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COVER STORY

MARISSA LARSON Raising her voice to help others.

11

By Tori Utley Cover Photo by Dawn Sanborn Photography

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018

BEAUTY AND FASHION 21

FINDING STYLE & FITNESS AT 40 40 Fit N’ Stylish blog.

HEALTH & WELLNESS 23

By Melissa McNallan

COMMUNITY 13

WOMEN HAVE GRIT Taking it on the road and bringing it back.

15

46

By Emily Watkins

CHANGING THE WORLD ONE WEEKEND AT A TIME All beliefs are honored at the Women & Spirituality Conference.

PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL

FOOD AND WINE

17

19

ITALIAN WINES Red, white and you. ITALIAN FARE AND AMORÉ! How one woman’s dream came true over chocolate cake.

45

MORE WOMEN ON THE MOVE Leadership lives in each of us. WOMEN LEADING HIGHER EDUCATION Learners empower learning. By Gina Dewink

49

32

25

LA DOLCE VITA! Part I: Experiencing the sweet life of Italy.

HOME DESIGN TRENDS Beautify and brighten your home. By Trish Amundson

35

COUNTRYSIDE BUILDERS A past winner stands out. By Cindy Mennenga

39

HANDY GAL’S HOME MAINTENANCE GUIDE Fall tips and resale considerations. By Cindy Mennenga

41

CAREERS FOR WOMEN Women dominate real estate industry. By Erin Pagel

By Catherine H. Armstrong

TRAVEL

FALL SHOWCASE OF HOMES AND Remodelers Tour Entries

LOCAL AUTHOR MEG HAFDAHL Debut novelist.

By Dawn Sanborn

WASTE NOT, WANT NOT Local organizations tackle food waste.

31

By Sarah Oslund

By Nicole Czarnomski

HOLISTIC HEALTH More than the sum of our parts.

By Debi Neville

27

SPECIAL HOME SEC TION

By Michelle Kalina

By Virginia Cooper

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HEMP HAS CHANGED MY LIFE Health benefits of hemp oil.

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THE RULE OF THREE Resilience creates happiness. By Kathryn Lenn

By Dawn Sanborn

By Sara Lohse

50

CELEBRATE FALL IN WABASHA SeptOberfest September 7 to October 27. By Holly Galbus

IN EVERY ISSUE 1. FROM THE EDITOR 8 IN THE KNOW 24 MARKETPLACE 52 CALENDAR EVENTS 53 ADVERTISERS INDEX

RWmagazine.com September/October 2018

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I’ve had some scary experiences getting mammograms. Cold. Clinical. Even when the tests turned out to be nothing, I’d already spent so much time worrying because no one talked to me. But since I started going to OMC’s Women’s Health Pavilion for my mammogram, the difference couldn’t be more striking. Warm. Personal. I may have gone into OMC as a patient, but I felt like I came out as a friend.

— Pat

The story of our patients is the story of us.

Visit olmstedmedicalcenter.org or call 507.529.6605 to learn more about our Women’s Services.


FROM THE EDITOR

ISSUE 107, VOLUME 19, NUMBER 4 SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER PUBLISHER

Jorrie L. Johnson, MBA, PMP

®

Rochester Women magazine hosted a Women's Empowerment (WE) event for women in business on July 24th at Chester's Kitchen and Bar.

MARKETING ACCOUNT MANAGER

Nikki Kranebell

GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Tessa Slisz

ASSISTANT EDITOR

Cindy Mennenga COPY EDITOR

Erin Gibbons PHOTOGRAPHY

Dawn Sanborn Photography Fagan Studios Jennifer Renae Photography COMMUNITY CALENDAR

Sara Albertelli

RochesterWomen is published six times per year by Women Communications, L.L.C., P.O. Box 5986, Rochester, MN 55903 Subscriptions available for $24 per year (six issues). Send check to the address above. All unsolicited manuscripts must be accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope. RochesterWomen assumes no responsibility for unsolicited materials. ©2018 Women Communications, L.L.C. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. RochesterWomen magazine does not necessarily endorse the claims or contents of advertising or editorial materials. Printed in the U.S.A. RochesterWomen is a member of the Minnesota Magazine & Publishing Association, Rochester Area Builders, Inc. and the Rochester Area Chamber of Commerce.

507-259-6362 • info@RWmagazine.com RWmagazine.com For advertising information: 507-254-7109

Women’s EMPOWERMENT I’VE BEEN RESEARCHING AND THINKING ABOUT WOMEN’S EMPOWERMENT. I FOUND PAPERS PUBLISHED ABOUT EMPOWERING WOMEN GLOBALLY AND NATIONALLY. LOCALLY, I HAVE SEEN MARCHES, MEETINGS AND THE LOCAL #USTOO MULTIMEDIA ARTS EVENT. ROCHESTERWOMEN HOSTED OUR OWN WOMEN’S EMPOWERMENT (WE) EVENT FOR WOMEN ENTREPRENEURS AT THE END OF JULY. WE WILL BE CO-SPONSORING WOMEN IN BUSINESS EVENTS (PAGE 26).

Jorrie Johnson at the Women's Empowerment (WE) event.

In this issue of RochesterWomen magazine, read about Marissa Larson (page 11), a beautiful young woman who overcame depression, chemical dependency and the challenges of being deaf. Through treatment and her own resiliency, she is recovering and now advocates for the deaf. She says, “We can do everything but hear.” Next, read about two local female doctors who created the GRIT for Women in Medicine: Growth, Resilience, Inspiration and Tenacity conference to be held September 20-22 in Truckee, California (page 13). The conference will “empower women and men in medicine with the skills and resources to remove barriers and bias of women in leadership positions specific to the challenges in health care.” The weekend of September 22-23, we have the opportunity to attend, meet and interact with women from across the nation at the 37th annual Women & Spirituality Conference held in Rochester for the second year. Hear from a few women who have participated in the conference (page 15). The More Women on the Move article is about women in leadership written by Sarah Oslund (page 17). I’m impressed by the number of women who are running for school board, city council and mayor in addition to county, state and national offices. Then, meet three women in higher education leadership in Rochester (page 19). They inspire and empower women to get more education to better their own lives and improve our world. The Rochester Area Builders Fall Showcase of Homes and Remodelers Tour, the weekends of September 22-23 and 29-30, are free and fun community events. Tour homes to get ideas for (re)creating your own safe, sacred space at home. With the booming real estate market, we offer you the opportunity to explore careers for women in real estate (page 41). Hear from a real estate agent, a title specialist and a mortgage lender about their careers. We also feature Italian food, wine and travel articles (pages 25, 27 and 28) in this issue. They will make you fall in love with Italy, or maybe your own life right here in Rochester. Enjoy,

We want to hear from you! Send comments, suggestions, ideas or original recipes to: RochesterWomen Editor, P.O. Box 5986, Rochester, MN 55903-5986 or email: editor@RWmagazine.com. RWmagazine.com September/October 2018

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N THE KNOW IN THE KNOW IN THE KNOW IN THE KNOW IN THE KNOW

QUARRY HILL FALL FESTIVAL Sat. Sept. 8 and Sun. Sept. 9, 11 a.m.–5 p.m.

Enjoy this annual event celebrating fall and all things uniquely Quarry Hill. Indoor activities include nature games, eco-friendly crafts and candle rolling, and outdoor activities include cave tours, canoeing, rock climbing, pumpkin decorating and more, qhnc.org.

ROCK THE MOAT SHREK THE MUSICAL

Oct. 6, 5–10 p.m., Castle Community

Sept. 7–30, Rochester Civic Theatre

Castle Community is renovating Rochester's historic Armory building into an arts and culture community center. Rock the Moat is a community block party featuring food and drinks by Cameo Restaurant, live music, a pop-up artist market, and hard hat tours of the project. Details at castlecommunity.org.

Based on the Oscar-winning DreamWorks Animation film, Shrek The Musical is a Tony Award-winning fairy tale adventure for the whole family to enjoy, buy tickets online, rochestercivictheatre.org.

BAREFOOT IN THE PARK Oct. 19–Nov. 4, Rochester Civic Theatre

FOUR DAUGHTERS VINEYARD & WINERY ANNUAL GRAPE STOMP Sat., Sept. 8, 1 p.m.–4 p.m.

Register or watch the annual fall grape stomp, prizes awarded for the winning stompers and the best costumed team, DJ Alan Reed will emcee, $10 per team, fourdaughtersvineyard.com.

Neil Simon’s Barefoot in the Park is a romantic comedy focusing on a pair of newlyweds, Corie and Paul, as they begin married life in a tiny, 5th-floor walkup apartment in a Manhattan brownstone, buy tickets online, rochestercivictheatre.org.

ASSISI HEIGHTS SPIRITUALITY CENTER JOURNEY OF GRATITUDE Mon., Oct. 22, 6:30–8:30 p.m. or Tues., Oct. 23, 2:30–4 p.m.

JOURNEY OF PEACE IX: THE VOICE OF HOPE! Sun., Oct. 28, 2:00–4:00pm

The Journey of Peace is an invitation to all peoples and cultures to move with urgency to bring peace with compassion to our world and community. The event is planned by and inspired by youth of many interfaith traditions.

EXPLORING WITH SOUL COLLAGE® Mon., Oct. 29, 6:30–8 p.m.

NORTHFIELD RIVERFRONT FINE ARTS FESTIVAL CANNON RIVER WINERY GRAPE HARVEST EXPERIENCE 2018

Sat, Sept. 8 & Sun., Sept. 9, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Rain or shine

507-645-8877, northfieldartsguild.org.

In a meditative atmosphere, discover images using a technique called Soul Collage®—a transformative process of creating personal cards of greater awareness of your inner wisdom. In a relaxed and supportive space, spend time with images, assembling collages, composing reflective writing using a journaling technique while tapping into your intuition. For more details and to register for workshops at Assisi Heights visit rochesterfranciscan.org or call 507-280-2195.

Sat. (8:30 a.m.) & Sun. (9:30 a.m.) Sept. 8 & 9, 15 & 16, 22 & 23 and 29 & 30

Get shuttled to and from the winery and vineyard, an educational, hands-on harvesting experience, followed by a delicious catered meal and wine tasting, must be 16 or older and 21 or older for wine tasting, $25/person, 507-263-7400, cannonriverwinery.com.

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September/October 2018 RWmagazine.com

OSLC ANNUAL FAIR TRADE MARKET Fri., Oct. 6, 4 p.m.–7 p.m.; Sat., Oct. 7, 8 a.m.–4 p.m.; Oct. 8, 9 a.m.–2 p.m. 2124 Viola Rd NE, Rochester

Our Savior’s Lutheran Church Fair Trade Market features Fair Trade coffee, teas, chocolates for purchase, credit cards accepted, 507-289-3021, rochesteroslc.org/fair-trade-market and on Facebook.


W WOMEN AND SPIRITUALITY CONFERENCE September 22-23, 2018 Mayo Civic Center Rochester, MN

An amazing multi-faith gathering that celebrates diversity, spiritual experience and healing.

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Copyright © 2015 Joseph Ribkoff Inc. All rights reserved. Any reproduction and/or use of the Joseph Ribkoff logo for commercial or promotional purposes is forbidden without the written authorization of Joseph Ribkoff Inc.

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COVER STORY

m a r i s s a larson Marissa Larson RAISING HER VOICE TO HELP OTHERS BY TORI UTLEY

PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAWN SANBORN PHOTOGRAPHY

32-year-old Marissa Larson.:

MARISSA LARSON HAS HAD HER FAIR SHARE OF CHALLENGES. FROM LEARNING TO ACCLIMATE TO LIFE AS A DEAF PERSON TO EXPERIENCING ALCOHOLISM AND DEPRESSION, HER STORY CAN TEACH US ALL ABOUT THE VALUE OF RESILIENCY—AND HOW BOUNCING BACK FROM DIFFICULTY IS WHERE OUR GREATEST PURPOSE CAN BE FOUND.

WE CAN DO EVERYTHING BUT HEAR

I WASN’T THE ONLY "DIFFERENT" PERSON

Larson has been deaf most of her life. The idaho native lost her hearing when she was just 3 years old for reasons doctors could never explain. Having to learn to live, communicate and play differently, Larson says growing up deaf wasn’t always easy. And with a few family moves across the country—from Idaho to Texas and, finally, to Minnesota—it was challenging to find friends and build a community. “It wasn’t easy growing up b-eing the only deaf person in my school,” Larson says. “I was bullied, left out a lot and struggled to make friends who were willing to learn sign language or take the time to get to know me.” But Larson knew, as do others living with a disability, that she was much more than a deaf person. She was a daughter and a friend, excelled academically, had a great sense of humor and was a great athlete. Today, as an advocate for the deaf community, she’s made it her mission to educate others who “can do everything but hear.”

After moving around as a child, Larson describes interacting with the deaf community for the first time as "culture shock." When she realized that she wasn’t the only deaf person in the world, “A sense of relief washed over me. I was happy to know I wasn’t the only ‘different’ person.” Finding community was a springboard for Larson. She made friends, got involved in her high school and discovered her athletic abilities in swimming, even landing a spot on the swim team for the Deaf Olympics in Venezuela in 2007. “I learned to love being deaf. It’s not a handicap to me,” Larson says. “In reality, I have the better of two worlds—English and ASL—and that makes me bilingual.” Larson later graduated with a bachelor’s degree in social work from Gallaudet University in Washington, D.C., the only university in the world specifically for the deaf. And after graduation, she took up her

calling helping others by advocating for Deaf and Hard of Hearing in Chicago, Ohio and, finally, back in Minnesota.

FINDING RECOVERY Although many doors and opportunities opened for Larson, she says moving back to Minnesota presented some new challenges. She was struggling to find a job, something she notes is a common challenge for the deaf community. It was during this time that she noticed her life was in a downward spiral at the hands of alcohol and depression. “I would drink to feel normal and fit in with everyone,” Larson says. “I didn’t know how to be myself or to communicate my feelings or to feel comfortable around people, so that’s why I turned to drinking—to calm my nerves and have fun.” What helped Larson feel comfortable initially later led to increasing feelings of depression and isolation. After hitting rock bottom, Larson says she got sober and began her recovery on November 15, 2013. “I decided to get help, RWmagazine.com September/October 2018

11


so I went to treatment and started going to meetings,” says Larson, who has now been sober for four and a half years. “I still have to remind myself to take it one day at a time. I’m now much calmer, happier and more content with my life than I’ve ever been,” says Larson. “I’m inspired by hearing others share their stories of recovery. It motivates me to do better, act better and be of service to others.”

RAISING HER VOICE Between helping the deaf community through her role as a social worker and an ASL teaching experience in Managua, Nicaragua in 2013, it’s clear that Larson’s gift is truly in helping others. “Being deaf has opened my eyes to how much oppression and discrimination we face on a daily basis,” says Larson. “This has taught me how to fight for my rights, to stand up for myself and for what I believe in and for the deaf community as a whole. Now, I not only fight for the deaf community, but for other minority communities too.” Today, she’s bringing her advocacy to the workplace. In 2015, she was hired as a clinical research coordinator at Mayo Clinic, where she’s now using her career to educate others on deaf culture.

