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Art of the Ancient World Greek, Etruscan, Roman, Byzantine, Eg yptian, & Near Eastern Antiquities

Celebrating our 74th Anniversary

royal-athena galleries

Volume XXVII - 2016

new york

london


No. 94 - Art of the Ancient World - Vol. XXVII - January 2016 We are pleased to issue this catalog celebrating our 74th anniversary of dealing in classical numismatics and our 62nd year of dealing in ancient art. It illustrates in full color 219 selected antiquities priced from $1,250 to over $800,000. This publication is one of a continuing series primarily illustrating new acquisitions featured in our New York galleries, where over two thousand fine works of art are on permanent display. All of the antiquities in this catalog are displayed at our New York gallery, the largest and most extensive collection of the ancient arts ever exhibited for sale. In addition to the many masterworks of ancient art, there is a wide variety of fine items on display priced from $100 to $1,000 and up, including Greek and Roman coins and Old Master prints and drawings, perfect for the beginning collector or for that very special gift. A few of the pieces illustrated may not be available since they were sold while the catalog was in preparation, but a number of other newly acquired objects will be on display in our New York gallery and on our website: www.royalathena.com, updated weekly.

Late Hellenistic Pentelic marble statue of Aphrodite 1st Century BC. H. as mounted 48 in. (122 cm.)

We unconditionally guarantee the authenticity of every work of art sold by Royal-Athena Galleries.

Attic black-figure pelike by the Plousios Painter Ca. 520-510 BC. H. 14 1/2 in. (36.2 cm.)

©2015 Jerome M. Eisenberg, Inc. Composed and printed in the United States of America.

Every object purchased by our galleries has been legally acquired. If imported by us into the United States, we have done so in compliance with all federal regulations and have given full consideration to all international treaties governing objects of cultural importance. Antiquities priced at $5,000 or more are now checked and registered with the Art Loss Registry in London. All of our objects are clearly labeled with complete descriptions and prices. Condition reports on all the objects are available upon request. We encourage browsing and are happy to assist and advise both the amateur and the serious collector. We urge our prospective clients to ‘shop around’, for we are proud of our quality, expertise, and competitive pricing. Appointments may be arranged outside of regular gallery hours for clients desiring privacy. Updated price lists for our catalogs are available upon request. For terms and conditions of sale see the inside back cover. COVER PHOTO: no. 1

BACK COVER: no. 90

(Detail) Text and catalog design by Jerome M. Eisenberg, Ph.D., and F. Williamson Price Photography by Ramon Perez

We will be exhibiting at BAAF Basel, The Basel Ancient Art Fair, Basel, Switzerland, November 13-18, 2015 TEFAF, The European Fine Arts Fair, Maastricht, The Netherlands, March 11-20, 2016 BAAF Basel, The Basel Ancient Art Fair, Basel, Switzerland, November 11-16, 2016 (Check our website to confirm the dates)

royal-athena galleries established 1942 153 East 57th Street New York, NY 10022 Tel.: (212) 355-2034 Fax.: (212) 688-0412 ancientart@aol.com Monday-Saturday, 10 - 6

Jerome M. Eisenberg, Ph.D. Director

VISIT OUR WEBSITE, updated weekly with our latest acquisitions:

www.royalathena.com

Royal-Athena at Seaby 20 Bloomsbury Street London WC1B 3QA UK By appointment Tel.: (44) 780-225-8000 Fax.: (44) 18-8334-4772


Art of the Ancient World Greek, Etruscan, Roman, Byzantine, Eg yptian, Near Eastern, & Prehistoric Antiquities

Volume XXVII - 2016 Table of Contents CLASSICAL ART Greek Marble Sculptures Roman Marble Sculptures Greek Bronze Sculptures Etruscan Bronze Sculptures Roman Bronze Sculptures, Ancient Mythological Bronzes Ancient Bronze Helmets & Weapons Greek Terracottas Etruscan & Roman Terracottas Early Greek Vases Attic Black-figure Vases Attic White Ground Vases Attic Red-figure Vases South Italian Vases Etruscan & Roman Vases Ancient Glass Ancient Jewelry

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3 7 24 26 28 33 36 38 43 45 49 51 53 57 68 71 73

ANCIENT VARIA BYZANTINE ART

75 78

EGYPTIAN ART Egyptian Stone Sculptures and Reliefs Egyptian Bronze Sculptures Egyptian Stone Vessels Egyptian Ushabtis Egyptian Faience Amulets

80 83 85 89 90

NEAR EASTERN ART

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COLLECTING ANCIENT ART 94 ROYAL-ATHENA GALLERIES 94 95 Expertise and Ethics Royal-Athena Galleries Catalogs Inside back cover

Photo above: no. 47 Roman bronze seated sphinx. 2nd-3rd Century AD. H. 2 5/8 in. (6.7 cm.)


Introduction As we enter our 62nd year of dealing in ancient art and our 74th year in Classical numismatics, we are delighted to present in our 94th publication another outstanding selection of antiquities assembled primarily from old collections in the United States and Europe. A large number of these objects were originally purchased from us over the past several decades and we are pleased to offer them again to a new generation of enthusiasts. We are proud to present a group of world-class antiquities from the private collection of a recently retired doctor in North Carolina, all acquired from us since 1999. This includes the superb Late Hellenistic Pentelic marble statue of Aphrodite (no. 1), the important Roman bi-colored marble statue of a kore (no. 16), and eighteen other fine works of ancient art. The catalog features further selections from the collection of the Director (the J.M.E. collection) acquired over the past thirty years such as mythological Etruscan and Roman bronzes, small Greek and South Italian vases, Egyptian stone vessels, and Egyptian faience amulets. A good representation of additional pieces from the J.M.E. collection may be found on our website. Further antiquities from the J.M.E. collection will be added regularly to our website and monthly Newsletter over the coming year. We have devoted over six decades to selling carefully attributed works of art with particular attention to their provenance. This diligence has resulted in an astonishingly low percentage of claims against legal ownership – less than 0.0006% or one out of every 2000 objects! In view of the increasing legislation being passed in several countries to restrict the trade in illegally exported antiquities, we may assure our clients that we continue to proudly conduct a very ethical business and take all of the proper steps to insure that our inventory is free of any possible claims. It is with great pride and delight that we celebrate our 74th year! Jerome M. Eisenberg, Ph. D.

Detail of no. 75: Etruscan terracotta cinerarium. Chuisi, mid-2nd Century BC.

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Greek Marble Sculptures 1 LATE HELLENISTIC PENTELIC MARBLE STATUE OF APHRODITE This superb near life-size goddess of love is nude except for a drapery which has fallen below her hips and which she clasps with her thighs. 1st Century BC. H. 44 in. (111 cm.); H. as mounted 48 in. (122 cm.) Ex Nicholas Chrissoveloni collection, England, acquired by Alex Wengraf at Christie’s, London, June 18, 1962, lot 116; Christie’s, London, April 21,1999, lot 182; private collection, Greensboro, North Carolina, acquired from Royal-Athema in 1999.

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2 LATE HELLENISTIC MARBLE PORTRAIT HEAD OF ALEXANDER THE GREAT, the youthful face surrounded by masses of thick curls, the hair in the manner associated with Alexander. Ca. 1st Century BC. H. 6 1/2 in (16.5 cm.) Ex Simon collection, England, acquired in 1983. Cf. Au royaume d'Alexandre le Grand. La MacĂŠdoine antique, catalog of the exposition, Paris, 2011, pp. 260-261, no. 149.

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3 HELLENISTIC MARBLE FEMALE HEAD, probably of a goddess or queen, her head turned to her right, her softly curving neck with Venus rings, her wavy hair centrally-parted with a diadem around her head. 3rd-2nd Century BC. H. 4 7/16 in. (11.3 cm.) Ex Israeli private collection, 1970s.

4 HELLENISTIC MARBLE HEAD OF A GODDESS with hair centrally parted and tied in a chignon, wearing a stephane. 2nd-1st Century BC. H. 2 1/4 in. (5.7cm.) Ex French private collection, acquired in the 1970s.

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Roman Marble Sculptures 5 ROMAN MARBLE STATUE OF THE SLEEPING EROS The god of erotic love lies in a naturalistic pose, his right arm across his body and his left hand by his face; his right leg lies across his left calf and his wings are beneath. 2nd-3rd Century AD. L. 27 1/8 in. (69 cm.) Ex D.C. collection, Paris, acquired before 1970. Cf. C. C. Vermeule, Greek and Roman Sculpture in America, Los Angeles, 1981, p. 186.

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6 ROMAN MARBLE MONUMENTAL HEAD OF MARS (ARES), GOD OF WAR of the so-called Borghese type and based upon a 5th century BC original by Alcamenes. The helmet is decorated in low relief with rampant, winged griffins. 1st-2nd Century AD. H. 16 in. (40.6 cm.) Ex Sir Francis Sacheverell Darwin, Sydnope Hall, Two Dales, Matlock, Derbyshire, acquired in the 19th century; G.T., art market, London, 2/08; J. Z. collection, Rumson, New Jersey, acquired from Royal-Athena in 2008.

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7 ROMAN MARBLE HEAD OF ASKLEPIOS, god of medicine and health, depicted with typical serene expression. 1st- 2nd Century AD. H. 9 3/8 in. (24 cm.) Ex Brussels and Paris art markets. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVI, 2005, no. 14. 8 ROMAN ROSSO ANTICO MARBLE ARCHAISTIC HEAD OF HERMES (MERCURY) bearded, his brow crowned with two tiers of tight curls. 1st 1/2 of the 2nd Century AD. H. 5 7/8 in. (15 cm.) Ex Tollmann collection, Cologne; private collection, Greensboro, North Carolina, acquired from Royal-Athena in February 2005.

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9 ROMAN MARBLE LIFE-SIZE PORTRAIT BUST OF A PATRICIAN YOUTH, possibly Drusus Minor, son of the emperor Tiberius, or a contemporary, with fine features and a pronounced forehead. Ca. 35-40 AD. H. 14 3/4 in. (37.5 cm.) An exceptional portrait said to have been found in the waters off Spain. Acquired in London, October 1990. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World , vol. VI, 2, 1991, no. 17.

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10 IMPORTANT ROMAN MARBLE HEAD OF THE EMPEROR CARACALLA, AD 211-217, somewhat idealized into a depiction of Mars wearing a Greek style helmet. Ca. 215 AD. H. 11 in. (28 cm.) Ex English collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVI, 2005, no. 15, His reign was notable for: the Constitutio Antoniniana, granting Roman citizenship to freemen throughout the Roman Empire in order to increase taxation; debasing the silver content in Roman coinage by 25% in order to pay the legions; the construction of a large thermae complex outside Rome, the remains of which, known as the Baths of Caracalla, are still imposing.

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11 ROMAN MARBLE HEAD OF A BEARDED MALE with calm expression, his locks well delineated with a running drill; traces of original pigment. Mid-2nd Century AD. H. 12 1/4 in. (31 cm.) Found near Lyon, France, 1945. Ex southern French private collection acquired in 1945; private collection, Greensboro, North Carolina, acquired from Royal-Athena in March 2004. 12 ROMAN MARBLE HEAD OF A YOUNG MAN Late 2nd-early 3rd Century AD. H. 9 7/8 in. (25 cm.) Ex Bezier collection, Paris, acquired in 1970; Paris art market, May 2008. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XX, 2009, no. 23. 13 ROMAN LIMESTONE HEAD OF A PAGE with bow-shaped lips, straight nose, and almond-shaped eyes beneath grooved eyebrows, his long hair arranged in rows of voluted curls and surmounted by a Phrygian cap with beaded decoration. Palmyra, 3rd Century AD. H. 10 1/4 in. (26.1 cm) Ex private collection, Nice, France, acquired in the 1930's. Cf. a similar head in G. Ploug, The Palmyrene Sculptures in the Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, 1995, p. 243, no. 113.

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14 ROMAN MARBLE HEAD OF A BEARDED MALE with short locks of hair across his furrowed brow, and a short beard running from ear to ear behind his chin. Later 1st Century AD. H. 11 1/2 in. (29.2 cm.) Ex Sir Sacheverell Darwin, Sydnope Hall, Derbyshire, acquired ca. 1828; private collection, Greensboro, North Carolina, acquired from Royal-Athena in October 2002. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XII, 2001, no. 23. 15 ROMAN MARBLE HERM BUST OF APOLLO with an unusual hair style centering three rows of snail curls flanked by waves pulled to the back and falling to his shoulders. 1st-2nd Century AD H. 7 1/4 in. (18.5 cm.) Ex French collection. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXI, 2010, no. 13

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16 IMPORTANT ROMAN MARBLE STATUE OF A KORE Carved of pavonacetto (red, purple, and white brecciated marble) in archaizing style. She stands rigidly upright, dressed in a peplos draped symmetrically over her body, her hands holding the sides of the garment at her hips. Her head is carved from giallo antico (a yellowish marble) and her wavy hair, crowned with a diadem, is parted in the center falling in two curls on either side of her oval face. Her eyes were once inlaid. The pavonacetto, rarely used for sculpture, is from a quarry in Dokimeion, Phrygia; the giallo antico comes from North Africa, either in Numidia or Libya. 1st Century AD. H. 27 1/2 in. (69 cm.) Ex collection of W. Kemp, ca. 1721; George Kemp, Baron Rochdale (1866-1945), thence by descent to John Durival Kemp, 1st Viscount Rochdale, Langholm, England (1906-1993); private collection, Greensboro, North Carolina, acquired from Royal-Athena in July 1999. Cf. E. Equini Schneider, Catalogo di Sculture Romane del Museo Nazionale, “G. A. Sanna, di Sassari e del commune di Porto Torres�, 1979, p. 25, no. 10. This is a work not only of exceptional rarity, but also one of exquisite beauty, having been created to serve in a luxurious private home as a trapezophoros, a support for an elaborate table composed of a variety of different colored marbles. To our knowledge, only two other examples of this type have survived, both headless and now in the collections of the Museo Nazionale of Italy. This is the only example in private hands. 16


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17 ROMAN MARBLE OVER LIFE-SIZE VEILED HEAD OF FAUSTINA II, circa AD 130-175, wife of emperor Marcus Aurelius. The features, carefully detailed eyes, drilled pupils, and hairstyle find their nearest parallel in the portraits of Faustina II. Ca. AD 161-180. H. 13 in. (33 cm.); W. 12 1/2 in. (31.8 cm.) Ex old Spanish collection, acquired by D. Cahn in March 2008 from Felix e Hijo, Seville. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXI, 2010, no. 29. Parts of the veil were restored in the 18th or 19th century. It has also been suggested that this is a portrait of Manlia Scantilla, as Augusta, wife of Didius Julianus and briefly empress, March-June of AD 193. Her portraits are so rare as to make definitive identification almost impossible.

