. Ambulance bay 7. Water room 8. Kitchenette 9. Washroom 10. Locker room 11. Medical supply 12. PPE cleaning 13. PPE dry storage 14. Janitor 15. Comm. desk 16. Suppression bay 17. EVT bay 18. Work bench 19. Storage 20. Shop 21. Hose / training tower 22. Fire pole 23. End of trip shower

1- The orientation of the offices, kitchen and dining room around an extensively glazed outdoor patio serves to maximize natural daylighting. 2- The kitchen looks out to the outdoor patio. 3- The rear elevation with the training tower to the right and the fire vehicle exit doors. 4- The bays for fire rescue vehicles.

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“Benson Steel Limited, under the guidance of Bouygues Canada and Stantec Engineering, was thrilled to be chosen to be the design assist structural steel, metal deck and glulam timber partner for the supply and installation of the NEW IQALUIT INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT TERMINAL as well as be chosen as the supplier and installer of the complete pre-engineered Combined Service Building. The project was a TREMENDOUS SUCCESS and we wish our fellow Canadian’s of Nunavut great congratulations on the completion of this state of the art airport complex”.

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72 Commercial Road Bolton, Ontario L7E 1K4 | 905-857-0684 x235 | www.bensonsteel.com

FALL 2018 | BC FOCUS

BC Focus Fall 2018  

CaGBC BC Chapter Focus Publication

BC Focus Fall 2018  

CaGBC BC Chapter Focus Publication