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MAY/JUNE 2019

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COVER STORY

MOMPRENEUR JENNIFER BECKER Building a business with creativity and confidence. BY TORI UTLEY PHOTOGRAPHY BY FAGAN STUDIOS

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BEAUTY AND HEALTH

10 MOTHER-DAUGHTER MAKEOVERS Nikki Kranebell, Jen Jacobson and Kate Brue get makeovers with their daughters.

MAY/JUNE 2019

13 “I AM THE WOMAN OF MY DREAMS” Kayla Harwick’s journey of self-love.

WOMEN’S EMPOWERMENT (WE) 19 CONNIE HAWLEY A supportive community and positive attitude are keys to her success.

BY TERRI ALLRED

36 RACHELLE SCHULTZ Leads Winona Health with an innovative spirit.

BY ERIN PAGEL

39 HEALTH CARE DIRECTIVES Making choices before a health emergency.

BY JEN JACOBSON

COMMUNITY 8

S’MORE ART ADVENTURES Three amazing art camps for kids.

BY JOY BLEWETT

14 UNITED WAY OF OLMSTED COUNTY CRADLE TO CAREER INITIATIVE Ensuring Rochester youth succeed.

BY GINA DEWINK

40 GOLF Get to know local golf pro Kari Phenix and learn about Rochester's ladies leagues

BY LUANN BUECHLER AND CINDY JO DICKSON

SHOPPING

16 MOTHER’S DAY GIFTS

BY HOLLY GALBUS

TRAVEL

42 IT’S OFF TO THE RACES! At Canterbury Park.

Shop local for mom.

BY KATHRYN LENN

ON THE LIGHTER SIDE

35 BUYING CARS Saleswomen offer insider information.

BY HOLLY GALBUS

46 THE TOOTH FAIRY All-knowing, no matter what.

BY KATHRYN LENN

BY ALISON RENTSCHLER

FOOD AND WINE

24 AVOCADOS From Mexico to Minnesota.

BY JORRIE JOHNSON

25 MY SWEET GREENS MN Grown in Zumbrota.

BY JORRIE JOHNSON

HOME AND GARDEN

27 UPGRADE YOUR BACKYARD “LIVING ROOM” 5 budget-friendly backyard upgrades.

BY KRISTIE MOORE

29 REFRESH YOUR HOME Update your kitchen cabinets.

BY TRISH AMUNDSON

33 GROW YOUR OWN FOOD Rochester’s Seed Library takes root.

IN EVERY ISSUE 7 FROM THE EDITOR 38 MARKETPLACE 44 CALENDAR EVENTS 45 ADVERTISERS INDEX

BY KAREN LEMKE

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ISSUE 109, VOLUME 19, NUMBER 2 MAY/JUNE 2019 PUBLISHER

Jorrie L. Johnson, MBA, PMP ® MARKETING ACCOUNT MANAGER

Nikki Kranebell

GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Kate Brue Tessa Slisz

ASSISTANT EDITOR

Jen Jacobson

COPY EDITOR

Erin Gibbons PROOFREADER

Jennifer Jacobson PHOTOGRAPHY

Fagan Studios

COMMUNITY CALENDAR

Sara Albertelli

RochesterWomen is published six times per year by Women Communications, L.L.C., P.O. Box 5986, Rochester, MN 55903 Subscriptions available for $24 per year (six issues). Send check to the address above. All unsolicited manuscripts must be accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope. RochesterWomen assumes no responsibility for unsolicited materials. ©2019 Women Communications, L.L.C. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. RochesterWomen magazine does not necessarily endorse the claims or contents of advertising or editorial materials. Printed in the U.S.A. RochesterWomen is a member of the Minnesota Magazine & Publishing Association, Rochester Area Builders, Inc. and the Rochester Area Chamber of Commerce.

507-259-6362 • info@RWmagazine.com RWmagazine.com For advertising information:

Photo by Cami McElmury, Blue Jean Photography.

FROM THE EDITOR

Makeovers Jorrie and Tiffany's makeup and hair styled by Blair Becher, Ulta Beauty.

One day this spring, my daughter Tiffany and I went get makeovers at the new Ulta Beauty store in Rochester. I have always told her that being beautiful on the outside doesn’t matter if you are ugly on the inside. As I age, I’m even more inclined to focus on goodness rather than looks, but darn it, I want to look (and feel) good. I think my daughter is beautiful and I am especially proud of her accomplishments, her heart and her sense of self-worth. Look at our RochesterWomen magazine team makeovers (page 10) and make an appointment to get your own makeover. In this issue, I chose to feature Kayla Harwick and her journey of self-love (page 13). I met Kayla at church about twelve years ago when she was twelve years old. I’ve seen her grow from a pre-teen, high school and college graduate, and now a beautiful young woman. Over the years she has fought battles with worthiness and body image issues. I am so inspired by her journey and hope you are, too. On the cover of this issue, we feature mompreneur Jennifer Becker who shares her love for food and service by running Bleu Duck Kitchen in Rochester (page 21). On top of managing a restaurant, she is a mom and newlywed. I wonder if she realizes her beauty and worth? Find gifts for your sweet-tooth, sporty and pet moms in our Mother’s Day Gifts guide (page 16). When you will shop with our advertisers for gifts for Mother’s Day, graduation and Father’s Day this spring, please let them know you saw their ad in RochesterWomen magazine. RochesterWomen magazine is co-hosting Women’s Ride Day at Bicycle Sports on Sunday, May 5. Join us for a bike maintenance clinic at 12:30 p.m. and either a shorter trail ride or longer road ride beginning at 1 p.m. Healthy treats will be provided by Fresh Thyme. The Mother <—> Daughter Experience at Assisi Heights Spirituality Center is on Friday and Saturday, May 10 and 11. Our keynote speaker on Friday evening is Allison Loftus, owner of Flourish Consulting, dedicated to meeting the mental health needs of women and teen girls. This great bonding experience for mothers and daughters will be right here in Rochester, so you can go back to your own home or stay overnight at Assisi Heights. Register at luannb. com by Thursday, May 9. You are beautiful, confident and worthy!

507-254-7109

We want to hear from you! Send comments, suggestions, ideas or original recipes to: RochesterWomen Editor, P.O. Box 5986, Rochester, MN 55903-5986 or email: editor@RWmagazine.com. RWmagazine.com May/June 2019

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COMMUNITY

S’MORE ART ADVENTURES THREE AMAZING ART CAMPS FOR KIDS BY JOY BLEWETT

THIS SUMMER, PROVIDE YOUR CHILD WITH A HANDS-ON ARTS EXPERIENCE. More and

more research is surfacing on the benefits of creating and engaging with art. Art-making opportunities can build skills in self-expression, critical thinking and creative problem-solving. Here are three organizations that open their spaces to kids during the summer to explore a wide variety of art experiences.

IN AN ART STUDIO After learning important lessons of selfacceptance and self-expression from the kids they taught last year, the arts team at Canvas & Chardonnay (C&C) is excited to offer kids art camps again this summer. Each day for a week from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Eileen Bruns, Leah Bee, Angie Pipkorn, Vanna Vanessa and Tyler Aug will provide an array of arts experiences from their personal expertise. “We cannot put a limit on what kids interpret as art,” ponders Leah, co-owner of C&C. “We will learn from them as much as we will share our crafts.” Along with painting, drawing and sculpting, students will explore architecture and street art through a downtown walk in Rochester and nature with rocks, plants and fiber arts. Aug shares his love of film by introducing kids to the use of green-screen technology. The kids art camp also includes a visit to the Rochester Art Center and learning breathing exercises and plant care from Vanna, a local yoga instructor. Don’t miss these weeks 8

being offered for ages 7 and up in June, July and August. For more information go to canvasandchardonnay.com/upcoming-classes.

IN AN ART MUSEUM The Rochester Art Center offers two art camps during the summer. Free family days continue throughout the summer on the first Saturday of each month. Kids Art Camp, a half-day program for kindergarten through third grade, will explore skill building with painting, drawing and hands-on projects. Participants will learn how to work individually and collaboratively, creating unique artworks and experiencing the natural world through the eyes of an artist. The Total Arts Day Camp, a full-day program for grades one to 12, will become a film studio with facilitation by Stewartville STEAM teacher Kelly Schrandt. Participants will incorporate painting, drawing and sculpting into a media-arts experience. Through writing, directing and filming, participants will learn about storyboarding and creating their own animated mini-movies. Included will be a film showing at the end of the week for family and friends. For more information about Rochester Art Center’s summer art camp opportunities go to rochesterartcenter.org/summer-camps.

welding and musical theater and textile, among traditional art making opportunities. “Art is a common denominator,” states Marie Marvin, co-director of Crossings. “Art can bring us back to a shared humanness beyond the perceived boundaries that separate us. It not only lets us know ourselves better, but helps us communicate across all languages and cultures to know each other better.” As an at-risk teenager, Marie was saved through her love and passion for the arts, and creating Crossings almost 20 years ago helped her find her calling. The kids camps are her favorite endeavor. “It is an honor to witness the innate artistic energy in our children, welcoming them year after year into our art camps. Art education and exposure to the arts is something we owe to all our children.” Crossings invites working artists and art teachers from the region to teach their passion and expertise each summer. Participants get to create art among inspiring artworks and learn from artists themselves. For more information on Crossings art camps go to crossingsatcarnegie.com. Joy Blewett is a freelance writer, artist and teacher in Rochester.

IN AN ART GALLERY Crossings at Carnegie is an eclectic art space in downtown Zumbrota with an art gallery, art store and assortment of classes. From Messy Munchkins to Running with Scissors, Crossings art camps offer wheel-throwing and hand-building clay classes, robotics and STEM invention workshops, woodworking and

FAMILY FUN Art on the Ave hosts Sound and Color, a free family arts event celebrating its 10th anniversary. Saturday, May 18, 2019, 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on 6th Avenue SE, Rochester.

March/April 2019 RWmagazine.com

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Minnesota Quilters

MINNESOTA QUILT SHOW & CONFERENCE Featuring Prince Cherrywood Challenge, Twisted, 70273 Project, Classes, Vendors, and 300+ Quilt Entries

JULIANNE KOCER

Elder Law, Estate & Disability Planning Attorney 2434 Superior Dr. NW | Rochester, MN 55901 507-218-0118

JUNE 13 - 15, 2019 9 - 6 THURSDAY/FRIDAY 9 - 4 SATURDAY MAYO CIVIC CENTER, ROCHESTER For more info, visit mnquilt.org/mq2019

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Ms. Julianne Kocer (ko/cher) is an Elder Law, Estate Planning, Disability Planning, Probate and Trust Administration attorney.  She assists families of all ages and all wealth levels and has been doing so for twenty years. Julianne began her legal career in Seattle, Washington after earning her law degree from William Mitchell College of Law in St. Paul, Minnesota.  Originally from Rochester, she relocated back here to be close to family. Having a strong passion to assist families with their estate planning needs and legal care needs as they age, Julianne returned to law school to earn her post-doctorate law degree in Elder Law (“LL.M.-Elder Law”), with honors, from Stetson University College of Law in May 2013, a six year Masters of law program covering all areas of elder law.    Julianne is the only attorney in the states of Minnesota and Washington to have earned this advanced law degree.  She has testified and written opposition papers against legislation negatively affecting seniors and disabled people and is a frequent speaker to professional and community organizations. Julianne was rated by Super Lawyers for six consecutive years, an award granted to only 2.3 percent of attorneys annually statewide.  She is an active member of the Minnesota State Bar Association, Minnesota Olmsted County Bar Association, and Washington State Bar Association. You may learn more about Julianne at www.kocerlaw.com, or reach her at 507-218-0118, or info@kocerlaw.com

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PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL

MOTHER-DAUGHTER

Makeovers

RochesterWomen MAGAZINE MARKETING ACCOUNT MANAGER

NIKKI KRANEBELL, ASSISTANT EDITOR JEN JACOBSON AND GRAPHIC DESIGNER KATE BRUE GET MAKEOVERS WITH THEIR DAUGHTERS PHOTOGRAPHY BY CAMI MCELMURY, BLUE JEAN PHOTOGRAPHY

EDITOR’S NOTE: I wanted to get a makeover this spring, so I suggested to my RochesterWomen magazine team at our May/June issue planning meeting that we all go for makeovers. Considering we are all moms and Mother’s Day is coming up, we took our daughters with us. Thank you to the salons and stylists who made us all look and feel fabulous. Thank you to our photographer, Cami McElmury, who accommodated our schedules and made us all feel special.