“Mayo has been very gracious to me by providing all the accommodations that I require to do my job effectively,” she says. “I am truly grateful to be working for a wonderful institution, and it has been an amazing experience so far.” Larson was recently given the opportunity share her story with her colleagues in Mayo Clinic’s Otorhinolaryngology department. “It helped improve the workplace atmosphere by breaking the ice,” she says. “It’s not often deaf people have that kind of opportunity, so I feel very blessed to have been able to share my story.” Larson’s story can be an inspiration to others living with a disability: With the right perspective, what was once seen as a disability can later become your most valuable asset. Although life will have its fair share of struggles and failures, according to Larson, it’s just important to persevere and see where life will take you. “Never give up, and keep pushing forward to make your voice heard,” she says. “Stay strong and believe things will get better, and never stop believing in what you want or need. Challenge others and make them think. Most importantly, never stop chasing your dreams and goals.”

Larson's floral shirt and black pants are from Hers located in Shops in University Square and her glasses are part the signature line at Optical Vision w/Flair.

TORI UTLEY IS A ROCHESTER-AREA WRITER AND ENTREPRENEUR.

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Women Have

COMMUNITY

Grit

TAKING IT ON THE ROAD AND BRINGING IT BACK BY DEBI NEVILLE IT BEGAN WITH DISCUSSIONS AT BOOK CLUB: THE BURNOUT OF WOMEN IN THE MEDICAL FIELD, DISPARITY IN DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION, GENDER PARITY AND THE PROVERBIAL “GLASS CEILING.” THESE ISSUES BECAME A RECURRING THEME WITH THE BOOK CLUB—THEN THEY DECIDED TO DO SOMETHING ABOUT IT.

“They” are Anjali Bhagra, M.D. and Susan Moeschler, M.D. The “something” developed into the GRIT for Women in Medicine: Growth, Resilience, Inspiration, and Tenacity conference, the weekend of September 20-22 at the Ritz-Carlton, Lake Tahoe in Truckee, California. According to the two organizers, the conference was conceived three years ago and took 18 months to plan.

SOLD OUT EVENT “There has been an overwhelming response,” said Dr. Bhagra. “We had to limit the numbers due to the size of the facility.” Selling out at approximately 300, is a strong message that let organizers know they had hit a nerve in the medical community. The target audience is broad according to organizers: professional women and men in health care who are interested in developing a gender-balanced leadership that is representative of patient population and society. Some of the 48 speakers are from Mayo Clinic but others are from across the country. The conference is an opportunity to share problems but more importantly, solutions, policies and procedures, both on a professional and personal level. Subjects range from retention and fatigue effect on patient experience, to compliance and outcomes. Additional issues include maternity and parental leave, co-worker support, education and the dramatic changes in communication. “Attendees will discover the benefits of social media for women in the medical field including networking, mentoring, collaboration and career advancement. Attendees will also learn about the potential pitfalls and limitations of using social media,” says Dr. Susan Pitt, one of the presenters. Presentations are relevant and up-to-date with medical issues but also diverse topics such as, “How to Lead High Impact Strategic Initiatives that Accelerate Diversity and Inclusion,” “Recruiting and Leading the Next Generation for Success and Diversity,” “Mentoring Women and Navigating Career Changes” and “Re-inventing Self.” “I am thrilled to be part of GRIT, and excited about interacting with talented, motivated and enthusiastic women! My goal is to be provocative by starting the conversation around women successfully

Dr. Susan Moe schle

r, M.D. and Dr.

Anjali Bhagra,

promoting each other and themselves, positively impacting career trajectories, and changing environments. We can no longer wait to be selected, but must be strategic and bold,” comments presenter Amy Williams, M.D.

M.D.

SO MUCH SUPPORT Co-organizer Dr. Moeschler says, “The event is a culmination of support from our divisions, departments and many leaders within medicine. This includes physicians, researchers and administrators to promote patient care and work-life integration.” Mayo Clinic was very supportive. “Dr. Noseworthy (Dr. John Noseworthy, president and CEO, Mayo Clinic) made a video that proved to be very valuable in our mission of GRIT,” Dr. Bhagra states. “They are looking for ways to mitigate issues in many areas.” Organizers are very proud of the fact the conference is financially self-supporting. Ticket prices cover the costs. Not only are the format and subjects enticing, but the location provides a great weekend getaway. “We wanted it to be inspiring both physically and mentally,” Dr. Bhagra says.

TAKE HOME TOPICS The organizers encourage attendees to take awareness back to their community. Identifying issues and brainstorming to discover relevant answers is pertinent in all fields from classroom to office. The organizer’s goals upon completion: attendees should be able to demonstrate skills to enhance communication with colleagues and better manage conflict. They will be able to identify symptoms of burnout in themselves and describe strategies to manage symptoms. During GRIT, words of frustration will be replaced with positive words: empowerment, leadership, rejuvenation and equity. Work should be a journey Dr. Bhagra believes, “You need to re-evaluate and become empowered. We have to find our own solutions. Change cannot happen if you only ruminate.” DEBI NEVILLE IS A FREELANCE WRITER FROM ROCHESTER. SHE ENJOYS READING, ALL THINGS THEATRE AND HER FAMILY.

RWmagazine.com September/October 2018

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On October 5th we will be celebrating our passion for both the ART and ARTISTS of South East Minnesota. This annual event is a Rochester tradition and is free to the public.

JOIN US! Art & Hors D'Oeuvres

We are located at: 320 S. Broadway Rochester, Minnesota Just across from the Steam Cafe. You will find FREE parking right behind our building after 5 pm.

OCTOBER 5TH • 5-9 PM SEMVA_SO18.indd 1

7/24/18 4:27 PM

Please Join Us For …

“Fall Solutions”

Please join Dr. Babovic, along with the staff from the Plastic Surgery department of Olmsted Medical Center, for an informational seminar.

Tuesday, October 2 at 5:30 PM Somerby Golf Club 975 Somerby Parkway NE, Byron The evening will also include: • hors d’oeuvres and refreshments • door prizes. Space is limited. RSVP by September 21, 2018 by calling 507.529.6740.

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7/30/18 4:59 PM


COMMUNITY

Changing the World One Weekend at a Time

ALL BELIEFS ARE HONORED AT THE WOMEN AND SPIRITUALITY CONFERENCE BY VIRGINIA COOPER LAST SEPTEMBER, OVER 750 PARTICIPANTS OF THE 36TH WOMEN AND SPIRITUALITY CONFERENCE WERE WARMLY WELCOMED AT THE NEWLY REDESIGNED MAYO CIVIC CENTER. THE CONFERENCE OFFERED 84 DIFFERENT WORKSHOPS ON TOPICS RELATED TO FEMINISM, SPIRITUALITY, HOLISTIC HEALING, SELF-HELP AND MORE. OVER 80 VENDORS OFFERED THEIR UNIQUE WARES IN THE EXHIBIT AREA, PLUS MANY READERS AND HEALERS WERE ON HAND TO OFFER THEIR GUIDANCE. LILAC WELLNESS CENTER CREATED A BEAUTIFUL SPACE FOR MASSAGE AND BODYWORK WITH A QUIET AREA FOR MEDITATION AND REFLECTION.

EVER-CHANGING CONFERENCE After 35 years at Minnesota State University (formerly Mankato State University), the conference now finds its home in Rochester. Evolving from their Women’s Studies Department in 1981, the conference has given voice to those with a message to share through teaching a workshop and those open to new insights or experiences through learning, personal growth or healing. Their mission statement reflects their goal to provide a “supportive and nurturing setting for a dialogue of caring and mutual respect between and among women and men from many spiritual and religious traditions.” Over the years, the conference has been a safe space for experiential workshops like yoga, drumming, moving meditation or dance, discussion groups, lectures and presentations. Many of the presenters have utilized the conference to present papers for their master’s thesis or doctoral research on topics ranging from theology to feminism. What has made it a fascinating experience is that it changes completely from year to year with new presenters, new workshops, new talents and new ideas.

WOMEN SPEAK College student Ashalul Aden gave a talk at the 2017 conference entitled, “Social Justice in Islam.” She spoke of her hectic life, learning to take care of herself and her decision to slow down her journey through life by focusing on patience and her personal commitment to her spirituality. As a black Muslim woman, she faces prejudice every day and often feels like the world is against her.

In her writings, Aden shares, “I deal with racism, sexism and Islamophobia regularly. Growing up, I was silent about those things and listened to what people who had negative perceptions of me had to say. It was not until I was in high school, I decided that I had enough. Every human being deserves to have their voice heard regardless of their ethnicity, gender, race, religion or any other labels.” She wants to live in a world where people can live peacefully among each other, and she knows that takes hard work. She says, “It is the job of every person to learn how to live with people who are different and embrace those differences. Diversity in community is a beautiful thing, there are so many different things to learn about each other, whether that be language, customs, anything!” The world would be a boring place if people all looked alike, sounded alike and had the same interests, Aden suggests. She adds, “We should all embrace these differences and admire the beauty that diversity brings to our perspective. Historically, women have had their voices silenced because men controlled what they could say, wear, etc. It is now—and has always been—the time for women to speak out and fight the barriers men have placed on us.” Aden defines her spirituality as an interpretation of her soul—that personal, deep self-journey, leading her to find her purpose and identity in the world. Last year’s conference impacted her to not rush her journey to finding herself. She found new clarity and wisdom knowing that this journey through life is an enduring task and requires patience. When asked what she feels is the difference between religion and spirituality, Aden says,

“Religion is a loaded word. Religious scholars have a difficult time defining it. Religion is a lot like race; it is a social construct. To me, I define religion as a community where people have shared beliefs about God, afterlife and religious practices.”

HEALING AND HELPING Anyone who has met Sue Stoltz will feel instantly blessed by her smiling presence. Invited by a dear friend, she drove to Rochester for her first conference experience. Since a young age, she has had a deep compassion and reverence for all living things and life itself. She has always known she had an ability to touch and heal people, to be the one to make a difference in someone’s life. She had never talked about it or understood it. Through her experience in that “joyous weekend” she learned to stop secondguessing herself for who she is, to accept herself for being different and acknowledge her abilities. Her experience has helped her to heal, so that she can begin to help others. The Women & Spirituality Conference was one of the most powerful awakening weekends she has ever experienced. For Stoltz, her spirituality has no limits; it is the free-flowing energy of the Holy Spirit that can be shared without judgment. She gives thanks every day to the Creator. She feels that as a woman she is still learning to find her unique voice, and in today’s chaotic world, it is time for women to find their voices and that it is time for women’s voices to be heard. She is on her path to understanding herself and says once she does, “Watch out, because I will be shouting from the rooftops, what it is, what I have been put on this earth to do!” RWmagazine.com September/October 2018

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LAW OF ATTRACTION Another conference presenter last year, Shawngela Pierce, teaches others about the Law of Attraction. She says, “It’s been around for millennia and guides us to tap into our own spiritual guidance, whether we call it ‘Source,’ 'God' or 'providence.'” She teaches people to learn to know who we really are: We are spiritual beings in a physical body, a completely different approach from thinking of ourselves as physical beings seeking spirituality. She offers spiritual healing retreats, individual sessions and uses chi-gong, meditation and movement to help her clients to open to the message of their own inner guidance. She offered her reflections about the difference between religion and spirituality. “My definition of spirituality is tapping into your Source. I feel that in many respects spirituality is different from religion. Religion has doctrine, rules to be followed. Spirituality is listening to your spirit and letting that be your guide. Always we are awakening to loving thyself and loving thy neighbor.” For Pierce, her spiritual practice is woven into her life; she “walks the walk” as she says, and is guided from within. She is currently writing a book entitled “Law of Attraction Healing” that will be available at the September 2018 Women and Spiritualty Conference. The message of her book is that we can use the Law of Attraction to heal and to train our subconscious minds to understand ourselves as creative beings. “We need to relearn that we are powerful beings. When we have been misled to believe that someone else knows better than we do what we need; this is disempowering. Relearning that we are powerful is not random. We can own the fact that we create imbalance or disease in our bodies or lives. When we take back our power, we can heal ourselves and our lives from within,” explains Pierce. Pierce is in private practice in Sedona, Arizona. For more information visit her website at seekwithinyou.com.

HONORING THE FEMININE POWER Tina Cotterman volunteered her time and energy last year as a workshop proctor, also her first year at the conference. She identifies as Pagan and acknowledges the essence of the natural world as her inspiration for her spirituality. This has given her the ability to feel grounded and centered in her life. Cotterman was raised Lutheran and still honors her roots in the church. She lives her spirituality at all 16

September/October 2018 RWmagazine.com

times, finding solace in nature. She grew up on 20 acres of natural forest, and the cycles of life in the woods gave her more answers to her spiritual questions than the church. As a 10-year-old girl, Cotterman was deeply impacted by the death of her beloved grandfather. At his funeral she was so overwhelmed with grief that she ran out of the funeral home crying. Even at that age, she already knew she was an empath. She questioned, “Why would God do this?” Her mom told her, “It’s just the way things are; you have to have faith.” Not understanding this as an answer led her to look to the natural world, the cycles of life and death, which has brought peace along with grace and beauty to her path through life. Cotterman embraces the woman-centric conference as a celebration honoring the feminine power. She spoke of the recent #MeToo movement and how so many brave women are sharing their stories of being raped, abused or molested. She is proud to see women accepted for their truth. She also talked about her own #MeToo experience and how she used it as a “point to grow from.” Cotterman describes her own cycle of victimhood as a “labyrinth of pain.” The way out of her pain was through therapy and personal work, drawing strength from her spirituality as she learned to push through the pain. She learned to recognize her feelings, not to push them down, to feel them and let them go. Her focus has shifted to one of positive sexuality: She has learned to embrace her inner goddess, her divine feminine, to be empowered. This, she says, is key to being both pro women and pro-men, honoring both sexes. When we are in the victim role we diminish our total self. When we honor both the inner feminine and the inner male side of ourselves we can live as an empowered, whole person. Cotterman is an environmental scientist working to better air quality in Minnesota schools, prisons and businesses. She is also high priestess of her coven and teaches classes to young women interested in exploring pagan traditions at a Twin Cities bookstore. She supports and encourages young women to revere strong female role models and to embrace the divine feminine. She also offers “seekers” classes and a tarot series; all her classes are free.

2018 CONFERENCE DETAILS The 2018 Women and Spirituality Conference will be held September 22-23 at the Mayo Civic Center in Rochester. The keynote speaker of this year’s conference is Donna Mejia, assistant professor at the University of Colorado - Boulder. Mejia is a choreographer, scholar, director and performer specializing in contemporary dance, traditions of African and Arab diaspora and emerging fusion dance traditions. A Fulbright scholar with a Master of Fine Arts, her research focus on gender representations and social coding in dance and movement traditions, transnationalism and emerging models of global citizenship promise to be enlightening and timely. To register for or volunteer at the Women and Spirituality Conference 2018, visit womenandspirituality.org.

