Page 1

OPINION

MACHINERY & PRODUCTS

NEWS

Rural recycling a no-brainer.

A loader with a difference.

Water quality in rivers the number one priorityEnvironment Minister PAGE 7

PAGE 24

PAGE 32

TO ALL FARMERS, FOR ALL FARMERS MARCH 6, 2018: ISSUE 648 

www.ruralnews.co.nz

ETS opt in option PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

WHILE 95% of agricultural emissions will not come under the Emissions Trading Scheme, farmers will have an option to opt in and gain the financial benefit, says Minister for the Environment David Parker. The Government wants to ensure there is reward for people who reduce their greenhouse gas emissions, Parker told the Agcarm Summer Conference in Auckland recently. He says most agricultural emissions will not come under the emissions trading scheme, he says. “95% of their emissions will free: they will be paid for by others effectively. The 5% being charged will be collected at the processors.

“But we will enable individual farmers who want to opt into the scheme at a farm level to opt in. “If you have a farmer who opts in with their share of those 95% free emissions, if they reduce their emissions by for example converting to a horticultural land use where there are no ruminant greenhouse gas emissions, they get the financial benefit of that emissions reduction,” he explains. “That will incentivise the land use change that both reduces greenhouse

gas emissions and leads to higher value land uses.” ASB’s senior rural economist Nathan Penny says climate change and a net carbon economy by 2050 is one policy which will stick – even with a future change in government. Agriculture will be helped along in the first instance with a subsidy of 95% to begin with, Penny told the conference. “But once the climate commission meets and makes it recommendations

There she flows! Fiona Crombie, Central Plains Water Ltd’s (CPWL) environmental technical lead, explains the irrigation scheme to Federated Farmers’ dairy and sharemilker section members in Canterbury, last week. Behind her is the end of the stage one canal near Hororata, with a pumping station intake at left. The inlet for the big stage two development, now being built, is about 700m upstream. The three-day meeting of the Feds’ joint dairy and sharemilking section councils started with a bus tour of CPWL sites and a visit to the Synlait plant at Dunsandel. – PHOTO NIGEL MALTHUS

these will start to be enacted,” he says. “Our view is that these policies are likely to stick even with a change of government. “There is broad support for climate change policies. “Although some farmers and the rural sector may not be too keen, given the urban support for climate change policies, even if there was a change of government at the next election we believe climate change policies would be likely to stick long term.”

BYE BYE BUNNIES THE RELEASE of a new strain of calici virus has been welcomed by the Minister of Agriculture. Damien O’Connor says the new strain of the disease RHDV1 K5 is the right decision and will benefit, in particular, the South Island, and all New Zealand. It will be released nationwide in March and April, especially targeting rabbit ‘hot spots’. O’Connor asks regional councils to ensure they have a good plan that maximises the release of the virus. RHDV1 K5 is not a new virus – it’s a Korean strain of the existing RHDV1 virus already widespread in NZ and only effects the common European rabbit. The virus causes hepatitis and blood clotting in the rabbit, killing it fast. “I am told it’s a faster-acting virus than the previous and one and we hope it will rapidly knock rabbit numbers to a point where [follow-up shooting will make a difference].” O’Connor says allowing rabbits to multiply leads to land degradation and environmental destruction on farmland and the conservation estate. Calici virus is the most effective known method of killing them, he says. “Farmers over the years have told me that killing rabbits has had an immediate impact, on production and on the environmental diversity of their land. While it’s not a silver bullet for rabbit control it’s expected to greatly assist the control of wild rabbit populations.” – Peter Burke • More on page 9

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

NEWS 3 ISSUE 648 www.ruralnews.co.nz

Milk supply battle heats up in Mooloo land SUDESH KISSUN sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

NEWS�������������������������������������� 1-17 AGRIBUSINESS����������������18-19 MARKETS�������������������������� 20-21 HOUND, EDNA���������������������� 22 CONTACTS����������������������������� 22 OPINION����������������������������22-24 MANAGEMENT�������������� 25-28 ANIMAL HEALTH����������� 29-30 MACHINERY AND PRODUCTS����������������������� 31-34 RURAL TRADER������������� 34-35

HEAD OFFICE Top Floor, 29 Northcroft Street, Takapuna, Auckland 0622 Phone: 09-307 0399 Fax: 09-307 0122 POSTAL ADDRESS PO Box 331100, Takapuna, Auckland 0740 Published by: Rural News Group Printed by: PMP Print CONTACTS Editorial: editor@ruralnews.co.nz Advertising material: davef@ruralnews.co.nz Rural News online: www.ruralnews.co.nz Subscriptions: subsrndn@ruralnews.co.nz ABC audited circulation 80,580 as at 30.09.2017

THE BATTLE for milk supply in Waikato is heating up with Canterbury processor Synlait entering the region. It will build a $280 million powder plant at Pokeno, north Waikato, and is now encouraging potential Waikato suppliers to register their interest to avoid missing out. Synlait’s project means three new milk plants will be commissioned in Waikato over the next 24 months, all three plants seeking milk at Fonterra’s doorstep. Open Country Dairy’s new plant is nearing completion. Its chief executive Steve Koekemoer told suppliers last month the Horotiu factory build is progressing very well and interest in milk supply has been strong. Happy Valley Dairy has resource consent for a $230m infant formula plant in Otorohanga. Its founder and director Randolph van der Burgh says farmers around the factory will be offered milk supply contracts once construction starts. “We expect some farmers to switch supply to us; others may want to stay

The battle for Waikato milk supply is hotting up with Synlait’s entry into the region.

with Fonterra… it’s entirely up to each farmer,” he says. Waikato Federated Farmers president Andrew McGiven says the new plants prove the effectiveness of the Dairy Industry Restructuring Act (DIRA), which led to the formation of Fonterra. “It is ensuring that farm gate competition for milk supply is alive and well,” he says. McGiven agrees that Fonterra suppliers in Waikato will be targeted by the independent processors. “Obviously Fonterra will have to compete to meet this competition,” he says. “Congratulations to Synlait for taking

the risk in developing a factory away from their supplier base... but they have experience in doing that obviously.” Pokeno, the location for Synlait’s second nutritional powder plant, already has an infant formula plant, owned by Yashili. “Our forecast increase in customer demand for infant formula products means we need to add additional powder manufacturing capacity as soon as we can,” says Graeme Milne, Synlait chairman. Chief executive John Penno says the commissioning date will be known once consents and approvals are obtained.

Rural med school pledge at risk SHORT-SIGHTEDNESS AND political game-playing by the new Government have prompted the withholding of $4.5 million pledged to help set up a Waikato rural medical school. Philanthropist Sir Owen Glenn in February 2017 pledged the gift for a proposed Waikato medical school, saying he liked “how the primary focus was on community healthcare in high needs communities”. However, Sir Owen has told Waikato University vice-chancellor Neil Quigley by email that he is “dis-

appointed that Labour had discounted the proposal,” accusing them of being “short-sighted and political”. “Nothing will change” while politicians serve their own re-election interests instead of the interests of the communities that elect them, he said. Health Minister David Clark told Parliament in late February that the Government was “still exploring proposals for a third medical school”, but he declined to elaborate. Asked by National’s health spokes-

man Jonathan Coleman if he had instructed the health ministry on a rural medical school, Clark replied, “It’s not in the public interest to give further information on that matter.” The rural medical school is proposed as a joint project by The University of Waikato and the Waikato District Health Board. Their aim is to to get more doctors into provincial and rural regions. In response, Otago and Auckland universities pitched a rival bid to create a national school of rural health.

HEAD IN THE SAND? DESPITE NEWS that Fonterra’s partnership with Chinese company Beingmate appears to be going from bad to worse, the co-op is still claiming “confidence” in the investment. Beingmate last week reported a preliminary net loss of RMB964 million (NZ$211 million) down 23% on last year’s result. The company also confirmed it was delisting from the Chinese stock exchange. Fonterra bought an 18.8% share in Beingmate in 2014 for $756m. Four years later the value of that investment has shrunk to about $220m. Chairman John Wilson admits, in the latest issue of Fonterra’s Farm Source magazine, the co-op “remains very concerned” about Beingmate’s performance. However, despite the plague of issues with the Chinese company, he tells farmer shareholders they need “to be patient and play the long game”. Wilson claims that despite Beingmate’s recent performance “the potential of our broader partnership remains”. Wilson also says Fonterra’s management – including chief executive Theo Spierings – are “working through a strategic co-operation committee with Beingmate founder Sam Xie and are confident the situation can be turned around in the medium term”.

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

4 NEWS

Swede stuff-up fans out NIGEL MALTHUS

PGG WRIGHTSON is blaming human error for a mix-up resulting in farmers, mostly in the South Island, planting a livestock swede of a variety older than they ordered. The new product, Cleancrop Hawkstone, is a yellow-fleshed swede intended to replace the white-fleshed HT-S57 variety this season. David Green, New Zealand seeds manager for PGG Wrightson, confirmed that everyone who ordered Hawkstone this season got HT-S57 instead. He says 9300ha of the crop had been sown by 556 farmers, about 90% in the South Island and

90% of that in Otago and Southland, the main swede-growing regions. The error came to light when an agronomist noticed the wrong colour bulb during a farm visit. Green says PGG Wrightson has set up a contact point for all affected farmers. It is too early to discuss compensation, he says; the focus now will be to talk through the issue. Nutritionists or veterinarians may visit some affected farms. “Dawn-to-dusk effort is going into communicating with people -- and all industry stakeholders, e.g. DairyNZ, Beef + Lamb NZ, Federated Farmers, NZ Veterinary Association -- to make sure first and foremost that farm-

Green says that in warm weather, all brassicas tend to go into a reproductive phase during which compounds called glucosinolates accumulate in the leaves. That occurred unusually early in 2014. Heavily pregnant or recently calved animals tend to be more susceptible to

The visual differences between yellow- and white-fleshed swede varieties alerted PGG Wrightson Seeds to a mix-up in swede seed affecting many farmers. SUPPLIED/PGG WRIGHTSON

glucosinolate poisoning. He says the HT cultivar was being phased out not just because of the 2014 issues but also because it was reaching the end of its product life cycle. Some 47,000 ha of the variety had been sown over seven years, and Green says farmers had continued to use it successfully after 2014.

HUMAN ‘ERROR’ ers themselves are aware of the issue,” Green told Rural News. “There is no silver lining to this, but we are conscious that we are at least three months away from anybody starting to feed these crops so the more time we’ve got the

better that allows us to make decisions. “On some properties we’ll be able to re-prioritise feed so the inconvenience will be minimal. On some other properties we will have to work… through what the best options are.”

The HT (herbicide tolerant) S57 was implicated in stock deaths in the winter and spring of 2014 but Green says a large DairyNZ peer-reviewed study also implicated other cultivars and the extremely warm winter weather.

THE ‘ERROR’ will be “quite inconvenient” for some farmers, NZ seeds manager for PGG Wrightson David Green admits. “Certainly in some situations a farmer might have purchased the Hawkstone product because he might have intended to feed it to younger stock, or to dairy cows. “We have made a serious mistake here and we’re really sorry for what has occurred. We handle tens of thousands of tonnes of seed a year in our business and we pride ourselves on our quality systems. PGG Wrightson seeds “This is not a good thing, manager David Green. but a lot of people have contacted us and said, ‘we’ve used it before and we don’t see that it’s going to be a major issue at all’.” Southland Federated Farmers president Allan Baird says HT swede had given “a lot of grief” in 2014, but the industry had learnt a lot about how and when to use the crop. If the swedes had been sown for winter grazing it shouldn’t be a problem because even the HT variety wouldn’t normally move into its reproductive phase before use, Baird told Rural News. However, many dairy farmers may have sown it to feed a herd returning to the platform in spring. If it were sown in the expectation it would be good for spring feeding “there could be trouble,” he says. Baird says PGG Wrightson will work hard to protect its reputation. “That will mean working with each farmer on a caseby-case basis to see what his feelings are regarding the effects on him. If it was a spring crop and he now has no spring crop then he would have a much bigger issue than if it had been planted for winter feed.”

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

NEWS 5

Feds go woolly – again PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

Feds meat and wool chair Miles Anderson.

NO MORE SAME-OLD MILES ANDERSON’S initiative to raise the profile of wool has drawn praise from Hawkes Bay wool buyer Philippa Wright. She says Anderson is genuine in his desire to raise the profile of wool and has worked hard to meet the people working on the ground in the wool industry as opposed to just doing same-old. “He came to one of our wool campaign meetings, participated and stayed there until he got a full understanding of what we are doing, why we’re doing it and what our struggles are. “He then went away and came back and told us where he thought he could and couldn’t help. It wasn’t just a visit and a handshake.” Wright says Anderson understands there is no quick fix for the industry’s problems. She says the industry can’t just go on working in silos; there needs to be greater collaboration which Anderson is advocating. “Obviously we are all working as hard as we can. We have absolutely no way of getting funding and in every avenue we have tried the doors have been shut. The Feds will help us apply pressure when it is necessary, hopefully to create that funding to do something positive.”

IN A move designed to support wool, Federated Farmers has returned to ‘meat and wool’ as the label for that producer section. Years ago it had changed to ‘meat and fibre’ after an earlier change from – ‘meat and wool’. Section chair Miles Anderson – also a Feds director – led the move for change. He says ‘fibre’ referred mainly to goat hair, but because goat producers now have their own section it’s appropriate to go back to ‘meat and wool’. “The aim is to lift the profile of wool and give a clear indication of the people we represent,” Anderson says. In support of wool, the renamed section showcased wool in a special exhibition at its recent national meeting. Fourteen leading wool industry people highlighted to Feds members and guests the great things being done with wool

TRACTORS LEAD CHARGE TRACTOR IMPORTS remained at high levels in January 2018, continuing the trend for the last year, says Statistics NZ. The value of imported tractors rose $27 million in January 2018, up 191% on January 2017. For the year ended January 2018, values were up 51% on a year ago. “Imports of tractors can be an indicator of confidence in the agriculture industry,” international statistics manager Tehseen Islam said.

bums with fingers crossed hoping the Chinese would start buying again in the volumes of two years ago.

“If your only source of information was mainstream media, you’d be forgiven for thinking the only thing happening now with New Zealand wool – except for Merino – was that the bottom had dropped out of the market.”

Anderson says his people want to raise wool’s profile and help show its qualities and many uses. “If your only source of information was mainstream media, you’d be forgiven for thinking the only thing happening now with New Zealand wool – except for Merino – was that the bottom had dropped out of the market. And that everybody was sitting on their

“Yes, prices for crossbred/ strong wool have halved since mid-2015, but farmers and downstream companies are fighting hard to find new and innovative products to soak up the warehoused clip and spark revenue.” Anderson says Federated Farmers wants to play a key role in greater sector-wide collaboration on wool initiatives – as reflected

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in the name change. The effort is intended to lift the price of crossbred wool and encourage innovation in using wool. At the function, Minister of Agriculture Damien O’Connor was presented with special wool products to give to Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern. Feds’ Ruapehu president Lyn Neeson, who co-owns the woollen blanket maker ShearWarmth, presented O’Connor with a blanket for Ardern for her baby.  O’Connor also took away baby clothes from Merino Kids, Wairarapa. Anderson says the meat and wool council has discussed reinstating the wool levy, but parked it in the meantime. “But it’s not off the agenda. Personally, I think if we can [work well] with the rest of the industry that would be the ideal time to talk wool levy again,” he says. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

6 NEWS

Changing the face of the Mackenzie NIGEL MALTHUS

THE FIVE agencies with statutory responsibility for managing land and water in the Mackenzie Basin have welcomed a report outlining ways for them to better coordinate their work. The Mackenzie Basin – Opportunities for Agency Alignment – reviews identifies opportunities and challenges facing the agencies and their community in the future management of the iconic region. Environment Canterbury (Ecan) chief executive Bill Bayfield says the regional council, DoC, Land Information New Zealand and the Mackenzie and Waitaki district

councils are seeking ways to better work together for the benefit of the basin, its environment and the people who live there. “There has been substantial change in the basin,” Bayfield says. “Not everyone is happy with it. Changes in natural character, landscape, biodiversity and biosecurity, and water quality are all issues, as are the ability to develop businesses and the rules and consent framework.” The five agencies jointly commissioned the project to identify opportunities for better alignment between them. The report was released at two public meetings in Tekapo and Christchurch

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last week. The report’s joint authors, environmental consultant John Hutchings and Land and Water Forum chair Hugh Logan, say the Mackenzie Basin has been subject to extensive land use change for 15 years. “The land tenure review process is viewed by some as contributing to the problem. The slow pace and the variable success at which agencies have attempted alignment may also have contributed to the problem,” the report says. “Biosecurity challenges continue. Risks to water quality require ‘front- foot’ action. Consent processes are viewed by many as not being

as streamlined as they could be and above all else some parties believe there is a lack of balance between pastoral intensification (and associated private property gains) and the protection of ecological and landscape values.” The authors make seven main points, including a need to state clearly the relevance of the 2013 Mackenzie Agreement, and to “stocktake” the various bodies’ statutory and regulatory functions. They call for the agencies to identify appropriate areas with “intensification potential,” and for the creation of a Mackenzie Drylands Natural Heritage Area,

Ecan chief executive Bill Bayfield.

an idea with “considerable merit, and achievable,” but needing “a clear action plan and discussion with affected parties before it can be put into place”. But people from environmental groups attending the Christchurch launch criticised the five bodies for their past performance. Forest & Bird Canterbury West Coast

regional manager Jen Miller said the five agencies were responsible for the basin’s current state, saying it had received “all the intensification but none of the protection”. She was concerned at the lack of urgency. The Environmental Defence Society’s Gary Taylor says while he supported the report, “good intentions were not going to be enough. The vision

is getting away from us.” Taylor welcomed the report’s calling for better regulatory co-ordination instead of the “compartmentalising” of the past. “People go in and they get their consents, brick by brick, and suddenly you’ve got an ugly structure that you didn’t really expect would be there, before your eyes. But they’ve got the approval.”


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

NEWS 7

River quality the top priority PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

ENVIRONMENT MINISTER David Parker says water quality in rivers is his number-one priority and he will soon take a range of measure to the Cabinet. The first steps will be to reduce further degradation, he told the Agcarm summer conference, last month. “In the last decade in New Zealand, when we already knew we had problems with nutrient and effluent inputs into rivers, we allowed an extra one million cows, each one producing the effluent equivalent of 15 people. “That was like having an extra 15 million people discharging their effluent to the land,” he said. “Some of that gets into our waterways.” There are three ways to encourage the changes in land-use practices needed to overcome these problems – education, regulation and price, Parker says. Technology can be enabled in respect of these three mechanisms to assist in improvements, but those three ways are the only influence the government has. Of those, regulation is the most important.

