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A World of

Opportunity Going Places With Geography “The universe is full of magical things, patiently waiting for our wits to grow sharper.� Eden Phillpotts

A Guide for Scottish Secondary Pupils and Parents Reasons to Learn Geography at School Advantages of Studying a Geographical Degree at University Career Opportunities With Geography

RSGS: a better way to see the world


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A World of Opportunity

The Royal Scottish Geographical Society (RSGS) is an educational charity that has a distinguished history of supporting and promoting geographical education, research and exploration. Please contact us or visit our website for more information on our work, including our publications, national public talks programme, visitor centre opening times, and membership details. We hope you will consider joining us and sharing your passion for, and fascination with, our world. RSGS, Lord John Murray House, 15-19 North Port, Perth, PH1 5LU tel: 01738 455050 email: enquiries@rsgs.org www.rsgs.org

Scottish Charity No SC015599

Acknowledgements This publication was originally compiled in 2015. RSGS appreciates the assistance given by Jim Bruce, Erica Caldwell, Alister Hendrie, other members of the RSGS Education Committee, and those who worked on the original publication in 2001. Thanks also to Stefano Andreottola for his graphic design work, and to all contributors. We are grateful to the Scottish Association of Geography Teachers (SAGT) for their contribution towards the costs of printing this edition.


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Combining Geography with other subjects .

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What will I study in National 4/5 Geography? .

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Why should I choose Higher Geography? .

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Why should I choose Advanced Higher Geography? .

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Why study Geography at university? .

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What is it like to study Geography at university? . Conclusion . Contacts .

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A World of Opportunity

Introduction

Never a day goes by without something of geographical concern in the news. Geography is weather, climate, oceans, volcanoes, deserts, populations, migration, atmosphere, and ecosystems. It is food, agriculture, environment, trade, transport, communications and sustainability. It is how we live, where we live, why we live there, and how we interact. It is our sense of place, our sense of community, and our sense of self. It is the whole of Earth’s history, the whole of Earth’s present interactions, and the whole of Earth’s possible natural and human future. It is not surprising that many enjoy and choose to study Geography. It is a dynamic subject that provides real insight into the world around us, and combines naturally with a range of other subjects, from Physics to Sociology. Geography delivers on citizenship, sustainability and outdoor learning, key driving principles of Curriculum for Excellence, whilst giving children and young people a sense of their place in the world, and encouraging exploration, analysis and joined-up thinking. Due to the broad nature of Geography and associated skill development, choosing Geography is a great way for young people to keep their options open, irrespective of whether they are going into further or higher education or straight into a job. Statistics continually show that studying Geography gives young people a wide range of study and employment options that are linked either directly to the course content, or to the attributes and skills developed during study.


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This booklet has been produced by the Royal Scottish Geographical Society for pupils and parents to outline the benefits of choosing to study Geography beyond the compulsory stages, and I sincerely hope that you enjoy getting to know your world, and going places, with Geography.

Mike Robinson Chief Executive Royal Scottish Geographical Society


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What is Geography? Geography is the study of Earth’s landscapes, peoples, places and environments. It is, put simply, about the world in which we live. Our world is likely to change rapidly in the next 50 years. Geography helps us to understand the nature of these changes (the who, where, what, why, when and how) and to prepare and plan for the future.

Why should I choose Geography? Learn to think in a holistic way Geography is the most interdisciplinary subject, sitting in a unique position as a bridge between the social sciences (Human Geography) and the natural sciences (Physical Geography). Human Geography topics are concerned with understanding cultures, societies and economies, and Physical Geography topics investigate the environment and the processes that shape the Earth’s landscapes.

Geographers study the interactions between human and physical processes, drawing on (and integrating) a range of other subject areas, from Physics to Sociology. Geography therefore teaches us to think in a ‘joined-up’, holistic way about issues at local, national and global scales.


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Understand Empathise Contribute Be a better informed and more aware citizen

Build your skills for future employers

Geography will help you to be more aware of the everyday lives of the people who live around you, in other parts of the UK, and around the world. Often, the top media stories, such as migration across the Mediterranean, the spread of Ebola in west Africa and the impacts of earthquakes in Nepal, are underpinned by Geography, making Geography a hugely exciting, relevant and dynamic subject to study.

