PoV (February 2015)

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4 POINT OF VUE OUR VUE FEBRUARY 2015

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TABLE OF CONTENTS FEBRUARY 2015 • VOLUME 9 • ISSUE 2

LOCAL VUE 50 OH SNAP

Bombs Away

52 WHO AM I?

Courtesy of Premier OB-GYN

53 FITLIFE 66 TELL ME WHY

20

70 DO YOU SEE WHAT I SEE?

WHERE THE GREEN GRASS DOESN’T GROW

Yard artist Ryan LeBoeuf

24 TIMEOUT

What Say Hue?

28 A NIGHT FOR GOODNESS’ SAKE

A gala for the Chabert Medical Center Foundation

Original wallpaper by Ashley Lasseigne

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Accordionist Ryan Brunet does his part to keep Cajun music alive.

Home tour

42 CARNIVAL NIGHT VUE

Mahony’s/Smoky Row, Boxer & the Barrel, Bar Roussell

44 WHY WE LOVE MARDI GRAS ...

32 CHATEAU CHIC

... in Bayou Country

46 CHIX DE FEMME 30 WALL ART

Strange Groundhog Day traditions

72 BELLOWING FOR A CAUSE

20 WHERE THE GREEN GRASS DOESN’T GROW

Answers to life’s most perplexing questions

A Houma Original

48 UNDER THE SCOPE

Babble at the Bistro

ABOUT THE COVER

Yard artist Ryan LeBoeuf paints a jester along Little Bayou Black in Houma. JACOB JENNINGS

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TABLE OF CONTENTS FEBRUARY 2015 • VOLUME 9 • ISSUE 2

OUR VUE

YOUR VUE

26 10 EDITOR’S NOTE

POV PICKS

Reflection

26 King Cake Ale 40 Dog Treats, Garden Weasel

11 THE VUEFINDER

Sugar, Sugar

12 THAT’S WHAT HE SAID

& Faceplant Pillowcases 68 Beef Fajita Pita

18 14 IN TERVUE

18 THE FOODIE CONNECTION

Say what?

Bread & ... Chocolate?

16 THE OBSERVER

Countin’ on Love

Joie de Vivre

EXPERT VUE

REAR VUE

86 80 LIVING WELL

83 A VUE FROM THE VINE

81 CHECK IT OUT

84 BON APPÉTIT

Let’s Look Inside Your Pantry Hallowed Halls of Greater New Orleans

82 BEHIND THE BREW

Cheers, Ye Olde Fox!

POVHOUMA.COM

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Off the Old Vine

King Cake Fries

86 UNDERGROUND SOUND

Ken Swartz, Mingo Fishtrap & Bear’s Den

98 88 SMARTY PANTS

For when your thinking cap fails

90 BON ÉTOFFE

Caution: Beware of Falling Objects

92 REN DEZVOUS

Where you need to be around town

94 SCENE IN

Look at ole so ’n’ so!

96 ADVERTISERS’ INDEX

The who and the where

97 LOOK TWICE PUZZLE

Sponsored by Synergy Bank

98 THE FINAL COUNTDOWN

7 Ways to Boost Your Java

NEWSLETTERS

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EDITOR’S NOTE TERRY TRAHAN JR.

Is

it really February 2015 already? Didn’t we just celebrate the arrival of the new year? I don’t know about you, but the first few weeks of 2015 have moved faster than any start to my past 26 years. Maybe I’m just getting older. Maybe I just have more to do. Maybe I should just accept that time flies when you’re having fun. Speaking of fun, Mardi Gras has arrived with its parade of king cakes, party buses, noise and debauchery. Strike up a conversation about Mardi Gras with any out-of-towner and you’ll quickly find out that most folks in other regions of the country view the holiday as one big excuse to party and toss all morals and cares aside. And while that may be true in the City That Care Forgot, it is far from reality in Bayou Country. In our little corner of the world, tucked away at the bottom of a geographical boot, Mardi Gras is a party, but the whole family is invited and welcome to participate. Here, Mardi Gras is about parking the truck and spending the day with parents, siblings and relatives you may not have seen since last Fat Tuesday. It’s about waiting for float No. 9 so your mom can “bomb” you and your friends. It’s about cheering on your little brother or sister as he or she passes by in a high school marching band. It’s about setting up the barbecue pit and passing a good time as you “burn some meat” and share a meal with strangers on the street. That’s what Mardi Gras should be about. But not everyone wants to ride on a float or march in a parade. Houma native Ryan LeBoeuf has come up with a way for anyone to share the Carnival spirit with his or her neighbors. All it takes is a little spray paint and an imagination. For the past few weeks, when not at his day job, Ryan has been painting local yards with scenes that depict colorful Mardi Gras masks and jesters. Gone are the

72 wooden craft signs and in is painted grass. Turn to page 20 to see what Ryan can do with a lawn canvas. No parade is complete without music. While floats don’t typically blare Cajun, zydeco or swamp pop tunes as they parade through the streets, once in a while parade-goers will hear the sound of an accordion and begin tapping their feet. Galliano native Ryan Brunet hopes to keep this music alive with his fervor for the Cajun genre. Turn to page 72 to learn more about Ryan’s accordion skills and his passion for a cultural tradition. As Mardi Gras brings the fun through Feb. 17, remember to enjoy the good times with family and friends. Send in your favorite photos ( EDITOR@RUSHING-MEDIA.COM) so we can all share in the joie de vivre. POV

Terry Trahan Jr. most enjoys the day parades, as they are typically followed by a crawfis boil with the family.

EDITOR@RUSHI N G-MEDIA.COM

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THE VUEFINDER Brian Rushing PUBLISHER

MELISSA DUET

EDITORIAL

Sugar, Sugar

Terry Trahan Jr. EDITOR Melissa Duet ASSISTANT EDITOR

CREATIVE

Gavin Stevens CREATIVE DIRECTOR Mariella Brochard GRAPHIC DESIGNER Alanna Relan GRAPHIC DESIGNER

PHOTOGRAPHY

M

ost South Louisianians’ fondest Mardi Gras memories range from seeing their parents reign as king or queen to hauling crawfish sacks on the verge of busting back to the family car. Mine, however, is all about king cake. That beautiful ring of sugary-sweet dough, projecting a spectrum of purple, green and gold from my dining room table, dances in my head when the sugarplums have taken up residence elsewhere. It’s a full-blown obsession, and I’m here to admit my sugar-induced problem. What feeds my ongoing hunt for the best and brightest in the king cake world is my ever-expanding food palate, honed with each fork I stab into another dough ring. And my selections don’t remain in the vein of the traditional filled and iced. Blended as a frappe, whipped into a cheesecake, nestling a hamburger and served from an elusive food truck in the Big Easy, I have seen it all ... and I’m planning my takedown, one eatery at a time. As a kid, I balked at the idea of strawberry- or Bavarian cream-filled cakes, ruling them unfit for a king cake purist. As my eyes were opened to the limitless possibilities waiting in restaurants and roadside eateries across America, however, I succumbed to the sweetness and found myself piling my grocery carts with the fruit-filled, candy-topped delights calling my name each time I walked through the automatic sliding doors. So don’t expect to find me front and center on the parade route this year. Come to think of it, I’ve never been keen on getting smacked in the face with a bag of plastic jewelry, anyway. Locate the nearest food table ... you’ll likely find me covered in a shower of sugar, inconspicuously wiping icing from my face and admiring the artistry of each pastry present. It’s everything that Louisiana is, condensed into one ridiculously delicious bite. And if hunting it down at every possible outlet is wrong, I don’t want to be right. POV

Melissa Duet is the assistant editor of Point of Vue Magazine. Her countertops will be littered with Carnival-colored sugar through Feb. 17.

MELISSA@RUSHI N G-MEDIA.COM

Melissa Duet, Jacob Jennings, Jo Ann LeBoeuf, Misty Leigh McElroy, Erica Seely, Brian Waitz

WRITERS

Dwayne Andras, Lane Bates, Graham Blackall, Lauren Bordelon, Jaime Dishman, John Doucet, Melissa Duet, Esther Ellis, Dr. J. Michael Flynn, Debbie Melvin, Bonnie Rushing, Lacie Toups, Terry Trahan Jr., Becca Bourgeois Weingard

ADVERTISING

Marian Long SALES MANAGER Jackie Gehbauer, Jamie Mazerac, Emily Melancon, Martha Naquin, Linda Pontiff

GENERAL MANAGER Lacey LeBlanc

CUSTOMER SERVICE

Brooke Adams, Brandy O’Banion, Ashley Thibodeaux

ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE Jessica Gifford

CONTACT

sales@rushing-media.com editor@rushing-media.com

SUBSCRIPTIONS

Point of Vue magazine is published monthly. Subscriptions are available for $36 for 12 issues. For more information, email mail@rushing-media.com

Copyright ©2015 Rushing Media, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part of editorial and/or graphic content is strictly prohibited. BUSINESS ADDRESS: 6160 West Park Ave., Houma, LA 70364 985.868.7515 Point of Vue magazine cannot be responsible for the return of unsolicited material such as manuscripts or photographs, with or without the inclusion of a stamped, self-addressed envelope. Information in this publication is gathered from sources considered to be reliable, but the accuracy and completeness of the information cannot be guaranteed. The opinions expressed in Point of Vue magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the opinions of Rushing Media, our employees or any of our advertisers. No employee or family member(s) of employees of Rushing Media are permitted to partake in any contests, giveaways or sweepstakes.

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THAT’S WHAT HE SAID TERRY TRAHAN JR.

Joie de Vivre Mardi Gras is not a parade. Mardi Gras is not girls flashing on rench Quarter balconies. Mardi Gras is not an alcoholic binge ... Mardi Gras is the love of life. —CHRIS ROSE

B

eing the eccentric personality that I am, while waiting for the first float of the Mardi Gras season to roll by, I tend to find myself sitting in a lawn chair in the bed of a Ford pickup thinking about what the experience would be like if George Washington would happen to walk up and inquire about all the debauchery. I didn’t live in the 18th century, and I haven’t studied the time period enough to know if folks walked around police-secured streets with Solo cups filled with 16 ounces of the contents of a beer keg set up about a dozen trucks down for no reason other than to be seen. I don’t know if it was normal for women to tilt back their heads and have other women pour the hard stuff followed by a mouthful of whipped cream down their throats as they gargled and swished and swallowed as if they were trying to win Fear Factor: Taking It to the Streets. I really don’t know if people tossed plastic jewelry from floats. If I were a betting man, I would say ... nah. Washington would have a lot of questions, and I wouldn’t have many answers. Maybe parade-goers booze it up as one last sinful hurrah before it’s time to give it up and return to being the angels with gilded wings that all South Louisianians are known for being. Maybe it’s to dance with the devil in celebration of free will and what that could mean. Wait, what are we celebrating, anyway? “You know, Mr. Washington, I’m not quite sure what all the debauchery is about. Honestly, I’ve never really given it much thought. All my life, my family has parked this truck in this spot and I’ve watched exactly what you are seeing year in and year out. What’s that you say? Oh, it’s a bit queer for men holding umbrellas to dress in graffitied, unmatched formal attire and dance around a girdled, noisemaking hearse?

“Well, I suppose so. “But, Mr. Washington, have you never seen a hearse? The goths love them ... and look how many sacks of beads they hold! “Beads? Oh, those plastic necklaces getting tossed around and landing on the street. See, mine has the Cajun trinity. “No, not the Father, Son and Holy Ghost. Onions, bell peppers and celery. You know, used when making a roux. “I’ll show you after the parade passes, Mr. Washington. We’ll whip up some crawfish étouffée. Now that’s the love of life.” POV

Terry Trahan Jr. is the editor of Point of Vue Magazine. He would dress up as George Washington for Mardi Gras, but he would look more like William Howard Taft.

