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Art of the Ancient World Greek, Etruscan, Roman, Byzantine, Egyptian, & Near Eastern Antiquities

Celebrating our 75th Anniversary

royal-athena galleries

Volume XXVIII - 2017

new york

london


No. 95 - Art of the Ancient World - Vol. XXVIII - January 2017 We are pleased to issue this catalog celebrating our 75th anniversary of dealing in classical numismatics and our 63rd year of dealing in ancient art. It illustrates in full color 176 selected antiquities priced from $1,250 to over $500,000. This publication is one of a continuing series primarily illustrating new acquisitions featured in our New York galleries, where over two thousand fine works of art are on permanent display. All of the antiquities in this catalog are displayed at our New York gallery, the largest and most extensive collection of the ancient arts ever exhibited for sale. In addition to the many masterworks of ancient art, there is a wide variety of fine items on display priced from $100 to $1,000 and up, including Greek and Roman coins and Old Master prints and drawings, perfect for the beginning collector or for that very special gift. A few of the pieces illustrated may not be available since they were sold while the catalog was in preparation, but a number of other newly acquired objects will be on display in our New York gallery and on our website: www.royalathena.com, updated weekly.

We unconditionally guarantee the authenticity of every work of art sold by Royal-Athena Galleries.

Every object purchased by our galleries has been legally acquired. If imported by us into the United States, we have done so in compliance with all federal regulations and have given full consideration to all international treaties governing objects of cultural importance. Antiquities priced at $5,000 or more are now checked and registered with the Art Loss Registry in London. All of our objects are clearly labeled with complete descriptions and prices. Condition reports on all the objects are available upon request. We encourage browsing and are happy to assist and advise both the amateur and the serious collector. We urge our prospective clients to ‘shop around’, for we are proud of our quality, expertise, and competitive pricing. Appointments may be arranged outside of regular gallery hours for clients desiring privacy. Updated price lists for our catalogs are available upon request. For terms and conditions of sale see the inside back cover. COVER PHOTO: no. 47 Roman bronze statue of Alexander the Great as a Dioscuros

2nd Century AD. H. 16 in. (40.5 cm.) (Detail) BACK COVER: no. 86

Attic black-figure amphora by the Bateman Painter Ca. 540-530 BC. H. 19 in. (48.3 cm.) (Detail)

©2016 Jerome M. Eisenberg, Inc. Composed and printed in the United States of America.

Text and catalog design by Jerome M. Eisenberg, Ph.D., and F. Williamson Price Photography by Ramon Perez

We will be exhibiting at TEFAF, The European Fine Arts Fair, Maastricht, The Netherlands, March 10-19, 2017 (Check our website to confirm the dates)

royal-athena galleries established 1942 153 East 57th Street New York, NY 10022 Tel.: (212) 355-2034 Fax.: (212) 688-0412 mail@royalathena.com Monday-Saturday, 10 - 6

Jerome M. Eisenberg, Ph.D. Director

VISIT OUR WEBSITE, updated weekly with our latest acquisitions:

www.royalathena.com

Royal-Athena at Seaby 20 Bloomsbury Street London WC1B 3QA UK By appointment Tel.: (44) 780-225-8000 Fax.: (44) 18-8334-4772


Art of the Ancient World Greek, Etruscan, Roman, Byzantine, Egyptian, Near Eastern, & Prehistoric Antiquities

Volume XXVIII - 2017 Table of Contents CLASSICAL ART Greek Marble Sculptures Roman Marble Sculptures Classical Silver Sculptures Greek Bronze Sculptures Etruscan Bronze Sculptures Roman Bronze Sculptures, Classical Bronze Helmets & Vessels Classical Terracottas Early Greek Vases Attic Black-figure Vases Attic Red-figure Vases Magna Graecia Vases Etruscan & Roman Vases Ancient Jewelry

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3 6 28 30 32 34 49 52 54 56 63 67 73 77

BYZANTINE ART

80

ANCIENT VARIA

81

EGYPTIAN ART Egyptian Stone Sculptures and Reliefs Egyptian Bronze Sculptures Egyptian Wood Sculptures Egyptian Stone Vessels Egyptian Varia

82 86 88 89 90

NEAR EASTERN ART 91 COLLECTING ANCIENT ART 94 ROYAL-ATHENA GALLERIES 94 Expertise and Ethics 95 Royal-Athena Galleries Catalogs Inside back cover

Photo above: no. 113 Sicilian red-figure calyx krater by the Chequer Painter Ca. 410-400 BC. H. 14 1/8 in. (35.9 cm.) (Detail)


Introduction As we enter our 63rd year of dealing in ancient art and our 75th year in Classical numismatics, we are delighted to present in our 94th publication another outstanding selection of antiquities assembled primarily from old collections in the United States and Europe. A large number of these objects were originally purchased from us over the past several decades and we are pleased to offer them again to a new generation of enthusiasts. We are pleased to announce the reacquisition of an important group of classical masterworks from a private north German collection purchased from Royal-Athena from 2000 to 2010. These include a large Roman statue of the nude Apollo Kitharoidos, a Roman marble relief section from a sarcophagus depicting a battle between the Greeks and the Trojans, and a Roman marble herm bust of a wounded Amazon. Also in the collection are a magnificent Roman bronze statue of Alexander the Great as a Dioscuros, an Attic blackfigure neck amphora by the Bateman Painter with Herakles fighting the Nemaean lion, and another Attic black-figure amphora from the Group of Toronto 305 with an Amazonachy. This catalog again presents a large selection of antiquities from the collection of the Director (J.M.E. collection) acquired over more than thirty years including Greek and Roman mythological bronzes and small Greek and South Italian pottery vases. A good representation of additional pieces from the J.M.E. collection including mythological bronzes, Greek and South Italian vases, Egyptian stone vases, and Egyptian faience amulets may be found on our website. Further objects from the J.M.E. collection will be added regularly to our website and monthly Newsletter over the coming year. We have devoted over six decades to selling carefully attributed works of art with particular attention to their provenance. This diligence has resulted in an astonishingly low percentage of claims against legal ownership – less than 0.0006% or one out of every 2000 objects! In view of the increasing legislation being passed in several countries to restrict the trade in illegally exported antiquities, we may assure our clients that we continue to proudly conduct a very ethical business and take all of the proper steps to insure that our inventory is free of any possible claims. It is with great pride and delight that we celebrate our 75th year! Jerome M. Eisenberg, Ph. D.

Greek Marble Sculptures 1 HELLENISTIC MARBLE HALF STATUE OF A GODDESS, PROBABLY DEMETER, goddess of agriculture, wearing a chiton, her himation over her head (capite velato). Asia Minor, ca. 325-250 BC. H. 35 3/8 in. (90 cm.) Ex Gregoire Couturier collection, DelĂŠmont, Switzerland, acquired before 1960. Dr. Norman Herz, University of Georgia, analyzed the marble as Aphrodisias 75%, Ephesus 83%, i.e. Western Turkey. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XIX, 2008, no. 4.

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2 GREEK MARBLE HEAD OF A KORE She wears a diadem that begins at the back of the head and runs to the forehead in three flat, overlapping double ears of grain. Under the diadem the slightly wavy hair is combed backwards. Pentelic marble, Athens, ca. 460-440 BC. H. 8 1/2 in. (21.5 cm.) Ex Swiss private collection. A corkscrew curl on either side of the neck and a small curl in front of the right ear. A blossom was orignally located in the centre of the diadem above the forehead. The planar treatment of the forehead and cheeks with the special emphasis placed on the eyebrows and lids, as well as the compact chin suggest a date for the head between the pediment figures of the temple of Zeus in Olympia and those of the Parthenon. Cf. H. Knell - 1990, 83 ill. 119 and the head of a goddess from the East pediment of the Parthenon, Agora-Museum, Athens, inv.-no. S 2094, see W. Fuchs - 1979, 559, ill. 671; Athenian Agora - 1976, 191. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXII, 2011, no. 1. 3 GREEK MARBLE HEAD OF A GODDESS depicted gazing forward, her expression serene, with almond-shaped eyes and a small mouth, her wavy hair centrally-parted and drawn back over her ears, the back flat. 3rd-2nd Century BC. H. 5 1/2 in. (14 cm.) Ex private collection, formed in the early 1980s. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXII, 2011, no. 4.

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4 GREEK LIMESTONE RELIEF OF MAENADS HUNTING STAGS, Three maenads in an ecstatic state, wearing chitons and billowing himations and holding thyrsoi, hunting stags. Carved in high relief. Taras, South Italy, ca. 300-280 BC. H. 7 1/4 in. (18.3 cm.); L. 26 3/4 in. (68 cm.) Acquired in London, February 2000. Ex English collection. Cf. J.C.Carter, “The Sculpture of Taras,” Transactions of the American Philosophical Society, vol. 65, part 7 (1975), p. 94, pl. 60c. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXI, 2010, no.5. 5

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HELLENISTIC MARBLE STELE OF ZOA depicting her in deeply sunken relief. Zoa, wearing a himation, standing in the center flanked by two girls, probably servants. Ex Dr. B. collection, Basel, Switzerland, acquired 1960-1970. Published: E. Pfuhl-H. Möbius, Die ostgriechischen Grabreliefs, vol. 1, Mainz, 1977, p. 151, no. 469, pl. 77; J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XI, 2000, no.6. Her himation covers head and body, leaving only a small section of the right arm and the richly pleated undergarment visible. The right hand grasps the hem of the himation. The girl to the left, shown in profile, is in a reflective or mourning pose, and looks up to the deceased from the side. The fingers of her left hand touch her throat. The pose of Zoa is reminiscent of that of the so-called Small Herculanian Woman, cf. W. Fuchs - 1979, 219, no. 237 with ill. The girl to the right holds an open box or mirror in both hands. A box, a kalathos and a double comb (?) stand on a ledge in the upper part of the relief. On the upper frame, an inscription: ΙΩΑ ΜΗΝΙΟΥ ΧΑΙΡΕ. The inscription translates: Zoa, daughter of Menios, farewell.


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Roman Marble Sculptures 6 ROMAN MARBLE RELIEF SECTION FROM A

SARCOPHAGUS DEPICTING A BATTLE BETWEEN GREEKS AND TROJANS. A standing warrior at left; in the midst, a nude helmeted horseman in the iconic pose of a hero is about to strike with his club an opposing warrior who raises his shield in defense. The uppermost edge is decorated with a frieze of frenzied animals including lions and boars; a deeply carved egg and dart border below. Ca. AD 200. H. 25 1/2 in. (64.8 cm.), W. 35 3/4 in. (90.8 cm.) Ex Swiss art market, April 1991; Dr. H. collection, Germany, acquired from Royal-Athena in April 2000. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. VII, 1992, no. 57; vol. XI, 2000, no. 30. Attributed. by Dr. Guntram Koch. A similar sarcophagus featuring a battle between Greeks and Amazons, is in the Thessalonika Museum (Bianchi Bandinelli, Rome, The Late Empire, 1971, fig. 277-278, p. 300). Other related reliefs may be found in the British Museum, the MuseĂŠ du Louvre, and the Istanbul Archeology Museum.

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7 ROMAN LARGE MARBLE NUDE APOLLO KITHAROIDOS The youthful god,

patron of music and poetry, standing in contrapposto, his centrally parted hair bound with a thick wreath, its long tendrils falling on his shoulders. At his left, on a thighhigh column or altar stands his kithara, created for him by Hermes. This sculpture is based upon the 2nd century BC statue of Apollo from his Temple at Cyrene, now in the British Museum. Late 1st-early 2nd Century AD. H. 46 1/2 in. (118.1 cm.) Ex Zurich art market, 1992; Christie’s New York, June 2000; M.B. collection, Woodland Hills, California, acquired from Royal-Athena in October 2002; Dr. H. collection, Germany, acquired from Royal-Athena in March 2007. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XII, 2001, no. 13; vol. XVII, 2006, no. 21. It is rare to find so large and relatively complete a statue with no restorations. A powerful work from antiquity!

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8 ROMAN MARBLE YOUTH AS THE YOUNG HERAKLES, wearing a lion skin over his head, its forelegs tied around his shoulders. its gaping jaw with fangs, the tufted mane delineated over the back of his head, 1st Century AD. H. 23 5/6 in. (60 cm.) Ex M. A. collection, Paris, ca. 1977; with Myths & Ledgends, Paris, 1980s; French private collection, acquired prior to 2000. A cult statue of Herakles as a child is thought to have stood in a temple or shrine on the Aventine Hill in Rome. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXI, 2010, no. 8. 9 ROMAN MARBLE TORSO OF MELEAGER, nude but for a cloak draped around his neck, after a 4th century BC prototype by Scopas. Meleager, an Argonaut, son of Oeneus, King of Calydon, killed the Calydonian boar. 1st Century AD. H. 28 1/2 in. ( 72.5 cm.) Ex A.D. collection, Paris, acquired in the early 1970s. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXIII, 2012, no. 6.