VIRGINIA COOPER IS A WRITER, INTUITIVE POET AND MUSICIAN WHO LIVES AND WORKS IN THE ROCHESTER AREA. SHE ATTENDED HER FIRST WOMEN & SPIRITUALITY CONFERENCE IN 1986. OVER THE LAST 30 YEARS SHE HAS PRESENTED MANY WORKSHOPS ON SEVERAL TOPICS, INCLUDING SHAMANIC DRUMMING, CONNECTING WITH YOUR OWN SPIRITUAL GUIDANCE, HEALING WITH FLOWER ESSENCES AND VIBRATIONAL MEDICINE. SHE IS CURRENTLY WRITING A BOOK ON THE GODDESS AND THE DIVINE FEMININE. SHE CAN BE REACHED AT JOYISESSENTIAL@GMAIL.COM


PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL

More Women on the Move LEADERSHIP LIVES IN EACH OF US

BY SARAH OSLUND

SINCE THE BEGINNING OF TIME, WOMEN HAVE BRAVELY AND TIRELESSLY FOUGHT TO ASSERT THEIR POSITIONS AS EXPERTS, TRAILBLAZERS AND INNOVATORS. FROM COCO CHANEL TO MARIE CURIE, NORA EPHRON TO ROSA PARKS, MAYA ANGELOU TO ELEANOR ROOSEVELT, THESE INSPIRATIONAL LEADERS SHARE A COMMON BOND: THEY DID NOT LET FEAR, DOUBT OR CONSEQUENCE INHIBIT THEIR ABILITY TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

SUCCESSFUL LEADERSHIP From elementary school class elections to the race for the White House, people want to understand what ensures success as a leader. But what often goes unrecognized is that there are many different visions of what constitutes a successful leader. Imagine if each of the women above had followed the exact same – path to “successful leadership.” They may not have achieved all that they did or have as much of an impact on the world. What made them incredible leaders were their unique dreams, talents, goals, influences, opportunities and many other qualities that each possessed and shared with others.

OVERCOMING OBSTACLES TO LEADERSHIP Some roadblocks on the road to becoming great leaders are self-imposed. Insecurity, uncertainty and self-doubt can creep up on anyone, but often it’s fear of judgment by others that prevents growth. Licensed psychologist Dr. Patricia Price believes that, “A true leader is someone who can be relied upon to stand by principles, rather than being overly driven by current popular opinion. These principles are not developed in a vacuum. They, instead, stem from open-mindedness, mental flexibility, social awareness, depth of experience and emotional integrity.” A leader is able to effectively communicate her rationale for decisions and actions, even when they are not widely accepted, Price explains. “In addition to all this, a great leader needs to be aware of the limits to her competency. No one person is an expert in all areas. The leader needs to seek advice and guidance, when outside her area of expertise.”

ENCOURAGING OTHERS As a health, lifestyle and business coach, Brittney Lutjen helps others develop their leadership abilities. She says, “Leaders can fall into the trap of managing a team without influencing them or helping them grow. In our busy work lives, it’s easy to become complacent and just get the job done because it offers gratification and recognition. But leadership is about growing others to create their own win.”

Samantha Duke

Samantha Duke, who has served in multiple leadership roles including civil service senator for the University of Minnesota Student Senate, believes true leaders support, encourage and challenge others. “Good organizational leaders develop and promote people,” she says, “even if that means the person they’re mentoring might outgrow their current position and pursue opportunities elsewhere.”

TAKING ACTION TO BECOME A BETTER LEADER Leadership is all about action. Here are three small steps you can take today to become a better leader: • Walk the talk. It’s easy to complain about injustices and societal issues, but taking action and looking for ways to improve the world around you is the sign of a true leader.

Brittney Lutjen

• Be purposefully vulnerable. A famous quote by Eleanor Roosevelt is, “Do one thing each day that scares you.” Commit to stepping out of your comfort zone. • Demonstrate integrity. Do the right thing for the right reason regardless of the consequence.

LEARNING LEADERSHIP Heather Holmes, owner of Heather Holmes Solutions and a long-term leader of Rotary International, offers some additional words of advice in strengthening your position as a leader. “Stay humble, and own your mistakes,” she suggests. “And don’t run from the fear you may feel. Embrace that fear; it will ultimately fuel thoughtful decision-making.” If you are ready to be intentional about your leadership journey and would like additional tools and resources, please connect with More Women on the Move at morewomenonthemove@gmail.com.

Heather Holmes

SARAH OSLUND IS THE OWNER OF INSPIRE AND IS A CORE TEAM MEMBER OF MORE WOMEN ON THE MOVE.

Dr. Patricia Price RWmagazine.com September/October 2018

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PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL

Women Leading Higher Education LEARNERS EMPOWER LEARNING BY GINA DEWINK

PHOTOGRAPHY BY FAGAN STUDIOS

WOMEN REPRESENT JUST 30 PERCENT OF UNIVERSITY PRESIDENTS OR CHANCELLORS, ACCORDING TO A 2016 AMERICAN COUNCIL ON EDUCATION STUDY. WHILE THE REPORT DOESN’T ACCOUNT FOR OTHER LEADERSHIP POSITIONS HELD WITHIN HIGHER EDUCATION, THE POINT REMAINS: ROCHESTER IS ATYPICAL BY HAVING THREE MAJOR INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER LEARNING WITH WOMEN LEADERS AT THE HELM.

WINONA STATE UNIVERSITY–ROCHESTER Jeanine E. Gangeness, Ph.D. Dr. Gangeness jokingly refers to herself as the “WSU-Rochester roadie.” But, in fact, she is the Winona State University-Rochester (WSU-R) chief executive and operations officer responsible for leading the campus. “I work with the team to develop planning documents for marketing, recruitment, enrollment, graduate programs, student services, finance and facilities,” Dr. Gangeness explains. “Through intense engagement of staff, we work together to improve local culture, increase graduate enrollment and develop strategy for branch campus sustainability.” Annually, WSU-R serves the higher education needs of over 800 undergraduate and 450 graduate students in Rochester. Dr. Gangeness describes the WSU-Rochester culture as supportive and respectful, while honoring the variety of life experiences that bring people to the institution. Dr. Gangeness explains, “We work together to ensure our students are able to take advantage of our higher education opportunities and achieve their career dreams. This is the promise I made when I came to Rochester, and it’s been easy to keep!” When asked how she came to choose a career in higher education, Dr. Gangeness says, “The dream and the promise. I believe higher education is the best equalizer for achieving life goals. Everyone should have an opportunity to achieve their dream, and higher education is the best way to realize a better career, exposure to new thinking and a life of your choosing.” WSU-R has been providing education to Rochester for over 100 years. Dr. Gangeness believes the institution provides opportunities to every student by empowering them to take the next step in their life. “That’s what makes this job so amazing,” she shares, “I’m creating an atmosphere and space for the superstars to work!”

ROCHESTER COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE Michelle Pyfferoen, MBA As the interim vice president of academic affairs of Rochester Community and Technical College (RCTC), Michelle Pyfferoen is involved in developing business and community partnerships to provide opportunities for the success of students. RCTC is Minnesota’s oldest original community college, with its 1915 founding date making it one of the nation’s oldest. “Early in my career,” Pyfferoen begins, “I worked with entrepreneurs, teaching them the skills to open, operate and grow a successful business.” As Pyfferoen’s career has evolved, she has aimed to help individuals build the skills necessary to meet the needs of employers. “I transitioned into my current work in career and technical education from there,” Pyfferoen explains. “This allows me the opportunity to build partnerships to align education with the needs of business and industry, all of which I’m familiar with. Education is lifelong, and we all play critical roles.” Pyfferoen cites finding skilled employees as one of the region’s biggest challenges. She states, “The availability of a workforce with the right skills is critical to the growth of a community. Therefore, by teaching students the skills needed to work in high-demand, high-wage occupations, they can find careers that support families, which in turn create strong communities.”   RWmagazine.com September/October 2018

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According to Pyfferoen, getting to know the stories of students is the best part of her career. “I continue to be amazed at the diversity of students’ experiences and backgrounds,” Pyfferoen says of working at RCTC. “I am so rewarded by their success in achieving their educational goals and careers following graduation.” Pyfferoen’s advice is to be passionate about what you do. “Those who have the greatest joy and success in higher education—whether students or leadership—are those who constantly look for ways to engage with learning.”

UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA ROCHESTER Lori Carrell, Ph.D. “Insatiable curiosity coupled with a desire to make a difference” is what led Dr. Lori Carrell to a career in higher education. “As a child,” Dr. Carrell, chancellor of University of Minnesota Rochester (UMR),

begins, “I remember waiting at the mailbox for National Geographic to arrive. I would marvel at the diverse cultures and scientific discoveries. The desire to make a difference and work in an innovative field has always been with me.” UMR is one of the youngest universities in the country, with its first graduating class in 2013. “We are a unique campus with a diverse population of students seeing success in a rigorous degree program. More than half of our undergraduate health sciences students are from underrepresented populations, and we see no difference in student success rates,” Dr. Carrell explains. “I credit UMR students’ success to the evidence-driven, educational innovations of our faculty and staff.” Dr. Carrell believes the Rochester community is intertwined with UMR because of the history of citizen advocacy that launched the campus. “When potential students take their tours, I see excitement light up their faces when they pass through the Gonda Building of Mayo Clinic. We are bringing 18- to 22-year-olds to downtown Rochester, and they are filling our community with passion, vibrancy and innovation. And the community is fostering our students’ drive with all of its distinctive amenities.” Dr. Carrell refers to UMR as “a playground for educators committed to student success” and an “innovation hub.” As she made her way from vice chancellor to chancellor of UMR, Dr. Carrell met with many leaders in Rochester and beyond. “What I hear from other leaders is that Rochester has an educational ecosystem and community support unlike other regions,” she states. “I talk regularly about our deep gratitude to the trailblazers who brought UMR here, as well as the community, which has made this complementary relationship a possibility.” GINA DEWINK IS AN AUTHOR, FREELANCE WRITER AND COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER LIVING IN ROCHESTER.

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BEAUTY AND FASHION

FINDING STYLE & FITNESS AT 40 FIT N’ STYLISH BLOG BY MELISSA MCNALLAN I’VE BEEN TRYING DREAMS OUT SINCE MY 36TH BIRTHDAY. AROUND THAT TIME, I WAS LEADING THE SALES BOARD AT A CAR DEALERSHIP, HAD RECEIVED A PROMOTION DESPITE DAMAGING A FEW $40,000+ VEHICLES AND WAS ENJOYING MY WORK. IF I COULD SUCCEED AT SOMETHING I DIDN’T KNOW MUCH ABOUT, I THOUGHT I COULD BE SUCCESSFUL IN SOMETHING I DREAMED OF DOING. For the curious: The vehicle damage was caused by my errant perception when parking large SUVs. I still remember that horrible crunching noise. Both times I was pulling forward and turning left.  

PRE-BLOG DREAM CHASING When I was growing up, I wanted to be an actress, writer and editor of a major fashion magazine. I planned to live in Manhattan, Paris and Los Angeles whenever I wasn’t traveling. Life happened, and I’ve stayed planted in my hometown: Rochester. After leaving car sales, I began chasing my younger dreams. Why not? I worked full time as a freelance writer, traveled the country setting up 5K races, and doing commercial acting in the Twin Cities. I was even an extra on ABC’s “In an Instant: Home Invasion Horror.” My adventures were fun, but unfulfilling.

BEGINNING 40 FIT N’ STYLISH My fiance is CEO and founder of PayGo, a software company. His advice is always from that creative, own-your-future mindset. While on a date night, he encouraged me to make a profitable outlet for my interests that would allow me creative and schedule control. The next weekend we were at a cabin up north. I’d just learned that I hadn’t gotten the part of a kayaker in a Nature Valley commercial. One friend mentioned Instagram influencers and bloggers. She follows several, knows of profitable ones and suggested I give it a go. I began structuring 40 Fit N’ Stylish before we left the cabin. I was 39.  

OVER A YEAR IN AND... Soon after I began my blog I was explaining what my blog would be with some uncertainty to Tessa Leung, owner of Tessa’s Office Wine Boutique. She reassured me that my business would tell me what it wants to be in time. Leung was right. My blog’s data indicates my audience is most interested in working out, handling life’s complications and food.      Along with being a dream job, blogging gives me an excuse to follow my curiosity. One of my followers may want to know if they should give online yoga a go, which restaurants are calorie splurge-worthy or what to do (and not) when visiting San Francisco.

WHAT’S NEXT FOR 40 FIT N’ STYLISH Future blogs will include posts about finances and physical fitness. Both have been challenges for me. In the past decade I’ve gone from a size 14 to a size 4. My muscles have been sculpted thanks to good nutrition and well-spent hours in the gym. As I trim and sculpt my financial well-being, I’ll share my struggles and what I learn. It’s one of those if-Ican-do-it-anybody-can journeys.   MELISSA MCNALLAN, BLOGGER-IN-CHIEF AT 40FITNSTYLISH.COM.

POPULAR POSTS: I’m Trying the ‘Fit and Fierce Over 40’ Course on DailyOM I took the “Fit and Fierce Over 40” yoga course on DailyOM. After I paid, I felt that first day of class dread. Could it end up being full of over-the-top kumbaya moments? Spoiler alert: I loved it. ’Treating People Well’ is a Must Read for Leading a Stylish Life (IMHO) As a confirmed book nerd I can’t resist posting about them. “Treating People Well” was written by two former White House social secretaries and covers 12 essential practices in the art of manners. They also share inside stories without stooping to gossip. My 4 Favorite Fit Made in Minnesota Snacks Why is it so easy to fall for sugar-loaded deviants? It’s like they’re the leather-clad boys our parents warned us about (making them only more seductive). I love sharing food options that are satisfying and good—nutritional marriage material. RWmagazine.com September/October 2018

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HEALTH & WELLNESS

HEMP HAS CHANGED

MY LIFE

HEALTH BENEFITS OF HEMP OIL BY MICHELLE KALINA

Photos courtesy of Michelle Kalina

WHEN I PLACED MY FIRST ORDER FOR HEMP OIL, I WAS UNAWARE THAT I WAS OPENING THE DOOR TO A PRODUCT THAT WOULD CHANGE MY LIFE. THIS PLANT-BASED REMEDY HAS COUNTLESS BENEFITS AND CAN SUPPORT YOUR HEALTH AND WELLNESS. Since I began my journey toward wellness eight years ago, I have tried nearly every natural remedy for sleep issues. In yoga, we call this “chitta vritti,” which translates from Sanskrit as mind chatter or “monkey brain.” By far, hemp oil has made the most significant difference in my sleep, with zero negative impact.

THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN HEMP AND CANNABIS There is a lot of confusion about the cannabis plant. People use the words cannabis, hemp and marijuana interchangeably, while they actually mean different things. Cannabis is a plant family that includes many species. Industrial hemp is a variety of cannabis grown for its tall, sturdy stalks, low THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) levels, and high levels of CBD (cannabidiol). Marijuana is a variety of cannabis grown for its high levels of THC, most commonly known for its and psychoactive properties. THC is also viewed as a beneficial cannabinoid that may support various health challenges.

HEMP OIL BENEFITS

NOT A GARDEN PLANT YET

Research has shown that pure hemp with high CBD content may provide support for energy regulation, neuropathic discomfort, sugar cravings, sleep, metabolism and healthy inflammatory response. Cannabinoids are chemical compounds which interact with our endocannabinoid system (ECS), the largest receptor system in the human body. Cannabinoid receptors were discovered 25 years ago by Dr. Raphael Mechoulam. He also found that the human brain produces its own cannabinoids. It is thought that CBD may support our neurological, endocrine and immune systems. Because of the ECS, our cannabinoid receptors are activated when we ingest CBD. That activation supports our body to make more of its own cannabinoids. CBD hemp oil comes in a variety of forms. Hemp seed oil is much like flax oil, with a variety of beneficial nutrients including omega fatty acids, fiber, protein and vitamin E, but it contains very low levels of cannabidiol. Supplements are only as good as they are absorbable. Look for oil that has high bioavailability, which means it enters the cells and blood stream quickly. Ideally, you want to select a product that is free of toxins, with a clean extraction method and proven liposomal delivery.

Hemp-derived CBD is now legal in all 50 states. You can’t plant it in your summer garden just yet; however, you can obtain a license to farm it. Currently, 34 states have defined industrial hemp as a distinct species and have removed barriers to its production. In Minnesota, you need an MDA Hemp Pilot Program certificate. To learn more, the State of Minnesota’s website has all the information you need to get started.