Many of the transferable skills that are developed through studying Geography, including research and data collection skills, report writing, time management and organisation, communication and interpersonal skills, use of IT, numeracy, problem-solving and group work skills, will help you in the future, no matter what your future path might be. Subjectspecific skills include producing sketches and graphs, as well as the practical skills of fieldwork and data collection and analysis. Choosing Geography is a great way to remain flexible and keep your options open for the future as it offers a broad knowledge base alongside skill development. In the 21st century, it is likely that you will have a varied career path, and Geography equips you with a range of skills and knowledge that will give you a flexible approach to work.

Geographers study the majority of today’s most pressing challenges and in understanding complex issues more fully, are best placed to offer solutions. Examples include, climate change, energy resources, natural disasters, land use conflicts, the globalisation of trade, transport and health planning and inequalities. Geography provides us with knowledge and understanding that allows us to tackle local problems, as well as global issues.

Geography helps you to understand the world around you, and develop useful skills, whatever your future path may be. Rachel Hay, Geography Teacher


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Will Geography help me to get a job? The answer is a resounding YES! Geography was recently named as one of the few recession-proof degrees, meaning that Geography graduates’ employability remained high, despite the economic downturn. Geography allows you to explore questions about the planet and how it works, forming a solid foundation for lifelong learning, no matter what your future path may be.

Geographers can…

Geographers are…

Research, and write concise reports

Confident communicators

Ask questions and find the answers

Critical thinkers

Make informed decisions about complex issues

Socially and environmentally aware

Carry out fieldwork tasks in ‘the real world’

Problem solvers

Solve problems

Effective team players

Handle data

Computer literate

Use maps with confidence

Independent, flexible thinkers

Geography is an adaptable, interesting and relevant subject, which develops excellent transferable skills that are of use in a wide variety of careers. Liz Crisp, Geography Teacher/SAGT


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Geographers work in a wide variety of fields. Geography directly relates to careers in: •

Renewable energy

Town and transport planning

Environmental management and conservation

Travel and tourism

Education, including teaching

Housing and social welfare

Resource exploration and extraction e.g. mining, petroleum

Work in the charity sector e.g. aid agencies

Geography also provides skills suited to a wide range of other careers. From postcodes to ‘Sat Navs’, much of our IT is now location-based, and Geographical Information Systems (GIS) has grown rapidly to become an essential tool in business organisations and government. The result is more opportunities for geographers at a time when competition for jobs is higher than ever before. The skills developed during Geography courses, including data and map analysis and exposure to GIS, link to careers in:

• IT • Administration, logistics and business management • Financial services • Retail and marketing • Research and development • Industry

I studied Geography at university, including modules in Urban Geography and Climatology, before completing a law conversion course. A classmate of mine is now a chartered accountant in Abu Dhabi! Geography definitely helps you to keep your options open! Richard Hogwood, partner in Family Law, Stewarts Law LLP


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Geography Geography with‌

Potential careers

Art & Design; Technology; Graphic Communication

advertising, architecture, cartography, landscape design, town planning

Biology; Chemistry

environmental health, nature conservation, agriculture

Physics

volcanology, earthquake monitoring, surveying, meteorology

History

archaeology, law, museums, libraries, publishing

Modern Languages

international business and marketing, leisure and tourism

Maths

civil engineering, meteorology, mining, air traffic control, market research, international business, accountancy, surveying

Computing

town and transport planning using GIS, logistics, web design, health service planning

Various subjects

leisure services, sport and recreation management, social work, youth work, local government, teaching, transport services, financial services, civil service, NHS, secretary/PA, police, armed forces


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Studying Geography at St Andrews taught me to think critically and creatively about the world in which we live. It is a truly varied and fascinating subject which has informed so much of my work since; from the meteorology I have needed to fly helicopters, through to understanding the human impact of elephant and rhino conservation in Africa. There is so much still to discover in the world, and Geography is an excellent place to start. HRH The Duke of Cambridge

