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AGRIBUSINESS

NZ NATIONAL FIELDAYS

Farming the Chathams: the tryanny of distance. PAGE 18

Bankers predict a buoyant Fieldays. PAGE 37

DEER INDUSTRY CONFERENCE Sector seeks better connections with policymakers. PAGE 10

TO ALL FARMERS, FOR ALL FARMERS JUNE 4, 2019: ISSUE 677 

www.ruralnews.co.nz

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AGRIBUSINESS

NZ NATIONAL FIELDAYS

Farming the Chathams: the tryanny of distance. PAGE 18

Bankers predict a buoyant Fieldays. PAGE 37

DEER INDUSTRY CONFERENCE Sector seeks better connections with policymakers. PAGE 10

TO ALL FARMERS, FOR ALL FARMERS JUNE 4, 2019: ISSUE 677 

www.ruralnews.co.nz

Cull hits 100,000

NO MORE TREES! PETER BURKE

NIGEL MALTHUS

FIGURES FROM MPI to May 24 reveal 99,805 animals had by then been culled in the Mycoplasma bovis eradication programme. However, that figure had almost certainly exceeded 100,000 as Rural News went to press last Thursday. The figures also reveal a 92% rise (from 254 to 487) in farms under active surveillance since a ‘surge’ was

announced just before Easter. The number of farms under a notice of direction jumped from 103 to 175 – a rise of 70%. Meanwhile, MPI’s surge in M. bovis eradication put “an extreme amount of pressure” on some farmers leading up to gypsy day, claims Hamish Walker, the Clutha-Southland National MP and the party’s associate agriculture spokesman. He believes acknowledgement is

lacking on the mental health effects of M. bovis eradication. “We’ve got to make sure everyone in the community supports those affected by M. bovis,” he said. Walker claims MPI “dropped the ball” in not having acted soon enough on the number of risk properties identified late last year. “In saying that, MPI are working as closely as possible with those affected farmers and I encourage anyone to get

in touch with me if they are having problems especially in communication with MPI,” Walker told Rural News. “They were the first to admit they could’ve done things differently over that Christmas/new year period, but they’re working extremely hard, especially everyone on the ground, to ensure we give ourselves the best possible chance of eradicating M. bovis.” M. bovis programme director Geoff TO PAGE 4

PHOTO PETER BURKE

She’s a winner This year’s Maori Young Farmer of the Year says winning the competition has given her the confidence to go forth and be a leader in the Maori farming community. She is Kristy Roa (20), a shepherd on Iwinui Station, near Tolaga Bay on the East Coast of the North Island. She was feted late last month at a gala awards function in Gisborne where the Ahuwhenua Trophy was awarded for the top Māori sheep and beef farm. About 600 guests attended including the Ministers of Agriculture and Māori Development. Roa says winning was great, as was her journey since making the finals. “Hopefully this will widen my networks and enable me to reach out to more people. This competition will not change me. I am the same woman, just more confident. And I don’t think anything will change in the workplace. I’m back into dagging sheep and getting ready for shearing next week.” See more on the Ahuwhenua winners on page 6

peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

A NEW lobby group is calling for an immediate halt to the government’s plans to plant a billon trees, saying it will damage the environment and harm New Zealand’s rural economy. Mike Butterick, speaking for 50 Shades of Green, told Rural News it wants the government to stop planting trees on good farmland immediately and fully assess the long term effect of the policy. It also wants the government to halt all Overseas Investment Office (OIO) applications for forestry until an assessment is made. “The government changed the rules to make it relatively easy for overseas investors to buy up productive farmland and plant it in trees,” he explains “We are not beating up forestry. It is really the environment being created by the policy settings which we believe... are creating something that wasn’t intended. “The other worrying thing is the great speed at which this is happening.” Butterick does not know how many productive farms have already been converted to forestry. However, he says in Wairarapa alone up to 8000ha on seven farms have moved from productive farmland to forest. Rural News has also been told of at least two farms near Gisborne recently planted in pine trees. “It doesn’t feel good and it isn’t TO PAGE 3

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RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

NEWS 3 ISSUE 677

www.ruralnews.co.nz

Trump’s trade war will hurt NZ – warning SUDESH KISSUN

NEWS��������������������������������������1-16 AGRIBUSINESS����������������18-19 MARKETS��������������������������22-23 HOUND, EDNA���������������������� 24 CONTACTS����������������������������� 24 OPINION����������������������������24-27 MANAGEMENT��������������� 29-31 FIELDAYS�������������������������� 34-62 ANIMAL HEALTH������������������ 32 MACHINERY AND PRODUCTS���������������������� 63-66 RURAL TRADER������������� 67-68

HEAD OFFICE Top Floor, 29 Northcroft Street, Takapuna, Auckland 0622 Phone: 09-307 0399 Fax: 09-307 0122 POSTAL ADDRESS PO Box 331100, Takapuna, Auckland 0740 Published by: Rural News Group Printed by: PMP Print CONTACTS Editorial: editor@ruralnews.co.nz Advertising material: davef@ruralnews.co.nz Rural News online: www.ruralnews.co.nz Subscriptions: subsrndn@ruralnews.co.nz

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sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

THE ESCALATING trade war between the US and China will impact NZ trade, warns special agricultural trade envoy Mike Petersen. He says it no longer rings true that, as some New Zealanders are saying, there’s nothing to worry about because the trade war is between two world super powers. “Yes, it is directly between the US and China and yes, generally we are sliding under the radar and managing to grow our international trading opportunities as we speak,” he told the recent DairyNZ Farmers Forum in Rotorua. “Just remember all these things have consequences.” Petersen points to President Donald Trump’s recent decision to offer US$16 billion aid to farmers affected by retaliatory tariffs imposed by China. “President Trump says farmers are struggling under the tariff war that he started. “Hey, this is everything that’s wrong in the world of international

NZ Special Agriculture Trade Envoy Mike Petersen pictured with the First Minister of Scotland Nicola Sturgeon.

trade. I call it aid for a self inflicted wound.” The US is beginning to be flooded with farm produce as Chinese retaliatory tariffs begin to bite. For example, the Trump administration is buying milk from farmers and putting it into aid programmes. “President Trump thinks he is going

GET ON ZERO CARBON BUS SPECIAL TRADE envoy Mike Petersen is surprised at the growing worldwide focus on ‘zero carbon’ food. During his recent trip to Europe and China, almost every politician and farmer he met wanted to know what NZ is doing to manage carbon emissions. “The direction of travel is clear. The future will be all about zero carbon. We have to get on the bus on some of these issues.” Petersen says there’s still huge global enthusiasm about NZ proteins. “Our livestock and agriculture sector leads the world in farming systems, our processing sector leads the world in international trade and our stewardship of the environment is still world leading.”

to solve the world’s hunger problems by buying milk off their farmers and dumping it in international markets,” says Petersen. Export of US soy to China has almost ground to a halt, Petersen notes. “Where is that soy going now? It is being dumped on the livestock feed

market to produce more milk. The US is one of the few areas actually growing its supply of milk largely on the back of cheap feed. “All these things have consequences and we need to work really hard in NZ to try to make sure we remain relevant in this world where these geopolitical powers are having massive games around trade.” Petersen urged maintaining close trade ties with China and said the recent visit by Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and a subsequent trade delegation led by Trade Minister David Parker have helped. He also said the dairy sector can create more value without increasing herd sizes. “We have a fixed amount of land and there’s growing environmental pressure. It’s not about more animals but more value and more profit from what we are doing today.” Petersen brushed off concerns about plant based proteins. “I’m not concerned about plant based proteins. Let’s focus on ourselves rather than the opponents -- as the All Blacks do.”

No more trees! FROM PAGE 1

right,” Butterick said. He says polices sometimes don’t deliver the intended outcome and in that case policy makers should “stop and go back to the drawing board”. So it is when pine trees are planted on highly productive farm-

land, he says. “You can’t eat wood. Taking those farms out of production will have a devastating effect economically, socially and environmentally on the local community. Instead of revitalising the provinces, tree planting will destroy them.”

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RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

4 NEWS

It’s a sheila, mate SUDESH KISSUN sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

AUSTRALIA HAS its first woman agriculture minister. Victorian Senator Bridget McKenzie was appointed to the post by Prime Minister Scott Morrison following his surprise re-election last month. McKenzie is the deputy leader of the Nationals, in coalition with Morrison’s Liberal Party. They won 77 seats in last month’s general election, beating the Labour Party which led almost all pre-election opinion polls. McKenzie replaces Queensland Nationals MP David Littleproud who held the job for 16 months.

“The deputy leader of the National Party wanted agriculture and when you’re the deputy leader you get to pick, that is only fair, and I know Bridget will do a good job,” Littleproud told ABC News. Littleproud remains in the Cabinet as Minister for Water Resources, Drought, Rural Finance, Natural Disaster and Emergency Management. McKenzie told Australian media that she plans to identify and removing some of the barriers to productivity growth. And she aims to see the value of Australian agricultural production rise to A$100 billion by 2030, she said. This will be a major part of her role and a focus as she gets her head around the

Bridget McKenzie

portfolio. “Australia’s farm sector has a great opportunity to grow,” McKenzie says. “I’m already aware of some of the key barriers. I was focused on digital connectivity in my previous portfolio.” The National Farmers’ Federation congratulated McKenzie. “Senator McKenzie has been a long time vocal and effective advocate for regional and rural

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Australia,” the NFF’s first female president, Fiona Simson said. “Women remain underrepresented in leadership roles in our industry. The significance of having a female in agriculture’s top job can’t be overstated.” Simson said the NFF had worked closely and successfully with McKenzie in her former roles as Minister for Regional Telecommunications and Rural Health. “Senator McKenzie has an in-depth understanding of the challenges and phenomenal opportunities before our regions and the policies and investments agriculture needs to reach its potential.” @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

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Here’s your surge: MPI data from the five latest updates since the announcement of the surge show a slight increase in confirmed Mycoplasma bovis properties, but a 70% increase in Notices of Direction (red) and a 92% rise in Active Surveillance numbers (yellow). RURAL NEWS GROUP/DATA: MPI

Bovis cull hits 100k partners to discuss the risks and see Gwyn was unavailable for com- if it can work for them to still move ment, but he acknowledged in a state- their cattle.” DairyNZ and Beef + Lamb NZ can ment that surveillance was difficult for talk with farmers about this. farmers. “For only a few of these “Active surveillance farmers under active surmeans that cattle on the veillance will testing indifarm have had a low risk of cate a higher risk that their exposure to M. bovis, and cattle have M. bovis, and we need to test these herds movement restrictions will to determine their disease be necessary.” status,” he said. Gwyn says “the need “These farms are not for the surge” was to conunder any movement tact a large number of restrictions while this testMPI’s Geoff Gwyn farmers who had some ing is carried out, although they should contact the M. bovis pro- risk of exposure before winter grazing gramme if they need to move the cattle movements. He says MPI has now contacted all being tested.” Gwyn claims that “fewer than 5% those farms, but will continue to conof farms” put under active surveil- tact farmers over the winter when lance have been found to have the dis- it becomes aware of new risk moveease, and that percentage is decreasing ments, in particular from newly confirmed properties. over time. “It is positive that fewer farms “Farmers under active surveillance can move and sell cattle, but often feel required movement restrictions and that it wouldn’t be right to do so,” he that fewer dairy farms are involved. That could be a good indication that says. “We suggest these farmers talk with we are progressing towards eradicatheir graziers, stock agents and other tion,” said Gwyn. FROM PAGE 1

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RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

NEWS 5

Farmers ticked off over NAIT ‘fluster cuck’ NIGEL MALTHUS

FARMERS ARE bristling over any suggestion they had been slack about reregistering their farm locations in National Animal Identification and Tracing (NAIT) in time for moving day on June 1. Every person in charge of animals must re-register their NAIT location following a recent upgrade to the system. Yet only one week out from moving day, the Agriculture and Biosecurity Minister Damien O’Connor released figures showing that about half of all dairy farms – 8000 out of 15,000 – had yet to re-register. O’Connor said that was not good enough. “One thing the Mycoplasma bovis response has highlighted is the low levels of compliance with NAIT,” he said. Woodville dairy farmer

“We want honesty in tracing so that we can track and trace every possible infected animal. We need to get... every single animal movement on every single farm... recorded. If we’d had that system before M. bovis we wouldn’t be in the position we are now.”

Ben Allomes, a DairyNZ director, revealed he had missed the need to reregister, but he questioned OSPRI’s low-key messaging about it. Allomes told Rural News that when he realised he had missed it, he looked back through his inbox and found the original notice at the bottom of an otherwise routine email that he hadn’t scrolled through. “There are some

pretty engaged dairy farmers who have missed this -- myself included. Don’t think we are deliberately being difficult,” he said in a Tweet. However, Allomes said he and the minister were “on the same page” over the need to get all farmers over the line. NAIT no longer has its own website and farmers must register via an interactive map on the OPSRI site.

Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor.

Allomes has since reregistered. He says the online process was easy enough but not intuitive. In his case it was complicated by the map-based location logging his farm including an unmade town of 200 separate

FEDS CALL FOR CO-OPERATION MEANWHILE, FEDERATED Farmers says while technical and other issues are not helping with re-registration it is urging all farmers to persevere. “This is too important to backslide on. The Mycoplasma bovis issue has highlighted why we need excellent levels of compliance with NAIT,” said Feds dairy chair Chris Lewis. “All of us – farmers and OSPRI – need to pull together to get NAIT working well,” he told Rural News. “To eradicate M. bovis -- borrowing the words of Ed Hillary -- that’s the way we’ll ‘knock the bastard off’.”

He said OSPRI representatives had attended almost every one of Feds 24 provincial annual meetings to explain current pressures on the system. “We really thank them for that,” Lewis said. “Their 0800 call centre staff are grappling with significant backlogs, and out on the farm it’s not helping that poor broadband is hindering the online processes.” Lewis says a minority group of farmers and lifestyle block holders seem unaware or, even worse, are unconcerned about their obligations. “They need to up their game.”

Feds dairy chair Chris Lewis.

titles which each had to be clicked on individually. Eketahuna farmer Micha Johansen also tweeted a response to O’Connor, saying she reregistered for NAIT after an email from OSPRI. But she then got a second

email which she hoped and assumed was just a reminder for not yet compliant farmers But Johansen told Rural News she has since looked up her details on the website and found nothing there to confirm that her re-registration was successful. Johansen’s tweet referred to the process as a “fluster cuck.” “Don’t blame farmers for a crappy system,” she said. But an unapologetic O’Connor says farmers and industry have been asking MPI to increase compliance so as to hold to account the people not complying. “Last year I introduced a package of technical law changes to support the M.bovis

eradication programme. As a result of that MPI increased the number of compliance staff,” he told Rural News. “So far this year, they have conducted 455 on farm inspections. Well over half were [badly] non-compliant and now face enforcement action.” O’Connor says compliance staff have served 82 notices of direction and 169 infringement notices to non-compliant farms. With moving day just complete, the minister reminded farmers that animal movements are the main way the disease spreads. “We want honesty in tracing so that we can track and trace every possible infected animal. We need to get... every single animal movement on every single farm... recorded. If we’d had that system before M. bovis we wouldn’t be in the position we are now.” O’Connor says farmers needed to “step up” and take responsibility. “This is not just a job for MPI. Every farmer in New Zealand has to play their part. We’ve ramped up our compliance activities and those who don’t comply will face the music.” O’Connor claims that MPI is on track to eradicate M. bovis and needs the support of farmers. “So get on to NAIT and complete your re-registration.”

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RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

6 NEWS

The Kings of Ahuwhenua PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

EUGENE AND Pania King from Kiriroa Station at Matawai, northwest of Gisborne, are this year’s winners of the Ahuwhenua Trophy for the top Māori sheep and beef farm. Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor announced their win and presented the trophy late last month at an awards function in Gisborne. At least 600 people attended. The other finalists were Whangara Farms located 35km north of Gisborne, and Te Awahohonu Forest Trust – Gwavas Station at Tikokino, 50km west of Hastings. Eugene and Pania King are the second couple in the King whānau to

“We like to benchmark ourselves and set and achieve goals and think we are performing very well. It’s not just our business, it’s our life.” win the trophy. Eugene’s sister Nukuhia and her husband Bart Hadfield won the competition in 2015, and brother Ron and his wife Justine were finalists in 2017. The hall erupted with cheers and applause at the news and the couple and their whanau walked to the stage to receive the large trophy. A haka was performed on stage. Emotions were high and tears flowed and the pair were unusually lost for words. Eugene King says they were rapt to win the award and buzzing with

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excitement. It all seemed surreal and they needed a few days for it to sink in. Pania King says they felt humble to be winners of the award, an acknowledgement of the work they and their whanau had done for 18 years, in particular the last six years since they bought Kiriroa Station. “We are proud tonight of what we have achieved, and proud of our wider whanau,” she told Rural News. “We like to benchmark ourselves and set and achieve goals and think we are performing very well. It’s not just our

Eugene and Pania King.

business, it’s our life.” Amidst the excitement a pragmatic Eugene pointed out that on Sunday they would be scanning lambs and getting right back to work on the farm. Sharing in the glory and excitement were the couple’s four sons who did a haka and put their

hands on the trophy. “They were really excited. I looked at their faces when they called out our names and our farm and it was just like when I take the chocolate cake out of the oven,” says Pania. Earlier in the evening, when the pair were presented with their final-

ist medals, Eugene King paid tribute to the men who inaugurated the Ahuwhenua Trophy – Lord Bledisloe and Sir Apirana Ngata. He says their foresight to encourage skill and proficiency in Maori farming is evident today in the wider agri sector. He had words of encouragement for the

finalists in the Young Maori Farmer competition, saying they are the future of the industry. But his final tribute was to his wife Pania. “You are a wonderful wife – the driving force of a lot of the things we do within our whanau, our business and community. Your passion, commitment and loyalty, your aroha and your hardnosed approach to things keep me on the straight and narrow. Pania, I love you to the moon and back.” Pania was quick to respond, praising her “lovely, supportive hardworking sometimes mismothered husband”. “Entering Ahuwhenua has been a positive and humbling experience. At times challenging, but it has made us an even stronger team,” she said.


RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

NEWS 7

Budget leaks IT SEEMS the agriculture sector wasn’t a winner in this year’s Budget, delivered by Finance Minister Grant Robertson last Thursday afternoon. Rural News went to press before the Budget was publicly released. However, according to papers and figures leaked to and released by the National Party prior to the event, there was only an incremental increase in funding allocated to agriculture and a boost to biosecurity, mainly to cover the Mycoplasma bovis eradication costs. The biggest change – and parcel of funding – appears to be the allocation to the newly established forestry related appropriation, now a standalone entity and outside the former primary industries vote. According to National’s figures, an extra $139 million was allocated for forestry in the Budget, making a total of $277m in the 2018-18 financial year. National’s leaked Budget figures also revealed that the Minister of Agriculture has been allocated $126m for the 2018-19 financial year and $106m for 2019-20. This funding will be used for: ●● administration of government approved schemes, grants and

assistance to the sector – including the Primary Growth Partnership ●● Education and enforcement intended to improve animal welfare in New Zealand ●● Climate change research ●● Sector recovery assistance and support following adverse natural events. There is also an appropriation of $121m for 2018-19 and an increase of $37m (to $158 million) for the 201920 financial year for “policy advice, the implementation of it and ministerial servicing for the Minister of Agriculture, the Minister for Biosecurity, the Minister of Fisheries and the Minister for Food Safety and for facilitating international trade in, and market access for, primary products”. Biosecurity is to get a $100m boost for the 2019-29 financial year to $365m. According to the papers leaked by National this extra funding is for “expenses incurred as a result of compensation and ex gratia payments arising from biosecurity events”. This will be to help cover the government’s costs and expenses in the M. bovis eradication programme.