AVAILABLE IN ROCHESTER You can purchase CBD hemp oil products in Rochester. As a nutritional supplement, CBD hemp oil is legal to purchase and is not subject to federal marijuana laws. It’s available at People’s Food Co-op and from independent vendors. MICHELLE KALINA IS A PRIME MY BODY INDEPENDENT AFFILIATE. SHE CAN BE REACHED AT 507-269-6439 OR MICHELLE@ MICHELLEKYOGA.COM.

RWmagazine.com September/October 2018

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24 September/October DawnPhoto_SO18.indd 1 2018 RWmagazine.com

8/17/18 5:48 PM


! a t i V e c La Dol

TRAVEL

PART I: EXPERIENCING THE SWEET LIFE OF ITALIA (ITALY) BY DAWN SANBORN

IF THERE IS JUST ONE WORD THAT COMES TO MIND WHEN SOMEONE ASKS ME TO DESCRIBE ITALY, IT’S "EXQUISITE." FROM ITS LONG MEDITERRANEAN COASTLINE WITH SPECTACULAR VIEWS OF SOME OF THE MOST VARIED AND SCENIC LANDSCAPES ON EARTH, TO ITS CULTURE STEEPED IN ART, FAMILY, ARCHITECTURE, MUSIC AND FOOD, TO ITS ANCIENT RUINS—AND HOME TO SOME OF THE MOST FAMOUS STRUCTURES IN THE WORLD, INCLUDING THE COLOSSEUM AND THE LEANING TOWER OF PISA—HOW COULD ITALY NOT BE DESCRIBED AS EXQUISITE?

FIRST STOP: ROME (ROMA)

Photography provided by Dawn Sanborn.

Consider the swirling traffic and exuberance of life in the Italian capital city and it’s easy to believe “all roads lead to Rome.” The city can overwhelm you with its millennia of history, unrivaled art collections and neighborhoods that feel like small villages. When you combine the enviable marriage of carpe diem (seize the day) and la dolce vita (the sweet life), you’ve got a city that will knock you out with excitement. Longing for the sweet taste of red wine and real Italian pizza, we dropped our bags off at our Airbnb and made our way down the street to a quaint little restaurant. That was our first taste of homemade Italian pizza, but not our last. After tours of the Catacombs, the piazzas, the Spanish Steps, the Trevi Fountain and Vatican City—one must see Michelangelo’s magnificent frescoes of the Sistine Chapel—we consumed more wine and pizza.

NEXT STOP: ASSISI The humanity, humility, and love for nature of one man—the patron Saint Francis—infuse the small, pink-hued Umbrian hill town of Assisi. We viewed more gorgeous artwork by master’s such as Giotto, who’s remarkable frescoes depicting St. Francis’s life cover much of the lower and upper basilica built in St. Francis’s honor.

The beautiful, unique doors (yes, every single door of every single entryway was different) caught my eye at each place we passed. The view, the cobblestone streets, the delightful afternoon I spent photographing all of the doors, and the afternoon I spent peoplewatching while sitting at a sidewalk cafe "all" made me adore Assisi.

UNDER THE TUSCAN SUN Next was our most pleasant stay at an agritourismo (family farm stay for tourists) in Tuscany, near Florence. Our host family welcomed us into their home with stately furnished private rooms, made us scrumptious homemade meals consisting of simple ingredients grown on their farm. One night we had wild boar and homemade wine. The other guests, from such places as South Africa, Canada and Germany, were delightful. We shared stories as we sat around the immense butcher block table next to the enormous fireplace used to cook food. We took day trips to other little towns around the area in the tiny red Fiat convertible car we rented and ate glorious food at Michelin 4-star restaurants. A visit to any country cannot be complete without a horseback ride, and Tuscany was the place for us. We rode horses through the picturesque countryside and drank more wine. We also visited the Cascate del Mulino hot springs: a delightful, relaxing moment of the trip. Pick up RochesterWomen magazine November/December 2018 issue to read Part II of "La Dolce Vita!" DAWN SANBORN IS A PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHER, ART TEACHER, WORLD TRAVELER AND BELIEVES EXACTLY WHAT THE ITALIANS DO: WINE, CHEESE AND PASTA ARE AN IMPORTANT PART OF MEALS. FOR ITALIANS, FOOD ISN’T JUST NOURISHMENT, IT IS LIFE. LA DOLCE VITA!

RWmagazine.com September/October 2018

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Women

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Welcome to WIB! The purpose of these events is to support and uplift women in our business community and connect them with resources each and every one of us have. I am Heather Donovan, creator of WIB. I welcome all business ladies to bring a friend & their business cards to join us for a night of networking & fun!


FOOD AND WINE

Italian Wines BY NICOLE L. CZARNOMSKI

RED, WHITE AND YOU

PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAWN SANBORN PHOTOGRAPHY

ITALY HAS OVER 2,500 INDIGENOUS TYPES OF GRAPES. ITALIAN WINEMAKERS CREATE WINE RANGING FROM FRUITY ROBUST REDS TO CRISP DRY AND SPARKLING WHITE WINES. WITH SO MANY VARIETIES, IT CAN MAKE THE SELECTION PROCESS DIFFICULT.

THE STRUGGLE IS REAL There are so many native types of grapes in Italy because the landscape is superb for growing grapes. “Grape vines like to struggle. They grow well in rocky, mountainous or hilly regions, and they thrive in volcanic, prehistoric ocean beds,” says Robert Riggs, wine expert at Apollo Liquor. There are three volcanoes in Italy creating the perfect conditions for grapes: Mount Vesuvius on the mainland, Mount Etna on Sicily and the island volcano of Stromboli.

EXPRESSIVE ITALIAN WHITE GRAPES “I love Italian whites. They are so, so expressive. The two main grapes are vermentino and verdicchio,” Riggs says. “Vermentino grapes are grown all over Italy, and even though it’s the same grape, it has different expressions.” In Sardinia the grapes create crisp and acidic wine. In Tuscany the wines are softer and rounder, and in Piedmont the wine is crisp with less mineral. Wine buyers beware: Italians have a habit of changing the name of the grape depending on the region. For example, the vermentino grape is known as the favorita grape in Piedmont. The verdicchio grape is primarily grown in Lugana, and its name is changed to trebbiano.  Apollo offers two different trebbiano Lugana wines. The higher priced bottle is crisper and brighter while the lower priced one is softer, rounder, with a hint of melon on the tongue and a touch of sweetness at the end.

MATCHMAKING: ITALIAN WHITE WINES AND FOOD Tiffany Houser, bar manager at Victoria’s Ristorante & Wine Bar, plays matchmaker. “Pairing is critical because wine brings the flavor of food to its highest level.” Pinot grigio, gavi and prosecco are intended for dishes with white meat, like chicken and seafood, as well as dishes created with white sauces like Marsala wine and Marco Polo. One of Houser’s favorite white wines is the Tiefenbrunner because it pairs so well with a variety of seafood dishes. It’s a pinot grigio with hints of pear and light fruit, yet it’s not overly fruity. It has dry attributes and brings out the spice in sauces without taking away from the food.

POPULAR ITALIAN REDS Chianti, Brunello, Barolo and Barbaresco are very popular grapes from Italy. Chianti and Brunello are made from the sangiovese grape. Sangiovese wines are medium bodied and acidic. Their flavors include notes of cherry, blueberry, blackberry and plum. Barolo and Barbaresco wines are created with the nebbiolo grape. These wines are light in color with hints of rose, cherry, anise and leather flavors. Riggs says, amarones are also popular, and created with a distinctive process called appassimento. When the grapes are harvested, winemakers put them in a building with open windows and let them sit for two months to dry before the wine is created. This process intensifies the sweetness.

WINE SPECIALS Apollo’s wine club members receive a10 percent discount off each bottle of wine and 20 percent off each case. Victoria’s offers $8 bottomless glasses of wine every Wednesday.

MATCHMAKING: ITALIAN RED WINES AND FOOD Houser loves Amarone Tommasi because it goes well with so many dishes. It’s dark and jammy, yet light and refreshing. “This wine pairs well with red meats, cheese trays and bread and oil. It’s easy to drink with a full meal or light appetizer,” Houser says.

SUPER TUSCAN WINES The term “super Tuscan” dates back to the 70s. It’s a red wine from Tuscany created with the sangiovese grape and blended with Bordeaux grapes. “The name ‘super Tuscan’ originated from American wine critic, Robert Parker, when he tasted one of these wines and stated, ‘Wow, that is a super Tuscan,’” says Riggs. “They are delightful wines because the sangiovese grape is expressive, and by adding Bordeaux grapes, it gives the wine some additional depth and vibrancy.” NICOLE L. CZARNOMSKI IS A FREELANCE WRITER IN SOUTHEASTERN MINNESOTA.

RWmagazine.com September/October 2018

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FOOD AND WINE

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! É R O M A D N ITALIAN FARE A EAM CAME TRUE OVER Sheryl and Vince

AN’S DR HOW ONE WOM KE PHY CHOCOLATE CA BORN PHOTOGRA Y BY DAWN SAN BY DAWN SANBO

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ERFUL LOVE THAT GOES AHH, ITALIAN FOOD! FRESH INGREDIENTS, AND ALL THE WOND ACK TO THE BEAUT Y ME—B INTO THE PREPARATION, BRINGS AUTHOR SHERYL NESS— AND OF ITALY EVERY TIME WE EAT SUCH AUTHENTIC FOOD. Sheryl Ness, The Chef’s Wife and author of “Love in a Tuscan Kitchen: Savoring Life Through the Romance, Recipes, and Traditions of Italy” shares my deep love of Italy and its food. I first met Sheryl and her husband, Vincenzo, this year when we entered their quaint, recently remodeled “Italianized” kitchen as Vincenzo was prepping the recipes below. I immediately had a connection to these two beautiful people, remembering my vacation to Italy in September 2017. After sampling the bruschetta, downing the risotto and finishing off the dessert, I was excited to start reading Sheryl’s book. Not only did these dishes remind me of Italy, but I could see the love Sheryl and Vincenzo had for each other just by being in their presence, and I wanted to learn more about their whirlwind romance in Italy.

CRACK OPEN THE BOOK

When I returned home that evening, I began reading the book with fervor and even emailed her later that night to tell Ness how much I was enjoying it. I also liked how she describes the book: “’Love in a Tuscan Kitchen’ is a different kind of love story. The book tells a story of my love for the people, traditions and foods of Italy first, then by chance, how I fell in love with a chef, Vincenzo,” states Ness. “What I appreciate most about Italian food is that each dish is made with fresh, simple ingredients and created in a way that you can taste the love and care in each bite,” Ness tells me. I agree. The food in Italy is so simple and prepared with such love from whomever the chef is, that you savor every bite. 28

September/October 2018 RWmagazine.com

THE BOOK OF AMORÉ

“Love in a Tuscan Kitchen” has been gaining admiring reviews, such as this from Midwest Book Review, June 2018: “A wonderfully entertaining, thoroughly engaging read with the added bonus of authentic ‘kitchen cook friendly’ recipes. ‘Love in a Tuscan Kitchen: Savoring Life Through the Romance, Recipes, and Traditions of Italy’ is unreservedly recommended.”

If you love Italian food, want to visit Italy for the real stuff and just can’t right now, read this book—it will take you there. The description from the back cover will entice you to read it: “This enchanting memoir will transport you to the cobblestone streets, lush hillsides dotted with grapevines and olive trees, and unique characters that create the backdrop for Sheryl’s Italian love story. ‘Love in a Tuscan Kitchen’ is sprinkled with traditional recipes she collected along the way and flavored with rich accounts of how her dreams were fulfilled many times over while living in a picturesque village in Chianti.”


TOM ATO • 3 BRUS –5 CHE • O fresh to

IOS D PISTACH to N A I IN H ITH ZUCC • 1 cup Carnaroli risotp for RISOTTO W e ½ cu e (Hint: us zu l cchini,

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ric al • 1–2 sm (or people) sliced thin every two halved and s, le ab white wine esh veget • ½ cup gular 1 cup of fr , wine or re us ng ag ki par (coo such as as e) s, peas) white win mushroom ter of es 4 Tbsp. but ov cl • 2 – • 1 o taste) ) (t d lt ce in Sa (m • eese garlic rmesan ch . olive oil • 4 oz. Pa • 4 Tbsp n llo ui ) bo d (grate getable • 1–2 ve ng opped ved in boili ½ cup ch • cubes dissol ) ts ar (unsalted) qu s 2 io – 1 ch d ta un pis water (aro hini and sliced zucc sauteing the t aside. by rt sta ne d ow d. Se an until lightly br ingredients l es al ut e in ol bl m ss em di ve. Ass l for 5–10 n cubes to c in olive oi Add bouillo il. e stock for bo bl minced garli to ta er ge arts of wat memade ve g. ho or d Bring 2 qu xe is it cookin ed, bo the rice as so use cann e it easily n adding to dl he la You can al w to m r ar de or ould be w the stove in this. Broth sh the rice on h close to ot br e th m heat and Keep oking.  over mediu e as it is co t add of olive oil . sp into the ric Tb te 4 as d. Nex pan, warm is slightly to e ine ric w til e un In a saute th s minutes aporate. A e. Stir 1–2 the wine ev e. Broth t ric le e d add the ric th an er e m in sim of white w broth and the ½ cup ium to low e ladle of d one larg rice on med e ad , th es ep at Ke or e. ric evap e th of r the top and stir. should cove to the rice cooking.  e of broth mer while dl la sim r til the to he un ot at h he d an adding brot minutes, ad . Continue ing, and ly ok nt Every 2–3 ta co ns of t co in the midpo ssary to stir utes. This is It’s not nece 10–12 min ed ok co s d .  rice ha zucchini getables) an the cooked (or other ve ni rice hi e th cc st zu time to add Te . ed in the cook few minutes y er takes ev e h ric ot Next, add to ding br mally, risot irring and ad done. Nor d is an it if te continue st hi e w se to my, ld be crea 20 minutes ixture shou at around to cook. M es   ut it. t in m ea 5 u Tbsp. of 20–2 when yo d add in 4 hard inside) f the heat an of lt to taste. ke sa ta d tender (not , ad e is cooked ir well and ric St e . th se e ee nc ch O consistency grated ing on the 2 oz. of the oth depend br ky.  of ic e butter and st dl o la r y and not to add anothe my, not runn remaining If needed, e ea at cr gr be g, in ld for serv It shou ped of the rice. wls or plates of the chop individual bo 4. ith 2 Tbsp. w g on Spoon into al ). p er to ef Serves se over the oil (if you pr ee ive ch ke ol a in an m rg es vi to Parm of extra n be used d a drizzle orio rice ca cery pistachios an of the gro aroli or Arb a rn re a a C s : d te goo a ry re d a e Recipe no th ialty this in alian spec u can find or in the It ce risotto. Yo ri of other types store near e. or st e of th

TORTINO CIOCCOLADI (HOT CHO TO “LOVE” CA COLATE KE) Chef V

incenzo G iangiordan • 6 oz. d o ark chocol ate, chopped (u se 60–70 percent ch ocolate)  • 10 Tbsp . unsalted butter  • 3 larg e eggs  • ½ cup sugar  • ½ cup all-purpose flour 

• 1 Tbsp . cocoa pow der • 1 tsp. baking pow der  • ½ tsp. salt 

Preheat ov en to 375° Melt togeth er the butte r and choc You can cr olate in bo eate a wat wl over a w er bath by above a m ater bath. placing a gl edium sauc ass or metal epan filled water over bowl with water medium he (half full). W at. The wat bottom of th arm the er should no e bowl. Se t be touching t aside the You can al the melted choc so use the olate to co microwave minutes to ol slightly. on 5 0 percent melt the ch po oc wer for 1– olate and Beat the eg 2 butter toge gs and suga ther in a gl r together on medium ass bowl. well with a until the mix ha tu nd or stand re is cream minutes. Sl y and light mixer owly add yellow—aro the melted to the egg/ und 3–4 chocolate sugar mixtu mixture (a re .  little at a tim Next add e) the dry ingr edients: flo powder an ur, cocoa po d salt. Mix wder, baki by hand w mixture is sm ng ith a whisk ooth.  for 1–2 min utes until th Spray 10 in e dividual ra mekins (4– coat the in 6 oz. size) side well w w ith ith sp bu ray oil or ramekins, fil tter. Pour th e chocolat ling about e mixture in ¾ full.  Bake cake to the s at 375° for 10–12 than overco minutes (it’s ok these, th be tte e middle sh r to underc ramekins up ould remai ook side down n a bit mel on a small cake. Serv ted). Turn th plate to turn e warm with e ou t ea va ch individu nilla ice crea cakes.  al m and berri es. Makes 8–10

Recipes are from the book “Lov e in a Tuscan Kitchen: Savoring Life Through the Romance, Recipes, and Traditions of Italy.” DAWN SANBORN IS A PRO FESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHER, WORLD TRAVELER, FOOD LOVER AND A HOPELESS ROMANTIC.