Geography literally means ‘writing about the earth’, and that is what I have been doing since graduating with my BSc (Hons) in Environmental Chemistry and Geography in 2007. I always enjoyed learning about the physical features of our planet and studying how human activity affects, and is affected by, the environment, so my degree subjects felt like a natural choice. Dr Helen Murray, Assistant Scientist, Scottish Environment Protection Agency

I’ve always had a burning desire to explore the world. I graduated with a BA Honours in Geography from Strathclyde University, before completing an MSc in GIS at Edinburgh University, preparing me for a career in digital mapping. The distinct advantage of studying Geography is you’re not pigeon-holed into a set career path or specific industry sector, although there are plenty of opportunities to specialise, like I have in GIS. Wendy Campbell, GIS Data Manager, Natural Power


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What will I study in National 4/5 Geography? Studying Geography will help you to understand our physical world: •

Weather

Landscape types: Glaciated uplands and coastal landscapes OR upland limestone, and rivers

Geography will help you to understand human activities in our world: •

Land uses and land use conflicts, including farming and tourism

Recent developments in towns, cities and rural landscapes in developed and developing countries

Population and migration

Development and trade

• Relief efforts after natural disasters

Geography will help you to understand global issues (2): • Climate change • Landscape degradation and management strategies • Methods of prediction for volcanic eruptions, earthquakes and tropical storms • Strategies to reduce inequalities in world trade e.g. trade alliances, fair trade • Features, impacts and management of tourism • Causes, effects and strategies adopted to manage diseases in developed and developing countries e.g. AIDS, malaria, heart disease Working on your 20-mark assignment will help you to develop all of these skills, and demonstrate your knowledge and understanding of a geographical topic or issue of your choice.

I knew as soon as I took Geography that I was going to love it! There is something truly amazing about learning how Earth itself has been formed and shaped over time. Geography reveals how everything and everyone is interdependent. Best of all, it explains why the planet looks and ‘works’ like it does. I have had loads of fun doing field work. Geography includes the widest range of content compared to other subjects, and I know that it is something I will continue to love all my life. Bethany Douglas, S6 pupil


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In my teens, I was interested in many subjects. Geography suited me well because it’s one of the most comprehensive disciplines that exists. Ranging from glaciers to governments, erosion to economics, it has a bit of everything! So if you’re feeling greedy, go for it! Alexa Martin, Geography graduate

Geography at school was really good fun, and learning key concepts and ideas inspired me to want to know more about Earth. I’m now studying Geography and Earth Science at university, which has really opened my eyes to how these two subjects affect everyday life in so many ways. Robert Tiainen, 1st year, University of Glasgow


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Why should I choose Higher Geography? Higher Geography allows you to gain a deeper insight into topics and themes covered during the N5 course, and study some new ones too:

Global Issues (2) • Development and Health – indicators, explaining differences between countries, malaria, primary health care

Physical Environments

• Global Climate Change – causes, effects, management strategies

Biosphere – soil types and profiles

• River Basin Management

Lithosphere – glacial erosion and deposition, coastal erosion and deposition, coastal management, and land use conflicts

• Trade, Aid and Geopolitics

Hydrosphere – the hydrological cycle, storm hydrographs

Atmosphere – global heat budget, atmospheric and oceanic circulation

Working on your 30-mark assignment will allow you to do some in-depth research into a geographical topic or issue that interests you. Fieldwork is strongly encouraged.

• Energy

Human Environments •

Population - population pyramids, demographic transition, census, migration

Urban – reasons for urban growth, traffic management, housing problems, retail

Rural – impact and management of rural land degradation

Studying Geography has helped me to understand the forces that shaped Scotland’s stunning landscapes, and consider future change. Studying Geography, especially at Higher level, sparked an interest that drove me to choose to study Earth Science at university. Katy Mellor-Jones, S6 pupil


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Why should I choose Advanced Higher Geography? Advanced Higher Geography is a varied and challenging course during which you will develop confidence in using a wide range of geographical methods and techniques for analysing and interpreting geographical data. You will further develop your ability to think critically about geographical issues.

Your teacher will guide you through the course, but the onus will be on you to carry out fieldwork and research to produce a field work report and an essay on geographical issues that interest you. This course is great preparation for university study.