BOVIS BEEF LEVY GARNERS INTEREST NIGEL MALTHUS

WITH SUBMISSIONS due to close this week, Beef + Lamb NZ says it is pleased with the number of responses from farmers on its proposed biosecurity levy increase. As part of the Mycoplasma bovis response, beef producers are being asked to approve an increase in the maximum biosecurity levy for cattle from $0.45/head to $2/head at slaughter. “The M. bovis response has been a difficult time for farmers whose farms are impacted by the response,” says BLNZ chairman Andrew Morrison. “Technical challenges with tracing and diagnosing the disease, and issues with the processes involved in the response, have highlighted the importance of the beef sector being part of the Government Industry Agreement (GIA) on biosecurity so that we ensure the voices of our farmers are being properly taken into account during the response.” Morrison says the consultation also contains a proposal to raise the maximum amount payable under

Beef + Lamb NZ chair Andrew Morrison.

GIA to $5 million per year, which would enable BLNZ to pay the costs of the M. bovis response as they are incurred. “Under the previous maximum biosecurity levy of $0.45/head for cattle, it would have taken nearly 25 years to repay the industry’s share of the M. bovis response – estimated at up to $17 million over 10 years,” he explains. The consultation also seeks to set different levy rates for different classes of cattle. For example, dairy cull cattle will not be levied for the M. bovis response, but could face a

beef biosecurity levy in the future for other potential incursions affecting the beef trade, such as BSE. Farmers should by now have consultation documents by mail, and have until June 7 to provide feedback, either by returning the documents or by completing the form online at www.beeflambnz.com/mbovis2019. Morrison says the BLNZ board is expected to announce its decision in July, with the new levy taking effect later in the year. He says the specific timing is yet to be determined but will be done in consultation with MPI and the meat processing companies.

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RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

8 NEWS

Opening milk price welcomed SUDESH KISSUN sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

FONTERRA’S WIDE forecast payout for this new season will make farmers happy, says Federated Farmers Waikato president Andrew McGiven He believes farmers feeling the volatility of

the last few seasons will be pleased at the co-op’s $6.25 to $7.25/kgMS forecast range. “I think most farmers will be feeling happier with the forecast range for next year as some of us are feeling a bit battered after some of the volatility of previ-

ous years,” he told Rural News. “Hopefully this will provide an opportunity for farmers to catch up on repairs and maintenance and pay off some debt.” Fonterra’s $1-wide range was announced during its third quarter

MINNOWS PAY MORE CANTERBURY PROCESSOR Synlait announced an opening forecast base milk price of $7/kgMS for the new season. However, the company acknowledges that this forecast relies on pricing remaining robust all season. “We think that’s realistic in the light of the current slowdown in world supply and strong demand from our key markets,” says chief executive Leon Clement. “But as always, these forecasts are based on the best information available to us and we are recommending that our farmers remain cautious in the face of geopolitical and economic uncertainties.

We will continue to assess movements to ensure our dairy farmers are kept up to date.” Synlait also said its forecast base milk price for the 2018-19 season has increased from $6.25/kgMS to $6.40/kgMS.   Meanwhile, Morrinsville company Tatua – with just 107 suppliers and often the leader in its milk prices to farmers -paid $8/kgMS for the recently ended (May 31) season. Tatua is now forecasting a payout of $7.50 for the new season, not including retentions, which last year amounted to 62 cents/kgMS.

result presentation. Chief executive Miles Hurrell says while the global supply/demand balance is in very good shape there are potential downsides. The trade war brewing between the US and China is something to watch out for, he said. “Ultimately we will have no winners over the long-term,” Hurrell warned. Fonterra will also be watching milk production during the spring flush in Europe: milk quantities out of EU countries this peak season and how fast the milk comes onto the global market. Hurrell says the co-op must take into account these factors in forecasting a milk price for its farmers. “It’s not easy but we are required to do this. The range we’ve presented is the best estimate at the time.” The forecast price will be “narrowed down” as the season goes on. ASB senior rural economist Nathan Penny says the opening forecast range is relatively healthy. He notes that given the

midpoints, the forecast if realised would represent a 40 cent/kgMS gain on 2018-19. However, Penny remains more bullish than Fonterra about the 2019-20 season. “Fonterra expects very modest milk collections growth of 0.6% which would also underpin the new season’s milk price forecast,” he says. “While we agree with the sentiment, we are more bullish on the outlook for global dairy prices than Fonterra.

“The current ‘spot milk price’ is a shade under $8.00/kgMS. Global production growth is soft and unlikely to match growth in global demand over the remainder of 2019.” With the NZ dollar falling below US75c, Penny says the bank has pencilled in a $7/kgMS milk price forecast for 2019-20. “And we see upside potential to that number. Indeed, if we were to use a similar $1/kgMS forecast range ours would be roughly $6.70 to $7.70/

kgMS.” Fonterra chairman John Monaghan says the opening forecast is realistic. “We are have to look out more than a year into the future which is difficult. But the information available is continuing to show us that demand remains strong across key trading partners and this is reflected in GDT prices. “We are giving farmers a wide range for the opening forecast milk price. It will be narrowed as the season goes on.”

Investor targets hort PAM TIPA

Supplier Roadshow 2019 Silver Fern Farms Co-operative shareholders and farmer suppliers are invited to attend our upcoming Plate to Pasture Supplier Roadshow. Meet Chief Executive Simon Limmer and members of our team to hear an update on company strategy, performance and the season to date. Rob Hewett, Chair of Silver Fern Farms Ltd and Richard Young, Chair of Silver Fern Farms Co-op will also be available to discuss progress on key business initiatives. We’ll be in your region at the following locations: Tue. 4 June

Masterton

12.00pm – 2.30pm

Masterton Club

Wed. 5 June

Gisborne

10.30am – 12.00pm

Poverty Bay Golf Club

Rotorua

6.00pm – 9.00pm

The Terrace Kitchen

Tue. 11 June

Marton

6.30pm – 9.00pm

Moo Baa Café & Bar

Thu. 13 June

Winton

12.30pm – 2.30pm

Winton Golf Club

Fri. 14 June

Balclutha

10.30am – 12.00pm

Cross Recreation Centre

Mon. 24 June Greta Valley

12.00pm – 2.30pm

Greta Valley Hotel

Tue. 9 July

6.00pm – 9.00pm

Pleasant Point Golf Club

Pleasant Point

Wed. 10 July

Oamaru

10.30am – 12.00pm

Valley Rugby Club

Thu. 11 July

Seddon

10.30am – 12.00pm

Seddon Rugby Club

Wed. 17 July

Pio Pio

1.00pm – 3.00pm

The Night Owl

We look forward to seeing you there. Please contact your local livestock representative to advise attendance.

SFF292 RN (4JUNE)

pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

AN INVESTMENT fund launched by MyFarm is aimed at helping ‘serious’ investors tap into the burgeoning horticulture sector.   Kakariki Fund Ltd, which is seeking $100 million, will invest in orchards, vineyards, plantations and farms that will be co-managed by horticulture processors and exporters. The latter will include apple growers Rockit Global and Freshmax, Sacred Hill wines, craft beer hop grower Hop Revolution, Manuka honey producer Comvita and kiwifruit grower and packer DMS Progrowers.  Kakariki is being promoted by MyFarm Investments, which has raised $165m for investment in 18 individual orchard, vineyard, hop garden and manuka plantation businesses since 2015.  MyFarm chief executive Andrew Watters says the fund offers investors access to all horticulture sectors with a single $100,000 investment.  “There is really no other single

investment that gives New Zealanders access to a diverse range of permanent crop businesses, or exposure to the intellectual property our partners have invested in their plant varieties and brand stories.” The fund is targeting annual returns of 10% from earnings from the sale of crops through the partners and any increases in land values. MyFarm says investors will benefit from exposure to all ventures in the portfolio, reducing the risks that come with investing in a business in a single geographic location and focused on a single crop.       Watters says forecast returns in each sector are strong, reflecting the success of NZ horticulture in providing consumers in high value export markets with a premium, high quality, great tasting product. Rockit Global chief executive Austin Mortimer says: “We are delighted MyFarm is bringing this investment opportunity to NZ.  “The demand for Rockit apples is outstripping supply. MyFarm has a long history of agriculture and

horticulture management as well as a solid understanding of our customers’ quality requirements. “MyFarm is therefore an ideal partner to help us grow the NZ supply of Rockit Apples. We are looking forward to working with the Kakariki Fund, Andrew and the team.”     Rockit apples are currently grown in six European countries and in the US.  To keep up with demand Rockit plans to expand its Hawkes Bay orchard plantings from 200ha today to 600ha by 2025.  Kakariki’s offer is initially for: ●● An 11 canopy ha SunGold kiwifruit orchard in Bay of Plenty ●● A 50% share in a large scale 130 canopy ha hop garden ●● 35 canopy ha of Rockit apples ●● A 2000ha manuka plantation development. Kakariki will be run by independent directors who will make all investment and divestment decisions, headed by Julian Raine who is a  Nelson orchardist, exporter and chair of Boysenberries NZ and NZ Dairy Desserts Ltd, and previous chair of Horticulture NZ.


RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

NEWS 9

NZ producers cheesed off with EU PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

TRADE EXPERT Stephen Jacobi says he thinks New Zealand cheesemakers are rightly concerned about a European Union plan to protect the names of common cheeses. It is a concern in the context of the EU-NZ free trade agreement negotiations, he says. “The Europeans say they are not looking to penalise in any way the generic names,” Jacobi told Rural News. “They are saying they are only interested in the ones that have geographical connections.” This means not ‘parmesan’ but ‘Parmigiano’, and not ‘gouda’ but ‘gouda hollanda’. But, Jacobi claims although the Europeans say that they have listed a number of names that aren’t geographical, for example ‘feta’. But there is no place called ‘feta’. “The EU says the list is a starting point but the concern is that we don’t know the rules that will apply to these generic names,” he says. “That is a bit of a problem, but this is a negotiation that has to be worked through.” Jacobi, executive director of the NZ International Business Forum and a former diplomat and trade advisor, also understands that the EU has not made a substantive offer on agriculture market access. “Until that has happened I don’t think they

can expect NZ to start reciprocating on the names of certain cheeses. But this is a negotiation so it is still very much in play. “The dairy companies and the cheesemakers make a valid point and hopefully we can work this negotiation out so that some of the risks are reduced and some of the opportunities are magnified.” Jacobi points out that he is commenting on the latest information he has, but there was a negotiating round recently and he does not know what happened in that. “My understanding is that in prior rounds they had not begun to negotiate seriously on market access for agriculture products. “I don’t think they can be surprised that NZ is not willing to engage in other agriculture issues [at this stage].” He says they have submitted a list but we don’t know exactly what the rules are. “The Europeans will tell you they have negotiated other FTAs and we can see from those the sorts of things they want in this one. But I think obviously our industry is saying it needs a lot more clarity. “The use of generic names is important both within NZ and to NZ cheese products exported globally. “So it is important but it is a negotiation that will have to work its way through. But the dairy

PATCH PROTECTION NEW ZEALAND cheesemakers fear that European proposals to protect names of many common foodstuffs may stifle local investment and innovation in cheesemaking and limit choices for NZ consumers. Their warning is prompted by the recent fourth round of negotiations towards an EU-NZ free trade agreement held in Wellington last month. The NZ Specialist Cheesemakers Association (NZSCA) and the Dairy Companies Association of NZ (DCANZ) are concerned that the extensive ‘geographical indications’ (GIs) framework proposed by the EU could limit future use of common cheese names by NZ cheesemakers.  There is a lot at stake for the NZ dairy industry with $2 billion of cheese exports each year.

companies and cheesemakers are saying this is a key issue for them. It needs to be thought about in the context of the negotiation.”

This shows this negotiation is not as straightforward as some people might think, says Jacobi. “There has been a lot of talk about finishing

HALF

this negotiation by the end of the year. It would be great if we could but there are still some very complicated issues to work out.”

Trade expert Stephen Jacobi.

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RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

10 NEWS – DEER INDUSTRY CONFERENCE

Sector wants better connections PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

WHILE PRODUCTIVITY on farm in the deer industry has improved, a question mark still hangs over the sector’s ability to get up to speed on sustainability and to connect better with policymakers. So said the Deer Industry New Zealand (DINZ) chief executive Dan Coup to Rural News at the organisation’s recent annual conference. He says the industry has lots of positives: exports worth $350 million come from a base of one million animals. The productivity lift on farm in the last few years shows the hard work by farmers moving things forwards. Coup attributes this to the ‘passion and profit’ programmes run by the industry. “But we need to get our heads around sustainability and earning the respect of the policy setters and the voting public

who elect them,” Coup adds. Communication with the industry’s main stakeholders is essential, he said. “We can’t just tell people stuff. We need to meet with them and talk to them - have a conversation. “The most successful work we have done in sustainability is where we have had one-on-one engagement with people.” Otherwise the industry risks drifting into obscurity. But Coup says the good news is that other farmers surveyed see the deer industry in a positive light. He wants to raise the profile of the deer industry in the news media and focus on consumers of deer products. “We have to form one-on-one relationships with the people who count in the value chain. We would like our customers to have a feeling about how their food is being produced in NZ and about the people producing it.”

Deer Industry NZ chair Ian Walker.

NZ venison rated top quality FIRST LIGHT Foods, a major exporter of venison, applauds deer farmers’ product quality, says Toni Foss, who runs the company’s venison operation. First Light exports 99% of its product. The UK and US are the main markets. “The UK is a key market. We broke away from the traditional German market although this is still extremely important to us,” Foss told Rural News. “Our focus is retail and that’s where the UK

Firstlight Foods Toni Foss and Gerard Hickey.

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fits. Equally the US is growing in importance for us.” But while things are going well on farm, there are challenges in the processing plants. Foss says obtaining and retaining skilled staff to run its plants efficiently is not easy. And because consumers want product 52 weeks of the year it’s important that farmers and processors can meet this demand. First Light Foods also markets wagyu beef which, says managing

director Gerard Hickey, complements venison in the market. Both are premium products. “It is incredibly important to have the two products working side by side in markets,” he says. “In the US, the beef is the lead act and venison follows. But in the Middle East, venison is definitely the lead act and the beef follows. “It’s good to have the two complementing each other.” Some farmers provide premium products to them all year round, others provide ‘mainstream’ products -- a ‘release valve’ in their farm system which enables them to quit stock when weather gets bad.

ALL THINGS IN BALANCE DINZ CHAIR Ian Walker says a critical goal for the industry must be deer farmers’ financial sustainability. He says the sector generally supports the intent of the Zero Carbon Bill introduced into parliament recently. But science must support the goal -- “facts not emotions” -- and he’d like to see the factual stuff supporting the mitigating factors. Walker says he’s not aware of any specific science project on what deer are emitting. Because scientists know the size of the deer rumen they can calculate what they think should happen. “I think the whole greenhouse gas thing is travelling faster than what the science is producing, particularly in the mitigating factors that would be important for producers,” he told Rural News. “The technology is not there and they’re struggling to match up with public perception. There are lots of bits and pieces of science. “But producers need to see what they are doing and see the ways they can offset some of the emissions, then they will act on that. Blanket recommendations make it really difficult.” Walker disagrees with claims by the Prime Minister and Climate Change Minister that the Zero Carbon Bill will provide certainty to deer farmers. The problem is the mechanics of the bill, not the intent.

BANKING ON DEER DEER IS a solid industry, says Rabobank’s head of business development, Hamish Midgely. He told Rural News that the industry is now highly profitable with venison prices still about $9/kg – more per kilo than any of the other primary industries. And it has great by-products – including velvet. “But it comes with infrastructural costs when setting it up such as fences and yards and you have to weigh that up with alternatives.” Midgely says some Southland deer farms that were converted to dairy could possibly revert back to deer. “We could see reversion of marginal areas back into deer, and the industry operating in that rolling hill country rather than on the intensive dairy land.” Deer has the advantage of putting less pressure on the environment, Midgley says. And while there are problems with wallowing and fence running, these can be fixed.


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RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

12 NEWS

Fonterra’s asset sales backed SUDESH KISSUN sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

FARMERS ARE backing Fonterra’s review of assets and overseas joint ventures as it grapples with strengthening its balance sheet. Federated Farmers Waikato president Andrew McGiven says any good board should be “consistently reviewing strategy as the world is changing and evolving”. Assets under review this month are the two wholly owned farms hubs in China and its Dairy Partners Americas (DPA) Brazil joint venture. And the co-op is closing its Dennington plant in Victoria, shedding 98 jobs in the process. Fonterra has already signed to sell its ice cream subsidiary Tip Top for $380 million,

ON THE BLOCK FONTERRA IS reviewing a range of assets and has already earmarked some for sale: ●● Tip Top Ice Cream sold for $380m to global company Froneri ●● Sale process started for co-op’s 50% share of DFE Pharma, a JV set up in 2006 between Fonterra and FrieslandCampina ●● Venezuelan consumer joint venture Corporacion Inlaca sold to Mirona, an international food business, for $16m ●● Fonterra provisionally agreed to unwind its Darnum JV with Chinese company Beingmate. Now considering its options for its share in Beingmate ●● Two China Farm hubs and Dairy Partners Americas (DPA) JV in Brazil under review.

offloaded its interest in its Venezuelan consumer joint venture Corporacion Inlaca for $16 million and agreed provisionally to unwind its Darnum joint venture with Chinese company Beingmate. McGiven told Rural News that the Fonterra

board and management reviewing any previous strategy is a good thing “regardless of whether it is the China farms, Brazilian JV or how it deals with its domestic suppliers with new competition at the farmgate”. “Any good board should be constantly

reviewing strategy, as the world is constantly changing and evolving. It doesn’t mean anything will change or be sold, but at least we shareholders are aware that a recent review has been done and that the board can decide if these assets and/or strategy are fit for purpose.” In the third quarter results for 2018-19, Fonterra chief executive Miles Hurrell said despite the review of the problematic China farms the Chinese market remains important. “We have contributed to China’s dairy industry by developing high quality model farms and showing there is a valuable opportunity for fresh milk in China’s consumer market. This continues to be an attractive prospect. “However, this does

Fonterra chief executive Miles Hurrell.

not necessarily mean we need to continue to have large amounts of capital tied up in farming hubs.” The two hubs milk 31,000 cows. Fonterra has spent about $1 billion setting up the farms but very little profit has

flowed back to farmer shareholders. Should Fonterra decide to sell the China Farms it would still have a milk hub it jointly owns with listed company Abbot Laboratories. Hurrell says this will allow

Fonterra to participate in the lucrative fresh milk market in China. On Fonterra’s DPA business in Brazil, Hurrell says the co-op will decide by the end of this year. The joint venture distributes chilled dairy products across Brazil. The Dennington, Victoria plant is at least 100 years old and considered unviable. Fonterra has been in talks with staff there. “The Australian ingredients business continues to feel the impact of the drought and other significant changes that mean there is excess manufacturing capacity in the Australian dairy industry,” says Hurrell. The asset sales will help the co-op achieve its goal of reducing debt by $800m by the end of this financial year.