“We need decent rules under the Resource Management Act imposed by central government under a national policy statement setting environmentally based limits on nutrient and effluent loss to waterways,” he says. “The rule of law must be enforced and [failing this] we will have this continuing trend of degradation of our waterways. And that trend is still bad: about 70% of monitored water sites in NZ still have increasing levels of nitrates. “I think there is now agreement across industry, rural industries and populations – whether they live in rural or urban areas – that we expect our rivers to be clean enough to swim in.” Parker says he has been working on lots of detail on fresh water and will soon take this to the Cabinet. His first priority is to stop further degradation. “If we can do that we will get time to clean things up. We have got to stop things getting worse. He wants an “effective and enduring” system for managing water quality and its use including maximising economic value for the longer term. The Government wants to reshape

the economy to better use land, people and money. “We want higher-value knowledgeintensive lower-emissions activity,” Parker says. The change required to shift to a low-emissions sustainable economy “is not simply about dairy and cow numbers”. “I am interested in seeing our agriculture sector innovating to reduce its environmental impact on water, climate change and land.” He wants a higher-value “exit” from environmental problems, not a decrease in economic output. Parker acknowledges many farmers and volunteers are fencing waterways and planting trees. “But at industry level a greater shift is required to ensure sustainable land use.” He says many local councils, moving to improve water quality, face challenges under the National Policy Statement for Fresh Water. Officials and working groups are looking at how this can be improved. For instance, Parker thinks E.coli levels should be weighted towards summer when people are swimming. He says sediments and nutrients are

at the top of the list, but other indicators of water quality are being looked at. The Land and Water Forum has contributed much to the debate and found consensus on many issues, Parker says. But “thorny” issues David Parker remain unresolved. He has asked them for advice on two key issues: what can be done between now and 2020 to prevent further damage; and how do we stipulate nutrient and sediment loads within catchments in a way that precludes each regional council having to engage in similar, tough debate. Parker says he wants to facilitate the development and deployment of technologies to improve productivity and the environment.

YOU WILL PAY! ASKED ABOUT financial help for farmers so they can improve environmental practices, Parker says the government is “not going to pay people to stop polluting”. The cost of changing land-use practice will be borne by the farming sector, he warns. But he says technology research will assist in moving some land to higher value uses, “if we can strip some of the labour cost disadvantage of higher forms of land use, for example in horticulture by using robotic sensor technology, mobile positioning gear, the internet of things and big data.... We’ve got this confluence of technologies now that enable us to both make money from the technology and improve that technology. “In Canterbury, for example, I think you will see over coming decades a move back to cropping and horticulture because there will be more money in it.”

27/02/18 11:59 AM


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

8 NEWS

Foresters raise concerns about cutting rights changes PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

A PROPOSAL that the Overseas Investment Office (OIO) should approve or decline sales of forest cutting rights

to foreigners is like a “solution looking for a problem,” says Forestry Owners Association (FOA) president Peter Clark. Under the upgraded TPP – the 11-country

CPTPP -- whatever rules a country has at the time of signing are what prevail, Clark says. “Under our legislation, forestry rights are not included in the Overseas Investment Act (OIA) so

that would prevail,” Clark explained to Rural News. “What concerns our Trade Minister (David Parker) is that if it is signed, the opportunity to bring those forestry rights into the OIA

[would be] lost forever. So the proposal now is to legislate to bring forestry rights and sensitive land into the OIA.” Forestry rights do not confer an interest in land; they give the right to

Forestry Owners Association chair Peter Clark.

grow and harvest a crop. Treasury invited submissions, now closed, on a proposal to expand the scope of the OIO to include forest cutting rights for forest blocks of 50ha and larger. “If they brought that in, any foreigner who went into a forestry right for more than 50ha – or whatever the threshold was – would need to go through an application.” An OIO application is “quite an onerous process – very expensive and time consuming”. “So that [would] be quite negative for foreign investment and negative for the New Zealand economy because we need foreign investors in our forestry sector,” says Clark. “It is a capital intensive business. Foreigners now own about 65-70% of all the forests in NZ.” He says Kiwis, including farmers, would be affected. “Once you bring in a rule like this you effectively remove a big chunk of potential investors in these tree crops -- people who might want to invest in new planting under a

• • •

forestry right instrument. They are already disincentivised to invest in new planting or to grow a forest that involves land because they are already captured under the OIA for transactions on land. “But to capture them under a forestry right -which is to grow and harvest trees -- would be negative for those investors and therefore negative for forest owners whether those forest owners are foreigners or Kiwis because it reduces the liquidity of the asset. It reduces the number of buyers. “If you reduce the liquidity of an asset you raise your hurdle rate. It is harder to get the investment across the line in the first place. “That is negative and goes against the other policy the Government has of getting more trees planted. It’s two policies clashing.” Clark says this would jeopardise the Government’s ambitions of seeing a billion trees planted and of meeting its Paris Agreement obligations to reduce carbon emissions.

POOR YIELD HITS SEEKA FRUIT GROWER and marketer Seeka’s 2017 kiwifruit crop was down 21% on the previous year, slashing its annual profit. The orchard-to-market trader’s profit after tax was $5.8 million, 44% less than the previous year, which also included a one-off tax gain of $3m. The company says the reduced kiwifruit yield had the potential to significantly impact earnings but it had seen these coming. It says its new and upgraded plant, precooling and cool storage capacity -- in anticipation of higher crop volumes, particularly Zespri SunGold fruit -- enabled it to optimise plant configuration and staff utilisation. Growers benefited through record low fruit loss and operating efficiencies reduced costs. 2017 fruit loss to Seeka’s New Zealand kiwifruit growers was at a record low of 1.18% for Hayward (green) conventional growers, 0.42% for Hayward (green) organic growers and 0.73% for Zespri SunGold growers. PWS 1849 Autumn Pasture 2018 Lush Press FW 280mmx187mm_v3_ƒ.indd 1

21/02/18 10:56 AM


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

NEWS 9

Rabbit killer virus gets go-ahead NIGEL MALTHUS

ENVIRONMENT CANTERBURY says the longawaited nationwide release of a new strain of rabbit haemorrhagic disease (calicivirus) will go ahead in the next few weeks. A hoped-for release last autumn was put off because of delays in the regulatory approvals. Federated Farmers Otago provincial president Phill Hunt says this is “incredible news” for farmers in rabbit-prone areas. “It’s not going to completely fix the problem, but it will give everyone in rabbit-prone areas a bit of breathing space in which they can plan for when rabbit numbers build up again,” Hunt told Rural News. Hunt farms sheep and beef on 470ha between Wanaka and Hawea and says he spends thousands every year on killing rabbits, on top of the efforts of voluntary rabbit shooters he allows on his property. He says when the calicivirus release was delayed a year ago he was having to consider extra control measures but in the end did nothing. “We have been awaiting this decision so we were reasonably confident common sense would prevail.” ECan is handling the process for the New Zealand Rabbit Coordination Group (RCG) – people from regional and district councils, Federated Farmers, DoC, MPI and Land Infor-

mation NZ. Graham Sullivan, Environment Canterbury regional leader biosecurity, said the decision is a milestone for the agencies working to curb wild rabbit damage to farms and the environment. The controlled release will be in March and April because “research suggests this is the optimal time to increase the effectiveness of the virus against wild rabbit populations,” Sullivan says. A high-quality commercially prepared product will be used at sites selected by the councils. “While not the silver bullet for rabbit control, we anticipate the new strain will greatly assist the control of wild rabbit populations by supplementing more traditional control methods. The impact of the RHDV1 K5 release will be monitored at a range of representative sites.” RHDV1 K5 is a Korean strain of the existing RHDV1 virus already widespread in NZ and only affects the European rabbit. Sullivan says RHDV1 K5 was selected for release because it can better overcome the protective effects of the benign calicivirus (RCA-A1), which occurs naturally in wild rabbit populations in NZ. Meanwhile, Sullivan is advising pet rabbit owners to talk to their vets about protection against the new strain. Australian studies show an existing vaccine will protect against the new strain. Sullivan says the maker has confirmed there will be extra supplies.

Rabbit damage on farmland near Dunstan, Central Otago. PHOTO: BOB DOUGLAS

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

10 NEWS

North v South contest for Maori dairy title MAORI FARMS near Rotorua and Hokitika are the finalists in this year’s Ahuwhenua Trophy for dairy. These are Onuku Māori Lands Trust near Rotorua and the propri-

etors of Mawhera Incorporation, located near Hokitika, on the West Coast of the South Island. The finalists were announced at a recent function at Parliament in Wellington, hosted by

the Minister for Maori Development Nanaia Mahuta and the Minister of Agriculture, Damien O’Connor. O’Connor says the Ahuwhenua Trophy is wonderful event that cel-

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their people and build a sustainable business. “The concept of sustainability is not new to Māori. We have been practising it for centuries.” Smiler says Māori agribusiness is in good shape and the Ahuwhenua Trophy has lifted the profile and perception of Māori agribusiness. Field days will be held at the two farms in April to showcase the finalists and let people see firsthand why the farms are finalists. The winner will be announced at a function at the Wigram Air Force Museum, Christchurch, on May 25. • More on finalists page 28 @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

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TARIFF REDUCTION benefits under the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) are higher than those under the China agreement, says Trade Minister David Parker. That is “hugely significant”, as would be appreciated by anyone who knows how good the China FTA has been for New Zealand trade, he told the Agcarm summer conference. “It effectively is a number of bilateral FTAs, one of them with Japan, the third largest economy of the world and particularly important,” he says. NZ beef exporters are currently “being cleaned out” by Australia, which already has a FTA with Japan, he says. “As a consequence, NZ beef exports to Japan have dropped by 38% because NZ exporters face a higher tariff into Japan. “We also have problems with competition from Chile for kiwifruit exports into Japan; this agreement fixes that. “It also gives us a FTA with Canada and Mexico, also among the largest economies in the world.” The text of the agreement was released on February 21. The trade agreement will give preferential access for the first time to Japan, Canada, Mexico and Peru. A Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade analysis estimates the CPTPP will boost NZ’s economy by $1.2 billion to $4b a year once it is fully in effect. The 11 countries involved are NZ, Australia, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, Peru, Singapore and Viet Nam. – Pam Tipa


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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

12 NEWS

Fonterra’s A2 milk deal ‘positive’ SUDESH KISSUN sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

WAIKATO FARMERS may switch to A2 milk provided there’s a suitable premium attached to the milk payment, says the region’s Federated Farmers president Andrew McGiven. He says Fonterra’s decision to partner with a2 Milk Company to develop the A2 milk can only be a positive thing for shareholders. “It seems to be a way to demand a premium from this milk with the A2 gene and certainly fits the co-op’s value added model,” he told Rural News. “I think farmers in the Waikato will be keen to investigate a move to A2 milk if there is a suitable premium attached to their milk payment, and if this is a way to reduce

The a2 Milk Company has joined forces with Fonterra to boost sales of A2 milk in NZ and Australia.

What’s the difference? There are several types of casein in milk and betacasein is the second most common. The two most common forms of beta-casein are: • A1 beta-casein: milk from breeds of cows that originated in northern Europe is generally high in A1 beta-casein. A1 milk comes from Holstein, Friesian, Ayrshire and British Shorthorn breeds. • A2 beta-casein: milk high in A2 beta-casein is mainly found in breeds that originated in the Channel Islands and Southern France – notably the Guernsey, Jersey, Charolais and Limousin breeds. Some studies indicate that A1 beta-casein may be harmful, and that A2 beta-casein is a safer choice. This is the reason for the ‘A1 vs A2’ debate.

some of the recent milk price volatility then I am all for it.” Fonterra and a2 Milk Company (a2MC) last month signed a deal that links the co-op’s global milk pool and supply chain, manufacturing, and sales and distribution with a2MC’s brand strength and capabilities.

Fonterra will now begin talking to its farmers to develop an A2 milk pool for a2MC products in New Zealand. A similar milk pool in Australia will also be developed. Fonterra chief executive Theo Spierings and a2MC chief executive Geoffrey Babidge say they expect to grow demand

in NZ and offshore for a2MC’s products. “The partnership is intended to fast-track market growth and this creates opportunity for our farmers to create additional value from their milk,” says Spierings.

The a2MC products will fit well in the co-op’s product range, he says. “Consumers like to have choices and the growth of a2MC branded nutritional powders and fresh milk sales in Australia, for example, show the potential.” Babidge says the partnership gives a2MC significant medium and long-term opportunities

via “multi-site and geographic diversification and new product development”. It will give access to large scale manufacturing performance and competitive terms in a global context, he said. “The relationship with Fonterra is the ideal model to build brand awareness and deliver a consistent high-quality product to the broad-

est customer base in this market. “The opportunity to work together with Fonterra to explore new markets and products is also significant,” Babidge said. The co-op’s resources and capability in many of a2MC’s new priority markets should help speed the distribution of a2MC products.

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NEW ZEALAND and Australian milk pools will support the partnership. Fonterra will talk to its farmers on the best way to source A2 milk and share the value it will create for farmers. The milk pools will expand over time. Under a ‘nutritional products manufacturing and supply agreement’ (NPMSA) with a2MC, Fonterra will exclusively supply nutritional milk powder products in bulk and consumer packages for sale in a2MC’s new priority markets in South East Asia and the Middle East. These products will be made at Fonterra’s NZ plants and at its nutritionals plant Darnum in Victoria.

The two companies plan distribution and sales arrangements to assist a2MC’s entry into its new priority markets in South East Asia and the Middle East. An ‘exclusive period’ would allow Fonterra to explore a2MC branded butter and cheese, and China-sourced liquid milk for sale in Australia, NZ and China. These would be complementary to the co-op’s existing product range. A jointly owned packaging facility will be explored under the NPMSA to cater for growth. A NZ fresh milk exclusive licence will enable Fonterra to produce, distribute, market and sell a2 Milk fresh milk in NZ.

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

NEWS 13 A STRETCH, BUT DOABLE SHANE JONES said last month in Gisborne that the government programme will see a gradual rise of tree plantings every year as seedlings become available. From 2022 planting will be in full swing at an annual rate of 110,000ha a year. Clark predicts the $6.5 million fund for afforestation grants will be oversubscribed. “At $1300/ha the grant will cover the total planting costs for most landowners who choose to go into it.  I also hope the scheme can be expanded in future years.” The scheme applies to forest plots of 5ha to 300ha, and while this “could lead to too many

Farms will be needed to hit tree target PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

FARMERS OR landowners will need to plant trees on their land if the Government is to reach its target of planting one billion trees in 10 years, says Forestry Owners Association president Peter Clark. The targets will require planting an average of 100 million a year for 10 years. “We have done those planting rates before; we already plant around 50,000ha a year or 50 million trees,” Clark told Rural News. “You are talking an additional 50 million trees a year… some of these trees might be conservation trees – manuka or other species.” The bulk will need to be fast growing exotic trees because that is what you need for the climate change requirements. “You need to sequester the carbon so there is no point doing it all in native, for that purpose anyway.” Clark says they got up to about 80,000 or 90,000 or even 100,000ha one year during the mid 1990s, “so it can be done physically”. “The constraints this time are greater: in the mid1990s when we were doing those sorts of numbers of planting, land value was maybe $1000-$2000/ha; now we are talking $6000-$7000/ha for hill country grassland. That is a major impediment. “You’ve got to have the landowners wanting to plant the trees because I don’t think you are going to have many investors buying or leasing land at those sorts of values,” he says. “We foresters are economically rational and we need a return on investment.” They need farmers planting the trees “but not in really tiny blocks,” says Clark. “They must have efficient harvesting and economic roading into them; it can’t be done on a tiny scale.” He says the association has talked several times with the Minister for Forestry, Shane Jones. “They know this is a challenge, but with the right policy settings there is a good chance of getting there or thereabouts,” Clark claims. “We won’t get trees planted in the ground unless the landowners want it to happen. Most of the land is privately owned and landowners are rational people and they will need education and information on the pros and cons.”

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isolated woodlots, if farmers amalgamated their plots it would pay off in reduced harvesting costs,” Clark said. He expects the next stage of the billion trees project will be to provide more details of the planned species and geographical mix. “Millable indigenous species such as totara and beech are obviously going to be part of the mix, along with others planted to convert grassland into native forestland,” he says. “But if forest plantings are to help with reducing the pain of meeting our Paris Accord commitments then we will need fast-growing exotics such as radiata pine, Douglas fir and eucalypts.” 

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

14 NEWS

Bugs cause a stink MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

THE MINISTRY for Primary Industries is taking new measures to reduce the risk of brown marmorated stink bugs entering New Zealand via vehicles and machinery imported from Japan. The pest was discovered in the last month. All used vehicles (cars and trucks) must now be inspected and cleaned at an MPI-approved facility in Japan prior to export. And used machinery or vehicles from Japan will require certification proving cleaning by an appropriate provider. “Nearly 95% of used vehicles

from Japan already go through approved facilities designed to eliminate the risk of biosecurity threats like seeds and hitchhiking organisms such as Asian gypsy moth,” said MPI biosecurity and environment manager Paul Hallett. This will now be compulsory for all imports, to reduce the risk of transporting dirty vehicles and machinery that could contaminate other cargo, he said. MPI’s move results from a spike in the number of stink bugs arriving at the border in bulk carriers from Japan; four vessels have so far been turned back. Brown marmorated and spotted yellow stink bugs, native to

Japan, are a pest that feeds on apples, kiwifruit, maize, tomatoes, cherries and wheat, with the potential to inflect millions of dollars damage. MPI says it has already increased inspections of arriving carriers and their cargoes, and is ‘fogging’ with insecticide to flush insects out of confined spaces. Hallet says MPI will work with industry to develop longer term options for reducing the biosecurity risk. “We are all keen to work together to consider solutions that avoid the need to turn vessels around at the border.” This could include treatment before ships enter NZ waters

or fumigating here if pests are detected. “A proposed treatment will be trialled on one of the affected ships this week,” Hallet said. “The vessel will have to pass rigorous biosecurity checks before MPI will allow the release of its cargo.” Four bulk carriers were turned away from NZ this month due to excessive contamination; they headed for Brisbane for unloading, treatment and reloading, then return to NZ. Rural News understands the vessels are loaded with at least 6000 vehicles; one distributor said one month’s retail supply had been re-routed.