EDITOR@RUSHI N G-MEDIA.COM

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INTERVUE

BREE

PAM

HEATHER

LACIE

MEGAN

Server

Retired Teacher

Owner/Medical Aesthetician

4th-Grade Teacher

Student/Bartender

What’s inside your cup on the parade route?

Daiquiris

Wine

Vodka, tonic water and lime

Bloody Mary or water

Jäger and Red Bull all the way

Other than cups, what typically gets stashed in your vehicle’s cupholders?

Perfume

Cell phone

Earrings, hair ties and lip gloss

Bobby pins

Bobby pins, ponytails and gum

Catch a parade: back of a truck, on the street or behind a barricade?

On the street

Back of a truck

Back of a truck

Back of a truck

Back of a truck

When eating crawfish twist and peel or pinch and pull?

Twist and peel

Pinch and pull

Pinch and pull

Pinch and pull, then dip

I’m more of a twist and peel kind of girl

Your bed’s sheets are made of what material?

Jersey cotton

Egyptian cotton

Bamboo

Cotton

They are made of pure heaven

What parade is a must-see each year?

Terreanians

None, not a huge fan of parades

Ambrosia and Endymion

Hyacinthians, of course

Hercules is the parade to be at

When picking out an outfit where do you start?

The weather

Dress or pants

Top and accessories

Shoes; the size is always the same

My top

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THE OBSERVER JAIME DISHMAN

Countin’ on Love I

was in high school when an English teacher introduced me to Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s classic poem, How Do I Love Thee? At the time, I’m not sure what love meant to me. But I remember bits and pieces of the poem. Lines about love seemed appealing, something to dream of, a fairy tale that one would “fall into” and never “fall out.” Fast-forward 17 years. I’d almost forgotten about the poem. But the fast approach of Valentine’s Day had me thinking of the poem and my teenage imaginations of love versus my mid-30s realization of love. In casual conversation, I recently mentioned to a friend how much I “love” cooking shows. It’s true. I do. But it has been years since I’ve actually watched one. There is little time for watching cooking shows, and my most recent advice on cooking came from a random lady in the Walmart checkout line—I wanted to know how to smother lima beans. She had the beans on the conveyer belt, and I couldn’t help but question her. She was gracious enough to tell me her secrets. I “love” so many things. Good movies. Good reads. Good times. Shoot, I’ve told complete strangers how much I love their outfits. Or their hair. Or whatever. My overuse of the word has led me to sometimes casually regard the things I actually love. As I thought about Barrett Browning’s poem, I didn’t get past the first line: “How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.” It’s the counting that sometimes reshapes the love once felt for something or someone. When we forget to count, we forget to love. It was a frigid January night fille with homework, frustrations and just a little bit of exasperation on this mama’s part. I found myself aggravated at all my people. And I do mean all. Not a kid, husband or pet escaped my arched eyebrow of disapproval over what I considered to be constant infractions of “the way this night should go.” I piled on the couch with them, defeated after a long day filled with disappointments. I turned on a mid-week movie for a little while before bed, and I snuck downstairs while they finished the show. I took Barrett Browning’s advice and started counting. I counted the ways I love each person in our home. I counted the small gifts each soul brings to our family. Ann Voskamp, a modern-day poet known for calling her work prosetry, says “gratitude for the seemingly insignificant—a seed— this plants the giant miracle.”

Some days need a miracle, and when we start counting the ways we love others, the miracle unfolds before us. My counting led to watching videos on my computer of when my children were younger. One by one, the kids trickled downstairs and crowded around me on the couch. They tucked themselves into every available space surrounding me, and I didn’t complain about personal space or their faces pressed to my computer screen. Because I was busy counting. They watched the old videos, and I counted how much I loved each one of them pressing around me. When you start counting, you can’t stop. My gratitude list went something like this that night: • Bodies of my people squeezed tight against me on a couch I am glad to share. • Laughter and memories. • A husband walking downstairs, wondering what all the giggling is about. • A mom whose counting is changing the entire mood of a house in desperate need of some lighter moments. • A changed heart from one who earlier counted wrongs and now counts delights. It is all too easy to quit counting, and it is the trend to wait until Thanksgiving to start being thankful. But November is a long way away, and I need to count the ways I love these people today. I’m blessed with a lot of people and a full house. It is a frustrating madhouse, but I’m counting. And the more I count, the better I am at loving. Because true love isn’t something we fall into ... it’s something we stay in by counting every way we are thankful for the ones we love. POV

Jaime Dishman isn’t always great at math, but counting the gifts, small and large, each day brings doesn’t require a calculator or algebra.

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THE FOODIE CONNECTION BECCA BOURGEOIS WEINGARD

Bread & ... Chocolate? Grilled Cheese with Chocolate Soup WHAT YOU’LL NEED 2 slices challah (white leavened bread) strawberry jam mascarpone cheese Brie sliced pear 3 T. toasted almonds, chopped cinnamon sugar butter 1/2 cup fat-free milk 1/2 cup half-and-half 3/4 cup bittersweet chocolate chips dash of cinnamon pinch of salt 1 1/2 t. orange juice 1/2 t. vanilla

B

read and chocolate go together like Forrest Gump and Jenny. Sometimes it’s not the best idea, but when it’s great, it’s award-winning stuff. As a wee lass, when I got Hershey’s Kisses for holiday occasions, I would melt them down and spread them on sandwich bread. I gained my freshman 15 during my junior year of high school (I was truly ahead of my time) by eating M&M’s Minis sandwiches. The recipe? Of course ... In your left hand, place one slice of white sandwich bread. In your right hand, grab a fistful of M&M’s Minis. Smash your right hand onto your left hand, fold up the bread, then head off to school. Part of a well-balanced breakfast. The recipe at right simply demonstrates my maturity into a highly evolved culinary aficionado. M&M’s Minis and white bread? How plebeian.

HOW TO MAKE IT Mix together about 1 t. of strawberry jam with 1 T. of mascarpone cheese, depending on how much strawberry flavor you want in there. Sprinkle thinly sliced pears with cinnamon and sugar; sauté in a skillet over medium heat for one minute on either side, or until caramelized. Spread mascarpone on both sides of the sandwich, sprinkle toasted almonds on top of the mascarpone spread, then add slices of Brie. Lay pear slices on top of Brie and press your sandwich in your fancy panini press, or just put it on a skillet with a pan on top. For the soup, pour the milk and half-and-half into a small saucepan over low heat; give it about 5 minutes to warm up, then stir in your chocolate, cinnamon, vanilla, orange juice and salt. Stir constantly until it becomes nice and smooth—somewhere in the chocolate world between hot chocolate and thicker hot chocolate, just like you’d imagine when you hear “chocolate soup” and think, “How is that diffe ent than hot chocolate?” That’s the question I leave you with. POV

A catfis out of bayou water, Becca Weingard shares adventures and recipes from her Cajun/ Italian kitchen in Washington, D.C. on her blog:

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TERRY TRAHAN JR. JACOB JENNINGS

Where the Green Grass Does Grow ’T

N DOES

Green grass is happy grass. —JULIUS VEAL

B

lack and gold grass is happy grass in Ryan LeBoeuf’s world. During the Mardi Gras season, purple, green and gold grass is even happier grass. But color doesn’t really matter. Painted grass is the happiest grass of all. Back in September 2014, Ryan, a diehard Saints fan, wanted to share his enthusiasm for what promised to be an above-average football season by painting a fleur-de-lis in the front yard of his house in Houma’s Broadmoor subdivision. At least the painting turned out well—so well that he began to receive calls from passersby asking if he could paint a similar design in their own yards for the season.

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I just work on it until I’m happy with it. —RYAN LEBOEUF

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GIVE YOUR YARD A MAKEOVER. VISIT PAINTMYYARD.COM TO SEE MORE OF RYAN’S WORK AND DREAM UP YOUR OWN DESIGN.

That’s when Ryan, a draftsman for T. Baker Smith, started Paint My Yard in his spare time as a way to make extra green off of green grass. Having tackled every local football design from Sir Saint to the LSU Tigers logo, the yard artist began to get more calls for Santas and cartoon characters wearing Santa hats with each new design that would pop up along highways around Houma. These days, all the red and white is getting painted over with lots of purple, green and gold in the form of Mardi Gras masks and jesters. Ryan paints for both “royalty” and parade-goers—anyone looking to bring the Carnival spirit to his or her home’s curb appeal. Backyards along bayous have become popular canvases, but the designs are just as visible in the yards of residences and businesses. “Right now, the designs will be good for at least five or six weeks before weeds start popping up,” Ryan says. “In the summer, they’ll last about three weeks.” As for the paint used to create yard art, Ryan says it is “environmentally safe” spray paint that comes from an online retailer that works closely with high schools and colleges in need of paint for football fields and other athletic venues. The medium is applied with a paint gun and an imagination. “I’ll have a design in mind,” Ryan says as he adds another layer of color to a jester overlooking Little Bayou Black along Highway 311. He sees a small patch of green and fills it in. “I just work on it until I’m happy with it.” POV

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TIMEOUT

What Say Hue? S

howing your significant other how much you care with a dozen of the finest roses has long been recognized as the quintessential romantic gesture. Selecting the right hue adds to the act, saying “I love you” or “I miss you” without saying a word. Pick your perfect palette this Valentine’s Day with this handy list:

Red

Evokes passion and romantic love.

White

Often referred to as the Bridal Rose, white represents young love, reverence and truth.

Pink

Represents femininity and sweetness.

Yellow

Ideal for joyous occasions or sending well wishes.

Orange

Symbolizes enthusiasm and excitement, perhaps for a new relationship.

Lavender

A traditional symbol of royalty and elegance. POV

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POV PICKS

King Cake Ale by Mudbug Brewery BAYOU COUNTRY TAPROOMS

It’s

finally here—just in time for Mardi Gras! Thibodauxbased Mudbug Brewery rolled out its first kegs last month, and this authentically Cajun beer is now on tap throughout the Houma-Thibodaux community. Among the selection is the brewery’s flagship beer, King Cake Ale, recently trademarked as the Official Beer of Mardi Gras. The sip is reminiscent of cream ale and includes cinnamon and premium Madagascar vanilla for that familiar flavor you can now enjoy year-round. POV

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MELISSA DUET

P

ut on your dancing shoes and enjoy an evening of entertainment and delicious food at the 11th annual A Night for Goodness’ Sake gala in support of the Chabert Medical Center Foundation, which works to assist Leonard J. Chabert Medical Center in providing the best in patient care. The night, to be held March 6 at the home of state Rep. Gordon Dove, will allow guests to sample a host of great eats courtesy of some of the area’s best restaurants, says Sam Hotard, executive director of the Foundation. Dean Schouest, a Foundation board member, will also be serving up Cajun favorites like jambalaya and fried shrimp and oysters. Billy Stark and Friends will keep the crowds grooving throughout the evening, and guests will also have the

opportunity to participate in live and silent auctions featuring autographed memorabilia, trips and a variety of unique household items. There will also be an appearance by an active New Orleans Saints player. The primary goal of the gala is to raise money to supply Chabert with medical supplies and other necessities that are essential for day-to-day operations. To date, the Foundation has raised over $500,000 for the hospital through the gala alone. “Our main goal of this party is to buy things that Chabert needs,” Sam says. “In the past, we’ve bought a bone scanning machine [and] new surgery equipment, EKG machines ... it’s been really helpful.” In addition to providing funds for the hospital, the Foundation also provides

an educational outlet through the Reach Out and Read program, which facilitates books to children ages six months to five years visiting Chabert for wellness exams. “They come in twice a year for their wellness exams, so our goal is for these children to have 10 books by the time they start school,” Sam says. “We also have volunteers that come in and read to the children.” Through the annual gala, the public has the opportunity to not only enjoy an evening on the town, but also to learn more about the work of both the Foundation and the hospital. “A lot of people think they have to receive a formal invitation to attend, but they don’t,” Sam says. “The public is invited, and we encourage them to come out and have a good time.” POV

Tickets are $100. Dress is cocktail attire. To purchase tickets, call 985.688.7111.