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RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

NEWS 15

Synlait still confident on plant NIGEL MALTHUS

SYNLAIT CHIEF executive Leon Clement still hopes to open the company’s new Pokeno milk powder plant on time. This is despite a Court of Appeal ruling reinstating restrictive covenants on the land it’s built on. The covenants effectively restrict the factory site to farming or forestry. They were lifted by the High Court in December but reinstated by the Court of Appeal last month. Clement says Synlait is still working towards Option A - opening the $250 million plant on time in October. It is already largely complete. “We are speaking to all parties involved and hopeful that we can get to a solution here,” he told Rural News. “The overturning of the ruling was a surprise to us and to others.” The Canterbury company announced in February 2018 that it had conditionally bought the 28ha site for its second nutritional powder plant. The land was subject to covenants limiting its use to grazing, lifestyle farming or forestry. However, Synlait

Synlait chief executive Leon Clement.

was confident these were no longer relevant because the land had been rezoned industrial and other industrial plants had been built in the area, including another dairy powder plant. The High Court agreed, removing the covenants in November 2018. The title was transferred to Synlait only after that ruling although work was already underway. However, the Court of Appeal has now effectively reinstated the cove-

nants in a ruling delivered on May 9 in favour of the beneficiary of the covenants, the adjacent land owner New Zealand Industrial Park Ltd. Asked why Synlait had started building the plant when an appeal was still possible, Clement says Synlait had always acted in line with legal advice “and that was supported by the High Court finding which was pretty unequivocal”. “So we were surprised the Court

of Appeal overturned it,” he says. “We were also acting in line with the industrial zoning for the area, which is consistent with neighbouring land and the other area around it including an infant nutrition factory.” Clements says the company’s confidence was supported by the High Court ruling and that’s why it continued to build. In the latest development, Synlait has now acknowledged receiving

a “cease and desist” letter from NZIP but is treating the letter as a request and has continued the build. Clement says the NZ Stock Exchange was advised of the letter because it was important to keep the market up to date. “But it doesn’t mean we have to comply with it. It’s not an order from the court,” he explains. “We are considering our options, but it’s important to note that we’re committed to Pokeno and to our investors, shareholders and farm suppliers. “We’re in discussion with all parties and still hopeful that we can get to a reasonable solution.” In anticipation of the opening, Synlait has signed up local farmers to start supplying milk from June 1, and collection is not expected to be affected by the legal hurdles. Arrangements were already in place to handle that milk before the scheduled opening in spring. “We’re committed to Pokeno and to the supply relationships we have built there. We will be acting accordingly to make sure we can commit to those.”

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RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

16 NEWS

No luck for Irish contractors IRELAND, OFTEN a source of skilled farm machinery operators for rural contractors in New Zealand, is facing even worse driver shortages than NZ. FCI Ireland, representing farm and forestry contractors, has told the Irish

Government some of its members will have to shut shop unless immigration rules change to allow NZ, Australian and South African operators to work there. Meanwhile, FCI chief executive Michael Moroney has asked Rural Contractors NZ for

help to find skilled Kiwi tractor and machinery drivers to work in Ireland’s grass silage harvest from May to July. “We are now facing a major shortage of seasonal machinery drivers. We know that many young Irish men go to NZ in our winter

RCNZ associate Roger Parton that it would make sense longer term for the two contracting bodies to join forces in a seasonal exchange of drivers. “This could provide these men with an interesting life and yearround work for their

months, September to March, to work with NZ contractors,” he writes. “Please let us know if there are young men available with these tractor skills that have worked with machines similar to the ones we use in Ireland.” Moroney has told his

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special skills, which are much appreciated by contractors here in Ireland.” In March, FCI’s national chairman Richard White sought a meeting with Ireland’s Minister for Business, Enterprise and Innovation, Heather Humphreys, to change Irish law which excludes NZ, Australian and South African farm machinery operators from taking up work.

essential value to Irish farming and the Irish food industry.’’ The FCI has sought information from RCNZ on its AIP scheme and how it worked. It wants to get a similar scheme in place in Ireland with the ultimate goal of getting some form of national registration. RCNZ chief executive Roger Parton says while NZ’s situation is not as dire as Ireland’s, a major part of his job is bringing

“We are happy to work with our Irish counterparts to help provide year-round work – a win-win for both countries, especially if the governments align.” He said farm contractors in Ireland turn over about 700 million Euros (about NZ $1.2 billion), employ close to 10,000 people and operate about one third of the national fleet of 20,000 tractors. “The farm contractor sector is finding it increasingly difficult to attract young entrant farm machinery operators,” White said. “We believe that without a temporary seasonal employment permit scheme in place, some farm contractors will be forced to cease operations entirely, due to skilled farm machinery operator [shortage], putting a threat to the prime mechanisation source that adds valuable and

together the annual agreement in principle (AIP) with Immigration NZ and Work and Income NZ, which allows mostly Irish and UK machinery operators to work here in our summer season. “Every week we get asked by contractors if we can help them find experienced operators,” Parton says. “We hope the Government’s proposed move to employerled immigration arrangements in rural areas will assist, but that remains to be seen. We are happy to work with our Irish counterparts to help provide year-round work – a win-win for both countries, especially if the governments align.”


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RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

18 AGRIBUSINESS

Farming the Chathams: the Like a small scale model of the challenges New Zealand agriculture faces being so far from its main markets, farmers on the Chatham Islands are far enough from the mainland to make shipping inputs in and livestock out a marginal exercise. Adam Fricker reports. AN AUSTRALIAN coined the phrase ‘the tyranny of distance’ but it certainly applies here. Rural News took the 2.5 hour flight on Air Chathams’ Convair 580, a graceful 1960s turbo prop. We came courtesy of Holden who were celebrating their 65th anniversary with an SUV adventure on Chatham Island, the main island in the scattered group of 25 islands. It’s not a cheap flight, so most of the non-human freight, including livestock, goes by ship.

To ship livestock the 860km due west to the South Island, the Chatham Islands Shipping Company charges $22.90 per lamb or ewe, $53.81 per ram and 52c/kg for live cattle. On top of that, farmers sometimes get underdone stock finished on the mainland before it goes to the works, cutting more out of the already slender margin. Locals say things like “you farm for the lifestyle, not the money” and while that’s probably true, no-one farms to go broke. So targeting better

lamb prices, say, on the shoulders of the season, is not just smart – it’s necessary. Your options are limited farming low-lying islands way out in the Roaring Forties, blasted by salt-laden winds that rust out your gear and stunt tree growth. It’s a long, long way to the nearest Farmlands or Wrighties store. A travel story in a 2016 copy of the Manawatu Standard recounts a yarn by an old Chathams local about how his dad once sent him “down to the

Low fertility soils and the tyranny of distance limit farming’s potential on the Chatham Islands.

boat” for more fencing staples. He came back two years later with a box of staples. Poetic licence or not, you get the point: it’s isolated.

The land is not very fertile and shipping fertiliser in to boost production is unlikely to pay off. They no longer have an abattoir on the island.

The last meatworks closed in 1994 so live export is the only option. Agriculture is listed as the biggest employer on the islands but this

includes fishing and forestry. Statistics NZ figures show that in 2016 farming (including forestry) earned $4.77m for the island, while fishing

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RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

AGRIBUSINESS 19

tyranny of distance Island hospitality at the Chatham Hotel and again at the splendid Admiral Lodge, both owned by members of the Croon family. Many of the crayfish hauled up during the season will be live exported straight into Asian restaurants. The blue cod is filleted and frozen then sent to the mainland, or gutted, chilled and sent direct to export markets in Australia. The island has its own seafood processing facilities. Owners of fishing quota risk their lives to earn a quid, but have seen some good times over the years, perhaps contributing to the interesting statistic of highest Harley Davidson ownership per capita in New Zealand. (That’s still only

The sea is the big obstacle for farming and the big opportunity for fishing – the main earner on the Chathams.

about 26 motorbikes, and where you’d ride them is questionable). Farms number 48, of which 20 are described in the book Chatham Islands, First to See the Sun as “relatively intensively farmed”. Eight are extensive grazing prop-

erties and the rest are small holdings. While the book says 45,000ha is farmed, only 20,000ha is described as “improved pasture”. Soil fertility is a limiting factor: only 18% of the soils are classed as having moderate fertility

and only 0.3% high fertility. Like the mainland, sheep numbers have declined in recent years on the Chathams, falling from 103,600 in 1994 to 59,600 in 2016. Cattle numbers have been relatively constant at about

10,000 head (not counting the wild cattle). Some have said farming output here has not reached its potential, and the farms being actively farmed do stand in stark contrast to the ‘less intensively farmed’ properties where dense

gorse and feral emu flourish. The idea of a more intensively farmed Eden once again crashes into the tyranny of distance. The shipping rate for a bulk commodity (stored indoors) is $241 per ton. That blows the cost of a ton of superphosphate out from about $320 on the mainland to $561 landed on the Chathams. Everything costs more here: electricity is twice the mainland average cost per kWh. Many generate their own power with diesel generators. Petrol and diesel prices are respectively 1.6 times and 1.25 times the NZ average. And a box of fencing staples takes two years to arrive. It is likely a low intensity farming model will persist, which seems to suit the rhythm of the islands just fine. 13150

earned $18.56m. The sea is the big obstacle for farming and the big opportunity for fishing, easily the main economic activity on the island. It accounts for 40% of the jobs on the islands, farming 14%, transportation 9% and tourism 8%. Incidentally, the second biggest job creator is government and public services at 20%, but don’t be misled by that figure – the Chathams have fewer unemployed and more self-employed than the mainland average. You make your own way. This place is famous for blue cod, paua and crayfish. As luck would have it, we arrived on the very day the crayfish season opened and enjoyed all these delights of the sea, served with a big helping of Chatham

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RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

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What’s the beef on beef trade? Australia DRY CONDITIONS continue to force additional cattle slaughter. In the first three months of 2019, total cattle slaughter is up 14% on 2018 and female cattle slaughter is up 33% on 2018 volumes. The proportion of females in the total cattle slaughter reached 58% in March, the highest figure in over 20 years. Male

slaughter for the first three months of 2019 is down 3% on 2018. Such a situation, with lower male slaughter, reveals the point at which higher female slaughter started to impact production. With ongoing high female slaughter numbers, further contraction of male slaughter is likely. Industry projections released in April estimate the total cattle inventory

Eastern Young Cattle Indicator, 2017-2019

to be at 25.2m head, the lowest value in over 20 years. Despite higher slaughter numbers, prices have been supported by strong export markets. Illustrating the tight supply of cattle in the market, the Eastern Young Cattle Indicator has been trading between AU$ 4/kg cwt and AUD 5/kg cwt for most of the year (see graph). Given that it is a price indicator for young weaner cattle, any rain that allows producers to hold stock longer, tightens cattle supply further, and causes prices to lift, as seen in late March. Rabobank expects prices could ease a little towards AU$ 4/kg cwt but remain volatile over the coming six months, with the volatility driven mainly by rainfall.

Brazil Total Brazilian beef exports continue to increase in 2019. During the first four months of the year, exports increased by around 12% by volume against the same period of the last year. While shipments to the EU, the UAE, Iran and Russia presented significant growth rates YTD, China and Hong Kong continued to be the main buyers of Brazilian beef. Reflecting slower beef supply growth – we project an increase of 2% in 2019, compared to around 4% in 2018 – and the improved demand, live cattle prices in April 2019 were on average around 10% above April 2018 levels. Brazilian meat exports are expected to be

FRIDAY NIGHT AGRIBUSINESS ON

additionally supported by the global supply gap that has been caused by the challenging situation with African Swine Flu (ASF). This is expected to support positive results for both the Brazilian beef industry and also local beef cattle producers, particularly due to the likely increasing competition among packers for fed cattle.

China CHINESE RETAIL beef prices have remained strong for the first five months of 2019. Although the prices dropped a little from the record high seen in February, they remain above RMB 68/kg, the highest price for this season historically (see graph). Rabobank believes beef prices will remain

Chinese retail meat prices, Jan 2016-Apr 2019

strong, supported by higher pig prices and increased beef consumption. Pork prices will increase substantially in 2H 2019 as a result of reduced pork supply following pig culling due to ASF. Furthermore a shift in consumption away from pork by some consumers, as a result of concerns around ASF, will see a rise in demand for beef. We expect these conditions to prevail through 2019

and into 2020, continuing to support strong beef prices. China’s beef production has yet to see any obvious expansion. The long production cycle and strong competition from imported beef are limiting domestic growth.

Europe RABOBANK EXPECTS 2019 beef production to decline slightly, in the range of 1.0% to 1.5% YOY, given higher

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MARKETS & TRENDS 23

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Europe beef prices, Jan 2017-Apr 2018

slaughter numbers in 2H 2018 in response to tightening margins. Beef production in Europe has essentially been flat in the first months of 2019 (Jan-Feb up 0.1% YOY), which we see as a carry-over impact of the reduced feed availability situation in 2H 2018. Drought-affected member states decreased their bovine herds markedly in 2018. This is especially the case in the Netherlands (-8.4% YOY), Germany (-2.7% YOY) and France (-2.2%), with these countries expected to feel the effects throughout 2019.

Consumption for 2019 is likely to follow the production trend down slightly, in the range of 1% to 2% YOY, on reduced availability. Prices are expected to be relatively stable, although could see some upwards pressure in response to rising pork prices (see graph). Rabobank does not anticipate material changes to beef trade in 2019, with both exports and imports expected to increase slightly (between 2% to 4% YOY).

suffered through one of the most difficult winters in recent history. And, so far, the cool wet spring with excessive rainfall over the majority of the country has been equally difficult. The late arrival of warm weather has only made things more complicated. Muddy conditions persist in feed yards, corn planting has been severely delayed and domestic demand remains soft as the cool wet weather has delayed the start of the grilling season. The uncertainty of trade wars, tariffs and countervailing duties, and the potential for

global protein demand changes in response to ASF in China, Southeast Asia, and Eastern Europe, are all adding to market volatility. Despite weather setbacks to cattle performance, carcass weights have not declined as much as expected. The extreme weakness in basis levels encouraged cattle feeders to delay fed cattle sales compared to the pace of fed cattle sales in recent strong basis years. The seasonal peak in fed cattle prices was in line with our expectations of USD 128/cwt to US$ 130/cwt in late February

US Five-Market Area Steer Price, Jan 2017-Apr 2019

US US CATTLE producers

and early March. Since the seasonal peak, prices have declined 10% to US$ 117/cwt (see graph).

NZ beef exports, 2017-2018

NZ FARMGATE PRICES firmed during April to finish the quarter sitting largely on par with where they were in February. This follows a dip in pricing through FebruaryMarch when drying weather conditions across large parts of the country resulted in a sharp increase in domestic slaughter supplies. Farmgate prices across all classes of cattle are now operating within a similar range to where they were at this point in the season

last year. Rabobank expects farmgate prices to hold firm over the coming months, with some upward pressure on prices later in the quarter once the seasonal supplies of cattle begin to slow. The number of cattle slaughtered in FebruaryMarch was 29% up on the same two months last season, to have New Zealand’s YTD cattle kill up 5% YOY. Beef+Lamb NZ are forecasting total slaughter numbers for the 2018/19 season to increase by less than 1%, indicating cattle

availability is likely to tighten over the reminder of the season (ending September). New Zealand’s beef exports performed strongly over the first half of the season (Oct-Mar), with both export volumes (up 6%) and value (up 9%) ahead of the same period last season. The average export value New Zealand is receiving for its beef exports is at the highest level it has been since the 2014-15 season, currently at NZ$ 7,486/metric ton (see graph). @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

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RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

24 OPINION EDITORIAL

EDNA

A recipe for disaster THAT OLD saying about not being able to see the wood for the trees could well describe the government’s infatuation with forestry at the expense of farming. Objections are growing stronger in rural New Zealand to the impact the ‘one billion trees’ programme will have on the regions’ farming landscapes, infrastructure and communities. Concern is such that a new lobby group has formed, wanting to preserve the economy, health and welfare of the NZ provinces. Named 50 Shades of Green, it aims to convince politicians and decisionmakers that the current push to plant a billion trees will destroy the provinces and ultimately may endanger the national economy. These are not non-productive or erosion prone areas of farms we are talking about. They are, in fact, entire productive food producing properties. Good productive farms are being bought out by often foreign owned entities and planted entirely in trees. The government’s desire to use forests as carbon sinks to contribute to the country’s climate change commitments will impose devastating economic and social cost on rural NZ. This ignores warnings by the Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment that planting pinus radiata is not a credible way of removing CO2 from the atmosphere. It is ironic that the parties that make up the coalition government – Labour, NZ and the Greens – all promised at the last election to tighten the Overseas Investment Act. They did this in respect of housing and farm ownership. However, they loosened the rule under which overseas investors may come in and buy farmland and plant trees. So now overseas investors can come to NZ and buy up farmland, allowing the likes of oil companies, airlines and big power generators to use the land to carbon farm. Once a tree is planted, little else is done with it for 30 years - aside from the odd pruning - until it is harvested (much longer if it is not a pine). Therefore jobs, communities and infrastructure in rural NZ will decline and fast. It is already estimated that the land now taken out of livestock production for forestry will mean the end of one meat processing facility. Consider the financial and social costs that will have on regional NZ. As 50 Shades of Green warns: “Instead of revitalising the provinces this tree planting will destroy them.”

RURALNEWS TO ALL FARMERS, FOR ALL FARMERS

HEAD OFFICE POSTAL ADDRESS: PO Box 331100, Takapuna, Auckland 0740 PUBLISHER: Brian Hight ......................................... Ph 09 307 0399 GENERAL MANAGER: Adam Fricker ....................................... Ph 09 913 9632 CONSULTING EDITOR: David Anderson .................................. Ph 09 307 0399 davida@ruralnews.co.nz

Want to share your opinion or gossip with the Hound? Send your emails to: hound@ruralnews.co.nz

THE HOUND Sell it

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THE HOUND’S ever growing list of ‘Landcorp fails’ keeps getting longer. The latest is that the state owned farmer has announced a $10 million slump in its forecast earnings for the 2019 financial year. In typical form, the news was done in a sneaky way – in a notice on Treasury’s website. It says Landcorp now expects full year earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and revaluations (EBITDAR) of between $27m and $32m versus the previous forecast range of between $37m and $42m for the year ending June 30. This notice appeared about the time the failing state farmer’s chief executive Steven Carden was prancing about on stage in Taranaki with Hollywood director James Cameron, telling farmers how they should farm in the future in a trendy, carbon zero way.

THIS OLD mutt was a little surprised to hear Winston Peters and Shane Jones both putting the boot into farmers recently over the legitimate concerns the sector has raised about the proposed methane reduction targets set by the Government in its climate change legislation. Peters snidely referred to farmers’ concerns, saying: “Sometimes the stuff at the end of cows can get into your ears and contaminate your thinking.” Meanwhile, the ‘mouth of the north’ and self confessed, taxpayer funded, pornography watcher Shane Jones reacted to criticism by slagging off farmers, saying, “If they are not milking or chasing cows they are moaning.” The Hound suggests the farming sector remembers these snide remarks by NZ First at the ballot boxes next year.