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Flattened maize crops will rise again MAIZE CROPS across Taranaki were flattened when excyclone Gita hit the region last month. But farmers have been urged not to be too worried by the flattened plantations. Maize trader Pioneer says the crop was a reasonably resilient plant, often surviving serious wind events. Pioneer regional manager Taranaki and Rangitikei David McDonald want farmers to “calmly assess” and categorise how much of the paddock was affected, and the severity of the damage, before jumping to conclusions. “Crop growth stage will have an impact on how the crop quality and yield will be affected,” McDonald says. “Plants affected at later stages of grain filling development may not be affected as much as if it was during early grain filling.” Pioneer Taranaki area manager Kim Sharpe says she had seen a varying degree of crop damage across Taranaki farms, but in most cases time would set right the damage. “I’ve seen a lot of maize on the ground, but it hasn’t snapped; if stems are bent but upper plants have straightened vertically (goose necking), plants will likely still be able to transport water and nutrients and should continue to mature, albeit at a slower rate,” Sharpe says. “It’s important for farmers to give the crop time to respond and recover, and in most cases it will still go through its process; it just takes time. “The key thing is acknowledging that every crop is different, and we are ahead of the game this season, which is an advantage.” This season’s higher than average temperatures meant most crops had matured early and were nearing harvest time, but McDonald says farmers still have a wide window in which to harvest crops. “From now, farmers still have a good two to threemonth window to harvest before crops become too dry,” he says. “Talking to your contractor is crucial, as there will be some differences in how they harvest maize that is lying down. “It is recommended to harvest in the direction going into the crop, or diagonally. Some contractors may have different heads or fronts that more easily pick maize up off the ground. “ McDonald says for farmers a key thing to remember is that the harvesting process is going to be a lot slower than usual: instead of contractors harvesting up to 4ha/ hour, some may be limited to harvesting around 1ha/hour.


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

NEWS 15

Best result in a decade RURAL TRADER PGG Wrightson (PGW) last week had good news for shareholders in its halfyear results. For the half-year ended December 31, 2017, earnings were up $8.2 million, and the company expects to surpass last year’s operating result. Net profit after tax was $14.6m, $400,000 less than the same period

says the company has a highly engaged team who deliver good results through the market cycles and weather variability that impacts the agri sector. ‘The lift in operating EBITDA on this time last year is heartening and puts us in a strong position as we move into the second half. This performance was achieved with

PGW’s livestock business benefited from strong international demand for protein and reduced tallies which combined to push up livestock prices across NZ; livestock supply chain products continue to perform well. last year due in part to movement in the New Zealand dollar. PGW chairman Alan Lai says the company has reported its best first-half result in a decade. It said last October that against a backdrop of higher commodity prices, lower agricultural production and a delayed start to spring it expected operating EBITDA to be similar to 2017. Lai says it is pleasing to be able to report a first-half performance at an operating EBITDA level stronger than last year. “We expect this strength to continue and anticipate operating EBITDA to exceed 2017’s result and be in a $65m to $70m range. “Previously we also expected that net profit after tax (NPAT) for the FY2018 would be about 30% lower than FY2017 because of lower gains on property sales which are now largely complete. With this stronger trading performance we now expect NPAT to be about 20% lower.” The company declared an interim dividend of 1.75c/share, to be paid on March 16. PGW’s new chief executive Ian Glasson

most of our businesses trading well through the first half,” Glasson says. PGW’s livestock business benefited from strong international demand for protein and reduced tallies which combined to push up livestock prices across NZ; livestock supply chain products continue to perform well. Glasson says there was an improved performance by its wool procurement and brokering business despite lower demand globally for crossbred wool. The real estate business had a challenging first six months but maintained market share and remains well positioned for better market conditions. The retail and water group increased operating EBITDA 25% over the same period last year. Glasson says the retail business finished with operating EBITDA higher than the same period last year despite some challenges with weather. “Wet growing conditions in spring were followed by dry conditions in November and December. “The impact on horticulture was the advance of harvest dates. This

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

16 NEWS

Danone doubles its NZ production capacity PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

A $25 MILLION upgrade and expansion of Danone’s Auckland blending and processing plant in late February has doubled its production capacity for finished products. It is part of $85m spent by the global infant formula company in New Zealand in the past four years. This cements NZ as a critical, strategic supply point for local and regional markets, the company says. Cyril Marniquet, NZ operations director, says NZ has a strong reputation for high quality milk and efficient production.

“We’re proud to be a growing part of the NZ dairy story through our high-quality international brands and expertise in early life nutrition,” he says. “Australia remains our number-one export destination, but we’re seeing growing demand for our international products in other markets, including China. “By doubling production capacity we’re better placed than ever to meet demand in key markets. Today we have end-toend processing capability, with 450 people working in our NZ processing operations, up from 300 in 2014.” Agriculture Minister

Danone has spent $25 million upgrading its Auckland blending and processing facility.

Damien O’Connor says NZ’s ability to sustainably produce high-quality, nutritious food for a growing global population is crucial to our eco-

nomic future. “That means moving NZ’s primary sector higher up the value chain so we continue to deliver what international con-

sumers demand,” he says. “But we must do so in way that is sustainable and leverages our competitive edge as quality food producers. Danone

Early Life Nutrition’s investment here shows it shares the same vision for NZ.” To support its export growth, Danone has innovated and gained critical certifications. Marniquet says innovation will include the latest global advances and product innovation via their NZ business. “Our local experts form an integral part of Danone’s Nutricia 400plus scientists and technologists worldwide.” Their work meets the specific needs of children during their first 1000 days – from pregnancy to two years of age.   “We have approval from the Certification

and Accreditation Administration of the People’s Republic of China to manufacture and export direct to China from the Auckland plant. We’ve also been granted a Halal licence by the New Zealand Islamic Development Trust. “Both certifications recognise our stringent processes in food safety, quality, hygiene and manufacturing. They open up exciting trade opportunities.” Danone in 2014 bought its Balclutha spray dryer and Airport Oaks (Auckland) blending, packing and canning plants. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

NEWS 17

Trade deals boosting beef SUDESH KISSUN sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

TWO KEY trade agreements could dictate beef sales in 2018, claims Rabobank. It says the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP), due for signing later this month, will bring gains for Australia and New Zealand as beef exporters. Meanwhile, the EU is considering accepting another 99,000 tonnes of beef from four South American countries as part of a new trade deal under negotiation, the bank says. The CCTPP free trade agreement includes NZ, Australia, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, Peru, Singapore and Viet Nam. The RaboResearch Beef Quarterly report says gains are expected for beef-exporting countries Australia, New Zealand, Mexico, and Canada because of reduced tariffs imposed by big-spending Japan and those of the smaller importers Chile, Vietnam and Peru. The EU is working on a trade deal with the four founding members of Mercosur (Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, and Uruguay). Rabobank refers to

a newly tabled proposal that would allow Mercosur countries to send 99,000t of beef to the EU at a lower tariff level. “This is a significant volume, given total EU beef imports over the last couple of years of 204,000 - 270,000t.” Brazil, Argentina, and Uruguay are already the EU’s main suppliers (63% of total EU imports); Brazil alone shipped 107,000t in 2017. “Mercosur negotiators are apparently seeking an increase to 150,000t,” Rabobank says. “This standoff may further prolong the discussions, which already run the risk of delay due to the Brazilian elections.” China is further opening its beef market to the world, allowing more beef imports and importing countries, intensifying market competition, the bank says. China has approved chilled-beef access for Argentina – fourth-ranking behind Australia, US and NZ. In frozen beef, Belarus has approval: two plants were accredited in January. China has signed to import beef from France and UK, starting in the next few months. And the first shipment of live cattle from northern Australia arrived in

January – “the strongest indication that live-cattle trade may persist,” the bank says. Rabobank’s latest beef quarterly report is positive about beef’s prospects.

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RABOBANK’s QUARTERLY report says the beef sector is embracing blockchain technology. Food and tech companies are developing blockchain in response to changing consumer preferences and the beef sector is no exception. “While many of the early applications have been driven by the desire to increase traceability and transparency [for] food safety, opportunities exist further up the supply chain,” says Rabobank’s Angus Gidley-Baird, senior analyst animal protein. Blockchain beats current solutions for sharing genetic traits, making it simpler to track productive performance. A chain including feedlot, farmer, genetic organization and others would be able to share performance and verify breeding values, all transferred in real time in a transaction. The shared-ledger approach of blockchain simplifies back-office work such as transaction reconciliation and reporting --helping beef processors/packers and farmers.

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18 AGRIBUSINESS

Riding the pink cloud PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

AGRICULTURE IS in a sweet spot, says ASB rural economist Nathan Penny.

After a rough run for the lamb sector in the last few years the present season has been “one out of the box”, he told the Agcarm conference in

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Auckland on February 22. “At the start of the season lamb prices weren’t too flash, and Brexit had just happened…. We were expecting more of the same in terms of low returns in the sheep sector. As it turns out, other players have stepped up and filled the gap the UK in part left behind. “The other markets are China, US, Middle East and even other parts of Europe…. That’s some of the best prices we’ve seen in the lamb sector since 2011-12 and the second best prices on record. “Those markets have picked up the UK slack. No one saw that coming; we were all talking about what impact Brexit would have and didn’t expect other markets to be so strong, or at least this

soon.” Lamb prices are expected to stay healthy -- $6/kg plus – for the rest of the season. They will dip as always at the end of the season but will end up much higher than last season. Supply is constrained by the lamb flock still falling as it has for several years; Australia is similar so the two largest exporters are reducing their flocks. Coarse wool prices are very low and likely to remain so. But medium and fine wools are doing well with Merino very strong. Beef prices were the highest on record for the month of January, he says. “Roll on 2018 for beef, another good season by the looks of it. Generally beef fundamentals

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are pretty good; there is plenty of demand out there.” The key US market is firm and the Chinese market is growing. Prices are expected to remain healthy over 201718 -- $5/kg plus. Dairy is experiencing a second season in a row of healthy prices. “But it does follow those two very low seasons where the milk price was about $4/kgMS and dairy farmers were losing considerable amounts of money.” ASB expects a season payout about $6.50/kgMS, slightly higher than Fonterra’s current forest of $6.40/ kgMS. Penny says most dairy farmers are “back in the black”. Last season any extra was going straight back into overdrafts, etc with little new spending. This season farmers will be looking at deferred maintenance and other spending they back away from in the “skinny seasons”. “Things like

MORE THAN DAIRY animal health would definitely be

IN THE early 2000s all the growth was in dairy, but now the agricultural sector is much more crowded, says Penny There is much more competition for resources – land, water, people and funding. Lamb and beef have enjoyed two very good seasons, kiwifruit has had a record season due to the Gold recovery and the next season will probably also be a record, forestry prices are very good due to the construction boom overNathan Penny seas, the apple export season is coming back onto the again a record high, wine radar this season.” is ticking along nicely Price forecasts for and even avocados are next season are similar doing well, he says. to this, so farmers may “A much more increase spending on crowded sector, which in higher priced items. a way is very healthy.” Global dairy markets He says it is possible are balanced, demand is the highest-returning holding and butter is still land use will be a sector short globally. other than dairy -- unlike the early 2000s. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

AGRIBUSINESS 19

New onion facility a ‘terrific’ asset PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

A NEW $2 million Seminis Onion Breeding Station in Pukekohe is “a terrific asset to have in that district in particular,” says Onions NZ chief executive Michael Ahern. That scale of investment is a “useful amount of money” for the NZ onion industry which is reasonably small on the world stage, Ahern told Rural News. “We, the NZ industry, are very reliant these days on overseas breeders having material that we can use and that’s not as easy as it sounds,” he says.. “A facility based in this country and having trials in our locality is very welcome. We are very supportive of the whole initiative. The name of the game is trialling and appropriateness for NZ conditions. “Sometimes these seed lines have been bred for other conditions – the US or Europe – so really you are trying to find the best fit for local conditions out of their full range which is fairly extensive of course. “Plus there is the intellectual side of it: you’ve got breeders who are then touching on the [growing] community which is fantastic.” The onion breeding station opened officially late last month is a world-class facility housing state-of-the-art sheds, crop covers and irrigation

Visitors look over the new onion breeding station at Pukekohe. PHOTO: MELISSA PARKER.

A VERY TRICKY SEASON ONIONS ARE challenged by the weather this year, after a good run for the last three or four years, says Ahern. And this season’s hurdles were not only growing, but also harvesting. “This high humidity and several days of

systems. It is part of Seminis’ global mid-day onion breeding program, supporting key markets including Australia, NZ, South Africa and Brazil. Dr Yossi Shapiro, global breeding director for large seed/root & bulb/brassica crops at Monsanto Vegetable Seeds cut the ribbon. “The Pukekohe sta-

rain on end is hard work. “We will see where we stand in about a month’s time; crops should all be in by then and we will take another look. But at the moment I don’t think anyone is hiding the fact that it is quite a tricky season.”

tion is already yielding significant results for Seminis onion growers in NZ, Australia and further abroad. It adds an important dimension to Seminis’ global onion breeding network, both in knowledge transfer and genet-

ics,” Shapiro says. “Our investment in the new station demonstrates Seminis’ long-term commitment to Australian and NZ onion growers and to developing onion varieties that meet their needs and suit local

conditions.” At least 40 growers from Australia and NZ attended the innovation day, with key members of the global Seminis onion breeding team who travelled to NZ from the US, Brazil and South America. The Innovation Day

gave growers the opportunity to see new Seminis hybrids and hear from experts on where breeding efforts will be focussed in future. Local growers were particularly impressed by the wide planting window of the new early maturing variety SVNH1752, which

will offer greater flexibility in sowing schedules. The new variety Currawong was also on show. Currawong is a high yielding, first early variety with resistance to Fusarium basal rot and Pink root. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

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20 MARKETS & TRENDS

global agribusiness research analysts sharing market outlooks

Beef report Q1 2018 New Zealand Production and exports to ease Tightening domestic supply and improving export returns will help to support cattle prices. However, the strengthening of the NZ dollar against the US dollar since the start of December (up nearly 6%) continues to create headwinds for processors. Consequently, Rabobank expects schedule prices to remain relatively stable over the next three months. New Zealand’s total beef kill for the first three months of the 2017/18 season (Oct-Dec) was 15.5% ahead of the same period last year. Cattle in many parts of the country were being killed earlier in the season, with dry seasonal conditions

Change in NZ beef exports, Q4 2016 vs Q4 2017.

and lower feed supplies forcing many farmers to destock. Since December, most key cattle-producing regions have received significant rainfall, restoring feed levels and slowing the supply of cattle to the processors. While slaughter prices did ease slightly over the quarter, overall, prices remained relatively firm, despite the sharp increase in domestic production. As of early February, the North Island bull price

averaged NZD 5.30/kg cwt, and the South Island bull price averaged NZD 5.05/kg cwt (down 5% and 3%, respectively, on November 2017). Higher production resulted in an 18% increase in exports in Q4 2017 (see graph: Change in NZ Beef exports, Q4 2016 v Q4 2017). Combined with strong average values, the value of exports increased 29% YOY, to NZD 588m over the Oct-Dec quarter—

the second-highest on record. Export volumes for the quarter to New Zealand’s largest two markets, the US and China, were up 24% and 43%, respectively, on the same period last season. Japan’s tariff hike on frozen beef did see the value of New Zealand’s exports to Japan for the quarter decline by 24%— but as Japan currently takes less than 4% of New Zealand’s total beef exports.

Australia Dry conditions soften prices Seasonal impacts are again driving the Australian market. With drier conditions through January and into February, producer demand has waned, and prices dropped. The

Australian cattle prices (Eastern Young Cattle Indicator, Jan 2016-Feb 2018

will delay the rebuilding process and limit production growth through 2018.

Brazil

Eastern Young Cattle Indicator fell 7% from the beginning of December, to AUD 5.39/kg cwt on 8 February (see graph: Australian cattle prices). Cattle slaughter in 2017 was 2% lower than 2016, at 7.2m head. Numbers were stronger in the second half of the year, with 2H 2017 5% higher than the corresponding period in 2016, illustrating that the holding of stock for rebuilding

was easing and—as herds rebuilt—more stock was coming on to the market. Exports in 2017 reflected the increased production, rising 3%, to 1.01m tonnes swt. Live (feeder and slaughter) cattle exports in 2017 were 22% lower than 2016, at 760,466 head. The ongoing dry conditions in Queensland—which accounts for 40% of the Australian herd—

Strong production growth in 2018 Rabobank estimates that Brazilian beef production will increase by around 5% during 2018, enhanced by an increasing number of cows that will be discarded owing to declining calf prices. Brazilian beef production increased by 2.5% during the first nine months of 2017, compared to the same period in 2016, signalling that the cycle of female retention has now come to an end. After having declined by 8% during 1H 2017, Brazilian beef exports rebounded and fin-


obal agribusiness earch analysts aring market outlooks

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MARKETS & TRENDS 21

COUNTRIES

Content supplied by Rabobank – Grow with the bank founded by farmers for farmers Brazilian beef exports, Jan 2014-Dec 2017

demand for calves (as many as 100,000 head of US calves were exported to Canada in 2017).

China

ished 2017 more than 9% higher, by volume, compared to 2016 (see graph: Brazilian beef exports). Additionally, average export prices were also up by 4%. Brazil’s GDP is expected to increase between 2% and 3% in 2018, which, in turn, should support a consistent recovery in domestic beef consumption.

Canada Fed cattle basis at record levels Canada continues to be a market filled with mixed signals. The drivers behind the mixed signals

are many. Drought conditions over a portion of western Canada and difficulty finding grass have limited expansion plans in the cow-calf sector. Canadian cattle inventory, including cow numbers, continues to be flat to marginally lower. At the same time, the weak US dollar, attractive feedgrain prices, strong beef demand, and increased exports of both beef and fed cattle have meant demand for cattle has been exceptional. This has been reflected in lower exports of feeder cattle to the US—down 33% in 2017—and strong

Shorter domestic supply The Chinese beef market has performed strongly in recent quarters. This is reflected by the steadily rising farmgate prices since August. The finished cattle price reached CNY 29.8/kg in January, up 8% YOY. The beef retail price has also increased, compared with other meats. The low production volumes caused by two years of drought in northern China have supported the strong prices of beef and sheepmeat. In addition, the ongoing exit of small to medium milking cow operators, driven by a lack of profitability, has also contributed to the decline in cattle supply. EU: Production to

grow, but prices variable EU beef supply is estimated to increase in 2018, due to slight increases in production and imports. Even though prices in the EU are variable, Rabobank expects 2018 average prices to experience more pressure. Beef production stabilised in 2017, after several years of expansion. Total EU supply for 2017 is estimated at 26.5m head, or 7.8m tonnes, just below the record level of 2016. On average, EU

heifer slaughter grew close to 2%. Conversely, dairy cow and young cattle slaughter dropped by almost 4%.

US Guardedly optimistic US cattle markets have started 2018 with guarded optimism. 2017 finished as the secondmost profitable year for US cattle producers— and, at least for the first quarter of 2018, market momentum continues. Supporting the positive market momentum was the 1

US Five-Market Area Steer Price, Jan 2016-Jan 2018.