Nikki Kra

Professional and Prom

nebell wanted a professio nal everyday look and daughter, Audrey, wanted a prom look. They went to Am her ber Berry at Sola North Rochester who uses KLASS Cosmetics and Skincare.

KLASS Cosmetics and Skinca re proudly partners with Am ber Berry. Berry is one of their top retailers and epitomizes the ir vision “to share God’s love through KLASS Act to create joy for those in need and enhance beauty by providing quality, healthy cosmetic and skincare products.” KLA SS Act provides a gift of lux ury products to Women’s Shelter , Inc. when Berry sells their products. The Kranebells enjoye d their KLASS Act lip produc ts. Audrey tried the Holy Fire ma tte lipstick that glides on smo othly, delivering full coverage tha t lasts for hours. It is parabe n free, fragrance free and sell s for $25. Nikki tried the ultr ahydrating Treasure Plumping Gloss with sheer color and high shine, to instantly create the appearance of fuller, softer, more youthful-looking lips. This pro duct is paraben free, gluten free, hypoallergenic, dermatologist tested and is also $25. Mother and daughter bot h used the KLASS Act Dual Action Concealer. This anti-aging con cealer helps to gradually imp rove the skin's texture while neutral izing dark circles. Eyes look beautifully refreshed and rad iant. Its medium-coverage form ula provides continuous hydrati on and a natural long-lastin g finish.

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Allergy Approved

In early March, Jen Jacob son and her 14-year-old daughter Arya went to Essence Skin Clinic in dow ntown Rochester for makeo vers. “We had the best time togeth er at Essence,” says Jen. “Ab igail and Michaela were fun, eng aging and so knowledgeabl e about the products they use d on us. Glo Skin Beauty pro ducts are cruelty free and parabe n free, which is a big deal for me since I have a paraben alle rgy. I had a number of produc ts on and not one gave a sign of irritation. Plus they felt great on and lasted all day. The Glo Hydra tion Mist, which both sets ma keup and boosts hydration, felt esp ecially fantastic.” According to Jen, Arya is just beginning to explore the world of makeup, so it was a fun learning experience for her. “Seeing her all glammed out and looking so mature made me tear up,” says Jen. “Thank goo dness my mascara didn’t run !” Makeovers cost $55 a person at Essence. Appointm ent s are recommended by calling 285-5505.

Glo Skin Beauty Essence Medical Skin Care

Mom and Mia

On Monday April 8, Kate Brue surprised her daught er, Mia, for her ninth birthday with a makeo ver at Hair Studio 52 in Roc hester. Brue says, “We decided on fun hairstyles for both of us and a makeup overhaul for me. Jes sica started my transformation with an amazing head massage followed by a wash and dry . She made the beach-wave curls look effortless and used a pro duct for maximum hold—she called it ‘back-comb in a can.’” Mia enjoyed having her hair curled and the conversat ion with Lauren. She was finishe d off with a birthday headba nd and some shimmery lip glo ss. “My daughter and I left the salon feeling beautiful and confident, like we could head right to a ball. It was a very specia l way to spend her birthday,” shares Brue. Hair Studio 52 offers make-u p application for $45 and free make-up app lication lessons with $50 minimum purchase. Ca ll 289-2986 or book your appointment online at hairstudio52.com.

RWmagazine.com March/April 2019

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WHITNEY BRANDRUP Sales Manager | Clements Chevrolet Cadillac 1000 12th Street SW | Rochester, MN 55902 507-289-0491 | wbrandrup@clementsauto.com

“I encourage more women to get into automotive sales. I find it fun, challenging and financially rewarding. Being able to help a customer find the right vehicle at the right price to best fit their needs and budget is very satisfying.” Whitney Brandrup is a shining star at Clements Chevrolet Cadillac. Whitney started at Clements six years ago in the service department as a Service Advisor. Whitney helped start our Internet Sales Department and then headed our Business Development Center. Now, as a Sales Manager, Whitney helps lead a team of ten. 80% of car buying decisions are influenced by women. Women identify with women and they’re happy and thankful when they see a woman in the dealership. Whitney says all customers appreciate that Clements has a negotiation-free pricing policy. It’s an easier way to buy a vehicle. It makes your purchase stress less and saves you time and money. Life can be difficult. Buying a car shouldn’t be. Whitney divides her time between the demands of the job and her growing family.

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Securities and insurance products are offered through Cetera Investment Services LLC, member FINRA/SIPC. Advisory services are offered through Cetera Investment Advisers LLC. Neither firm is affiliated with the financial institution where investment services are offered. Investments are: *Not FDIC/NCUSIF insured *May lose value *Not financial institution guaranteed *Not a deposit *Not insured by any federal government agency. 1016 Civic Center Drive NW Rochester, MN 55901 (888) 420-5981 1 12HomeFederal_MJ19.indd May/June 2019 RWmagazine.com

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HEALTH AND WELLNESS

"I AM the Woman of My Dreams" KAYLA HARWICK'S JOURNEY OF SELF-LOVE BY TERRI ALLRED

“I embrace the idea of loving myself fully. I am a woman devoted to praising my strengths and successes. I assert the notion that I am inherently worthy and deserving.” ~ Author unknown. KAYLA HARWICK SITS ACROSS THE TABLE FROM ME AT A LOCAL RESTAURANT AND DESCRIBES HER ORDEAL WITH AN EATING DISORDER THAT NEARLY TOOK HER LIFE. She is calm, yet

passionate, and tells me that she is sharing her experience so people know that there can be life after an eating disorder. In fact, she feels better about herself now than she ever has in her life. The journey, as difficult as it was, forged her into the person she is now.

I AM ENOUGH

“I used to tell myself that I would only be ‘good enough’ if I was the skinniest, prettiest, funniest, smartest,” Harwick shares. This constant critical assessment inevitably set her up for failure. She saw no value in herself. “I still have days when I wish I was skinnier, prettier, funnier and smarter. However, I’m now more equipped with skills to remind myself that everything I wish I was is already what I am and what I have always been. I am strong, I am active, I am brilliant, I am hilarious, I am beautiful, I am successful, I am inspiring, I am a hard worker and I am enough. No longer will I use the ‘I’m going to...’ or ‘I will...’ or ‘I’m trying

to...’ narratives. I AM the woman of my dreams. I work hard for my successes. I inspire others to do the same. And, I am thankful beyond words for this journey I am on.”

THE GIRL WHO LOST A LOT OF WEIGHT

Harwick remembers that as she was growing up, she got a lot of mixed messages about her body and food. That planted the seed for what would happen later. A big theme through her life was “not being enough.” Everything she did, she tried to be the best, the greatest. When she got to college, Harwick made a lot of new friends, but would compare herself to them. She wondered why she wasn’t getting the attention that they did. She asked herself why she wasn’t getting the grades that they did. She was unhappy with her physical appearance so she started going to the gym. She wasn’t really eating any differently, but she lost a significant amount of weight because of what she now realizes was excessive gym time. At some point, it became about seeing that number go down on the scale and having more attention for being the girl who lost weight. Ultimately, she spiraled into an eating disorder.

THE GIRL WHO FOUND HER WAY

One of Harwick’s favorite quotes comes from “The Gifts of Imperfection” by Brené Brown: “Worthiness doesn’t have

prerequisites. You are worthy right now, as is. You are deserving of love as you are.” This took Harwick a long time to believe and even longer to apply to herself. She acknowledges that there is vulnerability in examining and discarding your perceived inadequacies. “You may have to confront things you don’t want to, but doing that is so freeing and life-enhancing. You begin to stop caring what others think and focus on your passion,” Harwick explains. She is living proof that once you put what you love out to the world and find your passion, the people meant to support you and be a part of your journey will be there. Anyone who holds different ideas or a different perception of who you are will fall away. You will find your people. Terri Allred is the SE Regional Coordinator for the Minnesota Council of Nonprofits.

EATING DISORDER HELPLINE If you or someone you love has an eating disorder (with symptoms such as being preoccupied with food, appearance or weight), please reach out for help. A great resource is the National Eating Disorder Association Helpline at 800-931-2237.

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COMMUNITY

CRADLE TO CAREER INITIATIVE

ENSURING ROCHESTER YOUTH SUCCEED BY GINA DEWINK

CRADLE TO CAREER CREATES ACCESS TO RESOURCES THAT KIDS NEED, WHEN THEY NEED THEM, TO BE SUCCESSFUL FROM CRADLE TO CAREER.

Julie Brock, executive director of the Cradle to Career initiative, says this is done by aligning community resources to shared outcomes, as well as using data to drive the decision-making through the lens of equity. “It takes all of us doing something positive to create a community committed to equitable success of all youth,” Brock states. HOW THE PROGRAM BEGAN Cradle to Career came to life in 2015 when the three Rochester Rotary Clubs came together to align efforts around education, after identifying it as a critical community gap. The groups gathered data, held community interviews, researched other U.S. cities that were using the StriveTogether framework and obtained a Rotary grant to conduct a community summit. By 2016, they had linked up with United Way of Olmsted 14

County, who had been seeing the same opportunities for improved community health through better educational outcomes. StriveTogether, the group’s national nonprofit partner, says, “Communities are often program-rich and system-poor.” Cradle to Career is infrastructure so there can be real focus on the work of bettering the lives of youth. Brock states, “We are the system that elevates the hard work of our partners. We figure out how we can do this work together— not ‘for or to’ but ‘by and with.’”

COLLECTIVE IMPACT Since Cradle to Career is a systems approach that asks for a community commitment to a community opportunity, it’s not adding additional programs. It is creating a system in which partners continue to support children individually, with the collective goal of increasing every child’s chances of career excellence. Brock relays, “Career excellence, to us, means a livable wage. A livable wage allows people to break generational poverty, break down barriers within systems to create opportunity for growth and autonomy. This is what a strong economy looks like—happy, diverse people living in an inclusive community committed to each individual’s success as if

it is their family.” Brock goes on to explain that Cradle to Career helps achieve this goal "because the collective will allow us to amplify the great work our community partners are doing to create positive change in the lives of our youth.” The community partners are doing the important work of changing lives in positive ways every day. At recent kick-off meetings for the Kindergarten Readiness and High School Graduation collaborative action networks, there were representatives from across public and private sectors that came together to share data, learn from one another and consider committing to Cradle to Career. Brock says of the meeting, “We support our partner organizations by providing data analysis and facilitation so they’re not spending precious resources on that capacity. Instead, we provide that—allowing them to do the great work of positively changing lives without being tied down. The real stories we hope to amplify are the stories of our partners, who have been working tirelessly for our community for years.”

COLLABORATIVE ACTION Currently, Cradle to Career has seven collaborative action networks that span from prenatal up to career excellence. Brock

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Julie Brock became Cradle to Career executive director in September 2018.

believes there is a place at the table for every community member. She says, “We are starting with Kindergarten Readiness and High School Graduation, so if someone identifies as wanting to work in one of those areas, we welcome them to join us by contacting our Cradle to Career facilitator.” One of the community partners, Families First of Minnesota, found that just 30% of our youth are developmentally ready to enter kindergarten, according to data sourced from Rochester Public Schools and the Kindergarten Readiness Assessment. And based on Boys & Girls Club of Rochester’s work in the area of high school graduations, Rochester is at around an 86% on-time high school graduation rate, per the data from the Minnesota Department of Education’s data. The graduation rate for students receiving free or reduced lunches is just 74%. Brock finishes with a powerful statement about the program. She states, “We are committed to equity. It is at the heart of every decision. This isn’t about creating blanket responses, it is about studying and

implementing best practices and learning how they work best in our community. We can learn from the 70 other communities doing this work, but all systems change is built on the individual resources within our unique community. It is important to remember that this is slow and steady work and not about quick fixes. If we only pursue the low-hanging fruit, we miss out on the sweetness of that fruit at the top of the tree that needs time to grow, time to flourish and time to become the best it is supposed to be.”