MONTY PYTHON’S ‘Ministry of Silly Walks’ sketch sprang to the Hound’s mind as he pondered New Zealand’s most unnecessary government department – you will likely never have heard of it – the Walking Access Commission. This is responsible for “providing leadership on outdoor access issues and administering a national strategy on outdoor access, including tracks and trails”. Remember it was set up about ten years ago to appease a well known public walker and tramper, the former PM Helen Clark. Apparently the Act which set up this ridiculous organisation is now up for review. However, your canine crusader suggests this waste of public funds and shrine to Aunty Helen should be culled, just like she was at the 2008 general election.

THIS OLD mutt is not surprised that many people don’t bother to vote in local body elections, given that their councils make such dumb moves. The latest is the good burghers of Canterbury watching their regional council (ECan) declaring a “climate emergency”. Apparently, the ECan idiots made this useless, worthless call in response to a demand by 50 unwashed, unkempt, unemployed protesting hippies – called Extinction Rebellion. Said ECan, “Extinction Rebellion asked us to declare a ‘climate emergency’ and, after debate and careful consideration, that is what we have done.” Wow! The Hound reckons that logic would dictate that if a group of citizens asked the council to declare the Tooth Fairy real then they would do this too. With this kind of virtual signalling crap emanating from councils, no wonder people don’t vote.

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RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

OPINION 25

Jobs of the future on offer NATIONAL FIELDAYS at Mystery Creek is an event for everybody. Over the years, it has become more than a place to catch up with friends, see the latest equipment and take a day off farm with the promise of Fieldays bargains. Now it is where science, research, development and marketing meet. It is a place to discuss new ideas, test the old ones and hear about future prospects. It isn’t just the technologies of the future, it is the jobs of the future that can be discussed. More and more school parties, some coming

COMMENT

Jacqueline Rowarth respondents, security for 87%, holidays and time off for 86%, working with great people for 80% and flexible working hours for 77%. Agriculture, in all that it encompasses -- the land, processing, advisory work, marketing, research

The problem for all adults, including parents, is that it’s difficult to advise students about how careers really work today. Parents love their children and want to set them up for a life of self-sufficiency, meaning and happiness. But at the same time, the world of work has changed and so have the goals of the young. from agri-programmes, are part of the scene. For these school students, agriculture could be their future. For others it is simply a day out of the classroom, but that gives the opportunity for inspiring them. The problem for all adults, including parents, is that it’s difficult to advise students about how careers really work today. Parents love their children and want to set them up for a life of self-sufficiency, meaning and happiness. But at the same time, the world of work has changed and so have the goals of the young. At the end of last year, Manpower Research released information on the top five priorities for millennials when looking for a job. Money was in the top 5 for 92% of

and development – fits the bill. Robots are not going to take over all the jobs. They might take over some, and that might be a blessing, but somebody has to develop the robots and fix them and design the new ones. And those people will understand the business and the problems, and the skills and knowledge to create the solutions. Synthetic food is not going to fill all the mouths. Certainly if the price comes down some people will switch for some meals, but synthetic food is not ‘natural’ nor is it without environmental impact. And though in the future it might meet the convenience factor, the all- natural, few ingredients, non-processed label is still premium. Crucially important

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for the future will be the people who understand how to manage resources and produce food sustainably (minimum impact on the environment while maintaining economic viability). They will be in demand because as the population increases globally

resources will become scarcer. And so will food. The question for the future is simply, What does the world need and how do my interests align? That way lies a good career. Collectively, New Zealanders are producers of superb food and can

be proud of what their work has achieved for the country. Despite all statements that we should be finding something else to do as a country, primary production is still 75% of our export economy and the most productive sector (apart from retail)

over the last ten years. Annual growth has been 2.8% in multi-factor productivity. Be proud to be a part of the sector and encourage others to follow. What they want is what we can offer, and what we offer can be seen at Mystery Creek.

And the event is still a place to meet friends and find bargains. • Dr Jacqueline Rowarth CNZM CRSNZ HFNZIAHS is a soil scientist and taught at various tertiary institutions in Australasia for over 30 years. Her first visit to Mystery Creek was in 1976.


RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

26 OPINION

Methane goals way off target ANDREW HOGGARD

FEDERATED FARMERS is right on board with the purpose and framework of the Zero Carbon Bill, but not a methane target that has no grounding in science or economic sense. Criticism by New Zealand First that Feds is

being unreasonable with its comments on the flaws in the Zero Carbon Bill’s targets is of concern. Federated Farmers welcomes the opportunity to sit down with NZ First and work through these issues. Let’s be clear. We support the Labour/NZ First/Green proposals to

establish a framework to tackle global warming and we’re grateful for NZ First’s continued efforts to get a fair deal for the agricultural sector on a number of fronts. While we appreciate the coalition government has taken a two-basket approach to greenhouse gases, Federated Farmers

is adamant that the methane targets are unjustified and Herculean compared to what’s expected of other sectors. We’ll take the net zero nitrous oxide by 2050 target on the chin and we’ll work with other New Zealanders to get carbon dioxide to net zero as well.

The primary sectors requested a split gases approach so that the significantly different effects of short lived gas (methane) could be recognised from the long lasting and cumulative global warming effect of long lived gases (nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide).

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Feds climate change spokesman Andrew Hoggard.

The Zero Carbon Bill sets a gross biogenic methane reduction of 10% by 2030. The science is clear that this level of methane emission reduction is only needed by 2050 to have no additional impact on global warming. Yet farmers are being expected to shoulder their share of tackling climate change 20 years earlier than anyone else. The second target, a 24% - 47% reduction of methane by 2050, has been plucked out of two heavily caveated reports with a large number of scenarios. All of these scenarios – except one – involve new technologies not yet available. Or they involve a technology the government does not support: the use of genetic engineering. The one exception involves retrenchment from pastoral farming. The only significant option currently available to NZ livestock farmers to reduce methane emissions is retrenchment – to feed less to their animals.

The 24% - 47% by 2050 target equates to about 1% - 2% per annum reductions – three to six times greater than necessary for methane to reach carbon zero equivalent. The livestock sector wants to do its part. Food produced in NZ already has one of the lowest greenhouse gas footprints in the world. Our dairy products have a footprint (greenhouse gas per kilogram of milk solids) that is one third of many European competitors. Targets by companies such as Fonterra and Synlait to reduce emissions per kilogram of milk solids by a further 30% should not be confused with the still elusive but laudable goal of reducing gross methane emissions per farm without winding the industry down. We are supportive of the Zero Carbon Bill but not methane targets that will ravage farmer livelihoods, provincial communities and the national economy. • Andrew Hoggard is Federated Farmers climate change spokesman

Read us until the cows come home!

www.ruralnews.co.nz


RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

OPINION 27

NZ customers admire our values MIKE PETERSEN

THE INTERNATIONAL trading system is facing one of its biggest challenges in recent times. The building trade war between the US and China and the impasse at the World Trade Organisation (WTO) are two significant global events that demand the attention of New Zealand in its dependence on trade for continued success. Alongside these two geopolitical power plays runs a creeping tide of protectionism in the form of nationalist inwardlooking policies that challenge the global value chain model which is increasingly becoming the future of food. For NZ it is clear that as a country with a population smaller than Sydney, access to international markets is critically important for

our future. While international debate and brinksmanship dominate the world of trade, NZ is quietly getting on with efforts to secure our future. In the big trade issues at the WTO we have been asked to coordinate efforts to reform this crucially important organisation and make it more relevant for the future. NZ has taken on the very important role of depository for the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for TransPacific Partnership (CPTPP) 11-member trade agreement. And importantly we are continuing to expand our network of trade agreements globally. We have negotiations underway with Europe for a new trade agreement and preliminary talks with the UK for a new trade agreement with

them once the future of Brexit becomes clear. Our strategy for trade is now firmly anchored on higher value opportunities in the context of the rapidly changing shape of the agri-food sector in NZ. Growth in the production of commodity products from livestock is reaching a ceiling as environmental limits and our response to climate change imposes pressure on traditional farming. The focus on producing and marketing higher value goods from NZ is working. In the seven years from 2012 to 2019, primary sector export revenue grew 43% to an impressive $46 billion. There is plenty more growth to come with the unprecedented growth in horticulture and plantbased products and new industry development and ongoing efforts in value creation from our

largest trading partner, and disruption in China or the US spills over into international markets affecting NZ exports. In the European theatre, while the UK needs to finalise its future relationship with the EU, the longstanding relationships built up by NZ companies in this part of the world are at risk as uncertainty remains. Numerous visits by those of us involved in trade and commerce to all of our key markets are important as we continue to reinforce our relevance as a constructive and valuable partner on agriculture and trade issues globally. As a number of countries retract and imple-

Mike Petersen

traditional industries. Present day risks to NZ’s strategy are real. The US-China trade war, and the ongoing inability of the UK to finalise Brexit and its separation from Europe have hugely disrupted smaller countries such as ours. China is now our

ment protectionist policies, our experience has been that open, trade oriented agricultural policies encourage the development of a competitive, resilient and responsive primary sector. Fifty years ago, about three quarters of NZ’s agricultural exports went to Europe. An active effort to diversify across global markets in the time since then means that this proportion is now down closer to 12%. As a result, producers have seen economic, environmental and social benefits over the longer term. The good news for NZ is that in spite of the real risks to international trade we are seeing

unprecedented demand for nearly all of our agrifood and fibre exports. The quality and integrity of our products are highly valued, but it is the values of NZ and its people that now resonate strongly with consumers. As we look to a future where demand for food is strongly anchored to the way food is produced and the values of the people producing it, NZ’s future looks assured. In an increasingly challenging international trade environment we need to chart our own path to prevent the actions of others undermining our future. • Mike Petersen is New Zealand special agricultural trade envoy

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

METHANE MADNESS FOR 15 years we have been told that near 50% of New Zealand’s greenhouse gas emissions come from our livestock. This was and is a monumental mistake. This figure compares the net emissions – or carbon dioxide from burning fossil fuel – with the gross figure of methane from pastoral livestock. Methane breaks down. Like the steam from the spout of a boiling kettle it breaks down and is recycled. The only way to make the steam cloud larger is to turn up the heat and boil the water faster. It’s the same with the methane: the only way to have more methane in the atmosphere (from livestock) is to have more livestock producing it. John Key knew this and with his political antenna finely tuned he said: “We will be followers not leaders with a methane tax.” He understood that the net emissions of methane from livestock was near zero as it is for the whole world and that no-one else

would contemplate such nonsense. That’s where the matter rested, until the change of government. They all now understand, but they are playing politics -- anti-farmer politics -- and it dismays me. The levy funded leaders at DairyNZ and Meat & Wool NZ understand it, and Federated Farmers -still sleep-walking towards damaging legislation -- also understands it. They are all face saving instead of fighting for their farmers. I find their conduct in this matter appalling. It’s time for our farming leaders to come out of the shadows and show real leadership in this matter. They must tell NZ and the world that cows are not cooking the planet, that a stupid mistake is made in saying nearly 50% of greenhouse gases come from animals, and that our net greenhouse gas emission increase is actually 99% fossil fuel and 1% livestock. They must insist that our legislation be based on this science. If this does not happen

we risk legislation that will damage our economy and corrode our politics and our democracy. David Lloyd RD1 Te Kauwhata

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RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

MANAGEMENT 29

Forages help stem nitrate losses NIGEL MALTHUS

A SHEEP and beef farmer taking part in the big Forages for Reduced Nitrates Leaching (FRNL) research programme has found its stated goal of a 20% reduction in nitrate leaching out of reach. However, at 18kg/ha/ year, nitrogen loss from Bill and Shirley Wright’s 380ha property near Cave, South Canterbury, has always been modest. But the programme has identified a range of measures that will enable them to do more while keeping N loss low. The FRNL programme, now running for nearly six years and due to end in September, is funded by MBIE, DairyNZ and FAR, with financial and other assistance from CRIs and Lincoln University. Research has been done on nine monitor farms across Canterbury: four dairy, two arable, one arable/dairy and two

sheep and beef. One of these is the Wrights’ farm. Bill Wright says that on a sheep and beef farm with relatively low N loss the 20% reduction goal is not profitable or practicable. In modelling, they had managed to achieve it by selling 40% of the farm’s feed but that also reduced profitability by 60%. The nearest the farm came to the goal in practice was during the drought year of 2013 when Wright had to destock. “So we either have a drought and we don’t make any money – that’s a good way to reduce stock numbers and N loss,” he explained. “Or we cut and carry our fodder off farm and sell it to the dairy farmer next door who’s already got a problem.” Wright says it just doesn’t stack up. However, he adds that it’s essential that

AgResearch senior scientist Robyn Dynes discusses the Forages For Reduced Nitrates programme alongside event facilitator Richard Robinson during the open day on the Wright’s farm.

sheep and beef farmers understand the impacts they have on the environment and there are many little things that can make a difference. The former Beef + Lamb NZ director’s farm

LEARNINGS FROM RESEARCH AGRESEARCH SENIOR scientist possible after winter grazing. Dr Robyn Dynes says the He pointed to a spading FRNL programme overall has cultivator now being used in identified three main prospects Southland which can handle for reducing N leaching: catch even very muddy ground. crops, low-N fodder beet for “The take-home really winter grazing and plantain in is that the earlier you sow pastures. a catch crop the greater She told the recent field the potential to reduce the day on the Wrights’ farm that amount of nitrogen leached.” they had tried a lot of different Wright says there is not strategies to try to shift the one silver bullet. South Canterbury sheep farm’s leaching from 18kg. “Some of the information and beef farmer Bill Wright’s been hosting a five-year field we’ve gathered here will “What we did show was trial into the use of different that Bill and Shirley still had hopefully influence some forages to reduce nitrate more potential to do more with leaching. other farmer’s decision less so they could hold it at 18 making – make them think and still potentially be as – or even more – about where the crop might be, what the profitable.” image might look like if they’ve got stock AgResearch scientist Dr David Scobie grazing it and the public going past and told the field day there was not much risk what it might mean to our waterways,” he of nitrate leaching when grass is rising told the field day. out of the ground in spring, but things “We’ve got to be mindful of what you change with autumn grazing. The highest think it looks like from the other side of the risk comes from urine patches when plant fence – what the consumer sees. If you’ve growth has slowed. got stock in waterways or stock up to their “May is our critical point because hocks in mud then it’s not a good image some of you [sheep and beef farmers] will for a start. have cows turning up on your place to go “If we avoid that public distaste for through the winter,” he explained. “Have a what we’re doing and make sure that the think about what you’re going to do today public and our consumers are happy with to manage that.” what we’re doing then they’ll buy Another field day speaker, Plant and our product and see that farmers Food scientist Dr Brendon Malcolm, are actually doing their best for the emphasised research showing the value environment.” of getting catch crops in as soon as

runs about 75% beef and 25% sheep. He says they have made improvements

across their whole environmental impact. This includes fencing

waterways to tackle nitrates and sediments, phosphorus and E.coli.

Another change is to finish cattle early. He has also installed a feed pad for them to use in wet conditions. Wright says most of his soil is heavy clay that does not leach much even in winter cropping. However, he is using more fodder beet and maize and growing fewer winter crops on the lighter free-draining soils. He no longer grows monoculture feed crops. Instead he puts plantains into all his pastures, lucernes, fescues and clover on heavy soils, or prairie grass with lucernes to try to balance the diet. “Most of it is about trying to make sure stock have a balanced diet because [then] they tend to have fewer emissions and that includes nitrates.”

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RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

30 MANAGEMENT

Deer farmers set example CENTRAL HAWKE’S Bay farmers Evan and Linda Potter have won the premier Elworthy Award in the deer industry’s 2019 environmental awards. The Potters were

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support from the QEII Trust and Hawke’s Bay Regional Council. The Potters were also commended for their carefully planned nutrient management, waterway protection and other work. Extensive use of willows and poplars has helped prevent soil erosion and they have carefully identified critical source areas in an effort to protect water quality. The judges said acquiring a thorough knowledge of soils on the property had helped the Potters develop an excellent fit of stock class to land. The Potters also won the NZ Landcare Trust Award for excellence in sustainable deer farming through action on the ground. Central Otago deer farmers John and Mary Falconer won two environment awards: the Duncan New Zealand Award for vision and innovation in mastering a demanding environment, and the Gallagher Technology and Innovation Award for excellent utilisation of farming technologies to improve productivity and manage resources The Falconers have a wide range of deer based business streams including venison and velvet production, trophy hunting and genetics. In particular the award judges commended their efforts to manage water quality and quantity in Central Otago’s low-rainfall environment. They were also praised for their extensive pest control work, protecting biodiversity and the business. Adam and Sharon Waite, who manage the intensive finishing farm Northbank Station, near Dunsandel in Canterbury,

also won two awards: the Firstlight Foods Award for commitment to farming sustainably with a strong customer focus, and the NZ Deer Farmers’ Association Next Generation Award for outstanding performance in environmental, financial and social aspects of the business. The Waites have managed an extensive redevelopment on the property including more water efficient irrigation systems, improved pasture covers and new native shelterbelts and other plantings to provide shade. The judges commended the Waites for their extensive documentation and recording using the FarmIQ system. A young South Canterbury couple, Kiri Rupert and Josh Brook, were highly commended for excellence in business planning, farm environment planning and farm succession. Award entrants the Kinzett family, who farm for velvet production near Murchison, were acknowledged for their work in fencing and shelterbelts, providing shade and shelter and screening stock classes to prevent deer from fence pacing. Convenor of judges Janet Gregory, of NZ Landcare Trust, said all five properties entered for the awards were well managed farms of a high standard. She commended all the entrants for their work to improve environmental outcomes. The biennial Deer Farmers’ Environmental Awards were instigated by the late Sir Peter Elworthy. The inaugural awards made in 2001. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews


RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

MANAGEMENT 31

Community a priority SNAPSHOT OF FARM

NIGEL MALTHUS

STAYING IN touch with their community is a priority for the 2019 Canterbury regional Ballance Farm Environmental Award winners, Duncan and Tina Mackintosh. The Mackintoshes own and run White Rock Mains farm, a 1056ha sheep and dairy support property nestled against the hills at North Loburn, near Rangiora. Their recent winner’s field day featured presentations from the local North Loburn Primary School, which has partnered with the Mackintoshes on Garden to Table and Predator-Free programmes. Duncan Mackintosh told the field day attendees that community engagement is “top of the list” for the family. “We’ve all got stories we can share and tell the wider community about the great work farming is doing throughout the whole country.” Warning that disruption was coming fast in the form of “fake protein” and other synthetics, he said the crux of farming is engaging with the community, especially the children. “Because if they’re not in on the story why would anyone else be?”