January cattle inventory report, which showed a slower expansion rate than what was expected. All cattle and calves are estimated at 93.7m head, up 1%. All cows and heifers calved at 41.1m head, up 1%, with beef cows at 31.7m head, up 2%. Beef replacement heifers are estimated at 6.13m head, down 4%, while other heifers are estimated at 9.33m head, up 4%. Steers 500 pounds and over are estimated at 16.4m head (fractionally lower than a year ago), and calves under 500

pounds, at 14.4m head, are only fractionally larger than a year ago. Cattle prices for the year to date have been holding at, or above, expected levels, supported by a continuation of solid demand by both the domestic and export markets (see graph: US Five Market Area Steer price). While market tone has started the year with solid footing and continuation of profitability in all sectors, there are a number of potential headwinds that could become driving issues as the year unfolds. • Want to keep up-todate with the latest food & agribusiness insights? Tune into RaboResearch Food & Agribusiness Australia & New Zealand podcast channel. Most Apple devices have the Podcasts app preinstalled—if not, you can find it in the App Store. These are also available on Android devices.


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

22 OPINION EDITORIAL

EDNA

Here to stay! THE TWO main competitors to Rural News are exiting the rural publishing market. NZX and Fairfax are selling or closing their weekly farming titles – a move that could be seen as a signal that print media nor the farm sector are worth investing in. This is not the case! As publishers we are in the business of trusted news and information. Both are needed more than ever in the era of fake news, an era where the mainstream media’s pursuit of clicks and cost cutting in newsrooms has weakened their ability to provide quality journalism. Now more than ever the primary sector needs reliable and believable news and information that is relevant to them. Not so much because farming is “beset on all sides” by interest groups trying to drive them out of business, although there’s some truth in that, but more because the farm sector needs to keep evolving to retain market access and its social licence to farm. News and information shared by the entire farming community is vital to this evolution. An enduring strength of Kiwi farmers is that they always have evolved collectively, sharing advancements, retaining a united front that has led to the enviable international reputation of NZ ‘INC’ produce. Farming newspapers delivered to all farmers – supplemented with websites and social media feeds – remain the only way to ensure a free and open flow of relevant news and information to the entire industry. Digital mediums, good as they are, simply do not reach all the farmers all the time. The average age of farmers is late 50s. Internet coverage remains patchy at the fringes of the network. If we rely only on digital means of communication many will be excluded. Yet a quality newspaper delivered free to all farms by the Rural Delivery service does not exclude farmers who are digital savvy. Digital platforms offer great opportunities to farm businesses and communities. We use them and are not anti at all. But to glue the entire farming community together and keep the information flowing, farm papers must be in the mix. Rural News Group is a family-owned business with strong farming roots and 50 years of publishing for farmers. We enjoy doing it, we’re committed to it and we’re here to stay.

RURALNEWS TO ALL FARMERS, FOR ALL FARMERS

HEAD OFFICE POSTAL ADDRESS: PO Box 331100, Takapuna, Auckland 0740 PUBLISHER: Brian Hight ......................................... Ph 09 307 0399 GENERAL MANAGER: Adam Fricker ....................................... Ph 09 913 9632 CONSULTING EDITOR: David Anderson .................................. Ph 09 307 0399 davida@ruralnews.co.nz

“Great – most of us view them as a bunch of ratbags!”

Want to share your opinion or gossip with the Hound? Send your emails to: hound@ruralnews.co.nz

THE HOUND Keep calm

Major fail

Going potty?

Face-palm

YOUR OLD mate hears there’s a bit of concern about the state of rural publishing in this country. This stems from news that Aussie-owned and controlled Stuff (formerly Fairfax) is quitting lots of regional and rural newspapers – including the longsuffered NZ Farmer – and that the stock exchange operator NZX is quitting its NZ Farmers Weakly (sic). This has led to ill-informed speculation that publishers are abandoning the agriculture and rural sector in NZ. But, in fact, Rural News, its sister publication Dairy News and the website www.ruralnews.co.nz are going nowhere. Their company – family-owned – has been nearly 50 years in specialist publishing and knows and enjoys the business. The Hound is assured by the publisher that this old mutt and his mates will be fed and published for many years yet.

YOUR OLD mate understands that the continuing cluster#$%& that is the handling and management of the M.bovis outbreak by MPI can be laid squarely at the feet of Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor. Some observers may think this comment a bit harsh considering O’Connor inherited the M.bovis situation when he came into government. However, reports to the Hound suggest that the new minister’s insistence on restructuring MPI by April this year has led to confusion and a loss of focus amongst the MPI bureaucrats as they take their eyes off the M.bovis ball and worry more about their futures in the organisation. Farmers and others in the rural sector hit by M.bovis can rightly criticise, even rage, at O’Connor for not delaying this pointless review of MPI until the cattle disease is under control.

JUST WHEN your old mate thought the boffins at MPI couldn’t be seen in a worse light, given the M.bovis debacle, he came across this amazing example of bureaucratic bulls$%t. Apparently staff at various government departments – including MPI, the Ministry of Justice and Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) – are discouraged from having plants in the offices -- because they are an earthquake hazard. According to reports, MPI believes pot plants “can attract unwanted bugs and can easily be dislodged in an earthquake, creating a mess, a tripping hazard or may fall on someone”. The Hound suggests MPI has more important things to worry about at present -- like eradicating M.bovis and stopping stink bug getting into the country – than buggering around with head office pot plants.

THIS OLD mutt would love to have been a fly on the wall at the PGG Wrightson HQ when news came through of its almighty swede seed stuff-up. It seems ‘human error’ at the company led to some 9300ha of swedes sown by 556 farmers – mainly in Otago and Southland – being the white-fleshed HT-S57 variety this season instead of the yellow-fleshed Cleancrop Hawkstone swede. Imagine the fingerpointing and face-palming going on – especially considering the HT-S57 variety was implicated in cattle deaths in winter and spring 2014 – when the news broke. Your old mate wonders what PGG Wrightson has done to the ‘human’ who made this ‘error’. It would be a fair bet he or she will not be winning employee of the month for March.

PRODUCTION: Dave Ferguson ........................Ph 09 913 9633 davef@ruralnews.co.nz Becky Williams ........................Ph 09 913 9634 beckyw@ruralnews.co.nz REPORTERS: Sudesh Kissun ....................... Ph 09 913 9627 Pamela Tipa ............................ Ph 021 842 220 Peter Burke .............................Ph 06 362 6319 Nigel Malthus ...................... Ph 021 164 4258 MACHINERY EDITOR: Mark Daniel ............................. Ph 021 906 723 or 07 824 1190 SUB-EDITOR: Neil Keating ............................Ph 09 913 9628

NATIONAL SALES MANAGER: Stephen Pollard ....Ph 09 913 9637/021 963 166 stephenp@ruralnews.co.nz

WELLINGTON SALES REPRESENTATIVE: Ron Mackay ......... Ph 04 234 6239/021 453 914 ronm@ruralnews.co.nz

WAIKATO SALES REPRESENTATIVE: Ted Darley .......... Ph 07 854 6292/021 832 505 ted@ruralnews.co.nz

SOUTH ISLAND SALES REPRESENTATIVE: Kaye Sutherland Ph 03 337 3828/021 221 1994 kayes@ruralnews.co.nz

ABC audited circulation 80,580 as at 30/09/2017

WEBSITE PRODUCER: Jessica Wilson ........................ Ph 09 913 9621

Rural News is published by Rural News Group Ltd. All editorial copy and photographs are subject to copyright and may not be reproduced without prior written permission of the publisher. Opinions or comments expressed within this publication are not necessarily those of staff, management or directors of Rural News Group Ltd.


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

OPINION 23

Farming sector holds its breath Political change appears to have been an important driver behind the drop in farmer confidence from six months ago. tent weakness in coarse wool prices remain the exception. Of course, there are

various risks to the price outlook including the demand, supply and trade channels.

While there are differences across products, overall we see a mild softening in world prices for NZ primary products through 2018. But we are always mindful of the potential for supply shocks to alter the course of prices abruptly. Perhaps confidence

levels may be a touch higher if farmers were surveyed today, given the now agreed revised TPP trade deal, weather generally not as worrisome as after the dry in November and December, and dairy prices pushing higher in the first three GDT auctions of the year.

These are reasons to think that farmers will follow through on their already positive spending intentions. • Doug Steel is an economist with BNZ and his comments relate to the bank’s latest rural confidence survey Rural Wrap.

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hindered, although the recent blast from excyclone Gita has hindered many farmers, altering production profiles, causing disruption and/or lifting costs. Meanwhile, rising cost pressures were seen to have pushed farmer confidence lower. We can certainly see cost pressures brewing in the labour market. Farmers in dairy, meat and fibre, grains and others in all the main regions -- all reported difficulty finding labour. The current confidence slump has occurred despite generally firm primary product prices. These have been supported by strong and broad-based economic growth offshore that has driven down trading partner unemployment rates and boosted demand for many primary products while supply has been on the tight side in some sectors. Prices for most of NZ’s major primary export products are not only higher than a year ago, but are at levels well above their respective five-year averages. This is true for dairy, beef, lamb, forestry and venison. Horticulture is also strong -- note kiwifruit, apples and wine. Persis-

Room with a view 1% FROM

FARMER CONFIDENCE has fallen sharply over recent months. Political change appears to have been an important driver behind the drop in farmer confidence from six months ago, as it seems in other surveys covering the wider business sector post government formation. More farmers said the political situation was their greatest concern and many more farmers now see fiscal policy as the number-one government priority compared to six months ago. But while general regulation and compliance costs remain farmers’ single-biggest concern in the latest survey, this has fallen from six months ago. Also bear in mind that the near-term influence of policy change on agriculture may also be less than it might have been. The previously proposed water tax was put on ice, free emissions were lifted to 95% from the 90% initially mooted, and the 90-day trial employment period was maintained for small businesses against a chance of it being scrapped. But with the prospect that during this parliamentary term agriculture will be included, in some form, in the Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) (current signals suggest probably 95% free emissions for a start) it is no surprise that more farmers are naming climate change policy and the ETS as their greatest concern compared to six months ago. Much detail is yet to be worked through, but in this area costs look set to rise. However, it is not just politics and policy that have influenced farmer confidence over the past six months. Disease and weather are right up there too. The detection of Mycoplasma bovis from July last year has caused a lot of angst in dairy and beef as cows have been culled, activity disrupted and costs incurred. This revelation explains the sharp elevation of biosecurity to

the most important government priority as identified by farmers. And the weather for many farmers in the past six to nine months has, starting last winter, been too wet, then too dry, then too hot, then too wet. On the matter of farmer confidence, note that the survey was taken as the dry spell inflicted the most pain. Decent rain since early January has generally helped more than

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

24 OPINION

Rural recycling a no-brainer SIMON ANDREW

WASTE PLASTIC – enough to bury a rugby field 2m deep. That’s how much stuff the rural recycler AgRecovery says it handles each year, weighing at least 300 tonnes. Why bother? Because plastic farm chemical, animal health or dairy

hygiene containers, if buried, take 700 years to degrade or burning them wreaks havoc on our environment, so it makes sense to recycle empties. About 11,000 farmers and growers use this free service for containers from participating brand owners. They drop off empties at 80 locations nationwide. Or by

arrangement we can collect high volumes, or three or more large plastic drums. Agrecovery has diverted over 2000t of plastic, which gets made into underground cable cover. It’s a sustainable, 100% solution; we don’t ship it elsewhere for recycling, so there is

Around 3000 tonnes of plastic waste are removed off farm each yar through the AgRecovery programme.

minimal impact on the environment. Our company also offers safe disposal of unwanted or expired agrichemicals and has collected at least 100t so far. We make sure old chemicals are disposed of correctly. Agrecovery shows how manufacturers,

Simon Andrew

industry, government and consumers can work together to reduce the harm of plastic waste. Our operation grows each year – we recycled 40% more plastic in the last 12 months. It is accredited by the Ministry for the Environment as a product stewardship initiative and is

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RURALNEWS

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PAGE 24

TO ALL FARMERS, FOR ALL FARMERS

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supported by seven primary industry trustee organisations that govern the programme. It is made possible by 60 participating agrichemical makers voluntarily paying a levy on all the products they sell so that farmers and growers can use this service free. And retailers Farm-

lands, Farmsource, Rural Co and PGG Wrightson volunteer time and space to help collect empty containers. But more needs to be done. Agrecovery is also looking into collecting other waste such as fertiliser packaging. • Simon Andrew is general manager of Agrecovery.


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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

26 MANAGEMENT

Better way of life pays off for kiwifruit growers KIWIFRUIT GROWERS Mark and Catriona White and their Coastal Kiwis orchard have won the Bay of Plenty Ballance Farm Environment Awards. Ten years ago the Whites set out to find a

better lifestyle for their family away from the city; they found it on a bare block near Opotiki. Their work and passion have transformed part of an organic dairy farm into the successful

5.85ha orchard it is today, the awards judges said. “The concept of kaitiaki – acting as a guardian, protector and conserver – is evident in all aspects of the Coastal Kiwis orchard business.”

The judges said the Whites did not compromise: being organic was not a barrier to excellent productivity in the orchard. “Organics is a licence to do things differently.

Every opportunity is taken to try to learn new things by observation and open mindedness.” Catriona’s parents had offered the couple the chance to buy part of their organic dairy farm

BOP Ballance Environmental Farm Award winners Mark and Catriona White.

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near Opotiki to develop as a kiwifruit orchard. “My family has been farming this land four generations and our children (Letisha, 14, and Lochlan, 13) are the fifth generation to live here. For most of that time the land has been farmed using organic principles,” Catriona says. Although they initially didn’t know much about kiwifruit, they did most of the physical development work themselves, keeping costs down and learning by their mistakes. Mark also did a National Certificate in Horticulture. The orchard had 3.19ha of Zespri Organic Green kiwifruit, producing a total of 23,483 trays of kiwi-start fruit in 2017. Zespri Organic SunGold (G3) is now grown on 2.65ha producing 38,362 trays -- this in a “challenging growing year” with cyclones and a wet, windy autumn. Recently developed blocks of SunGold are set to produce in the next season. Initially the Whites grafted Hayward Green and Hort16A gold kiwifruit onto Bruno rootstock. They decided to remove the gold vines when they saw the devastation caused by the vine disease Psa-V. Organic passionfruit produced income until the newly grafted G3 vines began producing. A small flock of certified organic sheep eat the weeds on the edges of the orchard, helping reduce tractor work and its soil compaction, especially in winter.

Organic sprays are used as required to disrupt pest life-cycles. And unpaid ‘pest experts’ work in the orchard: weka and fantails prey on insects, bird seed plants are grown to encourage birds away from eating kiwifruit flower buds, and slugs help to recycle organic material on the floor of the orchard. “With plenty for the slugs to eat on the ground, they don’t bother to chew on the newly grafted vines. It’s a matter of finding the point at which everything can live in balance,” Mark says. He is active in the Tablelands Irrigation Scheme. Water use is carefully planned and monitored. The Whites were presented with the Bay of Plenty regional supreme award at a dinner on February 23 at the ASB Baypark Arena, Mt Maunganui. They also won the Bay of Plenty Regional Council Award, ZESPRI Kiwifruit Orchard Award and the WaterForce Integrated Management Award. Other winners at the dinner included Barbara and Wilson McGillivray, Awatea Orchard, Katikati, who won the Ballance Agri-Nutrients Soil Management Award and the Predator Free Farm Award. Whakatane sheep and beef farmers David and Carol Hodge won the Treeline Native Nursery Farm Stewardship Award, the Beef + Lamb New Zealand Livestock Award and Bay of Plenty Regional Council Environmental Award.


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

MANAGEMENT 27

Good H&S is good business Worksafe NZ’s Al McCone.

PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

THE STEPS that lead to good business are the same as those that lead to good health and safety practices, says Al McCone, sector leader for agriculture at WorkSafe New Zealand. “There is an intrinsic link between your business practices and your health and safety practices,” McCone told Rural News. Farmers should look at health and safety as part of keeping themselves and the people who work for them safe – but also keeping their business safe. “The things that underlie good business are the things that underlie good health and safety. That’s good leadership in where the business is going, understanding the risks in your business and how you plan to manage or mitigate those risks if you can’t eliminate them. “And it’s about communication at all sorts of levels -- with your accountant, workers and fellow directors, and with others who have an influence on your business activity. “If you translate that into health and

safety, you are talking about the need to lead the conversation on your farm about health and safety. “That need is driven by keeping people and your business running. If you have people who are injured or you are injured, the stresses and strains on you or your business to carry on are going to have a detrimental effect on your business.” Farmers tend to say that health and safety is all about compliance, but in

fact it’s people getting home healthy and safe. It should not only be a checklist of things to do based on the law “The law sets out the minimum levels where you should be – the bottom line. But in fact to be an effective business you need to be above that; you need to be aiming for the ceiling not the floor. “If everyone in a business is always thinking about improving production, and contributing their ideas, the production will increase. The same applies to health and safety: everyone being aware of risk and eliminating or managing that risk.” Part of that is who is leading the conversation across the whole sector? he says. While onfarm leadership is essential, just as important are the messages from people who influence the behaviour across the sector. Farming organisations, retailers, farm consultants, processors and the other people who come up the driveway have an influence on what is accepted as appropriate behaviour. “We are really lucky that over the last three years some organisations have really stepped up [on health and safety]

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in New Zealand. “Most of the major players in NZ agriculture -- the fertiliser companies, the major retailers, DairyNZ, Beef + Lamb NZ and larger corporate farmers -- have signed up for the Agricultural Leaders Health and Safety Action Group.” This group was formed in 2016 from organisations who want to make farming safer. “They have decided ‘let’s get together and lead the conversation across agriculture’ and I think that’s brilliant,” McCone says. It should be agriculture driving agriculture to improve; it should be dairy driving dairy to improve, he says. “DairyNZ drives dairy to improve in a whole lot of areas like production, genetics, etc. People who work in dairy are just as much part of dairy as animals and pastures and all the other things, and DairyNZ has a focus on people too. “DairyNZ has been really good over the past two or three years in stepping forward, starting to lead the conversation and providing training for people in the sector, just as Beef + Lamb NZ has for the sheep and beef sector and HortNZ has for horticulture.”

VEHICLES AND machinery are now a specific focus for WorkSafe because they present the most critical risks on farms, says McCone. “Identifying and eliminating critical risk, or managing the risk if it can’t be eliminated, should be your highest business priority.” Eighty-eight percent of fatalities on farms involve vehicles or machinery. Quads and tractors are the two main vehicles WorkSafe is focussing on because they are involved in most fatalities each year, he says. “The vehicles and machinery focus extends to our assessments when our inspectors come to your farm. “They are paying special attention to what vehicles you have, how well the operators are trained, the condition of the vehicles and how they are being used.” Of course, underlying all this will be an interest in seeing how health and safety is incorporated into everyday farm activity.

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

28 MANAGEMENT Nanaia Mahuta; Moyra Bramley, chair of Onuku Maori Lands Trust; James Russell, chairperson of the proprietors of Mawhera Incorporation; and Damien O’Conner at the announcement of this year’s Ahuwhenua finalists at Parliament.