GET INVOLVED To participate in the Kindergarten Readiness and High School Graduation action areas, contact Kristina Wright-Peterson at kristinawp@c2cmn.com. To join the mailing list and learn about upcoming opportunities, visit c2cmn.com and sign up Gina Dewink is a writer, author and communications manager living in Rochester with her husband and two small children.

SPRING COMMUNITY REPORT MEETING Wednesday, May 1, 2019, 4-6 p.m. John Marshall High School cafeteria Light supper, highlight of the work of the last six months and community input gathering

FALL COMMUNITY REPORT MEETING Tuesday, October 8, 2019 Time and location to be determined

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SHOPPING

Mother's Day GIFTS

SHOP LOCAL FOR MOM BY KATHRYN LENN

As Sweet as Mom

SWEET SATISFACTION BY DEBBIE BUCHBINDER Mail service only sweet-satisfaction.com Debbie avoids gluten and dairy and was getting tired of eating dark chocolate. In the fall of 2018, she started reaching out to candy companies who specialized in dietary-friendly recipes, and she began making her own mail-order treat boxes for others who needed some variety in their sweets game. You can hardly believe you’re missing the milk in the milk-chocolate candies, and two of the bars taste like big-name candy bars. They have toffee, brittle, truffles and chewy caramels. For the mom with a sweet tooth, sign her up to receive monthly boxes that cater to her dietary restrictions while still satisfying her desire for a treat. Or, maybe you just want something for yourself. You can buy online at any time. Everything is gluten and dairy free and 100% vegan. Visit the website and get $5 off your first order with promo code: “RWMAG5”

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For the Foodie

FIDDLEHEAD COFFEE CO. 412 3rd Avenue SE, Rochester fiddleheadcoffee.co Fiddlehead opened its doors in February 2019 and has been consistently adding to the Rochester food scene. It offers responsibly-sourced fresh coffee beans, a house bakery with a Minnesota State Fair blue ribbon winner running the show and local produce from Pearson Organics. And with the most green kitchen in the state of Minnesota that’s orchestrated by a James Beard award recipient, this small restaurant has big personality. Mom can eat local cuisine, drink organic and bio-diverse wine, try the house-made bitters or gin and subsequently give back to programs providing help and relief for those struggling in our community. Their Mother’s Day brunch is May 12 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., with bottomless blood orange mimosas. If you can’t make it to brunch, pick up a gift card.

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SHOPPING

Buy Local

DWELL LOCAL, LLC 602 7th Street NW, Rochester dwelllocal.com Dwell Local is packed with everything for the mom who loves Rochester’s local products and artists. Owner Paul returned to Minnesota from California and opened Dwell in June of 2014 to help give locals beautiful things being made by their neighbors. There’s a room for anything you may need for the new mom’s baby shower, such as adorable Minnesota onesies made by Driftless and hand-made blankets. There’s also a room highlighting the gardener, with scatter garden kits and Fox & Fern Floral arrangements. The walls are loaded with local license plate art, canvases with beautiful sayings and local artwork. You can also pop in to grab some artisan popcorn mixes, statement and fair-trade jewelry, various handmade soaps and bath bombs as unique as your mom. Mix in some antiques, craft accessories, wallets, hand-poured candles and one-of-a-kind furniture pieces, and this is a store mom can’t miss. Add a gift card to her present so she can experience it for herself too.

For the Mom with Pets

CHUCK & DON’S PET FOOD & SUPPLIES Barlow’s Plaza, 1117 6th Street NW, Rochester chuckanddons.com Chuck & Don’s Pet Food & Supplies is a Minnesota original. First established in Eagan in 1990, a Rochester location launched in October of 2017. Not only does it have a fully-supplied pet wash room, but it partners with local pet adoption agencies for coupons and special offers for your new family member. Chuck & Don’s also has a huge variety of handmade cookies and pet treats, carries an unmatched selection of everything you would need—from food to accessories—for any pet and employs staff that are passionate and knowledgeable about animals. Wellbehaved, leashed pets are welcome. On Wednesdays get $5 off a pet bath.

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SHOPPING

TERRALOCO 1190 16th Street SW, Suite 150, Rochester RUNterraloco.com TerraLoco is the place to shop for the mom who runs. The shop opened in August of 2012 and is now owned and managed by Tiffany Piotrowicz. Using video-gait analysis to ensure the running shoes you buy work for the way you run and featuring a variety of gear for hard-to-fit feet and strollers to take little ones on the trail, TerraLoco is the place to go to keep mom’s running (or walking) game strong. She can also sign up for workshops or classes or join various events. All the while, she’ll be giving back to our community. TerraLoco supports our area with every $5 5K event they put on, and they work with youth runners through Bolder Options, student discounts and more. TerraLoco’s summer challenge is a fun and easy way to have some friendly competition with friends and family while encouraging fitness.

A Moment in Time

MIDWEST LIFESHOTS PHOTOGRAPHY

Online or by appointment only midwestlifeshots.com When you realize that mom needs to be in some of the family photos and the kids won’t be this little forever, schedule a family session with a professional photographer. Scott and Jen Elder started Midwest LifeShots in the summer of 2008 and have been helping people remember the happiest moments of their lives ever since. Offering engagement and wedding shoots, maternity and newborn sessions and family sessions, there are a variety of packages to bring the photos to life. Midwest LifeShots allows you to document mom and the loves of her life. They take the time to build relationships with their clients, and they maintain the highest levels of customer service to ensure the picture-taking process is not only painless, but actually enjoyable. Visit their website and see for yourself just how beautiful a memory can be. Katie Lenn is navigating motherhood and adulthood, and finds it therapeutic to share her life’s mis-happenings by writing about them.

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Photos courtesy of Luya.

For the Sporty Mom


WOMEN'S EMPOWERMENT (WE)

CONNIE HAWLEY

A SUPPORTIVE COMMUNITY AND POSITIVE ATTITUDE ARE KEYS TO HER SUCCESS BY HOLLY GALBUS

CONNIE HAWLEY IS OWNER OF LUYA SHOES AND OTHER FINE THINGS IN ZUMBROTA AND STILLWATER, SPECIALIZING IN HAND-CRAFTED, WELL-MADE, ARTISTICALLY DESIGNED SHOES FROM AROUND THE WORLD. Since opening the first store in Zumbrota in November 2014,

Hawley has experienced both successes and challenges and has learned what it takes to be a business owner in the competitive retail market. A selfdescribed shoe fanatic, Hawley began to consider opening her own business after accompanying her friend and fellow Zumbrota business owner on buying trips. The two agreed there was a need for a shoe store in the area, and after Hawley signed the lease on a newly-renovated building on Main Street in Zumbrota, Luya Shoes was born.

Photos courtesy of Luya.

IMPORTANCE OF COMMUNITY

Hawley credits the supportive community of Zumbrota business owners for much of her early success. She says there is camaraderie and a bond between them—a sisterhood—and in those first months of opening Luya, Hawley had what she calls “instant customers,” because her colleagues often referred their customers to her shop. Hawley is also appreciative of the support from the Small Business Administration. They helped her create a business plan, walking her through key elements of owning a business, such as marketing, margin and insurance costs. Also important to the business’ success is the market research Hawley conducted before opening the store. “I learned the majority of women want to be left alone to play with shoes,” she says, “and that they do not want to be rushed.” Hawley thought a lot about the store’s design and asked many women what they would like in a shoe store. Those conversations informed the store’s layout, which is more like an art gallery than a store, with respect to how shoes are displayed. Hawley likes to use atypical fixtures and colorful, eye-catching displays throughout the store. Also, all the sizes she carries are out on the floor, rather than in a back room, making it easy for customers to know what’s available. Through research of various brands, she decided to purchase shoes primarily from

Portugal, Spain and Israel, because “their largest export is shoes. I’m drawn to the quality—the leather is amazing.”

CHALLENGES ENCOUNTERED

Just a few months into opening the store in Zumbrota, Hawley encountered what many retailers experience during the first quarter of every year: a significant dip in sales. The combination of cold, snowy weather and customers catching up on holiday bills put a damper on sales, something Hawley was unprepared for those first few years in business. She says it’s still frustrating for her, but she has learned it’s a normal part of the business cycle. What is helpful for her is to keep a positive attitude, practice gratitude and reach out to the business community for encouragement and support. Competition from online sales is another challenge Hawley has experienced. While many brick-and-mortar stores also maintain an online presence, Luya Shoes does not, primarily because of Hawley’s belief that people need to try many shoes on in the store before making a purchase. In her research she learned 50% of shoes purchased online are returned. Part of customer service, she says, is asking people who come to her store about their footwear needs. From there, she and her staff, who know how different brands fit, are able to make knowledgeable recommendations. A method

"We are opening a Luya Shoes in Excelsior in early May! We are really excited about branching out on the west side of the Twin Cities. My son Travis will be running that store." ~ Connie Hawley Hawley uses to overcome online competition is to work with brands that will not price their shoes for less online.

GROWTH MINDSET

In December 2018, Hawley decided to close stores in Edina and Red Wing due to underperformance. Describing the closures as “a hit, emotionally and financially,” she’s not deterred from looking at new opportunities. A new Luya location in Excelsior will open in May 2019, and she's currently at work on a collaboration with a clothing store in Wisconsin. "I'm keeping my eyes and ears open," she says, "awaiting new horizons." Holly Galbus is a freelance writer and news reporter.

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COVER STORY

MOMPRENEUR JENNIFER BECKER

BUILDING A BUSINESS WITH CREATIVITY AND CONFIDENCE BY TORI UTLEY PHOTOGRAPHY BY FAGAN STUDIOS

AS MANY ENTREPRENEURS KNOW, WHERE THERE’S NO RISK, THERE’S NO REWARD. Bringing a great idea to light requires

the courage to step out—often unsure of the outcome—with confidence, passion and tenacity. MEET JENNIFER BECKER Becker is the co-owner of Bleu Duck Kitchen, one of Rochester’s trendiest dinner spots, which is serving the Rochester community for a third year. While it took courage to start a restaurant of her own, Becker’s story can attest that she’s been preparing to lead her entire career. After her first serving gig at the Town and Country Cafe in Kellogg as a teenager, Becker moved to Rochester, working at Michael’s, PappaGeorge Taverna, Outback Steakhouse and the Rochester Golf and Country Club. After 20 years in the service industry, she was ready for a change of perspective. “I knew it was time to move forward and do something different,” she says. “My passion and

drive were so fierce for so many years, but it was starting to fizzle. I needed something to jumpstart me and get me back in my own skin.” The inspiration for Bleu Duck Kitchen came somewhat accidentally, she says. Teaming up with chefs Erik Kleven and Erik Paulsen to create a silent auction experience for the Boys & Girls Club of Rochester’s Chair Affair event—an eight-course meal at the historic Conley-Maass Building—the trio knew they were onto something. “We pulled it off with nothing but portable burners,” Becker jokes. “We all left thinking, ‘That was awesome. How can we make this work?’” After a conversation with her mom and the realization that opportunities are meant to be

taken, she decided to go for it. “If you don’t take the risk, you’ll never know,” Becker remembers thinking. “I was at a pivotal time in my life. I needed change—I needed to grasp onto something I could make my own.” Now three years later, Becker reflects on what it’s taken to create a restaurant of her own and the leadership lessons she’s learned along the way.

ALL HANDS ON DECK According to Becker, you won’t find her in the back office away from the action. If you want to be successful in this business, you need to dig in deep and get your hands dirty. And some days, that means bussing tables or folding hand towels. “There’s a joy in being a part of every aspect of the business,” she says. “It gets me out on the floor, talking with tables and helping my staff when and where they need it. It’s refreshing and gives the assurance that everything is moving in a good direction.” RWmagazine.com May/June 2019

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The direction of Bleu Duck Kitchen creative and fun. Becker adds that her team has opted for "fun dining" rather than fine dining. “We want you to get to know who we are,” she says. “We want to push your taste buds and make you wonder why certain textures and flavors go together.” In addition to pushing the limits with the dinner menu, Bleu Duck Kitchen has become known for the experiences they create, including Saturday Brunch, Ladies’ Bunco Night and a Kentucky Derby Party. “We believe in creating experiences because that’s what people remember,” she says. “We’re always looking for events that make you think and are hands on.” At the same time, simplicity is key. “We’re not trying to be big and extravagant, we just want to be approachable and provide opportunities that push you out of your comfort zone to try new things.” Embracing a trial and error approach, Becker knows it’s experimentation that shapes great ideas; some work, some don’t—and that’s okay. Becker says, “People can sense your excitement, and it will give you drive to keep creating new things.”