Tina and Duncan Mackintosh, the Ballance Farm Environment Awards Canterbury region supreme winners. RURAL NEWS GROUP

Tina Mackintosh said education is vital, whether that meant teaching kids a good work ethic or seeing them freerange roaming with their urban friends. “It’s the joy of trying to sneak up on a rabbit, throwing shite at each other or the pure joy of camping out in a paddock with no adults in tow.” Tina warned that the connections between urban and rural New Zealand are dying, with 86% of the population now urban. “It’s time to educate and share with our urban

SEEING WHERE THEY’RE AT THE MACKINTOSHS said entering the awards was a good opportunity to get a feel for where they are sitting. “We’re open to ideas and being challenged. While the environmental side of things is important, the awards are not just looking at the environmental footprint of the farm. It’s the whole system, so there’s much more to what you can learn from the judges.” The judges said: “Duncan & Tina Mackintosh impressed us with their strong focus on their animals, people and land. They demonstrate a willingness to adapt and change as new information becomes available and maintain excellent monitoring of stock, land and business.” On the way to the Canterbury regional award the couple also won the Bayleys People in Primary Sector Award for their focus on the people side of the business, the Beef + Lamb NZ Livestock Farm Award for long-term land and animal stewardship, the Massey University Innovation Award for demonstrating Kiwi ingenuity for solving a problem or pursuing a new opportunity, and the Predator Free NZ Trust award for successful control of animal predators to achieve native biodiversity outcomes. The 11 regional supreme winners will be profiled at the Ballance Farm Environment Awards national final in Hamilton, on June 6.

kids. I say kids because I believe that’s where it truly needs to start from. We need to create a generational change in attitude, that farming is not a dirty word but a diverse, robust and transparent career path to produce and harvest food that comes with a story of integrity and excellence.” She urged other farmers to open their gates and share their stories. However, Mackintosh says it is also paramount

that farmers – as a collective – have zero tolerance of any farming practice that puts the transparency and integrity of the sector at risk. She says farmers should not be afraid to offer to help to those having trouble meeting this standard. “And I equally challenge the urban community to accept these invitations, to walk on a farm with an open mind, to engage

in individual critical thinking and if you’re still not sure, ask.” In making the award, the judges praised the Macintoshs’ determination and hard work, particularly in helping their environment prosper. The couple recently established a 91ha QEII covenant, now being fenced off and wilding pines destroyed. The judges were also impressed with the Mackintoshs’ strong com-

A FIFTH generation of the Mackintosh family is now actively involved in White Rock Mains. The property was originally bought by Duncan Mackintosh’s forebears in 1909. A Charollais sheep stud has been established on the property in the name of Duncan and Tina’s 11-year-old daughter Casey, who expects to offer rams for sale for the 2020 breeding season. The property ranges from 115m to 400m above sea level, from flat to easy hill country with three district soil types and receives 950 to 1100mm rainfall a year. It winters 1900 MA commercial ewes, 700 2-tooth commercial ewes, 900 commercial hoggets, and 510 R1 heifers. The Mackintoshs have embraced technology in the form of three automated weather stations with integrated soil moisture sensors placed around the farm. Soil testing has been done on all paddocks and reticulated stock water is supplied to 98% of the farm. The tanks have sensors linked to phone alerts if water levels are low. White Rock Mains is also a focus farm and development partner for the farm data management company FarmIQ. The Mackintoshs also run a rodeo bull breeding company under the 8 Seconds Bucking Bull brand, noting that many of the bulls in their herd have never been ridden because “an extensive AI programme with genetics imported from US, Canada and Australia have created a headache for the NZ cowboys”. The farm also hosts the district’s dog trialling ground, home of the Loburn Collie Club.

the Garden to Table programme, which Tina supports. This programme involves children growing, harvesting, cooking and eating their own produce.

munity spirit and their involvement in many social initiatives. They noted that North Loburn School was just one of the beneficiaries of their generosity of spirit through

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RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

32 ANIMAL HEALTH

Combination of tools gives best worm control – expert PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

EFFECTIVE MANAGEMENT of worms in sheep, cattle and other ruminants is no longer a one tool job. It’s best to combine several approaches, says veterinarian Andrew Dowling. The PGG Wrightson animal health technical expert told a recent Beef + Lamb NZ Wormwise

“The adult worm has to live in the sheep or other ruminant and for some people that is a revelation. Some think they are out in the paddock.” workshop at Wenderholm Park, north of Auckland, that this requires background knowledge of the worms, their life cycles, and strategies for pasture, drench and breeding.

His presentation ranged across different management techniques and tips to keep worms under control and slow the development of resistance.

“The adult worm has to live in the sheep or other ruminant and for some people that is a revelation. Some think they are out in the paddock,” Dowling said. At any one time, only about 5% of the worm population is inside the animal and 95% - in the form of eggs and larvae are outside. In the animal gut are sexually mature female worms and male worms.

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They mate and the female lays eggs which are passed out in the faeces. The eggs hatch in the faeces where conditions are warm and moist. “If you have grass growing you have got parasites developing,” Dowling said. L1 and L2 are in the faecal pat. The L3 move away, wriggling or carried by earthworms. They can sit in a dew drop, get eaten by the animal, develop to fourth stage larvae and adults and so the cycle begins again. L3 has a limited lifespan, but these don’t mind the cold because it slows their metabolism. In summer, when it is warmer and their metabolism is faster, they will burn up their fat reserves and starve more quickly, Dowling explains. Hot conditions in summer can halve the number of barber’s pole worms in about two months. In winter it can take four months or more. Good grass growth also favours worm development. “We want to reduce the L3 stage because they

are the ones going into your animal,” Dowling said. “Worms are not directly competing with your animals for nutrients in the gut. But they excrete things which cause a lot of irritation. These interfere with the digestive process and in more severe cases result in a protein-losing gastroenteropathy. “But the biggest impact they have is that it makes the animal feel sick. When you feel sick you don’t eat. That is by far the greatest impact parasites have.” Dowling says although drench kills susceptible larvae and adult worms it doesn’t touch the eggs. It takes 21 days for an ingested L3 to become a sexually mature adult. A faecal egg count only tells you the adult female worm population, it does not diagnose the larval population which can be high and cause a lot of damage. Dowling advises that when a sample is collected it needs to be as fresh as possible then stored in the fridge so the

eggs don’t hatch. “If you want to do larvae identification you’ll need a second sample. However, don’t put this sample in the fridge as the barber’s pole eggs will not hatch. “If I want to know what is happening in a mob I want to sample as many animals as possible at random in that mob,” Dowling said. “This gives a more accurate indication of the average faecal egg count and worm burden.” He pointed out that an egg count will only tell the adult worm population. “In calves drenched four weeks ago the faecal egg count only tells you the larvae they ate in the first week after drenching. “If you are drenching to faecal egg count and you think it is not very high so you stretch the time out between drenchings, then you could end up with paddocks with massive numbers of parasites,” Dowling explained. “So I don’t advocate drenching young stock to faecal egg count.”

GENETICS COUNT FOR MUCH FOR GENETICS in sheep, Dowling says you should buy rams from someone who doesn’t drench their sheep because then you will get worm resistant genetics. He says farmers must carefully select heifer calves or ewe lambs as these will have an impact on genetics. A ewe or heifer might influence the genetics of, say, five or six offspring. A ram across 100 ewes has far more influence and similarly

with a bull. “Your breeder has far more influence on the genetics of the flock than you do,” Dowling said. “We look at them in the yard - like him, don’t like him, keep them.... For structure traits it is important. However, for breeding for resistance to disease you want to be talking to a breeder who is going the way you want to go.”


soleniet quiatibu. PAGE 15

soleniet quiatibu. PAGE 23

RURALNEWS TO ALL FARMERS, FOR ALL FARMERS

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NATIONAL FIELDAYS COMPLIMENTARY LIFT OUT MAP PAGE 24

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RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

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RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

NZ NATIONAL FIELDAYS 37

Bankers predict a buoyant Fieldays PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

PLENTY OF optimism in the primary sector points to a buoyant Fieldays this year, the banking sector believes. However, there are a few notes of caution. The scene at the Fieldays will be pretty positive, Rabobank NZ chief executive Todd Charteris told Rural News. “Milk prices have rebounded pretty strongly… the forecast for next year is strong, a little bit of softening in the dollar which will help exporters. “The outlook for dairy is certainly strong which dominates that part of the country where the Fieldays is held.” And other commodities are also looking good. Sheep and beef continue strong and horticulture is buzzing.

“We saw that with the recent release of extra licences (for SunGold) by Zespri and the subscriptions that were chasing those licences are a great indication of confidence. “Things are really positive so that is something to be excited about.” BNZ senior economist Doug Steel says overall he thinks this year’s Fieldays will be upbeat. “It’s a great event for farmers to get off farm and talk with like-minded people.” But as is often the case with farming, the weather will play a big part in the final numbers. On the economic side there are strong opposing forces to consider in the primary sector. “Revenues and cashflow are buoyant for many across the primary sector so that’s a big plus. But there’s been concern about possible policy

changes including tax and the environment as well as ongoing global trade tensions. Meanwhile, interest rates are low but there are concerns about the influence of proposed bank capital changes. “So a lot of pluses and minuses to weigh up. But overall I reckon it will be another good one.” ASB senior rural economist Nathan Penny says

he thinks the mood will be cautiously optimistic. “There are good positive signs for dairy, and more broadly across agriculture there are many sectors that are doing pretty well. The sheep and beef sector… arguably you could say the lamb sector is in rude health and horticulture is going great guns. “Given the outlook

for incomes you would expect the farming sector to be generally pretty positive and for punters to be cautiously optimistic.” With capital gains tax no longer on the agenda “we can move on and that may help the mood as well”. ASB will have its site as usual and a big presence. “I am looking for-

ward to meeting farmers and whoever else is about. My view and the bank’s view is pretty positive about the long-term outlook for the sector.” Meanwhile Charteris says from Rabobank’s point of view it is an important event on the calendar. “We can host a number of our clients from all over the country. It is important that we do that.” Interesting activities in their marquee will include hosting the trade delegation from the European Union. “The NZ-EU trade negotiations are topical so we have a session with a group of them on the Wednesday which I think will be interesting. “Also a session on a recent report by Blake Holgate, one of our research analysts, on carbon farming and some

of the key considerations for New Zealand farmers if they are thinking about planting trees on their properties. There are interesting topics which hopefully our clients will appreciate some insights into.” That’s the type of opportunity the Fieldays offers many businesses. “It is that alignment. People go there to network, to see what is new on the innovation front, make new friendships and build on the existing ones they have. That is why it is such an important event on the calendar.” Charteris says he is looking forward to it because it is always a great opportunity for him to get out and “really get a sense of how the farming community is feeling and how we can continue to support that”.

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RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

38 NZ NATIONAL FIELDAYS

Tips for saving fuel FUEL COSTS are a hot topic everywhere, added to the rising costs of compliance and licensing. Here are some tips on how to reduce fuel consumption and lower costs for rural businesses. 1. Reduce idling: idling a heavy commercial vehicle can use up to 2L fuel per hour. By cutting your idling time you can save 5% of your fuel bill, says the government agency EECA. Mangonui Haulage, in Northland, runs 50 trucks that include logging, livestock and mixed-use trucks. By its fleet management system the firm discovered many drivers were idling their trucks for up to 45 minutes. So it ruled that all engines must be turned off after five minutes of idling. This has helped the business’ profits. 2. Keep up regular equipment maintenance: telemetry data from Teletrac Navman shows that poorly serviced equipment and vehicles can use up to 50% more fuel. With a fleet man-

agement system you can set alerts for maintenance tasks based on an engine reaching a set amount of kilometres travelled or hours in operation. With regular maintenance check-ups, wear and tear can be fixed before it causes a machine to fail. 3. Keep tyres inflated: underinflated tyres use around 10% more fuel than properly inflated ones. Tyres are also known to lose around 1-2psi per month (3-6%) naturally, so checking and inflating is a monthly task. 4. Record important location coordinates on a GPS system: Haddrell’s of Cambridge (beekeepers) does a lot of running to visit its many hive sites. The company used its GPS fleet management system to set up ‘geofences’ around its many, often hard-to-find hive sites. A geofence is a virtual geographic boundary around an area which can be used to mark exact locations and to track which vehicles cross the boundary. Saving all the sites to

their fleet management system and using the navigation tool saves all new staff members fuel and time of their rounds of the sites. 5. Use fuel monitoring systems: this will allow your business to measure how much fuel is dispensed versus how much fuel is used. You can use this to identify inefficient vehicles and equipment, which helps to make informed purchasing decisions when fixing or replacing assets. A fuel management system can also help businesses identify fuel theft.

6. Tweak your driving habits to drive smarter: take corners carefully, avoid harsh braking and accelerate smoothly to reduce fuel consumption. The New Zealand Racing Board reduced fuel consumption from 21L/100km to 13.8L/100km in its fleet in part by smarter, safer driving habits. 7. Lighten your load: unused roof racks or roof boxes can be removed from a vehicle as they create wind resistance and this reduces fuel efficiency. 8. Claim your Road User Charges

(RUC) rebates: vehicle licensing costs have gone up. So if you’re running a diesel vehicle on private property or roads you can apply for a rebate on that ‘off-road’ portion of your RUC licence. For farm services that enter private driveways many times per day, the 500m stretch from the main road to the milk shed adds up. An electronic RUC system allows tracking the small distances for each vehicle, and automatically populate a claims form for the off-road distances. www.teletracnavman.co.nz

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RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

40 NZ NATIONAL FIELDAYS

Big show for Toyota MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

TOYOTA’S MASSIVE site in the automotive precinct will showcase its extensive range of SUVs. From the trendy C-HR to the powerful V8 Land Cruiser 200, these vehicles build on a 60 year heritage. A notable SUV addition will be the Next-Gen RAV4 including for the first time a hybrid electric version to complement the hugely popular Adventure models. The Kiwi icon and mainstay of rural NZ, the

Toyota Hilux, will be hot to see, and site visitors can try their hand at the Hilux ‘Spin to Win’ game which might win them a

4WD trip with a Toyota Ambassador. Getting its first public outing will be the new look Hiace van with

lots of new technology expected to cement its position as NZ’s favourite van. Visitors can learn

Postdriver

more about Toyota technology in the Innovation Zone. For example, the company says “augmented reality is the best way for people to understand how the self charging hybrid electric system and the Safety Sense package work in the new Corolla hybrid”. For a breather, visitors can enjoy Toyota’s ‘Drive Happy’ hospitality -- coffee and toasted sandwiches to combat the winter chill.    Site: corner of I Road and C Street in the automotive precinct.

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HANDYPIECE – SOLID, DURABLE AND EASY TEAM HANDYPIECE, recently back from AgFest in Tasmania, will exhibit at Fieldays then head to Scotland and The Royal Highland Show. The New Zealand-made Handypiece ticks many boxes, the company says. It’s a traditional design with combs and cutters, it’s solid, durable and easy to maintain, and it’s powered by a long life lithium battery for use anywhere, any time without mains power. It allows users of all abilities to keep on top of dirty jobs, resulting in better animal health and all-round efficiency. The Handypiece Pro has variable speed from 2400 - 3500rpm, typically dagging, crutching and trimming cows’ tails at a mid-speed of 2700 rpm. And for a superior finish while shearing it can run at its maximum speed of 3500rpm. It gives alpaca shearers a traditional handpiece that is slim to hold and it can be run at the speed of a clipper. New design means the battery lasts longer, so it will crutch up to 300-400 sheep on a single charge. For Fieldays, the Handypiece kit includes two lithium batteries, a battery charger, belt, holster and pouch made from heavy-duty leather and a 5m extension cord, all housed in a purpose made carry bag. Site G41


RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

NZ NATIONAL FIELDAYS 41

Coming to a vineyard near you ITS ITALIAN Same cousin won Machine of the Year 2019 at the SIMA show in Paris. And now the arrival of the Deutz Fahr Series 5D TTV will give specialised users another choice in a competitive market. These tractors run the SDF Group FARMotion engine in 3 or 4-cylinder common-rail layouts and power ranging from 88 to 113hp. They also have electronic control, charge air cooling, DOC exhaust gas treatment and am eVisco cooling fan. The engines are mated to a new continuously variable transmission built in-house by SDF. These offer stepless speeds between 0 to 40km/h and the ability to set ground speed independently of the tractor engine speed. They also have two ground speed cruise control settings for working or headland situations. In transport tasks, 40km/h is achieved with only 1650rpm, said to save a lot of fuel. The rear linkage can lift 2600kg and can work with a front lift and PTO system that lifts 1500kg. Rear linkage and external hydraulic remotes are fed by a 100L/minute closed centre hydraulic pump that

Deutz Fahr 5D Series tractor.

works alongside a 42L/min unit that runs the power steering system. The tractors can be configured with up to five pairs of remotes at the rear and four more pairs of mid mounted outlets. Adjustable flow and time control is available on all remotes. At the front of the machine, operators can use automated activation of

the four wheel drive system, and 100% differential locks ensure best traction in all conditions. The automatically activated, rear axle differential is available for added traction and stability and four wheel braking is fitted as a standard. In the newly designed cab a flat floor enhances the space available and

gives good access. Four post layout and a rounded frame profile is gentle on plants as it passes along the rows. The cab also meets all standards to Class IV for driver protection, removing the need for PPE. The InfoCenterPro high-res 5” monitor provides the driver with structured information on all operating

states of the tractor, and tractor and engine speeds are shown on analogue dials. Operating controls for automatic functions such as front axle suspension, Auto4WD and SDD fast steering, plus the lever for the hydraulic parking brake and a cellphone holder, are located to the left and right of the centrally mounted InfoCenterPro display. The new Maxcom joystick is incorporated into the right armrest, giving control of the transmission and other commonly used functions. The tractors are available in three versions: the V model is a narrow machine for tight spaces; the S model has a wider front axle for enhanced turning and greater stability; and the F model has the widest configuration for best stability due to the wider stance of the tractor. The S version can also be optioned with front axle suspension offering independent ‘wheel’ suspension and active steering. The system operates based on driving speed and steering angle, using sensors to supply data to the control unit, adapting shock absorber settings to control stiffness and damping, reducing vibration and increasing operator comfort.

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RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

42 NZ NATIONAL FIELDAYS

Keep it low or keep it slow, advises insurer MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

FMG’S INSURANCE cover on 30,000 tractors in New Zealand positions it uniquely to understand its customers daily problems. The company says that on average 15 tractors a week are damaged in accidents, with rollovers a standout cause of serious damage. Hence its new media message advising tractor drivers to ‘Keep it low or keep it slow’, because many insurance claims arise from the use of frontloaders during harvest and feed-out times. FMG’s data shows that one in five claims results from objects falling from

ling with the frontloaders as close to the ground as possible to help keep a low centre of gravity especially when loaded. Other tips include avoid carrying a raised load around corners and keep speed low when manoeuvring. The company also says operators should be mindful of changes in the centre of gravity of tractors towing, say, trailers, wagons or fertiliser spreaders, particularly on slopes, sidling land or hill country. Such setups might result in a tractor ‘feeling’ stable, but an unstable trailer or negative drawbar weight transfer might cause a tractor’s rear wheels to lose grip and crash. Rural News observes that the arrival

a frontloader, damaging bonnets, windscreens and cab structures. Typically, these objects include tree branches, bales and attachments such as buckets, forks and grabs improperly attached. And one in ten claims arises from tractors rolling or sliding into drains or gullies and causing serious damage. Again, says FMG, many of these claims arise when a loader has altered a tractor’s centre of gravity, increasing the risk of it rolling especially when it’s going too fast, turning too tightly or is on difficult terrain. FMG is offering several tips to help prevent these types of accidents and rollovers. Chiefly, it says, travel-

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of high output balers and baler/wrapper combinations in recent years has seen a marked increase in average bale weights: many early season silage bales now hit the one tonne mark. It might be worth considering the use of a rear linkage-mounted counterweight when handling these packages,

to create a more stable load. And it may be time to move from the conventional drawbar/pin set-up to the European-style pick-up hook that moves the loading much closer to a tractor’s rear axle. • Rural News acknowledges FMG’s help in preparing this article.