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18 ROMAN LIFE-SIZE MARBLE BUST OF TRANQUILLINA, WIFE OF GORDIAN III, AD 239-244, her hair dressed in the recognized style and wearing a stola. She was the daughter of the newly appointed chief Praetorian prefect, Timesitheus, and, as father in law of the emperor, he quickly became the de facto ruler of the Roman empire. Ca. AD 241-245. H. 20 1/2 in. (52 cm.) Old French collection, Montpellier, acquired in the 1980s from G. Cohen, Paris; Sotheby’s London, July 8,1991, lot 402; Paris art market, December 2008. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXI, 2010, no. 30. Cf. V. Poulsen, Les portraits romains, Copenhagen, 1974, vol. II, cat. 754, no. 169; M Weger, Gordianus bis Carinus, Berlin, 1979, pl. 21, a-c.

Visit our website, updated weekly, to view more of the nearly 100 marble sculptures in our current inventory as well as our latest acquisitions. www.royalathena.com

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19 ROMAN MARBLE HEAD OF APHRODITE, her head lightly tilted to the right, her long hair gathered into a chignon at the back and crowned with a diadem. 2nd Century AD. H. 7 5/8 in. (19.5 cm.) Ex French collection. 20 ROMAN MARBLE HEAD OF A YOUNG WOMAN or goddess. her hair parted in the middle and bound with a fillet. 1st Century AD. H. 2 3/4 in. (6.9 cm.) Ex French collection. 21 ROMAN MARBLE HEAD OF A PATRICIAN DAUGHTER OF THE ANTONINE PERIOD, sensitively carved with an elaborate court coiffure of braids and curls in the highest style. Her ears are pierced to receive earrings and a hole in the center of her hair at the front probably also served to anchor a jewel. Ca. AD 120-140. H. 11 in. (27.9 cm.) Ex Michael Hall collection, New York, acquired before 1959 from an estate in Bel Air, California; private collection, Greensboro, North Carolina, acquired from Royal-Athena in April 2009. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXI, 2010, no. 23.

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22 ROMAN MARBLE CINERARIUM, carved with a garland of flowers and fruits that drapes from the rams horns at upper corners; below, theater masks. Two birds stand atop the garland, underneath the inscription panel: DIS MANIBVS CLAVDIAE TRYPHANAE VIX ANNIS XXXXV M ANTIONIVS PRISCVS CONIVGI BENE MERENTI FECIT 1st-2nd Century AD. H. 7 3/4 in. (19.7 cm.); W. 13 1/4 in. (33.7 cm.); D. 9 in. (22.9 cm.) Ex collection of J. Riley, New York. 23 ROMAN MARBLE CINERARIUM COVER, the corners carved with palmettes, the central triangular pediment with a relief of Eros riding a hippocamp. 1st-2nd Century AD. H. 5 7/8 in (15 cm); W. 12 1/2 in. (32 cm) D. 11 7/8 in.) ( 30 cm.) Ex French collection 24 ROMAN LIMESTONE COLUMNAR ALTAR WITH MITHRAIC BUCRANEUM, flanked by rosettes and a spiral; on a stepped base with bracket feet. Ca. 2nd-3rd Century AD. H. 33 3/4 in. (85.7 cm.) Ex collection of Baron v.d. E., Belgium, acquired in the 1950s - 60s; American private collection, acquired from Royal-Athena in August 2003.

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25 ROMAN MONUMENTAL MARBLE RIGHT FOREARM probably from a statue of a deity or emperor. The fingers are partially open; cylindrical bridges between the thumb and forefinger. Very fine style. 1st-2nd Century AD. L. 20 1/2 in. (52 cm.) English private collection, acquired in the 1980s; W.B. collection, Dallas, Texas, acquired from Royal-Athena. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXIII, 2012, no. 27.

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Greek Bronze Sculptures 26 GREEK BRONZE NUDE VICTORIOUS ATHLETE standing in a relaxed pose, his muscular torso well defined, and wearing a diadem. Based upon the statue of Agias attributed to Lysippos, 337-332 BC. Ca. 330-300 BC. H. 5 1⁄4 in. (13.3 cm.) Ex H. Cahn, Basel; Royal-Athena Galleries, 1990; John Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia. Published: J. Eisenberg, Gods & Mortals, 1989, no. 4. This is a superb work, influenced by Lysippos, as evidenced by the contemporary copies of his Daochos monument of Delphi. Cf. F. Jognson, Lysippos, Durham, North Carolina, 1927, pp. 117-133, pl. 20. For a similar example in the Royal Mariemont Museum in Morlanwelz-Mariemont, Belgium, see no. 4.11.4, p. 86, in P. Moreno, et al, Lysippo, L'arte e la Fortuna. 27 GREEK BRONZE HERAKLES HOLDING THE HORN OF ACHELOÖS, a club in his left hand, a lionskin over his left arm. Southern Italy, 4th-3rd Century BC. H. 4 3/4 in. (12 cm.) Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. VIII, 1995, no. 28. Herakles loved Deianira, the daughter of King Aeneus. The river god Acheloös wanted her as well. They wrestled for her, the god changing himself into a bull which Herakles defeated and tore out one of his horns. Nymphs came forward filling it with fruits and this he gave to his bride: the cornucopia. Acquired in Basel, 24 March 1987.


28 LATE HELLENISTIC BRONZE HEAD AND UPPER TORSO OF A YOUTH crowning himself with a wreath of victory with his raised right hand, after the late 5th Century BC statue of Kyniskos by Polykleitos. This type is sometimes referred to as the Westmacott Youth after the verion in the British Museum. Eyes once inlaid; chest restored. 1st Century BC/AD. H. 13 3/4 in. (35 cm.) Ex private collection, Paris, acquired in the 1950s; Piasa, Paris, 10/1-2/2003, lot 370. Published: J. Eisenberg, Gods & Mortals II, 2004, no. 37. 29 LATE HELLENISTIC BRONZE NUDE ZEUS (JUPITER) standing in a relaxed pose, his right arm bent and held out before him with the palm open, his eyes inlaid in silver. 1st Century BC/AD. H. 5 1/8 in. (13 cm.) Ex John Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1988-90. Published: J. Eisenberg, Gods & Mortals, 1989, no. 36.

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Etruscan Bronze S cul ptu res

30 ETRUSCAN BRONZE SKYLLA ABOUT TO THROW A ROCK. The fish-tailed marine monster of Homer’s Odyssey preparing to throw a rock. Very rare. Ca. 4th century BC. H. 2 1/8 in. (5.4 cm.) Ex Royal-Athena Galleries, 1966; Albert L. Hartog collection; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at Christie’s, New York, December 1996. Exhibited: Morris Museum, Morristown, New Jersey,“The Etruscans: Legacy of a Lost Civilization,” 1993. Published: Art of the Ancient World, vol. I, 1966, no. 20. 31 ETRUSCAN BRONZE VESSEL FOOT IN THE FORM OF A SIREN in full relief, with a woman's head, breasts, and two long hair braids, the body terminating in a single cloven hoof. Two wings on the back with engraved feathers. Ca. 600 BC. H. 3 3/4 in. (9.7 cm.) Ex German collection; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in Munich in October 2008. 32 ETRUSCAN BRONZE APPLIQUÉ PLAQUE OF A GORGON, winged, running, details incised; waves on base. Ca. 5th Century BC. H. 1 3/4 in. (4.5 cm.) Ex collection of Pierre and Claude Vérité, Paris, acquired between 1930 and 1960; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at Christie’s Paris, December 2011.

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33 UMBRIAN BRONZE VOTIVE WARRIOR STRIDING, nude, left leg advancing, his right hand raised about to hurl his spear. Ca. 400 BC. H. 4 3/16 in. (10.5 cm.) From a private collection close to Paris, acquired in the 1970s. Cf: The Picener exhibition catalogue, Frankfurt, 2000, cat. 365, no. 234. Highly abstract in style, with an excellent shining green patina. A shield was once attached on the left hand. 34 ETRUSCAN BRONZE CISTA FOOT: THE NUDE WINGED SUN GOD, USIL, with soft pointed shoes with wings, skimming over the crests of waves; all above a lion’s paw foot. Rare and choice. Early 5th Century BC. H. 3 3/4 in. (9.1 cm.) Ex James Loeb collection, Munich; Albert Hartog collection, NY, from Royal-Athena in the 1960s; J.M.E. collection, NY, acquired at Bonham’s, London, September 1998. Exhibited: ‘Etruscans, Legacy of a Lost Civilization,” Morris Museum, NJ, 1993. Very rare. His knees are bent in the position known as Knielauf - an archaic way of representing rapid movement. Cf. a similar figure in the Getty Museum (96.AC.127), Handbook, p. 132. A comparable figure on an antefix from Temple B at Pyrgi has been plausibly identified as Usil.

See p p . 34-35 fo r R oman mytho lo gical b ro nzes .

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Roman Bronze Sculptures 35 ROMAN BRONZE NUDE ZEUS ( JUPITER), a chlamys draped around his shoulders, left arm raised (was holding a sceptre) and thunderbolt in right hand. Green patina. 2nd-3rd Century AD. H. 4 1/4 in. (11 cm.) Ex German collection. 36 ROMAN BRONZE HERMES (MERCURY) wearing a winged petasus, a chlamys on his shoulder, and holding a money purse. Hermes was not only the messenger of the gods but also the god of business and commerce. 2nd Century AD. H. 3 in. (7.6 cm.) Ex J. F. collection, Loveland, Ohio, acq. from Royal-Athena in 1986. Exhibited: Ohio State University 1986-90; Picker Art Gallery, Colgate University 1990-07. 37 ROMAN BRONZE APPLIQUE OF DIONYSOS RECLINING ON A PANTHER SKIN Nude, his left arm is languidly bent to support his head. 1st-2nd Century AD. L. 8 5/8 in. (22 cm.) Ex Leo Mildenberg collection; R.G. collection, Calodyne, Mauritius, acquired 1977-85.

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38 ROMAN BRONZE NUDE HERMES (MERCURY), standing in contrapposto, a cloak over his left shoulder; holding a money bag in his right hand and a kerykeon (caduceus) in his left, now lost. Fine style. Earlier 2nd Century AD. H. 4 3/16 in. (10.7 cm.) Ex German collection acquired in the 1960s. Dark green patina.

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39 ROMAN BRONZE BALSAMARIUM IN THE FORM OF AN AFRICAN LANTERNARIUS or lantern-bearer, seated in a pensive attitude on a high molded base with his right hand on his knee and his left hand against his chin; his garment draped around his lower body, a lantern by his left foot; a fragmentary loop on each shoulder for attachment of the missing handle. Ca. 2nd Century AD. H. 4 5/16 in. (10 cm.) Ex Susette Khayat, New York; collection of Dr. Robert Waelder (1900-1967); C.H. collection, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Exhibited: Yale University Art Museum, 2007-2015. Lanternarius balsamaria with African features are scarce; for an example in the Bibliothèque Nationale see E. Babelon and A. Blanchet, Catalogue des bronzes antiques de la bibliothèque nationale, Paris, 1895, p. 442, no. 1014. 40 ROMAN BRONZE APPLIQUE: DEEP BUST OF HERAKLES wearing a lionskin. 2nd-3rd Century AD. H. 6 7/8 in. (17.5 cm.) Ex German collection, acquired prior to 2008. 41 ROMAN BRONZE APPLIQUE BUST OF SOL INVICTUS, depicting the youthful sun god wearing a six-rayed crown atop his voluminous curls and a cloak buckled on his right shoulder. 2nd-3rd Century AD. H. 4 7/8 in. (12.4 cm.) Ex Christies, New York, September 12, 1999; private collection, New Jersey.

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42 ROMAN BRONZE INFANT HERAKLES KILLING A SNAKE Son of Zeus and Alkmene, the name Herakles means "gift of Hera." However, this angered Hera as she was not his mother, so she sent snakes into his crib but he strangled them, one in each hand, before they could strike him. 2nd Century AD. H. 4 1/8 in. (10.5 cm.) Ex European private collection acquired in the 1970s. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXI, 2010, no. 60. 43 ROMAN BRONZE HERAKLES, THE SO-CALLED FARNESE HERCULES The nude hero is depicted in middle age. Originally, he leaned on his club covered with the skin of a lion, now missing. He holds in his right hand the apples of the Hesperides. 1st-2nd Century AD. H. 6 7/8 in. (17.5 cm.) Ex old French collection, acquired from Galerie Serres, Paris. Superb style!

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44 PAIR OF ROMAN BRONZE VOTIVE HANDS Both right and left in a relaxed pose. 2nd-3rd Century AD. Ls. 6 in. (15.2 cm.) With a Munich art dealer in the 1990s. Green patina. 45 ROMAN BRONZE VOTIVE PLAQUE OF HEPHAISTOS (VULCAN), GOD OF THE FORGE, standing nude within an aedicula, or shrine, with arched pediment supported by columns. In his right hand he holds a hammer about to strike and anvil atop an altar; in his left a pair of tongs. Rare. 2nd-3rd Century AD. H. 5 1/2 in. (14 cm.) Ex P.P. collection, California, acquired prior to 2008.