COMMUNITY OF SUPPORT When asked about being a woman in the restaurant industry, Becker says she’s been fortunate to have been surrounded by strong women her entire career. From working with mother-daughter duo Thelma and Patty Holland at the Town and Country Cafe, to her staff at the Rochester Golf and Country Club, Becker says she’s received nothing but support. 22

“People have always respected me for what I brought to the table,” she says. “I’ve had such great support and have worked for incredible chefs who allowed me to do my own thing while teaching me along the way.” Now as a restaurant owner, Becker says she’s inspired by the number of women making waves in the local restaurant scene. “It’s inspiring to look around and see women who are doing well,” she says. Respect for other business owners is foundational to Becker’s leadership because when it comes to competition, she believes there’s always more room at the table. “As a business owner, you have to embrace every restaurant that’s opening up and growing,” she says. “It’s up to us to support one another and give other restaurants high praise because investing your time, money, heart and soul into starting a business is hard work.” Along with camaraderie among fellow restaurateurs, Becker says it’s been exciting to see the Rochester restaurant community embracing new styles, drawing on influences from bigger cities or geographic regions—a trend she says will continue giving area residents and tourists the options they’re looking for. “Our community is small, but growing,” Becker says. “Rochester is probably one of the best representations of how tight-knit this industry can be, and a lot of our restaurants are women-driven."

FINDING BALANCE Outside of her life at Bleu Duck Kitchen, Becker is a wife, mother and stepmother, all full-time

roles in themselves. She says a life of family and fun outside of work is what establishes a healthy balance. “I’m fortunate to have a huge support system that embraces my business,” she says. “It’s not always blue skies, so I have reinforcement when I need it.” With a support system by her side, Becker also says fitness, good coffee and gardening are all passions that help her be the best version of herself. While owning a restaurant may not seem to offer balance, Becker says the creative freedom and rejuvenation of her passions has helped her strike a balance that’s been working. “Passion creates a sense of energy that will give you the happiness you need to reach your dreams,” she says. “And along with passion, you’ll need the desire to advance, the willingness to learn, wanting to be bigger, better and ready to grow every single day.” “When you’re working on yourself mentally, emotionally, physically and spiritually, things will align for you,” she adds. Ultimately, it’s growth, Becker says, that develops a foundation for healthy leadership, where you can be open to new ideas, strong enough to handle criticism and thankful for the lessons that make you who you are. “Be confident and determined, and don’t be afraid to be yourself,” she adds. “My flaws and mistakes have molded me into who I am today— someone who is 110% confident in my own skin.” Tori Utley is Rochester area writer and entrepreneur.

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FOOD AND WINE

AVOCADOS FROM MEXICO TO MINNESOTA BY JORRIE JOHNSON

ACCORDING TO THE 2018 AVOSCORE CARD PUBLISHED BY HASS AVOCADO BOARD, AVOCADO UNIT SALES INCREASED BY 25.4% FROM 2017 TO 2018, WITH THE GREAT LAKES REGION LEADING WITH A 26.3% INCREASE. While

the quantities increased, prices decreased 14.1% in 2018, and the average price per avocado was $1.10 across the United States ($1.16 in the Great Lakes Region and $1.11 in the Plains Region). WITH LOVE FROM MEXICO

Hass avocados from Mexico are the most popular and readily available avocados in the U.S. today. They originated in the in 1920s in La Habra Heights, California, where Rudolph Hass began grafting newly planted avocado trees with mature Fuerte avocado trees to produce the bumpy, dark skinned avocados. In the 1950s, producers in Mexico started growing a version of the Hass grafted with some native varieties.

Michaoacán and the state of México are the main avocado growing states in Mexico. Michaoacán, with its rich soil, sunshine and plenty of rain, is home to more than 30,000 avocado orchards. The trees bloom 365 days a year, and avocados are harvested year-round, depending on the elevation of the orchard.

(My Sweet Greens MN recipe modified)

Smooth, nutty guacamole you can customize to your level of heat preference. Servings: 8

GOOD FOR YOU Luscious green, creamy, nutty-flavored avocados contain nearly 20 vitamins and minerals. They are cholesteroland sodium-free, naturally good in fat, nutritious and a good source of fiber and folate. The average avocado weighs 150 grams and contains 240 calories. One serving, one-third of an avocado, consists of 80 calories—high compared to other fruits, but worth it because the calories come from fat (75% good, monounsaturated fat). The good fat in avocados helps the body absorb vitamins A, D, K and E. Avocados are basically sugar free and are a low-carb fruit. There are so many ways to eat avocados, and they are so easy to prepare. Eat them in guacamole, on salads with other fruits or vegetables, in soups, in smoothies and even in desserts. The next time you think about using butter or mayonnaise on a sandwich, think about spreading some soft, creamy avocado instead. Or why not just eat one on its own for a snack? Try this delicious Sunflower Guacamole recipe incorporating locally-grown My Sweet Greens, MN sunflower shoots. This nutty shoot adds flavor and protein to the dip. It’s suitable as a meal with tortilla chips and made complete with a Corona or margarita on a summer day. Jorrie Johnson is publisher and editor of Rochester Women magazine.

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Sunflower Guacamole

INGREDIENTS • 4 avocados • juice of 1 whole lime • 1/2 tsp. salt • 1 1/3 cups (one package) My Sweet Greens sunflower shoots • 1/4 cup red onion, finely chopped • 1 tomato, chopped • jalapeno peppers, chili peppers, ghost peppers as desired INSTRUCTIONS 1. Place avocado, lime juice and salt in bowl and mash into a chunky mixture. 2. Roughly chop sunflower shoots. 3. Stir in sunflower shoots, red onion and salsa. 4. Enjoy with chips, fresh vegetables or on a sandwich or wrap. Use immediately. If storing, keep tightly wrapped or covered in the refrigerator. Each serving contains: 191 calories; 15 g total fat (2 g saturated; 0 g trans fat); 157 mg sodium; 15 g total carbohydrates (1 g sugars; 7 g fiber); 4 g protein. www.mysweetgreensmn.com/recipe/microgreens-thepower-of-green/ Original recipe source: www.alive.com/recipe/ sunflower-guacamole/

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FOOD AND WINE

My Sweet Greens MN GROWN IN ZUMBROTA BY JORRIE JOHNSON

Dean and Jayne Bredlau display their microgreens.

el of heat

JUST THREE MONTHS AFTER DEAN AND JAYNE BREDLAU MET IN 2014, JAYNE WAS IN A SERIOUS ACCIDENT AND FRACTURED HER TIBIA AND FIBULA. During her recovery, the couple spent time conversing about life, challenges and their faith in God. In September 2015, they married and began their life together in Zumbrota. Combining Dean’s passion for farming and Jayne’s interest in marketing, My Sweet Greens MN was born in 2016 out of a dream to get back to what’s real and meaningful.

GROWING THE BUSINESS During 2017, Dean started growing trials with seeds from Johnny's Seeds and retail flats and soil. They experimented with flats, seeding protocols, lighting and temperatures. In the meantime, Jayne was providing samples to an executive chef who became interested in

purchasing the microgreens. They expanded their growing by setting up a small, movable greenhouse to capture the best seasonal sunlight. Eventually, they added second- and third-season extensions to the greenhouse for spinach, cressida, pak choi (bok choy), mizuna, arugula and various salad greens, microgreens and herbs. In early 2018 the Bredlaus were invited to sell at a small, indoor farmers market in Faribault, Minnesota "We sold everything we brought: just harvested baby salad greens and microgreens. We were smitten with the whole farmers market scene," Jayne explains. Last summer they participated in four area farmers markets. By the end of December, they had vended at more than 50 area farmers markets. The Bredlaus quickly grew their retail business into several communities, stores and restaurants throughout southeastern Minnesota. They are regularly at the Rochester Downtown Farmers Market, where you can meet them and learn about their production. My Sweet Greens MN products are available at Just Foods Co-op in Northfield, Bluff Country Co-op in Winona, Spiral Natural Foods Co-op in Hastings and all Hy-Vee locations in Rochester. Restaurants currently serving the microgreens include Lord Essex Steakhouse in Rochester and Blue Heron Coffeehouse in Winona.

TASTING DEMONSTRTIONS The Bredlaus want to “share the flavors and fun of microgreens, especially in grocery stores to customers who are not typical co-op or farmers market shoppers, to enhance their home eating experiences.” Jayne says, “Tasting is believing.” I met Jayne at the Achieve 2019 event in January. After sampling My Sweet Greens MN microgreens at the event, I quickly became interested in the product.

Over the winter I demonstrated the microgreens at Hy-Vee stores in Rochester. It was fun to hear feedback from shoppers. Some people walk right by, while others take their time to sample the Sweet Pea, Sunflower, Classy Classic combination, Zesty Mix and Radish shoots. Most people can taste the sweet pea flavor immediately in the Sweet Pea shoots. The flavors get surprisingly spicier, which intrigues people who take their time to taste each of the varieties of microgreens.

EATING MICROGREENS The nutritional value of microgreens is superb. Each microgreen type reflects that of the plant itself with up to 40 times more punch, according to WebMD. Sunflower microgreens are one of the most complete foods you can add to your diet for overall health. They are packed with vitamins A, B-complex, D, and E. They also contain calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, potassium, phosphorus and zinc. As source of complete protein, sunflower microgreens help to repair muscle tissue and aid in enzymatic functions in the body. They benefit skeletal, muscular and neurological systems as well as activate the immune system and help keep gut bacteria healthy, improving our ability to fight disease. Microgreens can be eaten many different ways—as a base for or on top of salads, added to sandwiches, burgers or wraps, as a topping for eggs, soups and meats, or blended with fruits for smoothies or with herbs for a flavorful pesto. At demonstrations, we provide recipes that include My Sweet Greens MN microgreens. The recipes are also found online at mysweetgreensmn.com/recipe. Jorrie Johnson is publisher and editor of Rochester Women magazine.

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HOME AND GARDEN

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BUDGETFRIENDLY BACKYARD UPGRADES

1. ENHANCE AND UPDATE THE SURFACE. There are a variety of ways to enhance your deck or patio. Decks can be power-washed, stained or sealed. If your deck is no more than three feet off the ground, upgrade the look and function by removing the traditional railing and adding long steps the entire width of the deck down to the yard. This will not only look great, it will add extra seating. Patios made of concrete can be power-washed, stained or resurfaced with stone or pavers. Whether you improve or update the surface, try adding a large outdoor area rug to define the space and add a feeling of cozy opulence.

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“LIVING ROOM” BY KRISTIE MOORE

THE IDEA OF DIY HAS CHANGED CONSIDERABLY IN RECENT YEARS, BOTH INSIDE AND OUTSIDE OF THE HOME. Design shows, Pinterest and online video tutorials have

expanded the possible options and desires of the average homeowner. The availability of these resources has enabled homeowners to reimagine their properties like never before. When approaching improvements from a creative edge, even modest homes and tight budgets can be transformed into luxurious living.

