RMN #15 TO 5 TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME

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ROYAL MALAYSIAN NAVY

#15TO5 TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME

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STRATEGY DOCUMENT FOR

ROYAL MALAYSIAN NAVY

#15 TO5 TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME

First Published Nov 2018 Royal Malaysian Navy ISBN 978-983-99615-5-3 © All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means; electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without prior permission in writing from the Royal Malaysian Navy. Some images used are provided by a third party ‘as is’ without warranty of any kind, either expressed or implied, included but not limited to, warranties of merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, or non-infringement. All reasonable attempts to attribute the sources of the images have been made by the Royal Malaysian Navy. RMN Reference : BRL2-2 Strategy Document for RMN #15TO5 Transformation Programme

Published by ROYAL MALAYSIAN NAVY SEA POWER CENTRE Jalan Sultan Yahya Petra 54100 KUALA LUMPUR

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Printed by NURFA RESOURCES 2-3-8, 3rd Floor Jalan 34/26 Taman Sri Rampai 53300 KUALA LUMPUR


ROYAL MALAYSIAN NAVY

#15TO5 TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME

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#15TO5

569,845

MALAYSIAN WATERS INCLUDE AN EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE: SQUARE KM TOTAL LAND AREA:

TERRITORIAL WATER:

TOTAL COASTLINE:

329,758

TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME

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VISION & MISSION

SQUARE KM

65,035

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CHIEF OF NAVY FOREWORD

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SQUARE KM

RMN #15TO5 TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME

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6,037

MALAYSIA’S MARITIME IDENTITY

16

BLUE ECONOMY

18

KM

600

THE SOUTH CHINA SEA SEPARATES SABAH & SARAWAK FROM THE PENINSULAR: KM

ROLES OF THE RMN 20 MILITARY 24 CONSTABULORY 28 DIPLOMATIC

CONTENTS 44 51

34 36

DISPOSITION OF RMN BASES MARITIME SECURITY CHALLENGES AND FUTURE FORCE LEVEL DEVELOPMENT

WHY WE NEED TO TRANSFORM

VISION FOR THE FUTURE

EDITORIAL 2

AUTHOR , ORIGINAL IDEA & CONCEPT Admiral Tan Sri Ahmad Kamarulzaman bin Haji Ahmad Badaruddin

CO-AUTHOR/CHIEF EDITOR First Admiral Baharudin bin Wan Md Nor

82 100

80

78

76

64

60

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GAPS & FUNCTIONAL SOLUTION ANALYSIS

RMN’S 10-STEP APPROACH TO TRANSFORMATION STRATEGY EXECUTION

SCOPE OF TRANSFORMATION

FLEET #15TO5 TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME

RMN #15TO5 TRANSFORMATION GOALS RMN #15TO5 TRANSFORMATION MAP HORIZON 1

TRANSFORMATION INITIATIVE DESCRIPTION

RMN #15TO5 AS A BRAND


ROYAL MALAYSIAN NAVY

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#15TO5 TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME

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VISION

MISSION

To be a Credible & Versatile Force by 2030

To Protect Malaysia’s Sovereignty & Maritime Interests


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FOREWORD BY CHIEF OF NAVY

And prepare against them whatever you are able of power and of steeds of war by which you may terrify the enemy of Allah and your enemy and others besides them whom you do not know(but) whom Allah knows. - Surah Al Anfaal:60 –

...indeed, Allah will not change the condition of a people until they change what is in themselves... - Surah Al Ra’d:11 -

Assalamualaikum Warahmatullahi Wabarakatuh

Praise be to the Almighty for granting us the strength and wisdom to work for a better future. Our leaders, past and present recognise the fact that Malaysia by all accounts is a maritime nation. Our economy, security, identity and to a large extent our way of life are dependent upon and shaped by the sea. The sea connects us as a people, has brought us untold prosperity as well as attracted foreign influences. Our people were once renowned seafarers. In the distant past, well before Columbus started his journey, our ships had already reached the shores of China and the Arabian Peninsula. That was made possible largely because navies of the Malacca Empire and various kingdoms before that were bold and competent seafarers. Those were the notable achievements of the past. However, today we live in a ‘blue century’ with a very different set of challenges. Past glories and achievements have never granted any nation the right to rest on its laurels. Ours should instead be accepted as lessons that guide us in our future endeavours. Today, the Royal Malaysian Navy contributes to the development and security of the new Malaysia and remains as an important national instrument of power. This stems not just from our unique ability to operate on, under, above and from the sea but also from retaining our relevance and ability to steadfastly advance Malaysia’s national interests in peace, crisis and in war. When I first stood at the helm of this great ship 3 years ago, I inherited a very stable vessel that for many years now has been steering ahead in the direction of modernization and capability enhancement. We began with small, pioneering groups of gallant men and today we have grown into a modern navy; a force well respected. This evolution is due in no small part to my predecessor’s effort. But the recent rapid pace of technological change has increased not only the geo-strategic dynamics, but just as importantly, the financial challenges and higher expectations are a game changer. They require a change of course, else we risk running aground and becoming stuck in a sea of irrelevancy. It is for that very reason the navy came up with the RMN #15to5 Transformation Programme. It is a measure designed to ensure the navy will be able to deliver better results, while adapting to the needs of future environment. This blueprint will serve as a principle document to guide our journey through the next thirty years in transforming the navy. It sets forth our vision for the future, what it is we intend to achieve and why such measures are important. It describes better ways of developing and managing our people, of changing the way we conduct our enterprise to increase our efficiency, and of how we plan to implement our future force structure. While the programme calls for bold actions, it has employed data to manage risks. The results are prudent choices that align our resources to the country’s strategic interests. I am sure this programme will enable us to safely sail into the future while exploring new opportunities along the way. Now, we must ensure the successful execution of the plan. We owe our future generations of #NavyPeople that much and the nation expect nothing less.

ADMIRAL TAN SRI AHMAD KAMARULZAMAN BIN HJ AHMAD BADARUDDIN CHIEF OF NAVY

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ROYAL MALAYSIAN NAVY

#15TO5 TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME

RMN #15TO5 TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME Together, our Armada and our people have been the bedrock of selfless service to the country. For eighty four years they have provided Malaysia with a safe and secure maritime environment upon which our security and economic prosperity has depended on and grown from. However, new challenges abound. They demand that we change how we manage our most precious resource - our people, the way we run our Navy and how we design the composition of our future fleet. Todays frontline assets such as RMN SCORPENE class submarine and RMAF F/A-18D fighter jets form the mainstay of our conventional warfare capabilities

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The future of RMN rest on the shoulder of these young recruits.

The Royal Malaysian Navy #15to5 Transformation Programme provides us with a renewed impetus and an opportunity to shape the future of the navy. It is the first time that such a holistic and all-encompassing plan has been formulated. The aim is to move us forward as an organization toward our vision for the future. This thirty year programme addresses a multitude of challenges: from long standing difficulties to ensuring we are able to meet the increasing operational demands placed on us; to the complex task of reinventing the way we develop our human capital to creating a new culture that fosters efficiency, adherence to our navy’s core values and military ethos. Towards this end, the Chief of Navy, who is the chief architect of the transformation programme, has directed the Naval Transformation Office to embark on the largest, most inclusive consultation and engagement exercise ever undertaken in the history of the Navy to chart its new strategic direction. 51 engagement sessions were conducted within and outside of the naval premises. These sessions have enabled the naval leadership to craft new goals with associated strategies that support the transformation process. These strategies are in turn supported by 15 initiatives with over 100 projects revolving around three main thrusters - People, Processes and Platforms. The RMN #15to5 Transformation Programme is an anticipative action designed to ensure the navy will be able to deliver better results at optimal cost while adapting to future challenges and needs. The programme has its roots in the Malaysian Armed Forces long term development plan and fully supports the aspirations of the National Defence Policy. It is a comprehensive and robust plan for the gradual and sustainable transformation of the navy. The first phase will carry us through to 2030. In essence this strategy document sets out the “what”, “why” and the “how” of the fundamental changes that are required. Although the targets set appear to be daunting and ambitious, they are entirely achievable. The successful conclusion of this plan hinges upon our steadfast belief in our ability to do better; a laser sharp focus on set goals, a strong leadership involvement, and overall changes in our collective mindset. To meet this challenging future, we are blessed that we can depend on countless young #NavyPeople who choose to serve their country with pride and enthusiasm. They will not just be the beneficiaries, but will also be on watch to navigate our Navy towards a better future.