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MELISSA DUET BRIAN WAITZ

VISIT ASHLEYLASSEIGNEDESIGNS. BIGCARTEL.COM TO LEARN MORE ABOUT ASHLEY ELLENDER LASSEIGNE’S CUSTOM WALLPAPER.

Wall Art H

ouma native Ashley Ellender Lasseigne cut her teeth in the design world on faux finishing, a painting technique that allows the artist to take a client’s walls, furniture and home accents from average to extraordinary. Now she is evaluating her talent to the next level with custom wallpaper, perfect for the art lover looking to make a statement in any living space. “There were so many ideas. I started playing with my artwork and making some cool designs,” Ashley recalls of the process that began just over eight months ago. “The more people I started talking to about it ... they all said I should really pursue this. So I started editing, and it is what it is now.”

With only a handful of American paper producers from which to choose, Ashley settled on a North Carolina-based company that she consults with to get each of her kaleidoscope-esque designs just right. Pulling inspiration from the 1930s and 1960s, the artist is able to achieve an intriguing blend of Gatsby-inspired patterns and bright colors that she says are perfect for any room in need of a little something special. “Some things are very structured; some things are very whimsical,” Ashley says. “People can do accent walls, bathrooms ... [this wallpaper] is something that you can put in a space and not have to put it everywhere. It can be its own piece of art.” POV

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CHATEAU CHIC BONNIE RUSHING ERICA SEELY

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A

B

T

hree years after moving into their home, a local couple has placed the finishing touches on their Southern abode. Recently, a 500-square-foot outdoor living space, complete with an outdoor kitchen and dining area, was added to the home. A 20-foot gabled roof with whitewashed knotty pine tongue-and-groove ceilings keep the space bright and airy while adding character to the new space. An additional screened-in patio maximizes the outdoor living area.

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C Inside, hardwood and tile floors are found throughout the two-story home. An open floor plan with a second-story balcony overlooks the common space. A neutral color palette and coastal accents give the home a cozy feeling. In the kitchen, new granite countertops and a backsplash above the stove brighten the space, while in the adjoining living room the space is

D

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E F

anchored around a gas fireplace, which has become a natural gathering place. The room is bathed in sunlight filtering in from the secondstory windows. In the dining room, meals are shared at the 60-year-old dining set, a family heirloom belonging to the homeowners’ grandparents. POV

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G H

Special thanks to: Supreme Ornamental Iron Works Tony Wilson Home Builders C J’s Electric Services Elegant Granite & Cabinet Inside & Out Home Improvements

A Exterior B Kitchen C Dining Room D Sitting Area E Master Bedroom F Outdoor Patio G Kids Room H Living Room 38 POINT OF VUE LOCAL VUE FEBRUARY 2015

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POV PICKS

Basil & Baxter’s All-Natural USA Treats WAGGIN’ TAILS, HOUMA, 985.876.0013

No

artificial flavors here. These all-natural, American-made treats are crunchy and uniquely flavored, offering your dog a bite of something new and exciting. Give Fido the gift of something savory and sweet with treats like peanut butter and apple, or lend a helping hand with treats designed to aid problems affecting weight management and the heart.

Garden Weasel Nut Gatherer HOME HARDWARE CENTER, HOUMA, 985.223.6370

F

orget bending over to rake up those annoying acorns in your front yard. The Nut Gatherer does the work for you. Just roll over any cluttered surface and watch as the metal ball collects nuts, small pine cones, fruit, golf balls or any other small items littering your land.

Faceplant Pillowcases OUTSIDE & IN, HOUMA, 985.876.7809

R

est easy with these beautifully crafted bedroom centerpieces. Each pillowcase is made with 300-thread-count cotton and adds a subtle touch of elegance to the room. The incredible softness is sure to make you feel like a king or queen as you tuck in and begin to count those sheep. POV

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You

hear the sirens and the roar of the motorcycles and dune buggies making their way down Main Street. You look up from your favorite lifelong parade spot and see that the lights are not far off, just beyond Lafayette Street, almost to historic Smoky Row. You look down and your cup is empty—better fill up before the party arrives. As you duck into your favorite downtown Houma taproom, you meet hospitable folks behind the bar mixing up the perfect Mardi Gras cocktail to fill your cup.

Cheers! ... and drink responsibly.

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A DV ERTORI A L

Mahony’s & Smoky Row 7834 MAIN ST., HOUMA

S

JACOB JENNINGS Cooyon Cucumber

wing open the old, rickety wooden door that leads to Mahony’s and Smoky Row in downtown Houma and take a seat. You might be greeted by Britnie Massey, one of about eight friendly faces tending bar inside the historic landmark. Britnie splits her time among studying human services, volunteering with CASA of Terrebonne, and quenching the thirst of the patrons that call Mahony’s and Smoky Row their second home. Honing her mixology skills at various establishments around town, Britnie eventually followed her best friend to her current workplace, where she has been for just over a year. Mahony’s and Smoky Row, situated in a two-story historic building in the heart of downtown Houma, have become the go-to local joint that is sure to offer up a cold pint and a good time during each visit. “The regulars here ... they’re like family ... the employees, too,” Britnie says. “Friday shifts, we have regulars ... I schedule doubles on that day so I can see them.” Whether it’s a classic cocktail, exclusive Smoky Shots or one of the beers from the taproom’s over 100 selections, Britnie is happy to slide it down the bar in hopes of securing first-timer as regulars. During Carnival season, Britnie whips up the Cooyon Cucumber, a refreshing blend of citrus notes paired with Effen cucumber-flavored vodka, reminiscent of spa water. “Most people love the environment—that it’s not just a club setting,” Britnie says. “We have Smoky Row, then down here at Mahony’s it’s more relaxed. People can talk to each other, just hang out and have a couple of beers.”

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Why We Love Mardi Gras in Bayou Country Do

you hear all that noise? Mardi Gras is here again, and with it comes the excitement we wish could last throughout the year. Beads ... second-lines ... floats. There is nothing else quite like it. When it comes to Carnival time in Bayou Country, well, it’s a little different from how it’s done in the Big Easy. But we like it that way. Here’s what we love most about Mardi Gras in our hometown:

7 The Crawfish Tradition

Once the parades have passed, families gather to boil some mudbugs—perfect for satisfying an empty belly after a daylong party.

4 Catch It Twice

If you plan ahead, you can catch the parade twice.

1

6 Bead Recycling

These days, most parades end with a truck that invites revelers to toss back beads for the sake of recycling.

3 Get Bombed

Your uncle and everybody else you know are in the parade. Prepare to get bombed.

5 Shriners

The figu e-eight pattern might be dangerous, but it is fun to watch.

2 Tailgate Vue

Forget the ladders ... we stand in truck beds.

Be sure to pick up your Mardi Gras Guide in Gumbo’s February issue for the complete regional parade schedule!

Uh-Oh ... You Gotta Go?

No worries. There is a place to pee on Mardi Gras Day. POV

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A DV ERTORI A L

The Boxer & The Barrel 7817 MAIN ST., HOUMA

M

ardi Gras along Main Street in Houma is always a good time to be had, but step inside The Boxer and the Barrel next to The Duke and that’s where the real party is at. The downtown watering hole is an eclectic mix of familiar faces from all walks of life, thought-provoking art and that classic Southern barroom atmosphere that invites you to pull up a stool, strike up a conversation, and try your new favorite mixed JACOB JENNINGS drink. Speaking of trying something new, each Carnival season the owner (Mitchell Sargent), managers (Michael Valencia and Rachel Hogenstad) and bartenders (Whitney Loupe, Blare Callais and Jazz Parfait) at The Boxer and the Barrel get creative and offer up a signature drink to be enjoyed by parade-goers as the party makes its way down Main Street. If you find yourself in the downtown area for Mardi Gras, stop in and ask for The Green Mambo, a mix of Southern Comfort, Blue Curaçao and citrus flavors that’ll have you asking for a refill in no time.

The Green Mambo

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Chix de Femme A Houma Original MELISSA DUET

T

hose whose taste buds savored it said it was developed in the kitchen of Excelsior Bakery in the 1800s, destined to find new life in the hands of bakers honored to carry on the Houma tradition when the bakery closed in the 1980s. Jay’s Pastry Shop on Barrow Street was among the holders of the secret recipe. As was Best Bakery on Tunnel Boulevard. Slightly sweet, bathed in a shade of golden yellow, and mysteriously irresistible, chix de femme was and still is Houma’s best kept secret. “We got our recipe from [Nick Messina, former owner of Best Bakery], and we’ve been told it’s the closest to the original,” says Melissa Bertinot, owner of Bertinot’s Best Bakery.

Melissa’s father, Anthony Matrana, operated Best Bakery from 1995 to 2007, before passing it on to his daughter and son-in-law, Robert, who now keep the business operating with a dizzying array of sweets and breads, including the popular chix de femme king cake. Glazed traditionally or baked half-andhalf with pecans and caramel, the bite is unparalleled in the world of Carnival confectionaries. Chix de femme king cakes come in an assortment of traditional fillings like Bavarian cream, as well as a few new additions, such as 2015’s pistachio-filled cake that has been dubbed Mardi Gras Mambo. “Whenever we first took over the bakery, we didn’t make king cakes,”

It’s our heritage. It’s what we know. —MELISSA BERTINOT

Melissa says. “I was looking for a way to do them differently, and I said, ‘Why not chix de femme?’ It’s something nobody else has. This is an original.” Best Bakery is set to roll out about 4,000 king cakes throughout Mardi Gras. The cakes are so in demand, Melissa says, that the bakery will make them year-round to satisfy Houma’s sweet tooth. “When Easter comes around, we’ll do Easter king cakes,” Melissa says. “If that’s what they want, we’ll do it. It’s our heritage. It’s what we know.” POV

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A DV ERTORI A L

Bar Roussell 7887 MAIN ST., HOUMA

S

ip your new favorite cocktail along the parade route this year at downtown Houma’s classiest bayouside hangout, Bar Roussell. The Carnival Cooler chills comfortably in the sophisticated, easygoing atmosphere, thanks in part to the cocktail’s star— Rougaroux Sugarshine Rum by Thibodauxbased Donner-Peltier Distillers. “It’s very unique compared to what we’ve always had behind the bar,” says Rory Eschete, manager at Bar Roussell. “The [Sugarshine] rum is very powerful, but there is something about Rougaroux that makes it have its own unique smell and taste that sets it apart from all the other clear rums. It’s very refreshing.”

JACOB JENNINGS

Carnival Cooler 1.5 ounces Rougaroux Sugarshine Rum by Donner-Peltier Distillers 3/4 ounce pineapple juice 1 ounce sour mix 1.5 ounces grape Kool-Aid lemon squeeze

Fill a pint glass with ice. Pour Rougaroux Sugarshine Rum, pineapple juice, sour mix and grape Kool-Aid over the ice. Using a cocktail shaker, shake well for about 10 seconds. Squeeze in the juice of a lemon and garnish with the lemon slice.