Battle of islands for Ahuwhenua Trophy Two top Maori farms, one near Rotorua and the other at Hokitika, are the finalists in this year’s Ahuwhenua trophy for dairy. SOUTH MAWHERA INCORPORATION Farm is a 348ha property in the Arahura

Valley, north of Hokitika. This river is famous for its pounamu (greenstone) and the river and

A good start goes a long way.

tracks into the bush are a popular tourist attraction. The farm runs alongside the river and is a long, narrow property which runs from the coast up into the valley. The milking platform is 257ha, with two support blocks of 35ha and an undeveloped support block of 55ha. Mawhera is milking 500 cows this season, targeting 190,000kgMS. All stock are wintered onfarm. Fifty/fifty sharemilkers Mark and Debbie Van Beek are in their twelfth season on the farm and they employ four staff. Given its location, it’s not surprising that the rainfall on the farm is about 3500mm annually. The incorporation says dairy farming is now one of its major investments. They own three dairy farms and commercial and residential properties on the West Coast. The farm’s history dates back to the 1800s when the Mawhera Incorporation was formed. Today, a new marae and a learning institution looks out on a stunning coastline and forms part of this unique property. NORTH Onuku Boundary Road Farm comprises a 72ha block near Lake Rotoma-

hana, about 30km south of Rotorua. On this property, the trust milks 220 cows producing 90,000kgMS. It is a small attractive farm with many trees dotted around the flat to rolling countryside. From the farm there are views of Mt Tarawera which erupted in June 1886 wiping out the Rangitihi Pa at Moura on the shores of Tarawera, and the world-famous Pink and White Terraces. The surrounding land, including that of Onuku, was covered with Rotomahana mud and portions of Tarawera ash and gravel. These soils today make up the base of the Onuku Farms. It is one of three dairy farms owned by the trust. Onuku says it aims to buy land on its boundaries and when the Rotorua District Council Northern Boundary Road dairy farm was put up for sale in 2004, Onuku was a serious bidder. The farm was run down and needed work to bring it up to standard. It has been a good investment and today averages 1214kgMS/ ha. Rotorua consultancy AgFirst supervises the farm, while contract milkers Jim and Trina Braithwaite look after the day-to-day running.

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IT IS now 85 years since Māori leader Sir Apirana Ngata and the Governor General, at the time Lord Bledisloe, launched the Ahuwhenua Trophy. Since the re-launch of the competition 15 years ago, Māori agribusiness is now seen as an integral part of the New Zealand economy. The Ahuwhenua Trophy competition was introduced to encourage skill and proficiency in Māori farming. Sir Apirana Ngata realised that retaining and improving what remained of Māori land was critical. The inaugural 1933 competition was won by William Swinton, a dairy farmer from Raukokore, Bay of Plenty. A new award for young Māori farmers was introduced in 2012. The first winner was Tangaroa Walker, and the 2016 dairy award was won by Jack Raharuhi, Westport.

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

ANIMAL HEALTH 29

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Animal welfare regulations are important for New Zealand New Zealand is internationally recognised for its wellfounded and stringent animal welfare regulations. Yet, as reporter Peter Burke notes, cases of mistreatment of animals keep coming before the courts. BREACHES OF the animal welfare regulations have long tarnished the image of New Zealand farming. The bobby calf scandal, as exposed by an animal rights organisation and which led to the formulation of new regulations, is one high-profile example. There have been others. But a good law is no guarantee of preventing some farmers from failing to meet their legal obligations to treat animals well. Prosecutions of farmers mistreating stock appear with monotonous regularity in the media. But the news is not all bad, says Professor David Mellor, a bio-ethics specialist at the School of Veterinary Science, Massey University. He says farmers are now more keenly aware of what animal welfare means than they were 20-or-so years ago. Farmers then did not fully understand what was required and the extent of the pain and other unpleasant experiences animals can feel. Nowadays, when a breach of animal welfare regulations is reported, the regulators look to see how and why this occurred. “For example, did the animal welfare problem arise because of the personal circumstances of the producer and did this result in a catastrophic outcome?” Mellor says. “The next question asked is whether or not it is a matter of education or a

misunderstanding of the law, and will some form of education -- such as people coming onfarm to demonstrate best practice -- solve the problem?” But Mellor says if farmers don’t respond positively to advice or are antagonistic to it, then the authorities have to decide whether or not a prosecution is merited. In some cases, where there is compelling evidence of obvious ill-treatment or wilful or persistent ill-treatment, a prosecution may be taken immediately. “Taking a prosecution is a big step because by their nature they are extremely expensive and there needs to be compelling evidence to secure a guilty verdict,” he explains. In dealing with animal welfare problems, Mellor says, the Animal Welfare Act focuses solely on the welfare of animals and no account is taken of wider implications such as damage to the reputation of NZ agriculture. In recent years, much has been said by farming industry leaders and scientists about the fallout for NZ from cases of animal cruelty. It has been said that consumers in our high-value markets want assurances that animals are treated well, in some cases as a precondition for buying our products. Mellor says the NZ public are quick to seize on breaches of animal welfare standards, so sticking to the rules is necessary to maintain public support for farming.

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

30 ANIMAL HEALTH

Heat detection device up for an award PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

A LOW-COST device designed to detect when cows are ovulating and ready to be inseminated has earned two Kiwi entrepreneurs a place among the finalists in the 2018 New Zealander of the Year awards. Fraser Smith and Matt Yallop, of Farmshed Labs, are finalists in the New Zealand Innovator of the Year category for their product FlashMate. The $10 FlashMate is a small plastic dome, housing touch screen electronics, that accurately detects the activity in a cow that shows she is in heat and ready for insemination. A flashing red light gives the go-ahead. Smith says this technology helps address a huge challenge faced by

Fraser Smith

dairy farmers -- knowing exactly when a cow

is in heat. He says there are big economic factors

at stake in heat detection because it’s the single controllable factor that makes the biggest impact on farm profitability. “Lifting heat detection rates by even a small margin can have a massive impact on the economy,” he says. “DairyNZ has said a lift in detection rates by 15% would add $300 million to New Zealand’s GDP, so there are huge gains to be made from this.” Smith says he and Yallop are proud that such an important innovation for the national dairy industry is being recognised by their placing as finalists in the New Zealander of the Year Award contest. The innovator category recognises discoveries, research or innovations that are advancing society.

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“It’s great to be recognised for what is a very simple tool, but one that will have a really big impact.” Smith says every year NZ farmers are trying to spot at least 10 million heats during a six-week period. “They’re looking for behavioural cues and rubbing marks on tail paint that indicate the cow is ready for insemination. This requires a judgement call, which is stressful. FlashMate removes the guesswork: if it’s

flashing then the cow is almost certainly in heat because a clear pattern of heat activity has been established. “Having your best heat-detecting farmer available for six weeks straight during breeding comes at a real cost on an individual level. We have essentially ‘baked’ that skill and experience into FlashMate so that farmers can leave this critical task to anyone without the fear of getting it wrong and losing out in an economic sense.”

Smith says technology should provide valuable solutions to relevant industry problems. “Mucking in with farmers gave us a full understanding of the challenges they face. We quickly realised that heat detection was their biggest pain point, so developing an accurate heat detector that could retail for under $10 quickly became our target, and now we have a scientifically proven product.” @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

WORLD FAMOUS IN NZ FLASHMATE IS now distributed nationally by Gallagher, and Smith and Yallop are meeting with dairy and beef researchers around the world who are interested in understanding what the product can do for their industries. “We are meeting with people at the top of their game internationally, the key influencers in their industries, and they’re excited by the potential of the product,” says Smith. “Whether it’s farmers, chief executives or research professionals, once they see it’s from NZ we immediately have their attention because we have such a fantastic dairying reputation. Our dairy industry is one of the few competitive industries competing on a global scale that NZers should be proud of.” FlashMate is now sold in Australia, Ireland, UK, South Africa and South East Asia, and enquiries are coming from all over the world. Internationally, dairy systems differ from NZ’s and Smith and Yallop are working to create evidence for FlashMate in these systems. A large project is now underway at the University of Missouri, and Smith and Yallop will travel to UK next month to initiate another project with the University of Cambridge.

Other industry research groups in the UK, Ireland, USA and Japan have also taken an interest in FlashMate. “It’s set to be a busy year for us,” says Smith. At home, Smith continues to get positive feedback from farmers using the technology. “We’re beginning to form a loyal following among NZ farmers. Last week I spoke to three farmers using FlashMate for the second year and all three are now in the top 5% of dairy statistics for reproductive performance in NZ, which is fantastic to see.” Hamish Maclean, who milks 1300 cows in Waikato, says he would normally not have a single day off during breeding. “Before using FlashMate I wouldn’t have left the farm during breeding.” Maclean says it’s important for farmers to know they can rely on technology to help them find balance in their lives, and FlashMate has done just that. Smith says that spoke volumes to him about the technology. “The fact that it reduces the stress of the breeding season enough to allow farmers to have their days off, spend time with their family and not worry about someone else on the farm making costly mistakes with heat detection is great.”

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

MACHINERY & PRODUCTS 31

Keeping up with the Jones’ MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

DO GOOD things happen in threes? Sometimes: 1958 was a year of three notable events. This year Massey Ferguson celebrates 60 years in New Zealand, so does the well known South Island tractor and machinery dealers J.J. Limited, and lastly, your machinery editor enters his seventh decade. Today, Massey Ferguson is part of the Global AGCO empire. In 1958, the new Massey Ferguson brand emerged from the merger of the Massey Harris and Ferguson companies in 1953. In late 1957 and early ’58 came the iconic ‘Massey’ -- the MF35 -that even today still earns its keep on many farms worldwide. Then came the 100 series, e.g. the 135, 165 and 185, and during the late 1970s the 200 series that gave us the much vaunted MF 290. Through the 1980s we saw 600 series and of course the 300s with the likes of the 390 and the 399; then came the series 4200, 4300, 5400, 6600, 7700 and 8700. Today the product range encompasses miniscule compacts to high powered goliaths. Throughout those 60 years Massey Ferguson, or Fergie as they are fondly known, has brought inno-

vation, technology and ultimately increased production and cost savings. Also about then (1958), Abbey Jones and Jack Johnson formed JJ Ltd in Invercargill to sell the ‘new’ Massey Ferguson brand. This set the scene for a business now turning 60. Its success was soon followed by a second branch in Gore, and both branches still operate on the same sites. In the 1970s the Sadlier family bought into the Gore business. In 1983, when the two founding partners decided to go in different directions, Johnson moved into motor vehicles while the Jones and Sadlier families stuck with agriculture. A third depot was opened at Mosgiel, Otago, in 2001 and a new depot in Hornby, Christchurch in 2009. Then came parts and service branches at Ashburton and Timaru; these duly evolved into full-line, stand-alone businesses. Today, JJ’s employs 85 full-time staff throughout the South Island. The company encompasses three generations of the Jones and two generations of the Sadlier families. Between them Dave Jones, Paul Jones, Geoff Sadlier and Grant Jones have been in the business for 50, 24, 37 and 26 years respectively – a total of 137 years service over six

FMR JOINS SPANISH MAKER MARLBOROUGH VINEYARD and orchard equipment supplier FMR Group has made an exclusive Australasian distribution deal with the Spanish manufacturer Niubo Agriculture. Like FMR, Niubo Agriculture is a family-run firm that works with growers to equip them with vineyard and orchard gear that best suits their needs. FMR says customers here and in Australia are after innovative, quality equipment with no-frills specification at a lower purchase price. The Niubo Agriculture products will complement FMR’s existing range and help fill some product gaps. They will also suit small to medium size owner-operators seeking a versatile, dependable FMR alternative at a lower cost. The Octopus Plus Series, for example, offers one, two and three row configurations and multiple tank sizes.

decades – and they’re still counting. As for the third part of the story, a Welsh fella with a love of farm machinery worked for several machinery distributors in the UK. He

caught a plane to NZ in 2001 and spent the next 13 years messing about with tractors at Power Farming Group, before picking up the pen to spread his wisdom. Two out of three aint bad!

The JJ’s team with a combined total of 137 years’ service between them: from left, Dave Jones, Paul Jones, Geoff Sadlier and Grant Jones.

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

32 MACHINERY & PRODUCTS

Positive vibe MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

THE SAYING ‘it’s best to play the hand you’re dealt’ well suits the stoic folk of Southland who recently held the biennial South Island Agricultural Field Days at Waimumu, near Gore. Despite their being hit by the worst drought in 60 years and the uncertainty caused by Mycoplasma bovis outbreaks in the dairy sector, the overall mood appeared on the bright side. Three sunny days were interrupted by one cloudburst late on day two, which cleared to make way for the rugby match between the local heroes the Highlanders and the Cantabrian Crusaders. The outcome, in a game giving several returning All Blacks a pre-season workout, saw the local boys tri-

umph 42-26. The only controversy at Fred Booth Park was a hay bale set alight near the end of the game, no doubt by a disillusioned visitor from Christchurch. Final attendance figures are expected to beat the last event’s total of 40,000. There was plenty for visitors to see on the 767 trade sites, up slightly on 2016. A straw poll of exhibitors suggested that business had been brisk, with the Southern folk doing a lot less tyre kicking than their North Island counterparts. The machinery lines had plenty of the latest harvesters, handlers, tractors and all manner of equipment. With the region having a large focus on livestock, suppliers in that sector where wearing broad smiles as chequebooks appeared and credit cards ‘blinked’ in the sunlight.

Aside from the rugby match played adjacent to the field days site, notable events were the tractor pull that generated a heap of noise in the southern corner, and a shearing competition between radio host Jamie Mackay and outgoing National leader and local boy Bill English. That tussle saw Mackay come out on top and claim bragging rights for the next two years. This great event is an excellent showcase for farming and the rural sector in general, organised by no-nonsense, practical people who epitomise the locals and get things done. One younger member of the organising committee voted his approval of the girls on the Seed Force site for their outstanding use of Lycra; as they say, ‘what goes on tour stays on tour”.

JCB NZ product manager Steve Gorman with the new Loadall Agri-Pro at the South Island Agricultural Field Days, Waimumu, Southland.

A loader with a difference MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

WINNER - BEST UTILITY 120-140hp

TRACTOR OF THE YEAR® 2018 The new X6 Series is the perfect balance between comfort & performance. Visibility, soundproofing and air-conditioning in the new four pillar cab are in a class of their own, while the technology features are truly impressive: 120 to 140hp Tier 4 engines, VT Drive or Powershift transmission, front axle with independent suspension and cab suspension.

FRESH OFF the boat and whisked down to the South Island Field Days, the latest development from handling specialist JCB— the Loadall 541-70 Agri-Pro – was getting attention on the Harvest Centre site. It results from six years development work and 10,000 ‘real-world’ testing hours; engineers monitored the typical use of this type of machine, finding that that workloads were generally split between handling 60% of the time, towing and roadwork 35% and the remaining 5% sitting idle. The resultant new DualTech VT transmission combines elements of hydrostatic and powershift in one unit, a first for this type of machine. In simple terms, the hydrostatic element takes care of speeds from 0 - 19kph, then the 3-stage powershift unit propels the machine to the maximum of 40km/h. Changes are automatic and seamless, using clutch packs in the powershift sector to change speeds and transmit direct drive to the machine’s front wheels. In use, speeds can be ‘limited” by selecting the top gear and, effectively, a speed you do not want to exceed. In use, hydrostatic drive takes the machine from 0-19km/h, the 1st power-shift step to 25 kph, the 2nd step to 33kph and the final step to the max of 40km/h. In Flexi mode, available only in the hydrostatic sector, a drive strategy can

be adopted to give independent control of the engine revs and the groundspeed. Once selected, engine speed is set using the hand throttle, and groundspeed as a percentage is selected by a dial on the dashboard from where the drive pedal is used to regulate the groundspeed up to the maximum level selected. The product manager for JCB in New Zealand, Steve Gorman, says the Agri-Pro will interest anyone who works a lot of hours on this type of machine. “As well as offering fine control of the transmission at lower speeds, the independent control of engine and travel speeds will save a lot of fuel.” The 541-70 is powered by the latest 4.8L JCB DieselMax engine producing 145hp and meeting the Tier4B/Final emission regulations with the use of EGR and SCR technology. The manufacturer claims that SCR usage is about 3% of diesel consumed, dependent on workload. In use, the driver can choose Power or ECO mode: the former offers maximum power, greater aggression and holds onto the transmission shifts for longer; the ECO setting limits maximum engine speed to 1700rpm, reduces the aggressiveness of the transmission and results in a more relaxed way of operation. Lift capacity is 4.1 tonnes to a maximum height of 7m with hydraulic power delivered by a closed centre, load sensing hydraulic pump offering 140L/min output and the latest energy saving regenerative circuit.

Check out our websites www.ruralnews.co.nz www.dairynews.co.nz

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

MACHINERY & PRODUCTS 33

Forage harvester makers chase power markd@ruralnews.co.nz

FOR THE 2018 season, the newly launched FR920 is the most powerful self-propelled forage harvester from New Holland. Its all-new FPT Industrial Stage IV V20 engine delivers a maximum power of 911hp (670kW) at 1600 to 1800rpm, 4095Nm maximum torque and a 44% torque rise from 2100 to 1600rpm. The company says the engine reacts fast to changing load and is fuelefficient in the 1600 to 1900rpm working range. The in-line concept and direct driveline logic of the FR Forage Cruiser ensures power from the new V20 engine is efficiently transmitted to the driven parts and, ultimately, to the ground. Components are reinforced to manage the increased power, while the heavy-duty mechanical 4WD option increases

the maximum torque transferred to the wheels by 60% compared to the standard 4WD system. Engagement of the 4WD system is controlled by the Terralock feature, which automatically activates and deactivates the four-wheel-drive axle depending on the steering angle setting, minimising damage to the field surface during headland turns and reducing operator fatigue in long harvesting days. Other features of the harvester include heavyduty axles that are guidance ready, a reinforced steering axle support and the possibility to fit larger footprint steering tyres. The overall feeding system has been improved with a 12.5% bigger intake channel and, in addition to the standard crop processor, the FR is now available with the new DuraCracker and DuraShredder systems. The new DuraC-

PLASTIC FEEDER MADE TO LAST THE ABILITY of farmers to come up with practical solutions to on-farm problems never ceases to amaze. Some are extremely clever in their simplicity, take for example, the Three Rivers Bale Feeders. Alistair Hay, farms 1000ha near Fairlie, South Canterbury, rearing deer and beef and offering dairy support. He fed out with traditional steel and sheetmetal ring feeders but found them heavy, awkward to handle, and so roughly handled during moving with frontloaders that they soon fell apart. Looking to build a lighter, easier-handling and more durable type, Hay made one from alkathene waterpipe. Trial and error through five or six prototypes resulted in the unit he sells today. This uses medium density pipe for the main support rings and polypropylene uprights, which started life as risers for irrigation systems. Five years and 600 units later they’re selling well, especially his 1.8m diameter models. They have space for 16 cattle yet weigh only 35kg. These are easy to roll or slide about and a breeze to lift and place over bales. “We had to mess around a bit to get the first units right, but it all came together when we discovered fusion butt welding for the main support rings,” Hay says. The feeders come in several sizes for cattle, sheep and horses. They are said to be extremely durable – even in mobs of bulls— and look likely to outlast similar-sized conventional steel units. www.balefeeder.weebly.com

racker system has reinforced frames and drives to deliver uniform kernel cracking and outstanding processing performance to match the high outputs of the new model. Meanwhile, the DuraShred-

der module adds a further element, using rolls with additional spiral cuts that shred the crop and more intensively process both kernel and stover, especially at longer chop lengths.