OUTDOOR LIVING SPACE Warm weather means spending more time outside. Spring is the perfect time to shake off the winter doldrums and evaluate how you are using your outdoor spaces. Perhaps it’s time for an upgrade. Start by assessing your backyard to determine what needs your attention, then after that… dream a little. Consider your spatial reality, lifestyle, interests and budget. A great place to begin is with a deck or patio. Enhancing this space by creating an outside “living room” will not only add enjoyment to your life, it will add resale value to your home. Kristie Moore is a certified home stager and stylist @ Soul Purpose Home Solutions www.soulpurposehome.com

2. CREATE MOOD LIGHTING. Any space, either inside or out, has better ambiance with subdued lighting. String bistro lights overhead, add candles to table tops, or consider outdoor solar lights along pathways and hanging solar globes in trees. 3. FILL YOUR SPACE WITH SOUND. Like lighting, music adds wonderful ambiance and sets the mood. There are many options available for every budget, from inexpensive Bluetooth speakers to sophisticated all-weather, landscape-integrated speakers. 4. ADD COLOR AND LIFE. Nothing adds vibrancy like a variety of healthy plants and shrubs. Mix colors, shapes and textures for the greatest interest. Group clutters of pots in a variety of heights to add drama and simplify watering. Spruce up your lawn with fresh grass seed and natural fertilizers, especially at the start of the season. 5. BRING THE INSIDE OUT. Enjoy this space like you enjoy your living room. Don’t be afraid to bring out pillows, throw blankets, ottomans, end tables, lamps, even an occasional—relocating the kitchen table and chairs for a larger group on a special occasion. Borrowing these inside treasures creates instant upgraded luxury. Can you leave these items out permanently? No, but the extra effort and vibe it creates during special get-togethers is so worth it. Does your house have a sunny side? Invest in one or two large cantilever umbrellas, or if budget allows, a pergola. These come in a variety of shapes and sizes and can range from preconstructed to DIY kits. Constructing a pergola will really give the feeling of an actual “living room” in your backyard. RWmagazine.com May/June 2019

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HOME AND GARDEN

REFRESH YOUR HOME

UPDATE YOUR KITCHEN CABINETS FROM BUYING NEW TO REFURBISHING, EXPERTS PROVIDE OPTIONS TO UPGRADE YOUR KITCHEN CABINETRY—AND YOUR LIFESTYLE BY TRISH AMUNDSON

ARE YOUR KITCHEN CABINETS DATED? ARE YOU READY FOR A NEW LOOK?

Whether you’re up for a complete overhaul or just want to freshen up your cabinet surfaces, there are many possibilities to consider when updating the most prominent fixtures in the heart of your home. Local experts can help you achieve a stunning transformation that incorporates modern styles and features—and aligns with your personal preferences and budget.

Photos provided by Beyond Kitchens.

DESIGNING YOUR DREAM KITCHEN Diane Quinn, owner of Beyond Kitchens and a certified kitchen designer, leads the way in her knowledge of current styles. “Painted cabinets are still the favorite,” she says. “However, we are seeing a movement away from all-white kitchens toward more color or mixing with stained wood. We’ve moved totally away from decorative detail to more simple and clean lines.” Beyond Kitchens is a design-build remodeling company, which specializes in kitchens, bathrooms and other spaces within the home. “We design the project, assist in product selection and provide contracting services to complete the project,” says Quinn. The company partners with Plato Woodwork, Inc., a nationally known Minnesota-based cabinet company, to offer both custom and semi-custom

cabinetry in a variety of styles. Quinn also collaborates with Daryl Nigon, president of Nigon Woodworks, Inc., for specialized projects, such as decorative ventilation hoods that can breathe new life into almost any kitchen. For over four decades, Nigon has helped customers with projects from simple repairs to complex woodworking needs.

Top Photo: This kitchen was designed by Beyond Kitchens with a Nigon Woodworks hood and Plato Woodwork cabinets. Bottom Photo: Nigon Woodworks decorative ventilation hoods add charm to kitchens.

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HOME AND GARDEN

BUILT-IN QUALITY, CONVENIENCE AND ACCESSORIES “We can make cabinets for any room in the home from kitchens and bathrooms to family rooms, home theaters and more—and any room that has built-ins,” adds Nigon, who does the majority of his work in existing homes. Nigon likes to see pictures of projects that appeal to each client as they consider choices, and together, they will finalize a plan. He also recognizes changes in cabinetry over the past few years: “More base cabinets just have drawers and no doors, and some include very large drawers for pots and pans or dishes,” he says. “These are more convenient than getting things out of a base cabinet with doors and shelves.” Hardware offerings now include soft-close hidden hinges and soft-close, full-extension drawer slides. Creative accessories can be built into new cabinets—pop-up mixer shelves, vertical dividers for cookie sheets, wood dividers for silverware and utensils, heavy-duty lazy Susans, swing-out shelves and roll-out shelves and trays. “Shaker-style doors are very popular and often constructed of fine-grained woods like birch, alder, cherry or even walnut,” says Nigon. He constructs high-quality custom cabinets with high-grade parts and thicker, durable materials, and when it comes to customizations, the possibilities are endless. “Unique things can be done with custom cabinets, such as matching the grain of the wood from cabinet to cabinet or using different materials like metal accents or reveals.”

Higgins creates cabinets for both existing homes and new constructions. A family-owned business for nearly 40 years, his shop can accommodate special requests and can make your cabinets unique—with “impeccable detail.” The process begins by scheduling time with a designer at the company’s showroom, which displays a variety of cabinetry styles and wood and color choices. “With custom cabinetry, the mantels, built-ins and even the closets can be constructed by the same shop,” he says, noting they also give customers the opportunity to see their projects in the different stages of production. “The choices for woods and finishes are increasing every year. Reconstituted veneers, textured laminates and gloss and matte acrylics are some of the man-made options that have become more popular recently,” says Higgins. “Our native woods are still the most popular choices.”

Photo provided by Artisan Construction & Remodeling.

REMODELING AND REFACING

Photo provided by Higgins Custom Cabinetry.

UNIQUE PRODUCTS AND SERVICES “New cabinetry is a major investment whether you use a custom shop or factory ‘box’ cabinets,” says Darcy Higgins, president and CEO of Higgins Custom Cabinetry. Architecture of the home, space utilization, lifestyle and budget all influence the homeowner’s decisions in making their cabinetry selections.

Some homeowners choose to keep the current layout of their cabinets but update the look. A popular alternative to replacing cabinets is refacing them. This process is less time consuming, less costly and less disruptive than a total cabinet overhaul. “Refacing is possible when the owner likes their existing cabinets, and they are still in acceptable condition,” explain Matthew and Janai Haynes, owners of Artisan Construction and Remodeling, Inc. Matthew Haynes is a third-generation craftsman with more than 20 years of construction experience. The company’s projects include full-scale kitchen remodels, decorative backsplashes, granite and wood countertops and replacing and refacing cabinets. He recommends cabinet and countertop replacement if possible, noting homeowners are happier when they actually have “a new kitchen.” But he understands the scope of the project depends on the budget and whether the owner can or wants to invest in new cabinets and countertops—or if they want a more economical option.

Left Photo: Higgins Custom Cabinetry built these kitchen cabinets out of rift sawn white oak with a custom stain and glaze. Right Photo: A revised kitchen layout required new kitchen cabinets for this remodel by Artisan Construction & Remodeling, Inc.

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The refacing process includes removing the doors and drawers from the cabinet boxes and then cleaning and scuff sanding the cabinet faces and exposed sides to achieve a sound surface. The facing material, which can be pre-finished, stained or painted in a variety of colors, is bonded to the cabinet faces and sides before it’s trimmed and sanded for a pleasing appearance. “Usually we add new doors, drawer fronts, hinges and drawer slides to finish out the process,” the couple says.

OTHER BUDGET FRIENDLY UPDATES Cabinet products and services also are offered through large home improvement retail stores, such as Home Depot. If custom cabinets are not in your budget but you still want to buy new, you may consider stock units. Home Depot also offers cabinet refacing, which it describes as “a quick and convenient way to give your kitchen a new look in less time than it would take for a full remodel.” Customers have the opportunity visit with a project consultant, who will partner with local trusted installers to refresh your kitchen. Another lower-cost possibility is to spruce up your current cabinets with fresh paint and hardware. However, take time beforehand to do research and visit with professionals to understand the appropriate process and products to achieve a clean, new look that will last KITCHEN AND BATH SPECIALIST for years to come. “Sometimes painting the existing cabinet doors 507-993-1446 | www.artisan-mn.com S and drawer faces is all the homeowner’s budget allowsExpert for,” says Installation Matthew Haynes. Lic. #BC635270 Sanding Refinishing FITTING YOUR LIFESTYLE Custom Designs Gather photos, expert tips and inspiration. From top-quality custom, ArtisanConstruction_MJ19_4th.indd 1 Free Estimates factory-produced and lower-cost options, take time to find the right solution for both you and your kitchen. Visit the online galleries and showrooms of local craftsmen to see examples of their fine quality workmanship. HARDWOOD FLOORS, INC. Your kitchen should not only suit your cooking and diningJim needs— Brogan Oak • Maple • Cherry • Hickory • Exotic Woods but also your personal style. An ideal cabinet update will Trent complement Rutledge Cork • Bamboo • Prefinished Flooring your home’s architecture, provide maximum use of space Tony and stay Horsman within your budget. It will help create a space for you and Over your 50 family years combined experience that fits your lifestyle. www.creativehf.com

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HOME AND GARDEN

GROW W YOUR OWN FOOD ROCHESTER’S SEED LIBRARY TAKES ROOT BY KAREN LEMKE

don’t want that to happen again,” she explains. Kass says she’s passionate about seed diversity, as well, but she’s even more motivated by the idea of giving people the tools to grow their own food. “Having a backyard garden has become a lost art—everyone used to have a garden in their back yard.”

ROCHESTER PUBLIC LIBRARY

KELLY RAE KIRKPATRICK AND HEIDI KASS ARE ON A MISSION: TO ENCOURAGE AND INSPIRE ROCHESTERAREA RESIDENTS TO GROW THEIR OWN FOOD AND PROMOTE SUSTAINABILITY ON A LOCAL LEVEL. Their simple

idea has turned into a blossoming Seed Library at the Rochester Public Library (RPL). TWO GREEN THUMBS

Kirkpatrick, an architect of the local “Plant a Seed” initiative, is pursuing her master’s degrees in biology and leadership education. Meanwhile, Kass is the founder of the Backyard Bounty Urban Homesteaders Meet-Up group in Rochester and holds a bachelor’s degree in biology. Their passion for sustainability is rooted in the diminishing seed diversity. “We’ve easily lost 80% of our seed diversity,” says Kirkpatrick. As fewer seed variations are available, the ability to adapt to changing conditions is also impacted. According to Kirkpatrick, one of the most famous examples of the importance of seed diversity is the Irish Potato Famine. “We

Kirkpatrick and Kass put their passion into action by contacting RPL in April, 2018, to pitch their idea for a seed library. The proposal was immediately embraced by library staff, including RPL’s head of technical services, Keri Ostby. “We had casual conversations about seed libraries in the past,” says Ostby. The library often develops new programming initiatives following a formal program proposal. The Seed Library has been a prime example of that work, with volunteers like Kirkpatrick and Kass donating hundreds of hours of their time. Master gardener Beth Plaetzer and RPL staff, particularly Robin DeVries and Judy Goldsmith, have also invested hundreds of hours to make the project happen. Through March, Kirkpatrick had donated more than 550 hours of time to the Seed Library and will donate even more time this summer, helping a group of Girl Scouts with their Silver Award project. “I am helping them grow plants in the planters outside the library,” she says.

THUMBS UP In all, over 100 volunteers have shared their talents with RPL for the Seed Library. In January and February the volunteers gathered to package over 6,000 seed packets. There are a total of 44 seed varieties for different vegetables, fruits and herbs.

During the Seed Library’s grand opening week, over 1,500 seed packets were checked out by community members, showing the strong demand for learning how to grow food. “The packets are available for any RPL cardholder,” says Ostby. Individuals can check out 10 packets of seeds on their card, with no due date. Patrons take the seeds and enjoy their harvest, but they are also encouraged to learn about seed saving. Ostby says the Seed Library includes more than just seed packets, with ongoing educational classes and events planned throughout the growing months. The library already hosted a speaker from Seed Savers Exchange in January, with a larger-thanexpected crowd attending the event. “We hoped to have 30 or 40 people, but 81 attended the event,” says Ostby. While Kirkpatrick says the Seed Library is “exactly how it was envisioned,” both women know it has the potential to turn into something even bigger. “I would love to eventually have a network of master gardeners in the area who grow food and collect seeds,” says Kass, adding, “Our work is far from done.”

SEED LIBRARY SUPPORTERS The Seed Library is made possible with money from Minnesota’s Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund and the people of Minnesota for Library Legacy activities. The project is also getting support from the weGive365 membership and Rochester Area Foundation, University of Minnesota Extension SNAP-Ed, History Center of Olmsted County, Plant a Seed, and the Backyard Bounty Urban Homesteading Meetup. For more information about the Seed Library, visit www.rplmn.org/seed. Karen Lemke is head of marketing and community engagement for Rochester Public Library.