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BACKGROUND

MALAYSIA’S MARITIME IDENTITY Malaysia is truly a maritime nation. Malaysian waters comprise an Exclusive Economic Zone covering and area of 569,845 square km extending beyond 65,035 square km of Territorial Waters. Its total coastline extends over 6,037 km and the sea area is more than twice the size of our landmass. In the past, Malays were known to be great seafarers. At its peak, the Malacca Sultanate was an empire that covered much of maritime Southeast Asia, with Malacca itself being the most important regional port of the 15th century. With the formation of the Federation of Malaysia in 1963, Malaysia grew to include Sabah and Sarawak, the two states located along the northern shore of the island of Borneo. The South China Sea separates the two states from the peninsular at approximately 600 km at its closest point. The notion of a “Maritime Nation” was further enhanced when the government declared their objective of attaining a maritime nation status for Malaysia in the 4th Malaysia Plan (1982-1986).

The Port of Tanjung Pelepas (PTP) is situated adjacent to one of the world’s busiest shipping lane - The Malacca strait.

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The Malacca Straits serves as one of the global shipping superhighways

Malaysia, with its unique geography has several maritime neighbours. Maritime boundaries between Malaysia and its two close neighbours, Indonesia and Thailand have been successfully delineated through bilateral agreements. Two bilateral agreements between Malaysia and Indonesia covering the boundaries of the territorial seas and the continental shelf in the Straits of Malacca were signed in October 1969. Another agreement signed between the same two countries in early 1970 defined a 174-nautical mile long line separating the territorial seas of both nations. In the past, decisions by the International Court of Justice regarding the dispute over the islands of Sipadan and Ligitan, located off the Sabah coast, helped settle a potentially explosive situation that would have added to the complexity of regional security environment. Nevertheless, recent unilateral declaration of new maritime boundaries through Peta Negara Kesatuan Republik Indonesia which encroached into what was previously Malaysia’s maritime territory is likely to be a new thorn in bilateral relationship. Malaysia and Indonesia are two coastal states that straddle the Malacca Straits. Over 95,000 vessels transit the straits annually carrying a quarter of world’s trade, thus making it the busiest straits and one of the most important trade routes in the world. To the east, Malaysia borders the Sulu and Celebes Seas, providing another important maritime trade route but one that is vulnerable to piracy, sea robbery, kidnap-for-ransom and acts of terror. In the South China Sea, Malaysia is a party to a six nation overlapping claim over an area known as the Spratly Islands. The area is not only coveted for its strategic location but also its rich natural resources. Since 1974, over 30 military clashes and standoffs have occurred in the Spratlys. Exacerbating the situation is the return of great power competition in the South China Sea which has been prompted by attempts to change status quo. All these issues complicate the security environment as they threaten to escalate disputes and regional stability with each having the potential to directly affect Malaysia’s maritime security and national interest.


ROYAL MALAYSIAN NAVY

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13 PETRONAS CONTRIBUTION Components of Contribution to the Federal and State Governments of Malaysia In RM Billion

Despite its many challenges, maritime sector remains a very important component of the Malaysian economy. The expansion and globalisation of world economy has contributed to the increased significance of our ports and shipping industry. In 2017, Port Klang and the Port of Tanjung Pelepas handled 12,060,000 and 8,330,000 Twenty-Foot Equivalent Units (TEU), positioning them as the 12th and 19th busiest container ports in the world. Both continue to record growth in their capacity. The fisheries industry is another important contributor to the Malaysian economy and is a source of income for 134,000 fishermen. In 2016, the fisheries sector produced 1.74 million tons of fish valued at RM10.18 billion and generated additional trade worth RM6 billion. Aquaculture production too is gaining prominence and today it is a source of employment for over 30,000 fish farmers and culturists. With the present government’s emphasis on enhancing agricultural productivity, including that of the fishing and aquaculture industry, these numbers are set to increase.

FY2017

16.0

FY2016

16.0

FY2015

13.4

8.7

0.6

42.7

7.1 0.4

26.0

FY2014

36.9 15.9

10.2

29.0

FY2013 Dividends

17.4

Cash Payments

33.3

12.6 12.0

1.2 75.3 1.1

73.4

Export Duty

PETRONAS contribution to the Federal and State Governments of Malaysia for the year ended 31 December 2017 amounted to RM42.7 bilion, higher by RM5.8 bilion compared to 2016, consistent with the improved performance.

Malaysian oil and gas industry is predominantly maritime in nature. All of our oil and gas fields are located offshore. In 2016, Malaysia’s petroleum production totaled three quarters of a million barrels per day. As of January 2017, our proven oil reserves stood at 3.6 billion barrels – the 4th highest proven reserves in the Asia Pacific region. In 2016, Malaysia exported 1.2 Tcf (trillion cubic feet) of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG), accounting for 10% of LNG exports worldwide. We are the third largest exporter of LNG after Qatar and Australia. Malaysia’s LNG is valued at RM47 billion and is worth 6% of the country’s total export. Our natural gas resources are estimated to be 100 Tcf. Together, oil and gas account for almost 20% of Malaysia’s Gross Domestic Product. A local shipping company - Malaysian International Shipping Corporation Berhad is the world’s largest LNG carrier.

DOLLAR PER BARREL

All of Malaysia’s oil field are located offshore and protecting them require persistent presence in the maritime domain

110.00

110.00

100.00

100.00

90.00

90.00

80.00

80.00

70.00

70.00

60.00

60.00

50.00

50.00

40.00

40.00

30.00

30.00

20.00

20.00

10.00

10.00

74.34

2014

2015

2016

2017

Crude Oil WTI (NYMEX) Price

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52.7 32.5

27.0 Taxes

0.6

2018

5/10//2018


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Ship building and repair at Boustead Naval Shipyard Sdn Bhd.

Maritime tourism and recreation is another sector that contributes to the overall Malaysian economy. Malaysia’s maritime assets, which include its pristine coastline and islands, are a major tourist attraction. Traditionally, marine tourism in the country involves a short trip to the beach for recreation and relaxation. This trend however is presently shifting towards developing offshore islands into major tourist destinations, where resorts serve a wider range of marine-related recreational activities such as open sea diving, yachting and sport fishing. Arguably, Malaysia owns some of the finest island resorts in the world. Marine based activities and ecotourism constitute yet another important segment of tourism that has a great potential for expansion.

Pulau Layang-Layang situated in the Spratly is one of the Malaysia’s major tourist attraction.