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UNDER THE SCOPE JOHN DOUCET

Babble at the Bistro Y

ou are at a nice restaurant—perhaps for the first time in a really long time. And you are sitting across from someone with whom you can have an effortless conversation—so easy that you never have to much more than whisper and you never have to anticipate a pause to speak. In fact, you don’t have to speak at all. There is only one job for your mouth at this place. There is the occasional chime of a tapped wine glass. There is the soft clash of silverware touching. The lighting and the music are as soft and smooth as that baked Havarti cheese you just had as an appetizer. And you’ve just lain something on your tongue that is French and heavenly, like beurre blanc and angel hair pasta. As you press this against your palate, your eyes close and slowly roll back a bit. Everything in life is lush and luscious, rich and sensuous. Suddenly, you are elsewhere ... and you are someone else. You are released. Then the table on the side of you arrives and loudly reminds you that you are a hungry captive in a world that is loud and complaintive and gossipy. Your soufflé deflates. Your dressing separates. Your oysters Rockefeller turn to Bigorneaux Boudreaux. And, much worse, you are helplessly entrapped as an innocent by-sitter in conversation that is not of your choosing. Your eyes slowly roll back into place, despite their best wishes. Forget about Facebooking and identity theft. People lose most of their privacy these days by over-talking in quiet places like restaurants or cinemas ... or even in the whispery back pews of a church. Just by innocently and quietly sitting by, you can unintentionally learn about a whole community of goings-on among a wide variety of neighbors, friends, enemies and lovers— whether you wish to learn or not. When you are in a quiet restaurant, you are committed aesthetically and financially. To a large extent, you are trapped. You are helpless to hear a conversation louder than your thoughts. On the other end of the spectrum of unwanted conversations are the meaningless ones. The worst conversation you can’t hope for is the one in which absolutely nothing is said. It’s not even small talk. It’s more like nanobabble. Consider a recent conversation in which I was entrapped. To protect the identities of the guilty, let’s call the perpetrators Shrimp and Dip. My comments are in brackets.

SHRIMP: Dude! How you doing? DIP: I’m doing! What about you?

[They clasp hands—thumbs up—and thump chests, in the traditional bro manner.] SHRIMP: Any better and I’d be dead. [No comment.] DIP: Me, I can’t complain. If I do, nobody listens. [Except the people around you who are forced to listen!] SHRIMP: How’s work? DIP: It’s work. You? SHRIMP: You don’t want to know. [That’s right. I don’t want to know.] DIP: How’s the thing with the guy? SHRIMP: Same old, same old. DIP: You know what? Gotta do what you gotta do. SHRIMP: Yep. Can’t complain. It don’t pay. DIP: Hey, it is what it is. [Didn’t Yul Brynner say that in The Ten Commandments?] SHRIMP: True. DIP: You know what I mean? SHRIMP: I do know what you mean. [No, I don’t know what you mean!] DIP: What you hungry for? SHRIMP: I think I’ll have that thing with the stuff on it. DIP: Had that before and you didn’t like it. SHRIMP: Maybe I’ll have that other thing I like. DIP: Remember what that did to you last time? SHRIMP: Oh, yeah. But they got ointment for that now. [OK! That’s enough!] ME: Waiter! Check, please! And hurry! Let’s hope that nanobabblers never prove doctors wrong. That way, megababblers will have less to talk about. Then perhaps one day non-babblers can enjoy a few fine eye-rolling dinners. POV

John Doucet is the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Nicholls State University. He kept “A Little Less Conversation” by the legendary Elvis Presley on repeat as he wrote this column.

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OH SNAP Bombs Away A Houma float rider showers the crowd with beads. MISTY LEIGH MCELROY

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WHO AM I?

Courtesy of

You might think you know everyone

in the area, but some of our hometown's most upstanding citizens (those you would know) sure have changed!

Who Am I? • Although it’s not a habit, you may have seen me around town in a habit. • I was a Halloween baby. • P.S. Speaking of babies, my work revolves around them.

Check next month’s issue to learn my identity. Good luck!

Last month’s mystery young’n:

Suzanne Carlos Houma-Terrebonne Chamber of Commerce

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fi life 54 WARM UP

Sweet Stuff

56 WHATCHA MAKIN’

Cookin’ Up Some Love

57 WE SUPPORT A HEALTHIER FUTURE

Sponsored by Thibodaux Regional Medical Center

58 INCREDIBLY SHRINKING KATIE

Making a change and seeing changes

62 WHAT’S SHAKIN’

How you can roday around your community

64 FITMIND

Have a Mind to Relax

65 COOL DOWN

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Put a Spoon in It

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Up

WA R M

Sweet Stuff W I T H L E N T R I G H T A R O U N D the

corner, you are undoubtedly feeling

1. 4 g

Slice of white bread

2.3g

Cube of sugar

the urge to load up on every sugary indulgence out there before giving it up for 40 days. Going overboard can be easy to do and detrimental to your overall health. Eating too much of the sweet stuff means weight gain, increased blood sugar levels, and an increased risk of diabetes, which all

3g

Peanut butter (2 T.)

amp up your risk of heart disease. The American Heart Association recommends no more than 24 grams

15g

Frosted brown sugar cinnamon Pop-Tart

23g

Apple (large)

30g

Bag of milk chocolate M&M’s

34g

Cool Blue Gatorade (29-ounce bottle)

45g

Slice of king cake (3 inches)

77g

Mountain Dew (20-ounce bottle)

of sugar for women and 36 grams of sugar for men per day. Here’s how some of your favorite foods are contributing to your sugar rush:

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W H AT C

HA

M a k i n'

Cookin’ Up Some Love

V A L E N T I N E ’ S D A Y is all about love and chocolate, right?

Here’s something you may not love about chocolate: Three squares from a package of chocolates are typically 20 0 calories with over 20 grams of sugar. And the whole box? Well, that’s a lot of unnecessary calories and processed sugar. This recipe is low in fat and calories. Spread the love by introducing that special someone to a healthier alternative that he or she is sure to enjoy.

Chocolate-Mousse-Stuffed Strawberries W H AT Y O U ’ L L N E E D :

2 cups low-fat vanilla Greek yogurt 9 ounces semisweet chocolate 1 cup low-fat milk 1 T. sugar 12-16 strawberries Coconut flakes (optional)

Wash the strawberries. Cut a small piece off the bottom of each strawberry so it will stand up. Next, cut off the stems

H O W T O M A K E I T:

and cut around the inside (slightly hollowing it out). Once

Chop the chocolate into fine pieces. In a double boiler,

the mousse mixture has cooled, stuff the strawberries. Top

cook milk and sugar on medium heat until hot, not boil-

with coconut flakes.

ing. Add chocolate to milk and allow it to sit for about a minute, then begin to stir. Stir until the mixture is

Recipe adapted from ToriAvey.com.

smooth. Remove from heat. Drain any liquid from the Greek yogurt and whip it with a whisk or a fork until it is fluffy. Add the chocolate mixture to the Greek yogurt and

L A C I E T O U P S has a degree in dietetics from Nicholls State University.

fold in with a spatula.

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WE RT SUPPO

er a healthi future

THIBODAUX REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER

Geaux Red for Women

T H E A M E R I C A N H E A R T Association’s Go Red for Women

R I S K F A C T O R S T H AT Y O U C A N C O N T R O L :

Day is celebrated on Feb. 6. On that day, thousands of

Smoking

people across the United States wear red to show their

High blood cholesterol and high triglyceride levels

support. In the United States, 1 in 4 women die from heart

High blood pressure

disease, and it is the No. 1 killer of both men and women.

Diabetes and pre-diabetes

Even if you have no symptoms, you may still be at risk for

Being overweight/obesity

heart disease.

Birth control pills Lack of physical activity

Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is a disease in which

Unhealthy diet

plaque builds up on the inner walls of your coronary

Stress or depression

arteries. These arteries carry oxygen-rich blood to your

Anemia

heart. Plaque is made up of fat, cholesterol, calcium and

Sleep apnea

other substances found in the blood. Over time, plaque can harden or rupture (break open). Many researchers

R I S K F A C T O R S T H AT Y O U C A N N O T C O N T R O L :

think a drop in estrogen levels during menopause

Age and menopause

combined with other heart disease risk factors causes

Family history

coronary disease.

Preeclampsia

There are many known CHD risk factors. Your risk for

Lifestyle changes, medication and medical or surgical

CHD and heart attack rises with the number of risk

procedures can help women lower their risk for CHD.

factors that you have, as well as their severity. Also, some

Early and ongoing CHD prevention is important. For

risk factors, like smoking and diabetes, put you at greater

more information, call the Heart and Vascular Center

risk for CHD and heart attack than others.

of Thibodaux Regional at 985.493.4736.

Comprehensive Heart Care

Close at Hand Put Your Heart in the Hands of Experts

thibodaux.com 985.493.4703

Nationally-Recognized Hospital Patient-Centered Excellence

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F O R T H E I N C R E D I B LY S H R I N K I N G K A T I E ,

it has been an incredibly productive year. On Dec. 20, 2013, Katie Lasserre vowed to

THE

make a lifestyle change—a change that has

Incredibly

SHRINKING

helped her drop over 78 pounds and feel, well, incredible. “I woke up one day and decided I didn’t like what I saw in the mirror,” Katie says. “It really hit me when I went to a work Christmas party and saw a picture of myself. I was devastated. I thought to myself, ‘I can’t believe I let myself get so out of hand.’ But I didn’t want to yo-yo diet anymore ... I wanted to do it the right way.”

KATIE

‘So Can I’ At 33, Katie says she has struggled with her weight for nearly 15 years, eating unhealthy foods and leading a sedentary lifestyle of little to no exercise. As a fourthgrade teacher at St. Charles Elementary School in Thibodaux, as well as a wife and mother of three sons under 12 (including twins), she had the excuses to put off making a lifestyle change.

ESTHER ELLIS

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E R I C A S E E LY

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“My whole life I always made excuses; I didn’t have time,” Katie says. “I finally had to say to myself, ‘If busier

... I’m not on a diet. If I want to eat a piece of cake, I can ... but I have to pay for it in exercise.

people than me take time to run, so can I.’ I had to literally say to myself, ‘If you don’t make time and make

—Katie Lasserre

health a priority, you will die.’ I was headed down that route, and I was miserable. I had to tell myself that it is worth it to make the time.”

choose whole-wheat pastas. My goal is for it to be a lifestyle and not a diet. My biggest thing is that I’m not on a diet. If I want to eat a piece of cake, I

Small Steps

can ... but I have to pay for it in exercise.”

Once the excuses were put to rest, Katie began to see her life change

As with any change, the beginning can be challenging, and it wasn’t any

in a positive way. She tried fad diets

different for Katie. At first she says every change felt very forced; it wasn’t

for years and saw the yo-yo effect

natural to exercise or eat healthy. The first two months, she had terrible

in her weight. She knew she needed

cravings for sodas and snack cakes—things she was used to eating regularly.

to change her lifestyle in a way that

Self-control became very important in resisting those cravings, and today

would be sustainable, so she began

Katie says the cravings have gone away.

with small steps, walking up and down her street and making simple

Putting It All Out There

changes in her diet like modifying

As a determined wife and mother, Katie found comfort and inspiration

portion sizes and planning her meals.

through Facebook, where she met other mothers and individuals with the same struggles. These new “friends,” too, posted about their own journeys.

“Pills don’t change any habits, and I

This encouraged Katie to be honest with herself and those around her. She

yo-yoed for probably the last nine or

created a Facebook page, “The Incredibly Shrinking Katie,” and shared her

10 years,” Katie says. “Food prepara-

journey with whomever cared to listen. The support received was key to her

tion is huge for me, and [my family

success.

plans meals] every Sunday for the week ... and we stick to the meal plan.

“I decided from the beginning that I would be completely honest,” Katie

I make whatever we would have eaten

says. “I posted weigh-ins and talked about my diet. Whenever I don’t post for

before, but just a healthier version.

a few days, [my friends will] say something, and it keeps me accountable. The

If I’m going to make a burger, I make

more I post, the more motivated I get because people will say I’ve inspired

a turkey burger on a healthier bread

them. Being alone was the worst thing to do. The minute I started explaining

or turkey chili without the oils, and

how I felt, you wouldn’t believe how many people were feeling the same.”

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b e f o re

Running for the Health of It

J O I N K AT I E O N H E R J O U R N E Y. V I S I T F A C E B O O K . C O M / K AT I E . L A S S E R R E T O W AT C H HER SHRINK AND GET INSPIRED.