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SHOPPING

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DO YOU WANT TO BUY A NEW CAR, BUT YOU’RE NOT SURE HOW TO START THE PROCESS? Or do

you have an idea of your “dream car,” but you don’t think you can afford it? Do you know if you will qualify for a car loan? Not so fast. The salespeople at dealerships can help you and explain the process to you. And maybe you’ll end up with that dream car.

financial situation is different. There are benefits to both.” Hoffman goes on to explain that leasing is a privilege, and it’s harder to enter into a lease than a purchase.

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LEASING VS. BUYING You may be interested in leasing a car and getting a new car every few years. Or you may want to buy a car. When asked about whether she recommends leasing or buying, Sheri Hoffman, a salesperson at Zumbrota Ford, explains, “It depends on the situation. Every

BUYING NEW VS. USED Some people may want a new car, but others may be considering a used car for reasons such as cost. When customers are considering whether to buy a new car or used car, Brandrup says, “Whether they buy a new or used vehicle, it’s most important that the vehicle meets their needs and budget.”

Hoffman notes, “I take the time to educate them and explain the opportunities. For example, many people think they can’t afford a new car. We talk about the total cost and the out-of-pocket costs for new and used cars. We want to be very real with our customers.” Hoffman explains, “I’m not trying to sell a car. I’m trying to make a friend and be a consultant to help them, educate them and give solutions to meet their goals. I listen as well as I can for things that are important to them.” When talking to customers about whether to buy a used car, Hoffman says, “It depends on financing. Zumbrota Ford does a great job. We’re willing to do a one-year warranty. We talk about cost of ownership, the risks and if it’s a good fit for them.” Brandrup says, “At the beginning of the sales process, we identify each customer’s driving needs, what is important and not so important in a new or used vehicle. From there, we can help find a car that best fits their needs and budget if the customer hasn’t already picked one out.” Brandrup also notes, “Nearly all of our pre-owned vehicles are Clements Clear Value certified pre-owned. This gives you peace of mind.” She explains this includes a six-month or 6,000-mile powertrain warranty and other

benefits, such as a 30-day exchange.

NO NEGOTIATION POLICY AND PRICING Brandrup explains, “Clements is committed to providing outstanding value and service to each customer, every day. We found that our customers wanted an easier way to purchase a vehicle. We listened and developed the Clements Clear Value pricing policy. This is a negotiation-free pricing policy we apply to all of our vehicles. Price is based on demand, availability and how long the vehicle has been in our inventory. We know our Clear Value price is highly competitive because we constantly shop actual sales prices of vehicles in the area, as well as online third-party resources like Edmunds and Kelley Blue Book.” Hoffman says, “We’re a unique, market-rate dealership. We consider the age and condition of used vehicles, and prices fluctuate every day. We use guidelines to price the vehicle and use tools for benchmarks. We use NADA Black Book and Kelley Blue Book. We have competitive pricing.” Alison Rentschler is a writer and editor living in Rochester, Minn., with her two dogs and a cat. RWmagazine.com May/June 2019

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HEALTH AND WELLNESS

RACHELLE SCHULTZ LEADS WINONA HEALTH WITH AN INNOVATIVE SPIRIT BY ERIN PAGEL

traditional charm and character along with a growing sense of urbanity. Winona boasts an active art scene and abundant natural beauty, ready to be explored. This year, Winona celebrates 125 years of communityfocused health care services at its homegrown hospital, Winona Health.

Rachelle Schultz, EdD President/CEO

COUNTING THE YEARS It’s no small task to keep a hospital running for 125 years. Health care and what patients expect from their care have changed greatly since 1894. Winona Health has demonstrated unwavering commitment to the community, growing and advancing to meet the changing needs of the people it serves. For the last 17 years, Rachelle Schultz has served as president and chief executive officer of Winona Health, overseeing the hospital, multiple clinics, a nursing 36

home, assisted living residences and other related health care services. She leads with an innovative and community-driven approach, keeping focus on patients while striving for continuous improvement and team development. Schultz notes that Winona Health is the first point of health care access for many people across the Winona area and that the hospital is pleased to a part of the Winona community.

"THESE ARE GREAT PEOPLE" Schultz has been in the health care industry for over 30 years and has a varied background with a community focus. She holds a bachelor’s degree in Economics, a master’s degree in Health Care Administration and a doctorate in Interdisciplinary Leadership. She has a presence on national and local stages, serving on multiple boards, groups and initiatives, all working to improve health care and its delivery. In short, Schultz has a broad range of knowledge and a unique perspective, and she actively works to advance Winona Health and the communities it serves. Schultz is credited with many accomplishments in her tenure as CEO. Individually she has received national recognition for significant leadership and improving health care delivery. Winona Health has been recognized nationally for quality and safety and is ranked among the Top 100 U.S. Rural and Community Hospitals in the nation. “Organizations are really functions of their people. The most important role of the CEO is the development of people,” says Schultz. “These are great people.”

REACHING WOMEN Women are often the health decision-makers for themselves and their families. Winona Health’s Inspiring Women and Sparkle programs seek to engage and encourage women by providing accurate health information and opportunities for mothers, daughters, sisters and friends to gather while learning about health and wellness. “These programs create awareness and engagement

around health care issues impacting women, their children and their spouses,” says Schultz. The information provided by Winona Health physicians and other experts is always pertinent and timely for women.

INNOVATIVE PROGRAMS Schultz leads with an innovative spirit and preference toward action, as demonstrated by Winona Health’s various partnerships and initiatives. She explains, “Cost and access are big issues in health care. There are services we can deliver at a much lower cost. We can provide expanded access for patients and are experimenting with ways to broaden and shift our health care delivery system. We are keeping our patient focus and leveraging technology.” Schultz’s words echo in Winona Health’s recent launch of SmartExam online virtual visits. The program allows patients to access health care providers without even leaving their homes, through an online clinic visit. Patients can connect and even send pictures to a health care provider who will respond electronically. For the patient, the program may mean no coordination of transportation or time off work to get expert answers and a treatment plan from Winona Health health care providers. For Winona Health, the program means serving patients in a new way. Another thoughtful and innovative program is the Winona Health initiative providing on-site sale of medical equipment, including walkers and canes, breast pumps and compression wear. Under Schultz’s leadership, Winona Health has opened a new storefront adjacent to the hospital that provides these products. The store offers an array of equipment patients need for improved quality of life outside the hospital, serving patients with products, answers to questions and the convenience of the store location. This autumn, patients will find yet another new way to connect with health care providers. Winona Health’s Main Street Clinic will be a new physical space in downtown Winona.

Photo provided by Winona Health.

ABOUT 50 MILES EAST OF ROCHESTER, THE CITY OF WINONA IS NESTLED AMONG SCULPTED BLUFFS AND THE FABLED MISSISSIPPI RIVER. It’s a city with

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Schultz promises the clinic will “provide a different experience for the patient, not traditional health care.”

PARTNERS IN THE COMMUNITY

evolving needs of patients and the Winona community. What the younger generations look for is different from what the older generations look for. “We don’t act our age of 125 years,” says Schultz. “We are very unique and agile. We are vibrant, advancing with the times, evolving with the needs of the community.” Erin Pagel is a freelance writer living and working in Rochester.

Photo provided by Winona Health.

Community partnerships are an important part of how Winona Health continues to innovate and evolve. The organization has a long-standing history of partnering with local businesses and nonprofits. Under Schultz’s leadership, Winona Health is collaborating with the Winona Family YMCA to capitalize on each organization’s strengths and increase community health. Next spring, a new Winona Family YMCA building will open on the hospital campus. The building will house Winona Health’s rehabilitation services, including physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy and even massage therapy. The shared space will leverage strengths of the hospital and the Winona Family YMCA to serve patients and community members in a manner neither could do alone. In the new space, patients undergoing rehabilitation

will be able to easily continue their journey to improved wellness. The close proximity of the two groups will improve outcomes and patient/community experience, without duplicating resources. The partnership serves the Winona community and the complementary missions of both groups. Being successful in health care means constant evolution, serving many different needs and listening to patients. Schultz strives to recognize and capitalize on opportunities to innovate and partner to meet the

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E

FINANCIAL

HEALTH CARE DIRECTIVES MAKING CHOICES BEFORE A HEALTH EMERGENCY BY JEN JACOBSON

WOMEN OFTEN TAKE THE LEAD WHEN MAKING HEALTH CARE DECISIONS FOR THEIR FAMILIES. But what

if an emergency occurs—an accident or a stroke, for example—leaving you unable to express your wishes for your own health care?

Unfortunately this is a common scenario, and one that can occur at any stage in life. That is why it is critical to prepare an advance health care directive. This documentation allows you to name a trusted person to make these decisions on your behalf. It also can allow you to document your health care preferences and goals. “People often think of advance directives as just for nursing home residents,” says Tricia Schilling, Nursing Home Services and Social Services Manager with Olmsted Medical Center. “But every adult needs to be thinking about what would happen.”

CHOOSING AN AGENT The person you choose to make health care decisions when you’re unable is referred to as your health care “agent,” “proxy” or “representative.” This person doesn’t have to be a spouse or family member, but does have to be at least 18 years old. Ideally, it’s someone who knows you well, is good with critical decisionmaking and is someone you trust to respect your wishes and speak up on your behalf. You may also choose alternate agents in case your primary agent is unreachable or otherwise unable to fulfill the role. Once you’ve identified a good candidate, talk to that person about including him or her in your health care planning and the decisions

you’ve made about any potential care. Ideally it’s a role that will never need to be fulfilled. But if need be, your agent will be ready to react.

DECISIONS, DECISIONS The other component to a health care directive is a statement of your goals, values and preferences about your health care so that your health care team can act according to your wishes. You can be as specific or as general as you wish. Common topics may include where you’d like to receive care and whether or not to use life-prolonging measures such as CPR, ventilation, dialysis or placement of a feeding tube. It also may cover end-of-life decisions such as comfort (palliative) care, as well as organ and tissue donation.

COMPLETING YOUR DIRECTIVE While an attorney can help you prepare a health care directive, it can be done on your own, as well. State-specific forms can be found through organizations such as the American Bar Association and the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization. Mayo Clinic and Olmsted Medical Center (OMC) also have packets available. OMC also offers an abbreviated version of the directive, which focuses on naming your agent and a brief statement of health care goals. “The full directive can be intimidating, but we’ve really seen numbers increase with using the abbreviated version,” says Schilling. “We still urge people to complete the full directive down the road, but at least we’re getting something on file.” Once complete, the document must be notarized or signed in the presence of two

witnesses. At OMC locations, these forms can be notarized at no charge. Storage of your completed directive is key. In addition to keeping a copy in a safe place, give a copy to your agent and any alternate agents and file a copy where you receive primary medical care. These forms may be changed at any time. It’s a good idea to review periodically—at least every 10 years.

A GIFT Talk to the important people in your life about your advance directive and your health care wishes. By having these conversations now, you help ensure that your loved ones understand your preferences and can help lift the burden of any future conflict or guilt. Says Schilling, “It’s a gift you give to your family when you have one of these documents on file.” Jen Jacobson is a local writer and editor.

HEALTH CARE DIRECTIVE RESOURCES FOR MINNESOTA RESIDENTS MINNESOTA BAR ASSOCIATION www.mnbar.org/docs/default-source/ wills-for-heroes/here-.pdf?sfvrsn=6 NATIONAL HOSPICE AND PALLIATIVE CARE ORGANIZATION www.caringinfo.org/files/public/ad/Minnesota.pdf OLMSTED MEDICAL CENTER www.olmmed.org/patients-visitors/ advance-directives/

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COMMUNITY

GOLF GET TO KNOW LOCAL GOLF PRO KARI PHENIX AND LEARN ABOUT ROCHESTER’S LADIES LEAGUES BY LUANN BUECHLER AND CINDY JO DICKSON

“GENTLEMAN ONLY, LADIES FORBIDDEN” USED TO BE THE PERCEPTION, OR MYTH, OF THE MEANING OF THE WORD "GOLF". Historically,

women might have believed it to be true. However, women’s golf is alive and well in the Rochester area.