Our stock of ancient bronzes numbers over 300 museum quality examples. For an overview consult our recent catalogues, visit our New York gallery, or go to:

www.royalathena.com 32


Roman Mythological Bro nzes 46 ROMAN BRONZE WINGED SIREN with fine female head, fully developed bust, and bird-shaped lower body. 1st-2nd Century AD. H. 3 in. (7.7 cm.) Found in Dorset, England. Fine green patina. A rare subject in superb style. Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at Christie’s London in July 1991. 47 ROMAN BRONZE SEATED SPHINX The leonine, human-headed, full-breasted, sickle-winged creature seated upon her haunches, her forelegs extended; on an integral base. 2nd-3rd Century AD. H. 2 5/8 in. (6.7 cm.) Superb style! Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at Christie’s New York in December 2000. Exhibited: Sphinx: The Guardians of Egypt, Brussels, October 19, 2006-February 25, 2007.

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48 ROMAN BRONZE GROUP OF A NEREID RIDING A KETOS The semi-nude nymph is seated on the back of the goat-headed sea monster, her cape billowing above her head; on an integrally cast rectangular base. Probably a furniture attachment. A rare type. 3rd-4th century AD. H. 3 1/4 in.(8.3 cm.); L. 4 in. (10.2 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in Ascona, October, 1996. Cf. LIMC 4, nos. 153 a-c and a similar attachment with a figure of Oceanus in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston: C. Vermeule & M. Comstock, Sculpture in Stone and Bronze, 1988, no. 71. 49 ROMAN BRONZE HERAKLES BATTLING THE LERNEAN HYDRA A rare subject in bronze. Ca. 1st Century AD. H. 4 in. (10.2 cm.) Ex French collection; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at the Drouot, Paris, June 2005. Exhibited: ‘Monsters, Demons, and Winged Beasts: Composite Creatures of the Ancient World’, Carlos Museum of Art, Emory University, Atlanta, February 5-June 19, 2011. The hero’s second labor was to slay this serpent with nine heads, one of which was indestructible. He accomplished this by bashing off the heads with his club as seen here. His companion Iolus would then burn with a torch the neck sinews prohibiting the hydra from regrowing the last head. The immortal head he lopped off and buried by the road. His left leg and tail of the hydra lacking.

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50 ROMAN BRONZE THREE-HEADED CERBERUS, THE GUARDIAN OF HADES, as a lion advancing, his jaws agape, two canine heads emerging from the unruly mane, two long serpents entwined around his legs, draping over the canines. 2nd Century BC. . 2 11/16 in. (6.8 cm) Superb! Ex collection of Natacha Rambova (1897-1966); Professor Donald P. Hansen (1932-2007), New York; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at Sotheby’s New York in December 2007. Exhibited: ‘Monsters, Demons, and Winged Beasts: Composite Creatures of the Ancient World’, Carlos Museum of Art, Emory University, Atlanta, February 5-June 19, 2011. 51 ROMAN BRONZE APPLIQUE OF A HIPPOCAMP A lively depiction of the mythical sea horse. Ca. 2nd Century AD. L. 3 5/8 in. (9.2 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired from A. Weber, Cologne, in April 1993. 52 LATE HELLENISTIC BRONZE SEATED GRIFFIN Fine style. 2nd-1st Century BC. H. 2 1/2 in. (6.6 cm.) Ex French collection; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at the Drouot, Paris, December 2007.

See p p . 26-27 fo r Etr u scan mytho lo gical b ro nzes

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An c ie n t B r o n ze H e l me t s & W e apo ns 53 ILLYRIAN BRONZE HELMET OF TYPE II The edges with a band of decorative rivets; two strengthening ridges run front to back over the calotte; with long integrally worked cheekpieces. Late 7th-mid-6th Century BC. Max. H. ca. 10 1/2 in. (26.6 cm.) Ex Helios Ancient Art, London, 1992; British private collection. 54 HELLENISTIC BRONZE HELMET OF THE PILOS TYPE with a broad offset concave brim. Slight deformation at the helmet point, with one soldered attachment loop on the inside for the chinstraps. 4th-3rd Century BC. H. 9 in. (23 cm.) Ex collection (AG 519/H 172) of Axel Guttmann (1944-2001), Berlin, acquired in Krefeld in 1991. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXI, 2010, no. 100.

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55 ROMAN BRONZE LEGIONARY HELMET OF THE MONTEFORTINO/BUGGENUM TYPE with hemispheric calotte topped by a mushroom-shaped knob, a narrow brow brim and a wide brim at the back. Cf. U. Schaaf, Antike Helme, Mainz, 1988, p. 325. Derived from Etruscan models, this served as the primary helmet of the late Republic. 1st Century BC. H. ca. 7 1/4 in. (18.5 cm.) Ex German private collection acquired in the 1980s. 56 EUROPEAN BRONZE AGE BRONZE SCHALENKNAUF-TYPE SWORD, heavily ridged, leaf shaped blade with finely incised geometric ornamentation on both sides. The point slightly shortened. Riveted grip cast in one piece with a large bowl-shaped pommel. Ca. 1500-1200 BC. L. 26 3/4 in. (68 cm.) Ex private collection, Vienna, 1980s. 57 CENTRAL EUROPEAN BRONZE AGE BRONZE SWORD Two-edged blade with a bulging middle rib. A flat punched hilt-tongue with beveled edges; at the crossing are six punched holes with three preserved connection rivets. Ca 1000 BC. L. 19 5/8 in. (50 cm.) Ex German collection. Cf. P. Schauer, ‘Die Schwerter in Süddeutschland, Österreich und der Schweiz I,’ PBF IV 2, 1971, pl. 90f. no. 592.

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Greek Ter racottas 58 ARCHAIC BOEOTIAN TERRACOTTA FEMALE with bird-like face, flat body on a splaying base, with short arms, wearing a flaring polos with large projecting volute; dark brown painted details. Ca. 580-550 BC. H. 6 3/8 in. (16.4 cm.) Ex private scholarly collection, Munich; H. R. collection since the mid-1980s. 59 GREEK TERRACOTTA HEAD OF A GOD, probably Apollo, his centrally parted hair held with a band. Ca. 470-460 BC. H. 3 1/8 in. (8.1 cm.) Ex German collection. 60 GREEK TERRACOTTA HEAD OF A GOD wearing a rolled fillet and diadem with a large palmette. Tarentum, 4th Century BC. H. 4 1/2 in. (11.5 cm.) Cf. R. A.Higgins, Terracottas in the British Museum, Oxford, 1970, p.180, no. 1314. 61 GREEK TERRACOTTA HALF-FIGURE OF DIONYSOS as a banqueteer. The god of wine bearded, wearing a large fillet, and nude to the waist. Tarentum, ca. 420 BC. H. 8 5/8 in. (22 cm.) Ex Belgian private collection.

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62 HELLENISTIC POLYCHROME TERRACOTTA KLINE GROUP A young couple, he singing at right, his right hand raised, his left holding a cup, and she seated playing a lyre (now lost). With them on this remarkable, ornately decorated couch (kline) are two winged erotes, one holding a wine jug, the other at left disrobing the young lady, holding up her himation. Extensive original paint remaining. Superb! Myrina, ca. 3rd-2nd Century BC. L. 9 in. (22.8 cm.) Ex collection of Baron v. d. E., Belgium, acquired in the 1950s-60s; private collection, Greensboro, North Carolina, acquired from Royal-Athena in November 2002. Cf. S. Mollard-Besques, Catalogue Raisonné des Figurines et Reliefs en Terre-cuite Grecs et Romains, vol. II, Myrina, Museé du Louvre et Collections des Universités de France, 1963, pls. 70, 71, 153.

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63 GREEK PAINTED TERRACOTTA NUDE ACROBAT IN A BACKFLIP POSITION, wearing a Phrygian cap, balancing atop a slender column with broader, flat round top. Canosa, South Italy, 4th Century BC. H. 5 1/2 in. (14 cm.) Ex collection of Baron v. d. E., Belgium, acquired in the 1950s; private collection, Greensboro, North Carolina, acquired from Royal-Athena in September 2002. 64 HELLENISTIC TERRACOTTA FORMIDABLE LADY OF FASHION, her long stiffly rendered himation wrapped over her head and around her body; on integral circular plinth. Boeotia, 2nd Century BC H. 10 1/4 in. (26 cm.) Ex French collection. 65 HELLENISTIC TERRACOTTA LADY OF FASHION, wearing a long chiton and wrapped in a himation. She stands in a relaxed pose, her weight on her right leg and her right hand on her hip. Her head is raised and her hair in the melon coiffure. Ca. 3rd-2nd Century BC H. 8 7/8 in. (22.5 cm.) Ex French collection.

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66 HELLENISTIC POLYCHROME TERRACOTTA VOTIVE THEATRE MASK depicting a female with rows of curls and and a head piece with flowers, her eyes drilled and mouth agape; extensive red, blue, and white polychromy remaining. Very fine style. Ca. 3rd-2nd Century BC. H. 6 in. (15.2 cm.); W. 7 1/4 in. (18.4 cm.) Ex J. Haering, Freiburg; Mason Phelps collection (1987), La Jolla, California; private collection, Greensboro, North Carolina, acquired from Royal-Athena in January 2004. 67 HELLENISTIC TERRACOTTA LADY OF FASHION wearing a kekryphalos cap and wrapped in a himation; traces of white and pink slip remaining. Ca. 300-250 BC. H. 10 in. (24.5 cm.) Ex collection of Edith Holland, England, acquired between 1900-1920; private collection, Greensboro, North Carolina, acquired from Royal-Athena in December 2003. 68 HELLENISTIC TERRACOTTA LADY OF FASHION wearing a sun hat and wrapped in a himation. Late 4th-early 3rd Century BC. H. 10 5/8 in. (27 cm.) Ex collection of Baron v.d. E., Biot, Belgium, acquired in the 1950s-60s; private collection, Greensboro, North Carolina, acquired from Royal-Athena in November 2002.

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69 HELLENISTIC TERRACOTTA LARGE HEAD OF A LADY OF FASHION with melon hairstyle and a hand-modeled bun; the curly strands fall about the back of the head. 4th-3rd Century BC. H. 4 1/4 in. (11 cm.) Fine style. Ex collection of Eva Winkler, Augsburg, Germany; private German collection acquired in 1968; American private collection, acquired from Royal-Athena in February 2009. For a nearly identical example in the Louvre Museum see: S. Mollard-Besques, Catalogue Raissonne de Figurines et Reliefs en Terre-cuit Grec, vol. III, 1972, pl. 211, no. D3280. 70 HELLENISTIC POLYCHROME TERRACOTTA LADY OF FASHION standing, wrapped in a pink himation trimmed in blue. Canosa, South Italy, ca. 3rd Century BC. H. 8 5/8 in. (21.9 cm.) Ex M.P. collection, France, acquired between 1980 and 1990. 71 PAIR OF HELLENISTIC TERRACOTTA WINGED NIKES Extensive white slip remaining. Ex French collection. Wings of one reattached; on the other, the square patera and hand restored. Canosa, South Italy, ca. early 3rd Century BC. H. 6 7/8 in. (17.5 cm.)

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Etruscan & Roman Terracottas 72 ETRUSCAN POLYCHROME TERRACOTTA SATYR MASK Executed in the bold relief of the Archaic style, with a row of brow curls, pointed ears, broad moustache, thick lips, and a wide, curly spade-form beard; extensive polychromy remaining. Veii, 5th Century BC. H. 9 in. (22.9 cm.) Ex R.H. collection, New York, acquired before 2001. A related 5th Century BC temple frieze from Veii is now in the Villa Giulia Museum, Rome. 73 ETRUSCAN TERRACOTTA VOTIVE HEAD OF A YOUTH with his himation pulled over the back of his curly-haired head. This was a symbol that he was ready to meet the gods. Cerveteri, 3rd Century BC. H. 9 1/4 in. (23.5 cm.) Ex private collection, Freiburg, Switzerland; K.B. collection, Lyon, Michigan acquired from Royal-Athena in 1985. 74 ROMAN TERRACOTTA CAMPANA PLAQUE OF A SATYR, Nude but for a cloak clasped about his neck and fluttering behind his back, he kneels on his right knee, bending forward to pick figs and drop them into a basket in front of him. Ca. 1st Century AD. W. 8 5/8 in. (21.9 cm.); H. 8 in. (20.3 cm.) Ex Swiss collection, dispersed in 1995; private collection, Greensboro, North Carolina, acquired from Royal-Athena in January 2006. For a similar relief depicting two satyrs symmetrically placed either side of a grape vine, cf. J. S. Ostergaard, Catalogue: Imperial Rome, Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, Copenhagen, 1996, p. 286, no. 187.

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75 ETRUSCAN POLYCHROME TERRACOTTA CINERARIUM The base depicts the battle of Eteocles and Polynices for the throne of Thebes after the death of their father, Oedipus; the name of the owner painted above. The cover (not belonging, as is most often the case) is in the form of a female, holding a crown of flowers, and enveloped in a himation while reclining on cushions. Chuisi, mid-2nd Century BC. H. 17 1/8 in. (44 cm.); Max. L. 14 in (35.3 cm.) Ex Edward J. Smith collection, Weehawken, New Jersey, acquired from Royal-Athena Galleries in the 1960s; E.C.R. collection, Wassenaar, The Netherlands. Cf. A. Maggiani et al, Treasures from Tuscany - The Etruscan Legacy, 2004, p. 136, no. 229, for a similar cinerarium depicting Eteocles and Polynices fighting. The urn dates from a period when Etruscan culture was becoming increasingly similar to that of the Romans: the Etruscans practised the Roman custom of cremation as well as their own traditional custom of inhumation.

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Early Greek Vases 76 MYCENAEAN SINGLE-HANDLED POTTERY CUP decorated with red, wavy, vertical lines, red interior, and a red band around the flaring rim. Ca. 1350-1300 BC. H. 3 in. (7.6 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at Christie’s London, November 1997. 77 MYCENAEAN POTTERY FLASK WITH TWIN HANDLES attached at neck and shoulder of globular body. Palmettes on shoulder; body ringed. Ca. 1250-1150 BC. H. 4 1/2 in. (11.2 cm.) Ex collection of Albert F. Pagnon (1847-1909), Luxor; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at Christie’s London, December 1993. 78 MYCENAEAN THREE-HANDLED POTTERY JAR with brown cross-hatching on shoulder; below, horizontal bands. Choice. Ca. 1300 BC. H. 3 5/8 in. (9.2 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in Freiburg, Germany, September 1988. 79 MYCENAEAN POTTERY SPHERICAL STIRRUP JAR decorated with dotted circles and stripes in brown slip. Ca. 1350-1200 BC. H. 3 3/8 in. (8.7 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at Christie’s London, April 1999.