The newly launched FR920 is New Holland’s most powerful forage harvester.

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MARK DANIEL


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

34 MACHINERY & PRODUCTS / RURAL TRADER

WORLD LEADERS IN BALE HANDLERS

Ace may save you MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

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FARMERS KEEN to save their bodies are taking note of a recent offering from Polaris, test driven by Rural News. This cross between a quad and a UTV -- the Polaris Ace 570 HD -- has the footprint of a quad but differs in that the rider sits in, rather than on, the machine, steers using a wheel, and accelerates and brakes by means of pedals. The machine has a full ROPS frame. The layout is good for a would-be traveller who can’t ride a motorbike, for a farmer having trouble throwing a leg over, or for people needing to tackle difficult terrain - low seat position lowers the centre of gravity. And the Ace would suit orchards where overhanging canopies limit head-

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room. You get aboard through full-width doors and find a comfortable, adjustable seat and steering column. A high-back bucket style seat, substantial side bolsters and a three-point seatbelt impart a sense of security. Rider safety is further enhanced by limiting speed to 25km/h if the seatbelt is not locked in

position. Powered by a Polaris ProStar engine delivering 44hp, the 570 is no slowcoach, topping out where conditions allow at about 80km/h. Speed/range selection is by a single, right side lever offering high, low, neutral, reverse or park lock. There are disc brakes on each wheel, and the front axle benefits

No air required AN AIRLESS tyre from Michelin might suit agriculture but until now has been available only in North America for industrial applications. Soon it will be on sale in Europe. The X Tweel SSL tyre and wheel combination is non-pneumatic and available in two configurations. The All-Terrain (AT) version has a deep, open tread for off-road use on varying surfaces, while the Hard Surface Traction (HST) option has a smooth tread and 100% surface contact, so is ideal for surfaces such as concrete or asphalt. The carrying capacity of the ‘wheel’ centres on ‘poly-resin’ spokes, said to operate and behave much like conventional pneumatic tyres but without risk of downtime

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further from twin-pot callipers. Like other Polaris machines, on-demand true AWD is standard; the machine effectively uses 2WD until wheel slip is detected and AWD is engaged. This happens seamlessly and during our test we never looked like getting stuck. But in extreme conditions a difflock can be used to lock

both axles together. In rough conditions, 260mm of ground clearance gives the Ace great ability, and 240mm of rear wheel travel keeps the operator comfortable and the wheels planted. Suspension layout takes the form of a HD double-A arm set-up, with HD front and rear antiroll bars limiting body roll. The Ace also carries several modifications for the Australasian market, including sealed ball joints, driveshaft splines and suspension bushes, which all serve to extend the service life. First impressions of the Ace are of something different, and it is an option worth considering, showing that a manufacturer’s thinking outside the norm can pull an ace from up the sleeve to deliver a full house.

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from punctures or impacts. Made at the company’s Piedmont, South Carolina plant since 2014, the system is said to be easy to mount. It may have applications in agriculture, especially in animal barns for scraping yards or moving feed or bedding. Michelin is no longer just a tyre maker, but is moving to dominate the world’s central tyre inflation industry. It recently bought the German tyre inflation specialist PTG and the French tyre pressure control maker Téléflow. The company says these takeovers mark a new era for its agricultural product line, for example Zen@Terra, which combines Michelin’s new EvoBib ADT (adap-

tive design technology) tyres with a central inflation system: this enables ultra low-pressure tyre running in the field, then quickly increased pressure for road travel, controlled in the cab by an easy-touse touchscreen display. Following three years of R&D, five European farmers will initially test the system, with a commercial launch for high-power tractors planned for next year The system is said to help farmers and growers optimise the performance of their machines while protecting their soil by managing all aspects of tyres and their interaction with the ground, in the field and on the road. – Mark Daniel

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On Display at...

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Central Districts Field Days

TO ALL FARMERS, FOR ALL FARMERS FEBRUARY 20, 2018: ISSUE 647 

FEILDING MARCH 15-17, 2018

www.ruralnews.co.nz

Silver jubilee event likely to be a biggie PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

CENTRAL DISTRICTS Field Days is in celebration mode this year and for good reason. It has reached a special milestone – 25 years young. The event which draws in close to 600 exhibitors and thousands of people from town and country has been at the same site – Mansfield Raceway -- since it was started by Don Eade in the 1980s. The idea of a regional field day is to attract local businesses and people with an affiliation to the agri sector. This year will see the usual array of farm machinery, cranes, farm products and motor vehicles plus other products. Field days sales manager Cheryl Riddell says they also cater especially for women. “I like to have something there for women, hence the outdoor furniture, cookers and clothing,” she says. “Women come along and want to have a few hours doing their own thing and meet up with their partners later. “They probably have more to say now, so if dad wants a new tractor he wants his wife to have a look at it as well,” she says. Riddell says most people attending the field days come from the lower half of the North Island -- normally about two hours driving distance from Fielding.

The CD field days will draw in close to 600 exhibitors this year and attract thousands of people from town and country to the Mansfeild Raceway at Feilding.

But she says its different with exhibitors. “There are the national ones like Fonterra and Farmlands, but now I am starting to get a few from Australia. In fact, just a few days ago I had a call from Melbourne from a guy who wants to sell tools.

“There’s good support this year: all the initial sites are sold and I am now having to add additional sites for latecomers. Being an outside event we have plenty of room; it’s just a case of getting the foot traffic to them.” Unlike Mystery Creek, the Central

Districts Field Days doesn’t have a particular theme; it’s a case of see and sell. But the weekend coincides with St Patrick’s Day so a few years ago some food exhibitors tried to enter the spirit of the Irish feast day by dyeing their potatoes and corn green.

The lack of a theme has never been a problem for the event, she says. “Every year, the rural community and many townies roll into Feilding either to sign a cheque or just to check out what’s happening in the farming sector.”


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

2 CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS

Cheryl’s show – the joy of selling PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

THE WOMAN leading the success of Central Districts Field Days is undoubtedly Cheryl Riddell. She’s been on the job selling sites to exhibitors virtually since the event started. At the time, Riddell was selling advertising for a rural publication and saw an advert for someone to sell for the field days; she applied and got the job. In her first year in the role she sold 230 sites and today is selling close to 600 sites. “I basically work 11 months of the year. At the end of the field days I take a few weeks off, but I am back into serious selling just after the National Fieldays. I came from a sheep and beef farm so I know the basics of the sector.” Riddell says about 25 exhibitors have

been there since day one and she has developed a special relationship with these people. She says a feature of her job is getting the repeat business; about 75% rebook every year. Some may pull out for various reasons, but regular visitors notice this and often these people come back again. “The exhibitors are great people to deal with and they know and trust me. In the early days it was different but now most bookings are by email and when you have 100 new exhibitors it’s very hard to get around and meet all of them personally over three days,” she says. She says rural people are down-toearth and this makes all the effort worth it. “I still enjoy it and get a buzz, whether I sell a $500 or a $3000 site,” she says.

Central Districts Field Days Site G27

CD field days sales manager Cheryl Riddell.


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS 3

Makes stubble short work MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

DESIGNED SPECIFICALLY for stubble cultivation and seedbed preparation, the Pottinger Terradisc compact disc harrow has a compact layout and aggressive disc angle position to promote mixing of harvest residues in shallow seed beds and stubble. The 3.0m and 4.0m trailing Multi-Line versions allow for the fitting of a seed drill to the rear, providing a one pass cultivation and seeding system. The machine layout has 580mm diameter scalloped discs mounted on twin arms with large rubber suspension blocks to give a higher break-out force for work in harder soil conditions. These also protect the large twin-race double-sealed disc bearing units, ensur-

ing trouble free life and maintenance. The range has fixed or trailing versions ranging from 3.0m to 6.0m working width with a choice of rear roller options. PackRing roller or Rubber Packer rollers have proven to be the most popular types, providing a cracking effect and breakdown of clods for a finer seedbed. These help by pushing the crop stubble into the surface of the soil to increase contact and accelerate breakdown of residues. The rollers also increase moisture retention by leaving a well consolidated surface. Hydraulic folding side discs are a standard feature on all linkagemounted and Multi-Line models, allowing the operator to reduce overall width in transport. Meanwhile, hydraulic-folding trailing models have a rear transport

wheel system which folds up and over the top of the discs when working. This increases weight over the discs, helping soil penetration and improving stability when working at high speeds.

The Terradisc’s compact harrow layout makes short work of stubble.

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WHY A DCS MILK COOLING SYSTEM IS THE BEST INVESTMENT IN YOUR FARM European design and quality - Over 50 years experience in developing milk cooling tanks and one of Europe’s leading Dairy Cooling Systems producers for the needs of farmers around the world – from Mexico to Japan, from Russia to South Africa, Australia and New Zealand. Horizontal Milk Cooling Tanks with Iced Water Cooling – 50% more effective in cooling the milk compared to standard direct expansion systems without any risk of freezing the milk due to the water temperature of +0.5 > 1.0degC. Packo Milk Tanks

Highly suitable for AMS (Robotic Farming Systems) with low milk flows – no risk of freezing the milk. Energy Saving with Packo Ice Builders (PIB’s) – thanks to the ice energy store build-up during night time hours, a smaller refrigeration unit can be installed, plus the potential savings of off-peak power rates.

ECONOMIC FUEL STORAGE FUEL STORAGE Systems Ltd of Ashburton, maker of Sebco diesel, waste oil and AdBlue storage tanks, has launched a new range of low-cost models to complement its existing diesel storage line up. Suitable for users not requiring computerised fuel management, the tanks are basic, compliant, safe and secure – with many of the advantages of the mainline Sebco diesel stations. “We discovered operators with a lower diesel use have also upgraded to vehicles with a common rail engine,” says Sebco managing director Ed Harrison. “These require clean fuel, so the design of our bunding system, which virtually eliminates condensation -- the inner vessel cannot rot or rust – ensures the fuel being dispensed is clean.” The tanks have quality components and a manual pump that is easy to access and operate. A 4m delivery hose with a filling nozzle helps reduce the risk of spillages, and a lockable door keeps all pumping equipment and hoses secure when not in use. All Sebco units carry a 5-year warranty on the rotomoulded tanks and have a 25-year design life.

PIB 230 - 370

Water Saving with PIB’s – bore water pre-cooling is not necessary with the correctly sized PIB. This is ideal for drought prone regions or where water supplies are restricted. Improved Milk quality through Snap Chilling = potentially a higher return adding PROFITS to the farm.

PIB 25-160

For 30yrs Eurotec has been supplying the NZ Refrigeration Industry with leading Global Brands. The only NZ supplier of this technology providing nationwide coverage and After Sales Support with branches in Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch with over 30 Approved Refrigeration Installers throughout the country from Invercargill to Whangarei. Check out the DCS website www.dairycoolingsolutions.nz or talk to your refrigeration contractor, and come and see us operating at the Northland Field Days (Site 206B) and the Central Districts Field Days (Site H18), March 2018

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

4 CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS Key information

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Wilco (2003)

When is CD Field Days? Central Districts Field Days 2018 will be held Thursday 15 - Saturday 17 March, 2018. What time do gates open?  Visitor gates open at 9:00AM each day. Field Days closes at 4:30PM Thursday 15 and Friday 16 March, and 4:00PM Saturday 17 March. Where is Field Days held?  Field Days is held at Manfeild Park, Feilding. Please enter off South Street. Is there free parking?  Yes, all parking is free. Please enter off South Street, Feilding and you will be directed to your park. Where is the mobility parking?  Please enter off South Street and follow the signs for mobility parking. Can I hire a mobility scooter or wheelchair?  Yes - you can hire a mobility scooter or wheelchair for the event from EASIE Living Centre and pick this up from the gate. To book ph Raewyn on 06 353 5889 or 027 291 6121.

CENTRAL DISTRICTS

C20-C21

How much are tickets? Online (prior to 28 February): Tickets are $15 for adults if purchased online prior to the event. Senior tickets are $13. Children 5-15 are $5 and 0-4 are free. Online (prior to 15 March): Tickets are $18 for adults if purchased online prior to the event. Senior tickets are $13. Children 5-15 are $5 and 0-4 are free. At the Gate (15-17 March): Tickets are $20 for adults. Senior tickets are $15. Children 5-15 are $5 and 0-4 are free. Where do I buy tickets?  You can buy your tickets online at cdfielddays.co.nz from early 2018, or at the gate on the day. Can I bring my dog?  No - no dogs are allowed on site. Guide dogs are allowed. What’s on during the day?  There are lots of events on throughout field days see cdfielddays.co.nz for full details

THE BEST IN 4X4, AGRICULTURAL AND FORESTRY TYRES! ALL ON ONE SITE!

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS 5

Farming’s new age draws the crowds A FOCUS on innovation will distinguish the 25th Central Districts Field Days, at Manfield, Feilding, on Thursday to Saturday, March 15 to 17. “Our byline has changed from the ‘best day off the farm all year’ to ‘exploring the latest trends in agricultural innovation and development’,” says organiser Cheryl Riddell. New this year is a free wi-fi zone sponsored by InspireNet, also offering umbrellas, tables and beanbags to help people relax. An upmarket food and adjacent bar will have two local entertainers, Libby Offord and Daniel Webster, perform on the

MORE THAN 6000 EXHIBITORS THE ORGANISERS expect the largestever number of exhibitors and at least 25,000 visitors over three days of the event. The 2018 show is set to be bigger and better than ever with over 600 exhibitors expected, Cheryl Riddell says. “We are looking at hosting a business, family, fun-filled and must-attend event for rural and urban alike,” she says. “We are expecting ministers, local government,

Friday and Saturday. Also new is the Suzuki Rural Prize. This can be entered using iPads at either the information kiosk or directly at the Suzuki site. Suzuki has donated a quad and it will be towing a Brent Smith Trailer

international delegations, industry leaders and of course families and farmers from around the North Island.” In addition to the usual crowd favourites such as the Claas Tractor Pull, the National Excavator Championships and the Central Districts fencing competition, this year the NZ Army band, and the RNZAF Black Falcons Aerobatic Show and the A109 Helicopter Display, will be on show.

filled with donations from exhibitors – all farm and home related prizes. Would-be entrants must visit the field days, be over 18 and live at a rural delivery address. The variety of exhibitors will be huge, indoors and out. The sold-out

agriculture pavilion will have animal health and veterinary products, tertiary education providers, fertiliser companies and other ag-related organisations. “The Bayleys rural lifestyle pavilion will be like a home show,” Rid-

dell says. It will promote 12 boarding schools and Tararua District Council promoting the district’s many attractions. A new area fronting the pavilion, facing the main food court, will have spa pools, barbecues, cast iron cookers, camping gear from Sylvan Sport and electric bikes from Ubico. The New Zealand Army Band will perform on the stage in the main food court. The band is famous for being versatile and innovative, and is recognised internationally as among the world’s finest marching bands. The show’s first-ever Kids Zone will include giant snakes and ladders,

an obstacle course and a bouncy castle. A hop on/hop off shuttle service will be available at six stops; the fare is a gold coin donation to support rural mental

health. Blue Wing Honda will lend several six-seat side-by-sides for this service. And a delivery service to the carpark will haul heavy items for purchasers.

C RAIGCO

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

6 CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS

Massey Uni adds new enviromental farm plan course PETER BURKE peterb@ruralnews.co.nz

THE GROWING need for farmers to have farm environment plans has prompted Massey University to develop a new course to help train rural professionals to do these. Dr Lucy Burkitt and Dr Mike Bretherton of the university’s School of Agriculture have put together the course, which is online, making it easier for people to complete it in their own time. Burkitt says with new regulations, such as the Healthy Rivers programme, Massey recognised the need for a tertiary qualification in this subject. It’s built on work done by colleague Mike Touhy, who has been running a course on understanding soils and landscapes, and how nutrient and sediment are lost from landscapes

“We spent last year going around the country doing a lot of market research, talking to regional councils about the important attributes they want their employees and people doing farm plans to know and understand,” she told Rural News. “We have revamped the existing course to be targeted, so that rural professionals can do it online in their own time.” Burkitt says the course has three modules. The first is an introduction to soil and nutrient loss issues, with a field trip that will be done with the regional councils. The second module goes into a lot more detail about soil and nutrient loss processes and understanding the hydrology that makes soil and water move, as well as erosion processes. “The final module has the stu-

dents developing a farm environment plan themselves, so we will encourage them to hook up with the regional councils. Many of the councils have agreed to provide mentorship to the students and help guide them through the process,” she says. The aim of the course, Burkitt says, is have people who will be qualified, confident and understanding of all the components of farm plans. Anyone interested in nutrient management can do the introductory module and field day, but only people with qualifications in soil and nutrient management can do the remaining two modules. Burkitt says farm plans are complex and people doing these need to understand landscape and soil processes and how these interact with hydrology to influence nutrient and soil loss.

Dr Lucy Burkitt

See Site us at O-2 0

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS 7

Burgess Non Slip Safety Matting HOOFBOND TRAY & MATTRESS

Slush fund boost to local port and rail

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Protect against heel erosion Promote resistance to bacterial infection Strong Tough Reliable 2200 x 900 x 58mm

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Field Day Sites

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value-added specialist manufacturing and make Whanganui an attractive investment prospect for marine and logistics industries.” Jones reckons expanding the port precinct will lead to 160 new jobs as businesses set up.   He says the Government will pay out an extra $90,000 for further technical and design work, including undertaking a geotechnical assessment. “The PGF will also provide $3 million for a project to build resilience into the Whanganui rail line – a good example of the sort of remedial infrastructure projects the fund can assist,” Jones adds.  “The project will improve the resilience of the line and support KiwiRail in moving the growing export volumes in the region, which include dairy products and logs. “KiwiRail estimates that each year [railing freight will keep 6250 trucks off the road and 563 tonnes of carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere,” Jones says.  The work is expected to take three years.