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Why study Geography at university? • Choose to study Geography because it is a subject you enjoy and want to study further. It is important that it suits your capabilities and motivates you to find out more about the wider world.

• Geography is so broad that it gives you a chance to pursue wide interests before specialising. Some people gain a Geography degree before specialising with a Masters degree, or going on to further training e.g. accountancy, law, teaching.

• Most employers are looking for wellrounded graduates with a range of skills rather than specialists who focus on a narrow area of study. Geography courses are ideally suited to help you to develop these skills in the context of a wide range of interesting and relevant subject material.

I was always fascinated by documentaries on Discovery and National Geographic so chose to study Geography in Dundee. I am now studying a MSc in ‘Water Hazards, Risk and Resilience’ in Dundee, which is about tsunamis, storms and landslides and their impacts on people. It’s fascinating! John Simpson, MSc student, University of Dundee


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What is it like to study Geography at university? Choosing to study Geography at university opens up a huge range of possible modules. Courses usually offer a broad base for the first two years of the programme, with compulsory modules, then allow you to select more specialised modules in 3rd and 4th year. Courses focus on skill development, including training in research methods and data analysis, as well as allowing you to develop your understanding of the world around you.

The image below shows some selected module titles from universities across Scotland, and demonstrates the broad scope of the material covered and contemporary nature of issues that are tackled.


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A World of Opportunity

Craig Davidson

Gavin Williams

Studying Geography at Glasgow University

Doctoral Researcher in Freshwater Ecology, University of Birmingham

“The first two years at university introduce you to a wide range of topics from cultural, historical and urban geographies, to the more scientific physical or environmental geographies, and their interactions. I am now choosing modules for Honours and there is just so much to choose from! From the Geographies of Political Solidarities and Internationalism, to the Social Geographies of Outsiders, to Limnology: Understanding Lakes…it’s just a shame I can’t do them all! Probably the best thing is the opportunity to meet and work with your fellow students, who soon become friends. Although you are given the skills to work independently, much of the course involves group work, either in labs or tutorials, which allows you to get to know your classmates in a way that might not happen on other courses. Field trips are one of the best things about studying Geography! During the field trips you learn much more than you would in lecture theatre, but there is also the chance to socialise. In third year our “compulsory” field trip is to spend a week in the sun in Mallorca! As someone who wasn’t even sure that they were going to study Geography until the UCAS deadline, I can’t recommend it enough and honestly could not imagine studying anything else.”

“I studied Geography at school and went on to study it further at college as I enjoyed it so much. At college, I decided that I preferred Physical Geography, particularly global environmental issues. I then studied BSc Environmental Science at university. Studying Geography helped me to get onto the degree course. Now I am studying a PhD, looking at climate change in rivers. I get to do fieldwork and attend conferences in some great locations, which is great! After my PhD, I could continue my research at universities, or even go into conservation work, consultancy or something else, but I plan to teach Geography in schools.”

Choosing to study Geography was one of the best things I have ever done. It has allowed me to travel to some of the most remote areas of the planet, such as the Himalayas and Greenland, and enabled me to properly understand them and the issues they are facing. Cameron Mackay, 2nd year, University of Glasgow


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Zoe Robinson Studying Geography at Glasgow University

“Studying Earth Science at University has been incredibly rewarding. I love the subject and the in-depth knowledge it has given me of the systems and processes at work within the Earth, both past and present. Studying at university provides me with a lot more freedom than at school. Choosing and specialising in a subject that grabs your attention and motivates you makes studying very easy because you naturally want to know and understand more. Seeing passionate lecturers not only teaching, but carrying out their own research also inspires you and makes you think about all your options for the future. Ultimately, my degree in Earth Science will satisfy my aspiration to learn and discover as much as possible about our complex planet. I hope to travel and spend time in the field, potentially working with mineral exploration and mapping companies.�


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Conclusion We hope that this publication has given you an insight into the broad, relevant and exciting nature of Geography, alongside the wealth of travel and employment opportunities the subject offers. Now, whenever anyone says ‘Geography is just about flags and colouring in’, we hope that you can put them right!