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80 GREEK GEOMETRIC POTTERY TANKARD with arching striated handle, the body with overall banding, flanking a central frieze of water fowl. Geometric IB-IIA, ca. 750-725 BC. H. 6 3/8 in. (16.2 cm.) Ex private North German collection. Published: W. Hornbostel, Kunst der Antike, Schätze aus Norddeutschen Privatbesitz, 1977, p. 241, no. 226. 81 GREEK GEOMETRIC MINIATURE POTTERY MUG with long handle and elaborate banded geometric decoration covering its surface. Ca. 750-730 BC. H. 3 1/8 in. (8 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired from C. Ede, London, November 1996. 82 GREEK GEOMETRIC POTTERY OINOCHOE with long neck, pinched lip and arching handle; intricate geometric decoration in reddish-brown paint. Ca. 8th century BC. H. 4 3/4 in. (12 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at Christie’s London in December 1996. 83 EAST GREEK POTTERY TREFOIL OINOCHOE, conical, three storks between four cross-hatched pyramids at neck. Overall banding, three rows of dots at waist. 7th Century BC. H. 4 1/8 in. (10.5 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at Sotheby’s New York in July 1992.

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84 EAST GREEK BLACK-GLAZED LYDION decorated with a black band around the body. Late 6th Century BC. H. 4 in. (10.2 cm.) Ex Hesperia Art, Philadelphia, Bulletin 15, 1961, no. 96; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at Sotheby’s New York in December 1998.

85 PROTO-CORINTHIAN POTTERY CONICAL OINOCHOE with a frieze of rams and panthers around body below collar of tongues. Rare form. Ca. 650 BC. H. 7 7/8 in. (20 cm.) Ex M.S. collection, Princeton, New Jersey; private collection, Greensboro, North Carolina, acquired from Royal-Athena in August 1999.

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86 EUBOEAN BLACK-FIGURE PLATE FEATURING A STRUTTING COCKEREL Above him, a palmette and to the right, a spiral supporting a lotus flower on a long stem. Ca. 600-550 BC. D. 5 3/4 in. (14.6 cm) Rare. Ex American private collection. 87 CORINTHIAN POTTERY FLAT BOTTOMED OINOCHOE BY THE PAINTER OF BOSTON F471 Between bands, a central frieze of animals including panthers, an ibex, a small bird, and a siren; tongues on the shoulder and rays beneath the frieze. The bottom with dipinto (painted inscription). Ca. 580 BC. H. 8 in. (20.5 cm.) Cf. D. Amyx, Corinthian Vase-painting of the Archaic Period, 1988, no. 221, pl. 91. Acquired in Basel, Switzerland, June 2000. 88 CORINTHIAN POTTERY ARYBALLOS of inverted pyriform shape with radiating tongues on lip, shoulder and point; double scale band at waist heightened in red and yellow. 6th Century BC. H. 4 in. (10.2 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired from P. Donati, Lugano, April 1993. 89 RHODIAN MOLDED POTTERY OWL ARYBALLOS The bird modeled as if resting, its head turned to its right; nozzle at mid-back. Mid-6th Century BC. L. 3 3/8 in. (8.6 cm.) Ex French collection; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in the 1980s.

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A tti c B lac k-fi gu re Vases 90 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE PELIKE BY THE PLOUSIOS PAINTER On either side, two bearded males, himations wrapped about their waists, sit playing a board game. Ca. 520-510 BC. H. 14 1/2 in. (36.2 cm.) Ex Dr. Elie Borowski collection, Basel. Published: N. Leipen, et al., Glimpses of Excellence, Royal Ontario Museum, 1985, no. 7; J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XII, 2001, no. 199. Exhibited: Yale University Art Museum, New Haven, CT, 2003-2015. The same scene, with but slight variation in detail, decorates both sides of the vase. Two bearded males, each with stick in hand and himation wrapped closely about legs and waist, sit opposite one another at a gaming table. A large skyphoid krater, with oddly shaped handles, stands at their feet; a sapling in the background betokens a setting outdoors; and a small camp-stool contrasts with a more elaborate chair at right, whose curved back terminates in a duck’s head. One player has thrown a two; he signals two with the index and middle fingers of his raised right hand. His companion bends forward to retrieve the dice and take his turn. Gaming with six-sided dice or four-sided knucklebones was a popular pastime in ancient Greece. The nonsense inscriptions are scattered about the figured panels. There is a graffito under the foot. Dietrich von Bothmer has recognized the hand of the painter of the Borowski pelike on four other vases: pelikai in the Louvre and the Vatican; and neckamphorae in Boston and Haifa (the latter two once assigned by J. D. Beazley to a ''Smithy Painter"). Bothmer has christened his artist the Plousios Painter after an invocation to Zeus for wealth inscribed on the Vatican example. Briefly described and attributed to the "Plousios Painter" by D. von Bothmer, "Les vases de Ia collection Campana”, Revue du Louvre 27 (1977), 216. For the shape, D. von Bothmer, "Attic Black Figured Pelikai," JHS 71(1951), 40-47; and further, C. M. Robertson in the Burlington Magazine 119, 1977, pp. 8182; R. M. Becker, Formen attischer Peliken von der Pionier-Guppe bis zum beginn der Frühklassik,Tübingen, 1977. For the repetition of scenes on the same vase, K. Schauenburg, “Zu Repliken in der Vasenmalerei,” AA ,1977, pp.194204. For heroes gaming, J. Boardman, "Exekias," AJA 82, 1978, pp. 18-21.

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91 ATTIC SMALL BLACK-FIGURE PHIALE with seven lively dancing satyrs and maenads. Late 6th Century BC. Diam. 4 in. (10.2 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in the New York art market, August 1984. 92 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE LEKYTHOS FROM THE COCK GROUP Two warriors between two women (probably Thetis, Achilles, Memnon, and Eos). Ca. 500 BC. H. 5 1/2 in. (14.1 cm.) Ex D.D. collection, London, ca. 1980. 93 ATTIC OR BOEOTIAN BLACKFIGURE MINIATURE HYDRIA The frontal panel depicting three nude komasts (male dancers); on shoulder, a siren with outstretched wings. Later 6th Century BC. H. 4 3/8 in. (11.1 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at Christie’s London in December 1989.

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94 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE LEKYTHOS from the Phanyllos Group. Two females draped capite velato in black walking right between two apotropaic eyes. Ca. 500 BC. H. 11 3/4 in. (30 cm.) Ex French collection. 95 ATTIC BLACK-FIGURE EYE CUP: A CENTAUR BETWEEN APOTROPAIC EYES, hoplites flanking the handles. Later 6th Century BC. W. 11 1/8 in. (28.2 cm.) Ex collection of Pierre P., Paris, acquired in 1970. 96 ATTIC WHITE-GROUND BLACKFIGURED KALPIS BY THE PAINTER OF THE HALF-PALMETTES, the panel on the body with a bearded ithyphallic satyr walking to the right and looking back, holding a thyrsos in his left hand, followed by two galloping horses from a biga, a dog below, vines in the field. Ca. 500 BC. H. 7 7/8 in. (20 cm.) Ex collection of Frank H. Sommer III (d. 2006), former head of the Winterthur Library, Winterthur, Delaware, acquired in 1968. Attributed by Winfred van de Put.

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97 ATTIC WHITE GROUND LEKYTHOS A female wearing a chiton and himation, strides right holding a casket with her left arm, a wreath dangling beneath; in her right hand she holds a mirror. Ca. 450 BC. H. 10 7/8 in. (27.6 cm.) Ex American private collection, acquired from Royal-Athena in August 1999. 98 ATTIC WHITE-GROUND LEKYTHOS Athena looking right holding helmet and spear. 5th Century BC. H. 6 1/2 in. (16.5 cm.) Choice! Ex collection of Jean Lauffenberger, Geneva; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at Sotheby’s London in December 1987. 99 ATTIC WHITE-GROUND BLACK-FIGURE LEKYTHOS decorated with two large palmettes, meander band, and dotted bands. 5th Century BC. H. 5 7/8 in. (14.8 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at Sotheby’s New York in December 1998.

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Attic Red-figure Vases

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100 ATTIC RED-FIGURE NOLAN AMPHORA BY THE HARROW PAINTER Nude satyr, a panther skin tied around his neck, strides, regardant, to right, a thyrsos (staff carried by the followers of Dionysos, god of wine and ecstasy) in his outstretched left hand, a kantharos (wine cup) in his right. Reverse: Draped youth. Ca. 480-470 BC. H. 12 1/8 in. (30.8 cm.) Ex Swiss private collection; C.H. collection, Ann Arbor, Michigan, acquired from Royal-Athena in 2002. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XI, 2000, no. 90. Exhibited: Yale University Art Museum, 2003-2015.


101 ATTIC RED-FIGURE BELL KRATER Four nude maenads and a satyr cavort around a laver in their midst, in which a nude, winged Eros alights. Reverse: Three draped youths. 4th Century BC. H. 15 3/8 in. (39 cm.), Diam. 16 in. (40.6 cm.), W. 17 in. (43.2 cm.) Ex A.D. collection, Brussels, acquired in the 1980s; Munich art market, April 2008. Published: J. Eisenberg, 1000 Years of Ancient Greek Vases II, 2010, no. 90.

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102 ATTIC RED-FIGURE COLUMN KRATER BY THE PAINTER DE SUESSULA A departure scene with three Scythian warriors in opulent Eastern costume, a horse between the two at right, a woman wearing a chiton holding an oinochoe and a phiale toward the central figure. Reverse: Three draped youths in conversation (misfired). Ca. 410-400 BC. H. 13 7/8 in. (35.3 cm.) Ex English collection acquired in the 1960s.

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103 ATTIC RED-FIGURE SKYPHOS, CIRCLE OF THE PENELOPE PAINTER A standing bearded man holds a stick in his right hand. On the opposite side a cloaked youth stands in front of a column. Ca. 450 BC. H. 6 1/4 in. (16 cm.) Published: J. Rohde, Ars Una, 2006, no. 135, ill. 184. Ex collection of the author H. P. Rohde. Published: J. Eisenberg, 1000 Years of Ancient Greek Vases II, 2010, no. 117. Exhibited: Odense Bys Museer in cooperation with Storstrøms Kunstmuseum. 104 ATTIC SMALL RED-FIGURE LEKYTHOS Palmette, meander band, and laurel leaf decoration. Ca. 450-425 BC. H. 4 5/8 in. (11.8 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired from G. Puhze, Freiburg, Germany, 1984. 105 ATTIC SESSILE KANTHAROS St. Valentin class. Feather patterns and grape ivy branches on both sides. Choice. 4th Century BC. H. 4 3/4 in. (12.1 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in Lugano, October 1988.

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106 APULIAN RED-FIGURE SITULA BY THE PATERA Sout h Italian Vases PAINTER A maenad seated upon a rocky outcrop holds a thyrsos and a patera; a tambor in the field. Reverse: A satyr walks to right holding a calyx krater with both hands; at left a thyrsos on which hangs a panther skin. On the arching handle is a laurel wreath, at one end a lion’s head in raised relief and at the other end a maenad’s face. Ca. 345-325 BC. H. 8 3/4 in. (22.2 cm.) Ex Swiss collection, acquired in the 1930s. 107 APULIAN RED-FIGURE SMALL KANTHAROS with two ring handles. A kneeling Eros holding a mirror. Reverse: A seated female holding a mirror. Ca. 350 BC. Choice. H. 3 1/4 in. (8.3 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired from D. Cahn, Basel, March 2000.

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108 APULIAN SESSILE KANTHAROS, ST. VALENTIN CLASS. Slanted checkerboard pattern, etc. Reverse: Vertical columns, etc. Choice. 4th Century BC. H. 4 1/4 in. W. 6 in.(15.2 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired from Atlantis Antiquities, New York, in December 1990. 109 APULIAN RED-FIGURE SMALL SQUAT LEKYTHOS depicting a crouching Theban sphinx with the head of a young woman, body of a lion, and large wings; facing right. 4th Century BC. H. 3 3/4 in. (9.5 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired from H. Cahn, Basel, March 1998. 110 APULIAN GNATHIA ASKOS WITH CHECKERBOARD DESIGN, the front with a bearded theater mask in added white. A rare type. Ca. 340-320 BC. 4 1/4 in. (10.8 cm.) Ex Greville Chester collection, Pitt-Rivers collection, purchased from Sotheby's, December 4, 1882 (1882 auction label on base); J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at Christie’s London in May 1992. 111 APULIAN BLACK GLAZED STEMLESS KYLIX The tondo with a pygmy battling a stork. A rare subject for a kylix. Later 5th Century BC. Diam. 8 1/2 in.(21.5 cm.) Ex Eastern French collection; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired from Pierre Bergé, Paris, April 2001.

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112 APULIAN POLYCHROME RED-FIGURE OINOCHOE IN THE FORM OF A FEMALE HEAD Extensive red and white paint remaining. Later 4th Century BC. H. 15 1/4 in. (38.7 cm.) Ex L.B. collection, NY, acquired from Royal-Athena Galleries in 1981; American private collection, acquired from Royal-Athena in January 2006. Exhibited and published: M. Mayo, The Art of South Italy, Vases from Magna Graecia, exhibition catalog, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, May 12-August 8, 1982, p. 301, no. 155. 113 APULIAN RED-FIGURE KOTHON PROBABLY BELONGING TO THE MENZIES GROUP The body being a sculptural female head with black hair, veiled. Above, a draped female holding a mirror and a casket. Rare type. Ca. 330-320 BC. H. 7 1/8 in. (18.2 cm.) Cf. A.D. Trendal, RVAp 2 S., p. 826, following with pls. 311-318. Ex H.H. collection, South Germany; D.Cahn, Auktion 1, Kunstwerke der Antike, Jun15, 1998, no 43. 114 GREEK PLASTIC VASE IN THE FORM OF A HORNED GOAT From the Magenta Class, couchant, wearing an applied garland around his brow; long incised beard. The tubular neck and ribbon handle are attached to his back. 3rd-2nd Century BC. L. 9 1/2 in. (24. cm.) Ex American private collection, 1970s.