RWmagazine.com September/October 2018

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September/October 2018 RWmagazine.com

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ROCHESTER AREA BUILDERS AB ROCHESTERAREABUILDERS.COM FALL SHOWCASE OF HOMES SEPTEMBER 22-23 AND 29-30, 11 A.M. TO 5 P.M. ADMISSION IS FREE! REMODELERS TOUR SEPTEMBER 22-23, 11 A.M. TO 5 P.M. ADMISSION IS FREE!

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DeWitz Home Builders, Inc. 6043 51st Street NW, Rochester Distinguished Homes by Mitch Hagen, LLC 2467 Woodstone Lane SW, Rochester 2374 Woodstone Lane SW, Rochester H&H Company of Rochester, LLC 6436 Summit Pine Rd NW, Rochester Leyendecker Homebuilders, LLC 3939 Stone Point Dr NE, Rochester M.P. Kaye Builders, Inc. 4159 Stone Point Dr NE, Rochester Maplewood Custom Homes 3283 Coneflower Ln SW, Rochester MDH, Inc. 1023 Fox Hill Ln SW, Rochester Med City Builders of Rochester, LLC 3240 Scanlan Ln NE, Rochester Meier Companies, Inc. 1468 Riverwood Ct SW, Oronoco Riverbend Ct SW, Oronoco Mike Allen Homes, LLC 4156 Galena Ln, Rochester R&M Development Company 40th St SW and 55th Ave SW, Rochester

R. Fleming Construction, Inc. Century Ridge Rd NE, Rochester 3148 Century Ridge Rd NE, Rochester 2574 Sand Trap Rd SE, Rochester R.J. Manemann Custom Homes, Inc. 2395 Scenic Park Pl SW, Rochester Radcliffe Homes & Remodeling Petersen Ct NW, Stewartville 35 Tyrol Ln SE, Rochester Range Custom Homes, LLC 2742 Sherburn Ln SW, Rochester Robert Gill Builder, Inc. 840 Somerby Pkwy NE, Byron Rochester Towneclub, LLC 6643 Clarkia Dr NW, Rochester Rymark Construction, LLC 4887 Winston Ln SW, Rochester Seavey Builders, Inc. 2868 Sherburn Ln SW, Rochester StoneBridge Builders, LLC 546 River Park Rd SE, Oronoco Thimijan Custom Homes, LLC 2479 Fieldstone Rd SW, Rochester Wright Homes, Inc. 1859 Alder Ln NW, Rochester

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Design Studio B 1123 8th St SW MAIN FLOOR Elias Construction, LLC 510 Chalet Dr NE KITCHEN/MAIN FLOOR 6369 Granite Dr NW LOWER LEVEL FINISH Interiors by J.Curry, LLC 1011 1st St NW WHOLE HOUSE

Master Builders, Inc. 2735 Fairview Ct SE ADDITION & DECK 2105 Baihly Summit Dr SW 3 SEASON ADDITION & DECK Stier Construction, Inc. 1306 Edenborough Ln NW KITCHEN, LAUNDRY, LIVING & DINING ROOM Zen Custom Homes 3061 Thaddeus Rd SW LOWER LEVEL FINISH RWmagazine.com September/October 2018

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ROCHESTER AREA BUILDERS AB ROCHESTERAREABUILDERS.COM FALL SHOWCASE OF HOMES SEPTEMBER 22-23 AND 29-30, 11 A.M. TO 5 P.M. ADMISSION IS FREE! REMODELERS TOUR SEPTEMBER 22-23, 11 A.M. TO 5 P.M. ADMISSION IS FREE!

HOME DESIGN TRENDS TO BE AUTIFY AND BRIGHTEN YOUR HOME

ADD MODERN APPEAL TO YOUR HOME BY TRISH AMUNDSON WHETHER YOU’VE BUILT NEW OR ARE UPDATING YOUR LIVING SPACE, KEEPING YOUR HOME LOOKING FRESH IS A WORK IN PROGRESS. MANY HOME DESIGN TRENDS COME AND GO, BUT A CLASSIC DESIGN HOLDS UP OVER TIME AND IS ONE THAT YOU WILL ENJOY YEARS LATER. CURRENT AND POPULAR STYLES OFFER A WIDE ARRAY OF EYE-CATCHING FORMS, COLORS AND MATERIALS THAT CAN FIT ANY LIFESTYLE. “Every trend has a shelf life to a certain extent,” says Karen Blissenbach, design principal at Design Studio B. “The Midwest typically follows the coasts in trends, so by the time we are really getting into them, they may be changing in other parts of the country. Eventually people tire of seeing the same things over and over again and want to do something different.”

SLAB FRONT CABINETS, BOLD COLORS & TRANSLUCENT FINISHES Jessica Curry, owner and certified kitchen designer and interior designer at Interiors by J. Curry, LLC, describes the appeal of bold colored cabinets to homeowners. Often used as an option for base cabinets on the perimeter of a kitchen or as an accent for a standalone buffet or island, “The main cabinetry throughout the space may be painted very neutral gray or white,” she says. “The accent colors that people are asking for are the jewel tones in navy, deep emerald greens, black and charcoal.” Many are moving away from dark-stain accent colors for cabinetry. There is an ever-growing interest in wood tones too. An example of this is a very light blonde cabinet finish on a modern door, such as a simple slab of white oak or other wood that shows the grain through a milky white or very light gray translucent-like stain. Blissenbach notes all-white kitchens are timeless but also may not be as popular in the near future. “We also are seeing natural wood make a bit of a comeback in cabinets with horizontal grains and slab fronts, rather than panels, in addition to the painted islands,” she says.

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September/October 2018 RWmagazine.com

LIGHT QUARTZ COUNTERTOPS AND MIXING METAL FINISHES Engineered quartz remains a highly requested item for those wanting light counters with a gray vein or a brighter, truer white look than what granite typically offers. “It is more durable than natural marble, which is the other main option to get the very white and light look,” says Curry. “Although I often mix both materials in a kitchen if the customer wants to create some contrast in the backsplash or island.” Blissenbach notes a nearly exclusive desire for quartz countertops, in addition to more solid colors than patterns. She says mixing metal finishes, such as black and brushed pewter, is trending. “Satin gold and light brushed bronze are also popular plumbing fixture (and cabinet) finishes,” explains Curry. “The old polished brass look is certainly not what it used to be! It can add a unique layer of luxury and depth that can be just stunning in the right space.”

WINDOWS WITH DARK TRIM “Black or dark bronze are popular finishes in both interior and exterior colors for windows and patio doors,” says Candy Singbusch, sales support at Kruse Lumber. “Black interior pre-finish is now offered by some window manufacturers. Clean, thin, straight contemporary lines— minimum frame and maximum glass that allow for bright sunlight—are also popular for windows and patio doors.” Tim Stock, territory manager at Marvin Windows and Doors, says contemporary and modern window and door designs have grown recently. “We continue to see dark-stained or painted-black interiors be very popular these past couple of years, and we expect to see more of it moving forward,” he says. “Large glass and ‘bringing the outside in’ to the home has moved


ROCHESTER AREA BUILDERS AB ROCHESTERAREABUILDERS.COM FALL SHOWCASE OF HOMES SEPTEMBER 22-23 AND 29-30, 11 A.M. TO 5 P.M. ADMISSION IS FREE! REMODELERS TOUR SEPTEMBER 22-23, 11 A.M. TO 5 P.M. ADMISSION IS FREE! Marvin Windows and Doors to produce larger windows while keeping the window frame lines narrow, yet structurally sound.” Patio doors are following this trend, with sizes over 50 inches wide and over 10 feet tall and multiple other options. “Our products are able to incorporate new popular options and trends, while still providing a product that will perform to the rigid demands of the four seasons in Minnesota,” Stock adds.

Interior barn door designs pull in the modern industrial style, which has been popularized by many home-design shows and continues to trend in 2018. “Hanging barn doors are a popular look in the right application. For example, they work nice as a semi-permanent closure to a closet area or dining space,” says Curry. “Most of the ones I specify now are a wood horizontal-plank look in a metal frame with a metal track and often a dark finish, such as black or iron metal, on the frame hardware and door pull.” You can get ideas of other possibilities through inspirational home design magazines, websites and apps, or visit with local professionals who can help beautify your home and make it enjoyable for years to come.

CRAFTSMAN AND BARN-STYLE DOORS “People will come in looking to replace a front door or patio door and can be surprised or overwhelmed at all the choices available,” says Singbusch, noting options include construction material, cladding, glass efficiency and grille design, plus hardware design and color. “These choices help lead to the right product for the customer.” Satin nickel or matte black finishes are popular for door hardware. “For front doors, the craftsman-style in fiberglass is popular,” Singbusch shares. Kruse Lumber’s showroom features several options for consideration, including steel and fiberglass front doors. 

TRISH AMUNDSON IS A ROCHESTER-AREA FREELANCE WRITER WHO LOVES TO DECORATE AND RE-DECORATE HER FARM HOME.

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ROCHESTER AREA BUILDERS AB ROCHESTERAREABUILDERS.COM FALL SHOWCASE OF HOMES SEPTEMBER 22-23 AND 29-30, 11 A.M. TO 5 P.M. ADMISSION IS FREE! REMODELERS TOUR SEPTEMBER 22-23, 11 A.M. TO 5 P.M. ADMISSION IS FREE!

COUNTRYSIDE BUILDERS A PAST WINNER STANDS OUT BY CINDY MENNENGA PHOTOGRAPHY BY R. THOMAS SOBOTTA

THE ROCHESTER AREA BUILDERS FALL SHOWCASE OF HOMES IS A POPULAR ANNUAL EVENT, WELL-ATTENDED BY PEOPLE PLANNING TO BUILD A NEW HOME OR SIMPLY THOSE WANTING TO SEE THE LATEST IN HOUSING TRENDS. THE 2018 FALL SHOWCASE OF HOMES PROMISES TO BE LOADED WITH GORGEOUS HOMES BURSTING WITH THIS YEAR’S HOTTEST DECORATING AND DESIGN IDEAS. Area builders enter their finest homes in the showcase competition, inviting the public to tour their newest houses, hoping for the much-coveted recognition—being voted a winner—from the home-building community. The prestige of having a winner on the showcase is not only good for business for the builder; it also brings credibility and elevated standing within the community. There are several homes on the Fall Showcase as there are five distinct divisions in the competition, all based on the price of the home.

Photo courtesy of www.DesignBuildMagazine.com

WINNER IS A STUNNER Last year’s Division 3 (homes between $408,000 and $499,900) winner was Countryside Builders. Their home at 2206 Glady Lane NE in Rochester nabbed the prize and all the honors. It’s easy to see why this home, exuding timeless classic beauty, was the 2017 Division 3 winner. The ranch-style home boasts a wide-open floor plan with a bank of windows overlooking the backyard. “There are lots of windows, and the fireplace is offset and features stone from floor to ceiling. There’s also a beautiful built-in bench. It’s very nice,” Countryside Builders co-owner Betty Stoflet shares. The spacious kitchen has a huge island featuring a stunning quartz countertop with veins of color flowing through the surface, adding one-of-a-kind character to the kitchen. Of the kitchen, Stoflet says, “Countryside features a lot of drawers, which are more convenient and provide easy access.” There is also ample work space and a generous pantry in the kitchen. The open-concept floor plan is ideal for entertaining. There is plenty of room for guests to mingle, and the island is perfect to stock with game-day snacks or to set up a buffet-style holiday meal. The beautiful hand-scraped dark wood flooring, which runs throughout the kitchen, dining and living areas, provides warmth and makes it feel

This home built by Countryside Builders was voted Rochester Area Builders 2017 Fall Showcase of Homes Division 3 winner.

spacious and inviting. The casual dining area has a three-panel wide patio door that overlooks the backyard and allows in lots of natural light.

FUNCTIONAL AND PRACTICAL The home was built for today’s busy lifestyles with plenty of well-designed features. The dining area has a built-in counter with storage that offers great versatility. It could function as an area to serve cocktails; it would also be a perfect coffee bar, or perhaps it’s best use would be as the home’s charging station—one central location to charge today’s many hand-held devices. The main floor is spacious, and the rooms flow well together. There are two bedrooms and two baths on the main floor. The tastefully appointed master bedroom includes an en suite bathroom with walk-in shower and a large walk-in closet. The laundry is also conveniently located on the main floor along with a walk-in mudroom adjacent to the large three-car garage. RWmagazine.com September/October 2018

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ROCHESTER AREA BUILDERS AB ROCHESTERAREABUILDERS.COM FALL SHOWCASE OF HOMES SEPTEMBER 22-23 AND 29-30, 11 A.M. TO 5 P.M. ADMISSION IS FREE! REMODELERS TOUR SEPTEMBER 22-23, 11 A.M. TO 5 P.M. ADMISSION IS FREE! The lower level offers lookout windows and includes a huge family room with plenty of room for entertaining. There are also two bedrooms and a bathroom in the lower level. The entire home is decorated in neutral tones, with subtle grays and whites adorning the walls. The home is situated on a quiet cul-de-sac in a small new development in northeast Rochester. The lot is fully landscaped, and the home backs up to a park which makes it perfect for a family.