Help prevent hoof rot

INCLUDES

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THE PROVINCIAL Growth Fund (PGF) will spend at least $6 million on upgrading the Whanganui Port and the town’s rail line, says the Government. Subject to a business case, the Government says it will support works to the port planned by Whanganui District Council and identified in the 2016 ManawatūWhanganui Economic Action Plan – Accelerate 25. The money will come from the $1 billion per annum PGF launched in Gisborne last month by Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones. “The fund is open for business and has the potential to make a difference to the people of provincial New Zealand,” Jones says. The first regions to benefit from the taxpayers’ largesse will be Northland, TairāwhitiEast Coast, Hawke’s Bay, Manawatū-Whanganui and the West Coast of the South Island. The plan to redevelop the Wanganui port precinct will help bring in new businesses and rejuvenate the region, Jones says. “The goal is to create a bigger area for

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

8 CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS

Irish mixer wagons hit New Zealand MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

GILTRAP AGRIZONE says it’s had outstanding success with the HiSpec range of slurry tankers and muck spreaders. The company has now added the Irish compa-

ny’s mixer wagons to its product offering in New Zealand. As the name suggests, the manufacturing process uses high-grade materials and attention to detail to enable these machines to work day in, day out for many seasons.

This detail starts with an independent, reinforced chassis that carries a single or tandem axle layout and incorporates a 4 cell Digi-Star weighing system. The heavy-duty tapered body is mounted to the chassis and repeats

the theme of high-spec with a 20mm thick floor with vertical reinforcing to deal with mixing forces. The sidewalls of the tub are manufactured from high-grade 8mm thick steel, with the upper edge incorporating a straw-ring to keep

FEED SYSTEMS SINCE 1962

Giltrap Agrizone is now offering HiSpec’s mixer wagons in NZ.

Se CD e us a Site Field t O 11 Days A& O 12

Supreme quality stainless steel feed trays / Exceptional back-up support / Easy to use and maintain First class installations / Robust construction / Skiold Disc Mills Grain Holding Silos / Utility Augers / Mobile Auger

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bales in place during the initial stages of mixing. This results in a 27 cu.m machine weighing 8.6 tonnes empty. Offered in single- or twin-auger formats, the V and T Series machines have capacities of 7 to 32 cu.m, with all models using industry-leading Comer Industries gearboxes. Machines larger than 12 cu. m have a twospeed planetary reduction set-up that allows the use of a lower-powered tractor. In operation, material travels up the auger screw, before tumbling back down the tapered sides to repeat the cycle. Along the way, self-sharpening, serrated knives chop the material to

between 5 and 10mm in length as required. These are aided by adjustable counter-knives fitted to the lower part of the tub. Completing the package, simple guillotine doors, standard crossconveyors or variable height discharge conveyors handle discharge, allowing adaptation to all types of feeding regimes or layouts. “While the diet feeders are new to the market for us, the build quality and attention to detail have certainly got people talking,” says Giltrap’s Jarred L’Aime. “The extensive range means we will be able to offer machines, building on the already founded reputation of delivering HiSpec solutions.”

LATEST STORIES EVERY DAY Get up-to-date news at www.ruralnewsgroup.co.nz

Built Strong. BORN READY. The new John Deere 6250R • • • •

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CERVUS EQUIPMENT WILL HAVE BOTH MODELS ON DISPLAY AT Central Districts Field DAYS Sites C31-C34. contact your local branch today TO LEARN MORE. 0800 333 734

CervusEquipment.co.nz


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS 9

Getting rid of onfarm plastic THE RULES on waste disposal by farmers and growers are changing: the traditional options of burning and burying are no longer allowed. The Plasback recycling service collects plastics from farms and sends it for recycling. Plasback is a government-accredited product stewardship scheme owned and operated by Agpac Ltd, New Zealand’s largest supplier of crop packaging products. It collects such plastics as balewrap, silage covers, twines, drums and polypropylene bags. Plasback operates a bin and liner system for collection. The liner system keeps the plastic cleaner and allows it to be collected in large bags –

easier to collect and bale than loose plastic. Plasback owns six recycling balers that handle the large bags of waste plastic. Once baled, the plastic is sent away for recycling. Since its start in 2006 the scheme has recycled 10,000 tonnes of used plastics. Plasback is now working with Astron Plastics, Auckland, to recycle farm silage plastic into Tuffboard, a plywood-replacement product with many uses on farms. Using new dry-clean technology, silage plastic is heated and treated to clean the shredded film before it is made into pellets. Tuffboard is strong, easily cleaned and

hygienic. The deer industry uses it in upgrading velveting barns to new hygiene standards. Tuffboard is also used by pig farmers to replace plywood – pigs do not eat

the plastic sheet. The Tuffboard range has been expanded to both a recycled and virgin plastic. The recycled plastic is black and the virgin a natural colour.

Lightweight portability. Heavyweight performance.

S400 & S200 Portable Solar Energizers

Keep your power contained.

TICKLED PINK

THIS YEAR at Central Districts Field Days, Stallion Plastics will have something special on display – the limited edition, pink MTF70 feeder. Apart from the girly-pink tank, the MTF has been designed to save time and energy during the calf-rearing season, with an electric start motor bringing the machine to life, allowing the stainless-steel mixing system to mix milk, milk powder or colostrum within three minutes. The nozzle and hose feature makes filling the tank easier than the traditional method of lugging buckets and will prevent backache and sore arms. Cleaning the MTF is simple: half fill the tank with water, turn on the motor and the tank will self-clean within three minutes. Drain out the tank and the nozzle and the job’s done. A special promotion during the South Island event will see purchasers also receiving $650 worth of Stallion Products, leaving money in the pocket to spend up large on the significant other. The only problem Rural News can forsee is that if the ‘other half’ has a hairy chest and is called Nigel he’ll probably want a blue or all-black tank.

www.stallion.co.nz

Agpac’s plastic baler in action.

Extra High Voltage Strain Insulator 0800 731 500 www.gallagher.com

See us at Site I13

Animal performance data at the touch of a finger.

TW-3 & TW-1 Weigh Scales

The Electric Fence, re-invented... From the ground up.

Insulated Line Post


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

10 CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS

Even more kick from latest Mule MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

ARRIVING JUST in time for regional field days is the latest addition to the Kawasaki Mule range – the Mule PROFXR. Described as a premium side-byside that offers performance, work capacity and comfort, the FXR differs from other models in the range by having a wide-body chassis and a wheelbase reduced by 320mm, compared to its nearest relatives. This is said to increase manoeuvrability, noticed in its tight turning radius of only 4.3m. The chassis features a classic Japanese theme -- shinari (elasticity). It has a frame that can bend without braking then return to its original shape, much like a hunting bow or a fishing rod. This feature improves performance over difficult terrain, while keeping wheels in contact with the ground and superior comfort for the passengers. Power comes from a liquid cooled, 3-cylinder petrol engine with 30L fuel capacity. This delivers 48hp and 65Nm torque and is mated to a CVT trans-

mission for stepless speed control and engine braking on the downhill sections. Suspension is double wishbones front and rear, with twin tube shock absorbers absorbing bumps. Shod with 27-inch tyres mounted on cast-aluminium wheels, the set-up offers 275mm ground clearance, a 34 degree breakover angle to lessen bottoming-out on ridges or climbing over logs, increased rider comfort and superior grip. Stopping is by disc brakes on all four corners and a park brake system that acts on the rear axle. Electrically actuated 2WD/4WD and a rear diff lock are complemented by electric power steering that is speed-sensitive, as well as acting as a damper to eliminate bump-steering and backlash, particularly in rough terrain. A wide, comfortable cab area has a three-person, contoured bench seat with seatbelts and a tilt/adjustable steering wheel. There are several storage options -- a glovebox, dashboard pockets and under-seat storage bins, and the essential cup holders. A high output generator is capable of producing 60 amps to run numerous accessories. These are also catered

for with four pre-wired feeds and two DC power sockets. Digital instruments keep the driver informed of all key machine functions, quadruple headlamps point the way to go and the driver is protected by standard doors and a roof overhead. A robust, gas-assisted tilt bed

offers 453kg carrying capacity, and a 2-inch receiver for the

tow coupling is rated to 907kg.

The Mule Pro FXR will be on show at the round of regional field days.

See us on Site S53, S54

Th

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198

7

PHONE 0800 4 AGBITS | 0800 4 242 487 WEBSITE www.agbits.co.nz

in

Mystery Creek See us at Field Days H26 CentralSiteDistricts Field Days Site G14 & G15

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS 11

All its bales nicely wrapped the original bale chamber application, creating a markd@ruralnews.co.nz perfect seal. After the 3D cycle is AWARDED THE prize completed, 80% of the Machine of The Year bale is covered in film 2018 in the forage harbefore the unit reconfigvesting category at the ures to a conventional recent Agritechnica wrapping cycle to ensure event, the Kuhn FBP 3135 that 100% of the bale is baler wrapper combinasealed. tion uses the company’s The film unique film bindapplied to the ing system – as an Inventory management cylindrical side alternative to conhelps bales ventional net wrap is also said to be easier retain their orig– to achieve high with only one type of inal shape and silage quality at film having to be bought allows prolow costs. longed storUsing two for both binding and age if necessary. 750mm film rolls wrapping. Meanwhile, rather than a the Intelliwrap single set-up, the than a conventional wide- system allows control of system is said to save the number of film layers mantle film. up to 30% in film costs, applied to suit local crop From the bale chamwith the bonus of offeror climate conditions. ing lighter rolls (27kg) for ber, a transfer system Also designed to with smooth rollers the operator to handle increase output by avoidmoves the bale to the rather than the more typing downtime, the Kuhn wrapping sector, formical 40kg+. FBP 3135 has an intake ing a well-sealed bale Inventory manageunit that uses the makusing both 3-D wrapment is also said to be er’s fully automatic rotor ping and Intelliwrap feaeasier with only one tures. Again, using regular Deblock function to type of film having to be allow clearance of rotor stretch film, the addibought for both binding blockages from the tractional wrapping is said to and wrapping. tor seat, automated knife become an ‘extension’ of In operation, at the MARK DANIEL

start of the wrapping cycle the two applicator heads start in a vertical position to create two strings of film which are applied on top of the bale. After tilting to a horizontal position, the wrap covers the full width of the bale after just half a rotation – much quicker

cleaning at a pre-determined interval and the ability to change from film to conventional net binding.

Operator comfort and maximum control are guaranteed using the new Process View user interface on the ISOBUS con-

troller. This user interface conveniently shows the different procedures within the machine, allowing each process to

be paused and restarted at any time. www.kuhn.co.nz @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

The Kuhn FBP 3135 bale-wrapper combination.

Zeddy

Automatic Dry Feeder for Cows, Calves, Goats and Deer

Come and check us out at the Central Districts Field Days, March 15th to 17th, Site N17 Contact us for more info on 0800 444 001 or visit our website www.zeddy.com

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RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

12 CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS

Kuhn fronts up with new mowers KUHN IS expanding its range of front-mounted mowers. The new GMD 3125 F (3.10m) and 3525 F (3.50m) machines are

Kuhn is expanding its range of frontmounted mowers.

FARM MACHINERY STRENGTH / QUALITY / PERFORMANCE CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS

designed for solo operations, in combination with rear-mounted mowers up to 4.40m, or triple mowers in a butterfly formation bringing with them a choice of six different models for all situations. Both machines are equipped with two rotating drums to keep the crop flow centred. This is delivered into a single, adjustable swath width of up to 1.3m, to adapt to the available space between a tractor’s front

tyres. Vertical travel of nearly 70cm offers ground following and adaptation to all types of front linkage systems. The lift control hydraulic suspension system allows adjustable pressure for fast adaptation to mowing conditions. The new mowers also have the advantage of low ground pressure to protect plant cover, and reduced fuel consumption and ground-contacting parts wear.

The front-mounted GMDs have the maker’s Optidisc maintenancefree cutter bars and Protectadrive safety system that protects the mechanical parts if the machine hiyts trash. To further reduce down-time and lower maintenance costs it also has fast-fit knives which save changeover time. And Flex-protect side guards resist objects that are hit in or around the mowing area. www.kuhn.co.nz

SEE US AT SITE

I30 - I35

Bale Feeders

Forage Wagons

Manure Spreaders

Tip Trailers

www.mcintosh.net.nz FREEPHONE: 0800 622 276

JD EXPANDS ZERO-TURN LINE UP JOHN DEERE has added two new commercial, zero-turn radius mowers to its range. The ZTrak Z945M and ZTrak Z955M models come with electronic fuel injection engines (EFI) that give more power, increased fuel efficiency and the power to deal with tough mowing. JD says the increased power makes quicker work of jobs such as material collection, mulching and mowing in thick turf, while the EFI engine set-up improves overall fuel economy. The Z945M, has a 27hp, 824 cc EFI engine, and the Z955M a 29hp engine of the same capacity. Both are available with a choice of decks: the 60-inch, side discharge or a 60-inch, mulch on demand version, to a 72-inch, side discharge unit specifically designed for the Z955M. The machines also have enhanced ride comfort and easy use, allowing

operators to stay more comfortable on long mowing days. A newly designed seat has a thicker bottom cushion, extra padding on the back with ergonomic contouring and adjustable armrests to improve ride comfort; and there is a choice of an premium suspension seat. Other improvements include an enlarged and angled fuel filler neck for fueling with less mess.

The Agrifert Biological range utilises soil bacteria to fix nitrogen, unlock phosphates, combat thatching and improve soil health.

A biological treatment for plant disease and root development

Advanced multi strained biological nitrogen technology

Talk to us about how our Biological range can assist growth and production on your farm. Freephone: 0800 300 315 www.agrifert.co.nz

A biological treatment for plant disease and root development

See us at Central Districts Field Days Site 074


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS 13

DOCKING YARD DEALS!

New Gallagher tech on show MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

2018 MARKS a big year for Gallagher, with its 80th anniversary and the release of several new products. Celebrations will take the theme of ‘Sparking Possibilities’, a nod to the first electric fence that started the business years ago. The latest product

releases represent what Gallagher has done well with – providing fencing and weigh scale solutions and gaining a reputation for high quality, relevant equipment. The fencing technology sees the completion of the Solar Energizer family, with the introduction of the S200 and S400s units, developed following the success of the smaller S10 - S100

models and said to be ideal for heavy crop grazing. The rugged units include an integrated battery and solar model using smart technology to keep the battery power at optimum even on the darkest days. A high-quality casing and circuit protection ensures it can be relied upon in harsh environments. A new extra high volt-

DRENCH RACE KIT Add a drench/force race kit to your existing tailing set up.

1850

$

+ GST

TW weigh scales will also be on show.

age Strain Insulator is created to deal with the increased voltages delivered by modern energisers. The Strain Insulator is especially suited to places where the farmer does not want stray voltage, including electric fences close to dairy sheds and hay barns. Likewise, the new Insulated Line Post will offer flexibility and easy installation with a wide

New S200 units will be on display.

IRRI-MAX SMART REEL EFFLUENT IRRIGATOR

The answer to your effluent spreading woes! COMPUTER CONTROLLED WIND-IN SPEEDS FOR ACCURATE APPLICATION SEE US AT SITE 098 EVERYTIME! We also supply and install most water and effluent products

range of applications including fencing sheep, cattle, deer and horses. Farmers needing to sharpen up their livestock data collection may want to look at the TW Weigh Scales units that combine a user-friendly touch screen interface with time saving technology that has eliminated any need to re-enter data at the end of a weigh run; these generate useful reports on site.

FENCING PRODUCTS TO SEE!

PANEL PACK Upgrade your existing docking trailer with aluminium and make tailing enjoyable BUY 10 x 2.1m x 1.0m aluminium panels and pins & receive 1m x 1m panel FREE*

2470

$

+ GST

*Order 1000 + GST of components and get freight free to your nearest main centre.

Standard Units DELIVERED FREIGHT FREE TO NEAREST MAIN CENTRE

Converting? Upgrading? Maintenance? PIGTAIL STANDARD ❱ Strongest foot in NZ! ❱ Spring steel shaft SUPER SALE

2.50

$

3.0m Standard Yard

280 ewes with lambs prices start at $9695*

SPACELINK – space your wire off the post – attaches directly to Taragate Doubler Dtm or Tarapin Insulator – simply the best outrigger on market today

3.0m Maxi Yard

500 ewes with lambs prices start at $14,795*

EACH

TARAGATE – the ORIGINAL Multi Strand Electric Gate 4.5m Standard Yard

The preferred choice for over 20 years! • Taragate 4 Strand • Taragate 2 Strand • Taragate 4 Strand ‘Lifestyler’

❱❱ Ferrari Effluent Pumps. ❱❱ Ferarri Vacuum Pumps. ❱❱ Irri-Max Hydraulic Hose Reel.

1000 ewes with lambs prices start at $17,895*

❱❱ Ferbo Diesel Pumps. 3 Point Linkage Yard

❱❱ Water hard hose irrigators ❱❱ Complete effluent installations.

120 ewes with lambs prices start at $6295*

These products and more!

❱❱ MDOD Pipe. ❱❱ All farm irrigation couplings.

Small Block Holders Kit

0800 426 296

www.irrimax.co.nz

50 ewes with lambs prices start at $2695*

Taragate Ltd

RD2 Hamilton • Phone 07 843 3859 • Fax 07 843 3952 info@taragate.co.nz • www.taragate.co.nz

• VISIT TARAGATE AT SITE I23 • Do come and talk to us about all your fencing needs

www.landquip.co.nz

0800 269 776

*all prices exclude GST


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

14 CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS

Making it really count WITH THE annual round of regional field days about to hit us, followed by the National Fieldays in June, it might be the right time for exhibitors to look at how they will perform. Many companies put a lot of time and effort into setting up their sites, while others appear to be there to make up the numbers – or because the boss told them to attend. Any visit to any field days will reveal sites that are buzzing and others as still as a graveyard. Now’s the time for exhibitors who don’t do well at these events to put themselves in the shoes of visitors and look at things from the other side of the fence with a more critical eye. How about inviting your top customers or key prospects along to the site? Give them a reason to visit – either to look at a new product, take a little hospitality or even perhaps to collect a thank you freebie. But all the time remember that ultimately any of

your activities are intended to save them time or money. A couple of weeks before the event, send them the invite and follow it up with a phone call just before to give them a final reminder. If you do send an invite, make sure it clearly states your site number and preferably a map of how to find you. How frustrating for you to learn that a key prospect couldn’t find your site. In a similar vein, make sure your site signage clearly says who you are. Use product signage to explain the USPs (unique selling points) of your products, but keep it brief and don’t exaggerate. If you have something new to promote, make sure the signage says ‘NEW’, because sometimes visitors are in a rush and won’t venture onto a site unless there is something new to see. Think about how the site is staffed,

both in terms of the right people and the number. If it’s a smaller event too many people can be intimidating. Most of all, make sure staff are easily visible in the company uniform and greet customers in a positive manner – even if those customers are not their own and from another area. Equally importantly, if you are going to place somebody on site, make sure they are briefed on the products on display. There is nothing more disconcerting for a visitor to hear, “Umm... that’s a new product... I don’t know anything about it”. Finally, don’t have too much seating on your site, to prevent your staff from sitting in huddles bitching about competitors or planning the night’s activities before the day is over. Visitors will find it intimidating to intercept these groups. In some cases, too many seats will lead to a paralysis that hinders staff -- gazing at their phones -- from getting off their backsides when a customer approaches. Field days, whatever the size, take up valuable time and lots of money. Be sure to make them work for you.