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10 ROMAN MARBLE MEN, THE ANCIENT MOON GOD OF ANATOLIA The young god stands with his weight on his right leg, his left advancing, He wears a chiton with a chlamys pinned on his right shoulder, and the traditional Phrygian cap over tiered curls. Remains of the crescent moon at his back. 2nd Century AD. H. 20 7/8 in. (53 cm.) Ex French collection, acquired on the European market ca. 1985. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXIII, 2012, no. 9.

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11 ROMAN MARBLE STATUE OF A YOUNG SILVANUS with masses of long curly hair bound with a fillet; wearing a goat skin (nebris) about his neck, filled with fruit, which he holds up with his left hand. 2nd Century AD. H. 18 1/2 in. (47 cm.) Ex private collection, Southwestern France, acquired in the mid-1990s. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXIII, 2012, no. 7. His name in Latin literally means “of the woods�. This woodland tutelary deity was a protector of the fields and flocks which are referenced in this example by his goat skin bulging with fruit.

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12 ROMAN MARBLE RECLINING YOUNG FAUN LEANING UPON A WINE ASKOS He is depicted as a handsome adolescent, nude, lying upon a draped rock in a languid pose; originally used as a fountain. 1st-2nd Century AD. H. 11 3/8 in. (29 cm.) L. 19 1/4 in. (49 cm.) Ex collection of Massimo Gargia, Paris; French collection, acquired in May 2008. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXII, 2010, no. 7.

13 ROMAN MARBLE STATUE OF A NUDE YOUNG BOY, possibly a representation of Eros. 1st-2nd Century AD. H. 26 1/8 in. (66.4 cm.) Ex Swiss private collection, acquired in 1973. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXIII, 2012, no. 12

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14 AN IMPORTANT ROMAN MARBLE STATUE OF THE NUDE APHRODITE, (VENUS), the goddess of erotic love and beauty, reaching down in the pose of unfastening her sandal. Her head is turned to the right and her hair is tied on top of her head. After a 3rd Century BC prototype. Ca. 1st Century AD. H. 14 1/2 in. (36.8 cm.) Ex Harounoff Family collection, Europe, 1950s. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXIII, 2012, no. 2

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Aphrodite statues of this type were popular in Asia Minor, the Greek islands, and Roman Egypt (see M. Bieber, The Sculpture of the Hellenistic Age, New York, 1961, p. 99). For related examples see A. Adriani, Repertorio d'Arte dell'Egitto Greco-Romano, vol. II, pl. 58, figs. 179182, and pl. 59, figs. 183-184, J. Marcadé, Au Musée de Délos, Paris, 1969, p. 509, pl. XLVII, and M. Bieber, op. cit., fig. 394. For a discussion of the prototype and a list of other examples see D. Brinkerhoff, Hellenistic Statues of Aphrodite, New York and London, 1978, pp. 70-97.

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15 ROMAN MARBLE STATUE OF AN EMPRESS AS A GODDESS, standing in a relaxed pose, her weight on her right foot. She wears the stola and palla worn capite velato over a diadem. 2nd half of the 2nd Century AD. H. 33 in. (85 cm.) Ex European collection, 1980s Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXIII, 2012, no.24

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16 ROMAN MARBLE PORTRAIT HEAD OF THE EMPEROR AURELIAN, AD 270-275 The face is marked by strict traits: the cheeks are hollow with salient cheekbones; short hair, mustache and beard, directly incised on the surface of the stone. Ca. AD 270-275. H. 10 1/4 in. (26 cm.) Ex old Belgian collection, ca. 1989. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXIII, 2012, no.18 The forehead is engraved with horizontal and vertical wrinkles, and the eminent eyebrows are also engraved to mark the hairiness. The foundation of the neck is rounded up for insertion onto a torso or a statue. Aurelian successfully reunited the Roman Empire by defeating the Alemanni, the Goths, Vandals, Sarmatians, and the Gallic Empire in the west and the Palmyrene Empire in the east. He thus gained the title ‘Restorer of the World.’ His portraits are rare.

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ROMAN MARBLE LIFE-SIZE PORTRAIT HEAD OF AN ATHLETE, possibly a pankratist. His closely cropped beard and thin moustache are suggestive of the styles favored by the athletes of the period. Sensitively carved of marble from the area near Saliari on the Greek island of Thasos, his strong countenance has alert deepset eyes and a determined expression upon his parted lips. Ca. 130 AD. H. 10 in. (26.7 cm.) Ex French collection; W. H. collection, Westport, Connecticut, acquired from Royal-Athena Galleries in 1988. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVI, 2005, no.12.

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18 ROMAN MARBLE HEAD OF A BEARDED GOD OR HERO modeled with a prominent brow, the almondshaped eyes with defined lids, the lips parted, his hair center-parted and spiraling from the crown in thick waves. 1st Century AD. H. 5 1/2 in. (13.9 cm.) Ex Swiss private collection, 1970s. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXIII, 2012, no. 13. 19 ROMAN SMALL MARBLE PORTRAIT HEAD OF A FLAVIAN MALE Ca. 70-80 AD H. 5 1/8 in. (13. cm.) Ex collection H.J., Sun City, Arizona. Exhibited at Kresge Art Museum, Michigan State University, 1985-2009. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. 4, 1985, no. 257.

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20 ROMAN MARBLE OVER-LIFESIZE HEAD OF A GODDESS, her head slightly turned to the left, with articulated eyes and bow-shaped lips, wavy hair deeply drilled, centrally parted and tied in a large chignon; wearing a high crescentic diadem with scalloped edge. Late 2nd Century AD. H. 13 in. (33 cm.) Ex English private collection, pre-2000. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXIII, 2012, no. 25.

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21 ROMAN MARBLE HERM BUST OF A WOUNDED AMAZON of the ‘Sciarra’ type,

based upon a Greek bronze of ca. 440—430 BC. This remarkable example exhibits so much pathos, yet, despite her plight, this Amazon shows no sign of pain or fatigue. The serenity and emotional restraint in her facial expression are a testament to the sensitivity of the Greek original and this Roman artist. 1st-2nd Century AD. H. 15 in. (38 cm.) Ex French collection of Klaus Otto Preis, acquired c. 1950-1960; French art market, March 2008; ex Dr. H. collection, Germany, acquired from Royal-Athena in April 2008. Cf. Roman marble head of an Amazon in the Capitoline Museum, Rome. 24


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22 ROMAN MARBLE HEAD OF A MUSE, GODDESS, OR VOTARY with downward cast gaze, wearing a himation over a floral garland. Socle base carved for insertion into a draped body; with fine root marks throughout. 1st Century AD. H. 6 1/8 in. (15.6 cm.) Ex Mark Sanders collection, Princeton, New Jersey; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired December 1995. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. IX, 1997, no. 23. 23 ROMAN MARBLE PORTRAIT OF A SEVERAN WOMAN The oval face is framed by a voluminous, shoulderlength coiffure, styled in even waves. Early 3rd Century AD. H. 13 in. (33 cm.) Ex B. collection, Switzerland, acquired between 1960-1980. The hair is set loosely around the ears, and finally formed into two plaits which were loosely coiled to form a flat spiral in the nape of the neck. This coiffure is typical of the Severan period. The coiffures of the empresses Iulia Domna and Plautilla served as models. Cf. K. Fittschen & P. Zanker, 1983, 99, no. 144, pls. 171172.

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24 ROMAN MARBLE RECTANGULAR OSCILLUM: NUDE DIONYSOS AND AMPELOS The bearded god of wine having over-imbibed, holds a rhyton (wine cup) in his right hand, a chlamys over his shoulder. His nude companion, the young satyr Ampelos, supports him while stroking a panther. Rev: Two Erotes on a dolphin. Ca. 3rd Century AD. L. 18 1/8 in. ( 46 cm) x 12 1/4 in. (31 cm.) Ex Nicholas Koutoulakis, Paris, 1970s; thence by descent. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXIII, 2012, no.32.

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Classical Silver Sculpture 25 ROMAN SILVER FIGURE OF A ROMAN GENIUS OF THE PATER FAMILIAS wearing his toga capite velato, standing on an ancient base; a scroll in his left hand, a patera in his right hand. 1st Century AD. H. 3 5/8 in. (9.2 cm.) Ex collection of John Moore, York, England acquired in 1980s. Cf A. KaufmannHeinimann, Die rรถmischen Bronzen in der Schweiz I, Augst, 1977, p. 79 no. 80; H. Kunckel, Der rรถmische Genius, 1974, pl. 58 ff. Gruppe F V. In the Roman religion the genuis is the individual instance of a general divine nature that is present in everyone. Much like a guardian angel, the genius would follow each man from the hour of his birth until the day he died. 26 GRAECO-ROMAN SILVER RIGHT ARM HOLDING A THUNDERBOLT from a statuette of Zeus. 2nd Century BC/AD. L. 2 3/8 in. (6 cm.) Ex B.K. collection, Munich, since the 1990s.

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27 HELLENISTIC SILVER APOLLO, probably a portrait of a Hellenistic prince in the guise of the god, perhaps Mithridates VI Eupator of Pontus, or his son Ariarathes IX Eusebes Philopator of Cappadocia, of slender and youthful form, standing in a graceful attitude with his weight on the left leg, his extended right hand holding a rhyton, the left hand a fragmentary bow, his head turned to the right, with full lips, straight nose with flaring nostrils, and eyes with indented pupils, his long unruly wavy hair bound in a diadem. Late 2nd-early 1st Century BC. H. 4 in. (10.2 cm.) Ex New York private collection; Australian private collection. acquired in 2002. Published: R. Symes, Royal Portraits and Hellenistic Kingdoms, New York, 1999, no. 24, illus; J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XX, 2009, no.134. Cf. Marie-Louise Vollenweider, MusÊes de Genève, no. 274, January 1987, pp. 4-5, cover illus; Treasures from an Ancient Jewelbox: Gold and Silver of the Ancient World, New York, 1992.

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Greek Bronze Sculptures

28 EAST GREEK BRONZE GROUP: TWO ZEBUS AND A MAN standing behind them reaching under each animal’s croup, all on an integrally cast plate base. Ex German collection. Very rare. Cesme, Anatolia, ca. 610 BC. H. 2 3/8 in. (6 cm.); base: 2 3/4 in. (7 cm.) x 2 1/2 in. (6.5 cm.) Cesme is 50 miles west of Smyrna, Turkey. For other bronzes from this area see British Museum: BM.52.91.10, acquired in 1852. See also M. Constock & C. Vermeule, Greek, Etruscan & Roman Bronzes in the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, 1971, no. 16, for a man and woman in an oxcart. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XX, 2009, no. 36. 29 HELLENISTIC BRONZE DIONYSOS ASTRIDE A SNARLING PANTHER, nude, his left arm is resting on his upper thigh, his head turned to his right, the panther's fur covered with oval spots inlaid in silver. Fine style. 1st Century BC. L. 3 7/8 in. (9.8 cm.) Ex John Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1989; J.M.E. collection, New York. Published: J. Eisenberg, Gods & Mortals, 1989, no. 12.

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30 LATE ARCHAIC SMALL GREEK BRONZE SPHINX SEATED ON AN IONIC CAPITAL wearing a polos. Very fine style with engraved details. Ca. 500 BC H. 1 1/2 in. (4 cm.) Ex German collection; J.M.E. collection, acquired on the Munich art market.

31 GREEK BRONZE SEATED SPHINX APPLIQUÉ, her outstretched wings curling at the tips. She wears a polos over her long braided hair which falls on her shoulders. Ca. 550-540 BC. W. 2 3/8 in. (6 cm.); H. 2 1/8 in. (5.4 cm.) Ex French collection; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at the Drouot, Paris, March 2001. Exhibited: Sphinx: The Guardians of Egypt, Brussels, October 19, 2006 - February 25, 2007. 32 HELLENISTIC BRONZE BEARDED CENTAUR leaping to right, in gesture of aiming arrow at pursuers. Ca. 2nd Century BC. L. 3 3/8 in. (8.6 cm.) Ex collection of Patricia O'Brien, acquired ca. 1948; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at Sotheby’s, New York, May 1989.

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Etruscan Bronze Sculptures 33 VILLANOVAN BRONZE ATTACHMENT: HORSE AND RIDER standing in the crook of a J-form spar incised with circles on both sides. Ca. 8th Century BC. H. 3 7/8 in. (9.8 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired from Galleria Serodine, Ascona, February 1994. 34 ETRUSCAN BRONZE HELLE RIDING THE RAM WITH THE GOLDEN FLEECE Once a princess, daughter of King Athamas of Boeotia, she was the goddess of the Hellespont Sea. She, partially draped, reclines upon the ram’s back as it kneels; her left arm around his neck. Probably a cista finial. Vulci, ca. 400 BC. L. 2 3/8 in. (6 cm.) A rare type. Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in the Zurich art market, June 1995. Cf. E. Babelon & A. Blanchet, Catalogue des bronzes antique de la Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris, 1895, no. 260. 35 ETRUSCAN BRONZE NUDE MALE DANCER OR ATHLETE his body twisted forward with arms extended; decorative figure from a candelabrum. Ca. 420-400 BC. H. 3 in. (7.6 cm.) Cf. Scavi di Spina, pl. 100. Ex Sotheby’s London, December 1990; Swiss collection, 1995. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. VI, 1995, no. 31.