We very much hope that you will enjoy getting to know your world and going places with Geography.

What next? • Join RSGS. Keep up to date with the latest geographical news with magazines, newsletters and more. See www.rsgs.org for more information. • Contact your school’s Careers Officer to discuss your options for employment or further study. • If you are intending to go to university, visit the websites for Geography, Environmental Science, Earth Science and Social Science departments. Contact departments for more course information. • Take your time to become familiar with course information from universities in Scotland, as well as further afield, so that you choose the course that best suits your interests and future aspirations.

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Contacts Education Scotland Education Scotland is responsible for supporting quality and improvement in learning and teaching. You can find support documents for Geography on their website. www.educationscotland.gov.uk

Scottish Qualifications Authority (SQA) Scotland’s national body for qualifications (excluding university degrees), the SQA provides information on National Qualifications, including course outlines, past exam papers and marking instructions. www.sqa.org.uk

Scottish Association of Geography Teachers (SAGT) The SAGT is one of the most active subject associations in Scotland. They organise an annual conference for teachers are involved in policy work with the SQA, alongside the RSGS. www.sagteach.org

Geographical Association (GA) The GA is a subject association that produces a wide range of materials to support the teaching and study of Geography. www.geography.org.uk

Geography in Scottish Universities Geography was one of the founding subjects listed in the charter for Edinburgh University in 1583, but it was not taught as a degree subject until 1908, when RSGS Secretary George Chisholm was appointed as the first Lecturer in Geography at Edinburgh. Geographical or Earth sciences can now be studied to degree and post-graduate level at eight Scottish universities: University of Aberdeen: Department of Geography and Environment www.abdn.ac.uk/geography University of Dundee: Department of Geography www.dundee.ac.uk/geography University of Edinburgh: Institute of Geography www.geos.ed.ac.uk/geography University of Glasgow: School of Geographical and Earth Sciences www.gla.ac.uk/schools/ges Heriot-Watt University: Geography, Society and Environment www.hw.ac.uk/study/uk/undergraduate/geographysociety-and-environment.htm

University of the Highlands and Islands: Geography www.uhi.ac.uk/geography University of St Andrews: School of Geography & Sustainable Development and School of Earth & Environmental Sciences www.st-andrews.ac.uk/gsd earthsci.st-andrews.ac.uk University of Stirling: School of Biological and Environmental Sciences www.stir.ac.uk/natural-sciences/about-us/bes

A further three Scottish universities include some elements of geographical teaching within related subjects: Edinburgh Napier University: Faculty of Health, Life & Social Sciences www.napier.ac.uk/courses/ ba-hons-social-sciences-undergraduate-fulltime Glasgow Caledonian University: Glasgow School for Business and Society www.gcu.ac.uk/gsbs University of Strathclyde: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences www.strath.ac.uk/humanities


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The

The

The

The

The

Geographer Geographer Geographer Geographer Geogra Spring 2009

The newsletter of the

Royal Scottish Geographical Society

Summer 2009

The newsletter of the

Autumn 2009

The newsletter of the

Royal Scottish Geographical Society

Royal Scottish Geographical Society

Winter 2009–10

The newsletter of the

Royal Scottish Geographical Society

1884

In This Edition...

Palin talk marks 100 years of Geography at University of Edinburgh

Scotland lends a hand in the warm heart of Africa

• Nick Crane Goes To School

• Talks Programme Supplement

• Country In Focus: Malawi – The Too Warm Heart Of Africa

• On The Map: John Thomson’s Atlas Of Scotland

• University News, SAGT News plus other news,

Michael Palin

comments, books...

Photograph © Chris Blott

RSGS – Making Connections between People, Places & the Planet RSGS GEOGRAPHER 21.indd 1

25/3/09 12:59:52

The

“My object in returning to Africa is to try to get a permanent path to that central region from which most of the slaves have always been drawn... to propitiate the different chiefs along (the Zambesi)... endeavouring to induce them to cultivate cotton and to abolish the slave trade.” David Livingstone 1855

• Inside the RSGS: The Bartholomew Archive • Off the Beaten Track: Poland • Reader Offer: So Foul and Fair a Day

• Expert View: Kyoto 2 • Expert View: Renewables Without the Hot Air

plus other news,

RSGS – Making Connections between People, Places & the Planet RSGS GEOGRAPHER SUMMER 7.indd 1

25/6/09 21:08:07

“We live not by the jingling of our coins, but by the fullness of our harvests.”

plus other news,

comments, books...