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115 APULIAN GNATHIAN LEKYTHOS with female in profile facing left wearing frilled collar as a flower; with elaborate floral designs. Ca. 330-320 BC. H. 6 1/2 in. (16.5 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in Basel in September 1988. 116 APULIAN GNATHIAN SKYPHOS, CIRCLE OF THE ROSE PAINTER Female head facing left amid grape arbor with ornate tendrils, leaves and grape clusters. Ca. 320 BC. H. 4 3/8 in. (11.1 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at Sotheby’s New York in December 1993. 117 APULIAN GNATHIAN LIDDED PYXIS with four running animals and florettes on lid in added white and yellow. 4th Century BC. H. 4 in. (10.2 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in Lugano, October 1988.

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118 APULIAN RED-FIGURE PLATE BY THE DARIUS PAINTER Battle between Athena and the giant Pallas. Athena wears a belted chiton and plumed helmet, holding the Argolic shield on her left side with the head of Medusa, and her golden staff, her right arm outstretched brandishing a flaming torch; the winged Pallas, shown here with an animal skin over his left shoulder, his legs encased in two pouches with snakes curving outwards on either side. Ca. 320 BC. Diam. 11 in (27.9 cm.) Ex private Swiss collection, prior to 1975. Published: Aellen, Cambitoglou & Chamay, Le peintre de Darius, 1986, p. 234. A rare depiction. 119 APULIAN GNATHIAN LIDDED PYXIS with ornate decoration of applied white grape clusters and wave pattern on both body and lid. 4th Century BC. D. 5 1/4 in. (13.3 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired from La Reine Margot, Paris, in April 1988.

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120 APULIAN XENON GROUP POTTERY SESSILE KANTHAROS with meander, laurel, and chevron bands in applied red. 3rd Century BC. H. 4 1/8 in. (10.5 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, N.Y., acquired in 1992. 121 APULIAN XENON GROUP POTTERY SESSILE KANTHAROS Laurel and scroll bands, palmettes; in applied red. 3rd Century BC. H. 4 1/4 in. (10.8 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, N.Y., acquired in 1992. 122 APULIAN XENON GROUP SMALL SKYPHOS On either side, between scrolls: a swan with rising wings in applied red. Late 4th Century BC. H. 2 1/4 in. (5.8 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in 1988.

123 APULIAN SMALL CHOUS: SATYR PLAYING AULETES in applied red. He walks to right, body bent, head garlanded, toward a single ivy leaf. Choice. 4th Century BC. H. 3 1/8 in. (7.9 cm.) Ex H. Cahn, Basel; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in Basel in December 1994.

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124 CAMPANIAN RED-FIGURE SKYPHOS with profile head of a bearded satyr, wearing a wreath in his unkempt hair, with pointed ear. Reverse; Profile head of an Amazon, her hair tied back under a dotted peaked cloth cap; palmettes below the handles. 4th Century BC. H. 3 1⁄4 in. (8.4 cm.) Very fine style. Ex German private collection; J.M.E. collection, N.Y., acquired at Christie’s, London, April 2008. 125 CAMPANIAN RED-FIGURE LEKYTHOS OF AN AMAZON in profile facing right, wearing a high dragonate helmet and holding an axe in front of her. 4th Century BC. H. 41/4 in. (10.8 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in New York, November 1990. 126 CAMPANIAN RED-FIGURE SQUAT LEKYTHOS: HELMETED BUST OF ATHENA holding spear. Ca. 370-360 BC. H. 5 1/2 in. (14 cm.) Ex C. Ede, 'Greek Vases', 1990, no. 109; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in London, September 1988. 127 CAMPANIAN RED-FIGURE SQUAT LEKYTHOS OF A SATYR in profile facing left, with black curly hair, wearing a fillet. 4th Century BC. H. 3 1/4 in. (8.3 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in New York, November 1990.

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Campanian Owl Vases 128 CAMPANIAN SMALL RED-FIGURE OWL AMPHORA FROM THE OWL AND PILLAR GROUP with twisted handles. On either side of the neck an owl between laurel branches. Choice! 4th Century BC. H. 6 1/2 in. (16.5 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at Christie’s New York in December 2000. 129 CAMPANIAN RED-FIGURE OWL SKYPHOS Forward facing owl with outspread wings. Reverse: Theban sphinx. A rare combination of motifs. 4th Century BC. H. 3 1/2 in (8.9 cm.) Diam. 3 5/8 in. (9.3 cm.) Ex German private collection; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired from Fragments of Time, 2004. 130 CAMPANIAN RED-FIGURE OWL PELIKE On both sides, a spotted-faced owl between floral sprays. Possibly Sicilian, 4th Century BC. H. 4 in. (10.2 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York. acquired in 1982.

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131 CAMPANIAN LARGE RED-FIGURE BAILHANDLED AMPHORA BY THE BOSTON READY PAINTER A woman at her toilette with her maid above a helmeted Chalcidian warrior wearing a white chiton and a bronze belt, his right arm resting on a large circular shield, a woman walking toward him. Reverse: two draped youths. Ca. 330-320 BC. H. 24 1/4 in. (61.5 cm.) Ex Axel Guttmann (1944-2001) collection, Berlin, acquired in Krefeld in 1991.

132 CAMPANIAN BLACK GLAZED HEAD ARYBALLOS: GREEK COMEDY MASK The body strongly modeled with double-arch hairline, thick eye brows, and extreme grin. Rare type. 4th Century BC. H. 4 3/4 in. (12.2 cm.) Ex French private collection.

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133 CAMPANIAN SMALL PAGENSTECHER CLASS LEKYTHOS with leaping, spotted hare. Ca. 350-325 BC. H. 3 3/4 in. (9.5 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in the 1990s. 134 CAMPANIAN PAGENSTECHER CLASS LEKYTHOS Head of a female with long curly hair; a palmette on the reverse. Ca. 350-325 BC. H. 5 1/4 in. (13.3 cm.) Ex German collection; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in Freiburg, Germany, April 1989. 135 CAMPANIAN MINIATURE RED-FIGURE LEKYTHOS Female head with applied white floral band, facing left. Ca. 350 BC. H. 3 1/8 in. (7.9 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired fron J. Haering, Freiburg, Germany, in April 1991. 136 CAMPANIAN CALENE WARE BLACK GLAZE POTTERY GUTTOS in the form of a quince with double knotted handle and lion-head spout. Late 4th Century BC. H. 3 1/2 in. (8.9 cm.) Rare type. Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired from P. Donati, Lugano, in April 1993.

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137 LUCANIAN RED-FIGURE HYDRIA BY THE PISTICCI PAINTER Two draped women, one holding a mirror, standing addressing each other over a kalathos. Ca. 440-430 BC. H. 10 5/8 in. (27 cm.) Ex old Belgian collection, A.D.M., 1970; J.S. collection, Paris, acquired in Paris art market, 2000; Drouot, Paris, May 2008. Published: J. Eisenberg, 1000 Years of Ancient Greek Vases II, 2010, no. 159. 138 PAESTAN APPLIED RED-FIGURE SMALL CALYX KRATER FROM THE ASTEAS-PYTHON WORKSHOP A seated nude youth. Reverse: A nude youth with his foot on plant, his hand on his hip. Ca. 330 BC. H. 6 7/8 in. (17.5 cm.) Ex German collection; John Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1988; Patricia Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, 1990-2010. Published: J. Eisenberg, 1000 Years of Ancient Greek Vases II, 2010, no. 163. Unusually fine quality and shape for applied red-figure.

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Et ru sc an & Ro ma n Vas es 139 VILLANOVAN POTTERY URN WITH LID IN THE FORM OF A CRESTED HELMET, with a handle on one side, a flaring rim, and incised geometric designs of meanders, triangles, hatched fields, and swastikas. The lid with smilar incised decoration. 9th-8th Century BC. H. of urn 13 5/8 in. (34.6 cm.); H. of lid 9 in. (23 cm.); Total H. 19 3/4 in. (50.2 cm.) Ex collection (H 71) of Axel Guttmann (19442001), Berlin. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XX, 2009, no. 125. 140 ETRUSCAN BUCCHERO CUP WITH MOLDED FACE, eyes and eyebrows opposite the bifurcated ring handle. Cerveteri, ca. 575-550 BC. H. 4 1/4 in. (10.8 cm.) Ex collection of M. Studer, Lugano; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired from Cahn, Auktion 1, Kunstwerke der Antike, June 15, 1998, no. 23. Cf. M. Martelli, La Ceramica degli Etruschi: La Pittura Vascolare, 1987, no. 137 no. 93; W. Biers, “An Etruscan Face: a Mask Cup in Missouri,” Muse, 1979, vol. 13, pp.45-53. These amusing cups come in two types - painted and bucchero. 100 examples of the painted are known; fewer than 14 bucchero examples published. 141 ETRUSCAN BLACK FIGURE POTTERY TREFOIL OINOCHOE: PANKRATIASTS The combatant at right, having fallen, looks back at the victor. Both are nude, their hands and wrists bound with meilichai. Ca. 5th Century BC. H. 8 7/8 in. (22.5 cm.) Ex H.H., Zurich, 1973.

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142 ETRUSCAN APPLIED RED-FIGURE BELL KRATER, Three nude athletes in conversation; details incised. Reverse: two draped youths, one bearded, in conversation. Late 5th-early 4th Century BC. H. 14 3/8 in. (36.5 cm.) Ex French collection. For a similar krater see: J. Beazley, Etruscan Vase Painting, 1947, pl. VIII, 3-4. 143 FALISCAN RED-FIGURE KYLIX, Tondo: female head in profile facing left, her curly hair wrapped in a saccos, in meander border; on either exterior side a draped youth between palmettes. Choice. Early 4th Century BC. H. 2 3/4 in. (7 cm. ); Diam. 6 3/4 in (17.2 cm.); W. 9 5/8 in. (24.4 cm.) Ex private collection, Brussels, Belgium; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired from D. Thirion, Brussels, in June 2007.

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144 ETRUSCAN CAERETAN RED-FIGURE BEAKED OINOCHOE Female head in saccos to left between large tendrils; large palmette on neck. Late 4th Century BC. H. 5 7/8 in. (15 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired from Hesperia Arts, New York, in December 1990. 145 ETRUSCAN CAERETAN RED-FIGURE BEAKED OINOCHOE Comical bearded satyr head in profile to the left between large tendrils; large palmette on neck. Late 4th Century BC. H. 5 7/8 in. (15 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired from Hesperia Arts, New York, in December 1990. 146 ROMAN MOLDED REDWARE MOON FLASK WITH GLADIATORS IN COMBAT in relief on both sides. Surrounding the central image are bordering bands of roping, rosettes, and tongues; two arching handles on the shoulder. 2nd-3rd Century AD. H. 9 3/4 in. (24.8 cm.) Ex French private collection, acquired in the 1970s. 70


Ancient Glass 147 EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN COBALT BLUE GLASS ALABASTRON, with a disc rim and tapering neck, the shoulder with applied lug handles, the body with white trailing combed in a feather pattern, reverting to a spiral design towards the tapering base. 2nd-1st Century BC. H. 4 3/4 in. (12.1 cm.) Ex Spanish collection formed in the mid-20th century; purchased by the former owner from a London collector in the late 70s. 148 SIDONIAN MOLD-BLOWN PURPLE GLASS AMPHORISKOS with globular body blown into a two-part mold, decorated with a central band of scrolls between gadrooning, with two small heavily weathered glass handles. Ca. 1st Century AD. H. 2 3/8 in. (6.2 cm.) Ex collection of Dr Carle Kempe (1884-1967), Ekolsund, Sweden. 149 ROMAN COBALT BLUE GLASS AMPHORISKOS, mold-blown, the ovoid body with concentric horizontal ridges and a pointed base, with a cylindrical neck, flaring mouth, the rim folded out then in, and twin vertical handles. Later 1st Century AD. H. 4 1/4 in. (10.8 cm.) Ex collection of Dr. Elizabeth Khayat, Connecticut, acquired Parke-Bernet Galleries, New York, December 13,1979, lot 193. For the type see: E. M. Stern, Roman Mold-blown Glass, 1995, pp. 158-159, nos. 66-67. 150 ROMAN IRIDESCENT GREEN GLASS DOUBLE UNGUENTARIUM with arched handle, trailing down sides, fine spiral trailing around body; remains of bronze rods. Overall silver iridescence. 3rd-4th Century AD. H. 6 in. (15.2 cm.) Ex collection of P.V., Mt. Vernon, New York, acquired 71 from Royal-Athena Galleries in 1991.


151 ROMAN PALE GREEN GLASS STEM GOBLET, of hemispherical form with a rounded slightly everted rim on short stemmed flaring foot with folding tubular edge. 5th Century AD. H. 3 in. (7.6 cm.) Ex Christie’s London, May 1998. 152 ROMAN GREENISH-YELLOW GLASS VASE with bulbous body and flaring cylindrical neck. 2nd-5th Century AD. H. 6 1/4 in. (16.5 cm.) Ex collection of Louis-Gabriel Bellon (1819-1899), Saint-Nicolas-les-Arras, France; thence by descent. 153 ROMAN GLASS JUGLET MOLD-BLOWN WITH RIBBED CYLINDRICAL BODY and green ribbon glass forming the handle and applied to the trefoil lip. 3rd-4th Century AD. H. 4 3/8 in. (11 cm.) Ex collection of M. & Mme. M., Paris. 154 EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN GLASS VASE The hexagonal body molded with vertical palm fronds, the inverted thick lip anchoring the two applied trailing handles that arise from the shoulder of the body. 5th-6th Century AD. H. 3 3/8 in. ( 8.8 cm.) Ex French collection acquired: Christies’ London, April 25, 2001, no 575.