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36 ETRUSCAN BRONZE CANDELABRUM Of typical form, the finial is a sculpture of an embracing couple on a pedestal base with beading on its upper edge, the figures looking toward each other, stepping forward, with their outer arms akimbo. Ca. 450 BC. H. 45 3/4 in. (116.3 cm.) Ex private collection, southern France, acquired in the late 19th-early 20th century; thence by descent. For a similar candelabrum finial with an embracing couple, see G. Q. Giglioli, L’Arte Etrusca, Milan, 1935, pl. CCXIV, 2 (Berlin). Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXIII, 2012, no. 42.

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37 ROMAN BRONZE NUDE APOLLO wearing a bow case on a strap, holding a laurel sprig in his right hand. Ca. 2nd Century AD. H. 8 7/8 in. (13 cm) Ex Dutch private collection, Maastricht; H.J. collection, Sun City, Arizona. Exhibited at Kresge Art Museum, Michigan State University,1985-2009. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. IV, 1985, no. 278.

Roman Bronze Sculptures 38 ROMAN BRONZE NUDE APOLLO WITH LEFT FOOT ON OMPHALOS, the navel-stone of the earth. 1st-2nd Century AD. H. 4 3/4 in. (12.1 cm.). Ex American private collection, acquired from RoyalAthena in 1990. Exhibited: Picker Art Gallery, Colgate University, 1990-1994. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XII, 2001, no. 82. 39 ROMAN BRONZE NUDE APOLLO KITHAROIDOS The athletic figure standing with his weight on his left leg, the right relaxed and bent at the knee, holding a plectrum in his lowered right hand, originally holding his kithara in his right, his head turned, his hair bound in a fillet, with long braids falling onto each shoulder. 2nd Century AD. H. 5 1/8 in. (13 cm.) Ex collection of John Kluge, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from RoyalAthena in 1989. 40 ROMAN BRONZE THRACIAN APOLLO RIDING A GALLOPING HORSE Nude, he wears a radiate headdress and an arrow quiver on his back, its strap across his chest. In his right hand he holds a phiale. In fine style. 2nd-3rd Century AD. H. 2 1/2 in. (6.5 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in Munich, June 2005. Cf. L. Ogneneove-Marinova, Statuettes en bronze du musee national archeologique a Sofia, 1975, no. 17. 34


41 ROMAN BRONZE ASKLEPIOS, THE GOD OF MEDICINE, wrapped in a himation and leaning on a staff entwined by a serpent. On an ancient cylindrical pedestal. Dark green patina. Fine style. 1st-2nd Century AD. H. 6 in. (15.4 cm.) Ex B.K. collection, Munich, acquired in the 1990s. This sculpture is probably based upon the cult statue at Epidaurus, the center for his worship. Born a mortal, educated by the centaur Cheiron, he became so skilled in the art of medicine that he was said to be able to raise the dead. 42 ROMAN BRONZE ASKLEPIOS, THE GOD OF MEDICINE depicted wrapped in a himation, his muscular torso exposed, his curly hair bound with a fillet. His right hand is upon his waist and at his left he leans upon a staff entwined with a snake. 1st-2nd Century AD. H. 4 1/4 in. (11 cm.) Ex K.G. collection acquired in Germany in the 1990s. 43 ROMAN BRONZE HERAKLES BIBAX The nude drunken hero stands with his weight on his right foot, a lionskin over his left shoulder, a knopped club in his left hand, his extending right hand possibly once holding a kantharos, his wavy hair bound with a diadem. 2nd-3rd Century AD. H. 5 5/8 in. (14.3 cm.) Ex Lord McAlpine of West Green collection, England, 1980s; John W. Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from RoyalAthena in 1989. Published: J. Eisenberg, Gods & Mortals, 1989, no. 86.

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44 ROMAN BRONZE PAN PLAYING A SYRINX the god of shepherds, herds and hunters, with upper human part and goat horns, legs and tail, holds a syrinx in his right hand, approaching his mouth, and his left hand he holds a logobolan (shepherd’s crook). 1st-2nd Century AD. H. 5 1/8 in. (13.2 cm.) Ex German private collection, Z.C., acquired betweeen 1970 and 1980. Cf. M. Kunze, Meisterwerke antiken bronzen und metallarbeiten aus der sammlung Borowski, Franz Phillip Rutzen, Germany, Mainz 2007, pp. 158-159, fig. C.24. 45 ROMAN BRONZE ALEXANDER THE GREAT WEARING ARMOR over a chiton, a chlamys over his left forearm, and holding a phiale in his right hand. 1st-3rd Century AD. H. 3 3/4 in. (9.5 cm.) Ex English private collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXIII, 2012, no. 49. 46 ROMAN BRONZE NUDE DIOSCUROS One of the divine twins, Castor and Pollux, with right arm extended and wearing a conical helmet. 1st-2nd century AD. H. 5 1/8 in. (13 cm.) A scarce subject in exceptionally fine style. Ex Sotheby’s New York, December 1997; Dr. H. collection, Germany, acquired from Royal-Athena, April 2000. Fine dark brown patina.

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47 ROMAN BRONZE STATUE OF ALEXANDER THE GREAT AS A DIOSCUROS, holding a lance, pilos helmet on his head, he stands in contrapposto with his weight on his left leg, his left hand on his hip, and his right knee slightly bent. With his raised right arm he holds the lance, a portion of which still remains. Ca. 2nd Century AD. H. 16 in. (40.5 cm.) A superb work of art in exceptional condition. A powerful and evocative example based upon the masterpiece by Lysippos. Ex Belgian collection; Brussels art market, July 2005; Dr. H. collection, Germany, acquired from Royal-Athena in January 2006. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVII, 2006, no. 43. After his death Alexander was often associated with the Dioskuroi, mortals who became devine, and were regarded as the saviors and benefactors of the people. From ancient literature we know of a painting by Apelles representing Alexander between the Dioskuroi. This and another painting by Apelles were brought to Rome by Augustus who set them in facing walls of the Aula del Colosso, a square room at the end of the long northwestern lateral portico of the Forum Augustum, next to the Temple of Mars. This would associate Augustus with Alexander and also infer his divinity and underscore his benevolence as Pater Patriae.

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48 ROMAN BRONZE WINGED, STRIDING EROS HOLDING A DOVE in his left hand and a large alabastron in his right. He stands atop an ancient spool-form pedestal. Smooth green patina. 2nd Century AD. H. 3 1/8 in. (8 cm.) Ex T.A. collection, Munich, acquired in Munich, in 2003. 49 ROMAN BRONZE EROS RIDING ASTRIDE A LEAPING DOLPHIN Probably a vessel foot. 2nd-3rd Century AD. H. 4 1/4 in. (11 cm.) Ex F. Hancock collection, London, acquired in 1975; collection acquired in Germany in the 1990’s. 50 ROMAN BRONZE NUDE BOY RIDING A DOLPHIN, its body arching; from a handle. 2nd-3rd Century AD. H. 5 1/2 in. (14 cm.) Exhibited: Detroit Institute of Arts, 1984-1993. Ex RoyalAthena, 1984; reacquired for J.M.E. collection, New York, at Christie’s, New York, December 1993. 51 ROMAN BRONZE YOUNG BOY AS A GLADIATOR A rare subject. 1st-2nd Century AD. H. 2 5/8 in. (6.7 cm.) Ex French collection; J. F. collection, Loveland, Ohio, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1989. Exhibited: Ohio State University Art Museum, 1985-1990; Picker Art Gallery, Colgate University, 1991-2007. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XIX, 2008, no. 70.

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52 ROMAN BRONZE TOGATUS, GENIUS OF THE PATER FAMILIAS The face modeled with youthful plump features, standing wearing a tunic with his toga draped over the head and secured in a roll at the waist, holding a patera in his right hand, his right knee relaxed; tangs under the feet. 1st-2nd Century AD. H. 4 in. (10 cm.) Ex private Suffolk collection, England. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXI, 2010, no.61. 53 ROMAN BRONZE COMIC ACTOR The hollow cast figure standing wearing a comic actor's mask and banquet wreath, dressed in a tunic and close fitting patterned trousers, the right hand grasping the left wrist, leaning nonchalantly with one leg crossed over the other, against a short pillar surmounted by a comic mask. 2nd-3rd Century AD. H. 5 ½ in. (14 cm.) Ex private European collection. Cf. J.R. Green and A. Seeberg, Monuments Illustrating New Comedy, 1995, 5XB 6 and 6DS 1. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXI, 2010, no. 62. 54 ROMAN BRONZE APHRODITE (VENUS), her right arm is extended, holding an attribute, her left bent and folded towards her body, her head turned to her right, gazing downward, her wavy hair is crowned by a diadem. Significant remains of gilding. 1st-2nd Century AD. H. 8 1/8 in. (20.6 cm.); Ex collection of Dr. Alfred Vogl and Patricia Stickney, New York, acquired between 1950 to 1973. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXIV, 2013, no.43.

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55 ROMAN BRONZE APPLIQUE BUST OF HERAKLES emerging from a palmette, the hero bearded and wrapped in a lionskin; probably from a carriage. Ca, 2nd Century AD. H. 5 1/2 in. (14 cm.) Ex collection of J-P. Mariaud de Serres, France, acquired before 2000. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXIII, 2012, no. 55. 56 ROMAN BRONZE DEEP APPLIQUE BUST OF ALEXANDER THE GREAT, his hair arranged in the characteristic anastole. 2nd Century AD. H. 5 7/8 in. (14.9 cm.) Ex collection of B.H.S., St, Petersburg, Florida, formed in the 1950s-early 1970s. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXIII, 2012, no. 53. 57 ROMAN BRONZE APPLIQUE BUST OF A WARRIOR, POSSIBLY MARK ANTONY, emerging from openwork foliate scrolls, seven incised ears of wheat at the center below, wearing a crested helmet over luxurious curling hair, head turned slightly to the left, with pierced eyes and fleshy lips, plunging an eagleheaded dagger into his right breast. 1st-2nd Century AD. H. 8 in. (20.3 cm.) Ex collection of a Greek archaeologist, pre-1950. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXIII, 2012, no. 54.


58 ROMAN BRONZE LIFE-SIZE LEFT FOREARM OF A WOMAN wearing a twisted movable bracelet, dressed with a pleated veil on the upper part of the arm. Ca. 3rd Century AD. L. 13 3/4 in. (35 cm.) Ex Swiss private collection acquired in the 1970s. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXIII, 2012, no. 57.

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59 ROMANO-BRITISH BRONZE CROUCHING WINGED GRIFFIN Hollow-cast, front legs raised and joined; details incised. 1st Century AD. L. 3 1/4 in. (8.3 cm.) Found in East Sussex, together with other Romano-British metalwork. Apparently the only sculpture of a griffin to have been found in Britain. Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at Christie’s London, 1990. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. VI, 1991, no. 45. 60 ROMAN BRONZE PROTOME OF A WINGED GRIFFIN. Finely modeled head, chased fur and feathers, raised lion paws; the back with a square socket, two lugs, and a rivet pin. 1st-2nd Century AD. L. 2 3/8 in. (6.2 cm.) Ex German collection, acquired in the 1970s; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in Munich, April 2010. 61 ROMAN BRONZE APPLIQUE OF A WINGED SEA-GRIFFIN depicted in profile to the left, the winged monster with its foreleg projecting forward and its foliate tail rising up, some details incised. Fine style. 2nd Century AD. L. 21⁄2 in. (6.3 cm.) Ex Pars Ancient Antiques, London, 1999; private Midwestern collection; J.M.E. collection, New York.

Our stock of ancient bronzes numbers over 300 museum quality examples. For an overview consult our recent catalogues, visit our New York gallery, or go to:

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62 ROMAN BRONZE THREE-HEADED CERBERUS The triple-headed guard dog of the underworld with three canine heads, the larger central head upraised and two smaller heads, that to the left also turned to its right, that to the right looking up and slightly to its left, two of the heads with upright triangular ears, one with the ears folded back, the fur rendered by neat incision. Ca. 2nd Century AD. H. 4 in. (10.1 cm.) Superb style. Ex French collection, sold at Christie’s, London, July 10, 1987, lot 201; John Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1990, sold at Christie’s New York, June 2004; J.M.E. collection, New York. 2005-15. Published: C.C. Vermeule and J.M. Eisenberg, Catalogue of the Greek, Etruscan, and Roman Bronzes in the Collection of John Kluge, New York and Boston, 1992, no. 88-107.