The

• Expert View on: Biochar

• Expert View & Reader Offer: A World Without Bees

• Reader Offer: The Third Man Factor – Surviving The Impossible

The transport issue which direction now?

• Expert View on: Transition Towns

• Inside RSGS: Our First 25 Years

• An Expert View: Carbon Capture and Storage

2009

• Opinions on: Food Security from Rt Hon Hilary Benn MP and Mike Small of Fife Diet

• Country in Focus: Maldives

• An Expert View: Women And Geography

• Reader Offer: Travel Book – A Slow Guide To England

2009

125

th Anniversary of RSGS

In This Edition...

• Opinions on: Copenhagen from Business, Government, a Senator & a President

Prof Wallace Broecker

• Off The Beaten Track: The Tuamotus And The Marquesas

“..we need more than ever to keep in touch with the rest of the world, to see how others are coping and hopefully to learn something along the way”.

“It would be good if our descendants looked back on this challenge we face now as the one that allowed us, as a species, to grow up.”

• On The Map: David Livingstone’s Map Of Lake Malawi

• Opinions On Energy: Turner Lecture, Energy Options, Biofuels

Future Food Security, in Fife and Further Afield

• Extra Talks: Doug Scott & Pen Hadow

• Your Chance To Nominate Awards

• Country In Focus: Discover Greenland – Where The Weather Is Out Of Its Mind

The newsletter of

1884

125

th Anniversary of RSGS

In This Edition...

In This Edition...

RSGS – Making Connections between People, Places & the Planet

22/9/09 13:16:29

The

“He who goes softly goes safely, he who goes safely goes far.”

comments, books...

RSGS Council Member, 1896-98

RSGS – Making Connections between People, Places & the Planet RSGS GEOGRAPHER AUTUMN 10.indd 1

“Chi va piano va sano, Chi va sano va lontano” plus other news,

Professor Patrick Geddes

comments, books...

RSGS GEOGRAPHER WINTER 11.indd 1

15/12/09 13:39:45

The

Italian motto adopted by Joseph Thomson, African Explorer, RSGS Honorary Member & RSGS Silver Medallist 1892

RSGS – Making Connections between P RSGS GEOGRAPHER SPRING 10.indd 1

The

Geographer Geographer Geographer Geographer Geogra Spring 2011

The newsletter of the

Royal Scottish Geographical Society

What Are We Fighting For? The geography of conflict “War does not determine who is right - only who is left.”

Summer 2011

The newsletter of the

Sunshine States

In This Edition...

The geography of happiness and well-being

• Letter from Tahrir Square • Expert Views: Citizenship, Terrorism

Bertrand Russell (1872-1970)

The newsletter of the

Royal Scottish Geographical Society

In This Edition...

Autumn 2011

Royal Scottish Geographical Society

• Country in Focus: Paul Salopek on South Sudan

In This Edition...

Bright Balloons, Brown Clouds, and the Black Triangle

• News Feature: The Fair Maid’s House Opens its Doors

past and present polar perspectives

• Expert Views: The Scots before Scott

• Country in Focus: Bhutan

• Reader Offer: A User’s Guide to the Crisis of Civilization

• Reader Offer: The Spirit Level

plus other news, comments, books...

• Opinions: Polar Bears, Polar Pairs & the Northern Lights • Country in Focus: Greenland from the Inside

• Country in Focus: Somalia, and Famine in the Horn of Africa • Reader Offer: Scotland: Mapping the Nation

“Thousands of tired, nerve-shaken, over-civilized people are beginning to find out that going to the mountains is going home; that wildness is a necessity; and that mountain parks and reservations are useful not only as fountains of timber and irrigating rivers, but as fountains of life.” John Muir

• Reader Offer: Mapping the Railways

plus other news,

“As citizens of the world, our unifying force, our strength must come from something that is not bound by nation, ethnicity or religion – from fundamental human values. Values shape the future of humanity.”

comments, books...