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RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

NZ NATIONAL FIELDAYS 43

Four tractors in the 90125hp series MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

JOHN DEERE will use Fieldays to show the latest 5R series tractors -- four units in the all-important 90-125hp sector. The 5090R, 5100R, 5115R and 5125R tractors are all powered by stage IIIB compliant, 4.5L John Deere PWX engines (90, 100, 115 and 125 hp respectively). These ‘diesel only’ four-cylinder engines deliver an extra 10hp for transport applications via their transport power management (TPM) system. JD says the engines deliver up to 8% power bulge to respond to tough conditions, and a torque rise of up to 38% as the engine drops below rated speed. Three transmission options start with the entry-level 16F 16R CommandQuad Manual with four ranges and four powershiftable gears within each range. Also available are a 16F 16R CommandQuad and a 32F 16R Command8 transmission, with eight powershiftable gears and an ECO mode that enables a top speed of 40km/h at just 1759rpm. All three transmissions have a fully automatic clutch, individual start-up gears, individually settable speeds and an electric park lock. Automatic shifting is standard on the Command8 and optional on the 16F 16R CommandQuad.

The transmission uses AutoClutch, so the operator no longer has to use the traditional clutch to stop or control tractor take off. But the traditional clutch pedal is still there for operators who prefer it. AutoClutch “provides the ultimate in ease of use to stop, start, and modulate tractor take off using only the brake pedal,” says JD. It allows the operator to stop the tractor without clutching but without overloading the engine, to inch or creep the tractor forward or reverse on a level surface or incline, and to accelerate the vehicle back to normal speed when releasing the brake. For increased comfort and performance, front axle suspension and an optional mechanical cab suspension system are available. An air suspended Grammer seat, as fitted in the 6R series, has up to 15° of swivel, lumbar adjustment and optional heating. Other new features include variable-ratio steering and the option to order tractors as AutoTrac Ready, allowing future use of the latest guidance and steering technologies as these evolve. Built around a one piece, curved frame, the 5R series has a turning radius of just 3.75m, making it ideal for loader operation. Options include a choice of mechanical or

Read us until the cows come home!

www.ruralnews.co.nz

new ‘E’ joysticks, both linked to the tractor seat.


RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

44 NZ NATIONAL FIELDAYS

Tractor trader to showcase technology INDUSTRY LEADING technology will be plentiful on the AGCO site, says New Zealand manager Peter Scott. “Our focus this year is on industry leading technology with our Fendt, Massey Ferguson and Valtra brands, showing AGCO’s investment and commitment, particularly in the technology space.” The Fendt 1000 series tractor occupies a new segment with its power output, and ingeniously combines compact design, high manoeuvrability and visibility with cutting edge technology and cabin comfort, Scott says. The Fendt 1000 series, with power up to 500hp, suits many different applications such as seeding, pulling a chaser bin, spraying and

baling, which until recently may have required farmers to own several tractors that “can spend a lot of time in the shed,” says Donny Cloney, product manager for Fendt. Also on the site will be the new Massey Ferguson 8700 S with its improved power, comfort, usability, efficiency and reliability. “The new MF 8700 S exemplifies our pragmatic approach to developing the highest levels of technology which are easy to use, while delivering tangible benefits and high performance to owners and operators alike,” says John Horan, product manager for Massey Ferguson. The Valtra N and T Series will show the Valtra SmartTouch which has raised usability to new levels, making it even more intuitive than

a smart phone. “What makes Valtra SmartTouch so extraordinary is that settings are easily accessible with only two taps or swipes,” says Paul Morris, Valtra product manager Australia and New Zealand. Fitted on the N, T, and S series, Valtra SmartTouch is available on tractors in the 135 to 405hp brackets. Valtra SmartTouch symbolises Finnish design with its intelligent solutions that make using a tractor more productive. Using ergonomic design and first-class materials, SmartTouch is designed with the farmer in mind. It even has safety features built in to prevent accidental use of linear levers. @rural_news

NO 8 WIRE AWARD HAMILTON ARTIST Gaye Jurisich has won top honours in the 2019 Fieldays No.8 Wire National Art Award with her piece labelled Snare. The awards are hosted and coordinated by Waikato museum, partnered by Farmlands cooperative and supported by the New Zealand National Fieldays Society. Judge Linda Tyler praised Jurisich’s art for using the space effectively. “Often with sculpture, people think it’s fine to have something wall mounted.

The whole attraction of that piece was its sprouting out of the walls and using the floors as well. It was a real installation. “The sculpture captured the energy of the material well. No.8 wire is strong stuff and when it’s coiled it’s got all that springing energy. It really did express the quality and energy that’s inherent in the wire.” Snare was one of 25 artworks created by 23 artists on display at ArtsPost Galleries & Shop showing the value, versatility and symbolism of No.8 wire.

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RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

46 NZ NATIONAL FIELDAYS

Lemken eyes NZ expansion MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

THE GERMAN cultivation and seeding machinery maker Lemken is chasing more business in New Zealand. It set up a subsidiary in mid 2018 to support its business in New Zealand and Australia. This is to give new dealers and customers in NZ a more direct link to the company, better technical support, a wider choice of tillage and seeding equipment and greater access to demonstration machines. Lemken managing director and sales manager Robert Wensing says the move will be crucial to Lemken’s growth and will help develop the company’s partnerships with

local dealers. “We have begun establishing our new dealer network,” Wensing said. The first dealers are Te Aroha Tractors, Te Aroha, and Tractor Repairs and Spares (TRS) in Renwick, Seddon, Richmond and Hawke’s Bay. “We expect to make further announcements regarding new dealers soon,” said Wensing. New Lemken products will be launched in NZ later this year, Wensing said. These will include the Rubin 10-disc cultivator with larger discs than the Rubin 9 it replaces, a symmetrical disc layout and much improved overload protection. Other releases will include the Diamant 16 plough and Solitair 23 front-mounted, air-seeder. 

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RURAL NEW Zealand is helping to lead the way in Mitsubishi Motors Corporation’s (MMC) global rebrand. Piako Mitsubishi Morrinsville is the first dealership in Australasia to sport the striking new global visual identity launched last year. MMC’s new identity marks the newly built Morrinsville dealership as a distinctly modern showroom. It has a black diagonal enfolding the building’s front left corner and a large black portal marking the entranceway. Piako Mitsubishi Morrinsville dealer principal Darrell Russell, who has won MMC’s Diamond Dealer award 11 times, is proud of this first rebranding in New Zealand and Australia. “We wanted to build a new, modern showroom that would take our business to the next level, which we and the town could be proud of,” Russell says. The new branding was formally unveiled at an opening event on Saturday May 18. The glass walled showroom showcases the striking architectural aspects of the new MMC branding. Inside it’s concrete, timber accents and soft furnishings. The building design, material suppliers and builders were all local. “People have been really receptive. I’ve had a lot of positive feedback from locals on how great it looks day and night.” Russell says. The efforts of Russell and his wife Catherine garnered praise from Mitsubishi NZ chief operating officer Daniel Cook. He said the benchmark set by the Russells will reinforce Mitsubishi as a fresh, forward thinking brand with a modern aesthetic Kiwis can relate to. MMNZ says it plans to roll the new branding across its entire dealer network over the next three years. “We look forward to this next chapter as we build towards our goal of 10% market share,” Cook said. – Mark Daniel

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RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

NZ NATIONAL FIELDAYS 47

‘Unbeatable offer’ on telescopic loaders AN ‘UNBEATABLE’ offer will point up Claas Harvest Centre’s Fieldays promotion. The offer, on JCB Loadall 526-56 telescopic loaders, is part of the Harvest Centre network’s celebration of 25 years marketing JCB agricultural machinery in New Zealand. All 2019 loaders will carry an anniversary logo and special discounts will apply across the range. The popular Loadall 526-56 lifts up to 2.6 tonnes to 5.6m, uses a turbocharged 100hp Dieselmax 4-cylinder engine, four-speed powershift transmission and has hydraulic capacity of 80 L/minute. Also on display will be the Fastrac 4220 (235hp) high performance tractor with continuously variable transmission, all round self-levelling suspension and optional four wheel steering. Four equal size tyres, 50/50 weight distribution and all wheel disc braking

allow operating speeds up to 60km/h. Maximum lift at the rear linkage has been increased by 30% to 8000kg and the front linkage lifting capacity is increased 20% to 3500 kg. New chassis and suspension allow a maximum vehicle weight of up to 14 tonnes including a load of four tonnes on the rear deck. The Farm Master 435S Agri wheeled loader is also improved - in performance and efficiency, typically to help it clear the high volume outputs of self propelled foragers. A 435S Agri fitted with a 4m buck rake can clear a trailer load in one pass, allowing plenty of time to roll and seal the heap before the next trailer arrives. Also on display will be the new Claas Orbis 600 SD and Orbis 750 maize front attachments available in working widths of 6.0m and 7.5m. These deliver optimal crop flow, are highly efficient and

reliable and use a proven combination of large and small discs. The new models have a new folding system for rapid set-up and transport, a transport width of 3m, an integrated vibration damping system allowing road speeds up to 40km/h and two transport wheels to bear the main load of the attachment and meet permissible axle loads. Newly designed fingers ahead of the knives reduce crop loss and have points which can be removed for harvesting laid maize. A new tilting frame concept, standard for the Orbis C-Flex, ensures a centred feed of crop to the pre-compression rollers. Depending on conditions, the angle of the frame can be set at zero degrees in normal conditions or six degrees for difficult conditions including laid maize. Ground tracking options include Auto Contour which provides

DON’T EVEN GET OFF YOUR BIKE NEW FOR Fieldays 2019 is the Taracarry Plus, a nifty pigtail and reel carrier for quads. Made by Taragate as a modular system, the Taracarry Plus can be added to and extended as best suits the user. The base model is a pigtail carrier which sits neatly out of the way at the rear of the machine, but still allows the rear carrier to be used as normal. This easily carries 30 pigtail standards and two reels of fencing wire. A second module allows a third reel

to be carried with the fitment of an extra bracket. A third module, the Sidewinder which carries a fourth reel, fixes to the front carrier of the quad and allows the farmer to put up a fence without getting off the bike. The unit is made of robust galvanised steel, is easy to attach and remove, carries two to four reels securely depending on the module, and fits most major brands of quad. Site M36-38

active control of the lateral compensation and can permit stubble height as low as 85mm. A two-speed gearbox governs the speed of front attachments, a three-speed gearbox governs the speed of the feed drums, and an automatic function for the variable front attachment drive allows optimum crop flow. A communication module transmits data to the forage harvester to save settings for future use. An extended oil change interval of 2500 hours or five years reduces service costs, Also at Fieldays will be the new Claas Disco Move 3600 and 3200 mowers. These machines offer up

JCB Loadall

to 1m vertical movement and 30 degrees lateral travel, allowing them to work efficiency and safety in the roughest of paddocks. Both units have the maker’s Max Cut cutter bar, pressed from a single piece of steel and using a wave shape design to push discs further forwards, improving cutting quality. Available in 3.4m and 3m cutting widths, respectively, the new

units have a manoeuvrable headstock that allows the mower to move independently from the tractor front linkage when coupled directly or using an A-frame attachment. The headstock includes Claas’s Active Float integrated hydraulic suspension and a low pivot point. Active Float eliminates the need for suspension spring coupling points. Suspension pressure can

be adjusted in use by a single acting hydraulic service. An adjustment guide allows the front link arms to be set at the right height from the tractor cab, to remain fixed during operation. The mower is raised and lowered via integrated hydraulics. Both models can be configured as a mower only (F), with a tine conditioner (FC) or with a roller conditioner (FRC).


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RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

NZ NATIONAL FIELDAYS 49

Turning effluent into valuable farm resource OF THE food intake ruminants use for maintenance, milk production, rearing a calf and/or to produce meat, as much as 85% can end up as waste. This needs to be stored and used in an environmentally friendly way. And while many farmers consider slurry a waste product, growing numbers see it has fertiliser value and so can reduce bought-in fertiliser. Fertiliser value depends on variables such as time of applica-

tion and weather. Applying it in cool moist weather in spring rather than summer increases the amount of ammonium-N captured by the crop and reduces losses of N resulting from ammonia volatilisation. The method of application also has a major bearing, for example, applying slurry below the crop canopy with a vertical trailing shoe spreader allows the grass to harness more of the ammonia and reduce ammonia loss to the atmosphere. Irish company Abbey

Machinery, in its recent Guide to Slurry Management, refers to six key steps to get the best from effluent and realise its eventual potential. The process starts with proper storage and agitation of slurry to get a homogenous mix, picking the right equipment to transport the slurry, application method, environmental considerations, minimising compaction and using technology for accurate application. Abbey makes a big range of manure spread-

ers and slurry tankers and pays due attention to the method of application. Its trailing shoe applicators are available in 6m and 7m working widths with 24 or 28 outlets of 50mm diameter across the unit. Feeding is by a Vogelsang ExaCut macerator that helps create a homogenous mix while also reducing potential blockages. The effluent is fed to hardened cast iron shoes carried on sprung legs attached to self levelling booms. The Abbey Tri App

system has a 7.5m working width comprising individual floating sections and a forward folding boom design. Again, fed by a Vogelsang distributor with an auto reverse function, the unit can also carry a 600m reel assembly. The cereals applicator is set up to cover 12m. It uses much the same technologies as other applicators in the range but has rigid feed pipe ends to

ensure application on the ground next to the plants for optimum utilisation. A further option is a 7.5m door mounted (DM) band spreader that can be retro fitted to the rear door of a slurry tanker. The machine is fully galvanised. The unit is mounted close to the tanker body to optimise weight transfer to the tractor hitch point, and it has vertical folding booms for easy

transport. Abbey says its wide range of applicators help make efficient use of a readily available organic fertiliser, emit fewer odours than traditional splash plates, reduce grazing and downtimes and help achieve a more uniform spread pattern resulting in better utilisation by plants. See the Abbey team at the Irish Enterprise Exhibit

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RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

50 NZ NATIONAL FIELDAYS

Free cab kit for buyers A FREE cab kit is on offer to buyers of Honda’s Pioneer 700-2P side by side, on show at Fieldays. For a limited time every order will include a free roof, screen, wiper and tow hitch with a combined value of $2367. The Pioneer 700-2P is New Zealand’s largest selling such machine, says Honda, and its features are “crucial to the day-to-day running of NZ farms”. “It gives a smooth ride, has class leading stability and a well proven, fuel efficient engine with power to get the job done.” It’s powered by a 675cc liquid cooled engine with fuel injection for easy starting in cool weather and better operation at higher altitudes. The automatic transmission and heavy duty torque converter make

Honda Pioneer 700

the Pioneer 700-2P the only completely mechanical automotive style automatic in its class, Honda says. The torque converter and three hydraulic clutches provide positive engine braking. And unlike typical belt drive systems the machine’s true gear based mechanical driveline is not subject to the problem of belt stretch or breakage under heavy load.

Automatic mode can be overridden with steering column mounted, paddle style shifters, and the change from fully auto to manual selection is controlled by a dash mounted toggle switch. It has long travel suspension – 200mm movement up front and 230mm at the rear – and the rear set-up also has pre-load adjustment to cope with impressive load carrying ability. A large, hydraulically

assisted tilt bed is complemented by the ability to tow 680kg. Braking falls to 200mm hydraulic discs up front and 170mm units at the rear. For safety, operators are prompted to use seatbelts by a seat belt Interlock feature which limits maximum speed if the belt is not used. A sturdy protective cab, doors and side nets also favour the driver. Site E29

Sheep handling made easier HECTON PRODUCTS, whose name is familiar to many New Zealand sheep farmers, has a new product -- Mobile Stock Worker. This versatile handling unit is designed for easy transport around the farm or between properties, helping to make short work of sheep handling jobs. Set up or take down is easily achieved in 15 minutes. This is done by simply reversing up to the yard or holding pen, removing the transport wheels and then getting on with the job at hand. It has a reversible clamp frame to suit left or right handed users. Once the sheep are clamped, the operator is hands free to go about the work. The dagging race is available left or

right handed, and has two anti-backing wings to increase stock flow. Ideal for drafting, weighing, dagging, mouthing, tagging and inoculations, the units can handle ewes and lambs at the same time without any adjustment. With the addition of weighing equipment the unit becomes indispensible for monitoring lamb weights then drafting off finished animals. Southland farmer Nigel King has used a Stock Worker for 12 months and says he is very impressed. “It’s easy to use, stress free for ewes and lambs and importantly people,” he explains. “You name it, we’ve done it. Weighing, mouthing, uddering, drenching, ear tagging and even a cheeky wee crutching at the same time.”

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RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

NZ NATIONAL FIELDAYS 51

Side by side set to prove popular markd@ruralnews.co.nz

ONE OF two machines due for release by Landboss New Zealand at Fieldays is its U550 side by side. This machine should prove popular with farmers, given its gutsy engine, excellent powertrain and competitive purchase price of $11,990 + GST. It’s powered by a 500cc, fuel injected, single cylinder engine pushing out 33hp for quick response and good lugging ability. The power plant mates to a CVT transmission with high, low, neutral and reverse selections. Most importantly, it has effective engine braking via a sprag clutch -particularly effective in downhill when carrying a load or towing loaded trailers. Selecting low range gives maximum braking, meaning tricky inclines can be travelled under control. This is especially so given the U550 has particularly effective disc brakes at both ends. Traction is chosen by a 2WD or 4WD selector on the dashboard, and a combined button allows diff lock selection in difficult conditions. Also of interest is a free wheel selection for the rear axle, keeping

lawns at home unmarked. Happy wife, happy life, as they say. Nicely weighted, electric power steering feels good at high speeds and in easy manoeuvring in tight situations. Ride comfort is aided by an independent dual A-arm suspension set-up and long travel, adjustable pre-loads for spring rates (depending on load) and excellent rebound damping in all conditions. Black, 12-inch alloys are shod with well sorted, heavy lugged rubber good in poor conditions. And a front fender mounted 3000lb winch will prove useful if things go pear shaped. An all steel load tray has 250kg capacity, with fold down sides and rear tailgate all easily removeable if a flat platform is preferred. Positive locking is accessed from either side of the machine and loads are easily tipped with the aid of gas struts under the body. In the cab area, occupants are protected by a substantial ROPS frame fitted with a roof as standard, side nets, rear headrests and inertia reel seat belts. The comfortable bench seat layout has a drop down centre armrest with twin drink holders. An adjustable steering column carries a clever information display

pod that gives details of speed, drive mode, 2WD or 4WD selection and visuals for lights, engine temp, oil pressure, etc. Completing the package, a HD towbar fit-

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Ferist et quati aut pedici te vollab imod quamet atur soleniet quiatibu. PAGE 15

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Ferist et quati aut pedici te vollab imod quamet atur soleniet quiatibu. PAGE 23

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Visit us at site PE37 to receive a free coffee and reusable cup!