These economic activities are indicative of the growing interest and importance of the maritime sector to the national economy. They also demonstrate the potential of a maritime sector that needs to be further developed as a natural component of a true maritime nation. The idea and concept of a maritime nation as applied to Malaysia can only be realised if there is a significant contribution from the maritime sector to the economy. For the sector to flourish there must be a secure and stable security environment. In today’s volatile and unpredictable world, such an environment should not be seen merely as an enabler but rather a prerequisite - an imperative for the successful development of the Malaysia’s maritime industry. Since the golden age of Malacca Sultanate, a navy has been a major constituent of sea power in and around the Malay Archipelago. Today, that role is assumed by the RMN. While its primary role has evolved from protection and expansion of a Sultanate’s imperial territories to the protection of Malaysia’s sovereignty and national interest, the Navy continues to be an essential part of Malaysia’s maritime character. Other than its primary role which is irreplaceable in time of crisis and war, today in time of peace the navy also makes a significant contribution to the maintenance of good order, security and safety at sea as well as in the littoral environment.

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BLUE ECONOMY

The Blue Economy is the sustainable use of oceanic resources for economic growth, improved livelihoods and jobs, and the health of the oceans’ ecosystems.

MALAYSIA’S MARITIME IDENTITY AND ECONOMIC INTERESTS

The Blue Economy encompasses many activities... RENEWABLE ENERGY Sustainable marine energy can play a vital role in social and economic development. TOURISM Ocean and coastal tourism can bring jobs and economic growth to coastal areas, least developed countries and small islands.

MARITIME TRANSPORT Over 80% of international goods traded are transported by sea and the volume of seaborne trade is expected to double by 2030.

+80% YEAR 2030

1,400,000 Tonnes Metric

RM8 billion

Protecting

Sabah Tourism

50,000,000

3.43 million

Tonnes mineral reserve

tourists

RM7.25 billion

Yearly

RM6 billion

tourism receipt (2016)

lost of revenue to IUU

RM241 billion Oil & Gas Production

CLIMATE CHANGE The impacts of climate change on rising sea levels, coastal erosion, changing ocean current patterns and acidification are staggering. Oceans are an important carbon sink and help mitigate climate change.

20% GNI

BLUE ECONOMY RMN #15to5 Transformation Programme will provide Malaysia with effective maritime security which is a necessary component to enable the country to partake in the Blue Economy confidently, within a safe and secure environment.

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hectares Aquaculture Project

Gugusan Semarang and Peninjau

270

US BIL GLOBAL GDP FISHERIES Marine fisheries contribute more than US$270 billion annually to global GDP. More sustainable fisheries can generate more revenues over long term.

6,610

crucial sea-lines of communication WASTE MANAGEMENT 80% of liter in the ocean is from land-based sources. Better waste management on land can help oceans recover.

80%

LAND-BASED LITTER

Malacca Straits

World’s busiest straits. >95,000 ships p.a. carrying

Benefits of Blue Economy : • Providing a boost to coastal and national economies. • Generating new employment, skill-sets and capacities. • Promoting entrepreneurship in new areas of economic activity. • Facilitating the interconnectedness of the regional economy. • Utilising the vast, untapped potential of the Ocean. • Contributing to sustainable development and climate change mitigation.

RM42 billion worth assets protected by RMN

24% of world trade

Port Klang (12th) Port of Tanjung Pelepas (19th) Busiest container port in the world

The Spratly Home to rich natural resources


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SPAN OF MARITIME OPERATIONS Naval Assistance to Civil Community

T

NE

GN NI

AT OM DI

ER

Degree of Force Employed

EM

RC

CI

Sanctions and Embargoes

FO

Y

VE

Peace Operations

EN

CO

Counter-piracy

AR

Coercion

Maritime Barrier Operations

UL

PL

Preventive Diplomacy

IC

Evacuation Operations

BE

Presence

Naval Assistance to Civil Law Enforcement Authorities

B E TA NC NS NA CO

Assistance to Allied and Friendly Nations

Environmental and Resource Management and Protection

TE IN

Naval force possesses considerable utility in a wide range of situations that spans a spectrum of conflict and other peaceful maritime-based activities. The role of naval force in this context falls into one of three categories: military (combat-related), constabulary (law enforcement-related) and diplomatic (foreign-policy related).

Capacity Building

MA

ROLES OF THE RMN

Search and Rescue

MILITARY

Role of naval force encompass military, constabulary and diplomacy

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COMBAT OPERATIONS AT SEA

COMBAT OPERATIONS FROM THE SEA

• • • • • • • • •

• Maritime Mobility (Sea Lift) • Land Strike • Support to Operations on Land and in the Air • Amphibious Operation

Intelligence Collection and Surveillance Cover Maritime Strike and Interdiction Containment Blockade Barrier Operations and Defended Areas Layered Defence Advance Force Operations Protection of Merchant Shipping


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MILITARY

RMN AUTHORITIES AND LEGAL OBLIGATIONS

The essence of all navies is their military character. The Navy exists to protect the wealth, prosperity and peace of the nation’s maritime domain. This is accomplished by attaining control (or targeted denial) over the sea, frustrating any seaborne projection of force by an adversary and when necessary being able to project power into maritime related areas controlled by an enemy. The Navy’s military role is characterized by the threat or use of force at and from the sea. This includes the application of maritime power in both offensive operations against enemy forces, their territory and trade, and defensive operations to protect one’s own forces, territory and trade. The military role is performed through the accomplishment of specific military objectives, missions and tasks. MILITARY ROLES

OBJECTIVES Deterrence Interventions

MISSIONS Limited Sea Control Sea Denial

TASKS Surveillance Maritime Strike

Decisive victory Secure Territorial Integrity Influence events ashore Safeguard national assets from maritime based security threats Safeguard own citizens from maritime based security threats Safeguard own merchant and commerce from maritime based security threats Safeguard other national interests from maritime based security threats

Expeditionary Operation Blockade *SLOC Protection SLOC Interdiction

Amphibious Operations Anti-Submarine Operations Anti-Surface Operations Defensive Anti-Air Operations

Maritime Domain Awareness

Minewarfare Operations

Destruction of an aggressor’s naval forces

Electronic warfare

Compulsion

Harbour Defence

a. b. c. d. e. f. g. h. j. k. l. m.

National Security Council Act 2016. Exclusive Economic Act 1984. Protected Areas and Protected Places Act 1959. Fisheries Act 1985. Environmental Quality Act 1974. Anti-Trafficking in Persons and Anti-Smuggling of Migrants Act 2007. Merchant Shipping Ordinance 1952. Immigration Act 1959/1963. i. Customs Act 1967. Penal Code. United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) Law of Armed Conflict. International Humanitarian Law.

COMBAT OPERATIONS AT SEA This operation emphasizes the offensive, bringing to bear information, intelligence, and tactical initiative against an adversary. This will require a complete and seamless integration in Command and Control infrastructure within a joint forces environment. War at sea involves fully integrated offensive and defensive tactics that span the subsurface, surface, air, space, and electromagnetic environments. The aim is to acquire freedom of use over the sea’s three dimensions - the surface, subsurface and air space above the sea while at the same time preventing the enemy from doing the same. This concept of establishing supremacy over a specific maritime area over a definite period of time is known as Sea Control. In situations where Sea Control is unrealistic such as the case when friendly forces are confronted by a superior force, the aim will be modified into one of Sea Denial. Sea Denial in turn, can be achieved through Sortie Control, Choke Point Control, Open Area Operations or Local Engagement. COMBAT OPERATIONS FROM THE SEA

Special Operation Own force’s protection Seaward defence **NCAGS *Sea Lines of Communications **Naval Cooperation and Guidance for Shipping ***Visit, Board, Search and Seizure

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Among the fundamental responsibilities of a State is the requirement to protect its sovereignty and territorial integrity as well as to ensure the security of its citizens. The Federal Constitution in Article 41 states that, “The Yang di-Pertuan Agong (the monarch) shall be the Supreme Commander of the Armed Forces of the Federation”. As supreme Commander, the Yang diPertuan Agong has the authority to direct the Malaysian Armed Forces in the employment of military force or to execute the law as constitutionally authorized. In performing its roles and responsibilities, the MAF, and by extension the RMN, adhere to a set of legal authorities and obligations. Some of these authorities and obligations are stated under the following laws and conventions:

***VBSS Intelligence Gathering

Combat operations from the sea is the extension of naval influence through power and force projection over the shore. An amphibious assault capability is an integral component of an effective naval force. Naval forces must not only secure Sea Lines of Communication (SLOC) to bring troops and equipment to the area of concern, but also provide a mobile base from which to conduct military operations. Such a capability, while rarely put into practice in real situations where open hostilities are declared, is a common feature in joint operations and United Nations mandated missions.