LPGA PROFESSIONAL JOINS THE OAKS Oaks Golf Club in Hayfield recently brought in Kari Phenix, an LPGA Class A golf professional and native of Hayfield, as the head golf professional and general manager. Phenix says she knew when she was young that she would be a golf professional. She and her parents played golf at Zumbro Valley Recreation Club (ZVRC) when she was a child. A group of members from ZVRC pooled their money and opened Oaks Golf Club in 1977. Phenix played on the Hayfield High School team that was the first to bring home a state golf trophy. She then went to school in Arizona for business management and started her golf career in Leesburg, Virginia as an assistant golf pro. She moved back to Minnesota and worked as head golf pro in New Richland and then played on the Futures (now Symetra) Tour for a few years. In 1997 she worked one season at Oaks. 40

She spent the last 22 years in Florida at the historic Fort Myers Country Club, a course that began with Thomas Edison and was played by Henry Ford and Harvey Firestone. The ladies league at Oaks Golf Club is a 9-hole league on Tuesday evenings. Phenix will be providing lessons to anyone who wants to learn or sharpen their skills at any level. Phenix loves the concept of the game, the skill of creatively crafting the shot, the fact that you call penalties on yourself and the integrity involved. “You learn a lot about a person by how they act on the golf course,” she shares. One interesting note is that Toni Phenix, Kari’s mother, was the first Ladies League President at Oaks. New to Oaks Golf Club is fling golf, which is a hybrid of lacrosse, baseball and golf. It takes only one club so no need to make a decision on which club to use. You can play with others using regular clubs or as a whole group playing fling golf; you book your tee time the same way. Fling clubs can be rented at Oaks, or you can buy them online. Fling is great for reunions, families, corporate and nonprofit golf events because it makes the game inclusive to all players at all levels.

ROCHESTER’S LADIES LEAGUES Hadley Creek’s ladies league, known as the Fine Nine and Wine, play any time of the day on Wednesdays and host a 5:30 p.m. shotgun start event and potluck once a month to build community among their members. Last year they added a senior ladies league, known as Lady Legends, who play on Monday mornings. Most recently, the young woman coaches from the First Tee program have created a young ladies golf social league (for 10- to 16-year-olds) that meets Thursdays from 5:30-7 p.m. at Hadley Creek in June, July and August. Rochester public courses host ladies leagues in the summer. Eastwood has ladies leagues May through September. Their 18-hole league plays on Monday mornings and a 9-hole league plays on Thursday mornings. Northern Hills Ladies League plays every Tuesday morning and afternoon from the first week of May until September. Soldiers Field hosts their Nifty Nine Hole ladies league or the SMFWGA 18-hole league on Wednesday mornings. For more information on City of Rochester golf courses visit RochesterMNGolf.com LuAnn Buechler is a member at Hadley Creek and hosts an annual Women’s Golf Retreat in Arizona, at Lone Tree Golf Club owned by Rochester native Greg Avant and managed by Ms. Keeley Bina, director of merchandising. For more information, visit LuAnnB.com/Upcoming Events. Cindy Jo Dickson is an interior design consultant and loves all things golf.

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RUFC

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TRAVEL

IT’S OFF TO THE RACES! AT CANTERBURY PARK BY HOLLY GALBUS

THOROUGHBRED HORSE RACING, A CARD CASINO OPEN 24/7, FUN FAMILY ACTIVITIES AND A FULL SCHEDULE OF SUMMERTIME EVENTS, INCLUDING THE INAUGURAL TWIN CITIES SUMMER JAM MUSIC FESTIVAL. It’s all available at

Canterbury Park, just 90 minutes away in Shakopee, Minnesota. Canterbury Park, formerly Canterbury Downs, opened in June 1985. In December 1992, it closed due to a drop in attendance but re-opened a few years later under new ownership. In June 2012, Canterbury Park and the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community, owners of Mystic Lake Casino, formed a 10-year agreement, which added $75 million to horsemen purses over the life of the agreement. AT THE RACES In 2019, the racing season begins May 3 with a special weekend celebrating the Kentucky Derby. The season runs through mid-September, with races scheduled each Thursday through Sunday. Racing begins at 6 p.m. on Thursday and Friday nights, and on weekends, start time is 12:45 p.m. Each day, the schedule includes eight to 10 races, with each race lasting 24 minutes. Arrive early (45 minutes before the first race) and plan to spend at least three hours at the park, or more if you would like to eat at one of the many on-site restaurants. There are numerous dining options available, from traditional stadium foods, such as hot dogs and mini donuts, to a full-service restaurant on the third 42

floor. Admission to live racing is $7 for adults and free for those 17 and younger. There is no charge for parking.

BETTING HOW-TOS New to horse racing? Not sure which horse to bet on? Not to worry. Canterbury Park offers lots of ways for novices to learn about the sport. When you get to the track, pick up the daily program. It lists every race and provides information about each horse and jockey. Attend Paul Allen’s “Today at the Races” prior to the start time of the first race. Fifteen minutes before each race, while the horses are being saddled, racing analyst Brian Arrigoni will offer his “Paddock Preview,” a six-minute summary of the upcoming race. Or, you might just make a “hunch bet,” deciding a horse’s name or the jockey colors feel lucky. Whatever method you choose, keep in mind that the minimum bet is a mere $2. Bets can be placed with a teller, at a self-service machine or with your smartphone at betcanterbury.com.

visit around include the English and French Bulldog races on May 26, Corgi racing (one of the largest non-horse racing events, with 90 dogs competing) and Extreme Day on July 13, when camels, ostriches and zebras take to the track. Planning a girls’ day out? Canterbury Uncorked, a wine and appetizer event, is June 28, and the Canterbury Cocktail Classic is July 26. Check the events calendar at canterburypark.com for a complete listing.

FAMILY FUN Sundays at Canterbury feature family-friendly activities including face painting and pony rides. And the Little Big Thrill Factory and a mammoth playground get kids moving. It’s great for older kids, too, as the Rush family of Rochester discovered. “We celebrated our son Ryan’s 18th birthday at Canterbury,” says Nancy Rush. “It was unique and fun. He enjoyed it so much, he later brought friends to enjoy a day at the park.”

SUMMER FUN Canterbury Park is the location of one of the largest musical events of the summer. The Twin Cities Summer Jam, July 18-20, brings Aerosmith, Tim McGraw, Pitbull, Rascal Flatts, REO Speedwagon and others to the infield of Canterbury Park. Over three days, 12 bands will play the main stage with many more local and national bands performing on a second stage. Fourth of July fireworks at Canterbury has become an annual event for many in the area. Nearly 20,000 people attended last year. This year, fireworks on both July 3 and 4 are sure to be two nights of dazzling entertainment. Other fun, non-wagering events to plan your

From left to right, the Rush family: Jon, son, Alex and (now) wife, Jen, and son, Ryan. Nancy Rush is not pictured (she took the photo).

Holly Galbus is a freelance writer and news reporter.

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REBLOSSOM FEST May 4 & 5 Artisans , Music and Food! Free Admission! MOTHER’S DAY BRUNCH in the Greenhouse Sunday, May 12 11 AM – 2 PM French Crepes & Fruit Tarts Reservations Required

CAMERA I - Basic photography workshop that will give you all the essential camera skills, in a quick and easy-to-understand format. COMPOSITION - Is an exciting and informative class which will improve the way you make photos from now on! You will never see the world the same again! WORKSHOPS NOW AVAILABLE AT CASTLE COMMUNITY AND STEWARTVILLE COMMUNITY ED. - See website for dates and times

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CALENDAR EVENTS GATHERED BY SARA ALBERTELLI

Check out our Community Calendar online for additional listings at RWmagazine.com Events in purple are sponsored by RochesterWomen magazine. Deadline for submitting events for RochesterWomen July/August 2019 issue is May 31, 2019. Send events to calendar@RWmagazine.com *(507 area code unless stated)

MAY

MAY 2-4

Just Between Friends Spring Consignment Sale, Graham Arena, save money when shopping for children’s products, 990-7668, rochester.jbfsale.com

MAY 3-4

MAY 4 Choral Arts Ensemble Presents: Closest Distance, Zumbro Lutheran Church, partnering with Great River Shakespeare Festival actors for an evening of surprise, 7:30 pm, 252-8427, choralartsensemble.org

MAY 5

Mid West Music Fest, Winona, showcasing over 100 acts of quality music, collaborations, and special events, 494-8079, midwestmusicfest.org

Unleash the SHE 5K and 10K, run to raise funds for ovarian cancer research, education, and awareness, 9 am, 664-9438, unleashtheshe.com

MAY 3-4, 9-11, 16-19

Women’s Ride Day, Bicycle Sports, learn, ride and connect, 12:30 pm bike maintenance clinic, 1 pm trail ride or road ride, bicyclesportsinc.com

Don’t Talk to the Actors, Rochester Repertory Theatre, a comedy about actors in the NY theatre scene, Thurs., Fri. and Sat. 7:30 pm.; Sun. 2 pm, 289-1737, rochesterrep.org

MAY 4-OCTOBER 26 Rochester Farmers Markets, downtown Rochester, every Saturday May through October, check out new vendors and food, outdoor activities, chef demos and delicious food, 7:30 am-12 pm, rochfarmmkt.org

MAY 4 Rochester Great Strides 5K, Silver Lake Park, walk/run and raise funds to find a cure for cystic fibrosis, 9 am, fightcf.cff.org

MAY 4 Walk MS, Soldiers Field Veterans Memorial, team up and raise funds to help end multiple sclerosis, 9 am, 1-855-372-1331, secure.nationalmssociety.org

MAY 4 Paws and Claws Humane Society 25th Annual Pet Walk, Cooke Park, bring your pet and collect pledges to support animals in our community, 9 am, 288-7226, pawsandclaws.org

MAY 4 World Labyrinth Day, Assisi Heights Spirituality Center, walk and experience the outdoor labyrinth on the grounds at Assisi Heights, 12-1 pm, 280-2195, rochesterfranciscan.org 44

MAY 5

MAY 10-11 Mother <-> Daughter Experience, Assisi Heights Spirituality Center, bonding opportunity for mothers and daughters, Fri.: dinner and speaker Allison Loftus, Sat.: breakfast, yoga, workshops, lunch and time to connect, $100 per person or $150 for mother+daughter, luannb.com

MAY 10 A Night of PossAbilities, new Hilton Hotel, an evening of wine, roses, and craft beer to benefit PossAbilities, 5:30 pm, 281-6116, possabilities.org

MAY 10-12 47th Annual Gold Rush, Olmsted County Fairgrounds, antique show and market featuring pottery, jewelry, glassware, collectibles, and more, 269-1473, iridescenthouse.com

MAY 10-26 Moon Over Buffalo, Rochester Civic Theatre, a comedy centering on George and Charlotte Hay, stars of the 1950s, Fri. and Sat., 7 pm; Sun. 2 pm, 282-8481, rochestercivictheatre.org

MAY 11 Mother’s Day Brunch, Assisi Heights Spirituality Center, includes live music and a program retelling the lessons taught by mothers, 10-11:30 am, 280-2195, rochesterfranciscan.org

MAY 11 Journey Together, Empire Event Center, Senator Carla Nelson will be guest speaker sharing her journey as a Woman of faith in Government, her challenges and joys as a mom and grandmother, build your own parfait, door prizes, celebrating the uniqueness of women, $17.95 per person, 10 – 11:30 am, 208-4107, ihoprochester.org

MAY 12 Mother’s Day on the Farm, Red Barn Learning Farm, free planting projects and wagon rides to celebrate moms, 11 am-5 pm, 365-8321, redbarnlearningfarm.com

MAY 15 Women on Wednesdays Presents: I Like Kids. I'm Just Not Planning on Having Any, Rochester Civic Theatre, a discussion exploring social issues impacting our community and promoting inclusiveness, 5:30-7 pm, 282-8481, rochestercivictheatre.org

MAY 15-16 Rochester Garden & Flower Club 80th Annual Plant Sale, Olmsted County Fairgrounds, featuring over 150 different plant varieties grown by club members for sale, Wed. 4-7 pm; Thurs. 8 am-12 pm, rgfc.org