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63 ROMAN BRONZE APPLIQUE OF A TRITON with the head and torso of a man; below, the tail of a fish. The bearded diety gestures with his extended left arm. 2nd Century AD. L. 6 1/4 in. (16 cm.) Ex Lequeu collection, acquired in Egypt at the beginning of the 20th century; Sotheby’s London, December 1992; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in Paris, April 2010. 64 ROMAN BRONZE APPLIQUE: WINGED SPHINX, crouching to left, wreathed head facing front, wearing necklace with three pendants. Ca. 2nd Century AD. L. 3 1/2 in. (9 cm) Ex European private collection, acquired in Zurich, 1974; J.M.E. collection, acquired at Christie’s London, April 2005. 65 ROMAN BRONZE PROTOME OF A SPHINX with the head and bust of a woman, up-turned wings, and lion’s paws. She wears a mural crown and may represent Tyche, goddess of destiny. A rare type. 1st-2nd Century AD. H. 2 3/8 in. (6 cm.) Ex South German private collection assembled from the 1970s; J.M.E. collection, New York.

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66 CHALCIDIAN BRONZE HELMET WITH INCISED DECORATION Narrow elongated skull with a carinated and crested crown, holes for the plume attachment, large cheek pieces, and a short flaring neck guard. Ca. 5th-4th Century BC. H. 9 in. (23 cm.) Ex collection of Axel Guttmann (1944-2001), Berlin, acquired in Krefeld in 1990. The forehead has decorative eyebrows in relief and richly incised palmettes, serpents' heads, locks of hair, and floral ornamentation. 67 HELLENISTIC BRONZE CIRCULAR MIRROR COVER: EROS AND PSYCHE seated upon a rock, their bodies turned out but their heads facing; the goddess at right wearing a chiton and a flowing himation and love’s messenger nude at right; the back of the mirror is Roman. Ca. 3rd Century BC. Diam. 5 in. (12.5 cm.) Ex collection of Dr. P. Poitier, France, acquired before 1980.

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Classical Bronze Helmet & Vessels


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68 GREEK GILT BRONZE TREFOIL OINOCHOE with splayed foot engraved with tongues, piriform body, tapering neck with raised collar and high strap handle with rosette engraved rotelles. Base repaired in antiquity. Probably Lydian. Late 7th-6th Century BC H. 9 1/4 in. (23.5 cm.) Ex New York collection dispersed in Hesperia Arts Auction, November 1990; S.B. collection, San Diego, California. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXIII, 2012, no. 65.

69 HELLENISTIC BRONZE CHOUS: IN RELIEF A DANCING NUDE DIONYSOS holding thyrsos and lionskin draped over his arm; to left, two dancing maenads holding tympana and thyrsoi; goat, altar, and tree. 3rd-1st Century BC. H. 2 1/2 in. (6.3 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired from J.-A. DeSerres, Paris, in September 1995.

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70 VILLANOVAN BRONZE CIRCULAR LIDDED PYXIS with straight sides decorated with six rows of embossed circles. On the lid, embossed circles around a wreath of rays in the centre; three projections with double aperture for suspension. Ca. 725-675 BC. Diam. 5 5/8 in. (14.4 cm.) Ex private Swiss collection, acquired in 1961; D-J Cahn, Basel, Sept. 2008. Published: J. Eisenberg, Ancient World, vol. XXI, 2010, no. 107. For a pyxis of the same design see: M. Cristofani, Civiltà degli etruschi, 1985, Florence, p. 55, no. 2.4.10,9. See also the identical decoration on a double flask from the Tomb of the Warrior of Poggio alle Croci, Volterra, published in M. Torelli, The Etruscans, 2001, p. 539, no. 12.2. 71 ROMAN BRONZE MINIATURE LIDDED VESSEL INLAID WITH NIELLO The body incised with bound floral motifs heightened with niello. 2nd-3rd Century AD. H. to lip 3 in. (7.6 cm.) Ex Flohr collection Germany; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired from B. Gachstätter, Frankfurt, in July 2006. Niello is a black metallic alloy of sulfur with silver, copper, or lead that is used to fill designs that have been engraved on the surface of a metal.

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72 LATE ROMAN BRONZE BALSAMARIUM IN THE FORM OF A BOOT or calceus, ankle-high, with nailed sole, and engraved lacing details; one chain remaining. Unusually complete. Eastern Mediterranean, 4th-6th Century AD. H. 4 1/8 in. (10.5 cm.); L. 4 1/2 in. (11.5 cm.) Ex A.P. collection, acquired in the 1990s.

Classical Terracottas 73 ETRUSCAN TERRACOTTA VOTIVE HEAD OF A VEILED YOUNG WOMAN, with an oval face framed by a coiffure of helical locks over the forehead and pendant corkscrew locks to both sides. Calenian, ca. 375-350 BC. H. 11 3/4 in. (30 cm.) Ex collection of Dr. V. Z., Switzerland, acquired between 1950 and 1965. Exhibited: Archaeological Collection, University of Zurich, 1986-2001.

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74 GREEK ARCHAIC TERRACOTTA KORE wearing a peplos and draped with a himation. In her right hand she holds a wreath. Ca. 530-500 BC. H. 7 7/8 in. (20 cm.) Ex German collection. 75 HELLENISTIC POLYCHROME TERRACOTTA DRAPED FEMALE She wears a draped, anklelength himation, drawn up at her side, showing the pleated lower hem of the floor-length chiton; with pastel mauve pigment over white ground. Canosa, 3rd Century BC. H. 10 3/4 in. (27.3 cm.) Ex J-D. Cahn, Basel, Switzerland; Dr. M. S. collection, Scarsdale, New York. 76 HELLENISTIC TERRACOTTA OF A DANCING WOMAN, her left leg advancing, and her left hand pressed against her hip beneath the fabric of her billowing garment, and her right hand gathering the fabric to keep her from tripping. 3rd Century BC. H. 8 1/4 in. (21 cm.) Ex German private collection, acquired from the Baroness von Ohlendorff, Munich, in 1988. 77 ROMAN LARGE TERRACOTTA APHRODITE GENETRIX wrapped loosely in a himation; her upraised right hand lifts a corner of it which hangs down the back; on an integrally molded pedestal with a relief of a thiasos, with a satyr and flautist on the front. First half of the 1st Century AD. H. 17 7/8 in. (45.5 cm.) Ex German private collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXIII, 2012, no. 102.

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Early Greek Vases 78 MYCENAEAN BUFF-WARE POTTERY CHALICE of elegant form, with slender stem flaring into a deep conical bowl with slightly everted rim, the bowl painted with a stylized cuttlefish, the two handles gracefully curving like tentacles with painted edges; the stem painted with bands. Early 13th Century BC. H. 4 3/4 in. (12.1 cm.) Ex German collection, acquired 1970s; J.M.E. collection, acquired in Munich, December 2007. Cf. P. Mountjoy, Mycenaean Pottery: An Introduction, Oxford, 1993, p. 86, no. 305 (LH III B). 79 MYCENAEAN POTTERY JAR WITH THREE SMALL HANDLES with stylized 'rock' decoration on shoulder; parallel bands on neck and body. Ca. 1450-1350 BC. H. 2 3/8 in. (6 cm.) Ex Richard Hattatt collection; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at Sotheby’s London, December 1984. 80 MYCENAEAN POTTERY SQUAT JAR with single handle and decorated with ivy leaves and scrolling stems in purplish-brown slip; lip and handle also covered in dark slip. Ca. 1450-1350 BC. H. 3 in. (7.6 cm.) Ex collection of Richard Hattatt, Hampshire, England; J.M.E. collection New York, acquired at Sotheby’s, London, December 1984. 81 MYCENAEAN POTTERY SQUAT STIRRUP JAR with spout and twin handles. Decorated on the shoulders with fan-shells and stripes in brown-orange slip. Ca. 1350-1200 BC. H. 2 1/4 in. (5.7 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at Christie’s London, April 1999.

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82 ATTIC LATE GEOMETRIC CUP WITH OPENWORK PEDESTAL FOOT with bands of zig-zag decoration in black slip. Later 8th Century BC. H. 2 7/8 in. (7.3 cm.) Ex H.S. collection, Germany, acquired between 1971-1998.

83 RHODIAN TERRACOTTA ALABASTRON IN THE FORM OF A VEILED FEMALE HEAD AND BUST, holding a dove to her breast with her right hand. Ca. 550 BC. H. 7 in. (17.8 cm.) Ex Fritzemeier collection, acquired in 1975. 84 CORINTHIAN POTTERY ARYBALLOS BY A PAINTER IN THE OTTERLO WORKSHOP, with the head of a man and a woman vis-à-vis; stylized rosettes in the field. Ca. 570-560 BC. H. 4 3/8 in. (11.3 cm.) Ex collection of Pierre and Claude Vérité, Paris, acquired between 1930 and 1960. Cf. Würzburg L 110 in D. Amyx, Corinthian Vase-Painting of the Archaic Period, 1988, p.179: A-26.

85 GREEK DOUBLE COCKLESHELL ARYBALLOS, the shell realistically modeled with ridges and stripes in black slip. The shell imitates the form of a cockle. Choice. Ca. 525-475 BC. H. 2 3/4 in (6 cm.) Ex German collection; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in March 2008. The idea for creating a shell-shaped terracotta vessel may derive from containers made from real shells. Archaeologists have found shells outfitted with hinges and clasps in order to serve as containers for small items.

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Attic Black-figure Vases

ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE AMPHORA BY THE BATEMAN PAINTER Herakles stands in the center, locked in combat with the Nemaean lion, an invulnerable beast that terrorized the vicinity near Nemea in the Northwestern Peloponnese. Iolaos, Herakles’ nephew and companion, stands at left holding Herakles’ club and gesturing excitedly. At right stands Athena and Hermes. Reverse: The red-bearded Dionysos stands in profile holding a kantharos. Before him at right dance two nude satyrs. Behind him a third satyr and a whiteskinned maenad dance. Ca. 540-530 BC H. 19 in. (48.3 cm.) Ex New York art market, November 1990; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1991; Dr. H. collection, Germany, acquired from RoyalAthena in September 2010. Published: Summa, Ancient Art, 1976, no. 9; 1000 Years of Ancient Greek Vases II, 2010, no. 36; Art of the Ancient World, vol XXII, 2011, no. 106. Sir John Beazley placed this artist among the followers of the Lysippides Painter and records only five other works by this artist: the name vase in the Cleveland Museum, two in the Metropolitan Museum, New York, one in the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, and the other in a private American collection. This is a classic depiction of a popular mythological tale.

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87 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE NECK AMPHORA FROM THE GROUP OF TORONTO 305 In a battle between Greeks and Amazons (amazonomachy), a four-horse chariot (quadriga) is wheeling to the left. The horses have already turned, but the chariot itself still faces frontally, with the wheels foreshortened. The charioteer is not visible, but we see the Theban shield he wears on his back, with its red rim and characteristic indented sides. Of the warrior riding beside the charioteer, we see only his high-crested Corinthian helmet, his scabbard, his two long spears, and his round Argive shield. An air of equine ferocity is reinforced by the open mouths and white teeth. At the left is an Amazon carrying a spear and shield. She falls to the left; at first glance, the horses seem to be trampling her, but in fact she is behind them. Her attacker is probably the warrior at the far right, who strides to the left behind the chariot, his face hidden by the shield of the charioteer. Reverse: In the center, Dionysos stands holding a rhyton in his left hand and a grapevine in his right. He wears an ivy wreath. Like the two satyrs in the scene, the god has a long red beard. One satyr stands empty-handed at the far right; the other stands behind Dionysos holding a jug, ready to fill the god’s rhyton when summoned. Behind this satyr, at far left, is a maenad wearing a deerskin (nebris) over a chiton decorated with stars and rosettes. Ca. 520-510 BC. H. 16 in. (40.6 cm.) Ex Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1990; Dr. H. collection, Germany, acquired from Royal-Athena in September 2010. Published: J. Eisenberg, 1000 Years of Ancient Greek Vases, 1990, no. 30; Art of the Ancient World, vol XXII, 2011, no. 108.

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88 ATTIC BLACK FIGURE COLUMN KRATER BY THE PAINTER OF LOUVRE F 6, FROM THE WORKSHOP OF LYDOS. A swan between two confronting panthers. Reverse: A large mountain-goat; under the handles a swan on either side, same on the square top of the handles. Ca. 560 - 550 BC. H. 11 in. (28 cm.); diam. 11 1/4 in. (28.5 cm.); W. 14 in. (35.6 cm.) Ex South German private collection, acquired in the 1980s. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXII, 2011, no. 112.

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89 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE LEKYTHOS. ‘The Concert of Apollo’ with the god of music playing a lyre instead of his usual kithara. Late 6th Century BC. H 10 3/4 in. (27.3 cm.) Ex Swiss private collection; John Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1988; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, 1990-2010. The goddesses standing on either side of him are probably his sister Artemis (behind him) and his mother Leto. Each holds a flower. At far left stands Dionysos holding a rhyton. At far right, is Hermes holding his kerykeion. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. IV, 1985, no. 63. 90 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE SIANA-CUP BY LYDOS Tondo with flying eagle; outside, on each side, a nude heroic warrior followed by a young horseman between five men. Ca. 550 BC. H. 4 5/8 in. (11.9 cm.): Diam. 9 3/8 in. (23.7 cm.) Ex Belgian private collection, acquired in the 1980s. To Lydos and his workshop belong the painters who developed the black-figure style.