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shore areas of the littoral. Operations in brown water (navigable rivers, lakes, bays, and their estuaries) involve shallow and congested areas that constrain manoeuvre but do not subject maritime forces to extreme surf conditions. Operations on land in the littoral may involve landing forces ashore via embarked aircraft, landing craft, and amphibious vehicles typically from MRSS. Joint maritime operations are performed with maritime forces, and other forces assigned, attached, or made available in support of the Joint Force Commander’s operation or campaign objectives; or in support of other components of the Joint Force. The degree of integration and coordination between the Joint Force Component Commanders and the eventual success of the conduct of the Joint Operations depends largely on the availability, suitability and capability of assigned forces.

Malaysian Armed Forces conducting joint exercises

Whenever we engage in conducting a military operation, domination of the battlespace is the primary aim. Domination does not necessarily dictate that we possess a numerically superior force. It can and must focus on employing available capabilities to the best advantage. This demands that our assets must be maintained at the highest state of readiness and that they can be operated to their maximum capacity by cohesive, proficient and highly motivated personnel. This is important as it helps to ensure a successful conclusion of operations against our adversary. In this regard, the RMN #15to5 Transformation Programme is designed to enable both the RMN’s assets and its personnel to become more effective components of Joint Operation whenever they are conducted in the maritime domain.

JOINT MARITIME OPERATIONS AND THE MARITIME DOMAIN While Combat Operations at Sea involve the application of a decisive offensive force to achieve control of the sea area, Combat Operations from the Sea concerns the extension of maritime influence through power projection over the shore. In Malaysia’s context, both of these operations when conducted in the maritime domain, share common features – they require support from and coordination with our sister services (Malaysian Army or Royal Malaysian Airforce), relevant government agencies and in some situations non-governmental organizations. The maritime domain consists of the oceans, seas, bays, estuaries, islands, coastal areas, and the airspace above these, including the littorals. Joint maritime operations occur in blue, green, and brown water and in the landward areas of the littoral. Operations in blue water (high seas and open oceans) require forces capable of remaining on station for extended periods, largely unrestricted by sea states, and with the logistics capability to sustain the force over a sufficiently long period. Operations in green water (coastal waters, ports, and harbours) stretching seaward require combatant ships (Littoral Combat Ships), amphibious warfare ships (Multi Role Support Ships - MRSS) and landing crafts as well as Littoral Mission Ships with the stability and agility to operate effectively in surf, in shallow water, and the near-

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His Royal Highness Sultan Sharafuddin Idris Shah Alhaj is the Captain-in-Chief of the RMN. HRH has vast interest in development of RMN operational capability


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CONSTABULARY MILITARY OPERATIONS OTHER THAN WAR (MOOTW) MOOTW encompass the use of military capabilities across a range of military operations, short of war. MOOTW focus on promoting peace, resolving conflict and supporting civil authorities in response to crises. It may involve elements of both combat and noncombat operations in peacetime, conflict, and warlike environments. Some of the more common operations involving navies include:

Jan 2011, RMN successfully foiled the attack on MT Bunga Laurel by Somali pirates in the Gulf of Aden

Assisting civil law enforcement authority

MARITIME BASED RESOURCE PROTECTION Maritime-based resource protection is one of the most common constabulary roles of naval forces and remains an important activity. From a primarily fishery protection, the role has extended considerably in recent years to include the surveillance and protection of strategic offshore oil & gas infrastructures and other installations, including the surveillance and monitoring of the maritime environment and the actions of humans within it. ANTI-PIRACY Naval forces have an international obligation to suppress piracy, which by definition is an activity on the high seas. The continuous presence of warships at sea provides a visible deterrence to pirates and enhances the confidence of international community in the safety of patrolled waters. NAVAL ASSISTANCE TO CIVIL LAW ENFORCEMENT AUTHORITY

Rescue of MT Orkim Harmony in Jun 2015 by RMN is an example of successfull anti piracy operation

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Naval operations that provide military assistance to civil authority are usually aimed at supporting domestic law enforcement at sea. Maritime operations that provide military assistance to the civil authority include counter-terrorist operations, such as the recovery of offshore gas or oil installations or ships hijacked by terrorists.


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Providing supplies and assitance to remote areas affected by disasters helps to promote Malaysia’s image and reputation

MH370 and QZ8501 insidents show that RMN is the only maritime agency in Malaysia capable of conducting extended search and rescue operation outside of Malaysia’s waters

SEARCH AND RESCUE

EVACUATION

All vessels on the high seas and aircrafts operating over them have obligations under international law to assist in search and rescue. The air and naval forces may therefore be required to engage in search and rescue operations at a very long range and in extremely demanding conditions with little notice.

Evacuations will almost always be conducted on a joint basis and seek to utilise a seaport or airport, but an amphibious operation may well prove necessary in undeveloped areas. Apart from their ability to transport and support large numbers of people, naval forces also provide significant assistance with shore to ship transport, utilising boats and helicopters, as well as command, control and communications facilities to coordinate such operations.

DISASTER RELIEF Naval forces repeatedly demonstrate that their inherent capabilities make them uniquely valuable in providing both short and long term assistance in disaster relief, not only for coastal locations, but sometimes further inland. While shipborne helicopters can be particularly useful, suitably configured ships may act as logistic support bases, hospitals and command posts for long periods of time. Specialist skills available in ships also mean that their personnel can be an invaluable source of trained manpower for rehabilitation and repair work. Naval forces are self-supporting and are not a logistical burden in situations where the infrastructure has been destroyed or severely damaged. RMN will need to be better equipped and prepared to respond effectively to the increasing frequency and intensity of natural disasters as a result of global climatic change.

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Naval capabilities are also useful for disaster relief and evacuation such as during the tragic Palu, Sulawesi earthquake/tsunami.

MARITIME FORCE ASSISTANCE TO ALLIED AND FRIENDLY COUNTRIES Naval force assistance can be provided to other countries in a wide variety of ways. In addition to the benign activities already listed, naval forces can exercise and assist with the training of other national forces to increase their effectiveness. Examples include participating in bilateral and multilateral exercises with other navies as well as the sharing of intelligence and surveillance data.


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DIPLOMATIC Another facet of the role of naval force is defence diplomacy. This role compared to the other services is unique for naval force, as ships arrive in overseas ports as a complete unit and are able to represent Malaysia whenever they conduct port visit. In this role, the tasks range from activities which are benign to coercive in nature. Although these tasks do not represent traditional naval roles for the RMN per se, dispensing diplomatic duties demonstrates the geographic mobility of naval forces which can be deployed even to the most remote coastal areas of the world. Representing the country in various geographical areas also presents RMN with the opportunity to contribute in broader non-combat areas, promote cooperation and at the same time build trust among countries. By showing its presence in foreign countries and flying the Jalur Gemilang, the RMN helps enhance bilateral relationships between Malaysia and other countries. Informal foreign visits by RMN ships also provide Malaysia with the opportunity to reassure neighbours, show its ability to work with host country’s military, as well as promote Malaysia to the public at large.