MAY 17 14th Annual Stay Out of the Sun Run, Lourdes High School, raise funds for the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center and support melanoma research, 6:30 pm, 289-5626, sosrun.org

MAY 17 8th Annual Uncorked and On Tap Benefitting Camp Companion, Garten Marketplatz Perennial Farms, includes a silent auction, live music, appetizers, wine, and beer for purchase, 4:30-8:30 pm, 288-4331, experiencerochestermn.com

MAY 18 ZVAS Bird Walk & Potluck Social, Chester Woods County Park, a walk where you will look for migrating warblers and other birds, 2-6 pm, 269-7064, zumbrovalleyaudubon.org

MAY 18 10th Annual Art on the Avenue, Slatterly Park Neighborhood, promote arts education and help showcase local artisans and art-based organizations, 9:40 am-4:30 pm, 421-2903, slatterlypark.org

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MAY 18

JUNE 11

Annual Lion’s Root River Triathlon, Houston, MN, non-swimming triathlon set in Root River Valley in scenic bluff country, 8 am, rootrivertriathlon.weebly.com

Stories in Stone: An Architectural Tour, Assisi Heights Spirituality Center, see the architectural features, aesthetical designs, and the often-overlooked artistic Franciscan features, 6:30-8 pm, 280-2195, rochesterfranciscan.org

MAY 19 Mamma Mia! Chanhassen Dinner Theatres, luxury minicoach will transport you to Chanhassen for dinner and Mamma Mia performance, 3–11:30 pm, $115 includes transportation, dinner and show, reservations required RochesterMNtours.com or 507-421-0573

MAY 20 23rd Annual Kids Cup Tournament, Somerby Golf Club, proceeds go to the Mayo Children Center and OMC infant/prenatal care, 9:30 am-6 pm, 285-1616, kidscuprochester.org

MAY 25 Guided Tours of the Historic Zumbro Hill Cemetery, Historic Forestville, mnhs.org

MAY 25-26 Med City Marathon, Mayo Civic Center Exhibit Hall, various running events for both children and adults, 664-9438, medcitymarathon.com

JUNE JUNE 1

Chester Woods Trail Races, Chester Woods Park, participate in the Mason Run 5K, 10 mile, or 50K, 6 am, teamredgo.com

JUNE 1 RideAbility Spring Family Fun Barn Dance, RideAbility Barn, includes horse and wagon rides, a bounce house, and a silent auction, 3-9 pm, 356-8154, rideability.org

JUNE 1-2 Rummage and Bake Sale Benefitting Paws and Claws, Olmsted County Fairgrounds, gather up your household items and bring them to the sale, Fri. 5-8 pm; Sat. 7 am-4 pm; Sun. 8 am-12 pm, 288-7226, pawsandclaws.org

JUNE 2 Garden Fair, History Center of Olmsted County, buy plants to help the homeless youth within our local community, 9 am-3 pm, 282-9447, olmstedhistory.com

to the advertisers who made RochesterWomen magazine May/June 2019 issue possible.

JUNE 11 14th Annual Power of the Purse, Rochester International Event Center, speaker and bestselling author Sue Klebold will discuss mental health awareness, 287-2000, uwolmsted.org

JUNE 12

ALTRA FEDERAL CREDIT UNION................................................. 2 ABERRY HAIR...................................................................................15 AMY LANTZ.....................................................................................20 ARTISAN CONSTRUCTION AND REMODELING INC....... 31 BICYCLE SPORTS..................................................................38 & 41

21st Annual ABWA Golf Tournament, Willow Creek Golf Course, raise funds to provide scholarships, grants, and other educational efforts for women, 2 pm, 319-7455, rochester.abwa.org

BUDGET BLINDS............................................................................28

JUNE 15

ROCHESSTER TROLLEY & TOUR COMPANY..........................43

4th Annual “Believe In Me” Bike Ride, Eagles Fraternal Organization, hosted by Greater Rochester Rotary to support local youth programs, 7 am, 254-9220, grrbikeride.org

CLEMENTS CHEVROLET...............................................................12

JUNE 15 Rochester Shakespeare Festival, Immersion Youth Repertory will transform Peace Plaza into a miniRenaissance festival, live theatrical performances, juggling, strolling musical minstrels, arts and crafts, games, face painting, and food, 12-6 pm, 206-1559, immersionyouthrep.com

NORTH RISK PARTNERS...............................................................37 CAMP VICTORY..............................................................................15 CARPET ONE...................................................................................47 CHANHASSEN DINNER THEATRES.........................................43

COMMONWEAL THEATRE........................................................43 CREATIVE HARDWOOD FLOORS............................................. 31 DAPPER SURFACES........................................................................28 DAWN SANBORN PHOTOGRAPHY........................................43 DENTISTRY FOR CHILDREN & ADOLESCENTS, LTD.............26 DUNLAP & SEEGAR, P.A...............................................................32 ENERGYWORKS............................................................................28 ESSENCE SKIN CLINIC.................................................................. 4 FAGAN STUDIOS...........................................................................23 FORESIGHT BANK.........................................................................23 GARDEN OF MASSAGE..............................................................38

JUNE 15

HAIR STUDIO 52.............................................................................. 6

Movies in the Park, Central Park, bring your lawn chair and gather for a free, family-friendly event, 9 pm, 216-9882, downtownrochestermn.com

HOME FEDERAL.............................................................................12

JUNE 21

AMERIPRISE FINANCIAL SERVICES..........................................26

Relay for Life of Olmsted County, Rochester Community and Technical College, raise money to support the American Cancer Society, 5 pm-12 am, 424-4615, main.acsevents.org

JUNE 21-30

JRK MEDICALS................................................................................20 ELDER LAW OFFICE OF JULIANNE KOCER, P.S...................... 9 KARI DOUGLAS, ECHELON WEALTH PARTNERS, KEMPS...............................................................................................38 LUYA..................................................................................................20 MAYO EMPLOYEES FEDERAL CREDIT UNION........................ 9 MINNESOTA QUILTERS, INC....................................................... 9 MR. PIZZA NORTH........................................................................26

The Importance of Being Earnest, Rochester Civic Theatre, Oscar Wilde’s comedy tells the story of gentlemen who live a double-life, Fri. and Sat. 7 pm; Sun. 2 pm, 282-8481, rochestercivictheatre.org

OLMSTED MEDICAL CENTER....................................................... 3

JUNE 22

REVITALIGHT THERAPY.................................................................20

JUNE 6-AUGUST 29

Rochester Hangar Dance, Rochester International Airport, support our veterans, active duty military and emergency services men and women, 5-11 pm, 282-9447, olmstedhistory.com

Thursdays on First & 3rd, First Avenue SW / Peace Plaza, a weekly outdoor market of art, craft, food vendors, and live entertainment, 11 am-8:30 pm, 216-9882, downtownrochestermn.com/events/tof

Rochesterfest, varying locations, explore everything that Rochester has to offer through a variety of events, 285-8769, rochesterfest.com

JUNE 7-9

JUNE 23

Annual Fresh Art Spring Tour, Lake Pepin Area, a selfguided journey to the finest art studios and galleries, 10 am-5 pm, freshart.org

THANK YOU!

JUNE 22-30

Damsels & Dragons, Chester Woods, search for and catch dragonflies and damselflies to examine, 3-5 pm, 269-7064, zumbrovalleyaudubon.org

OMC REGIONAL FOUNDATION, CROQUET FIELD DAY.... 41 ON TRACK BOUTIQUE ...............................................................12 PROFILE BY SANFORD..................................................................20 QUARRY HILL PARK ANIMAL HOSPITAL..................................38 ROCHESTER GREETERS................................................................38 ROCHESTER INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT................................... 6 ROCHESTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS.................................................28 ROCHESTER UNITED WOMEN'S SOCCER TEAM............... 41 SARGENT'S GARDENS.................................................................37 SEMVA................................................................................................ 9 SQUASH BLOSSOM FARM.........................................................43 STERLING STATE BANK................................................................34 TACO JED.........................................................................................38 TWIGS...............................................................................................48 TYROL SKI & SPORT.......................................................................34 WINONA HEALTH........................................................................32 WOMEN'S DAY RIDE....................................................................38 ZUMBROTA FORD.........................................................................34

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ON THE LIGHTER SIDE

Tooth Fairy

ALL-KNOWING, NO MATTER WHAT BY KATHRYN LENN

THE TOOTH FAIRY HAS BEEN THE SUBJECT OF MANY OF OUR FAVORITE SHOWS ON DISNEY JUNIOR AS OF LATE. One show depicted a

told her that is not how it works. I told her that when I was a kid, we got just coins. My husband chimed in that it was the same for him. She responded with, “No, guys. Its presents and coins. Both.” So, not only does the Tooth Fairy need to stealth-mode into the room to retrieve the tooth, but then they need to leave presents and coins. Lift the pillow once to retrieve that nasty little tooth. Then, lift it again to put presents and coins underneath.

tooth loss-ee losing said tooth, as it was stolen by another to receive the gift from the Tooth Fairy. Another reviewed the loss-ee being upset that the Tooth Fairy had not shown after his tooth was lost, and how they go to find the fairy and JUMPING ON THE BED realize the problem was that it One day Cecelia jumped herself right out of Don’t miss XTREME SAVINGS on wasn’t under his pillow. her bed—over the rail, on the ground—and ®

carpets. INNOVIA XTREME crying CLEAN commenced. Since then we’ve talked From muddy pets to super dirty kids, UNDER THE PILLOW, about not jumping on her bed, because she REALLY? you need a carpet may thatfallstands up to the off. The message then morphed to, It’s hard enough for the Tooth Fairychaos to get of ifoutdoors…inside. she didn’t actually fall out of her bed, she XTREME around to all the houses with lost teeth, but may hit her face her guard rail and knock Uniquely constructed with the on patented then to specify to children that it “needs” her teeth ®out. That message was given a few Innotex™ fiber, INNOVIA carpets have to be under their pillow for them to receive times. She responded to me one day saying built the prize. When I waspermanent a child, we putstain and she soil hopedprotection she knocked her teeth out so the into every fiber, so it never washes or our teeth in a glass of water, and the next Tooth Fairy would come to her house. Well, you can imagine my shock as morning, there wouldwears be shinyoff. quarters in

Cecelia Lenn brushing her teeth.

being bad and the Tooth Fairy won’t give you anything. The Tooth Fairy doesn’t come for naughty teeth.”

COINS OR PRESENTS

The Tooth Fairy Committee met and discussed that coins or presents may be given for lost teeth. There was also a note that the threat will remain, but we may request an exception from the Tooth Fairy if she connected those dots. Don’t worry, it was an accident. And, as for the pillow, that same glass. though, Mom is just as smart. I replied we will invest in a tooth pillow that hangs Now, this Tooth Fairy is not into digging with a new “fact” that the Tooth Fairy around the door knob. We are doing under a sleeping child’s head to find doesn’t come if you lose your tooth from our best to simplify processes wherever the tooth that has, no doubt, migrated not listening. Her eyes widened as she we can, as well as save some “coins and in slumber toss-and-turns. This Tooth asked me how the Tooth Fairy would presents,” while still keeping childhood Fairy would rather have it hanging in a know. I told her the Tooth Fairy was like fantasies alive and well. In the meantime, receptacle of some sort around the door made withno your Carpet card 4/11/19 and 5/19/19. Santa; all-knowing, matter what.One creditwe willbetween put our energy into getting her to knob where it can easily be swapped on purchases SQUARE FOOT SQUARE FOOT Another day, as I’m folding laundry in the brush the teeth she still has. without disturbing the sleeping child. basement and listening to Cecelia play with Two different shows depicted the Tooth * Katie Lenn is navigating motherhood and her Barbies. She has her Anna doll jumping Fairy in two different ways, so my child is adulthood, and finds it therapeutic to share on the bed as Elsa tells her, “Stop jumping on now convinced that the Tooth Fairy brings her life’s mishappenings by writing about your bed! You will knock your teeth out from presents and coins when a tooth is lost. I them.

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May/June 2019 RWmagazine.com

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Profile for Rochester Women Magazine

Rochester Women Magazine May June 2019  

Rochester Women Magazine May June 2019  

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