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91 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE BAND CUP with palmette frieze. 6th Century BC. D. 5 1/4 in. 13.3 cm.); W. 7 1/2 in. (19 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at Christie’s London in December 1984. 92 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE WHITE-GROUND TREFOIL OINOCHOE. Dionysos holding a kantharos, with maenad, goat between, perhaps by the Painter of Vatican 649. Ca. 490 BC. H. 9 in. (22.9 cm.) Ex Swiss collection; John Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1988; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, 1990-2010. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. IV, 1985, no. 72.

93 ATTIC BLACK-GLAZED PIRIFORM AMPHORISKOS tapering to a narrow ridged ring foot; twin handles join shoulder and neck. Around the body is a stamped key block meander; below and above is a row of stamped palmettes. An elegant and rare type. Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at Bonham’s, London, April 2000. Cf. q, p. 107, no. 397, pl. LV; Oxford CVA, I, pl. 40, no. 10.

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Attic Red-figure Vases 94 ATTIC RED-FIGURE COLUMN KRATER BY THE VILLA GIULIA PAINTER A nude satyr, running to the left with his arms outstretched, pursuing Amymone. As she flees to the left holding a hydria by one horizontal handle in her lowered left hand, she looks back at her pursuer. Reverse: A standing draped youth holding a staff in his right hand. Ca. 460 BC. H. 15 1/8 in. (38.4 cm.) Ex H. Vollmoeller, Zurich, 1968; private collection, Geneva, Switzerland. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXIII, 2012, no. 111.

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95 ATTIC RED-FIGURE COLUMN KRATER BY THE PAINTER OF THE LOUVRE CENTAUROMACHY Dionysos with a kantharos and a thyrsos looks at a satyr stomping grapes in a wine skin on a footstool at left. From the right another satyr with a big sack full of grapes approaches. Reverse: Three draped youths. Ca. 470-460 BC. H. 13 18 in. (33.4 cm.); Diam. 11 1/8 in. (28.4 cm.); W. 13 1/2 in. (34.3 cm.) Ex D.O. collection, South Germany. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXIII, 2012, no. 113.

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96 ATTIC RED-FIGURE COLUMN KRATER BY A LATER MANNERIST. On either side: two young horsemen each holding a spear, cloaks around their shoulders, and petasoi hanging down their backs, ride to right. Mid-5th Century BC. H. 16 1/8 in. (41 cm.) Ex A. L. collection, Rocourt, Belgium, acquired in 1972 from another Belgian collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXIII, 2012, no. 112.

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97 ATTIC RED-FIGURE NOLAN AMPHORA BY HERMONAX Nude frontal Dionysos wearing a laurel wreath and cloak draped over his arms from behind, stand, holding a thyrsos, looking to the right. Reverse: a nude satyr holding an oinochoe, wineskin, and a thyrsos. Ca. 470-460 BC. H. 14 3/8 in. (36.4 cm.) Ex North German private collection. Hermonax was a pupil of the Berlin Painter. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XX, 2009, no. 103. 98 ATTIC RED-FIGURE LEKYTHOS BY THE ICARUS PAINTER A nude Eros flying to the right, his wings outstretched behind, reaching towards a tendril. Mid-5th Century BC. H. 6 7/8 in. (17.5 cm.) Ex American private collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. IV, 1985, no. 96; 1000 Years of Ancient Greek Vases II, 2010, no. 113.

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Our collection of ancient vases, numbering over 300 museum quality examples, is arguably the finest and most comprehensive available for sale anywhere. For an overview, consult our recent catalogs, visit the New York gallery, or go to

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Magna Graecia Vases 99 APULIAN GNATHIA LARGE HYDRIA FROM THE BALTIMORE/WHITE SACCOS GROUP, ribbed, with a horizontal band along the handle zone, centered with a female head emerging from elaborate scrolling tendrils. Choice! Ca. 325-300 BC. H. 24 1â „2 in. (62.2 cm.) Ex collection of John Kluge, Charlottesville, VA, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1980; Dr. E. collection, North Carolina, acquired from Royal-Athena in April 2005. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVI, 2005, no. 110.

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100 APULIAN RED-FIGURE PLATE WITH HERAKLES, seated on rocks, wearing lion-skin covering his head and tied around shoulders, holding club in right hand and raised bow in his left, flanked by foliate tendrils, wave pattern below. Ca. 380-360 BC. Diam. 6 1/8 in. (15.5 cm.) Ex Charles Ede Ltd., London; Gil and Myrna Goldfine collection, Tel Aviv, acquired in 2000. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXIII, 2012, no. 112.

101 APULIAN RED-FIGURE LIDDED PYXIS In the form of a spindle whorl, a janiform female profile on the cover. Mid-4th Century BC. Diam. 4 1/4 in. (9.6 cm.) Ex New York private collection since the 1960's; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in the New York art market, March 2009. 102 APULIAN GNATHIA SMALL RIBBED HYDRIA with depictions of hydria and kantharos on shoulder; two sections of deep incisions on body separated by a meander in white. Ca. 4th century BC. H. 5 3/8 in. (13.8 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired from Axel Weber, Cologne, in June 1996. 103 APULIAN GNATHIAN PHIALE In the tondo, a Gorgon head in high relief surrounded by ivy maeander. Late 4th Century BC. Diam. 7 7/8 in. (20 cm). Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired from Me. de Ricqles, Paris, Oct. 2000.

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104 APULIAN XENON GROUP POTTERY KANTHAROS Applied red decoration. Triple dog-headed Cerberus to right. Reverse: Hooded female (Amazon?) to left. The Cerberus motif is very rare. Choice. Ca. 350 BC. H. 4 1/2 in. (11.4 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired from C. Ede, London, in October 1990. 105 APULIAN XENON GROUP POTTERY KANTHAROS with applied red decoration: two male goats butting, vine between. Vine meander around waist. Reverse: Two palmettes. Choice. Late 4th Century BC. H. 4 3/4 in. (12.1 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in Basel, February 1994.

106 APULIAN APPLIED RED-FIGURE CHOUS; TWO CARIAN MUSICIANS one playing the auletes is preceded by a another playing clappers; a dog to the rear. A rare depiction. 4th Century BC. H. 4 3/4 in. (12 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired from H. Cahn, Basel, in October 1984. Probably a gift for the second day of the Anthesterian which was one of the four Athenian festivals in honor of Dionysos. It was held each year from the 11th to the 13th of the month of Anthesterion, around the time of the January or February full moon. The three days of the feast were called Pithoigia, ChoĂŤs, and Chytroi. It celebrated the beginning of spring, particularly the maturing of the wine stored at the previous vintage, which was now consumed. During the feast, social order was flexible, slaves being allowed to participate The Anthesteria also had aspects of a festival of the dead: either the Keres or the Carians were entertained, freely roaming the city with feathers attached to their headwear, until they were expelled after the festival.

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107 CANOSAN LARGE CIRCULAR POTTERY PYXIS with a cylindrical body and splayed foot, the domed lid molded in relief with an embracing couple seated on a stool, the man nude, his mantle below, the drapery hanging from the chair, his right arm crossing the woman with his hand on her shoulder; to the right a large winged Eros. 3rd Century BC. Diam. 9 3/4 in. (24.8 cm.) Ex Sotheby’s London, July 1987; New York collection, acquired at Sotheby's, New York, December 1996. 108 LARGE CANOSAN POTTERY KANTHAROS The buff body with the interior, foot, handles, central band, and short neck in black slip. The lip with palmettes, and the shoulder with a frieze of grape vines also in black slip. Ca. 330-300 BC H. 13 3/4 in. (34.1 cm.); diam. 10 1/4 in. (26.1 cm.) Choice. Ex collection of Dr. V. Z., Switzerland, acquired between 1950 and 1965. Exhibited: Archaeological Collection, University of Zurich, 1986-2001. 109 CANOSAN YELLOW GLAZED POTTERY OLPE The upper register decorated with relief masks, the lower register with reliefs of Herakles fighting two centaurs and the Lernean hydra. Ca. 3rd Century BC. H. 11 7/8 in. (29 cm.) Rare. Ex French collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXI, 2010, no. 155.


110 CAMPANIAN RED-FIGURE BELL KRATER PROBABLY BY THE LIBATION PAINTER Two fighting warriors. Reverse: Two draped youths in conversation. Ca. 360 BC. H. 12 in. (30.5 cm); Diam. 12 1/4 in. (31.1 cm) Ex old Austrian collection, acquired before 1970. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXIII, 2012, no. 119.

111 CAMPANIAN LARGE RED-FIGURE SKYPHOS BY THE VPH PAINTER Bearded male in profile to left/Female wearing saccos, in profile to left. Ca. 350 BC. H. 5 in. (12.7 cm.) Choice. Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired from Pino Donati, Lugano, in February 1994. 112 CAMPANIAN RED-FIGURE SKYPHOS BY THE PAINTER OF THE LEIDEN SKYPHOI A strutting Pan carrying a thyrsos, a large cloak over his left arm. Reverse: A young woman holding a wreath. Ca. 340 BC. H. 6 in. (15.4 cm.); W. 9 in. (23 cm.) Ex German private collection, A.L., acquired in the 1970s. This painter is part of the larger Frignano Group.

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113 SICILIAN RED-FIGURE CALYX KRATER BY THE CHEQUER PAINTER A komos procession led by a nude youth holding a grain sheaf, followed by a draped female playing the double-flute and followed by another nude youth holding a torch and staff. Reverse: two youths, one holding a strigil and the other an aryballos, standing on either side of a meta. Ca. 410-400 BC. H. 14 1/8 in. (35.9 cm.) Ex German collection. The Chequer Painter and his follower the Dirce Painter are considered by Trendall to be the chief forerunners of both early Campanian and Paestan vase painting. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXI, 2010, no. 145. 114 SICILIAN GNATHIAN LEKANIS FROM THE VINE GROUP the lid with vine of grapes, tendrils, and flowers; wave meander around rim. Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at Chritie’s New York, in December 1993. Cf. K. Hamma, ed., The Dechter Collection of Greek Vases, San Bernardino, 1989, no. 47.

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Etruscan Vases 115 CASTELLUCCIO CULTURE RED POTTERY CONICAL CUP with a board-like handle, the outside painted in brown with highly organized and carefully worked geometric decoration, and inside with vertical lines. Ca. 2000-1400 BC. H. 4 1/8 in. (10.5 cm.) Ex collection of Dr. V. Z., Switzerland, acquired between 1950 and 1965. Exhibited: Archaeological Collection, University of Zurich, 19862001. A very rare type in fine condition. The prehistoric civilization of Sicily, originally identified by Paolo Orsi (d. 1935) on the basis of a particular ceramic style, in the homonymous village, between Noto and Siracusa. 116 DAUNIAN POTTERY TREFOIL OINOCHOE The body with panels of concentric rectangles in brown slip, the neck with wavy lines, and the edges of the vase heightened with brown slip. Ca. 625-575 BC. H. 9 1/8 in. (23.4 cm.) Choice. Ex collection of Dr. V. Z., Switzerland acquired between 1950 and 1965. Exhibited: Archaeological Collection, University of Zurich, 1986-2001.

117 ETRUSCAN BUCCHERO CHALICE of typical form, with a frieze of five seated felines in a relief around the bowl; a zigzag meander and bands around the lip. 6th Century BC. H. 5 3/4 in. (14.6 cm.); Diam. 5 1/2 in. (14 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in Freiburg, Germany, in January 1984.

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118 VILLANOVAN BLACK GLAZED STAMNOS, the lid surmounted by two conjoined rams; of dome-form divided into quarters by raised ridges. The body biconical with a stem and spreading foot. Two loop handles attached to the waist. Ca. 8th Century BC H. 8 1/4 in. (21 cm.) Ex French collection; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at the Drouot, Paris, September 2008. 119 VILLANOVAN BLACK IMPASTO WARE CHALICE The body incised with Phoenician palmettes, the bowl base with radiating grooves; with four handles in the form of stylized dogs; on a spool foot. Early 7th Century BC. Diam. 6 1/2 in. (16.5 cm.) Ex collection of M. Studer, Lugano; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired from H. Cahn, Basel, June 1998. The palmettes are influenced by styles popular in Capena, most notably Veii, but much more refined in this example.

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120 ETRUSCAN RED-FIGURE STAMNOS BY THE VOLTERRA CAERETAN PAINTER A seated Artemis (the Etruscan Artumes) in biga drawn by stags, a hare in front. Reverse: A female holding a large basket. Caere, ca. 350-325 BC. H. 13 5/8 in. (35 cm.) Ex Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1991. Cf. M. Del Chiaro, Etruscan RedFigured Vase Painting at Caere, Berkeley, 1974, 29-33. An unusually fine work by this artist. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. VI, part 2, 1991, no. 78.