Once Katie began to feel comfortable walking, she decided to join the

has lost 25 pounds and built muscle. He

Thibodaux Running Group, which runs

loves to run, too. We run at least three

5K routes twice each week. She found

to five times each week, sometimes

support through her church, Thibodaux

more.”

Family Church, and says her church family continues to encourage her to

Katie says she uses her running time to

keep pursuing her goal. Most of all, she

unwind—it allows time for her and her

found support through her husband,

husband to talk and pray. In the future,

who has been her running partner

Katie hopes to return to school to study

throughout her journey.

dietetics and learn more about making healthy choices so she can help those

“When I first decided this, [my hus-

who struggle with their weight like she

band] backed me up 10 0 percent,” Katie

did.

says. “At first, he thought it was just

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going to be another one of those things

Since vowing to make a change in late

that I did every year that only lasted

2013, Katie has seen much progress

about two weeks. But he told me he

in the pursuit of achieving her goals.

could see I meant it because I was the

With 25 more pounds to lose, achieving

one that would make sure we would

that goal is only the beginning of great

run. He eats everything I cook, and he

things to come.

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W H AT '

S

S h a k i n'

WANT US TO INCLUDE YOUR EVENT IN OUR C ALENDAR?

Shoot an email to editor@rushing-media.com and we’ll help spread the word.

LAISSEZ LE BON TEMPS COURIR S AT U RDAY, F EB. 7, 5K/10K: 9 A .M.

Where: Peltier Park Pavilion, Thibodaux Details: The Thibodaux Running Group will host its first annual 5K/10K to raise money to support the community fitness initiative. The race will begin at the Peltier Park Pavilion and follow much of the Krewe of Ambrosia’s parade route, which will roll through the streets of Thibodaux beginning at 5:30 p.m. that evening. Registration begins at 8 a.m. Entry is $25 through Jan. 10 and $30 after. There will also be a Mardi Gras costume contest. Contact: S P L I T S E C O N D L L C . C O M

IBERIABANK UPTOWN CLASSIC S UN D AY, F E B . 1, 1/ 2 MILE : 8:30 A.M., 5K : 8:45 A.M.

Where: Jewish Community Center, 5342 St. Charles Ave., New Orleans

THIBODAUX THUNDER 5K RUN/WALK TO COOPERSTOWN

Details: Enjoy a spin through some of the most scenic

S AT U RDAY, F EB. 21, 1-MIL E F U N RU N: 8 A .M., 5K: 8 : 1 5 A . M .

areas of the city at this family friendly event. The course

Where: Peltier Park, Thibodaux

will run along St. Charles Avenue to City Park and back.

Details: Help the 12U Thibodaux Thunder baseball

Entry is $30 for individuals and $20 for youths ages 17

team attend the Hall of Fame Invitational Tournament in

and under and seniors ages 65 and over. Family registra-

Cooperstown, New York, in June by participating in this

tion plans for two adults and two youths ages 17 and

run/walk through Thibodaux. Entry is $25 before race

under are $70.

day and $30 on race day.

Contact: N O L A R U N N I N G . C O M

Contact: S P L I T S E C O N D L L C . C O M

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MARDI GRAS MAMBO S AT U R D AY, F E B . 21, 1-MILE FUN R UN: 8 A.M., 10K / 15K : 8: 30 A.M

Where: North Boulevard Town Square, Downtown Baton Rouge Details: Celebrate the Carnival season with over 2,0 0 0 runners at Baton Rouge’s only 15K. The course will challenge runners to a 9.33-mile jog that loops through downtown Baton Rouge and City Park, then by the LSU Lakes and the Louisiana State Capitol. The event also features a 10K and one-mile fun run. The Post Race Fete, held in the Belle of Baton Rouge Atrium, will feature lots of food and drinks, as well as entertainment from Baton Rouge Music Studios. Race-day registration is $20 for the fun run, $50 for the 10K, and $65 for the 15K. Contact: R U N M A M B O . C O M

GIRLS VOLLEYBALL LEAGUE M O N D AY, F E B . 2 3, C LINIC S BE GIN

Where: Warren J. Harang Municipal Auditorium, Thibodaux Details: Girls ages 7-14 can join this sports league to hone their athletic abilities in a fun, safe environment. Clinics will be held Feb. 23-26, and the season will begin on March 23. Registration, $30, runs through Feb. 13. Contact: C I . T H I B O D A U X . L A . U S / D E P A R T M E N T S / R E C R E AT I O N

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fiN D

M I

Have a Mind to Relax

“YOU NEED TO RELAX MORE.”

Mindfulness enables us to be aware of our experiences, rather than be consumed by or lost in them. This allows us

Have you heard that before? Would you agree that most

to make more purposeful, wise choices, instead of reacting

everyone can benefit from learning how to take time to

automatically to things we can’t control. Mindfulness

relax? Of course, it is easy to say ... but difficult to do in

also involves an intention to reduce or relieve suffering

our busy lives.

through the cultivation of kindness and compassion for oneself and others.

When considering our past experiences, all that is going on in our present lives, and the mystery of the future, how

Mindfulness-based stress reduction classes are now

are we supposed to relax?

being taught at hundreds of hospitals across the country. Greater relaxation and mindfulness go hand in hand.

It is easy to agree that relaxation is a good thing. From

The fact that scientists say it is “very healthy” but “rarely

reading to gardening, fishing to dancing, there are many

achieved” is a signal that greater attention needs to be

ways to relax.

focused on healthy methods to direct the mind and find peaceful relaxation. The consequential damage of tension

A simple definition of relax is “to release or bring relief

and anxiety that too often leads to addictions of alcohol,

from the effects of tension, anxiety, etc.” What is impor-

drugs, gambling and overeating, among others, can be

tant is to make a personal decision to consciously choose

addressed by being more mindful.

to relax more and make the time regularly to actually do it. It could be as easy as learning a few relaxing breathing

Before Cooper attended the mindfulness retreat, he said

techniques. But it does not include sitting on the couch

he was “totally skeptical;” however, he found the experience

watching television.

to be very meaningful.

Millions of Americans watched recently as popular TV

“The idea is to at least for a few moments, even a few sec-

personality Anderson Cooper went to a “mindfulness”

onds, to not be agitated by the thoughts ... but to be aware

weekend retreat to discover a way to relax and better cope

of our breath,” Cooper says. “The thing that has really

with life’s distractions, namely his cell phone. You can

stuck with me is returning to your breath.” Conscious

watch the entire 60 Minutes segment at CBSNews.com.

breathing heightens awareness and deepens relaxation.

The network’s Web site claims the report was filed because “scientists say [mindfulness] is very healthy, but rarely

The difference between who you are and who you want to

achieved in today’s world of digital distractions.”

be is what you do. Make the choice to relax more and to do it in a healthy, mindful way.

Mindfulness means paying attention on purpose, nonjudgmentally, to what is happening in the present moment, both internally (thoughts/emotions) and externally.

D R . J . M I C H A E L F LY N N practices at the

Flynn Clinic of Chiropractic in Houma. He is available to “talk health” with your organization or club—call 985.855.4875 or visit www.drmikeflynn.com.

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oWlN o c D O

Put a Spoon in It

T H E G O O D O L ’ S M O O T H I E is no longer just for sipping.

The smoothie bowl, a layered treat consisting of the blended mixture topped with diced-up fruits, nuts, seeds and just about anything you can find in your pantry, is a great way to get your daily dose of vitamins and minerals in a way that allows for a more enjoyable nutritional experience. First, create a base of greens, frozen fruits, proteins, healthy fats, a liquid like milk or coconut water, and ice. Next, top with fresh fruit and something crunchy. Grab a spoon and dig in.

MANGO STRAWBERRY SMOOTHIE BOWL 1/2 cup 2 percent or skim milk 1 cup frozen mango chunks 1/2 cup frozen strawberries 1/2 cup frozen raspberries 1 scoop vanilla protein powder 1/4 cup vanilla Greek yogurt crunchy topping like chia seeds or granola 1 fresh strawberry cold water or milk Combine everything except the crunchy topping and blend until smooth. Pour into a bowl and top with the crunchy topping and a fresh, sliced strawberry.

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TELL ME WHY MELISSA DUET

We

start asking “Why?” at a very young age. And, frankly, we never seem to grow out of the habit. So ... in the spirit of being inquisitive, we decided to keep on asking and searching for answers to some of life’s most perplexing questions.

Why do birds fly in a V formation?

Why do people say items are “selling like hotcakes”?

The word hotcake has roots in the late 17th century, but the phrase didn’t appear until around 1840. There was no great pancake demand that spurred the creation of the term. Instead, historians tend to believe it originated from fairs and social gatherings where crowds typically outnumbered the food that could be cranked out. An alternative theory is that pancakes are traditionally eaten as a final indulgent meal before Lent in Britain, Canada and Australia.

Although seemingly random, some bird species actually fly in this formation in order to save energy. As a bird flaps its wings, a rotating vortex of air swirls behind and on the sides of the bird; those behind receive a little extra lift if positioned properly in the formation. As a result, these birds won’t have to exert as much effort to get where they are going. It is also theorized that some birds form a V formation in order to better communicate and stay together thanks to optimal visual positioning, allowing the birds to see each other while in the formation.

Why do trick candles relight?

It might seem like magic, but this is all about pure science. In traditional candles, there is a burning ember in the wick that causes paraffin smoke to rise once the candle is blown out. Once extinguished, the ember simply burns out. In a trick candle, the wick also contains magnesium flakes. Magnesium is a metal that burns rapidly and is hard to extinguish in flake form. Once the flame is blown out, the magnesium is ignited by the embers; one magnesium spark is all it takes to relight the candle, thereby bringing it back to life. POV 66 POINT OF VUE LOCAL VUE FEBRUARY 2015

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POV PICKS

Beef Fajita Pita 531 LIBERTY CAFÉ & COFFEE SHOPPE, HOUMA, 985.223.2233

C

himichurri, a traditional Argentinian sauce for grilled meats, marries beautifully with arugula, melted cheese and strips of fajita beef for what will soon become your new favorite sandwich. Sliced cherry tomatoes complement the mix, leaving you full, happy and planning your next visit to the downtown Houma café. Keep an eye on the café’s Facebook page to find out when the sandwich will make an appearance ... you can only snag a bite of this lunchtime fiesta once every few weeks. POV

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Insta

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TIMEOUT

Do You See What I See? A

holiday that celebrates a chubby animal most of us see only once a year, if we’re lucky, seems odd, but Groundhog Day, held Feb. 2, actually has more to do with weather patterns. What began as a modest celebration of the coming springtime evolved in the 1800s into analyzing hibernation patterns to predict the end of winter. Here’s how Punxsutawney Phil and a host of other strange traditions came to be:

The legend of a groundhog predicting the weather was created by Punxsutawney Spirit city editor Clymer H. Freas, who dreamed up today’s foretelling traditions. Punxsutawney Phil is the original groundhog, living so long thanks to a gulp of groundhog nog administered at the annual Groundhog Day picnic. When not doing his annual duty, Punxsutawney Phil and his wife, Phyllis, live in a temperature-controlled area of the Punxsutawney Memorial Library. Don’t expect to get anywhere near Phil without rubbing shoulders with his crew. To join the Inner Circle, the guys in charge of the Groundhog Day festivities, you’ll need a nomination from an active member and a vote from the rest of the club. Kids at Punxsutawney Area High School get a day off of school so that school buses can transport the crowds that flock to Gobbler ’s Knob, Pennsylvania, for the annual event. POV

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MELISSA DUET JO ANN LEBOEUF

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L N E W O L I B G for a

Music was my salvation. —RYAN BRUNET

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C

ajun music flows through Galliano native Ryan Brunet’s veins like muddy water flowing along the banks of Bayou Lafourche. The bayou was once home for the accordionist, who now resides in a 100-year-old country house nestled among the back roads of Crowley, Louisiana, a scene that feeds his authentic spirit and old soul. Ryan straps on the accordion that sits on his dining room table and belts out a tune on the instrument that has saved him, healed him and renewed in him a sense of passion and appreciation for his roots.