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RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

NZ NATIONAL FIELDAYS 53 TROJAN DESIGNED FOR KIWI FARM THE DR200 Trojan has been a benchmark farm two-wheeler motorcycle since its introduction 23 years ago. Designed from scratch by the engineers at Suzuki New Zealand for the country’s unique conditions, it’s ideal for all types of NZ farms. During its development Suzuki NZ custom-built a farm-oriented version of the already robust DR200 trail bike, added features that NZ farmers needed then sent it back to Japan for final sign-off and manufacture. A popular feature on the Trojan has always been its large 12V headlight, a bonus during early morning starts, and the quality aluminium protectors that give handlebar levers a second chance, not to mention saving knuckles from nasty skinning. Japanese-built means a quality standard that has some competitor products looking distinctly cheap. A case in point is the four-stroke engine’s exhaust header pipe (stainless steel) and oil cooling for performance and durability. Dual side stands are a winner on any farm and the chunky Bridgestone knobbly tyres front and rear make for great traction. Low gearing with a quality O-ring chain allows slow speed riding without continual stalling or heavy clutch use, and the 13L fuel tank holds enough to last most farmers all week. The Trojan is a real Kiwi farmbike. Site F86-92

Forester ferries Feds FEDERATED FARMERS will front for Subaru at Fieldays, a spin-off from the partnership the vehicle maker formed with Feds in 2018. Feds president Katie Milne and its nine territory managers nationwide drive Subaru Foresters, recently named New Zealand Car of the Year. Like all Subaru models, its all-wheel drive and 220mm ground clearance give the Forester lots of traction on slippery farm tracks and make for optimal driving stability on the roads to town. The family friendly SUV won five awards last year and earlier in 2019, many for the technology that keeps drivers and passengers safe. Milne says the Forester is the perfect vehicle for her and her colleagues. “It gives me

See SIT us at EC 94

TRAILERS • Built strong • Quality running gear • Over rated suspension

airport, Milne applauds having “all sorts of technology, like the improved X-Mode, working for me if the roads are slippery, snowy, or icy”. The new Forester has better rear seat access and room for three slimline child car seats across the back. The class-leading

confidence that they have the Forester’s safety and technology at their fingertips as they drive New Zealand’s highways and rural roads. It gives me peace of mind to know they are in the best car for their roles.” Regularly travelling from her Lake Brunner farm over Arthurs Pass to fly from Christchurch

driver monitoring system uses facial recognition to identify and monitor the driver. Subaru’s updated crash-avoidance technology, EyeSight, helped win the Forester the maximum 5-star ANCAP safety rating. Starting price is $39,990 RRP. Federated Farmers site PA1C.

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RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

54 NZ NATIONAL FIELDAYS

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THE IMPORTANCE of seeing regularly to your wellbeing will be the focus of Farmstrong’s site at Fieldays. Regularly taking breaks, connecting with mates, keeping active, eating well and doing stuff you enjoy – these add up over time and help you cope better with the ups and downs of farming. And these pay off for the business, says Farmstrong project leader Gerard Vaughan. “Farmers who ‘lock in’ these habits tell us they not only feel better, but their performance, decision making and efficiency on the farm also improve,” he says. This year, the Farmstrong site at E34E36 will have interactive tools to allow visitors to

RUGBY AMBASSADOR FARMSTRONG AMBASSADOR Sam Whitelock will also be on the Fieldays site on Friday June 14 from 2pm to 4pm. Whitelock will be signing Farmstrong merchandise and telling what he does to cope with the pressure of being a professional athlete. “As a rugby player, and someone from a farming background, I can identify with many of the pressures farmers have to deal with every day. “That’s why I know looking after yourself is so important,” says Whitelock.

identify tactics that could work for them. “Over the last four years, hundreds of farmers have shared what they do for their wellbeing, countered by the things in farming that make withdrawals on their wellbeing.” The Farmstrong site will have an interactive ‘wellbeing bank account’ display where visitors can quickly identify their current ‘investments’ and ‘withdrawals’ on their wellbeing.

“In farming, we regularly make plans and put systems in place to look after our land, stock and machinery, but sometimes forget about ourselves,” says Vaughan. “Using this interactive tool will help you quickly see what you currently have in place and whether there are other things that you could be doing. “Life can regularly throw ‘curve balls’ our way, whether it is weather ‘bombs’, low payouts or

animal and plant diseases. Having habits in place for wellbeing can get us through tough times without our burning out or becoming unwell.” The Farmstrong site will display basics from neuroscience that help us perform at our best each day. “How we think about things, particularly when we are under the pump, can make a huge difference to the way we manage stress, solve problems and even prevent injuries,” Vaughan says. “Knowing some of the more common thinking traps and how to avoid these is a good skill to add to the farming toolbox. “Visitors can have a quick game of matching five common thinking traps with a farming example and a solution to it.

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FARMERS WHO have yet to update their NAIT accounts will have an opportunity to do so at National Fieldays at Mystery Creek. “We’ll have a big presence this year for all the event days,” says the head of NAIT, Kevin Forward. “Our focus is NAIT re-registration and we want farmers to come forward and get help or advice on what to do with their NAIT accounts.” OSPRI, which manages NAIT, expects 4000 visitors to their stand and plans to double staff to meet demand. “If you are a livestock farmer

and your business depends on it, you need to update your NAIT account. This improves animal traceability and supports disease management, which is what OSPRI specialises in.” Farmers will also have a chance to go into a prize draw to win a livestock scanner. “This is always popular and a scanner is a great addition to the farm shed especially for doing NAIT. You can win a different brand on the day between Wednesday and Friday,” says Forward. Visitors to the OSPRI stand will also be able to trial a new NAIT

online system prototype. “We want to build farmer engagement with NAIT and this year’s Fieldays will be special as we have organised for farmers to test run and sample the future NAIT system. “This prototype is an exciting development and illustrates our ongoing focus to make the system more user friendly.” The OSPRI team will be in the Agriculture Pavilion at site PE40PE42 and be available to discuss TBfree management of livestock and the progress of TB eradication in your region.


RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

NZ NATIONAL FIELDAYS 55

Merge Maxx set for debut MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

Merge Maxx uses conveyor belts to achieve gentle swathing of forage.

30 and 50cm of overlap front to rear. Complementing the mower ranges, the new GF 8712 T trailed tedder has Kuhn’s new HLC (headland lift control) system that raises all rotors at least 50cm from the ground in five seconds from the tractor’s control unit. On the swath presentation front, the allnew Merge Maxx 950 belt merger uses a different method of windrowing, two independent

pick-ups and hydraulically driven conveying belts to achieve gentle swathing of forage in crops such as lucerne. Also on the site will be the forage harvester that won the Agritechnica Machine of the Year 2018 award -- the FBP 3135 fixed chamber combi baler. This uses the maker’s patented film on film and net binding systems which help to achieve high silage quality at the lower costs. The design, said to

result in a guaranteed binding start under all circumstances, uses two regular 750mm film rolls rather than one large mantle film roll, saving 30% on film costs due to the higher pre-stretch ratio of 70%. Operators looking to optimise forage use can see the latest vertical twin-auger mixer wagon -- the Profile 28.2 CL. A new range is available in single auger format from 4m3 to 15m3 or from 12m3 to 34m3 capacity in twin

M-EMC represents the high-end of the Kuhn mounted spreader range, with built-in variable rate and section control function ready to unlock. The patented EMC (electronic mass flow control) automatic rate control is said to be unlike any other on the market, weighing its output on each spreading disc every second for unrivalled accuracy.

At the other end of the spectrum, the MDS 19.1 spreader is an entry level twin-disc spreader that’s truly simple. It’s simple to setup via either a flip chart or phone application and simple to operate with a push-button start option or hydraulic open/close via the tractor outlet. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

Kuhn’s combi baler will also be on display.

Choose wisely.

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KUHN NZ will show a new series of bar mower and an addition to its forage raking range -the Merge Maxx 950 belt merger. In the mower lineup, the all new GMD 355 top drive bar mower, although like the wellknown GMD 310 has its cutter bar driven through the top of the first disc, eliminating the need for an inner skid drive which can drag crop when the machine is used for topping. The FC 3125 and FC 9530 triple mower conditioner remain the maker’s ‘flagship’ machines with premium features such as hydraulic ‘lift control’ suspension and the on-the-fly hydraulic side shift, giving between

auger configuration. The Profile 28.2 CL model on display has industry leading K-NOX mixing augers, using an alloy of chrome and ferrites, making it a more ‘stainless’ steel for intensive use. Kuhn fertiliser spreaders on display will include a fully GPS and ISOBUS controlled simulator. The Axis 40.2

HARDI RANGER 2,500 l capacity, 12 m to 24 m boom options, 1.5 m to 2.0 m track, easy to operate and maintain

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RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

56 NZ NATIONAL FIELDAYS

Booming sheep milking a top prospect More farmers are enquiring about sheep milk, says Spring Sheep Milk Co.

GOOD GROWTH in the sheep milking industry during the 2018-19 financial year signals this is a good time for farmers to get involved, says Spring Sheep Milk Co. The firm’s producer business manager, Thomas Macdonald, says international demand for New Zealand sheep milk products is strong. And more farmers are inquiring about converting their dairy farms to sheep milk, he says. “Heading into our fifth dairy season we are noticing a lot more interest in the industry,” says Macdonald. “Last year, I might have received around one inquiry a month from a farmer looking at options, but those inquiries are now coming in thick and fast.” Macdonald says with Spring Sheep being demand-led they will only bring in more suppliers when the demand is there, which is now. “We have 4000 sheep being milked. But strong customer demand means we are now looking to grow sheep numbers by bringing in new supplier farmers.” Most milk demand is from Asia where consumers want alternative milks and nutrition products, Macdonald says. Growth in this market is on Spring Sheep’s agenda. “Last year, we saw our productivity double thanks to new genetic lines imported from Europe.” Previously, NZ-bred ewes were producing 120L each per season, but the new, high-performing genetic lines have the potential to increase production to 600L per ewe per season. “Most farming systems need about 250-450L per ewe per season to achieve a good return. So the improved productivity we’re seeing presents a good opportunity for farmers considering a conversion to sheep dairy farming.” The company has two farms, one near Cambridge and one in Reporoa, near Rotorua. It has just finished its first season successfully running three farm system trials: full grazing outdoor, hybrid indoor outdoor grazing and large scale

hybrid models. Milk from its farms is then processed at Melody Dairies’ spray drier at Waikato Innovation Park in Hamilton. Macdonald says dairy farmers in Waikato region, being within the twohour travel zone for processing, are ideal future suppliers. “Waikato region is rich dairy country, and the pastoral farming practices and core skillset of dairy farming found there is easily transferred to sheep milk. “The optimal sheep milking system in NZ requires the use of high-performance genetics, combined with a farming system that uses our pastoral advantage. We now have those genetics available, and we’re looking to work with passionate, skilled dairy farmers with high-quality land.” Macdonald says the growth in the industry is encouraging for farmers who are looking at sheep milk as a viable, highreturn farming option. “As a value-added product, sheep milk isn’t at the mercy of fluctuating market prices so the farmgate price remains stable,” he says. There are several positive environmental impacts for farms converting from cow dairy to sheep milk. “Converting to sheep milk doesn’t require any land use intensification, and there’s a positive impact on water use and nitrogen leaching,” he says. “We partnered with AgResearch to do nitrogen leaching trials on our farms, with results showing a 30% reduction in N-leaching compared to an equivalent stocked bovine operation.” Macdonald says the strong demand for sheep milk products from the market, combined with four seasons of operational experience on Spring Sheep’s farm group, paints a positive picture for the sheep milk industry. • To find out more on purchasing dairy sheep and supplier contracts, visit Spring Sheep Milk Co at the 2019 National Agricultural Fieldays at Mystery Creek, 12-15 June, at stand J22.

Visit us at the Mystery Creek Fieldays, June 12-15 Site I6-I8 Pace Power & Air specialises in supplying a complete range of reliable diesel generators from 8kVA to 2,750kVA. We are committed to selling the highest quality power solutions and focused on delivering outstanding local service and support to ensure your power always stays switched on! Call 0800 002 056 or visit www.power-air.co.nz to find out how a JCB generator can support you.

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RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

NZ NATIONAL FIELDAYS 57

More power, better fuel economy MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

THE NEW McCormick

X5 series contains three models powered by a 3.6L Deutz 4-cylinder engine tuned for max outputs of 99hp (X5.35), 110hp (X5.45) and 113hp (X5.55). More power, torque and better fuel economy are gained from this the new engine which has a simplified emissions control system -- a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC). This needs no diesel particulates filter which would require more maintenance or operator intervention. A viscous cooling fan option is said to maintain cooler tempera-

tures and help reduce fuel consumption. From the engine, power is channelled to a 24F/24R speed transmission equipped with a splitter button on the gear selector that permits up or down shifts to cope with changing load on the tractor. In addition, a new Eco

Forty feature reduces engine revs once the 40km/h maximum speed has been reached, saving fuel and reducing noise during transport operations. All wheel brak-

ing uses internal discs in the front axle and a new power boost system lessens the pedal effort required. A new four-speed PTO option is another fuel saving feature in the paddock, providing 540rpm or 1000rpm speeds at ‘economy’ and standard settings.

Hydraulic output is via a 63L/min gear pump complemented by a 32L/ min pump dedicated to steering and ancillary clutches, supplying the three double-acting spool

valves fitted as standard. Other standard equipment includes interchangeable ball and claw ends for the 4500kg rear linkage lift arms. Electronic control of the rear

hitch is standard. Standard equipment includes an air suspension seat, tilt/telescopic steering wheel and air conditioning in the cabin. Site C17-19

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WMS EXPANDS INTO EFFLUENT WAIKATO MILKING Systems (WMS) will use Fieldays to promote its expansion beyond milking systems into effluent and environmental plant. The Hamilton company in 2015 bought the effluent management specialist Hi-Tech Enviro Solutions, founded in Morrinsville in 1992. “The acquisition aligned with WMS’s expansion of its product offering,” said its chief executive Campbell Parker. “Now is the right time to fully integrate effluent and environmental into the WMS core product

offering rather than keeping it as a separate brand. “Since we acquired Hi-Tech Enviro Solutions we’ve been working to improve the quality of product and aligning the culture of both businesses to reflect the standards WMS is known for. “We’ve also needed to work with our dealer network to ensure seamless delivery of our entire product range. Farmers will now be able to discuss their effluent needs with any member of the WMS team. “When a farmer needs an effluent system review one of our dairy

effluent specialists will advise and design a system for compliance. “WMS is a trusted brand in dairying world-wide, and adding effluent and environmental will give farmers confidence that they are getting the best advice and systems to futureproof their farm dairies.” The WMS Fieldays site has been extended and will display all the company’s products -- milking parlors, milking automation, dairy management, milk cooling and effluent and environmental.

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RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

58 NZ NATIONAL FIELDAYS

Data will unlock the next era of farming CAM ANDERSON

NO MATTER the size of a farm, most farmers talk about wanting to be more efficient and productive so they can spend more time doing what they love. We throw around phrases like smart farming or precision farming but making changes to longstanding processes and traditional methods isn’t always easy. Using technology wisely is key to unlocking the full productive potential of our farms. It’s not just about what happens in our milking shed or paddocks. We also need to focus on what goes on in the farm office. We can get excited about virtual fencing, autonomous milking robots and other agricultural robots. They are going to take some of the heavy lifting out of farming, but only if we know how to use them correctly, and that all comes back to the data they are programmed with. Take drones for example. Histor-

“We may talk about the technology of the future, but first we’ve got to make the most of technology at hand.” ically, if you needed to check your fences, livestock or perimeter you would have done it manually, perhaps wasting productive hours. But by using a laptop, iPad or smartphone a modern farmer can operate a drone and finish task in a fraction of the time. Using the information collected, such as identification of irrigation problems or soil nutrient variation, you can proactively alter your farming plan to improve crop yields and so improve overall farm efficiency. The same is true of data collected in the office. If you have boxes of receipts and invoices that you or your bookkeeper are entering into your accounting system irregularly, then you are missing the advantage of live data.

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Timely data means you can make proactive decisions about your finances, improving your efficiency and leaving you with free time and peace of mind, knowing your decision hasn’t been made on a whim. We may talk about the technology of the future, but first we’ve got to make the most of the technology at hand. Pulling together one farm team that can view finances, forecasts, crop and quantities, and track livestock movement and value in real time is a must. Implementing new technologies on your farm is exciting. But capturing real time data about your current situation means you have the foundation to take advantage of new technology

Cam Anderson

coming down the line. It’s important you know what efficiencies they’ll drive and the impact they’ll have on your bottom line so that you can improve your financial sustainability. Well thought out plans and investments, strong forecasting and budgeting, and the use of reliable information are all part of good agricultural management. This is where digital platforms like Figured are useful for collecting, digesting and processing all of this raw data into something tangible. Its production planning and farm budget-

ing tools work seamlessly with online accounting software, Xero, enabling you to plan ahead with confidence and easily re-forecast when conditions such as milk payout change. Whether the conditions are weather, crop yields or livestock numbers, you and your entire farming team can collaborate using real time financial data – wherever you’re working – because it’s all online. These are just some of the solutions you can see at this year’s Fieldays. • Cam Anderson is Xero’s head of agribusiness and practice strategy

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RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

NZ NATIONAL FIELDAYS 59

Seeders, mowers, rakes, balers and more on display MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

TULLOCH FARM Machines will display the latest Krone Big X 780 plus maize header, a Big M 450 self-propelled mower conditioner, a Comprima CF 155XC baler and a Swadro TC 640 rotary rake. On the mower front, units WILL include the EC F 320 CV Pull and EC F 320 CV Push mowers, an Easy Cut R 280 and the ActiveMow R 280. The BiG X 780 is powered by an 8-cylinder, 775hp Liebherr engine, offering X-Power and EcoPower for power adjustment to suit conditions and reduce fuel consumption. The hydraulically driven intake system enables stepless length of cut, with feed rates controlled by six intake rollers. Crop is fed to a 660mm diameter chopping cylinder that can be fitted with 20, 28 or 36 blades arranged in a chevron pattern, said to centre the crop to deliver a continuous flow in all crop types. After the chopping cylinder the corn processor has new Optimaxx rollers for processing maize, using twin 250mm diam-

eter rollers equipped with 105 and 123 teeth respectively, angled at 5% and running at a speed differential of 30% to shatter kernels and shred stalk even at longer chop lengths. The Big M 450 self propelled mower conditioner has had major design changes -- a new cab, engine, running gear and redesigned mower units. With a working width of 9.95m, the Big M can achieve work rates of up to17ha/hour. The EasyCut F 320 CV mower has a working width of 3.16m and a unique headstock that allows it to be mounted as a push or pull version. The push version has an A-frame that incorporates two substantial coil springs that draw the mower toward the tractor for exceptional suspension. The push design creates a compact machine, reduces weight and is gentle on the surface of the paddock. In the pulled version, the suspension springs are integrated into the mower’s suspension system. The tension of the two springs is controlled by a single crank and is easy to adjust. With mechanical weed

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Row-Guard system he recovered the cost of the machine in just 13 days use. From the Monosem camp, the NG Plus ME (Monoshox with electric drive) planter is said to be low maintenance, versatile and efficient in the field. It achieves faster

working speeds with its Monoshox suspension system, the ISOBUS system and section control allow ease of use, and automatic shut-off takes the worry out of doubleplanting. For the first time at Fieldays, TFM will showcase the Strebel strip

tillage system. With a combined planter and front tank the system achieves lower input costs, less soil erosion and better environmental outcomes. The unit has a working width of 3m, a cultivator working to 20-25cm depth and a rotary tiller working at 10-15cm. Two configurations offer a choice of models with four tines and 75cm spacing or six tines at 50cm spacing. The layout of the machine uses a subsoiler with rotary hoe blades on either side of the subsoiler leg. The design breaks up the sub-surface pan and in turn brings soil up to the rotary hoe and creates a fine seedbed, delivering a planting area for the intended rows without disturbing the soil between them. @rural_news

Krone Big X780 plus maize header.