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121 ROMAN GREEN LEAD-GLAZED CHALICE with three rows of applied pine cone scales; Twin ribbed handles; interior glazed honey-brown. Ca. 50 BC/AD. H. 4 1/16 in. (10.3 cm.) A choice example. Ex French private collection, from Tunisia, 1960s, J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at Christie’s New York in June 2004. 122 EARLY ROMAN GREEN GLAZED POTTERY SKYPHOS with two ring handles surmounted by a molded thumbpiece, the body has relief decorations in the form of pine cone scales and covered with a silvery iridescence; ochre glazed interior. 1st Century AD. H. 3 1/2 in. (9cm.); Diam. 3 7/8 in. (10 cm.); W. 6 3/8 in. (16 cm.) Ex van Driesum collection, France. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVII, 2006, no. 124. 123 ROMAN MINIATURE GRAY TERRACOTTA BARBOTINE CUP of cylindrical form with flaring lip and a small rounded handle, body decorated with inscription LEOIEM. 2nd-3rd century AD. H. 1 1/2 in. (3.8 cm.) Very rare. Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in Freiburg, Germany, in March 1997. Traces of incrustation on the interior. 124 ROMAN MINIATURE GRAY TERRACOTTA BARBOTINE SKYPHOS with inscription AQVILO VACINISCE VA. 2nd-3rd century AD. H. 1 1/2 in. (4 cm.) Very rare. Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in Freiburg, Germany, in March 1997.

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Ancient Jewelry 125 ROMAN GOLD FINGER RING WITH CARNELIAN INTAGLIO OF ASKLEPIOS, god of healing, wearing a himation, holding a patera, and leaning upon a staff with snakes. 2nd-3rd Century AD. Size 5; circumference 47 mm.; wt. 3 gr. Ex K.G. collection acquired in Germany in the 1990s.

126 ROMAN GOLD FINGER RING WITH BANDED AGATE INTAGLIO: HEAD OF SERAPIS, in profile , wearing a modius 2nd-3rd Century AD. Size 7 1/2; circumference 55 mm.; wt. 5.25 grs. Ex A. G. collection, acquired in the 1990s.

127 ROMAN GOLD FINGER RING WITH BANDED AGATE INTAGLIO OF A EWE between branches. 2nd-3rd Century AD. Size 7 1/2; circumference 55mm.; wt. 8.55 grs. Ex A. G. collection, acquired in the 1990s.

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128 ROMAN SILVER FINGER RING IN THE FORM OF A COILED SNAKE Details of the snake’s head are gilded. 2nd-3rd Century AD. Size 13; circumference: 68 mm. Ex A.T. collection, Munich, acquired in 1985.

129 ROMAN SILVER FINGER RING WITH A BUST OF KYBELE, THE GREAT MOTHER, wearing a kalathos on her head, within a circular beaded frame, flanked by lions’ heads. 2nd-3rd Century AD. Size 7; circumference: 52 mm.. Ex A.T. collection, Munich, acquired in 1985. 130 LATE ROMAN GOLD FINGER RING WITH GREEN, RED, AND BLUE GLASS RINGSTONES Open gold work with swirls. 4th-5th Century AD. Size 5; circumference: 43 mm.; wt. 7.71 grs. Ex A.G. collection, acquired in the 1990s. 131 EARLY CHRISTIAN OPENWORK GOLD FINGER RING WITH FOUR CROSSES in a rectangular projection from one side of the band of ivy leaves. 4th-5th Century AD. Size 5 1/2; circumference: 49 mm.; wt. 4.3 grs. Ex M.P. collection acquired in Germany in the 1990s. Cf. A. Yeroulanou, Diatrita, 1999, p. 261, no. 340.

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132 EARLY CHRISTIAN GOLD FINGER RING WITH BANDED AGATE CARVED WITH A CHI-RHO 4th-5th Century AD. Size 6 1/2; circumference: 51mm; wt. 4.40 grs Ex I.I. collection, Somerset, England, since 1995.

133 BYZANTINE GOLD RING WITH JERUSALEM CROSS IN NIELLO inlaid into the discus; granulation where the discus joins the shank. Ca. 11th-12th Century AD. Size 10; circumference: 60 mm.; wt. 4 gr. Ex B.R. collection ca. the 1990s. The design originates with the coat of arms worn by Godfrey of Bouillon during the First Crusade, and it remained in use as the arms of the King of Jerusalem throughout their duration (1099– 1291). 134 PAIR OF LATE ROMAN OR EARLY BYZANTINE GOLD EAR RINGS On a finely beaded circular wire, an inverted volute of twisted wire above an openwork disk, above a ring to suspend a jewel. 5th-6th Century AD. Diam. 1 1/8 in. (2.9 cm.) Ex J.R. collection, Portugal, acquired in Spain in the 1980s, previously from the Munich art market in the early 1970s. 135 BYZANTINE SILVER GILT EARRINGS On a twisted hanger centering a polyhedron with pyramidal elements as well as two smaller balls which are decorated with globules and twisted wires. 9th-10th Century AD. Diam. 1 5/8 in. (4.3 cm.) Ex A.T. collection, Munich, acquired in 1985.

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136 BYZANTINE LARGE BRONZE PENDANT CRUCIFORM ENKOLPION Incised with Maria orans, crosses, and PANAGIA above her head. Rev: John the Baptist in a richly decorated garment, with OAGIOH OANIC incised above. Green-brown patina. 10th-12th Century AD. H. 4 3/4 in. (12 cm.) Ex M. P. Collection., Germany, since 1990s.

Byzantine Art

137 BYZANTINE LARGE BRONZE PENDANT CRUCIFORM ENKOLPION On the front St. Nikolaus, arms raised in blessing, with the inscription: O AGHOC N/HKOLAC; at the back St. John, arms raised in blessing, with the inscription HOANHC. 10th-12th Century AD. H. 3 3/4 in. (9.5 cm.) Ex M. P. Collection., Germany, since the 1990s. 138 BYZANTINE BRONZE LAMP WITH A REFLECTOR OF A CROSS within an open-work ivy leaf The oil cover in the form of a bull’s head. A rare type. Green patina. 6th-7th Century AD. L. 6 1/2 in. (16.1 cm.); H. 5 3/4 in. (14.8 cm.) Ex M.O. collection, Germany, acquired from a Bavarian dealer in 2000. 139 BYZANTINE GRAY-PAINTED TERRACOTTA CHALICE crisply carved with a festooned rim and around the body geometric motifs within circles, leaf-crosses, etc., in the Kerbschnitt technique. Ca. 8th Century AD. H. 4 1/2 in. (11.4 cm.) Ex French collection; C.H. collection, Ann Arbor, Michigan, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1992. Rare.

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Ancient Varia 140 PAIR OF EUROPEAN MIDDLE BRONZE AGE BRONZE SPIRAL ARM GUARDS with spiral termini and finely incised decoration. Fine green patina. Late 2nd Millennium BC. Ls. 15 1/4 in. (38 cm.) Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXI, 2010, no.83. 141 PAIR OF CENTRAL EUROPEAN BRONZE AGE BRONZE SPIRAL ARMLETS with nine windings, and ending in spirals bent inward, ritualistically. Ca. 1200-1000 BC. Ls. 5 1/4 in. (13.5 cm.) & 5 1/2 in. (14 cm.) Ex German collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXI, 2010, no.84. 142 HELLENISTIC MARBLE AMPHORISKOS WITH A BRONZE CHAIN, with a long cylindrical neck ending in a rolled lip, bulbous body with two loop handles rising at an acute angle, and a small torus foot. 3rd-1st Century BC. H. 3 3/4 in. (9.7 cm.) Ex private South German collection; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in Munich in December 2005.

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143 EGYPTIAN LARGE OLD KINGDOM

Egyptian Stone Sculptures & Reliefs

POLYCHROME LIMESTONE RELIEF showing four bronzed males wearing white kilts processing to the right, balancing on their shoulders and extended left hand trays with offerings of vases, provisions, and a small calf; extensive red, black, green, and yellow pigment remaining. Magnificent! Saqqara, Vth-VIth Dynasty, ca. 2498-2181 BC. H. 16 1/2 in. (42 cm.); w. 29 1/2 in. (75 cm.); depth 2 5/8 in. ( 6 cm.)

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Ex old French collection; M.B. collection, Woodland Hills, California, acquired from Royal-Athena in 2002; K.O collection, New York, acquired from Royal-Athena in 2012. For a related relief probably from the same tomb and also from an old French collection, see Art of the Ancient World, vol. IX, 1997, no. 153; also see: Frederick Stafford, Odyssey of an Art Collector, 1966, no. 66, p. 41, for another related relief probably from the same tomb. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XIII,

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2002, no. 144.


144 EGYPTIAN OLD KINGDOM LIMESTONE RELIEF DEPICTING A HALF-FIGURE OF A MALE wearing a short wig composed of twenty tiers of tight curls. He is bare to the waist and both arms are raised; broken and repaired at the brow line and shoulder line. Vth-VIth Dynasty, ca. 2498-2181 BC. H. 10 1/2 in. (26.7 cm.) Ex American private collection, acquired from Mathias Komor, New York, in the 1960s. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XX, 2009, no. 168. 145 EGYPTIAN OLD KINGDOM LIMESTONE BREWER depicted tilted forward over her vat and wearing a long dress and typical wig of the period with a stripe in the middle, letting her hair appear as small wisps on the front of the forehead. Vth-VIth Dynasty, ca. 2498-2181 BC. H. 6 7/8 in. (17 cm.) Ex old French collection. Cf. Cyril Aldred, Le Temps des pyramides: de la preĚ histoire aux Hyksos, Paris, Gallimard, 1978, p. 201, no. 198. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XX, 2009, no. 169.

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146 EGYPTIAN NEW KINGDOM LIMESTONE BUST OF AN OFFICIAL wearing a short braided wig and a short beard. The reverse has an inscribed back pillar, of which only the top remains, carved with two lines of hieroglyphic text: 'Two arms under...' and '...whom the sacred barque has passed.' XVIIIth-XXIst Dynasty, 1550-1070 BC. H. 5½ in. (14 cm.) Ex Swiss private collection, acquired from Charles Ratton, Paris, in 1959. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XX, 2009, no. 175. 147 EGYPTIAN NEW KINGDOM ALABASTER USHABTI OF THE PRINCE MONTOU-HERKHEPESHEF ("Montu is above his powerful arm"), son of Ramesses IX, mummiform, holding hoes, and wearing an usekh necklace in red. Faintly painted with columns front and back with hieroglyphic text from Chapter VI of the Book of the Dead; details in black. XXth Dynasty, reign of Merenptah-Siptah, ca. 1194-1188 BC. H. 7 1/2 in. (19 cm.) Ex collection of G.F. Burgh, The Hague, The Netherlands, 1984. This example is very similar to those of the series made for Merneptah-Siptah, both stylistically and for the distribution of texts. His beautifully painted tomb, KV19, was discovered by Belzoni in 1817. It was originally intended for another prince, SetherKhepeshef. The tomb of this latter prince has never been found, nor has the mummy of Prince Montouher-Khepeshef.

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Egyptian Bronze Sculptures 148 EGYPTIAN BRONZE OSIRIS mummiform, holding the crook and the flail, and wearing the Atef-crown; eyes inlaid with silver. Late Period, 712-30 BC. H. 7 in. (17.8 cm.) Ex Lequeu collection, acquired in Egypt at the beginning of the 20th century. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXIII, 2012, no. 184. 149 EGYPTIAN BRONZE ENTHRONED OSIRIS IAH Mummiform, wearing tripartite wig with uraeus, he is surmounted by a crescent moon and sun disk. He holds the crook and flail crossed over his chest. XXVIth Dynasty, 664-525 BC. H. 4 in. (10 cm.) Ex French collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXIII, 2012, no. 184. 150 EGYPTIAN BRONZE NEFERTUM, GOD OF PERFUMES, striding, wearing a tripartite wig surmounted by a blue lotus with menat supports and two incised feathers. He wears the shendjit-kilt. In his right hand he holds the khepech-scepter. Late Dynastic Period, 664-343 BC. H. 6 1/2 in. (16.5 cm.) Ex American collection, acquired in 1980. 151 EGYPTIAN BRONZE BES, the grotesque dwarf with lion-like features and a feathered crown, who evolved into a protector of the household in the Roman pantheon. Roman Period, 1st-3rd Century AD. H. 3 in. (7.5 cm.) Ex D.M. collection, London, England, acquired in 1980s.