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Anci ent Jewelry

155 PAIR OF GREEK GOLD BRACELETS AND MATCHING RING or hair spiral, composed of woven wire bands joined together, each bracelet with a circular spoked wheel closing; both band and closing have granulation with applied small spheres. Earlier 5th Century BC. Diam. 1 7/8 in. (4.7 cm.); wt. 18.8 gr. Ring: Diam. 1 in. (2.5 cm.); wt. 10.3 gr. Ex Dean Collection, London, acquired between 1960-1970. 156 PAIR OF HELLENISTIC GOLD LION HEAD EARRINGS 3rd-2nd Century BC. Diam. 3/4 in. (2 cm.); wt. 4.84 gr. Ex German private collection acquired in the early 1990s.

157 ETRUSCAN GOLD FILIGREE EARRINGS of delicate openwork ribbons filled with wire bands, bosses, scrolls. Probably from Vetulonia, ca. 675 BC. Diam. 1 9/16 in. (4 cm.); wts 4.1 gm., 4.3 gm. Ex Thane Collection, England, dispersed at Sotheby’s, London, 1987. For a simliar pair of bracelets, see: A. Maggiani, et al., Treasures from Tuscany - The Etruscan Legacy, p. 40, no. 44.

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158 PAIR OF OSTROGOTHIC GOLD AND GARNET EARRINGS centering a polyhedral bead inset with square and triangular garnets. Earlier 5th Century AD. Diam. 1 1/16 in. (2.7 cm.); wt. 15.6 gr. Ex private European collection acquired in the 1990s. 159 PAIR OF BYZANTINE GOLD CRESCENT EARRINGS decorated with applied filigree. 6th-9th Century AD. L. 1 1/2 in. (3.8 cm.) Ex German collection. 160 BYZANTINE GOLD CIRCULAR OPENWORK PENDANT, designed as six cross rosettes around a central cross rosette, each of different design; a double loop for suspension. 6th-7th Century AD. Diam. 2 in. (5.1 cm.); wt: 24 gr. Ex Y. Saidnian collection, London and Jerusalem, acquired before 1960. Cf. “Byzantium 330-1453”, Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Exposition catalogue 2007, pp. 167, 172-173, 409-410, nos. 119 et 126.

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Ancient Varia 161 ROMAN ROCK CRYSTAL OCTAGONAL AMPHORISKOS, with two integrally carved standing rings for suspension. Rare. 1st Century AD. H. 2 1/4 in. (5.7 cm.) Ex Josef Raftl collection, Prague, Czechoslovakia, acquired in Munich before 1977; thence by descent. Cf. Hans-Peter Bu?hler, Antike Gef채sse aus Edelsteinen, Mainz, 1973, nos. 44, 45 and 56. Due to the limited sources of the material and the labor-intensive process of making them, rock crystal vessels were rare and expensive luxury items in the Roman world. S uch a miraculous stone was believed to have the powers of an amulet and was highly valued.

162 SIX ROMAN BRONZE PLAQUES WITH INLAID MOSAIC GLASS from a belt or a suite of horse trappings; white, red, and blue canes on alternating red, white, and blue fields. These brilliantly colored enamel pieces were probably used to decorate and adorn the outside of the harness and horse from a ceremonial chariot. 2nd-3rd Century AD. Maximum individual W. 2 3/8 in. (6 cm.). Total width as mounted: 9 1/8 in. (23.2 cm.) Ex collection of B.H.S., a retired military officer, St. Petersburg, Florida, formed in the 1950s-early 1970s; an American private collection, acquired from Royal-Athena in November 2008. For a nearly identical element found in York, see: E. Swift, Roman Dress Accessories, 2003, p. 42, fig. 38. See also a set of similarly inlaid chariot trappings in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, inventory no. 2000.FOFA-O.

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163 ROMAN BRONZE ARCHITECT’S CORNER, CONICAL PLUMB, CALIPERS, AND REGULA. The corner a total of 12.7 cms long and 9 cms wide, with 90 ° and 45 ° corners. The hinged regula in opened state is 11 1/2 in. (29.3 cms.). the calipers , L. 5 7/8 in. (15 cm.) with iron pointers. 2nd-3rd Century AD. Ex German private collection. Cf. similar in: Pompeii. Nature, science and technology in a Roman town. Exhibition and conference, Deutsches Museum, Munich, 1999, p. 134 no..384; J.P. Adam, Roman Building. Material and Techniques, 1994, 43; Pondera. Pesi e misure nell'Antichità, 2001, p. 241 no. 171. 164 ROMAN BRONZE OPENWORK ROUNDEL WITH DIONYSOS, or Hephaistos, reclining on the back of a donkey. 3rd Century AD. Diam. 4 1/4 in. (11 cm.) Said to have been found in Germany. Possibly a balteus or belt fitting. Ex A.T. collection, London, acquired in 1993. Green patina. 165 ROMAN IRON CAMPAIGN FOLDING STOOL (SELLA CASTRENSIS), literally stool for the camp, was essentially reserved for commanders in the field. 1st-3rd Century AD. H. 16 7/8 in. (43 cm.) Ex German collection. The leather seat is modern. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXI, 2010, no. 108.

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166 PAIR OF MIDDLE BRONZE AGE ARM SPIRALS OF SALGOTARJAN TYPE, named after the treasure findings at Svedlar in eastern Slovakia, with decorative incision work; olivegreen patina. 15th-13th Century BC. Diam. of spiral 4 3/4 in. (12 cm.); total length 8 1/2 in. (21.5 cm.) Ex German collection. Cf: M. Novotna, ‘The Axes and Hatchets in Slovakia’, Prähistorische Bronzefunde IX 3, 1970, pl. 56, 13.14. Intact and exceptionally well preserved. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XX, 2009, no. 70. For a nearly identical example, see Cleveland Museum of Art, acquisition no.1988.4

167 CENTRAL EUROPEAN EARLY IRON AGE BRONZE PECTORAL, Consisting of two spectacle fibulae joined by seven chains. Hallstatt, 8th-7th Century BC. H. 13 3/4 in. (35 cm.) Ex English private collection, acquired in the 1990s. Intact. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XIX, 2008, no. 173.

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Byzantine Art 168 BYZANTINE SHEET BRONZE REPOUSSÉ PLAQUE OF SAINT SIMEON, wearing full-length robes, with incised features, hair and beard, the figure with punched dot outline, the Saint's name inscribed to the left in a vertical column with two double scrolled heart-shaped motifs, pierced edges for attachment. Ca. 9th-10th Century AD. H. 8 1⁄2 in. (21.9 cm.) Ex British private collection; C.H. collection, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XVI, 2005, no. 131. Exhibited: Yale University Art Museum, 2005-2015. 169 BYZANTINE BRONZE CENSOR consisting of a hook attached to a cross, from which are suspended three chains supporting a small tripodal cup. Ca. 6th-7th Century AD. H. 19 5/8 in. (50 cm.) Ex collection Jean-Alain Mariaud de Serres, Paris: C.H. collection, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XIV, 2003, no. 144. Exhibited: Yale University Art Museum, 2004-2015. 170 BYZANTINE BRONZE LAMP ON STAND the lamp decorated with an integrally cast cross atop the handle; on a tripodal pricket stick. Ca. 6th-7th Century AD. H. 13 1/8 in. (33.5 cm.), Ex collection Jean-Alain Mariaud de Serres, Paris: C.H. collection, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XIV, 2003, no. 143. Exhibited: Yale University Art Museum, 2004-2015.

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171 MIDDLE BYZANTINE GILDED BRONZE PENDANT: MOTHER OF GOD enameled en cloissoné with blue, turquoise, and red on a green ground. Quadrifoil combined with a square, the portrait within a central double circle. 10th-12th Century AD. H. 1 3/8 in. (3.7 cm.) Ex A.T. collection, London, England, acquired in 1993. The detailed surfaces of the triangles, semicircles and the tape with middle burr between both internal circles are gilded 172 BYZANTINE SILVER CRUCIFORM ENKOLPION with engraved decoration showing Maria Orans on the front and ornamental decoration with a bluish green glass stone on the reverse. Ca. 12th Century AD. H. 3 7/8 in. (9.9 cm.); W. 1 7/8 in. (4.7 cm.) Ex B.R. collection since the 1980s. Cf. L. Warmser, Die Welt von Byzanz Europas östliches Erbe, Munich, 2004, p. 198, no. 270. 173 BYZANTINE BRONZE ENKOLPION DECORATED IN RELIEF WITH THE CRUCIFIXION The crucified Christ surrounded by three medallions with busts on the frontside and Maria with the child surrounded by three busts on the backside. 10th-12th Century AD H. 3 1/2 in. (9 cm.) Ex M.P. collection, Germany, acquired in 1990s. Cf. H.C. Evans - W.D. Wixon, eds., The Glory of Byzantium, New York, 1997, p. 303f, no. 206. Tiny hole on backside. 174 BYZANTINE BRONZE ENKOLPION DECORATED IN RELIEF WITH THE CRUCIFIXION Obverse: tabula ansata with the Greek letters IS XS, surrounded by four medallions with the vignettes of Nikolaus, the mother of God, St.George, under the cross arms other inscriptions in Church Slavonic (”The cross is our consolation. The cross is our fame”). Rev: Mother of God in the center, surrounded by four medallions with the busts of Peter, Damianos, and Kosmas as well as Basil, under the cross arms other inscriptions in Church Slavonic (”Holy mother of God, help us!”) Before 1240 AD. H. 2 1/2 in. (6.5 cm.) Ex M.P. collection, Germany, acquired in 1990s.

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175 EGYPTIAN OLD KINGDOM LIMESTONE RAISED RELIEF from the left door jamb of the entrance to a tomb chapel and representing the occupant, a high dignitary, walking to right holding a staff and wearing a striated wig, false beard, broad collar, and kilt; holding a strip of folded cloth. Vth-VIth Dynasty, ca. 2498-2283 BC. H. 16 1/2 in. (42 cm.); W. 11 in. (28 cm.) Ex French collection acquired before 1980. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. XXI, 2010, no. 203.

Egyptian Stone S cu lp tures & Reiefs 176 EGYPTIAN OLD KINGDOM LIMESTONE RELIEF FRAGMENT With two oarsmen facing right and leaning back to lever the oars, their bodies painted with reddish-brown with their hair in black; the tip of a water sign hieroglyph above the head of the left oarsman and another symbol in the register above. Vth-VIth Dynasty, ca. 2498-2181 BC. L. 10 7/8 in. (21.6cm.); H. 61â „4 in. (15.8cm.) Ex private Japanese collection; O.C. collection, Chicago, acquired from Royal-Athena in 2007. 177 EGYPTIAN AMARNA PERIOD SANDSTONE SUNK RELIEF: SERVANT GIVING HOMAGE From Karnak, XVIIIth Dynasty, reign of Akhenaten, ca. 1350-1334 BC 7 1/4 x 7 in. (18.5 x 18 cm.) Ex Jean-Marie Talleux Collection, Grand Fort Philippe, France; V.S. collection, Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. IX, 1997, no. 168.

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178 EGYPTIAN REDDISH BROWN STONE ENTHRONED OSIRIS, Mummiform, wearing atef-crown and holding crook and flail crossed over his chest. XVIth Dynasty, 664-525 BC. H. 6 1/2 in. (16.5 cm.) Ex Bandy collection, Rochester, Michigan. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, vol. IV, 1985, no. 420. Exhibited: Kresge Art Gallery, Michigan State University, 1985-2002. 179 EGYPTIAN NEW KINGDOM LIMESTONE COVER TO A CANOPIC JAR, human-headed with thick cosmetic lines. XVIII-XXth Dynasty, ca. 1570-1070 BC. H. 3 1/4 in. (8.5 cm.) Ex Edward Roffey collection, England, ca. 1960. Cf. G. Reisner, Canopics Catalogue général des antiquités égyptiennes, Cairo, 1967. 180 EGYPTIAN LIMESTONE SCULPTOR’S MODEL PORTRAIT, possibly of a king. Late Period, 712-30 BC. H. 4 3/4 in. (12 cm.) Ex French collection acquired in 1970 from Galerie Serres, Paris.

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181 EGYPTIAN LARGE BRONZE PHARAOH AS OSIRIS, mummiform, holding a crook and flail, and wearing an unusual helmet-like headpiece with diadem fronted by a uraeus; diadem, cosmetic lines, and eyes once inlaid; one blue glass inlay remaining on diadem. XXVth Dynasty, 715-664 BC. H. excluding tang 13 1/8 in. (33.5 cm.) Rare type, probably from Nubia. Ex collection of a Belgian noble family, by descent to Baron J. de C. Published: J. Eisenberg, Gods & Mortals II, 2004, no. 75. 182 EGYPTIAN LARGE BRONZE HEAD OF A KING OR GOD, with remains of inlay on the cheekstrap; cast for attachment to a large figure of wood or bronze; the wide face with aquiline nose, and large eyes, eyebrows and cosmetic lines. Rare XXIInd Dynasty, 945-715 BC. H. 4 1/4 in. (10.8 cm.) Ex collection of Flora Whitney Miller; dispersed at Sotheby’s, New York, May 29, 1987, lot 41A; F.K. collection, Bloomsbury. Michigan, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1987. .

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183 ROMAN-EGYPTIAN BRONZE FITTING: BES AND BESIT back to back, winged, on swans atop two lions; on an integral base. Rare type. 1st-2nd Century AD. H. 2 3/4 in. (7 cm.) Ex collection of Henry Wallis R.W.S. (18301916), the Pre-Raphaelite painter, thence by descent; J.M.E. collection, New York acquired at Bonham’s London in April 2010. While Henry Wallis is best known for his portrayal of 'The death of Chetterton', the Pre-Raphaelite artist was also a keen antiquarian, publishing works on Egyptian and Classical art. As a collector he often travelled to the Mediterranean and on one of his trips to Egypt met Sir W. M. Flinders Petrie (1853-1942). 184 EGYPTIAN BRONZE WINGED NUDE HARPOKRATES-EROS holding a cornucopia and wearing the Double-Crown. Late Ptolemaic Period, ca. 2nd-1st Century BC. H. 3 1/4 in. (8.4 cm.) Dark olive-green patina. Ex K.F. collection, Garden City, Michigan. Published: J. Eisenberg, Art of the Ancient World, 1985, p. 104, no. 292. Exhibited: Picker Art Gallery, Colgate University, 1996-2003; George Mason University, 2003-2007.