RMN’S ROLE DURING THE 2004 ACEH TSUNAMI On December 26, 2004 an undersea earthquake with a magnitude of 9.1 struck off the coast of Sumatera, Indonesia. The resulting tsunami, the largest and deadliest in recorded history, caused massive destruction. More than 230,000 people lost their lives and the damage was estimated to be over USD19.9 billion. Widespread damage to property and infrastructure, shortage of food and drinking water, as well as the risk of an epidemic were major concerns. RMN’s KD MAHAWANGSA along with several ships from Indonesia, were among the first to arrive in Aceh to provide assistance to those affected by the tragedy. The Aceh tsunami and other natural disasters such as typhoons and cyclones illustrate the vulnerability of coastal communities in our region. It is therefore incumbent that all regional nations be prepared with the necessary resources when assisting others deal with such crises. In acknowledgment of this, the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) established the ASEAN Militaries Ready Group on Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief (AMRG on HADR) during the 9th ASEAN Defence Ministers’ Meeting (ADMM) on 16 March 2015. To honour Malaysia’s commitment to this noble task, the RMN proposed the acquisition of a Multi Role Support Ship (MRSS) equipped with multiple tasking capabilities that would be invaluable to saving lives and helping affected countries deal with disasters.

TERMS OF REFERENCE OF THE ASEAN MILITARIES READY GROUP ON HUMANITARIAN ASSISTANCE AND DISASTER RELIEF (AMRG on HADR) “The Defence Ministers of ASEAN Member States adopted the Concept Paper on ASEAN Militaries Ready Group on Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief (AMRG on HADR) at the 9th ASEAN Defence Ministers’ Meeting (ADMM) on 16 March 2015 in Langkawi, Kedah, Malaysia.” “ The deployment of AMRG on HADR shall be based on three levels according to the period, the needs of the Affected State and the capabilities available from the Assisting States: Urgent

: Provide specialists for a needs-assessment team to complement Emergency Response and Assessment Teams Immediate : Deploy among others relevant assets and resources such as carriers, mobile air movement, forklift and fuel, search and rescue team, temporary shelter and field kitchen Middle and Long Term : Deploy among others damage assessment team, engineers and heavy machinery for long term recovery.”

Malaysian Armed Forces contribution to UN mandated mission enhance Malaysia’s reputation as responsible and caring nation among international community

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KD JEBAT conducting naval blockade off Lahad Datu

To ensure the effective conduct of operations against those terrorists and to re-establish control over the affected territory, a near full spectrum military response was initiated. While the RMAF conducted bombing runs which were followed by ground assault from elements of the Malaysian Army, RMN warships were at sea establishing a naval blockade to prevent reinforcement for the terrorists and to block their escape. RMN was also prepared to carry out Special Forces insertion or landing troops from the sea as well as Naval Gun Fire Support if they had been called upon at that time. Despite the huge sectors and challenging geography within the Operational Area, the blockade was successful in isolating the terrorists. The presence of RMN warships also effectively deterred various parties from interfering in the conduct of the onshore operation.

Lahad Datu incident claimed the lives of 10 Malaysian Security Forces personnel

RMN’S ROLE DURING LAHAD DATU INCURSION (2013) On the 9th of February 2013, a group of approximately 235 terrorists from the Philippines slipped, under the cover of darkness, from the south of the Philippines and made their way towards the east coast of Sabah. They were relatively well armed with heavy weaponry including rocket propelled grenades (RPG) and heavy machine guns. The group went on to seize control of a small village named Tanduo in the district of Lahad Datu, Sabah. The terrorists called themselves the ‘Royal Security Forces of the Sultanate of Sulu and North Borneo’, a previously unknown armed group led by a Tausuk ethnic Filipino called Jamalul Kiram. He was one of many pretenders staking a claim to the throne of the old Sulu Sultanate which had ceased to exist in Borneo. This act of terrorism started a chain of events that led to a military response from the government of Malaysia, which eventually ended the siege on 24 March 2013.

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This large-scale act of terrorism by a well-equipped foreign entity with potential interference or support from an external power against Malaysia’s sovereignty demonstrated that it is imperative for the Navy to be able to carry out full range combat operations, both at sea as well as from the sea. The incursion along with persistent threat from non-state actors has led to the establishment of a “Special Security Area” on 7th March 2013 which was subsequently re-named East Sabah Security Zone (ESSZONE). The area covers 10 districts from Kudat to the north and Tawau to the South of East coast of Sabah. The security of the 1400 km long coastal areas is being overseen by on organization known as East Sabah Security Command (ESSCOM). RMN has been and will continue to be an active contributor to the security of the area. Since the establishment of ESSZONE, the Navy alone has conducted 961 operational tasking to patrol the area followed by various logistical, technical and organizational support to assist in ensuring the security of Malaysians within ESSZONE. RMN personnel are also permanently stationed within ESSCOM. These events proved that maritimebased or originated threat to Malaysia’s sovereignty and territorial integrity is real and cannot be taken lightly. It also highlights the need for the RMN to be equipped with capable combatant platforms manned by proficient personnel to ensure we are able to operate in either single service or joint environment to deal with any such threats in the future.


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CAPACITY BUILDING As part of its effort to support Defence Diplomacy, RMN is currently involved in various forms of bilateral and multilateral naval cooperation aimed at building capacity and trust. Amongst them are exercises and exchange of officers within ASEAN navies and also navies outside ASEAN. Long-standing bilateral relationships have existed between RMN and neighbouring navies like Thailand, Indonesia, Singapore, the Philippines and Brunei Darussalam. These relationships have advanced to a stage where sufficient trust has been established to enable various arrangements to address regional security threats. Recent examples of such arrangements include the Trilateral Cooperative Arrangements (TCA) aimed at eliminating cross border criminal activities such as kidnap for ransom, human trafficking and other illegal activities that threaten stability, law and order and sovereignty of member states of TCA. NAVAL ASSISTANCE TO CIVIL COMMUNITY Naval assistance to civil community is another dimension that contributes to defence diplomacy. It differs from aid to the Civil Law Enforcement Authority in that it is related simply to the provision of help in civil matters and not the enforcement of law and order. It ranges from education to salvage, environmental management, pollution control and the provision of personnel and systems to aid community development.

RMN participation in RIMPAC 2018, the largest naval exercise in the world is a demonstration of its commitment to defence diplomacy.

RMN AND DIPLOMACY Malaysia’s Ministry of Defence (MINDEF) holds the view that the fast changing and dynamic global diplomatic environment requires a pragmatic approach to Military Diplomacy. The ministry has adopted a whole-of-ministry approach to advance Malaysia’s interest in this regard. The aim is to support the government’s effort in enhancing Malaysia’s credibility in the international arena through Defence Diplomacy. In enhancing naval cooperation with non-ASEAN navies within the region, RMN is engaged in various activities in support of established defence diplomacy channels, such as Five Power Defence Arrangement (FPDA), Defence High Level Committee (DHLC), Pacific Partnership, Naval Working Group (NWG) and Western Pacific Naval Symposium (WPNS). We also participate actively in numerous international defence forums, symposiums, seminars and exhibitions. Some of the more prominent extraregional partners with whom RMN has had regular interactions include members of FPDA, the United States Navy, People’s Liberation Army-Navy of China, French Navy, Indian Navy, Republic of Korea Navy and Japan Maritime Self-Defence Force.