THE COUNTRYSIDE DIFFERENCE Countryside Builders is a long-standing custom home builder in the Rochester area. Established in Byron in 1978 by Sherman and Betty Stoflet, Countryside has been delighting its clients for 40 years. Betty Stoflet says, “My husband has passed away, and now the second generation is involved. Our daughter, Tammy and her husband, Kevin Sternberg, are partners with me in running the business.” Countryside Builders has been building homes in rural areas for 40 years and has a plethora of experience obtaining building permits in rural townships and counties. Stoflet explains they work “with” the townships to make sure their projects meet each community’s unique requirements. Countryside also strives to listen to their customers and deliver the product their clients demand. Each home is built to meet the lifestyle needs of the new owner, with an eye on functionality and future resale. Each year, Countryside builds 15–25 custom homes within a 50-mile radius of Rochester. Stoflet continues, “Just because we are a

custom home builder, people don’t pay more. We have a detailed process—a seven-page form we have clients fill out—to help the buyer decide what they want, and it helps with the bid.” Stoflet says this process helps clients to get crystal clear with their expectations and eliminates surprises as buyers move through the building process. As you can imagine, this attention to detail—and truly listening to their customers—has earned Countryside Builders legions of loyal clients. Stoflet shares letters from past clients, all with the same theme: thanking Countryside for building them the home they wanted; thanking them for truly listening and understanding what they wanted in a home; and thanking them for listening. Forty years in business and lots of loyal and repeat clients is clearly a recipe for custom home building success. The 2018 Fall Showcase of Homes promises to be a fantastic opportunity to meet builders and see the latest home building and decorating trends. Be prepared to be impressed with the quality of craftsmanship and clever architectural design on display as you tour the homes on this year’s Fall Showcase.   CINDY MENNENGA IS A FREELANCE WRITER AND ALONG WITH HER HUSBAND, JOHN, OWNS CONSPECTUS HOME INSPECTION SERVICES, LLC BASED IN ROCHESTER. VISIT CONSPECTUSMN.COM FOR MORE INFORMATION.

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ROCHESTER AREA BUILDERS AB ROCHESTERAREABUILDERS.COM FALL SHOWCASE OF HOMES SEPTEMBER 22-23 AND 29-30, 11 A.M. TO 5 P.M. ADMISSION IS FREE! REMODELERS TOUR SEPTEMBER 22-23, 11 A.M. TO 5 P.M. ADMISSION IS FREE!

Handy Gal’s Guide to Home Maintenance FALL TIPS AND RESALE CONSIDERATIONS

BY CINDY MENNENGA FALL IS THE BEST TIME OF THE YEAR TO CATCH UP ON HOME MAINTENANCE—THE AIR HAS BEGUN TO COOL, AND OUR WEEKLY SCHEDULES BEGIN TO SETTLE INTO A FAMILIAR RHYTHM AFTER FUN-FILLED DAYS OF SUMMER. KNOWING THAT WINTER WILL BE CREEPING UP ON US SOON, IT’S TIME TO MAKE A TO-DO LIST FOR FALL AND START CHIPPING AWAY AT IT.

THINK SPRING You may want to plant some bulbs this fall so your yard will have a bright pop of color next spring. While you’re at it, you’ll want to cut back most of your perennials, rake the leaves and lower the mower height the last time you mow this fall. Also, after you mow your yard for the last time, you will want to winterize your lawnmower, so it will be in peak condition next spring.

John Mennenga, owner of Conspectus Home Inspection Services says, “A pre-listing consultation will help you identify specific tasks to complete before listing your home, and it will help you make informed decisions about what improvements, if any, you want to make so you can keep more money in your pocket.”

REMOVE SCREENS FROM WINDOWS

Halloween is such a fun time of the year. Candles flickering behind a scary jagged-tooth jack-o-lantern conjures up images of spooky fun; however, candles are exceptionally dangerous near trick-or-treaters wearing Halloween costumes that drape off their bodies and flutter about. The possibility of an accidental fire is heightened with dry leaves falling and wind blowing. To be safe and still have lighted jack-o-lanterns, substitute battery operated candles or glow sticks.

It’s tempting to save time and not remove the screens from your windows; however, removing the screens is a critical step in managing the air flow around windows during winter. Thomas Pinto from Champion Windows says, “Winters can be long, and people feel cooped up. Removing screens allows for better ventilation and a clearer view out the window.” Another key step to caring for your windows, is simply cleanliness. Pinto adds, “It’s important to properly clean window sills and frames to help windows be as energy efficient as possible.” Warm soapy water and a damp cloth should do the trick.

PREPPING YOUR HOME FOR SALE Part of caring for your home is always keeping an eye on resale and making sure your home is well-maintained. When the time inevitably comes to put it on the market, you won’t have a gazillion things to do to make it presentable for sale. Readying your home for sale involves more than a quick coat of fresh paint and tidied up rooms. You’ll want to make sure your home is running in peak condition, to command the highest price. While it is a sellers’ market here in the Rochester area, you don’t want anything to derail your sale. Having an expert walk through your home with you—before you list it—to help you identify items that need attention will save you a lot of money.

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KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK Whether you plan to sell your home or not, maintenance is critical to your home’s performance and your enjoyment. Like housework, if you stay on it, it never becomes overwhelming; however, if you let things slide, it can be daunting to dig your way out of the backlog of deferred projects. Essentially, the antidote for a well-maintained home is to create a home maintenance schedule and consistently follow it. The other key ingredient is to take action at the first sight of any minor issue because it won’t spontaneously resolve itself. When you do follow your maintenance schedule, it will enable you to feel empowered and in control—which is a good thing. CINDY MENNENGA IS A FREELANCE WRITER AND ALONG WITH HER HUSBAND, JOHN, OWNS CONSPECTUS HOME INSPECTION SERVICES, LLC BASED IN ROCHESTER. VISIT CONSPECTUSMN.COM FOR MORE INFORMATION.

RWmagazine.com September/October 2018

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ROCHESTER AREA BUILDERS AB ROCHESTERAREABUILDERS.COM FALL SHOWCASE OF HOMES SEPTEMBER 22-23 AND 29-30, 11 A.M. TO 5 P.M. ADMISSION IS FREE! REMODELERS TOUR SEPTEMBER 22-23, 11 A.M. TO 5 P.M. ADMISSION IS FREE!

C AREERS FOR WOMEN WOMEN DOMINATE REAL ESTATE INDUSTRY BY ERIN PAGEL THE REAL ESTATE INDUSTRY OFFERS EXCEPTIONAL CAREERS FOR WOMEN, PARTICULARLY WOMEN WANTING TO MAKE AN IMPACT IN THEIR COMMUNITIES WHILE CONNECTING WITH PEOPLE. A CAREER IN REAL ESTATE OFTEN COMBINES PERSONAL INTERACTION, SALES, INTEGRITY AND BUSINESS SKILLS. REAL ESTATE IS A SERVICE INDUSTRY THAT REQUIRES CURRENT SKILLS, LEARNING ABOUT THE REAL ESTATE FIELD AND NETWORKING. While many first think of real estate agents when considering the industry, there are numerous other careers in real estate. Appraisers, inspectors, loan officers and attorneys, just to name a few, are essential to the transaction.

REAL ESTATE AGENT Guiding a client through the home buying or selling process is the general job description of a real estate agent. The career focuses on helping people and getting to know what clients want to achieve by buying or selling property. Real estate agents help buyers find the perfect home and sellers find the right buyer. It is through agents or attorneys that buyers and sellers work out agreements for a property. “Guide” doesn’t convey the true depth of the partnership between a real estate agent and her client, however. The real estate agent’s role is service before, during and after the sale. The career involves juggling many moving parts, emotions and even friendships. Building a strong relationship and trust is essential. Life changes such as divorce, death, retirement or a newly empty nest can have a huge impact on where a client calls home, and there are often strong emotions associated. Real estate agents help clients

work through these emotions. The personal connection, often unexpected to newcomers in the field, is genuine and deep. “Helping people through and balancing waves of feelings, being a guide, a listener and a partner. That’s our job,” says Wendy Byers of Edina Realty in Rochester. She adds that real estate agents “are there throughout the process and help (clients) make their house a home. It’s not a place to eat and sleep. It’s where lives happen.” As a real estate agent, no two days are the same. Adaptability and strong relationship building is key. The career demands strong organizational skills and the ability to juggle work and personal responsibilities fluently. Being a good listener, observer and communicator is critical. “Clients need to feel informed and confident every step of the way,” says Byers, “I am their partner and advocate before, during and after the sale.” For many real estate agents, it’s a humbling feeling to be part of such a major event in the lives of their clients.

WOMEN IN TITLE After real estate agents have connected the perfect buyer and seller and an agreement is in place, the title team enters. The focus of the title team is to finalize the transaction and ensure the title of the property is clear. Unpaid taxes, assessments or other issues related

to the property must be resolved. Surveyors painstakingly measure and document the property. Then the detective work begins. An examiner collects and reviews all historical documents of the property and makes sure the buyers are aware of every inch of it. Are there any easements? Do the fences truly represent the property lines? Is the title clear? The search can stretch back to the 1800s. The title folks make sure everyone understands and agrees to what is being purchased. They register the sale with the county and state, while attorneys ensure the transaction is legal. Like the rest of the industry, working in title is all about people. Behind the scenes, employees get to be part of the tears, either happy or sad. According to Sheila Thorson, director of business development at Rochester Title, women in title “are vibrant caregivers morphing to be what the client needs.” Thorson’s passion is evident as she explains that “every customer is the most important customer. We get them to the next step, keep focus and get them to the finish line. The sale is not just a transaction. It’s people’s lives.” What does it take to be part of the title team? Flexibility and being detail oriented are critical characteristics. Those in title are good with people and able to make real connections. Teaching and educating clients are surprising components of the roles in title. RWmagazine.com September/October 2018

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WOMEN IN MORTGAGE In addition to the people component of real estate, there is, of course, a large financial element. For most buyers, their home is the most expensive buying decision they will make in their lifetime. The customer’s bank works closely with title and real estate agents to manage the financial aspect of the sale. The customer’s bank team continues the personal touch of the real estate industry and provides individual service to save customers as much money as possible on their loan. “Loan processors and assistants seek to make the financial arm of real estate easy and

as painless for their customers as possible,” says Amy Ross, loan assistant at Rochester’s Foresight Bank. Lending staff and credit analysts can help with prior approval for a mortgage to assist customers with determining their price range even before the buyer connects with their real estate agent. Changing interest rates and loan offerings can create a confusing landscape for buyers. Loan staff guide customers in financing and loan selection and help customers find the right loan fit. The loan staff also answers questions, assists with insurance and manages the transfer of payment from buyer to seller.

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Additionally, the mortgage team helps coordinate necessary property appraisals to review the value of the property. They also manage escrow. Compliance reviewers make sure everything is in line with current rules and regulations. Loan processors and assistants oversee the closing to help the buyer through the process and remain as the customer’s contact for any questions or issues with the loan. To be successful in the mortgage arm of the real estate industry one needs the ability to multitask, work well with others and troubleshoot. Critical thinking is essential, as well as be flexible. Customer service and truly knowing the customer cannot be overstated. According to Ross, it is the personal touch that keeps customers loyal and sets lenders apart. Ross loves the variety of duties and “the feeling of being part of a process that helps customers acquire their dreams.”

REAL ESTATE IN THEIR WORDS A genuine desire to help people is intertwined throughout the real estate industry. Women with teamwork skills, a people-focus and a strong work ethic can thrive in the real estate industry. Ross notes that her job is “about teamwork between co-workers and others in the industry. It’s everyone working together for our customers.” “It’s the most challenging and rewarding job I’ve ever had,” says Byers who has been a real estate agent for two years after owning a gift and home decor store in Rochester for 16 years and working as a corporate buyer for a big box retailer. The real estate industry is quite welcoming to women and women are loyal to real estate. “Once people get into the industry their passion is often ignited and they stay in the industry,” says Thorson who has spent 22 years in various roles of real estate herself. She adds, “You get to be part of someone’s American dream.” ERIN PAGEL IS A FREELANCE WRITER LIVING

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FOOD AND WINE

Waste Not, Want Not LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS TACKLE FOOD WASTE

BY SARA LOHSE

AT DINNERTIME, MY DAUGHTERS BECOME MASTER ILLUSIONISTS. UNWANTED FOOD IS STRATEGICALLY SPREAD ACROSS THEIR PLATES. TA-DA, THEY’VE MADE THEIR FOOD MAGICALLY DISAPPEAR! WHILE MOST OF THEIR SCRAPS ARE EDIBLE OR COMPOST-WORTHY, THEY’RE STILL SMUGLY SCRAPED INTO THE TRASH. FOOD WASTE: 1, FOOD CONSERVATION: 0.

A WAKE-UP CALL The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) estimates that food waste consumes 30 to 40 percent of our food supply, which is about 133 billion pounds. Farmers and grocery stores reject “ugly” produce, despite it being edible. Many schools, hospitals and restaurants lack information or resources to manage their food purchasing and waste wisely. Over-buying groceries and confusing expiration dates add to the epidemic. Dr. Roni Neff, researcher at Johns Hopkins University, projects that we could feed 84 percent of our nation with the food that Americans waste. Fortunately, the USDA and Environmental Protection Agency initiated the Food Waste Challenge in 2013. Their goal is to cut the United States’ food waste in half by 2030. They’re collaborating with charities, the private sector, and varying levels of government to minimize food waste. This initiative has had a strong ripple effect, all the way down to our local level.

CREATIVE COLLABORATIONS People’s Food Co-op has enlisted the help of its patrons, community partners, and even students to reduce food waste in our area. Their composting program has prevented 48-52 tons of food waste from entering the landfill. The Co-op prioritizes keeping edible food out of the trash and compost bins, redirecting it instead to Channel One and Community Food Response. They also helped fund the Lincoln School organic composting program. Fourth and fifth graders put trash and compost into appropriate containers in the lunchroom. Organics were then sent to a recycling cooperative. Lizzy Haywood, CEO of People’s Food Co-op, says, “Kids who compost now are more likely to carry this on at home, and continue through their lifetime.” Mayo Clinic has been creative in their food conservation efforts. According to clinic spokeswoman, Heather Carlson Kehren, “Last year, Mayo Clinic in Rochester diverted more than 1 million pounds of food waste from being thrown away.” Unsold and unserved food was donated to community food programs. Even local hogs benefited from their efforts. A local farmer collected buckets of trimmings from food prep, along with cooked food that couldn’t be reused or donated and fed it to the hogs.

EAGLE BLUFF FOODWISE PROGRAM Eagle Bluff Environmental Learning Center uses the incentive-based FoodWISE program to educate students on food waste. While at Eagle Bluff for my daughter’s field trip, I witnessed great excitement in their cafeteria. The fourth and fifth graders were in a fierce lunchroom competition. Whichever grade accumulated the least food waste was the winner. The Golden Clean Plate Award could be won if they stayed below 5 percent food waste. Sara Sturgis, Eagle Bluff development director, shares, “The first year we did the program, we saw a 75 percent decrease in the pounds of food waste.” Most discarded food is composted on-site, then used in their greenhouse or teaching garden. Now that is food efficiency.

EATING OUT AND AT HOME Brianna Clement, restaurant manager at Twigs Tavern and Grille, is very aware of food waste in the restaurant industry. She estimates that patrons typically leave a quarter to an eighth of food uneaten. She encourages restaurantgoers to ask questions if they’re unsure of what they want. Clement says, “The more questions, the better. That way you’ll better know what you’re getting and there’s less likely to be food waste.” To reduce food waste at home, start by creating meal plans. Plan to use up older food, stick to your shopping list, and avoid over-buying. Keep clutter out of the fridge and pantry. Avoid over-serving at dinner. Lastly, choose one night per week to use leftovers. Sara Sturgis shares, “Our family saves leftovers and does a Food Network ‘Chopped’ style challenge with them.” Get creative and have fun in your food conservation efforts. SARA LOHSE IS OWNER AND PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZER AT THE RESCUED ROOM, THERESCUEDROOM.COM.