RSGS – Making Connections between People, Places & the Planet

Mark Twain

RSGS – Making the Connections Between People, Places & the Planet

plus other news, comments, books...

Sheila Watt-Cloutier, Inuit Representative

RSGS: helping to make the connections between people, places & the planet RSGS GEOGRAPHER AUTUMN TWO 14.indd 1

The

“The Arctic is considered the health barometer for the planet. If you wish to see how healthy the planet is, come and take its pulse in the Arctic.”

plus other news, comments, books...

“Everybody talks about the weather but nobody does anything about it.”

His Majesty Druk Gyalpo Jigme Khesar Namgyel Wangchuck, King of Bhutan

The

• Opinion: Alexander Kellas - Himalayan Hero

• Expert Views and Opinions: Air Quality – Local, Regional & Global Perspectives

• On the Map: Philp’s Comic Map of Scotland

What’s the Point?

• Expert Views: Permafrost, Pesticides & Predicting Ice Sheets

• Expert View: A Short History of the Atmosphere

The newsletter of

National Parks

66 degrees and climbing...

• His Holiness The Dalai Lama on Happiness

• Off the Beaten Track: John Pilkington in Iraq

Royal Scottish Geographical Society

In This Edition...

• Letter from the University of Strathclyde

• Opinions on Afghanistan: Rory Stewart, Ahmed Rashid

The newsletter of the

The Science of the Atmosphere

• Expert Views & Opinions: The World of Well-Being

• Expert View: ‘Bokhara’ Burnes in Afghanistan

Winter 2011 -12

RSGS: helping to make the connections between people, places & the planet

22/09/2011 11:45

The

RSGS GEOGRAPHER WINTER THREE 9.indd 1

13/12/2011 14:21

The

RSGS: helping to make the connections betwe RSGS GEOGRAPHER SPRING THREE 17.indd 1

The

Geographer Geographer Geographer Geographer Geogra Spring 2013

The newsletter of the

Royal Scottish Geographical Society

Losing Heart?

In This Edition...

Re-imagining our town and city centres

• What’s Happening to Scotland’s Towns?

“What is the city but the people?”

• News: Mary Robinson, Livingstone Medallist

William Shakespeare

• Malcolm Fraser Reviews Town Centres

Summer 2013

The newsletter of the

Life, The Universe, and Everything Carbon: sources, sinks & cycles “We’ll be alive again in a thousand blades of grass, and a million leaves.”

The newsletter of the

Royal Scottish Geographical Society

In This Edition... • Working with SAGES to Increase Impact

Autumn 2013

Royal Scottish Geographical Society

Reseeding Forests?

• Opinions: National Parks & Geoparks

• Alcohol, Art, Activism and Alternative Approaches

• Expert Views: Dating, Pricing & Reducing Carbon

• Shops: Old and New

• Zoonotic Geographies – A Multi-Faceted Issue

• Deer, Disease & Reversing Degradation

• Viruses, Evolution & Spillover

• Quality, Quantity & Community Involvement

• Living Patterns, Vaccines & Vermin • A Syrian Refugee Camp & The Philippines After Haiyan • Villages of Hope • RSGS Education – A Year of Success!

• Reader Offer: The Ancient Pinewoods of Scotland

• Reader Offer: Life: A Journey Through Time

Forewords by VANESSA COLLINGRIDGE and AUBREY MANNING

Vanessa Collingridge is a geographer, explorer, broadcaster and author. Professor Aubrey Manning OBE is a distinguished zoologist, author and broadcaster.

£24.99

THE

ANCIENT PINEWOODS OF SCOTLAND A TRAVELLER’S GUIDE

Scattered across the Scottish Highlands are the surviving remnants of the ancient Caledonian pinewoods; woods which have naturally seeded and grown since the last ice age. Visiting the ancient pinewoods of Scotland provides an emotional connection to the past through the visible traces of people who lived and worked there over the centuries, and some spectacular individual trees over 350 years old. It also provides the opportunity to look forward, since one of the world’s great conservation success stories means a new future for the woods and their charismatic wildlife. A journey to the ancient pinewoods offers a natural spectacle alongside a rich cultural heritage which is also described in this comprehensive and fully illustrated guide. Details are provided on how to reach each of the sites, some in the farthest mountain glens and others easily accessed by public transport, with well-marked routes and visitor facilities. This book is also a tribute to all who have shared my passionate belief that the pinewoods are special and helped turn around their fate.