DEFENCE DIPLOMACY SECURITY MY-PRC GBC MY-US IMT TCA ADMM MSP UN Mission

READINESS Exercises MY-US HADR MY-FR MY-AU TTC DSA FPDA LIMA WPNS TCA

WELFARE HADR CIMIC Cox’s Bazar Pacific Partnership

To support MINDEF’s aim through Defence Diplomacy, RMN personnel, particularly those in command positions and senior officers must possess a good understanding of geo-strategic issues and their associated dynamics so that they can play the role of unofficial ambassadors representing Malaysia whenever they interact with our partners. RMN must also be equipped with assets which are sufficiently capable of reassuring our friends that we are a dependable partner - one that is able to work with them and support them when the need arises. ASEAN Navy Chiefs’ meeting in Pattaya, Thailand Nov 2017

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DISPOSITION OF RMN BASES HQ NAVAL REGION 3 Langkawi OFFSHORE STATIONS Gugusan Semarang Peninjau

EASTERN FLEET COMMAND SUBMARINE COMMAND Kota Kinabalu

HQ NAVAL REGION 2 Sandakan

RESIDENT NAVAL OFFICE Pulau Pinang

WESTERN FLEET COMMAND NAVAL EDUCATION TRAINING COMMAND SPECIAL FORCE COMMAND Lumut

HQ NAVAL REGION 1 Tg Gelang

NATIONAL HYDROGRAPHIC CENTRE Pulau Indah, Klang NAVY HQ Kuala Lumpur

NAVAL RESERVE COMMAND Sg Lunchoo

HQ NAVAL REGION 4 Bintulu

RESIDENT NAVAL OFFICE Kuching

FORWARD OPERATION BASE Tawau FORWARD OPERATION BASE Semporna

TRAINING CENTRE Tg Pengelih

Surface Ship Base Submarines Base Head Quarters Forward Base/Station

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MARITIME SECURITY CHALLENGES AND FUTURE FORCE LEVEL DEVELOPMENT A variety of factors, many beyond the scope of the maritime arena, will have a substantial effect on maritime security in the future. Most will neither be inherently asymmetrical nor conventional in nature, but will encompass elements of each. These forces are already at work today; indeed, many profoundly affecting the maritime security environment. In the future, some will retain their prominence and others will rise markedly in influence. According to the United Nations, 41 percent of the world’s pirate attacks between 1995 and 2013 took place in the Malacca and Singapore straits

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From a maritime perspective, the sea is a source of prosperity and advancement. It acts as a medium for interaction between local, regional and global communities. Enormous amounts of goods have travelled by sea since time immemorial. There are over 23,000 ships underway everyday transporting about 95% of the world’s commerce and more than half of the world’s population resides within 100 km of a coastline. When maritime security communities speak about Sea Lines of Communication (SLOC) they refer to more than mere shipping routes. SLOC represent access to the renewable resources of the sea such as fishing stocks and natural resources that can be extracted from beneath it. We continue to be dependent on free and open access to the sea for our security and prosperity just as we did centuries ago. The difference is that today the sea has become a dangerous conduit for various actors who see the general lack of security and attention by many coastal states as an opportunity to exploit and impose their will. This trend is expected to continue well into the future. Despite the absence of universally accepted definitions of “Regional Security”, the term in a Southeast Asia context relates to a significant degree to maritime security. Of the 10 ASEAN members, nine are coastal states and they include two of the world’s largest archipelagic states. Their reliance on maritime security was clearly demonstrated in August 2017 during the 50th ASEAN Foreign Minister’s Meeting held in Manila when the joint communiqué emphasized the need for

“...strengthening linkages in maritime cooperation to further promote mutual trust and confidence to ensure security, peace and stability including ensuring the safety and freedom of navigation...” Maritime security in its strictest and most traditional sense refers to protection from military threats via seaborne or naval operations carried out by adversary’s forces with the aim of seizing control over one’s seas. More contemporary and accepted definitions include security from the threat to coastal states or maritime communities from activities at sea such as piracy or armed robbery against ships, seaborne illicit trade or trafficking, intentional and unlawful damage to marine ecosystems or the environment such as discharging pollutants as well as illegal exploitation of maritime resources including those via illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing. This gradual but significant shift in strategic priorities - away from a strict interpretation of maritime security as a purely militaristic endeavour will result in ever-increasing pressures on navies to develop the capabilities necessary to address a wider range of security challenges.

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Collaboration and partnership in capacity building contributed to effective operations, build trust and manage risk

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Abu Sayyaf is the regional off-shoot of IS. It is one of several VEOs operating around the Sulu-Celebes Sea tri-border areas.

3. Great Power Competition. Some of the more pressing threats that are directly or indirectly linked to the maritime domain and has the potential to affect Malaysia’s security include: 1. Territorial Disputes and Maritime Claims Overlapping and competing territorial and maritime claims continue to be a source of friction in our region. Actions to change established status quo and militarization of part of the disputed area have resulted in heightening tensions between claimants and other legitimate users of the seas. As our economic livelihood depended so much on the open and free uses of the sea, any attempt to control or restrict uses of Sea Lines of Communications could severely impact our economy and sovereignty. These challenges appear to be escalating and are unlikely to be resolved in the near future. 2. Terrorism and Violent Extremist Organizations (VEOs). Threats posed to Malaysia by the self-proclaimed Islamic State (IS) and other VEOs have led to increased attention towards counter-terrorism efforts. Although Malaysia did not experience IS-related attacks since 2017 and the number of foreign terrorist fighters from Malaysia has decreased, we are still labelled as a source, transit, and to a lesser extent a destination country for suspected IS supporters. The March 2013 attacks on Lahad Datu and the five month siege of Marawi, Philippines in May 2017 demonstrated the type of capability that terrorists or VEOs are able to field within a short space of time. A range of extremist actors motivated by ideology, financial gain, clan ties, politics, or other reasons could result in other similar attacks with little or no warning.

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Rivalry, particularly between the world’s sole superpower and Asia’s rising power in this region is a source of concern. Although the probability of military conflict for the sake of gaining territory between the two powers is remote, their rivalry for dominant status and influence is equally dangerous. Brinkmanship, followed by a miscalculation by commanders on the ground could easily lead to conflict and destabilize the whole region. Malaysia has asked for a reduction in the presence of warship in the South China Sea as it sees it as being critical to preventing accidents and militarization and as having the potential to impede freedom of navigation. 4. Natural Disasters Our region is the most disaster-prone region in the world. About 75 percent of the Earth’s volcanoes and 90 percent of earthquakes occur in the “Ring of Fire” surrounding the Pacific Basin where the majority of our neighbours are located and where we are adjacent to. According to a 2015 UN report, disasters over the last ten years took the lives of half a million people in the region with over 1.5 billon people affected and causing damages valued at more than USD 500 Billion. When natural disasters and humanitarian crises strike, communities are often devastated and left vulnerable, having little access to life’s essentials such as food, clean water, shelter and basic services. When there is a disaster, an organized response to alleviate the consequence of a catastrophe is imperative. If the intensity of natural disasters result in severe humanitarian crises such as the one that struck Palu in Indonesia recently, a large scale disaster relief involving emergency response and restoration is necessary. In a maritime region like ours, large scale disaster relief can only be carried out effectively with the involvement of military assets, especially from a suitably equipped navy.


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5. Transnational Crime. Transnational criminal organizations operating across borders are responsible for the majority of illicit activities and violence in this region. In this instance, technology is the enabler that disperses such organizations across borders, while vast local knowledge is used to hide their real activities, thus making effective targeting of these threats very challenging. The discreet and versatile nature of drug and human trafficking organizations, smugglers and kidnapfor-ransom by armed groups often enables them to commit crime without being detected. Our maritime border areas which are vast and difficult to patrol are particularly vulnerable to these threats.