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HEALTH AND WELLNESS

Holistic Health MORE THAN THE SUM OF OUR PARTS BY EMILY WATKINS GATHER A WHOLE WELLNESS TEAM TO CONNECT YOUR BODY, Chiropractor Stacy LeQuire, of Vitality Chiropractic, performs an MIND, SPIRIT AND EMOTIONS BY FOCUSING ON PREVENTIVE adjustment on Sherry Sonnenberg. HEALTH MEASURES LIKE EXERCISE, HEALTHY EATING, MASSAGE AND REGULAR CHIROPRACTIC CARE. LOCAL PRACTITIONERS BRING WELLNESS TO THE ROCHESTER AREA.

TRILLIUM: OPTIMUM STRUCTURE FOR OPTIMUM FUNCTION There are many different types of chiropractic care in the Rochester area, and Dr. Amanthi Mapalagama, owner of Trillium Spinal Care with Dr. Kalan Stittleburg, offers a unique and gentle approach called NUCCA (National Upper Cervical Chiropractic Association). After initial X-rays and an analysis, the adjustment is done along with follow-up X-rays. Patients rest afterward, which Mapalagama says allows the adjustment to hold and means that patients don’t need to be seen as frequently.

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According to Mapalagama, holistic health care is, “a natural and conservative approach to accentuate life and wellness by addressing the cause of disease. At its core, holistic health care focuses on enhancing the body’s innate ability to get and stay well.” Mapalagama adds that benefits include “better sleep, more energy, a strong immune system, a renewed sense of well-being, improved mood, regular bowel movements, relief from chronic pain and an improved quality of life.”

HEALTHY LIVING AT MAYO CLINIC Mayo Clinic, which has a long history of providing health care to the Rochester area and indeed the world, now boasts the Mayo Healthy Living Program, which focuses on physical activity, resiliency and nutrition to “enhance mental, physical and emotional well-being.” Dr. Donald Hensrud, medical director of the Healthy Living Program, describes holistic health care as involving the whole person, their total care and how they interact with the environment. He explains, “The medical system evolved as a disease treatment model, but now it doesn’t necessarily take into consideration other aspects,” such as healthy living and lifestyle medicine. Hensrud says, “It’s been estimated that through lifestyle changes, 75 to 90 percent of heart disease is theoretically preventable.” For example, exercise can decrease blood pressure and the risk of diabetes. It can lower blood glucose levels along with the risk of certain cancers and heart disease.

HOLISTIC SPA SERVICES How does a spa fit into wellness? “It helps people to feel better with very little risk, so why not?” says Hensrud. “There may be less tangible benefits to certain things such as acupuncture and massage, but they can still be included” in a program of holistic health care, and his team continues to gather

evidence on those and other modalities. The Healthy Living Program provides expertise about evidence-based lifestyle changes. According to Hensrud, “In the spa, they not only meet spa credentials, they meet hospital standards for cleanliness.” The program collaborates with other departments at Mayo Clinic, and patients can have an overall wellness plan tailored to their individual needs. It is important for the program to be based on data, so they always gather data and evidence. There are many fads in the wellness realm. Hensrud says thaan example of a fad is lengthy fasting. Although some people report positive benefits, the risks such as low blood pressure and electrolyte disturbances may outweigh any possible benefits, and thus the program will not advise it. They are also collecting data to be able to prove that focusing on holistic care improves health, but for now, they are relying on anecdotes such as one about a couple who participated in the Mayo Clinic Diet Experience and lost over 100 pounds together. As the Healthy Living Program accumulates more evidence, they hope to be able to accept insurance.

TAKING TIME FOR HEALTH Stacy LeQuire says, “One of the things we hear most is that we take the time to listen. A new client was happy with adjustments she had elsewhere but didn’t feel listened to. We have intentionally made the choice to be the type of place that makes time for that. We get some tears. When you get face to face with people and really listen, the emotions come out. And that is an honor.” Hensrud adds, “What I would emphasize is quality of life.” By taking the time to focus on holistic health care, the return on the investment is tremendous. EMILY WATKINS IS A PERSONAL TRAINER, WRITER AND EDITOR.

Photo taken by Danielle Vetterkind of Lily and Fawn Photography.

VITALITY: THE KEY TO WELLNESS Dr. Stacy LeQuire, owner of Vitality Chiropractic with her husband, Ed LeQuire, says, “We are more than the sum of our parts, and that’s the principle that holistic health practitioners honor.” She recognizes each individual patient’s unique needs, telling them not to follow her professional advice blindly, but rather when “it makes sense and aligns with them.” Andrea Tolle of Green Compass Homeopathy, located at Vitality Chiropractic, says, “The body, mind, spirit and emotions are all connected and must be considered in the healing process,” reducing the risk of chronic illness. When people follow a holistic approach to wellness, she adds, “People are happier. They get sick less often and heal faster.” The LeQuires have been intentional about gathering a team so that “there is something for everyone, and the (services) complement one another.” The two doctors offer chiropractic techniques including the gentle Activator Method and traditional manual adjustment techniques. The other wellness services at Vitality include massage, fitness, mental health services, health coaching and nutrition. Tolle says, “Your long-term health is the priority. People feel the positive energy when they walk into Vitality.”


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LOCAL AUTHOR

LIST DEBUT NOVE

NG E H. ARMSTRO BY CATHERIN

"WICKEDLY SUSPENSEFUL" THOSE ARE THE TWO BEST WORDS TO DESCRIBE ROCHESTER AUTHOR, MEG HAFDAHL’S DEBUT NOVEL “HER DARK INHERITANCE.” Released in March by Inklings Publishing, “Her Dark Inheritance” is a horror thriller—in the style of Stephen King—where a sinister something resides in a small, off-the-beaten-path community of Willoughby, Minnesota. There, in what appears a quaint town, a Lizzie Borden-esque style murder has remained unsolved for nearly 25 years. In the days following the murder, the main suspect, Caroline Bergman (the daughter and twin sister of the victims), disappeared. In present day, cancerridden Jane Downs-Forrest makes a deathbed revelation to her daughter, Daphne, confessing to her real identify, yet proclaiming herself innocent of the “Minnesota Borden murders.” Determined to clear her mother’s name, Daphne sets out for Willoughby. But as secrets are uncovered, a sinister being is unearthed and turns its focus on Daphne.

A MINNESOTA CONNECTION While Minnesotans may recognize the town name of Willoughby, the town depicted in the book is completely fictional. “The name Willoughby actually comes from a Twilight Zone episode, and the town itself is based on a town in western Minnesota that I visited as a child,” Hafdahl explains. “It was where my great aunt and uncle lived, and as a big city girl I was at once intrigued and mystified by such a tiny place. It fascinated me how everyone knew everyone, and how time seemed to stop there. As I spent time reflecting on that small town, I couldn’t help think of the insular nature of such a place, and how it breeds horror and suspense.” Hafdahl has had a long fascination with rural gothic and female-driven suspense and names Shirley Jackson, the Bronte‥ sisters and Daphne DuMaurier as among her earliest influencers. Additionally, as a self-proclaimed aficionado the Lizzie Border murders, it’s no surprise she would model her first novel after the infamous crime. “Lizzie has always been a big part of my life,” Hafdahl shares. “I first discovered her when I was about eight or nine, and as a little girl fascinated with dark things, I became transfixed on the idea of this upper middle class, formerly docile woman, killing her parents in such a brutal way. I’ve read many books on the subject and fancy myself a bit of an expert, so there was no doubt Lizzie’s story was going to intersect with Daphne’s.”

HAFDAHL’S STORY While Hafdahl occasionally reads other genres, she’s especially drawn to writing horror and suspense. She explains, “As a writer, I love how high the stakes are, they allow the character to grow and change and face their inner turmoil head-on. And, for me, being scared is a delight. It opens the mind and forces you to ask how you would react.” Born in Canada, Hafdahl moved to Minnesota in her early teens and relocated with her husband to Rochester in 2011. “We came for my husband’s medical residency and knew pretty early on we wouldn’t be leaving. Rochester is a fantastic place to raise children, with a growing community of artists and writers,” she says.

Though “Her Dark Inheritance” is Hafdahl’s first full-length novel, it’s every bit as page-turning as any King novel, leaving the reader unable to forget the characters or the story after finishing the last sentence. Without a doubt, she may be one of the best writing talents Rochester has to offer.

PRIOR WORKS In addition to this first novel, Hafdahl is the author of two stand-alone short stories, “Willoughby” and “The Pit,” and two collections of short stories entitled, “Twisted Reveries” and “Tales From Willoughby.” She is a member of the Horror Writers Association and locally, the Rochester Fantastical Women Writers’ group. “Her Dark Inheritance” is available online through Amazon and Barnes & Noble, as well as other major book retailers. She will be appearing for a book signing at the Minneapolis Crypticon Convention October 26-28. For more information, visit meghafdahl.com. CATHERINE H. ARMSTRONG IS THE AUTHOR OF “THE EDGE OF NOWHERE,” AND WRITES UNDER THE PEN NAME C.H. ARMSTRONG. HER YOUNG ADULT NOVEL, “ROAM,” INSPIRED BY ROCHESTER’S HOMELESS COMMUNITY, WILL RELEASE FEB. 5, 2019. FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT WWW.CHARMSTRONGBOOKS.COM

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TRAVEL

SeptOberfest C E L E B R AT E FA L L I N

WA B A S H A

BY HOLLY GALBUS

FOR MANY PEOPLE IN SOUTHEASTERN MINNESOTA, FALL IS A FAVORITE TIME OF THE YEAR. THE LONG, HOT DAYS OF SUMMER GIVE WAY TO AUTUMN’S COOLER TEMPERATURES, THE LEAVES BEGIN TO CHANGE, AND THE SMELL OF WOOD SMOKE AND FRESH APPLES FILL THE AIR. WE ADMIRE THE CHANGE IN SEASONS AND PERHAPS THERE IS NO BETTER WAY TO CELEBRATE THAN AT WABASHA-KELLOGG’S SEPTOBERFEST SEPTEMBER 7 TO OCTOBER 27. What began in 2007 as a way to add something extra to the grand opening of the National Eagle Center in Wabasha has grown into a seven-week event with hundreds of family-friendly activities, events, unique shopping experiences and more. “This is our biggest event of the year,” says Christina Dawson, executive director of the WabashaKellogg Chamber of Commerce. “It is our opportunity to showcase our community for fall.”

EXPLOSION OF FALL COLOR Dawson says many people come to SeptOberfest to see the artistic displays of fall splendor sprinkled throughout the city. Crafters, artists and farmers use thousands of pumpkins, cornstalks, flowers, hay bales, gourds and squash to create fun fall scenes along the winding Mississippi River and majestic bluffs of the historic river town of Wabasha. There are many family-friendly activities—something for everyone— such as pumpkin races, scarecrow contests, train rides, a petting zoo and pony rides. Every Saturday, beginning Sept. 15, there are riverfront carriage rides and musical entertainment under the bridge in Heritage Park.

SEASONAL BOUTIQUE SHOPPING A “must-do” during SeptOberfest is to stop in and browse the selection of home decor and personal items for sale in the boutiques in the downtown area. In addition to the regular inventory each shop offers, a variety of fall-themed items are added to make fall decorating and holiday shopping a breeze. Grandpa’s Barn Boutique is located at 128 Second Street West in Wabasha. The gift shop, which is operated by the WabashaKellogg Area Chamber of Commerce, is open in May and during SeptOberfest. The boutique has a selection of home decor, clothing, soaps, kitchen items and more. 50

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One of the newer boutiques in Wabasha is Barton’s Brickhouse Boutique, located in a historic home at the corner of Second Street and Bailey Avenue. Five rooms of the home’s main level are filled with a variety of home decor items, wood crafts, antique furniture, windmills and farm-themed accents. A large selection of linens, aprons, soaps and bath bombs are suitable for gift giving. The Anderson House Boutique is located within the historic Anderson House Hotel on Wabasha’s Main Street. The wares of approximately a dozen local and regional artisans are for sale in the boutique. Items such as pottery, textiles, jewelry and prints are available at the gift shop, which is open from late February through October. Opened in 2017, Fifth Grant Boutique is located at 2311 Fifth Grant Boulevard in Wabasha. The boutique’s 50 vendors—both new and returning—have much to offer. Vendors offer wood carvings, pottery, rustic decor, gourmet pet treats, knit clothing, farmhouse furniture, framed artwork and more.

ART ALONG THE RIVERFRONT Each year, there are a variety of displays along the riverfront. The iron art of Jim Dehne of Point Creek Iron Sculpture in Newton, Wisconsin, will return to SeptOberfest again this year. Dehne, who has been creating both indoor and outdoor iron art for 16 years, will display his unique sculptures along the riverfront. In recent years, Dehne, has created life-size pieces of horses, moose, buffalo, peacocks—and even a grand piano—all-out of iron rods. He will bring a selection of smaller pieces to Wabasha and will be available to speak with customers about more specialized pieces. For a complete calendar of events at the 11th annual SeptOberfest, visit wabashamn.org and click on the SeptOberfest icon. HOLLY GALBUS IS A ROCHESTER FREELANCE WRITER.


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Calendar Events GATHERED BY SARA ALBERTELLI

Check out our Community Calendar online for additional listings at RWmagazine.com Events in purple are sponsored by RochesterWomen magazine.

Deadline for submitting events for RochesterWomen November/December 2018 issue is September 30, 2018. Send events to calendar@RWmagazine.com

*(507 area code unless stated)

SEPTEMBER

SEPTEMBER 7-30

SEPTEMBER 15

SEPTEMBER 22-23

Shrek The Musical, Rochester Civic Theatre, a Tony Awardwinning fairy tale adventure based off of the family-cherished movie, Thurs., Fri., Sat. 7 p.m.; Sun. 2 p.m., 282-8481, rochestercivictheatre.org

We Won’t Stay Silent Recovery 10K Walk/5K Run, RCTC Fieldhouse, raise funds for those in recovery from drug addiction, 8 am-1 pm, 218-4773, recoveryishappening.org

Rochester Area Builders Remodelers Tour, visit remodeled homes with varying levels and types of updates, 11 am-5 pm, 282-7698, rochesterareabuilders.com

SEPTEMBER 7-OCTOBER 27

SEPTEMBER 15 13th Annual Zumbro River Art Splash, Zumbro River Valley Area, discover art, literature, and history on this self-guided tour of artist studios, 10 am-4 pm, 732-5210, zaac.org/art_splash

SEPTEMBER 22, 29 & OCTOBER 6, 19, 20

SeptOberfest, Wabasha, pumpkin races, scarecrow contests, entertainment, food, concerts, and more, (651) 565-4158, wabashamn.org/septoberfest

SEPTEMBER 8 NPC Med City Muscle Classic, Mayo Civic Center Presentation Hall, competitions include men’s and women’s bodybuilding, classic physique, fitness, and more, 9 am-9 pm, (952) 945-9090, teamontrackproductions.com

SEPTEMBER 12 Fine Spirits Classic, Rochester Art Center, Minnesota Monthly’s inaugural Fine Spirits Classic Rochester event featuring Minnesota’s top mixologists and distillers, 6 -8:30 pm, $25, finespiritsclassic.com

SEPTEMBER 13 Celebrating Abilities, Rochester Civic Theatre, examine the unique perspectives of those affected by brain injuries through masks, 5-8 p.m., 281-6262, rochestercivictheatre.org

SEPTEMBER 16 14th Annual Join The Journey Breast Cancer Awareness Walk, Mayo High School, celebrate life, remember loved ones, and join in the journey, 8:45 am, 206-3212, jointhejourney.us

SEPTEMBER 18, OCTOBER 2 Balancing Your Constitution, Assisi Heights Spirituality Center, balance your body with Ayurveda and achieve a balanced mind and spirit, 6:30-8 pm, 282-7441, rochesterfranciscan.org