KQ400 4 X 4 MANUAL

9

Any visit to a field days will reveal sites that are buzzing and others that are as dead as a graveyard.

$ ,990 PLUS GST

SAVE OVER $1,500

WHY BUY SECO ND H WHEN YOU CAN AND B NEW AND GET A UY 2 YEAR WARRANTY?

REGIONAL FIELD DAYS SPECIAL OFFER: Offer ends 30 April 2018 or while stocks last – 50 units only nationwide. Not available in conjunction with any other offer. Special price $9,990+GST ($11,488.50 including GST). Save $1,506.50 including GST. Applies to LT-F400F Manual only. WWW.SUZUKI.CO.NZ


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS 15 CENTRAL DISTRICTS

Get your ute all properly decked out THE LIMITATIONS of a ute in keeping items safe and secure in the rear are really only addressed by fitting a tonneau cover or a solid lid. Neither of these solutions addresses the need to keep small items secure, nor do they enable retrieving of items from the front of the tray/ bed. Enter a new product called Decked, from Beaut Utes, designed and manufactured in the USA: this truck bed storage system raises the surface of the vehicle’s deck. In doing so it creates extra

waterproof storage space beneath the deck storage, and security. The newly raised deck space can still be used as a normal truck bed and is rated to one tonne capacity. Decked offers two large, secure and weatherproof full bedlength drawers for organising and storage, with each drawer able to hold 90kg. The drawers roll on four sealedbearing wheels running in dedicated channels, meaning that even full they are easy to open and close.

FIEldays We re ON OUR WAY ’

VISIT US AT SITE K8 TO SEE OUR RUGGED RANGE. 15TH-17TH MAR. RUGGEDVALLEY.co.nz 0800 4 RUGGED The ‘Decked’ product offers two large, secure and weatherproof full bed-length drawers for organising and storage on the ute deck.

Each drawer can be customised to suit the buyer’s needs, e.g. add trays and dividers, locks to protect expensive tools, and Core Trax 1000 tie-downs to secure bulky loads.

Available for most ute brands on the New Zealand market, the Decked system weighs 100kg at most, so does not diminish a vehicle’s overall payload. www.beaututes.co.nz

~ See us at CDFD – Site 075 & 076 ~

ECONOMY MODEL

BIG MUTHA

• Large working bench 1800mm long x 600mm plate • Ring lifter (standard on all models) • Cutting axe edge made of “Bisloy 80” steel • Light, easy to manoeuvre when uncoupled

• 16hp electric start engine • Independent suspension • Large working bench 1800mm x 700mm • NZ built heavy wall hydraulic ram

Normanby Fibreglass Ltd

FOR SERIOUS WOODCUTTERS

Ph 06-272 8162

DELUXE MODEL • Large working bench 1800mm long x 6mm plate • 7 second stroke cycle time (approximate) • 9hp petrol engine • Sliding surfaces made of “Bisloy 400”

746 Ketemarae Rd, Normanby

SHEEP JETTER SO MUCH TO DO AND SEE THE LARGEST-EVER Central Districts Field Days will this year celebrate 25 years in the business and the latest and greatest in agriculture. This 2018 event has a record number of exhibitors. Touted as New Zealand’s largest regional agricultural event, it will showcase at least 600 exhibitors and host an expected audience of over 25,000 visitors during the three days. The organisers say this is the region’s best chance to keep up-to-date with the latest trends and developments in rural innovation agribusiness and agritech, and there will be heaps of fun events for the whole family. This year field days is set to be bigger and better than ever, in addition to the usual crowd favourites such as the CLAAS Tractor Pull, the National Excavator Championships and the Central Districts fencing competition. Visitors will also have the chance to win the coveted Suzuki Rural Prize pack. This prize pack includes a new Suzuki quad hitched to a Brent Smith Trailer filled with many farm-related prizes.

Sheep dipping... made easier! Serving NZ Farmers since 1962

7500

$

+ GST

• Manufactured from stainless steel • Electric Eye • 800-1000 sheep per hour • Fantastic penetration • Get one now before price increase Innovative Agriculture Equipment

See us at the Central Districts Field Days – Site O 11A & O 12

www.pppindustries.co.nz / sales@pppindustries.co.nz / 0800 901 902


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

16 CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS

Toyota toughens its act MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

WHILE THE Toyota Hilux is the go-to no-nonsense ute, it’s been losing ground to Ford and Holden with their blinged-up Ranger WildTrak and Colarado Z71 models that catch the eye of town-dwelling drivers. This has prompted Toyota New Zealand to give the relatively new Hilux a refresh that sees the SR5 Limited discontinued and the introduction of a brace of hero editions called Cruiser and Gladiator. This has come about as Toyota NZ recognises that high-end models appear to make up 30% of their competitors’ offerings, but the SR5 achieved only 10% of the Hilux mix. From January 2018 a new flagship dubbed SR5 Cruiser will be available in 2WD PreRunner (4WD chassis with 2WD driveline) and 4WD formats. It will have a more upright frontal aspect, meatier front bumpers, and black alloy wheels and door handles -- more macho already. Also in the range, and in line with the concept shown at the 2017 Fieldays

Toyota has given its Hilux range a refresh with the addition of hero edition the Cruise and Gladiator.

in June, will be the Gladiator series. The concept featured unrated suspension, 20-inch alloys with mud terrain tyres, sump guards, bull bar, winch and futuristic graphics. A range of Gladiator Packages will allow a customer to personalise their

Hilux to their heart’s content, with a stage one version offering a different front grille and bonnet lip, 20-inch wheels and all-terrain tyres, Gladiator-embossed, upgraded seats and of course the graphics package. Stage two will take the look further

with e.g. flared fender extensions; stage three goes the whole hog -- 20-inch mud tyres, heavy-duty steel fenders front and rear, Gladiator scuff plates and a leather sports seat upgrade Depending on the package selected, the price will increase by $8k to $19k,

which shouldn’t deter enthusiasts who already spend about $3k on bog-standard machines anyway -- buying towbars, canopies and deck liners as a matter of course. Interestingly, Toyota NZ general manager of product Spencer Morris says “we offer… 300 different accessories that deliver us about $30 million in business each year; but the record for a single vehicle accessory upgrade stands at a little over $31,000”. Elsewhere in the range for 2018, aimed at generating 9000 sales, are more models available with auto transmission. Four of the nine 2WD variants and seven of the twelve 4WD models can now be specified with auto and this is likely to increase as customers change from manual. Listening to customers has prompted the company to drop all three 4.0L V6 petrol models from the range, and the parent company intends to cease making these soon because of reduced demand. There’s a common 3.5 tonne towing capacity across the range of PreRunner and 4WD drivetrains, and a differential lock in the 2WD PreRunner format.

STOCK WORKER

LIVES MATTER

PUT SAFETY FIRST

Email: hecton@xtra.co.nz Visit our website www.hecton.co.nz for a full list of products

TANDEM CONTRACTORS TRAILER

Shearing shed safety starts with the world’s largest selling & most trusted shearing plant & woopress

SINGLE CONTRACTORS TRAILER

EVO Shearing Plant - Winner of 2 Worksafe Industry Awards - Unique electronic safety switch - Designed to eliminate handpiece lockups - Proven choice for commercial shearing contractors in Australia and New Zealand

See us at CD Field Days SITE O21

Search

Heiniger Shed Safety on YouTube

TPW Xpress Woolpress SHEEP HANDLER AND LEAD UP RACE

Call in & see us | 73 Preston Street | Invercargill Phone: 03 215 8558

- Safety screen guard with automatic return - Presses more weight into less packs - Fast pack locking system - Automatic bale pinning and bale ejection - Contamination-free short square bales

CALL YOUR LOCAL REP, TONY HOGGARD ON 027 252 85 85 TODAY! Heiniger New Zealand | 1B Chinook Place, Hornby, Christchurch 8042 | 03 349 8282 | www.heiniger.com


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS 17

RURAL ONLINE

READING THE PAPER ONLINE HAS NEVER BEEN EASIER.

Go to www.ruralnewsgroup.co.nz

www.revolutionpostdrivers.co.nz

0800 957 868

Case IH gear will be part of the CB Norwood display at this year’s field days.

Norwood celebrates 70 years THIS YEAR will be a big one for CB Norwood as the Palmerston North headquartered, nationwide business celebrates 70 years of bringing global farming technology to New Zealand. Founded in 1948 by Sir Charles Norwood, a pioneer in NZ’s motor industry, the has grown to become synonymous with farming here. It supplies one in three tractors sold in NZ. “This is a fantastic milestone for us to reach and the whole Norwood team is very proud,” said chief executive Tim Myers. “It is an honour to have been a part of New Zealand’s ever-changing farming culture for so long. “We’re looking forward to celebrating our anniversary with those who have helped us get this far – customers, staff and their families, suppliers and stakeholders. We couldn’t have made it this far without them. “We have an awesome bunch of people involved in our business and we’re looking forward to another 70 years together.” Myers says more details of Norwood’s celebration activities will be released in the coming months.

SPECIAL OFFER!

Celebration

See us at SITE J29

• 50 years of Danfoss VLT, 25 years Corkill Systems partnership with Danfoss VLT Division. • TRADE IN any variable speed drive 10 years +, any make, used in the rural sector. • Upgrade your speed controllers on your vacuum pump, milk pump, irrigators, gates sludge pump, etc. • Not restricted to the dairy industry. OFFER ONLY • 20% discount and 5 year warranty. AVAILABLE IN • TRADE IN model to be returned for green recycling. 2018 • Some conditions apply

www.cbnorwood.co.nz

0800 10 7006 www.corkillsystems.co.nz

Superior, longer-lasting fuel storage VISIT US AT THE CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS Central Districts Field Days, March 15th to 17th, Site N17 Contact us for more info on 0800 800 221 or visit our website www.ensol.co.nz


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

18 CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS SERIOUS ABOUT FENCING!

See us at CD Field Days • SITE K19 •

✔ QUALITY ✔ TESTED

The new Versatile 400 looks impressive in its red, gold and black paint job.

New tractors impress

✔ PROVEN Setting the standards in quality

Ph 0800 266 258 www.strainrite.co.nz

MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

handypiece ■ Ideal for shearing sheep, alpacas, goats and cow tails. ■ Variable speed from 2400-3500 rpm. ■ Latest brushless motor technology means minimal heat build up ■ 1400gms means 100-200gms lighter than standard handpiece. ■ At 2700 rpm the 12-volt lithium battery will catch up to 300400 sheep, 400-500 cow tails. ■ Tough alloy switch box with auto rest fuse for overload or lockup – clips to belt.

Worl d’s m o spee st powe r d cli pper ful varia ble is he re! FIELD DAYS

SPECIAL receive a lithium battery 6Ah twin pack

H FASTER H LIGHTER H VARIABLE SPEED

See us at CD Field Days Agbits Site G14A

PREPARE YOURSELF FOR THE NEW SEASON View in action go to www.handypiece.co.nz

Freephone 0800 474 327

email: dave@handypiece.co.nz

SEEN RECENTLY at the South Island Agricultural Field Days, the new Versatile 400 tractor, stunning in a red, gold and black paint job, makes its European rivals look like oversized Tonka Toys. This builds on a history that dates back to 1966 and more recently ownership by the Russian Rostselmash group. The 400 sports a 6-cylinder, electronically controlled 9.0L Cummins QSL motor delivering 400hp at 2100rpm. This is mated to a Funk 16 forward/9 reverse speed transmission that can be programmed for sequential, auto or pulse

CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS

15-17 March 2018 New Zealand's largest regional agricultural event, with over 600 exhibitors and over 25,000 visitors over three days.

Need help with your stock water system? Come and see Pete.

Freephone 0800 800 262 Web www.iplex.co.nz

Central Districts Field Days Site K38 Iplex Lane (next to Farmlands)

shifting, good for using the machine’s near 50:50 weight distribution when it is doing heavy-duty tillage. At the business end, a 208L/min PFC hydraulic system takes care of oil flow and powers the rear hitch to lift 8400kg. In the newly redesigned cab, the operator is treated to 26% more space than in the old model, with 4.22 cu.m of room and 6.83 sq.m of glass. It has a leather upholstered air suspension seat and a similar training seat, and a 12-inch display terminal. And, of course, standard in a machine sourced from the American continent are four very large cupholders, six 12V power outlets, a 110V outlet and the obligatory USB socket.


RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS 19

Fast, accurate spraying every time MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

GERMAN FARM machinery manufacturer Amazone has unveiled three innovations said to achieve unprecedented application accuracy across the entire working width of the boom. Suitable for all Amazone sprayers equipped with Super-L2 booms from 27 to 40m, ContourControl and SwingStop systems control vertical and horizontal boom movement respectively. And the SwingStop Pro takes the concept a step further by adjusting the output of each nozzle according to its speed. Used individually or combined, the systems are said to offer unprecedented levels of application accuracy over the entire boom by

compensating for any vertical or horizontal movements of the sprayer boom. ContourControl uses six boom-mounted ultrasonic sensors and a fast-responding hydraulic system to maintain boom height. With the two outer sensors controlling the independent angling of the left-hand and righthand booms, and the two middle sensors regulating the height of the boom, it is guided in its height by the parallelogram. A hydraulic accumulator on the boom provides short reaction times -- literally in a fraction of a second. The system also allows the negative angling of the outer boom sections to maintain the determined application height in all conditions, such as when the booms dip below the horizontal

Amazone has unveiled three innovations in its latest range of sprayers to achieve application accuracy across the entire working boom width.

plane – useful if the sprayer passes over a ridge. SwingStop is an active yaw stabilisation system that maintains the horizontal boom position during fast travel over ground undulations, or during turning, accelerating or high

speed. All these can put booms under enormous strain, causing the boom ends to swing backwards or forwards. This can affect application rates, with forward movement causing under-dosing and backwards motion overdosing, the results of which can be readily seen

in heavier crops; this is even more pronounced with the use of wider booms. While most sprayers use passive buffer or damper systems to minimise yaw, the SwingStop system uses boom-mounted acceleration sensors to

determine the horizontal position of the boom relative to the forward speed of the sprayer. Two actively operating hydraulic rams in the centre section of the boom then counteract any detected movements to ensure the boom rides smoothly.

SwingStop Pro uses the same data to adjust the output of each individual nozzle relative to the forward speed of the sprayer, using pulse width frequency modulation (PWFM) nozzles controlled by valves with a high frequency range of 50Hz. High speed switching means the valves can be opened or closed in two milliseconds, and the application rate can be adjusted from 30 - 100% over the same time. In practice, if the nozzle is moving quicker than the sprayer, the opening time and application rate is increased for a short time. However, a nozzle moving slower than the sprayer will remain closed longer, so reducing the application but maintaining spray pressure and droplet size.

THE YAMAHA

KODIAK 450 EPS.

WHAT SETS THE YAMAHA KODIAK 450 EPS APART? GENUINE 3 YEAR WARRANTY Yamaha stands by all its product and offers a full three year warranty on ATV & ROVs.

ELECTRIC POWER STEERING

REAL WORLD TOUGH Yamaha is proud to have been proving itself on the toughest of NZ farms for over 40 years.

2WD / 4WD DIFF LOCK

Yamaha’s renowned EPS system offers light steering and precise handling for all day farm use.

The proven 2WD/4WD system has been designed to take on the toughest farming terrain.

ALL WHEEL ENGINE BRAKING

ULTRAMATIC TRANSMISSION

Our all wheel engine braking is designed to give you complete confidence going downhill.

Yamaha’s durable Ultramatic auto transmission CVT system provides assured reliability.

Come see us at site N28-N29 AT Central District Field Days!

The zero deposit, zero repayments for 12 months is available to approved applicants of Yamaha Motor Finance at a Finance rate of 4.95% across the ATV, ROV models and AG125, AG200 bikes. In addition following factory discount applies on RRP of selected ATV and ROV models YFM450FBJ -$717, YFM450FBPJ - $700, YFM700FBPH/J, YFM700FAPJ, YFM700FAPCG/J, YXM700PH/J, YXC700PH, YXE700PBH, YXE700PCH, YXE700PSEH - $1000 and YXM700PSEJ $1126 respectively. Offer ends 28 March 2018 and available to registered agri-business customers on a loan term of 36 months with annual instalments on YMF’s Commercial Hire Purchase standard terms and conditions. Credit criteria, fees, charges and terms and conditions apply including an application fee of $325, $10 PPSR fee and a dealer administration fee. Yamaha Motor Finance New Zealand Ltd. (YMF) NZBN 9429036270798. FSP 9622. Offer only available at participating dealerships while stocks last.

NOW ONLY

$11,899 + GST * SAVE $700

VISIT US AND YOUR LOCAL DEALER AT

www.yamaha-motor.co.nz


S AT SIEE US TE 13 4a

• Grow vegetables all year round and extend your growing season.

• 100% New Zealand made by family business for more than 30 years.

• Very affordable and easy to install.

• Strong construction that resists all weather conditions.

• Range of models 2m to 8m long.

• Nationwide delivery available.

t/f

03 214 4262 |

e

morrifield@clear.net.nz

RURAL NEWS // MARCH 6, 2018

20 CENTRAL DISTRICTS FIELD DAYS

www.morrifield.com

Site O11

BKT’s Agrimax V-Flect has been added to the Agrimzx tyre range; and it is reported to improve tractor performance on all kinds of terrain.

Tyres for all types of terrain ALL SEGMENTS of the agricultural tyre market are seeing technological growth, hence products that offer ‘combined’ solutions that streamline work and increase productivity. One such tyre, India-based BKT’s Agrimax V-Flecto, has been added to the Agrimax tyre range; it can improve tractor performance on all kinds of terrain. Using BKT’s VF technology, VF tyres offer ‘very increased flexion’ or ‘very high flexion’ and are like the

IF range. They have 40% higher performance than standard tyres, versus the IF series’ 20%. The ultra-resistant casing and special reinforced bead make Agrimax V-Flecto ideal for field and road without the need to change inflation pressures during the transition. A notable feature is that the user can maximise the load without having to change the inflation pressure regardless of the speed, so managing to transport 40% more weight than a standard tyre of the

same size and with the same recommended rim. This tyre imposes less soil compaction, helping to preserve soil structure thanks to a streamlined footprint and a 10% larger tread profile. BKT has grown rapidly as a world leader in off-highway tyres. It markets about 2000 off-highway tyres for many applications. TRS is the authorised distributor in New Zealand www.trstyreandwheel.co.nz.

BOARDING IN WELLINGTON Queen Margaret College offers student accommodation for girls Year 9 – 13 in our new boarding facility, Queen Margaret House. To enrol, visit qmc.school.nz

QMC Middle & Senior School Year 9 - 13 production of Beauty and the Beast Visit our Facebook page to learn more about this story

Rural News 6 March 2018  

Rural News 6 March 2018

Rural News 6 March 2018  

Rural News 6 March 2018