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7. Proliferation of Weapon of Mass Destruction Nuclear armament proliferation in several Asian countries is a major threat to regional security and stability. Countries with nuclear armament within this region have all increased their warhead inventories over the past several years, albeit in a muted manner. Malaysia along with other regional countries are particularly apprehensive when North Korea continues to carry out Intercontinental Ballistic Missile tests despite sanctions and having agreed not to do so. Elsewhere in South Asia, ongoing tensions between Pakistan and India remains a long standing challenge. The nuclear policies of both countries continue to be a significant source of concern for the region. The two states continue to develop and test nuclear weapons with land, sea and air-based missile delivery systems that possess the range that extends well beyond the sub-continent. 8. Climate Change Average temperatures in Southeast Asia have been on the rise every decade since 1960. Asian Development Bank estimates that Southeast Asia would suffer a bigger loss compared to most of the other regions of the world. Left unchecked, climate change could potentially reduce 11% of the region’s GDP by the end of the century as it affects important sectors such as agriculture, tourism, fishing as well as health and labour productivity. As climate change accelerates it will also shape the region’s major strategic challenges. This includes a host of maritime security issues such as contested boundary delimitation when demarcation baseline changes, trans-national migrations as populations flock to greener pastures and illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing when established areas have depleted their stocks.

6. Cyber Security Growing interconnectedness between digital and physical worlds and the increasing dependence on information technology have expanded the risk of cyber attacks in recent years. Geopolitical tensions further increases demand among state and non-state actors to collect confidential information, which in turn drive cyber espionage activities. The risk of cyber attacks particularly against critical infrastructure information (CII) systems such as those used in our ports and defense network is a major concern for Malaysia. Successful cyber attacks can degrade or disable CII systems and as a consequence disrupt essential services, undermine confidence in the national economy and affect safety and security. High-profile attacks such as the WannaCry ransomware attack in May 2017 disrupted livelihood in many countries, including Malaysia. Cyber attacks have become increasingly sophisticated and the trend is set to continue.

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9. Food Security Malaysia currently ranks 41 out of 113 countries on the Global Food Security Index. Although the Self Sufficiency Level is healthy, the trend may change in the future as our population increases and competition for food source intensifies. A vast majority of our food is either from the sea, or imported into the country via the sea. In the event of a conflict at seas that surround us or any other incidence that hampers our ability to extract food from the sea or impedes food supplies into Malaysia, we could face a severe shortage of food supplies. 10. Energy Security Energy security is defined as “the uninterrupted availability of energy sources at an affordable price”. Long-term energy security is about timely investments that supply energy in line with economic developments and sustainable environmental needs, while short-term energy security focuses on the ability of the energy system to react promptly to sudden changes within the supplydemand balance. Energy security is thus linked to the negative economic and social impacts of either physical unavailability of energy or large, unreasonable price fluctuations. As Malaysia’s major source of energy is still petroleum based and almost all of which are located offshore, any disruption to the production, storage and distribution of those supplies can have a negative impact on the economy and our well-being.

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To address the challenges stated above, RMN must develop an appropriate force structure and capability that is credible, versatile and relevant to the needs of the country. This will enable the navy to stay ahead of both the traditional and non-traditional maritime security threats. Designing a force structure cannot be effective unless directed towards clearly identified needs. While today’s needs are different from the past and may differ in the future, what is certain is that Malaysia requires a navy that possesses a diverse range of capability instead of one that is confined only to the realm of combat or fighting a high intensity conflict. Therefore our fleet or Armada as it is known in our Service, must be evenly prepared and our force structure be designed to be able to respond to different types of challenges; from providing assistance to civil community to responding to natural disasters and at the same time deter potential aggressors.

First Steel Cutting Ceremony of RMN Littoral Mission Ship (LMS) in Wuhan, China. LMS will provide versatile yet low cost solution for Malaysia’s needs

The high level technology and quality of the vessels within the Armada will be of little use if the “man behind the machine” and the relevant supporting elements are not performing at optimum level. To achieve this, RMN must adopt a more pragmatic strategy that not only focuses on recapitalizing the fleet, but also one that focuses on fielding a balanced Armada, while enhancing its enterprise processes, policies, structures and most importantly, its human capital. This will enable us to not only hone existing capabilities but also make necessary adjustments to meet the increasingly diverse challenges of the future.

Protecting energy supplies and the means to transport them such as this operation in the Gulf of Aden are increasingly important task for RMN

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As the largest and the only branch of maritime services in Malaysia that possesses the reach and the means to conduct persistent and out of area operations, the RMN is expected to continue to play an important role in addressing these security challenges either singularly or in cooperation with other maritime agencies. In short, RMN will need to balance its future force structure between one that is capable of fighting at sea, providing support and influencing events ashore as well as fulfilling other diplomatic and constabulary functions in an environment where Malaysia’s interests and Malaysian are becoming increasingly globalised.


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WHY WE NEED TO TRANSFORM Throughout our history, we have been called upon to act in time of crises and in peace, and today the navy is expected to play an even larger and more vital roles in advancing Malaysia’s maritime-based interests. At home, we are facing never seen before security challenges which are complex and evolving. Abroad, as Malaysia’s interests become increasingly global, we must keep pace and maintain our ability to respond to contingencies in other parts of the world. As we move forward, we are faced with competing realities of shrinking defence budgets and rising maritime security challenges. The current fiscal environment demands that we critically examine every aspect of our business enterprise to improve effectiveness and at the same time to drive down the cost of business operations.

The venerable KD HANG TUAH was constructed in 1966. As she aged, return of investment in term of availability vis-a-vis cost required to maintain her is diminishing

COMBAT

KASTURI

PATROL

2020

AGE

(2008-25 YEARS)

1983

(2008-25 YEARS)

35 YEARS LCS1 - 2019 35 YEARS 2009

1972

PERDANA

1979

HANDALAN

46 YEARS

(1997-25 YEARS)

39 YEARS

(2001-25 YEARS)

1968

42 YEARS

(1983-25 YEARS) 1980

MPCSS

50 YEARS (2005-25 YEARS)

38 YEARS

1997

AUXILIARY MAHAMIRU 1978 1966

21 YEARS (2010-25 YEARS)

1985

HIDRO

(1991-25 YEARS)

51 YEARS 2009

Ship’s Life Period

Point of Diminishing Return

SLEP

33 YEARS 40 YEARS

(1991-25 YEARS)

PERDANA MENTERI

9 YEARS

(1997-25 YEARS) 1976

KRIS SUPPORT

1983

KEDAH

HANG TUAH

TODAY

23 YEARS

LCS

JERONG

SUB

2010

1995

LEKIU

LAKSAMANA

44

2000

1990

1980

1970

CLASS

1960

Ageing of Royal Malaysian Navy Current Fleet

9 YEARS


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FROM VICIOUS TO VIRTUOUS: TRANSFORMING LOCAL SHIPBUILDING AND REPAIR INDUSTRY’S BOOM AND BUST CYCLE In the absence of a stable and long term shipbuilding plan, the industry is often faced with a vicious “boom and bust cycle”. This is the consequence of many years of under-investment and short term, ad hoc building plans. This situation has resulted in increased cost of construction, wasteful infrastructure investment, outflow of money and loss of talent as skilled workers look for work elsewhere on A continuous shipbuilding completion of eachprojects project.will lead to sustainable and robust shipbuilding industry VIBRANT SHIPBUILDING ACTIVITIES WITH #15TO5 10

1,200

9

Comparison of shipbuilding activities with the implementation of #15to5

1,000 8

7 800 6

4 400 3

2 200 1

Number of local Local shipbuilding vendors VS Naval Shipbuilding activities 5

800

2008 2009 700 2010 2011

4

600

3

No shipbuilding activity. The vendors either closed down or transitioned into different industries. The remaining vendors survived with naval shiprepair works

No shipbuilding activity. The vendors either closed down or transitioned into different industries. The remaining vendors survived with naval shiprepair works

3 2 2

2015 2016 2017 2018

No of ships

2019 2020 2021 2022 2023

2024 2025

2026 2027 2028 2029 2030

No of shipbuilding acticities

400 300 200 100

1

*No of vessels under costruction

2012 2013 2014

500

1

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027

Secured investment with long term shipbuilding programme

2028 2029 2030

No of vendors (5to5)

To change this into a virtuous cycle requires a strategic shift in how we deal with the local shipbuilding industry. As a major domestic shipbuilding customer, the government, through RMN’s Fleet 15to5 Transformation Programme, can positively shape the direction of local shipbuilding industry. This can be achieved by transforming our naval shipbuilding and repair industry with a long term, predictable and continuous work order for local shipbuilders. It will not only ensure the delivery of capabilities required by the navy, but will also result in lower costs of construction, a secure shipbuilding industrial future and retainment of investments made on infrastructure as well as skilled manpower. Further, it has a spill-over benefit into other related industries and sectors.