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152 EGYPTIAN BRONZE STANDARD FINIAL OF HORUS depicted as a falcon wearing the Double Crown and standing on a papyrus column fronted by a column of hieroglyphic text. Late Dynastic Period, 712-343 BC. H. 7 1/4 in. (18.5 cm.) Ex French collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXIII, 2012, no. 191. 153 EGYPTIAN BRONZE CAT INSCRIBED FOR HOR-IRY. She is the embodiment of the goddess of joy, Bastet, seated in the traditional pose on an integrally cast hm-shaped integral plinth with hieroglyphic invocation to Osiris written twice. Late Dynastic, 664-343 BC. H. 4 in. (10 cm.) Ex Belgian collection, acquired in the 1980s. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXIII, 2012, no. 195. 154 EGYPTIAN BRONZE BASTET, the cat-headed goddess of joy and patroness of women, wearing a close fitting, long sheath and holding aegis, fragmentary sistrum, and a basket; on integral plinth. Late Dynastic Period, 712-343 BC. H. 4 5/8 in. (11.8 cm.) Ex Francois Antonovich, Paris, 1984; M.A. collection, Harrison, New York, 1984-2014.

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Egyptian Wood Sculptures

155 PAIR OF EGYPTIAN OLD KINGDOM POLYCHROME WOOD FEMALE SERVANT FIGURES The standing figures lean forward, preparing to strain mash for beer or prepare dough, wearing knee-length white skirts, bodies painted in yellow ochre, facial detail and hair in black. VIth Dynasty, ca. 2345-2181 BC. Hs. 8 3/4 in. (22.2 cm.) Ex collection of Edouard Louis Joseph, Baron Empain (18521929), France. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXIII, 2012, no. 191. 156 EGYPTIAN WOOD NUDE CONCUBINE OR SERVANT standing with her feet together on an integral plinth, her right arm lowered, her left bent with the hand below the breasts, wearing a short wig of echeloned curls that frame her face and cover her ears. XXVth Dynasty, 712-664 BC. H. 8 1/4 in. (20.9 cm.) Ex Luigi Vassalli collection (1818-1887); Horace L. Mayer collection; gifted to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, in 1957. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXIII, 2012, no. 191. 157 EGYPTIAN UPPER SECTION OF AN ANTHROPOMORPHIC WOOD COFFIN LID The face is framed by a voluminous tripartite wig. The eyes and eyebrows once inlaid with bronze and stone, traces of which are preserved. Late Dynastic Period, 664-342 BC. H. 37 3/8 in. (95 cm.) Ex Belgian collection. Cf. S. Ikram and A. Dodson, The Mummy in Ancient Egypt, London, 1998, pp. 236-241. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient 88 World, vol. XXII, 2011, no. 181.


Egyptian Stone Vessels 158 EGYPTIAN EARLY DYNASTIC PEGMATITIC DIORITE BOWL The tapering body on a small flat base, with inward-curving rim with rounded shoulders. Ist-IIIrd Dynasty, ca. 3000-2600 BC. Diam. 4 1/2 in. (11.4 cm.) H. 2 1/4 in. (5.7 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired from Nicholas Wright, London, in September 1982. 159 EGYPTIAN EARLY DYNASTIC BLACK AND WHITE GRANODIORITE BOWL The tapering body on a small flat base, with slightly rounded lip. Ist-IIIrd Dynasty, ca. 3000-2600 BC. Diam. 4 5/8 in. (11.7 cm.) H. 2 1/8 in. (5.4 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in May 1983 from Rabi Gallery, London; label no. 289 on base. 160 EGYPTIAN EARLY DYNASTIC BRECCIA BEAKER with round lip, the body tapering slightly to a flat base with rounded edges. Ist-IIIrd Dynasty, ca. 3000-2600 BC. H. 3 1/8 in. (7.7 cm.) Ex old Belgian collection; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in the early 1980s. 161 EGYPTIAN OLD KINGDOM FOSSILIFEROUS STONE COSMETIC JAR with two lug handles. IVth-VIth Dynasty, ca. 2613-2160 BC. H. 3 in. (7.6 cm) Ex collection of Chester T. Tripp, Chicago; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in a Chicago auction in 1988.

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Egyptian Varia 162 EGYPTIAN TERRACOTTA HARPOKRATES RIDING A DROMEDARY CAMEL Seated sideways in Amazon style and wrapped in a himation. He wears a fillet around his brow and holds his finger to his mouth. Alexandria, 1st Century BC/AD. H. 5 1/8 in. (13 cm.) A very rare type. Ex English collection; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at Christie’s London, December 1993. 163 EGYPTIAN TURQUOISE FAIENCE USHABTI OF A WNR-PRIEST, OUAHIBRE-EM-HEB, high priest of Letopolis, born of Knabes, holding hoes and seed bag. The body is incised with nine lines of hieroglyphic text from Chapter VI of the Book of the Dead. Late Period, 525-30 BC. H. 6 7/8 in. (17.5 cm.) Ex old collection, Lyon, France; Parisian private collection. 164 EGYPTIAN TURQUOISE FAIENCE AMULET: HARPOKRATES, nude, wearing sidelock. Late Period Dynastic 715-343 BC. H. 1 7/8 in. (4.8 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired from Richard Gill, London, in November 1993.

165 EGYPTIAN GLASSY TURQUOISE FAIENCE BES standing with hands on hips, leonine features, and four-plume headdress. Choice. Early Ptolemaic Period, ca. 300 BC. H. 2 1/8 in (5.4 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired on the London art market in the early 1980s.

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Near Eastern Antiquities 166 ANATOLIAN MARBLE VIOLIN IDOL OF THE KUSURA TYPE with incised ‘V-collar’. Bronze Age II, ca. 2700-2400 BC. H. 4 1/4 in. (11 cm.) Ex private French collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVII, 2006 no. 218. 167 CANAANITE BLACK BASALT HEAD OF A GOD, the oval face with once inlaid eyes. He wears a conical tiara edged with three rows of bulls’ horns certifying his high rank in the divine pantheon. Rare. Ca. 1600 BC. H. 6 in. (15 cm.) Ex collection of Moncure Deardorf (1883-1968), Santa Barbara, California; Maurice Bonnefoy (1920-1999), New York, acquired in the 1960s. Cf. E. Gubel, Les Phéniciens et le monde méditerranéen, Brussels, 1986, p. 87; H. Spycket, The Sculpture of the Ancient Near East, Leiden, 1981, p. 266, pl. 181. 168 CANAANITE BRONZE JOINED COUPLE, the male figurine with raised arms and protruding genital is taller and holds a flat, s-curved weapon, resembling a sickle-sword; the female figurine on the right. 3rd-2nd Millennium BC. H. 3 in. (7.8 cm.) Ex M.H. collection, United States. since 1990. Cf. H. Seeden, The Standing Armed Figurines in the Levant (PBF I,1), Munich, 1980, p. 15 ff. pl. 10. 169 SOUTH ARABIAN BRONZE APPLIQUE: WINGED SPHINX with cold-worked details, walking on a ground line to the left, his right front paw raised. Ca. 2nd-1st Century BC. H. 3 3/8 in. (8.5 cm.) Ex French collection; J.M.E, collection, New York, acquired at the Drouot, Paris, May 2011.

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170 WESTERN ASIATIC EGYPTIANIZING BRONZE DISK A bearded adorant wearing a long hairdo stands on the ground and raises his hands in worship towards a large six-pointed star, a winged solar disc, a crescent moon, and the Pleiades (believed to be the home of Osiris); probably from a mirror. Most probably unique. Ca. 7th Century BC. Diam. 3 3/4 in. (9.7 cm.) Ex French collection. It has been suggested by Dr. Andis Kaulins that it represents the Archilochus’ Eclipse of 6 April 647 BC. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XX, 2009, no. 206. 171 PARTHIAN BRONZE PRIESTESS WEARING AN ATTRIBUTE HEADPIECE, chiton, and necklace. She stands upon an integrally cast tripodal platform. 2nd Century AD. H. 11 1/8 in. (28.5 cm.) A rare type, apparently unpublished, most probably of eastern Mediterranean origin. Ex French collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XX, 2009, no. 57. 172 SCYTHO-SARMATIAN LARGE OPENWORK BRONZE HORSE TRAPPING. Shield shaped with three registers of animals, the lowest with two pairs of rearing horses confronted against a central pole standard. East of Colchis, 3rd-2nd Century BC. H. 7 1/8 in. (18.1 cm.); W. 6 3/8 in. (16.3 cm.) Ex French collection. Cf. V. Nauka, Archéologie de l’Union Soviétique, 1992, p. 10, no 13. Similar bronzes were found in the Caucasus, west of the Caspian Sea in Dagestan (See Agayev, Belt Buckles from Dagestan, Soviet Archeology.) Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXI, 2010, no. 240.

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173 EURASIAN GOLD BELT ORNAMENTS, each of shaped rectangular outline, with entwined motifs ending in a pair of confronting griffins heads. The Steppes, 4th Century BC. Total weight 6 grams W. 1 7/8 & 1 15/16 in. (4.7 cm. & 4.9 cm.); Ex private French collection. For identical examples in bronze, see E. Bunker, Nomadic Art of the Eastern Eurasian Steppes, 2002, p. 97, no. 63. 174 ORDOS BRONZE OPEN WORK BELT APPLIQUE: WILD CAT ATTACKING A DOE, lying on its back trying to fend off the feline; suspension loop on its back. 6th-4th Century BC. L. 4 1/8 (10.5 cm.) H. 2 1/8 in. (5.5 cm.) Ex Rabi Gallery, London, in 1980. Cf. T. Demirjian, Treasures of the Eurasian Steppes - Animal Art from 800 BC to 200 AD. Exhibition catalog, New York, 1998, p. 110, no. 114. 175 WESTERN ASIATIC RED-VEINED MARBLE CHALICE The tall cylindrical stem splaying at the base, the spool-shaped bowl slightly concave, with an annular lip. Late 3rd-2nd Millennium BC. H. 9 1/4 in. (23.5 cm.) Acquired on the London market in 1995. 176 WESTERN ASIATIC BRONZE AND GOLD MIRROR, Set with six gold figures of running ibexes with back-curving horns, their forelegs outstretched. On a modern wooden papyrus-style handle. Ca. 2nd-1st Millennium BC. Diam. 4 1â „2 in (11.5 cm.) Ex Australian private collection, 1940s to 1970s; thence by descent. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XX, 2009, no. 207.

We are now issuing an online newsletter every month or two with a selection of our latest acquisitions to supplement this catalog and our website. If you are not receiving it please send a request with your email address to mail@royalathena.com


his objects of art, rather than depositing them in a vault or holding receipts. Also, art is not as volatile as stocks and bonds, the coin, gem, and collectibles markets, and especially the gold and silver markets. Sylvia Porter in her New Money Book recommends classical antiquities as one of the best types of art for rapid growth. Dr Eisenberg was first quoted on the investment value of ancient art in the February 9, 1966 issue of Newsday - 50 years ago! - and most recently in Business Week.

Why Collect Ancient Art? There are several reasons for collecting fine works of ancient art: • The excitement of owning a beautiful work of art that has survived for perhaps some 2,000 years or more. • The decoration of one's home or office with unique objects whose beauty and desirability have withstood the test of time. • The creative satisfaction, enjoyment, and pride in forming a truly fine collection. • The probable appreciation in value.

Royal-Athena Galleries

How to Collect Ancient Art Sylvia Porter lists ten sound rules as a guide in art collecting: 1. Study the field which interests you as much as possible. 2. Buy cautiously at first. 3. Make sure that your work of art has quality. 4. Deal with a top gallery or art dealer. “Some dealers and major galleries will guarantee the authenticity of the art works they sell, so check this point as well." (Not only have we been guaranteeing our ancient art for over fifty years, but to the best of our knowledge our two-day auction sale conducted by Parke-Bernet Galleries (now Sotheby's) in 1964 was the first auction sale by several years in which every piece was guaranteed - but by us!) 5. Have an understanding with your dealer or gallery about trading up - so he’ll repurchase or resell your works as you have more money to invest in high quality art. (We normally allow full credit for the exchange or upgrading of objects purchased from us.) 6. Do not buy art works just because they are a current rage. 7. Ask the advice of museum directors or curators whenever possible. 8. Decide upon your investing limit before you buy. If you fall in love with a more expensive object try to arrange for a time payment. (We certainly encourage this and offer flexible time payments!) 9. Spread your financial risks by buying a variety of art unless you are an expert in a particular field. 10. “Buy the best examples you can afford in any category.” We would add two other important rules: 11. Ask for the provenance of any potential acquisitions. 12. Do not buy objects that have been significantly restored. Beware of overly restored faces in both vase painting and sculpture.