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185 EGYPTIAN PREDYNASTIC ORANGE-BROWN BRECCIA JAR of elongated form with two pierced lug handles. Late Predynastic, ca. 3500-3200 BC. H. 3 1/2 in. (8.9 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at Sotheby’s New York in November 1987.

E gyp ti an St one Vessels

186 EGYPTIAN PREDYNASTIC BLACK SPECKLED BRECCIA JAR The ovoid body of elegant form with flat disk base, a splayed rim and pierced lug handles. Predynastic Period, ca 3200 BC. H. 3 1/16 (7.8 cm.) Choice. Ex collection of Nicholas Landau (1887-1979), Paris; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at Christie’s New York in June 1998. Old Landau label on base. 187 EGYPTIAN EARLY DYNASTIC SPECKLED CALCITE JAR of elegant form with pierced lug handles and splayed rim. Ist-IInd Dynasty, ca. 3000-2686 BC. H. 1 7/8 in. (4.8 cm.) Ex Monnier collection, Paris; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at the Drouot, Paris, in February 1996. 188 EGYPTIAN EARLY DYNASTIC GRAY SCHIST BOWL in the form of a truncated pyramid. Ca. 3000-2600 BC. H. 1 7/8 in. (4.8 cm.); D. 3 1/4 in. (8.3 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at Christie’s London in October 1988.

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189 EGYPTIAN MIDDLE KINGDOM BRECCIA KOHL VASE with globular body, flaring at the base, with disc rim. XIIth Dynasty, ca. 1991-1786 BC. H. 1 7/8 in. (4.7 cm.)Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at Bonham’s London in April 2005. 190 EGYPTIAN EARLY DYNASTIC DOLOMITE JAR of slightly flaring cylindrical form with flat everted rim. The white matrix has gray and black veining. Ist-IIIrd Dynasty, ca. 2965-2640 BC. H. 4 3/4 in. (11.9 cm.) Ex Charles Ede, London, 1972, catalog no. 31; George Halpern collection, New York; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at Sotheby’s New York in December 1998. 191 EGYPTIAN MIDDLE KINGDOM ANHYDRITE KOHL VASE with rounded shoulders and splayed rim. XI-XIIth Dynasty, ca. 2040-1790 BC. H. 2 in. (5 cm.) Ex Monnier Collection, Paris; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at the Drouot, Paris, in February 1996. 192 EGYPTIAN NEW KINGDOM BROWN SERPENTINE KRATERISKOS a wide-mouthed cosmetic jar. XVIIIth Dynasty, ca. 1570-1293 BC. H. 2 3/4 in. ( 6.9 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, ca. 1980s.

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193 EGYPTIAN NEW KINGDOM MOTTLED SERPENTINE ALABASTRON, of well executed form with two small lug handles. New Kingdom, ca. 1567-1085 BC. H. 4 3/4 in. (12 cm.) Ex Monnier collection, Paris; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at the Drouot, Paris, in February 1996. 194 EGYPTIAN NEW KINGDOM FINELY MOTTLED ALABASTER POPPY FORM VASE XVIIIth Dynasty, ca. 1567-1320 BC. H. 2 3/4 in. (7.4 cm.) Ex Wilhelm Horn (1870-1959) collection, Berlin; J.M.E, collection, New York, acquired at Christie’s London in December 1987. Choice! 195 EGYPTIAN NEW KINGDOM SERPENTINE JAR, mottled, of ovoid form with wide, rounded shoulders, shallow lip and two pierced lug handles. New Kingdom, ca. 1567-1085 BC. H. 2 7/8 in. (7.3 cm.) Ex Monnier collection, Paris; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at the Drouot, Paris, February 1996. 196 EGYPTIAN NEW KINGDOM ALABASTER BOWL with cylindrical sides, carved with three encircling raised bands around the body, set on a stemmed foot. XVIII-XIXth Dynasty, ca. 1540-1190 BC. Diam. 2 3⁄4 in. (7 cm.); H. 2 1/8 in. (5.5 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at Bonham’s London in April 2005.

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197 EGYPTIAN BANDED ALABASTER KOHL JAR with broad shoulder and tapering body set on a slender, flaring foot; with narrow neck and disc rim. Late Period, ca. 715-30 BC. H. 3 1/2 in. (8.9 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at Bonham’s London in May 2002. 198 EGYPTIAN BANDED ALABASTER ALABASTRON Attractive natural layering of alabaster to form concentric circles. XXVIIth Dynasty, ca. 525-402 BC. Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at Christie’s London in December 1988. 199 EGYPTIAN POTTERY BOWL PAINTED TO IMITATE LUMACHELLA of hemispherical form with a canted lip, decorated in black irregular concentric circles in imitation of that rare stone. Alexandria, 3rd-1st Century BC. Diam. of mouth 4 3/4 in. (12.1 cm.); H. 3 3/8 in. (8.6 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in May 1999.

For more Egyptian stone vessels visit our website www.royalathena.com

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Egypt ia n Fa ien ce Ushabt is 200 EGYPTIAN TURQUOISE FAIENCE USHABTI OF AMENEMOPÉ, Priest of Amun, with frontal column of hieroglyphic text and details in black. XXIst Dynasty, ca. 1080-945 BC. H. 4 in. (10.4 cm.) Acquired from antiquarian R.H. Blanchard; Egyptian Museum, Cairo, catalog number CB 30; private collection, Lancaster, New York, before 1936, thence by descent. Cf. Aubert, `Les Statuaires Égyptiennes, Paris 1973, pl.. 41; J.L. Chappaz, Les figurines funéraires égyptiennes du Musée dArt et dHistoire et de quelques collections privée, Ghent, 1984, nos. 43, 24. 201 EGYPTIAN GREEN GLAZED FAIENCE USHABTI OF SI-AST, Priest of Bastet, born to Ast-Iy, mummiform, holding hoes and seedbag. Five lines of hieroglyphic text. XXVIth Dynasty, ca. 664-525 BC. H. 4 1/8 in. (10.5 cm.) Ex D.R. collection, Woodinville, Washington, acquired in 1994. 202 EGYPTIAN TURQUOISE FAIENCE USHABTI holding hoes and seed bag. Incised text in T-format. Late Period, 664-30 BC. H. 4 in. (10.2 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in New York in 1992. 203 EGYPTIAN TURQUOISE FAIENCE USHABTI holding hoes and seed bag. Ptolemaic Period, 305-30 BC. H. 3 3/8 in. (8.6 cm.) Ex Dr. L.T. collection, Pennsylvania, acquired from Royal-Athena Galleries in 1982; reacquired in July 2006; J.M.E. collection, New York.

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Egyp tian Faience Amu let s 204 EGYPTIAN TURQUOISE FAIENCE AMULET OF A FALCON-HEADED GODDESS, enthroned, wearing a long sheath, hands to sides of lap. Apparently unique. No falcon-headed goddesses can be located; perhaps a nome deity. XXVIth-XXXth Dynasty, 664-343 BC. H. 1 7/8 in (4.9 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, acquired from D. Gautier, Hotel des Ventes, Enghien, June 2002. 205 EGYPTIAN TURQUOISE FAIENCE AMULET OF KHNUM, the ram-headed god who created man on a potter’s wheel. Finely detailed. XXVIth-XXXth Dynasty, 664-343 BC. H. 2 in. (5.1 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at the Drouot, Paris, February 1986. 206 EGYPTIAN TURQUOISE GLAZED FAIENCE HALF-FIGURE OF THOUERIS, patroness of pregnancy and protectoress of the family at night; with solar disk and horns. Late Period, 664-30 BC. H. 2 in. (5.1 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at Christie’s London in October 1988. Exhibited: “Sphinx: The Guardians of Egypt,” Brussels, October 19, 2006-February 25, 2007. 207 EGYPTIAN TURQUOISE FAIENCE AMULET OF SEKHMET, goddess of fire and passion, striding. Ptolemaic Period, ca. 305-30 BC. H. 2 1/8 in. (5.4 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at Bonham’s London in December 1993.

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208 EGYPTIAN GREEN FAIENCE AMULET OF PATAIKOS standing on the snouts of two crocodiles, holding snakes, the head commanded by a scarab. On the back a winged goddess wearing a solar disc, and on the sides stand the goddesses Isis and Nephthys. Late Dynastic Period, ca. 525-343 BC. H. 2 in. (5.1 cm.) Ex D.R. collection, Woodinville, Washington, acquired in 1994 from Royal-Athena. Cf. C. Andrews, Amulets of Ancient Egypt, London, 1994, p. 38. 209 EGYPTIAN TURQUOISE FAIENCE AMULET OF NURSING SEKHMET-MUT, the lion-headed goddess, reticulated, wearing the Double Crown, seated upon a throne; a child pharaoh or prince, stands beside her throne. XXIth-XXXth Dynasty, 664-343 BC. H. 2 5/8 in. 6.1 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at the Drouot, Paris, September 1998. 210 EGYPTIAN TURQUOISE FAIENCE AMULET: CAT WITH FOUR KITTENS, covered with cobalt blue spots. Ptolemaic Period, 305-30 BC. H. 1 13/16 in. (4.6 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York.

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Near Eastern Antiquities 212 HITTITE SMALL BRONZE STRIDING GOD ON A BULL, the bearded god wearing a stepped conical headdress. Ca. 1400-1200 BC. H. 3 3/8 in. (8 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired from S. Dere, New York, in 1990. 213 NEAR EASTERN BRONZE YOUTHFUL CENTAUR PLAYING A LYRE Probably a vase handle, the curly-haired centaur standing on a lower element of that handle. Possibly Parthian, ca. 4th Century AD. H. 5 7/8 in. (15 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired in Munich, December 2009. 214 HITTITE OR NEO-HITTITE BRONZE HORSE AND RIDER, the rider, wearing a conical cap, holds the reins to his mount on which an elaborate head harness is placed. Ca. 1200-900 BC. H. 2 1/8 in. (5.3 cm.) Ex J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at Sotheby’s New York in December 1997. 215 SOUTH ARABIAN ALABASTER VOTIVE BULL, stylized with powerful build and integrally carved plinth. 1st-3rd Century AD. H. 3 1/2 in. (9 cm.) Ex Janssens collection, acquired in the 1970s. Cf. Yémen, au pays de la reine de Saba, exhibition catalog, Paris, 1997, p. 211.

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216 BACTRIAN COQUILLACEOUS LIMESTONE PATERA, with broad lip and highly polished top. Rare in this material. Late 3rd-earlier 2nd Millennium BC. D. 12 1/4 (31.1 cm.) Ex French private collection acquired in the 1980s; American private collection, acquired from Royal-Athena in July 2004. 217 BACTRIAN TERRACOTTA GROUP: TWO EQUESTRIAN ACROBATS, said to have been found in Uzbekistan. 2nd Millennium BC. L. 9 3/8 in. (24 cm.); H. 7 5/8 in. (19.4 cm.) Very rare and lively depiction. Ex French private collection acquired in the 1980s, dispersed in the Drouot, November 2007. 218 SOUTHWEST CASPIAN BRONZE STYLIZED HORSE AND RIDER with hollow body, ridged tail, notched ornamentation, and grooved mane. The nude rider seated side-saddle with hands crossed over the abdomen. Kelardeshet, ca. 8th Century BC. L. 3 1/2 in. (8.9 cm.) Ex John Kluge collection, Charlottesville, Virginia, acquired from Royal-Athena in 1990; J.M.E. collection, New York, acquired at Sotheby’s, New York, in December 2007. 219 WESTERN ASIATIC GILT BRONZE FINIAL WITH A RECUMBENT BUCK, atop a sphere; probably from a brooch. The Steppes, 6th-4th Century BC. H. 2 1/8 in. (5.5 cm.) Ex H. collection, Munich, Germany, acquired on the London art market in the 1970s.

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his objects of art, rather than depositing them in a vault or holding receipts. Also, art is not as volatile as stocks and bonds, the coin, gem, and collectibles markets, and especially the gold and silver markets. Sylvia Porter in her New Money Book recommends classical antiquities as one of the best types of art for rapid growth. Dr Eisenberg was first quoted on the investment value of ancient art in the February 9, 1966 issue of Newsday - nearly 50 years ago! - and most recently in Business Week.

Why Collect Ancient Art? There are several reasons for collecting fine works of ancient art: • The excitement of owning a beautiful work of art that has survived for perhaps some 2,000 years or more. • The decoration of one's home or office with unique objects whose beauty and desirability have withstood the test of time. • The creative satisfaction, enjoyment, and pride in forming a truly fine collection. • The probable appreciation in value.