CLIFTON BAIN

Clifton Bain

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THE ANCIENT PINEWOODS OF SCOTLAND

He is currently living in his home city of Edinburgh and is actively involved in a wide range of national and international conservation activities as Director of the IUCN UK Peatland Programme. Darren Rees is a professional wildlife artist located in Central Scotland. www.darrenrees. com

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Clifton Bain has over 25 years of experience working in nature conservation. He has an Honours Degree in Zoology from Aberdeen University and enjoyed a long career as a policy officer with the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds. He has twice toured all 38 of the pinewoods, most recently completing the journey by relying on public transport, walking and cycling.

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CLIFTON BAIN Drawings by Darren Rees

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David Quammen

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A Year of Archaeology

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“We know more about the movement of celestial bodies than about the soil underfoot.”

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Dr Robert D Ballard, RSGS Livingstone Medallist

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Leonardo da Vinci

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• The Role of Social Media

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“I think the age of exploration is just beginning, not ending, on our planet.”

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SPRING 2016

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“We never know the worth of water until the well is dry.” Thomas Fuller, Gnomologia, 1732

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23 A World of Opportunity 14-

The

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O F

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COLIN PRIOR

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RSGS – Making Connections between People, Places & the Planet

V I S I O N

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“So geographers, in Afric maps, With savage pictures fill their gaps, And o’er uninhabitable downs Place elephants for want of towns.”

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Jonathan Swift

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J R R Tolkien

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Navigation “Not all those who wander are lost.”

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Winter 2012 -13

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een people, places & the planet 16/03/2012 15:53

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untry?

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Subsidies, security, sustainability and smart homes

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“No single raindrop believes it is to blame for the flood.”

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“Only the mountain has lived long enough to listen objectively to the howl of a wolf.” Aldo Leopold

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r of

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tion

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“Of all the forms of inequality, injustice in health care is the most shocking and inhumane.” Martin Luther King

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Green and Blue Infrastructure

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28/11/2016 16:15

The Geographer, RSGS’s intelligent, insightful, informative and impartial quarterly magazine, is sent free to all members. Each edition is packed with short articles written by professional geographers, RSGS members and others, introducing readers to a wide range of geographical topics.


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Join RSGS today! Geography has a vital role to play in helping us to understand and address this century’s crucial global concerns of environmental sustainability, social equity and economic balance. Scotland has long been at the forefront of geographical exploration, and RSGS has been working since 1884, with the support of thousands of members, to inspire people to want to find out more about the world.

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Please join RSGS today, and get to know your world! • Get FREE/discounted entry to c100 geographical, travel and adventure talks and other events. • Receive quarterly copies of The Geographer and the Scottish Geographical Journal.

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• Annie Lennox Receives Medal • Scotland the Hydro Nation • Origins of Onshore and Offshore Freshwater “Of all the forms of inequality,The newslette • Mortality: r ofCrisis in the theand Towers Royal Scottish injustice• Water in health care is the Geographical Contrasts Society Himalayas The newsletter ofLivingstone the Royal Scottish Geographical Society

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most shocking and inhumane.”

• Gain access to more than 130 years of RSGS collections and archives. • Enjoy being part of a community that shares a passion for the world. For further details, and to join, please visit www.rsgs.org or phone us on 01738 455050.

• Annie Lennox OBE • Portrait of Pskov: Bitesize: Clim on HIV/AIDS Exhibition ate ChangeFRSGS Solu • Formulae and tions • National and Martin Luther King

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and Economics

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Gnomologia, 1732 Thomas Fuller,

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RSGS: a better way to see the world

Scottish Charity No SC015599

A World of Opportunity; Going Places With Geography  

Why you should study Geography and where it can take you.

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