Ancient Art as an lnvestment Historically, ancient art investments have yielded excellent long-term capital appreciation, usually 8% to 10% annually. Any investment in tangibles, especially works of art, should be projected for at least five to ten vears. Normally one should not hold more than 10% of their investment portfolio in art. Collecting fine art is a pleasurable way of hedging against inflation because the investor can enjoy

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Jerome M. Eisenberg, Ph.D., the founder and director of Royal-Athena Galleries, is usually at the New York gallery and visits the London gallery several times each year. He is available by appointment for consultation, expertise, and appraisals; or for a telephone conference. At no obligation he will arrange a private viewing with guidance on a sophisticated long term program of collecting and investing in the fine arts. He also is in attendance at all the fairs in which we exhibit. Over the past 60 years we have sold more than 800 works of ancient art to many of the country's leading museums, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, the Sackler Art Museum at Harvard University, the Yale University Art Gallery, the Princeton University Art Museum, the Newark Museum, the Walters Art Gallery, the Detroit lnstitute of Arts, the Cincinnati Art Museum, the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, the Milwaukee Public Museum, the New Orleans Museum of Art, the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the J. Paul Getty Museum. In addition to the British Museum and the Louvre, we have sold ancient works of art to the Benaki Museum (Athens), the Egyptian Museum (Barcelona), the Musée du Cinquantenaire (Brussels), the Museum of Fine Arts (Budapest), the Römisch-Germanisches Museum (Cologne), the Rijksmuseum van Oudheden (Leiden), the Museo Archeológico Nacional (Madrid), the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, the Royal Ontario Museum (Toronto), the Papyrus Museum (Vienna), and a number of other museums in Australia, Belgium, Chile, France, Germany, Japan, and Switzerland. The new Mougins Museum of Classical Art in Mougins, France, has acquired nearly 200 antiquities from us. The catalogs of classical marble sculptures from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and from the J. Paul Getty Museum illustrate no less than 39 pieces acquired from our galleries. In addition, over one thousand objects purchased from us have been donated to many other museums, including the Freer Gallery of Art, the Sackler Gallery (The Smithsonian Institution), and the Brooklyn Museum of Art. Dr. Eisenberg travels overseas several times annually to visit collectors, museums, clients, and many of the nearly 150 private sources, agents, dealers, and auction houses with whom he is in frequent contact. Since 1954 he has made over 260 overseas


trips, purchasing over forty thousand antiquities for many tens of millions of dollars. This aggressive purchasing policy, perhaps without parallel in the field, enables us to offer an extraordinary number of choice objects at very reasonable prices. Our willingness to buy in volume and to purchase our inventory outright, rather than to take it on consignment, results in extremely competitive pricing, often considerably below that of other galleries. Furthermore, exchanges and purchases are frequently made from many past and present clients who may be upgrading their collections or liquidating some of their holdings in order to collect in other areas. Exchanges or purchases are sometimes carried out with museums both in the United States and in Europe for their duplicate accessions or for objects not in their recent or current fields of specialization.

Expertise and Ethics Ancient art has been the specialty of our director for over 60 years, and numismatics for 75 years. His many publications on ancient art and numismatics span over six decades. He published his first antiquities catalog, A Catalog of Egyptian Antiquities, in 1959. The first volume of Art of the Ancient World by Dr. Eisenberg was published in 1965. Since 1968 Dr. Eisenberg has concentrated on expertise in the ancient arts, having lectured on this subject at New York University and presented several scholarly papers at the annual meetings of the Archaeological Institute of America, most recently on the ‘Roman’ Rubens Vase. His wide range of expertise is further revealed through other recent papers: on Egyptian bronzes at a Congress of the International Association of Egyptologists, on Etruscan bronze forgeries at an International Bronze Congress, on the ‘Greek’ Boston and Ludovisi thrones at the Magna Graecia Symposium in Venice, on Roman bronze forgeries at the 1999 International Bronze Congress, and on the Portland Vase as a Renaissance work of art at the 2003 International Congress of Classical Archaeology. He chaired a conference in London on the Phaistos Disk in 2008. In 1996 he was a Visiting Professor at the Institute of Classical Archaeology of the University of Leipzig, Germany. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Numismatic Society in 1952; a member of the Archaeological Institute of America in 1960 (and a Life Member in 1988); a Patron of the American Numismatic Society in 1955 (and a Life Associate in 1998); a Fellow for Life of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1966; and most recently, a Benefactor of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and an Honorary Fellow of the Egyptian Museum in Barcelona, Spain. Dr. Eisenberg has appeared as an Expert in the Courts of several states and has conducted appraisals for the U.S. Internal Revenue Service, the U.S. Treasury Department, the U.S. Customs Service, the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the J. Paul Getty Museum, as well as many other prominent institutions. He was elected a Qualified Appraiser by the

Appraisers Association of America in 1964 and has participated in several episodes of the Antiques Road Show. He served on the vetting committee of the European Fine Art Fair at Maastricht from 1993 to 2001 and was the Chairman and co-organizer of the New York Antiquarian International Fine Art Fair held in November 2001. Dr. Eisenberg has been a leader for many years in the promotion of the ethical acquisition of antiquities by museums and collectors and has delivered papers on this subject at the Archaeology Section of the U.K. Institute for Conservation in 1993 and at the 1998 International Congress of Classical Archaeologists. He gave an address by invitation on the international trade in antiquities at the UNIDROIT Convention in Rome in 1993. He organized two symposia in New York in 1994 on public policy and the movement of antiquities and in 1998 on the acquisition of antiquities by museums for the International Association of Dealers in Ancient Art, of which he is a founding member and was a member of the executive board from 1993 to 2002. In 1999 he presented testimony to the United States Cultural Properties Committee on the legal and illegal trade in ancient art in Italy. In 2003 he was a featured speaker and panel participant in the U.S. Government Conference on Stolen Mideast Antiquities in Washington, D.C. Also in 2003 he featured on the European TV channel Arte and on BBC Radio’s File on Four in indepth interviews on the antiquities trade. He appeared on television on CBS News, Dateline NBC, PBS Jim Lehrer News Hour, and CBC Television (Canada), and was interviewed on the BBC and PBR Radio, and in print in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Boston Globe, Philadelphia Inquirer, Washington Post, The Times, and a dozen other publications. In 2004 he was featured on a Discovery Channel program and on Fox News on the antiquities trade. Also in 2004 he presented a paper on ‘The Mesopotamian Antiquities Trade and the Looting of the Iraq Museum’ to the American Bar Association. In 2005 he was interviewed on the antiquities market and the collecting of antiquities on National Public Radio in the US and in 2006 on National Public Television in Athens, Greece. In 2007 he delivered a paper on ‘Perspectives on the Antiquities Trade and the Collector: Past, Present, and Future’ at the symposium ‘The Future of the Global Past’ at Yale University. He was interviewed in depth for his expertise on Greek television in 2008 and on Artfinding in 2009. In June 2012 Dr. Eisenberg was awarded the title of officiale in the Order of the Star of Italy by the President of the Republic of Italy for having provided a meaningful contribution to the prestige of Italy in his many publications on Etruscan and Roman art.

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Ancient Coins We carry a fine stock of select Greek silver and bronze coins from $100, Roman silver and bronze coins from $75, and Byzantine coins. We began our business as ‘Royal Coin Company’ in January 1942, 75 years ago, and Dr Eisenberg, co-founder of the firm, has specialized in ancient coins, as sole proprietor, since 1952.

Acknowledgements Dr. Eisenberg wishes to express his gratitude to F. Williamson Price who has again diligently prepared and co-authored the catalog, to Ramon Perez who did nearly all of the photography, to the scholars who attributed and reattributed some of the sculptures and vases, especially Kees Neeft and the late Konrad Schauenburg, and to the several others who prefer to remain anonymous.

Wanted to Purchase: Fine Antiquities of All Periods We are prepared to travel world-wide to acquire select works of legally acquired ancient art for our continually expanding clientele. We will purchase collections of any size, act as your agent to sell your objects on commission, or exchange them for other select pieces from our extensive inventory. Send photographs and full details with your letter or e-mail.

International Association of Dealers in Ancient Art

Confederation Internationale des Negociants en Oeuvres d’Art

Art and Antique Dealers League

In the Mougins Museum of Classical Art, opened in 2011, in the French Riviera, a few kilometers away from Cannes, among the four floors of works of Classical and Egyptian art there are nearly 200 antiquities acquired from Royal-Athena including many marble statues and heads, bronze helmets, and other ancient treasures. They have an excellent website and a superb catalog has been issued. See www.mouginsmusee.com.

MINERVA Minerva, the bi-monthly, international review of ancient art, archaeology, and numismatics, published in England, was established by Dr Eisenberg, its publisher and editor-in-chief from 1990 to 2009. It features the most extensive and timely coverage by any magazine of worldwide excavations, auctions and exhibitions emphasizing Greece, Etruria, the Roman Empire, Egypt, and the Near East. The book reviews are concise and objective. It also includes the most extensive annotated listings of international museum exhibitions, meetings, and symposia in ancient art and archaeology. Sample copies: $11 or £8 postpaid. editorial@minervamagazine.com www.minervamagazine.com Subscription (6 issues per year):

U.S.A., Canada, and rest of world:

U.K.: 1 year £30 Europe: 1 year £33

Surface: 1 year £38

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Recent Royal-Athena Catalogs: • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XV, 2004) illustrates in full color 190 objects. (72 pages, $10) • Gods & Mortals: Bronzes of the Ancient World (2004, illustrates in full color 80 objects, 80 pages, $10) • Ancient Arms, Armor, and Images of Warfare (2004, illustrates in full color 100 objects, 48 pages, $10) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XVI, 2005, illustrates in full color 192 objects, 80 pages, $10) • Mythologies of the Classical World & Ancient Egypt (2006, 48 pages, $10) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XVII, 2006, illustrates in full color 233 objects, 96 pages, $10) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XVIII, 2007, illustrates in full color 259 objects, 96 pages, $10) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XIX, 2008, illustrates in full color 222 objects, 96 pages, $10) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XX, 2009, illustrates in full color 217 objects, 96 pages, $10) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XXI, 2010, illustrates in full color 252 objects, 96 pages, $10) • 1000 Years of Ancient Greek Vases-II, 2010, illustrates in full color 195 vases, 96 pages, $10) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XXII, 2011, illustrates in full color 207 objects, 96 pages, $10) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XXIII, 2012, illustrates in full color 251 objects, 96 pages, $10) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XXIV, 2013, illustrates in full color 246 objects, 96 pages, $10) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XXV, 2014, illustrates in full color 220 objects, 96 pages, $10) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XXVI, 2015, illustrates in full color 272 objects, 96 pages, $10) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XXVII, 2016, illustrates in full color 219 objects, 96 pages, $10) • All 17 of the above catalogs (total list price $170), with price lists of the most recent catalogs: $100. (Add $75 for overseas airmail.)

Other Royal-Athena Catalogs Available • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. IV, 1985) illustrates in full color over 600 works of art. 208 pages, 192 color plates: $30 • Gods & Mortals: Bronzes of the Ancient World (1989) illustrates in full color 180 objects. (52 pages, $10) • One Thousand Years of Ancient Greek Vases from Greece, Etruria, & Southern Italy (1990) illustrates in full color 186 vases. (48 pages, $10)

• Art of the Ancient World (Vol. VIII, 1995) illustrates in full color 244 objects. (48 pages, $10) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. IX, 1997) illustrates in full color 264 objects. (64 pages, $10) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. X, 1999) illustrates in full color 264 objects. (64 pages, $10) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XI, 2000) illustrates in full color 167 objects. (64 pages, $10) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XII, 2001) illustrates in full color 410 objects; 30 pages of glossaries and mythologies. (161 pages, $20) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XIII, 2002) illustrates in full color 203 objects. (80 pages, $10) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XIV, 2003) illustrates in full color 225 objects. (80 pages, $10) • All 10 of the above catalogs, 1985 through 2003 (total list price $130), only $100. (Add $75 for overseas airmail.) Orders for our catalogs may be charged to your credit card.

Trade lnquiries We cordially invite inquiries from fellow art dealers, art consultants, architects, interior designers, and institutional collectors and investors.

Special Presentations, Condition Reports, and Color Photographs of Objects We can supply special presentations with further information, such as condition reports, and 4 x 6 in. (10x15 cm.) or 8 x 10 in. (20x25 cm.) color photographs, often with other views or close-ups, on any of the objects illustrated in this catalog upon request.

Conservation and Mounting Services A professional conservator working on our premises in New York does expert conservation and restoration of ancient art and antiques.

Terms and Conditions of Sale All items are offered subject to prior sale. All prices are subject to change without notice, otherwise, the current price list is valid through 2017. The following credit cards are honored: American Express,Visa, Mastercard. A deferred payment plan is also available. New York residents must add the appropriate sales taxes (currently 8 7/8%). No cash refunds may be made after 10 days of receipt; however, full credit is allowed on all objects purchased from our galleries with the exception of a few consigned items. All shipping and insurance charges will be billed to the purchaser. Title remains with Royal-Athena Galleries until payment is made in full.

royal-athena galleries established 1942 F. Williamson Price, Associate Director Jerome M. Eisenberg, Ph.D., Director New York Richard M. Novakovich Betty W. Eisenberg Suzanne George

Associate Director & Manager Comptroller Office Manager

Alan J. Eisenberg Andrew England Ramon Perez

Associate Director Gallery Associate Photographer

London (Seaby Antiquities) Anthony Law

Administrator

Peter Clayton

Consultant


royal-athena galleries new york

london


Royal-Athena Galleries, Art of the Ancient World 2017 - Vol. XXVIII