Squeezing Into It

As a child, Ryan found himself in a neighborhood that bred some of Cajun music’s best players, like Vin Bruce and Harry Anselmi. He was only 12 then, “hashing it out to CDs” in his bedroom and dreaming of a day when his name might be added to the group of musicians who unknowingly preserved that only-in-Louisiana groove for others. By 14, the budding musician was performing for the first visitors of the Houma-Terrebonne Civic Center, squeezing alongside the best of them. All that momentum came to a halt, however, when the musician was forced to decide between his passion and a long-standing family tradition. “My family was a bunch of hard workers—fishermen, trappers—that work ethic just kept getting passed down and passed down,” Ryan says. “My dad graduated high school. My mom got pulled out at seventh grade and went help my grandma out. Whenever I went to school, all I had to do was graduate high school and my dad expected me to work. During my senior year, I met this man who was a teacher at South Lafourche High School, and he challenged me. He got me wanting to go to college.” 74 POINT OF VUE LOCAL VUE FEBRUARY 2015

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WHATARE

ou Y LISTENING

Zydeco

TO?

Originally crafted at house dances, zydeco integrates R&B, soul and blues to create a fast-paced tempo with heavy emphasis on the accordion.

HEAR IT: “Je Me Reveiller Le Matin (I Woke Up This Morning)” by Clifton Chenier

Cajun

Rooted in the ballads sung by the French-speaking Acadians who settled throughout Louisiana, Cajun music leans more toward a Country-Western sound and places the accordion and fiddle at the forefront.

HEAR IT: “Parlez-Nous à Boire” by The Balfa Brothers

Swamp Pop

Louisiana teens melded their Cajun roots with the sounds of the 1950s to create an infectious groove blending Cajun, Creole, rock ’n’ roll and R&B. Electric guitars and saxophones are often added to the traditional instruments to create this unique sound.

HEAR IT: “That Butt Thing” by Horace Trahan

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There are kids everywhere today starting to pick up this music ... and they’re better than us. Kids are trying to speak French and play French music, and they love that old spirit. You gotta have people that love that tradition and want to stick with it. —RYAN BRUNET

Hittin’ the Road

Ryan followed his heart to Nicholls State University, where he found a group of guys that felt the same familiar groove that he did. Formalizing as Ryan Brunet and Les Malfecteurs, the group hit the road, introducing a younger generation to the irresistible rhythms of Cajun music and genres like zydeco and swamp pop. The road was calling, and packing up and heading out west proved beneficial for the then-25-year-old. “It was kind of a getaway thing,” Ryan remembers. “My father had passed away, I got divorced, I lost my job—all at once. I was a wreck for three years. Music was my salvation.” The accordionist played a five-week gig at Marché de Noël, an annual Christmas market in France. There was also a stop in Russia in a small, impoverished community; it was an experience that Ryan ranks among his favorites. “People were living in shanties and houses that looked like they were going to fall down, but their community center was all marble, filled with statues,” he remembers. “Those people were not smiling when we started. By the end of the show, they were dancing on the stage with us.”

From Lafayette to Little Rock, Les Malfecteurs made their mark in the world of Cajun music in whatever spot would afford them the chance. After extensive time on the road “bringing the party” to people

intrigued by all the things the term “Cajun” has come to represent, Ryan made his way back to Louisiana, where he met his wife, Jennifer. The two settled near her hometown of Eunice, a region known for producing a hand-

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ful of prominent Cajun musicians like Wayne Toups, much like his childhood neighborhood did along Bayou Lafourche.

Build & Play

Ryan now splits his time between studying mechanical engineering at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette and breathing life into the music so many Louisianians hold close to their hearts. A passion so intense means absorbing every ounce of knowledge available, including how to construct the instruments integral to the authentic Cajun sound. Over nearly two years, Ryan learned at the hands of a local expert, crafting an accordion

JAM WITH THE CAJUN MUSIC PRESERVATION SOCIETY. VISIT WELOVECAJUNMUSIC.ORG TO FIND OUT WHERE THEY WILL BE GATHERING NEXT.

made of curly maple and African ebony woods and Italian bellows. “This old man from Iota, he’s pretty well known for building accordions,” Ryan says. “I’ve been friends with him for years. I told him, ‘You know, I’ve been playing the instrument my whole life and I’ve been wanting to see how it works.’ He said he’d do an apprenticeship, so myself and another fella from Eunice, we would meet at his shop and build accordions with him. I solely built the accordions. He literally talked me through the processes so I [could learn] his craft.”

Preserving Cajun Music

The result of Ryan’s craftsmanship now resides in Thibodaux with Nicholls State University biology professor Quenton Fontenot, one of the key members behind the Cajun Music Preservation Society. The Society, comprised of community members with an interest in Cajun music, gets together regularly to promote, preserve and jam to the music that they love.

One evening in early January, Ryan found himself seated among the group, playing the accordion he created. “I loved it. I was happy to be there,” Ryan says of the experience. “They have some of them that can’t play yet; they’re learning, but they’re loving every bit of it. It makes me reflect. I’ll never forget this: One time, an old man from Bayou Lafourche told me if I picked up that accordion while they were playing, he was gonna hang me on the flagpole I couldn’t carry a tune. But once I started getting it, it took off. Seeing the tradition, now thriving in cities like Thibodaux and Crowley, live on is part of what makes Ryan proud to be a Cajun musician. The music of his upbringing has found new life in the hands and voices of Louisiana’s next generation. “[Cajun music’s] got a future in Thibodaux and here in Lake Charles to Abbeville to Eunice,” Ryan says. “There are kids everywhere today starting to pick up this music ... and they’re better than us. One, because of technology. Two, their parents are bringing them more often to professional musicians to learn. They’re getting better at a younger age. Kids are trying to speak French and play French music, and they love that old spirit. You gotta have people that love that tradition and want to stick with it.” POV

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LIVING WELL DEBBIE MELVIN

Let’s Look Inside Your Pantry “W

hat’s for dinner?” One of the most feared questions at the end of the day. What shall it be: fast food ... frozen pizza ... a carry-out meal? All these are popular quick meals. But if you are trying to accomplish the goal of eating healthier by eating out less often in 2015 ... and you have been specific about how often that will be ... the question is even scarier. Hopefully you solicited your family’s input and have their support. In PoV’s January 2015 issue, I shared some of my favorite kitchen tools to make home meal preparation more efficient. Let’s continue the discussion. Wishing won’t make it happen. There is a lot to be said for preparing weekly menus, even if the preparing is done in your head. The word menu sounds so formal when you are talking about cooking at home, but you at least need to give it some forethought. How disappointing to have your dinner plans made, only to discover at preparation time that you are missing a vital ingredient. By shopping once a week from a deliberate grocery list that includes all the items needed for the planned meals, this should not happen. Remember that home meals need not be perfect. You may feel bad about breaking a few self-imposed rules, like using some convenience or processed foods, but rest assured ... most meals prepared at home are hands down better for you than any restaurant meal. Plus, you can plan for leftovers for another meal during the week or to store in your freezer for use within the month. If you have a garden, even a small one, you can have fresh seasonal vegetables, like lettuce and other leafy greens, broccoli and cauliflower in the fall and winter and tomatoes, cucumbers, green beans, squash and peppers in the spring and summer. Many, though not all, freeze well for enjoyment out of season. With a hunter or fisherman in your family, you can stock your freezer with venison, duck, fish and seafood. I also like to stock up on the basics for some quick meals that are old standbys. Consider your freezer, refrigerator and pantry to make a list of basic needs for your family’s favorite quick meals. Focus on healthy ingredients as much as possible. If you buy items like chips and cookies, limit how much you purchase on weekly shopping trips and stick to the “when they are gone, they are gone” philosophy.

Every choice has a cost in hours and minutes, in dollars and cents. Every choice impacts your health. Planning ahead increases your choices. ••• Here is one of my favorite recipes from the Smart Portions program that I instruct. It is quick, and I always have these ingredients on hand.

Creamy Baked Chicken Breasts WHAT YOU’LL NEED WHAT YOU’LL NEED: 8 boneless, skinless chicken breasts (5 ounces each) 8 (1-ounce) slices reduced-fat Swiss cheese 1 can 97 percent fat-free cream of chicken soup 1/4 cup dry white wine 1 cup herb-seasoned stuffi mix, crushed; or breadcrumbs 1/4 cup soft tub margarine, melted (or lightly spray with butter-flavo ed vegetable cooking spray)

HOW TO TO MAKE IT: IT HOW MAKE Arrange chicken in a lightly greased 13-by-9 baking dish. Top with cheese slices. Combine soup and wine; stir well. Spoon evenly over chicken. Sprinkle with stuffing mix. Drizzle margarine over crumbs. Bake at 350 degrees for 45-55 minutes. Serve with rice and two steamed vegetables. POV

TIP: In the morning, do all the preparation except the stuffing

mix or breadcrumbs. Cover and let marinate all day for tender, juicy chicken.

Debbie Melvin, M.S., C.F.C.S., is an extension agent for the LSU AgCenter. She specializes in nutrition.

DMELVI N @AGCTR.LSU.EDU

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CHECK IT OUT LAUREN BORDELON

Hallowed Halls of Greater New Orleans BY DEBORAH BURST

S

outh Louisianians are no strangers to the grand and elegant. From the delicate, intricate clothing that newly baptized babies wear to the elaborate wedding celebrations families throw for their loved ones, “over the top” seems to be its own way of life here. Bearing this in mind, it is not surprising to natives and visitors alike that some of the most humble and simple of places are the most ornate and extravagant. In her book Hallowed Halls of Greater New Orleans, Deborah Burst reminds us that the churches, cathedrals and places of worship found in South Louisiana are not just for show. These buildings contain stories of rich histories where birth, death, love and sacredness are experienced. While these places of worship stand as the cornerstones of many communities, Burst explains that collectively they are an important, necessary aspect of our greater community.

A freelance writer and photographer, Burst captures the places where so much is both celebrated and mourned. She finds the beauty of it all through her camera’s lens, while providing historical and anecdotal text that is sensitive and thoughtful to the actual place, as well as gripping and interesting to readers. Eight buildings are documented in Burst’s book, which also includes information and stories about places within a place. Gardens, chapels, windows and annexes are explored through pictures and text that make them seem like individual places themselves. Naves and narthexes are deconstructed and reconstructed as if the reader were moving over each architectural surface with a fine-toothed comb. Stories of papal visits, destruction by fire, and revitalization as places designed for secular purposes are presented with as much reverence as those who find solace in these places exude. Hallowed Halls is the perfect read for those looking for both eye-catching photography and well-documented histories and stories of some of the most beautiful and moving sacred places in the greater New Orleans area. POV

Lauren Bordelon is the adult services and public relations librarian for the Terrebonne Parish Library.