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tines placed at 20-30cm row spacings. The Row Guard system uses cameras to look down several rows and then automatically side shift the cultivator hydraulically, overcoming the limitations of GPS-RTK, even at 2cm accuracy. A Hawkes Bay squash grower reports that by replacing manual labour with the Chopstar and

control gaining ground in New Zealand among row crop farmers and maize and fodder beet growers, TFM will feature an Einbock Chopstar inter-row cultivator equipped with the advanced Row-Guard camera-based steering system. The Chopstar uses a hydraulically folding frame that in turn carries mounted spring or vibro

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RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

60 NZ NATIONAL FIELDAYS

Latest from Jean du Bru’s camp

FLAT ROLLER PUTS AWAY STONES, KILLS GRASS GRUBS

ally or hydraulically, helps shatter clods and creates a levelling effect. When folding the machine for work or transport the hydraulic wings are synchro-

nised to fold at the same time, improving stability on slopes and locking into the transport position. An APV seeder unit with 16 outlets is integrated into the overall

design. This is mounted on a factory installed platform at the rear of the machine, easily and safely accessed via a ladder with a handrail.

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FLAT ROLLING pasture, particularly in spring, is an effective method of pushing stones below the ground surface, so preventing damage to mowers, rakes and harvesters used subsequently. The process is also good for repairing pugged areas, consolidating peat land and killing grass grubs. The Aitchison transfer roller moves away from the traditional trailed design, being linkage mounted and using a weight transfer system via a hydraulic top link assembly. In practice, the weight of the carrying tractor is transferred to the roller, so increasing pressure over a small footprint, with the additional benefit of reducing tractor tyre wheelings. The pressure is easily adjusted from the tractor seat, and the machine is said to be suitable for wet and dry pasture situations. Robustly made and using a 600mm diameter smooth roller, the TR275 and TR 300 models come in working widths of 9’ 2” and 10’ respectively, with transport widths of 3.0 and 3.3m. Filled with water to increase the tare weight the units weigh 1920 and 2120kg respectively, can typically operate between 2 and 15km/h and require a tractor of 80-140hp depending on terrain.

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POWER FARMING at Fieldays will show the latest from the Jean du Bru cultivation camp -- a new roller drill fitted with an APV seeder unit. The MegaPack RS roller drills are available in 5.3 or 6.3m working widths with a heavy duty 150 x 150mm drawbar attached to a 100 x 100mm frame supporting the roller assemblies. Roller gangs are centrally pivoted to achieve good contour following, and a clever C-spring damping system will prove useful in uneven or stony ground. With a Cambridge and cracker ring setup, mounted on 70mm diameter shafts featuring greaseable bushes, the machines weigh up to 4.9 tonnes depending on model. Up front, the levelling bar, adjusted manu-

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RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

NZ NATIONAL FIELDAYS 61

Snap chiller hoping to be a drawcard THE ONLY snap chilling system that can simultaneously perform a range of functions is set to be a drawcard at Fieldays. The variable drive VariCOOL, VariCHILL and VariVAT range of snap chilling systems are unique in being able to to snap chill milk in multiple vats, generate

hot water and measure, record and report milk temperature -- all at the same time. The brainchild of Coolsense founder Allan Steele, the systems are designed and manufactured in New Zealand. They give farmers assurance that their milk is being chilled to the highest standards

with minimal power use. Says Steele, “Compliance across a range of functions is a distraction for farmers from what they do best – producing the best milk in the world. “They want systems which do what the makers say they’ll do, easily and efficiently. “Our systems do that.

Hot on safety SKELLERUP HAS taken gumboot design a step further – into greater wearer safety. Its new Red Band Safety gumboot “is all about hazard management and mitigation to prevent workplace injury,” says Perry Davis, the company’s national manager. “One of the simplest safety steps is to wear the right footwear. It’s a routine, everyday choice that can make a huge difference, not just to guard against direct foot injuries from crushing or penetration, but also slips and falls.” Anyone unable to walk properly, even for a short time, knows how critical their feet are for both work and life in general. The human foot has no fewer than 28 different bones. Together, both feet contain a quarter of all of our bones, 66 joints, 200 tendons, muscles, ligaments, blood vessels and about 8000 nerves. And good legal and financial reasons support protective footwear too. Businesses can face heavy fines for failing to keep staff safe at work. The new Red Band Safety gumboot ensures a wearer faces minimal risk of injury on the job. The boot is knee high with an exter-

nal leg trim line so it can be easily converted to calf length. The steel toe cap protects the foot from crushing and the nitrile rubber outsole resists oil, acid, heat and electrical hazard. A steel shank in the sole guards against penetration and an anti-slip outsole makes the boots skid-free on wet ceramic tile flooring. Like all Red Bands the Safety gumboot is hand-made from UV resistant natural rubber, with a hard-wearing internal cotton-canvas bonded lining and a 5mm rubber sponge insole.

Allen Steel, Coolsense.

One box, easily retrofitted to existing sheds or incorporated into new builds, snap chills milk to below 6 deg C within two hours of milking. One ‘box’ is capable of chilling multiple vats simultaneously. “The range of chillers operate on variable speed matching demand and minimising power usage. They also generate high grade heat recovery to a

maximum of 70degC and 480 litres per hour.” Steele said an awareness that farmers want to be able to measure the efficiency of their milk chilling led to the company developing a system which measures, monitors and reports chill capacity and efficiency and heat recovery in real time. “The Vari-COOL’s energy meter enables it

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sends a warning text should a system issue occur with most able to be rectified online.” The Coolsense system chassis is galvanised and powder coated and the condenser is polymer dipped, giving the system an expected life span of at least 20 years. Site E80 @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

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to calculate its return on investment. It calculates and reports energy savings, logging the temperature of the milk before and after snap chilling along with holding temperatures in the vat in real time. “WAN (wide area network) connectivity enables data retrieval and self-diagnosis monitoring of tank, milk temperature and system. The system

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RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

MACHINERY & PRODUCTS 63

A new legend? CONTINUING ITS long history of farm bikes in New Zealand, Honda now launches the all new CRF250F. This newcomer is powered by a new, 250cc four valve engine with Keihin electronic fuel injection for increased power. Strong torque and a linear power delivery enables new riders to learn at lower, less intimidating rpm, and advanced offroaders can use its torque for climbing on farm. The increase in torque at all rpm also results in fewer shifts, allowing riders to focus more on the trail ahead. Its tubular steel frame is durable and makes for excellent handling, a benefit appreciated by all riders. And the repositioning of the exhaust muffler closer to the centre of

mass helps give the bike a lighter feel, responsiveness and good handling especially at the entrance to corners. The Pro-Link rear suspension puts the smooth power to the ground, and the Showa 41mm fork works with the new frame’s steering geometry for maximum front-wheel traction. Braking is by new petal-style rotors for improved modulation,

heat transfer and mud clearing. The CRF Performance Line inspired bodywork aggressive and compact keeps the rider in touch with the machine. Hot or cold, stored in the garage or stopped on a challenging hill, the CRF250F’s EFI and electric starter always does its thing. There are no carburetor circuits to clog with fuel residue if the bike has to sit for a long time.

MACHINERY SALES STEADY, CHALLENGES LOOM SALES OF tractors and farm machinery so far in 2019 are steady versus 2018 but challenges loom, says Tractor and Machinery Association (TAMA) president John Tulloch. TAMA’s year to date figures to April 30 show 1104 sales across all sectors vs 1111 in 2018. North Island sales fell by 4.7% to 713 (2018 - 748). South Island sales rose by 7.4% to 390 units delivered (2018 - 363). April 2019 sales figures are down 11.7% on April 2018, says Tulloch. This is partly due to 10% fewer sales of smaller (20 - 50hp) machines typically used by small commercial operators and lifestyle block owners. While 2018 was a record sales year (4600 units sold) Tulloch predicts 2019 sales will fall to between 4300 and 4500 units, mainly due to the decline in the smaller model sales which last year totalled nearly 1000 units. Overall confidence in the rural sector remains strong, prompting

farmers to keep buying tractors and up importers’ costs and those of machinery, Tulloch says. But he customers. “There is also the impact of forsees a tightening of credit conminimum wage rate ditions, likely because of upgrades, meaning that signals by the Reserve as the lower end of pay Bank on increasing scales increase, then banks’ equity to loan other grades would also ratios to help increase need to be reviewed,” its cash reserves. Tulloch says. “This will have the He says service techpotential to affect the nicians four or five years indebted rural sector, ago typically earned $28/ particularly dairy farm- TAMA’s John Tulloch. hour but their rates now ers who typically carry exceed $35/h. greater debt.” “Yet despite these increases Tulloch also warns of a forthcoming increase in global shipping there is still an industry wide probrates – due to new emissions regu- lem recruiting qualified staff,” Tulllations – that will take effect by Jan- och told Rural News. “Like many other industries, uary 2020. These will require most ships to reduce sulphur emissions the tractor and farm machinery under the Marpol Annex VI treaty. sector must get better at attractWhile New Zealand has not rat- ing, inducting and retaining young ified this treaty, most visiting ves- people while also retaining older, sels are registered in countries that more experienced staff. “TAMA absolutely has a role in have ratified it and will be bound by the new rules. This will force ships this and we need to better promote now powered by crude oil to switch the exciting career opportunities to more expensive diesel, pushing that exist in our sector.”


RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

64 MACHINERY & PRODUCTS

Alternative quad may be a choice MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

YOUR BROW will furrow when you first see the e3 quad from Switchedevglobal. It looks like a cross between a giant skateboard and a sailing dinghy with a hint of motorised barrow and a golf buggy. Yet the e3 quad might suit you in being a bit different and environmentally friendly. It was developed in NZ and launched at the 2014 National Fieldays, promoted as ideal for agricultural applications. It carries two people and has a tipping tray with a 250kg capacity. Power comes from a 72V lithiumion battery pack with running costs amounting to no more than $1/day for a recharge, the company says. Battery life is reckoned at 6000 recharges – typically 16 years of daily charging. The battery pack feeds twin electric motors with peak torque of 84Nm. They drive the rear wheels via a 5:1 chain reduction. This combination offers a top speed of 35km/h and

The e3 quad may suit those farmers wanting to be environmentally friendly.

is halted by disc brakes. It has high torque, slow speed control in difficult conditions, and there’s regenerative braking in the drive line which tops

up the battery. The frame carries a high strength body monocoque body reinforced with Kevlar material and the maker

describes it as a highly stable platform. It’s all built around a heavy duty, hot dip galvanised chassis with stainless steel fittings and marine grade seating

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and switches. The e3 also benefits from a 304 grade stainless steel ROPS and inertia reel seatbelts as standard. The maker says testing suggested that a three wheel/ triangular layout – to carry two people side by side and a rear load -- offered better stability than conventional four wheel layouts. Especially this suits uneven terrain because all three wheels stay in constant contact with the ground, the maker says. The e3 is said to have a much wider wheel track than a typical quad, better for stability and for towing up to 500kg on the rear coupling. Owner George Cook, of Taupo, says he likes the vehicle. “Our selection criteria were a vehicle that both my wife and I could use, with battery power preferred for low noise and high torque, to deal with the steep areas of our property safely. “The latter quickly ruled out ATVs, so we chose the e3 and it has been a joy to use. The machine pulls our heavy chipper with ease and carts logs, bark and tools. It makes hard work a pleasure.” www.switchedevglobal.com

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RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

MACHINERY & PRODUCTS 65

100HP TRACTOR & LOADER

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Faster path in R&D MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

A NEW evaluation centre opened by Claas at its headquarters at Harsewinkel, Germany will help maintain its front ranking in harvesting technology. The centre will be pivotal in its development of new agricultural products. The NZ$25 million centre will have NZ$5.4m of testing gear to speed development of the company’s headers, forage harvesters and tractors. It was formally opened by Catherina Claas Muhlhauser, daughter of Helmut Claas, after 22 months construction. It has 13 test cells to replicate real world and extreme situations worldwide. The electrically driven rigs can run unattended 24/7, doing lengthy tests over

concise timelines. The largest rigs can accommodate combine cutter-bars up to 12m working width and will test engineering specifications and durability. The building itself incorporates several firsts, not least a 600-tonne foundation slab that was cast in a single piece and sits on an air suspension system. The building has a 1200kW cooling system reckoned equivalent to the heating systems found in 120 family homes. A purpose built electronics lab develops and tests electronic systems used in harvesting machines. Complete machine systems are housed in cabinet size enclosures, allowing systems that interact throughout a machine to be tested and improved before upgrades are built into production machines.

150K TRACTORS CELEBRATED FARM MACHINERY maker Claas is celebrating having made 150,000 tractors since it bought the Renault brand in 2003. To mark the occasion it is marketing two special editions of its Axion 870 (295hp) and Arion 660 (205hp) high tech tractors. Both models use the company’s CMatic continuously variable transmission, front axle suspension, four point cab suspension, and the Cebis operating system Telematics. A long list of cab features include leather trim, mobile phone mount, tinted rear window and LED lighting. On the outside, the celebratory models will sport a metallic paint

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job and special ‘150,000’ decals. Claas Harvest Centre product manager for tractors, Dave Knowles, says the company has over ten years spent at least $1 billion improving its tractor R&D and manufacturing capabilities. “It has redeveloped its tractor manufacturing plant and built a testing facility in France

and a transmission plant in Germany. This investment has allowed Claas to release a new series almost every year since 2006, an amazing achievement.” Claas tractors have earned a string of international accolades in recent years, with the Xerion 5000, Axion 900 and Axion 800 winning Machine of the Year awards at Agritechnica.

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Gearing you up for success.


RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

66 MACHINERY & PRODUCTS / RURAL TRADER

There’s no job like a snow job MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

CAN A robot be used to clear snow from an airstrip? Yes, it can, as demonstrated by tractor spe-

cialist Valtra with Nokian Tyres and three other Finnish companies. They set out to prove the concept in March 2019 at the European Union’s northernmost airport.

Winters are long in Finland with many regions covered in snow for 150 to 200 days a year. But airport operators need ‘summer’ conditions on runways even in mid winter, so they’re always

The runway snowbots in action.

for new ways to achieve this. Hence the project ‘Runway Snowbot’, conceived by Finnish experts, each a specialist in their field with a deep understanding of the Nordic climate. The result was two driverless Valtra T254 Versu tractors running on Nokian Hakkapeliitta TRI tyres and each pulling a 4.5m wide sweeper blower to clear the runway at Ivalo airport in Finnish Lapland. Valtra has worked for years on auto-guided tractors. With Nokian Tyres it set the speed record in 2018 for unmanned snowploughing with an autonomous T254 Versu tractor running on Nokian Hakkapeliitta TRI tyres. The ‘Runway Snowbot’ project used Valtra SmartTouch with auto guidance to centimetre precision. Isobus implement control provided the technol-

FOR GREAT PASTURE AND CROP YIELD. CHOOSE DUNCAN AERATORS, DISC OR TINE DRILLS. Alstrong Aerator Designed to aerate and fracture the top soil layer up to 30cm deep and turn your non-productive paddocks around. • • • • •

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ogy needed for controlled clearing of pre-defined routes. The Nokian Hakkapeliitta TRI tyre is the world’s first tractor winter tyre, providing the grip and accuracy needed for safe driverless tractor operation while gently treating the runway surfaces. The winter 2018–2019 tests were successful and though the concept is not quite ready to go commercial it has paved the way. “Tractors are an interesting alternative for airport fleets where working widths of 4.5m are sufficient,” said Tero Santamanner, a machine specialist at Finavia. “Tractors are much less expensive in total cost of ownership than trucks and much more versatile. They can be used for other tasks such as snow blowing or mowing during summer.”

Check out our websites www.ruralnews.co.nz www.dairynews.co.nz

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RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

RURAL TRADER 67

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RURAL NEWS // JUNE 4, 2019

68 RURAL TRADER

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LEGGINGS

$66

valued at $145 sold out of size: S

RAINWEAR XS - 3XL


FIELD

DR200SE

$4,899 EXCL. GST SAVE $360

®

LS

TF125

TROJAN

FARMBIKE

YS DE

• • • • • • •

Quality made in Japan Dual side-stands Comfortable seat Handlebar-mounted carrier 5-speed Electric start 4-stroke Large 12V headlight

MUDBUG

FARMBIKE

$2,999 EXCL. GST

• • • • • •

Quality made in Japan Dual side-stands Comfortable seat Handlebar-mounted carrier 125cc 2-stroke 6-speed

SAVE $549

Price excludes GST. Savings include GST. Offer not available in conjunction with any other promotion. Offer runs from 1 May to 31 July 2019, or while stocks last.

VISIT US THIS FIELDAYS ON SITE F86-F92

Get yourself a new Suzuki Ultimate Outboard and pay no interest for 24 months. But be quick, it’s for a very limited time. www.marine.suzuki.co.nz

0% INTEREST

TRACTA62020_RN

SUZUKI ULTIMATE OUTBOARD MOTORS GOING FAST.

Offer available on models 40hp and up. Suzuki Marine Finance to approved purchasers only from $0 deposit. Normal lending criteria applies. Please go to www.marine.suzuki.co.nz/finance-calculator for more information.

SUZ62020 0% Creative Wrap Rural News F.indd 2

9/05/19 3:10 PM


FIELD

SAVE $2,000

NOW FROM $19,990

+ORC

YS DE ®

LS

SAVE $2,000

NOW FROM $16,990

+ORC

SAVE $2,000

NOW FROM $27,990

+ORC

Offer available 1 May to 30 June 2019. Excludes fleet purchases, no deposit finance offer, demo vehicles and all other promotions. Fieldays site F86–F92.

NO DEPOSIT FINANCE

TEST DRIVE THE NEW 2019 VITARA TODAY

FROM

$120 PER WEEK

2WD or ALLGRIP • Climate air-conditioning • Sat nav Reversing camera • Apple CarPlay® & Android Auto™ Keyless entry • Cruise control & speed limiter • 5-star safety • Excellent fuel economy 5.8-6.5 L/100 km† and a whole lot more

JLX FROM $27,990 PLUS ORC TURBO FROM $33,990 PLUS ORC

* $119.43/week based on Vitara JLX 2WD Manual, $27,990 plus ORC, total amount payable $31,171.23; nil deposit, 3.9% p.a. fixed interest rate and 5-year term. On payment of on-road costs to the Dealer, finance payments include a $300 documentation fee and $10.35 PPSR fee. Offer available 1 May to 30 June 2019. Normal lending and credit criteria apply. Excludes fleet purchases, demo vehicles and all other promotions. †ADR 81/02 results for combined cycle. Fuel consumption will vary due to factors such as vehicle condition, driving style and traffic conditions.

LIMITED EDITION FROM

$

TEST DRIVE TODAY. FROM $25,990 PLUS ORC SUZUKI NEW ZEALAND LIMITED 1 HEADS ROAD, WANGANUI. SZM0456 JUNE 2019

95 PER WEEK*

• TWO-TONE ROOF • SIDE SKIRTS

• 17-INCH ALLOYS • SR2 BADGING

MANUAL $21,990 +ORC CVT AUTO $23,990 +ORC

* $94.12/week based on Swift SR2 Manual, $21,990 plus ORC, total amount payable $24,565.32 nil deposit, 3.9% p.a. fixed interest rate and 5-year term. On payment of on-road costs to the Dealer, finance payments include a $300 documentation fee and $10.35 PPSR fee. Offer available 27 May to 30 June 2019. Normal lending and credit criteria apply. Excludes fleet purchases, demo vehicles and all other promotions.

FIELDAYS SITE F86-F92

WWW.SUZUKI.CO.NZ

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Rural News 04 June 2019