Royal-Athena Galleries Jerome M. Eisenberg, Ph.D., the founder and director of Royal-Athena Galleries, is usually at the New York gallery and visits the London gallery several times each year. He is available by appointment for consultation, expertise, and appraisals; or for a telephone conference. At no obligation he will arrange a private viewing with guidance on a sophisticated long term program of collecting and investing in the fine arts. He also is in attendance at all the fairs in which we exhibit. Over the past 60 years we have sold more than 800 works of ancient art to many of the country's leading museums, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, the Sackler Art Museum at Harvard University, the Yale University Art Gallery, the Princeton University Art Museum, the Newark Museum, the Walters Art Gallery, the Detroit lnstitute of Arts, the Cincinnati Art Museum, the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, the Milwaukee Public Museum, the New Orleans Museum of Art, the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the J. Paul Getty Museum. In addition to the British Museum and the Louvre, we have sold ancient works of art to the Benaki Museum (Athens), the Egyptian Museum (Barcelona), the Musée du Cinquantenaire (Brussels), the Museum of Fine Arts (Budapest), the Römisch-Germanisches Museum (Cologne), the Rijksmuseum van Oudheden (Leiden), the Museo Archeológico Nacional (Madrid), the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, the Royal Ontario Museum (Toronto), the Papyrus Museum (Vienna), and a number of other museums in Australia, Belgium, Chile, France, Germany, Japan, and Switzerland. The new Mougins Museum of Classical Art in Mougins, France, has acquired nearly 200 antiquities from us. The catalogs of classical marble sculptures from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and from the J. Paul Getty Museum illustrate no less than 39 pieces acquired from our galleries. In addition, over one thousand objects purchased from us have been donated to many other museums, including the Freer Gallery of Art, the Sackler Gallery (The Smithsonian Institution), and the Brooklyn Museum of Art. Dr. Eisenberg travels overseas several times annually to visit collectors, museums, clients, and many of the nearly 150 private sources, agents, dealers, and auction houses with whom he is in frequent contact. Since 1954 he has made over 260 overseas

How to Collect Ancient Art Sylvia Porter lists ten sound rules as a guide in art collecting: 1. Study the field which interests you as much as possible. 2. Buy cautiously at first. 3. Make sure that your work of art has quality. 4. Deal with a top gallery or art dealer. “Some dealers and major galleries will guarantee the authenticity of the art works they sell, so check this point as well." (Not only have we been guaranteeing our ancient art for over fifty years, but to the best of our knowledge our two-day auction sale conducted by Parke-Bernet Galleries (now Sotheby's) in 1964 was the first auction sale by several years in which every piece was guaranteed - but by us!) 5. Have an understanding with your dealer or gallery about trading up - so he’ll repurchase or resell your works as you have more money to invest in high quality art. (We normally allow full credit for the exchange or upgrading of objects purchased from us.) 6. Do not buy art works just because they are a current rage. 7. Ask the advice of museum directors or curators whenever possible. 8. Decide upon your investing limit before you buy. If you fall in love with a more expensive object try to arrange for a time payment. (We certainly encourage this and offer flexible time payments!) 9. Spread your financial risks by buying a variety of art unless you are an expert in a particular field. 10. “Buy the best examples you can afford in any category.” We would add two other important rules: 11. Ask for the provenance of any potential acquisitions. 12. Do not buy objects that have been significantly restored. Beware of overly restored faces in both vase painting and sculpture.

Ancient Art as an lnvestment Historically, ancient art investments have yielded excellent long-term capital appreciation, usually 8% to 10% annually. Any investment in tangibles, especially works of art, should be projected for at least five to ten vears. Normally one should not hold more than 10% of their investment portfolio in art. Collecting fine art is a pleasurable way of hedging against inflation because the investor can enjoy

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trips, purchasing over forty thousand antiquities for many tens of millions of dollars. This aggressive purchasing policy, perhaps without parallel in the field, enables us to offer an extraordinary number of choice objects at very reasonable prices. Our willingness to buy in volume and to purchase our inventory outright, rather than to take it on consignment, results in extremely competitive pricing, often considerably below that of other galleries. Furthermore, exchanges and purchases are frequently made from many past and present clients who may be upgrading their collections or liquidating some of their holdings in order to collect in other areas. Exchanges or purchases are sometimes carried out with museums both in the United States and in Europe for their duplicate accessions or for objects not in their recent or current fields of specialization.

Expertise and Ethics Ancient art has been the specialty of our director for over 60 years, and numismatics for 74 years. His many publications on ancient art and numismatics span over six decades. He published his first antiquities catalog, A Catalog of Egyptian Antiquities, in 1959. The first volume of Art of the Ancient World by Dr. Eisenberg was published in 1965. Since 1968 Dr. Eisenberg has concentrated on expertise in the ancient arts, having lectured on this subject at New York University and presented several scholarly papers at the annual meetings of the Archaeological Institute of America, most recently on the ‘Roman’ Rubens Vase. His wide range of expertise is further revealed through other recent papers: on Egyptian bronzes at a Congress of the International Association of Egyptologists, on Etruscan bronze forgeries at an International Bronze Congress, on the ‘Greek’ Boston and Ludovisi thrones at the Magna Graecia Symposium in Venice, on Roman bronze forgeries at the 1999 International Bronze Congress, and on the Portland Vase as a Renaissance work of art at the 2003 International Congress of Classical Archaeology. He chaired a conference in London on the Phaistos Disk in 2008. In 1996 he was a Visiting Professor at the Institute of Classical Archaeology of the University of Leipzig, Germany. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Numismatic Society in 1952; a member of the Archaeological Institute of America in 1960 (and a Life Member in 1988); a Patron of the American Numismatic Society in 1955 (and a Life Associate in 1998); a Fellow for Life of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1966; and most recently, a Benefactor of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and an Honorary Fellow of the Egyptian Museum in Barcelona, Spain. Dr. Eisenberg has appeared as an Expert in the Courts of several states and has conducted appraisals for the U.S. Internal Revenue Service, the U.S. Treasury Department, the U.S. Customs Service, the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the J. Paul Getty Museum, as well as many other prominent institutions. He was elected a Qualified Appraiser by the

Appraisers Association of America in 1964 and has participated in several episodes of the Antiques Road Show. He served on the vetting committee of the European Fine Art Fair at Maastricht from 1993 to 2001 and was the Chairman and co-organizer of the New York Antiquarian International Fine Art Fair held in November 2001. Dr. Eisenberg has been a leader for many years in the promotion of the ethical acquisition of antiquities by museums and collectors and has delivered papers on this subject at the Archaeology Section of the U.K. Institute for Conservation in 1993 and at the 1998 International Congress of Classical Archaeologists. He gave an address by invitation on the international trade in antiquities at the UNIDROIT Convention in Rome in 1993. He organized two symposia in New York in 1994 on public policy and the movement of antiquities and in 1998 on the acquisition of antiquities by museums for the International Association of Dealers in Ancient Art, of which he is a founding member and was a member of the executive board from 1993 to 2002. In 1999 he presented testimony to the United States Cultural Properties Committee on the legal and illegal trade in ancient art in Italy. In 2003 he was a featured speaker and panel participant in the U.S. Government Conference on Stolen Mideast Antiquities in Washington, D.C. Also in 2003 he featured on the European TV channel Arte and on BBC Radio’s File on Four in indepth interviews on the antiquities trade. He appeared on television on CBS News, Dateline NBC, PBS Jim Lehrer News Hour, and CBC Television (Canada), and was interviewed on the BBC and PBR Radio, and in print in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Boston Globe, Philadelphia Inquirer, Washington Post, The Times, and a dozen other publications. In 2004 he was featured on a Discovery Channel program and on Fox News on the antiquities trade. Also in 2004 he presented a paper on ‘The Mesopotamian Antiquities Trade and the Looting of the Iraq Museum’ to the American Bar Association. In 2005 he was interviewed on the antiquities market and the collecting of antiquities on National Public Radio in the US and in 2006 on National Public Television in Athens, Greece. In 2007 he delivered a paper on ‘Perspectives on the Antiquities Trade and the Collector: Past, Present, and Future’ at the symposium ‘The Future of the Global Past’ at Yale University. He was interviewed in depth for his expertise on Greek television in 2008 and on Artfinding in 2009. In June 2012 Dr. Eisenberg was awarded the title of officiale in the Order of the Star of Italy by the President of the Republic of Italy for having provided a meaningful contribution to the prestige of Italy in his many publications on Etruscan and Roman art.

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Ancient Coins We carry a fine stock of select Greek silver and bronze coins from $100, Roman silver and bronze coins from $75, and Byzantine coins. We began our business as ‘Royal Coin Company’ in January 1942, 74 years ago, and Dr Eisenberg, co-founder of the firm, has specialized in ancient coins, as sole proprietor, since 1952.

Acknowledgements Dr. Eisenberg wishes to express his gratitude to F. Williamson Price who has again diligently prepared and co-authored the catalog, to Ramon Perez who did nearly all of the photography, to the scholars who attributed and reattributed some of the sculptures and vases, especially Kees Neeft and the late Konrad Schauenburg, and to the several others who prefer to remain anonymous.

Wanted to Purchase: Fine Antiquities of All Periods We are prepared to travel world-wide to acquire select works of legally acquired ancient art for our continually expanding clientele. We will purchase collections of any size, act as your agent to sell your objects on commission, or exchange them for other select pieces from our extensive inventory. Send photographs and full details with your letter or e-mail.

International Association of Dealers in Ancient Art

Confederation Internationale des Negociants en Oeuvres d’Art

Art and Antique Dealers League

In the Mougins Museum of Classical Art, opened in 2011, in the French Riviera, a few kilometers away from Cannes, among the four floors of works of Classical and Egyptian art there are nearly 200 antiquities acquired from Royal-Athena including many marble statues and heads, bronze helmets, and other ancient treasures. They have an excellent website and a superb catalog has been issued. See www.mouginsmusee.com.

MINERVA Minerva, the bi-monthly, international review of ancient art, archaeology, and numismatics, published in England, was established by Dr Eisenberg, its publisher and editor-in-chief from 1990 to 2009. It features the most extensive and timely coverage by any magazine of worldwide excavations, auctions and exhibitions emphasizing Greece, Etruria, the Roman Empire, Egypt, and the Near East. The book reviews are concise and objective. It also includes the most extensive annotated listings of international museum exhibitions, meetings, and symposia in ancient art and archaeology. Sample copies: $8 or £6 postpaid. www.minervamagazine.com editorial@minervamagazine.com Subscription (6 issues per year):

U.S.A., Canada, and rest of world:

U.K.: 1 year £30 Europe: 1 year £33

Surface: 1 year £38

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Recent Royal-Athena Catalogs: • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XV, 2004) illustrates in full color 190 objects. (72 pages, $5) • Gods & Mortals: Bronzes of the Ancient World (2004, illustrates in full color 80 objects, 80 pages, $5) • Ancient Arms, Armor, and Images of Warfare (2004, illustrates in full color 100 objects, 48 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XVI, 2005, illustrates in full color 192 objects, 80 pages, $5) • Mythologies of the Classical World & Ancient Egypt (2006, 48 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XVII, 2006, illustrates in full color 233 objects, 96 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XVIII, 2007, illustrates in full color 259 objects, 96 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XIX, 2008, illustrates in full color 222 objects, 96 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XX, 2009, illustrates in full color 217 objects, 96 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XXI, 2010, illustrates in full color 252 objects, 96 pages, $5) • 1000 Years of Ancient Greek Vases, 2010, illustrates in full color 195 vases, 96 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XXII, 2011, illustrates in full color 207 objects, 96 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XXIII, 2012, illustrates in full color 251 objects, 96 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XXIV, 2013, illustrates in full color 246 objects, 96 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XXV, 2014, illustrates in full color 220 objects, 96 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XXVI, 2015, illustrates in full color 272 objects, 96 pages, $5) • All 16 of the above catalogs (total list price $70), with price lists: $50. (Add $50 for overseas airmail.)

Other Royal-Athena Catalogs Available • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. IV, 1985) illustrates in full color over 600 works of art. 208 pages, 192 color plates: $15 • Gods & Mortals: Bronzes of the Ancient World (1989) illustrates in full color 180 objects. (52 pages, $5) • One Thousand Years of Ancient Greek Vases from Greece, Etruria, & Southern Italy (1990) illustrates in full color 186 vases. (48 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. VIII, 1995) illustrates in full color 244 objects. (48 pages, $5)

• Art of the Ancient World (Vol. IX, 1997) illustrates in full color 264 objects. (64 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. X, 1999) illustrates in full color 264 objects. (64 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XI, 2000) illustrates in full color 167 objects. (64 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XII, 2001) illustrates in full color 410 objects; 30 pages of glossaries and mythologies. (161 pages, $10) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XIII, 2002) illustrates in full color 203 objects. (80 pages, $5) • Art of the Ancient World (Vol. XIV, 2003) illustrates in full color 225 objects. (80 pages, $5) • A number of the objects in the last several catalogs are still available. Price lists will be included. • All 10 of the above catalogs, 1985 through 2003 (total list price $65), only $50. (Add $50 for overseas airmail.) Orders for our catalogs may be charged to your credit card.

Trade lnquiries We cordially invite inquiries from fellow art dealers, art consultants, architects, interior designers, and institutional collectors and investors.

Special Presentations, Condition Reports, and Color Photographs of Objects We can supply special presentations with further information, such as condition reports, and 4 x 6 in. (10x15 cm.) or 8 x 10 in. (20x25 cm.) color photographs, often with other views or close-ups, on any of the objects illustrated in this catalog upon request.

Conservation and Mounting Services A professional conservator working on our premises in New York does expert conservation and restoration of ancient art and antiques.

Terms and Conditions of Sale All items are offered subject to prior sale. All prices are subject to change without notice, otherwise, the current price list is valid through 2016. The following credit cards are honored: American Express,Visa, Mastercard. A deferred payment plan is also available. New York residents must add the appropriate sales taxes (currently 8 7/8%). No cash refunds may be made after 10 days of receipt; however, full credit is allowed on all objects purchased from our galleries with the exception of a few consigned items. All shipping and insurance charges will be billed to the purchaser. Title remains with Royal-Athena Galleries until payment is made in full.

royal-athena galleries established 1942 Jerome M. Eisenberg, Ph.D., Director

F. Williamson Price, Associate Director

New York Richard M. Novakovich Betty W. Eisenberg Suzanne George

Associate Director & Manager Comptroller Office Manager

Alan J. Eisenberg Arthur Ivan Bravo Ramon Perez

Associate Director Gallery Associate Photographer

London (Seaby Antiquities) Anthony Law

Administrator

Peter Clayton

Consultant


royal-athena galleries new york

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Royal-Athena Galleries, Art of the Ancient World 2016 - Vol. XXVII  

Royal-Athena Galleries - Art of the Ancient World, Volume XXVII - 2016 Featuring 219 Greek, Etruscan, Roman, Byzantine, Egyptian, & Near Eas...

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