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BEHIND THE BREW DWAYNE ANDRAS

Cheers, Ye Olde Fox! F

ebruary is all about “lovers,” right? One is expected to link the commercially manipulated, guilt-provoking Valentine’s Day holiday to wonderful beverages like chocolate stouts or fruitenhanced beers that pair well with strawberries, but I happen to be a member of the BVD—Boycott Valentine’s Day—crowd. I prefer to show my significant other my “love” year-around, as opposed to one day a year when the prices of roses and chocolates increase. No worries ... I do celebrate another great February holiday— George Washington’s birthday. You know, our great Revolutionary War leader ... founding President ... home-brewer and beer drinker. It has been written in history that when Washington became leader of the Revolutionary Army, one of his first actions was to order that each of his troops be given one pint of beer with his daily ration of food. It turns out that Washington was also an accomplished brewmaster who maintained his own brewhouse at his Mount Vernon residence. Historians have preserved a handwritten recipe for “small beer” in Washington’s journal. The New York Public Library houses the late President’s journal, which contains this entry: To Make Small Beer, Take a large Siffer [Sifter] full of Bran Hops to your Taste. Boil these 3 hours then strain out 30 Gall[ons] into a cooler put in 3 Gall[ons] Molasses while the Beer is Scalding hot or rather draw the Melasses into the cooler & St[r]ain the Beer on it while boiling Hot. let this stand till it is little more than Blood warm then put in a quart of Yea[s]t if the Weather is very Cold cover it over with a Blank[et] & let it Work in the Cooler 24 hours then put it into the Cask — leave the bung open till it is almost done Working — Bottle it that day Week it was Brewed. In honor of our nation’s first President—a champion of beer— I propose we raise a pint of Washington’s favorite beer—porter— a great choice for the winter months. Porters are typically fullbodied with a dark brown to black color. These brews feature the wonderful notes of roasted malts and rich chocolate and coffee flavors. Here are some porters that Washington would have enjoyed sampling:

Chafunkta Old 504

Named after the former Louisiana statewide area code, Old 504 is a coffee-infused vanilla porter that is brewed with vanilla beans and New Orleans roasted coffee. Chafunkta Brewing Co. is based in Mandeville.

Tin Roof Parade Ground Coffee Porter

A seasonal release of a robust porter, Parade Ground Coffee Porter is brewed with a blend of mocha and French roast. Tin Roof Brewing Co. is based in Baton Rouge.

Covington Brewhouse Electric Porter

Brewed with five different malts and coffee roasted locally by Campbell’s Coffee and Tea, Electric Porter features great chocolate flavors and a mild coffee finish. Covington Brewhouse is based in Covington. If you’d like to pair a few foods with these fine porters, stick with chiles, hearty stews and roasted, smoked or barbecued meats—even cheesecake. Cheers, Ye Olde Fox! POV

Dwayne Andras is a home brewer and selftaught beer expert in continuous search of the perfect pint. Chat with him about your favorite brew at DWAYNE.ANDRAS@GMAIL.COM 82 POINT OF VUE EXPERT VUE FEBRUARY 2015

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A VUE FROM THE VINE LANE BATES

Off the Old Vine

B

ogle Vineyards, arguably California’s best value winery, has long been known for producing quality wines made from grapes of the Lodi and Paso Robles regions, as well as other Central Coast areas. These wines tend to be blends of old vine Zinfandel and Petite Sirah, and are typically aged for 18-24 months, adding complexity to the flavor. Here are a few current selections:

Bogle Phantom 2011 $16.99

Bogle’s flagship wine, Phantom is a blend of primarily Petite Sirah and Zinfandel with lesser amounts of Cabernet and Mourvèdre, aged for over 24 months in American oak. The full-bodied, dark, dense wine features spice, vanilla and toasty oak flavors that are intense, yet focused. Phantom has great body and texture and finishes with long, firm tannins. Great to drink now, or store it away for a few years.

Bogle Essential Red 2012 $8.99

The newest wine in the Bogle lineup, Essential Red is an easy-drinking, rich wine that is layered with jammy flavors of vanilla, cherry and spice. The rock-solid wine finishes soft and easy with more spice flavors that sail on to the finish. A blend of Zinfandel, Syrah, Petite Sirah and Cabernet Sauvignon, Essential Red is aged for 18 months in American and French oak. Ready to drink now and sure to please at any social gathering.

WINE SPECTATOR RATING — 87 POINTS

Bogle Merlot 2012 $7.99

A perennial value wine from Bogle, the winery’s Merlot is supple and easy-drinking with flavors of ripe fruit, herbs and toasted oak. The wine is silky-smooth in texture and has a long, soft, elegant finish. A great everyday wine ... drink now or over the next few years. POV

WINE SPECTATOR RATING — 88 POINTS

Lane Bates is the wine and spirits specialist at Cannata’s. Feel free to visit him to fin out more.

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BON APPÉTIT GRAHAM BLACKALL

King Cake Fries

To

celebrate the arrival of Mardi Gras, take an alternate approach to the season’s beloved king cake. This recipe turns the classic cake into a dessert poutine with cinnamon-sugar-dusted sweet potato fries. Don’t be fooled ... the brown butter cream cheese glaze and pecan praline sauce disqualify an attempt at calling these fries a vegetable.

Cinnamon Sugar Sweet Potato Fries 3 large sweet potatoes, washed and peeled corn starch 2 T. coconut oil, melted 1/2 cup sugar 3/4 t. cinnamon 1 batch brown butter cream cheese glaze (recipe below) 1 batch praline sauce (recipe below) 1/2 cup chopped pecans, toasted purple, green and gold sanding sugar

HOW TO MAKE IT Preheat oven to 400 degrees and line two baking sheets with parchment paper. With an extra-sharp knife, slice the washed and peeled sweet potatoes into halves, then quarters, then individual slices. Desired thickness should be around 1/4-inch thick. Once sliced, toss the potatoes in a dusting of corn starch to ensure extra crispiness. Remove all excess powder and toss them in the melted coconut oil, making

sure to coat each fry thoroughly. In a small bowl, mix together the cinnamon and sugar, setting aside 3 tablespoonfuls of the mixture for later. Add the cinnamon sugar to the fries and toss to coat. Divide the coated fries evenly among the two baking sheets. Bake the sweet potato fries for 18 minutes on one side, flip them, then bake for another 15 minutes. Once done, you can either remove them or let them cool

slightly in the oven for 20-30 minutes for extra crispiness. Coat the warm fries in the remaining 3 tablespoonfuls of cinnamon sugar mixture. Pile the warm fries onto a serving plate and drizzle with brown butter cream cheese glaze and praline sauce. Top with toasted pecans and purple, green and gold sanding sugars. Serve immediately.

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Brown Butter Cream Cheese Glaze 1/4 cup (1/2 stick) unsalted butter 4 ounces cream cheese, room temperature 1 cup confectioner’s sugar 1/2 t. vanilla bean paste or extract 3-5 T. milk

HOW TO MAKE IT In a small saucepan, heat the butter over medium-high heat. Once melted, continue to cook the butter until brown flecks form at the bottom of the pan and it begins to smell nutty. In a medium-sized bowl, pour the brown butter over the cream cheese and whisk together until smooth. Once fully combined, sift in the confectioner ’s sugar. Mix in the vanilla and milk until the desired consistency is reached. •••

Praline Sauce 1/4 cup brown sugar, packed 3 T. unsalted butter 4 1/2 t. heavy whipping cream 1/8 t. sea salt 1/2 t. vanilla bean paste or extract

HOW TO MAKE IT In a small saucepan over medium heat, combine the brown sugar, butter, heavy cream and sea salt. After the butter melts and the mixture becomes homogenous, let the mixture cook for about 5 minutes. It will bubble and thicken pretty significantly during this step. Remove from heat and stir in vanilla. POV Graham Blackall is a 20-year-old professional sugar addict, food photographer and advertising student from the Big Easy. He shares recipes for crazy twists on classic desserts on his blog, Glazed & Confused, WWW.GLAZEDANDCONFUSED.US. POVHOUMA.COM 85

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UNDERGROUND SOUND TERRY TRAHAN JR.

Ken Swartz & the Palace of Sin LISTEN:

On Time

Mingo Fishtrap

There’s nothing fishy about this funk trap. Based in Austin, Texas, Mingo Fishtrap know how to boogie and fill a room with a healthy dose of Southern soul. Not responsible for any rugs getting cut.

RYAN HODGSON-RIGSBEE • RHRPHOTO.COM

S

unday afternoons in early February can lose some of their mojo once the parades have passed and the party has died down. All you really want is a little groove music to get you back into the swing of things and power you through the rest of the weekend. Ken Swartz and the Palace of Sin have just the formula to help you kick back on a breezy front porch, sip a cocktail, and enjoy the bluesy sounds of New Orleans. Having gigged around the Big Easy, Ken Swartz has shared the stage with hometown favorites like Anders Osbourne and Eric Lindell. He spends much of his time around Frenchmen Street, putting his own spin on covers and digging down deep to deliver original tracks born out of what he has experienced while playing songs that speak to the soul. “Lay Back Down” reminds listeners to “put your troubles all behind” ... exactly what happens on Sunday afternoons when Ken Swartz and the Palace of Sin are around.

LISTEN:

Agape

Bear’s Den

Having toured the U.S. in support of Mumford and Sons, British band Bear ’s Den are finding a folk base that appreciate their alternative roots. “Agape,” from the band’s debut full-length record, Islands, features a banjo driving a threepart harmony that’ll have you humming along soon enough. POV

CHECK ’EM OUT Visit KENSWARTZANDTHEPALACEOFSIN.NET to fin out where Ken Swartz and the Palace of Sin will be playing next. 86 POINT OF VUE EXPERT VUE FEBRUARY 2015

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SMARTY PANTS NO GOOGLING!

1

Which of these record labels helped to launch Elvis Presley’s career?

[A] [B] [C] [D]

3

5

[A] [B] [C] [D]

4

6

ll ñ ch w

Ethiopia Australian Outback Hawaii Easter Island

What is Brie?

[A] [B] [C] [D]

8

Eros Demeter Dionysus Hypnos

The Moai, or human figure statues, can be found where?

[A] [B] [C] [D]

2 3 4 5

Which of these is the elle in Spanish?

In Roman mythology, Cupid is the god of love. What god is his Greek equivalent?

[A] [B] [C] [D]

Cloud of gas Igneous rock Distant galaxy Spot on the cornea

Including their 2015 appearance, the Seattle Seahawks have made how many Super Bowl appearances ?

[A] [B] [C] [D]

7

Atlantic Sun Chess Verve

Which of these is not a nebula?

[A] [B] [C] [D]

2

Bread Grain Cheese Legume

When purchasing a cold coffee at PJ’s, the barista hands you a straw of what color?

[A] [B] [C] [D]

Black Purple Red Yellow

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Which of these cat breeds has long hair?

[A] [B] [C] [D]

11

13

[A] [B] [C] [D]

12

14

Bakers Mail carriers Musicians Prisoners

Gwen Stefani Katy Perry Ariana Grande Lady Gaga

What is the signature ingredient in enchiladas verdes?

[A] [B] [C] [D]

0 1 9 13

Who would most likely come in contact with bilboes?

Who is Stefani Joanne Angelina Germanotta?

[A] [B] [C] [D]

Volkswagen Mercedes-Benz BMW Porsche

The Confederate State of Louisiana flag, flown from 1861-65, featured how many yellow stars?

[A] [B] [C] [D]

15

Birman Javanese Snowshoe Sphynx

Audi is a subsidiary of what German automobile manufacturer?

[A] [B] [C] [D]

10

Tomatillo Chimichurri Mole Dulce de leche

Tea tree oil is native to what continent?

[A] [B] [C] [D]

South America Asia Australia Antarctica

Well, How’d You Do?

# CORRECT IQ

YOUR PANTSYNESS:

11-15

160 PANTS ON FIRE

6-10

110 SMARTY PANTS

1-5

50

PANTS ON THE GROUND

0

3

DID YOU FORGET YOUR PANTS?