SEPTEMBER 19 Women on Wednesdays Presents: Let's Talk: Boomers & Millennials Compare Notes, Rochester Civic Theatre, exploring social issues impacting our community through open and colorful discussion, 5:30-7 pm, 282-8481, rochestercivictheatre.org

SEPTEMBER 13-15

SEPTEMBER 22

Just Between Friends Fall Sale, Olmsted County Fairgrounds, consignment sale featuring discounted prices on name brand items, 990-7668, rochester.jbfsale.com

Dog Days of Stockholm, Stockholm Village Park, help find good homes for homeless dogs in our community, 10 am-4 pm, (715) 279-3277, bacbunleashed.com

SEPTEMBER 14-15 A Day in the Life of a Sister, Assisi Heights Spirituality Center, live in a convent for a day and meet a Franciscan Sister, 5-3:30 pm, 282-7441, rochesterfranciscan.org

SEPTEMBER 14-15, 20-22, 27-30 Godspell, Rochester Repertory Theatre, a musical featuring a comedic troupe that teaches Jesus’s lessons through song, Thurs., Fri., Sat. 7:30 pm; Sun. 2 pm, 289-1737, rochesterrep.org

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SEPTEMBER 22-23 Women and Spirituality Conference, Mayo Civic Center, explore various religious and spiritual traditions in an embracing environment, 8 am-9 pm, womenandspirituality.org

SEPTEMBER 22-23, 29-30 Rochester Area Builders Fall Showcase of Homes, see the newest trends in home building and visit with the builder, 11 am-5 pm, 282-7698, rochesterareabuilders.com

High Ropes Challenge, Eagle Bluff Environmental Learning Center, experience the thrill of a ropes course, 10 am-1 pm; 2-5 pm, 467-2437, eagle-bluff.org

SEPTEMBER 23 Rochester Global Mala: Yoga for Peace, Rochester Art Center, practice will include 108 sun salutations with optional modifications, 11:30-4:30 pm, yogatribemn.com

SEPTEMBER 24 Fore the Kids, Rochester YMCA Golf Challenge, Somerby Golf Club, 11 am shotgun, silent auction, josh.may@ymcamn.org

SEPTEMBER 27 BGCR 10th Annual Chili Challenge, Peace Plaza, music, family activities, varieties of chilies, and craft beer to benefit the Boys and Girls Club Rochester, 4-8 pm, 287-2300, bgcchilichallenge.org

SEPTEMBER 28 Med-City Crab Crack, International Event Center, fundraising supports innovation/ upgrade of the Madonna Towers Rochester Room, 6-10 pm, medcitycrabcrack2018.mydagsite.com

SEPTEMBER 28-29 Weathered & Rusty Market, Olmsted County Fairgrounds, a fall market featuring rusty, repurposed, and homemade items for sale, Fri. 9 am-6 pm; Sat. 8 am-5 pm, 951-0873

SEPTEMBER 29 “Out of the Darkness” Community Walk, Bear Creek Park, raise awareness and funds for suicide prevention programs, educational programs, and more, 10 am-1 pm, 721-8246, afsp.donordrive.com


OCTOBER

OCTOBER 6

Fall Fest, Peace Plaza Downtown, pumpkins, activities, fall treats, and more for the whole family to enjoy, 10 am-2 pm, 216-9882, downtownrochestermn.com

OCTOBER 6 12th Annual Brains Together For a Cure 5K Walk and 10K Run, RCTC Fieldhouse, walk or run to raise funds for brain tumor research and medicine, 8 am-12 pm, brainstogetherforacure.org

OCTOBER 6 Rock the Moat Castle Community Block Party, The Castle (former Rochester Armory), live music, food & drink from Cameo Restaurant, pop-up artist market, and hard hat tours, 5 -10 pm, castlecommunity.org

OCTOBER 10-13 The Yoga of Mindfulness: A Silent Retreat, Assisi Heights Spirituality Center, focusing on the art of yoga and the lifestyle of mindfulness, 7-4 pm, 282-7441, rochesterfranciscan.org

OCTOBER 11 14th Annual Empty Bowls, Mayo Civic Center, join the Channel One Regional Food Bank to help end hunger, 10:30 am, 328-2220, mayociviccenter.com

OCTOBER 13 Eagle Bluff Scholarship Banquet and Fundraiser, Eagle Bluff Environmental Learning Center, this 21st annual celebration of students will include games, food, and more, 5-8:30 pm, 467-2437, eagle-bluff.org

OCTOBER 13-14 52nd Annual Red Wing Fall Festival, Downtown Red Wing, showcasing original, stunning artwork from over 100 local artists, Sat. 9 am-5 pm; Sun. 9 am-4 pm, zapplication.org

OCTOBER 14 Festival of Music Concert, First Presbyterian Church, David Baskeyfield, English organist specializing in 19th and 20th Century French music, compelling sense of rhythm, crystalline articulation and seamless, soaring legato, 4 pm, 507-282-1618, fpcrochester.org

OCTOBER 14-15 Rochester Symphony Presents: Frankenstein, Lourdes High School, concert inspired by monsters and the macabre featuring spooky selections, Sat. 7 pm; Sun. 2 pm, 286-8742, rochestersymphony.org

OCTOBER 19-21 11th Annual Flyway Film Festival, Lake Pepin, showcasing over 50 films, visiting filmmakers, workshops, discussion panels, and more, varying times, flywayfilmfestival.org

Thank you OCTOBER 19-NOVEMBER 4 Barefoot in the Park, Rochester Civic Theatre, a romantic comedy focusing on a pair of newlyweds adjusting to life, Thurs., Fri., Sat. 7 pm; Sun. 2 pm, 282-8481, rochestercivictheatre.org

OCTOBER 20 October Recollections, Christ United Methodist Church, four musicians from the Minnesota Orchestra will join David Townsend and Horacio Nuguid, 7:30 pm, rochesterchambermusic.org

OCTOBER 21 Unveiled: The Wedding Show by the Wedding Guys, Mayo Civic Center, experience a day of bridal eye candy where inspiration is everywhere, 12-4 pm, (888) 715-7620, theweddingguys.com

OCTOBER 26 Trick-or-Treetops, Eagle Bluff Environmental Learning Center, Trick or Treat 30 feet off the ground with a zip line, 467-2437, eagle-bluff.org

OCTOBER 27 11th Annual American Cancer Society’s Rochester Hope Lodge Gala, DoubleTree Hotel, a one-of-a-kind evening featuring great food, an auction, and much more, 5-8:30 pm, 424-4615, acsmsp.ejoinme.org

NOVEMBER

NOVEMBER 3

Rochester Women’s Fall Expo, Mayo Civic Center, fun, shopping, entertainment, drinks, and more, 9 am-4 pm, 286-1010, kroc.com/expo Pick-up Rochester Women November/December 2018 holiday issue beginning Saturday, November 3 at Rochester Women’s Fall Expo.

"Love in a Tuscan Kitchen" author Sheryl Ness and her husband Vincenzo we will be at Rochester Downtown Farmer's Market on September 15, 7 am – 12 pm for a "Love in a Tuscan Kitchen" tasting event. Vincenzo will be making a few of the recipes from the book. That same day, they will be at Dwell Local from 1 – 6 pm for Oktoberfest & Fall Market. On September 29, they will be on Rochester's Hiding Artists Tour from 9 am - 4 pm.

TO THE ADVERTISERS WHO MADE ROCHESTERWOMEN MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER/ OCTOBER 2018 ISSUE POSSIBLE. A NAILS ......................................................................................... 4 ALLEGRO SCHOOL OF DANCE AND MUSIC........................ 9 ALTRA FEDERAL CREDIT UNION..............................................55 AMY LANTZ.................................................................................47 AUTOMOTIVE PROCARE...........................................................22 BEYOND KITCHENS..................................................................37 BICYCLE SPORTS.........................................................................44 BOYS & GIRLS CLUB OF ROCHESTER.....................................51 BUDGET BLINDS.........................................................................33 CARPET ONE FLOOR & HOME.................................................. 2 CASTLE COMMUNITY...............................................................51 CHANHASSEN DINNER THEATRES.......................................... 9 COMMONWEAL THEATRE........................................................ 9 COULEE BANK............................................................................33 COUNTRYSIDE BUILDERS OF MINNESOTA.........................34 CREATIVE HARDWOOD FLOORS............................................26 DAPPER SURFACES.....................................................................33 DAWN SANBORN PHOTOGRAPHY.......................................24 DEGUES TILE AND GRANITE...................................................38 DENTISTRY FOR CHILDREN & ADOLESCENTS, LTD.............22 DESIGN STUDIO B.....................................................................24 DR. LUCY MEYER, LAKESIDE DENTISTRY................................47 DUNLAP & SEEGAR, P.A............................................................18 DUNN BROS COFFEE................................................................24 EPIC NAILS...................................................................................10 FAGAN STUDIOS........................................................................51 FIRST ALLIANCE CREDIT UNION............................................22 FORESIGHT BANK......................................................................20 GARDEN OF MASSAGE............................................................24 HEARTMAN INSURANCE.........................................................44 HERS..............................................................................................10 HOME FEDERAL .........................................................................34 J. CURRY DESIGNS.....................................................................38 JENNIFER JONES PHOTOGRAPHY.........................................47 KRIS HEICHEL TEAM..................................................................40 LUYA..............................................................................................47 MAYO CLINIC.............................................................................56 MAYO EMPLOYEES FEDERAL CREDIT UNION............ 18 & 47 MELISSA ADAMS-GOIHL..........................................................34 MERCHANTS BANK..................................................................... 4 MR. PIZZA NORTH.....................................................................26 NIKOLINA LECIC........................................................................47 NORTH RISK PARTNERS - C.O. BROWN................................22 NORTH STAR KITCHENS............................................................. 3 O'BRIEN AND WOLF, L.L.P. ......................................................37 OLMSTED MEDICAL CENTER........................................... 6 & 14 PATTIE LYNCH..............................................................................47 PEOPLES STATE BANK................................................................ 12 PREMIER BANKS.........................................................................37 PROJECT LEGACY.......................................................................10 REAL DEALS..................................................................................36 RENEW RETREAT........................................................................... 9 ROCHESTER AREA BUILDERS, INC..........................................30 ROCHESTER COMMUNITY AND TECHNICAL COLLEGE...36 ROCHESTER GREETERS.............................................................24 SARGENT'S GARDENS..............................................................38 SEASONS BY JODI.....................................................................38 SEMVA..........................................................................................14 STERLING STATE BANK.............................................................51 THE BARN AT BUGLE PLAIN.....................................................10 THE RESCUED ROOM................................................................44 THINKSELF................................................................................... 12 TILE SUPERSTORE & MORE.......................................................43 TOWNSQUARE MEDIA, ROCHESTER WOMEN'S FALL EXPO...48 TYROL SKI & SPORTS................................................................. 12 VICTORIA'S RISTORANTE & WINE BAR.................................26 WIB EVENT, STERLING STATE BANK......................................26 WINONA HEALTH.....................................................................42 WINONA STATE UNIVERSITY..................................................18 WOMEN AND SPIRITUALITY CONFERENCE.......................... 9

RWmagazine.com September/October 2018

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ON THE LIGHTER SIDE

THE RULE OF RESILIENCE CREATES HAPPINESS BY KATHRYN LENN IT IS MY OWN SUPERSTITION THAT EVERYTHING HAPPENS IN THREES. PERHAPS I HAVE THIS SUPERSTITION BECAUSE MY BIRTHDAY IS MARCH 3, OR BECAUSE MY HUSBAND WAS MY THIRD BOYFRIEND. MAYBE IT'S BECAUSE WE LIVE IN THE THIRD HOUSE ON THE RIGHT, I’M 5 FEET 3 INCHES, MY BEST FRIEND IS THREE DAYS OLDER THAN I AM, OR BECAUSE MY DAUGHTER MADE US A FAMILY OF THREE WHEN SHE MADE HER DEBUT AT 33 WEEKS AND THREE DAYS. WHATEVER THE REASON, I BELIEVE IN THE “RULE OF THREE.”

ONE This applies to many things in my life and it can seem inescapable at times. So, when the dishwasher was sparking and spitting smoke on a Monday evening, I got a little worried what would be next. Our dishwasher was something my uneducated, first-time homeowner self took for granted. The first time we had it fixed, we were told to probably not fix it again because it was 15 years old. We knew it was only a matter of time, and that fateful evening we finally came to the end of the road with our beloved dishwasher.

Thursday morning was going well. We had our ducks in a row and were headed out on time (a rarity in our home). My husband and I were having our typical morning chatter about what was ahead for the day and who would be picked up in what order. All of a sudden, our truck stopped unexpectedly, and we heard a loud “bang!” I turned around to see our partially shut garage door that the truck had smashed into it, bending the door in the middle. It was a moment of shock as my husband pulled the truck forward and repeatedly said he didn’t know what happened.

TWO

HAPPY FAMILY

Still mourning the loss of our dishwasher, I put a load of dirty clothes in the washer Tuesday (the next day). When it was quiet too soon for the cycle, I was suspicious. Sure enough that washing machine broke a mere 24 hours after our last loss. It was a hard 24 hours to say goodbye to the two most convenient machines in my life. And, because we are a young family with a mortgage, day care expenses, student loans and other daily living expenses, it was going to be a while before we could afford to replace either.

On that same Thursday, we did buy a new dishwasher and a new garage door. It wasn’t our best day, and a big bowl of ice cream was consumed while considering the adjustments we will need to make to keep things moving. But, as I ate that ice cream, I heard my new washer and dryer working beautifully. It just reminded me that everything was going to be OK. We had met our three disasters, but we were still a healthy family of three, living in the third house on the right, and a new garage door or set of appliances would not put a dent in that. It’s good to have small mishaps that help put life in perspective sometimes. This probably won’t be the last time we will be touched by the “Rule of Three,” but it is a good reminder that we will be OK.

THREE A month went by, and all was quiet. We hand-washed dishes and took our dirty clothes to my parents’ house on Wednesdays when we dropped off our daughter for her day with Grandma. We were able to scoot by until we could afford a reasonable washer and dryer, which was our first priority. Then, we began the dishwasher hunt. The washer and dryer were installed on a Tuesday evening, and by Wednesday I had the itch to look at dishwashers. My husband convinced me to just give it a minute—and good thing I did—because the next day we met number three. 54

September/October 2018 RWmagazine.com

KATIE LENN IS NAVIGATING MOTHERHOOD AND ADULTHOOD, AND FINDS IT THERAPEUTIC TO SHARE HER LIFE’S MIS-HAPPENINGS BY WRITING ABOUT THEM.


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RWmagazine.com September/October 2018

55


LET’S FIND A BETTER WAY

The earlier that breast cancer can be found, the higher the chance of a cure. The purpose of the STRIVE Study is to evaluate a new blood test. This blood test may be able to detect breast cancer in its early stages by finding small pieces of genetic material released into the blood by the tumor. You may be eligible for this research study if you are receiving a screening mammogram at Mayo Clinic. The earlier that breast cancer can be found, the higher the chance of a cure. purpose Participants will receive a gift The valued at $25of the Study is evaluate a test.and This inSTRIVE appreciation fortoproviding a new bloodblood sample blood test may be able to detect breast cancer in its completing a questionnaire. early stages by finding small pieces of genetic material released into the blood by the tumor.

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Rochester Women Magazine September/October 2018  
Rochester Women Magazine September/October 2018  
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