ANSWERS 1) B 2) A 3) B 4) D 5) B 6) C 7) A 8) B 9) A 10) D 11) A 12) A 13) B 14) C 15) D

9

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BON ÉTOFFE MELISSA DUET

Caution: Beware of Falling Objects In the hands of a rider, the beads are all pearls, riches and prizes for good boys and girls. —THE THROW’S THE THING BY BROD BAGERT & CHARLIE SMITH

The

tradition of chucking bags of purple, green and gold beads, stuffed animals and other trinkets from Mardi Gras floats began as nothing more than a simple toss to family and friends of royalty in ancient Europe. These tossed items were tokens from the elite, if you were lucky enough to rub shoulders with them. The earliest recorded Carnival throws date back to the 1830s when masked revelers would toss sugar-coated almonds and other sweet treats to the select few below, a tradition that originates with festival customs of the English Renaissance. In 1872, the first New Orleans krewe, Rex, was established, and tossing candy became the norm. As more krewes formed, however, the throws became more mischievous, with revelers tossing bags of flour instead of sweet treats. Sanctions were soon put in place to regulate what could and could not be tossed to parade-goers. The subsequent introduction of trinkets allowed riders to interact with crowds without causing injury or embarrassment. In 1909, Mardi Gras met the Krewe of Zulu, which became Rex’s first real competition. Zulu handed out decorated walnuts, or golden nuggets, but soon switched to the now-iconic coconuts, which are much cheaper. These highly coveted coconuts were a hit with crowds, and Rex knew they had to come up with a new throw to survive. Perhaps to celebrate the krewe’s 50th anniversary, Rex, in 1921, introduced glass beads to the world of Carnival. The first

glass beads were imported from countries like Czechoslovakia and Japan; however, the glass became a hazard, and the beads were later fashioned into the plastic throws used today. Rex rode the wave of popularity for quite some time. But by 1960, it was time to shake up the Mardi Gras world again with the introduction of doubloons, coins designed to pay homage to the royal roots of Carnival. In 1960, artist Henry Alvin Sharpe unveiled Rex’s first doubloon, which looked similar to smaller coins handed out during the first tableaux and other exclusive events. It was the formation of super krewes like Bacchus in the early 1970s that is most responsible for the rising popularity of throwing beads and doubloons to parade-goers on the streets. Bacchus was the first non-societal krewe, allowing anyone willing to pay the member fee a chance to be part of the Carnival festivities. Plastic cups didn’t get added to the list of throws until 1980, when creator Corrado Giacona II designed the first plastic drinking cups for members of krewes like Alla, Bacchus, Rhea and Argus to toss from their floats. Within three years, nearly every krewe was throwing them, adding yet another coveted item to yell for at each parade. POV

Melissa Duet is the assistant editor of Point of Vue. Her collection of plastic cups is her fines china.

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RENDEZVOUS Good Company

Harvey

TUESDAY, FEB. 3, 6 P.M.

FEB. 27 - MARCH 22

WHERE: Schreier Theatre at the Morgan City

WHERE: Bayou Playhouse, Lockport

Municipal Auditorium, Morgan City

DETAILS: From Motown to bluegrass, the musi-

cians of Good Company weave each song together to tell the story of how the country’s most iconic tunes have inspired their own sound and approach to making music. Tickets are $45 for adults and $10 for children.

985.385.2307

Contact: 985.385.2307

Wild Game Supper

DETAILS: Bayou Playhouse director Perry Martin returns to the stage in this hilarious, touching story of a man and his best friend who happens to be a giant rabbit. Elwood P. Dowd tells everyone about his friend, Harvey, but Elwood is the only one who can see the rabbit. Family and friends believe Harvey is a figment of Elwood’s imagination.

1.888.992.2968, BAYOUPLAYHOUSE.COM 1.888.992.2968, BAYOUPLAYHOUSE.COM Contact:

THURSDAY, FEB. 26, 5 P.M. FOR CONSERVATION/VIP TABLES, 6 P.M. FOR GENERAL ADMISSION WHERE: Larose Civic Center, Larose

DETAILS: Stick a fork into some of the most unique dishes around at this annual fundraiser for the Larose Civic Center and Regional Park. The event features over 40 exotic dishes ranging from wild boar to zebra to kangaroo, all prepared by some of the best cooks in the area. Individual tickets are available with each $60 donation.

985.693.7355, BAYOUCIVICCLUB.ORG

Contact: 985.693.7355, BAYOUCIVICCLUB.ORG

10th Annual Eagle Expo FEB. 26-28 WHERE: Morgan City

DETAILS: Learn more about the beautiful creatures that call the Atchafalaya Basin home at this three-day expo. Full registration is $115 for adults and $65 for children ages 12 and under. One-day registration is $90 for adults and $55 for children ages 12 and under. Those wishing to enjoy a boat tour only may do so on Saturday ($60 for adults and $40 for children ages 12 and under).

985.380.8224, CAJUNCOAST.COM/EAGLEEXPO

Contact: 985.380.8224, CAJUNCOAST.COM/

The Ladies of the Sacred South FEB. 27 - MARCH 8 WHERE: Le Petit Theatre de Terrebonne, Houma

DETAILS: Five eccentric older ladies fight to save their beloved plantation museum by devising a plan to keep it out of the hands of the “History Establishment.” Tickets are $15. POV

985.876.4278

EAGLEEXPO Want us to include your event in our calendar? Shoot an email to EDITOR@RUSHING-MEDIA.COM and we’ll help spread the word.

Newsletters Receive additional content and weekly events when you sign up. SCAN HERE:

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SCENE IN A Houma-Terrebonne Chamber of

Commerce board members and staff gather with special guest Captain Richard Phillips at the Chamber ’s annual banquet held Jan. 14 at the HoumaTerrebonne Civic Center.

B Arianna and Kristina Robichaux attend

the Krewe of Endymion King’s Coronation Ball in New Orleans.

C Members of the Cajun Music Preser-

vation Society jam at the Venetian in Thibodaux and Bar Roussell in Houma.

D Students at The Core participate in an

A B

C

anatomy studies lesson, which involved a deer dissection.

E Arianna Robichaux and Blake Schouest attend the Krewe of Endymion King’s Coronation Ball in New Orleans.

F The Houma-Terrebonne Chamber

of Commerce, in association with Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government and Leadership Terrebonne, recognize the 2014 Terrebonne Young Achievers at a press conference in December. POV

Taking in the Scene?

Send your interesting, cute, fun pics to SCENEIN@RUSHING-MEDIA.COM. Please include the Who, What, When, Where and Why. 94 POINT OF VUE REAR VUE FEBRUARY 2015

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C D

A

E

F

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ADVERTISER

Cypress Bayou Casino & Hotel........................ 3

Mitchell Family Eye Care................................ 75

Cypress Columns, The.................................... 5

Old Estate Art Gallery.................................... 13

ADVERTISERS’ INDEX

DA Exterminating............................................. 9

Outside And In............................................... 79

Deep South Oil & Vinegar.............................. 88

Prejean Family Dentistry................................ 83

PAGE

Dermatology Clinic, The (Dr. Mark Neal)........ 15

Premier OB-GYN........................................... 52

Designs by Two.............................................. 27

ReDoux, The.................................................. 81

Digestive Health Center................................. 79

Royal Room, The........................................... 87

A&G Refrigeration.......................................... 49 A&H Paint...................................................... 41 Aaron Pools................................................... 93 Advanced Eye Institute.................................. 67 Ameriprise Financial......................................... 9 Ashley Furniture Homestore........................... 35 AVA Solutions, Inc.......................................... 69 Bar Roussell..............................................47, 69 Basketry, The................................................. 39 Barker Buick GMC......................................... 17 Bayou Black Electric Supply.......................... 31 Beasley Pest Control..................................... 87 Belle Visage Skincare.................................... 22 Blanchard’s Refrigeration............................... 91 Body Elite....................................................... 61 Boxer & The Barrel/ Duke, The...................... 45 Bueche’s Jewelry........................................... 93 Budget Blinds................................................ 15 Busy Bee Clinic.............................................. 87 Cannata’s................................................... 2, 49 Cardiovascular Institute of the South............. 35

Dishman Flooring Center............................... 13

Salinity Halotherapy Spa................................ 25

Donner-Peltier Distillers.................................. 37

Salty Dog Vapor............................................. 70

Double Oak Garden Center........................... 96

Sarah’s Mediterranean Cuisine & Café........... 79

Dr. Flynn Chiropractic.................................... 63

Scurlock Electric............................................ 19

E. D. White Catholic High School................... 27

South Louisiana Bank.................................... 77

Ellender Orthodontics.................................... 77

South Louisiana Financial Services................ 93

Emile’s Furniture and Appliances................... 85

Southland Dodge........................................... 39

Fakier Jewelers.............................................. 19

Southland Mall............................................. 100

Farm Bureau.................................................. 87

SOZA Clinic.................................................... 91

Felger’s Footwear.....................................37, 56

State Farm (Carreker, Brue, Bednarz)............ 29

G.D.C. Programs............................................ 76

Stire Office World........................................... 49

Gold’n Gifts & Bridal Boutique....................... 29

St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church...................... 4

Ground Pat’i Grill & Bar, The.......................... 15

Surgical Weight Management........................ 39

Heavenly Scent.............................................. 60

Synergy Bank................................................ 97

HoneyBaked Ham Co., The........................... 35

Terminix......................................................... 71

Houma Digestive Health.................................. 4

Terrebonne Allstate Group............................. 99

Houma OB-GYN Clinic.................................. 13

Terrebonne Folklife Culture Center................. 19

Houma-Thibodaux Spine & Rehabilitation........ 7

Terrebonne General Medical Center.............. 23

Iberiabank & Mortgage.................................. 78

Thibodaux Regional Medical Center.............. 57

Carmouche Insurance................................... 17

Jones Dermatology........................................ 41

Trapp Cadillac Chevrolet................................ 91

Carpet TED.................................................... 85

Just for You Flower & Gift Shoppe................. 76

Urban Loft...................................................... 28

Chackbay Nursery......................................... 25

La Carreta Mexican Cuisine............................. 9

Valley Supply.................................................. 67

Clearwater Pools............................................ 37

La Chique Maison.......................................... 77

Vintage Garden Café...................................... 96

Coastal Home Builders.................................. 25

Landmark Home Furnishings......................... 67

Waggin’ Tails.................................................. 22

Coburn’s Kitchen & Bath Showroom............. 71

Lil’ Sweet Pea’s Boutique.............................. 71

Wishing Well, The.......................................... 91

Corey Robichaux Guitar Lessons.................. 15

Live 4 Sports.................................................. 63

Workout Co., The..................................... 55, 92

Corporate Centre/Coporate Office Park......... 29

Louis Mohana Furniture................................. 17

Corporate Worxs........................................... 41

M. Bergeron + Company............................... 88

Courtyard Marriott......................................... 93

Mahony’s/Smoky Row................................... 43

Crawfish Aquatics.......................................... 69

Marie’s Wrecker Service................................ 89

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LOOK TWICE

Win a $50

Gift Card

Find the six diffe ences in this photo from our feature on page 72. Drop off your answers along with your name and contact number at the PoV office 6160 W. Park Ave., Houma. Stuck at the offic Fax it, 985.873.9009, or email it to us, EDITOR@RUSHING-MEDIA.COM. A winner will be picked by random drawing FEBRUARY 11. The winner will receive a $50 Visa® gift card courtesy of Synergy Bank.

CONGRATULATIONS TO ESTELLE SOLET FOR WINNING LAST MONTH’S CONTEST.

Courtesy of

ANSWERS TO LAST MONTH’S CONTEST 1 2 3 4 5 6

Handles shorter “Blue” missing Red label now yellow Extra “LIVE” bottle Label tray missing “T” now “E”

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THE FINAL COUNTDOWN

7 Ways to Boost Your Java Y

our daily order of coffee, two scoops of sugar and no creamer isn’t cutting it these days. There is no denying that each daily sip will give you the boost you need, but adding

an extra ingredient every now and then can change your whole day. Here are seven add-ins to request from your barista that will take your coffee from good to great.

1

2 Cinnamon

Salt

Trade cream and sugar for this immune system booster.

Just a dash will soften that bold bite.

3

4 Butter

Booze

Dubbed Bulletproof Coffee it’s definitel an eye-opener.

5

Egg

No acidity, no problem. Egg clarifie for a crisp, clean brew.

Spike your cup of joe ... but only after your day at work.

6

Ice Cream

Turn coffe into dessert with this welcome dose of creaminess.

7

Coconut Milk

Sweet without artificia sugar, add a little for a mid-morning island escape. POV

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