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Most of our ships have passed the point in their service life where the returns in terms of availability and readiness vis-a-vis the cost required to upkeep them has begun markedly to diminish. Several ships are venerable, having already passed the 50 year mark. Studies and experience have shown that traditional practices at prolonging their shelf life through efforts such as Service Life Extension Programme (SLEP) have failed to provide satisfactory returns compared to the investments made on them. In fact, in the long run, such efforts have proven to be more expensive than acquiring new ships.

600

5

4

With a strength of over 17,000 active personnel, today the RMN is the biggest and most important maritime defence and security agency in Malaysia. While the number of personnel is deemed optimal, the same cannot be said about our current force structure. The RMN’s existing Armada is made up of 15 different classes of ships that include frigates, submarines, corvettes, strike craft, support and auxiliary platforms. These ships were built in 7 different countries by several shipyards. This presents us with complex logistical and training challenges. Apart from cost challenges to keep the ships available for operational commitments, the Armada also faces obsolescence.

Having ships built mostly in foreign countries means the RMN is much more susceptible to foreign industry directions and variations in maintenance and logistical costs which result in having little to no control over the total cost of ownership. It also results in a constant outflow of Malaysian Ringgit, little domestic investment in infrastructure and skill sets, discouraging growth and contributing minimally to the country’s economy. Although it was necessary when Malaysia had very limited industrial capacity, the situation today has significantly changed. As we aspire to attain a developed nation status, it is incumbent that we support the development of our local shipbuilding and defence industry as part of a larger national endeavour. Like most other small navies, RMN’s legacy force structure is designed to conduct defensive operations against an adversary in a short and aggressive campaign within Malaysia’s maritime territory, deny their objectives and impose unacceptable costs on the aggressor. The fulfilment of other roles was not a major consideration but a byproduct of existing combat capability. While current individual ships are relatively well equipped for their tasks and are operationally able, they lack the flexibility needed to operate effectively against many of the potential threats and challenges that we will face in the coming decades. Today, not only are our ships ageing, they also represent a mismatch between inventory and actual operational needs. As it stands, RMN’s Armada is hard-pressed to meet their operational requirements especially when taking into account the required maintenance, crew training, personnel turnover and operational tempo objectives.


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The accelerating pace of technology and its exploitation by our adversaries is changing the way battles are fought on land and in the sea. To be ahead of the curve and remain relevant, business as usual and doing nothing is not an option. We have to face up to these challenges head on and adapt. - ADMIRAL TAN SRI AHMAD KAMARULZAMAN BIN HJ AHMAD BADARUDDIN CHIEF OF NAVY

Continued engagement with international partners and allies are crucial in building our capacity

Although military roles remain at the heart of our force structure and central to what we do; the demand for RMN to fulfil constabulary and other benign functions has been on the increase in recent times. In the past five years, for example, Maritime Security Operations and other constabulary/benign functions constituted over 85% of the tasks assigned to us. On the other hand, incidents such as the Malayan Emergency (1948-1960), Konfrontasi (1962–1966), Second Malayan Emergency (1968-1989) and the Lahad Datu Incursion of 2013 provide a vivid reminder that RMN must continue to place combat capability at the forefront of its force structure. The Lahad Datu incident especially and the growing militarisation in the South China Sea highlight the need for the navy to design a new force structure that comprises assets that are able to meet both combat and non-combat demands as well as future maritime security challenges at optimal cost. Today’s dynamic security environment has multiple challenges from state and non-state actors characterised by volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity that are often fed by disorder, ideological and great power competition as well as technological advancements. Developing a versatile and credible force is imperative if we were to remain relevant to the needs of the country. Transforming our legacy fleet is the way forward as it prepares us to meet these challenges more effectively by striking the right balance between capabilities for military, diplomatic, constabulary and benign functions. To ensure the successful execution of missions entrusted to us, we cannot depend solely on ships. While it is intrinsically linked to how capable we are, success requires a more holistic approach that includes transforming our people and enterprise processes.

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Different variable and it’s relationship with RMN #15to5 Transformation Programme

S O C IA L

E

T

E

O

C

I C M NO

VISION FOR THE FUTURE

G Y O L O HN

P O L I T I CA L

C

INTERNAL CONSIDERATION #NavyPeople centric

NATIONAL SECURITY POLICY

Future Fleet & CONOPS

Transformative

Doing more with less

NATIONAL DEFENCE POLICY

Technology, best practices & partnership

EXTERNAL CONSIDERATION

V E N

Long term Local Science perspective shipbuilding & & defence Technology industry

Cost Future vs challenges Requirements

National Defence Strategy

4DMAF

IT Y

GUIDANCE AND DIRECTION Maritime Defence Strategy

O

U

R

IR

N

50

M

E N T

L E G A L

S

E

C

RMN recognizes the fact that its missions and roles have evolved considerably over the years and will continue to evolve along with the dynamics of maritime security, geopolitical developments and many other factors. Today, its resources are channelled not only towards undertaking its traditional military roles but have extended considerably to include diplomatic, constabulary and other more benign peacetime tasks.


ROYAL MALAYSIAN NAVY

#15TO5 TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME

To ensure we are able to persistently and effectively accomplish assigned missions at optimum cost, the Fleet Transformation Initiatives under the ambit of the RMN #15to5 Transformation Programme is designed to achieve two mutually supporting aims. The first aim is to field a credible fighting force that forms the core of our combat capability, while the second is to augment that fighting force with platforms sufficiently versatile in performing wide-ranging maritime security related missions but which can be appropriately reconfigured to support combat missions when required. The military role will be fulfilled by a new Armada consisting of 4 submarines, 12 Littoral Combat Ships (LCS-Guided Missile Frigates) and 3 Multi-Role Support Ships (MRSS-Landing Platform Helicopter/ Dock). They in turn will be supported by 18 New Generation Patrol Vessels (NGPV-Offshore Patrol Vessels) and 18 Littoral Mission Ships (LMS-Large Patrol Craft) which will be assigned primarily to conduct constabulary and benign tasks. Both NGPV and LMS are designed to be re-configurable vessels that can quickly be retrofitted and converted into small combatant ships (corvettes) in time of crisis. This new force of 55-ships Navy means we will be able to deploy a small, versatile and reasonably capable Task Group. It will enable us to operate better in nearly all of the naval warfare domains, extend our reach, better protect our sovereignty and territorial integrity, provide us with the ability to operate effectively alongside our sister services, partners and allies. Importantly, it will enable us to rapidly respond to crises, contingencies or threats against Malaysia’s maritime interests well into the future. Transforming our capability will also result in more days at sea. This translates into persistence and visible presence that will protect our maritime based economic and security interests. RMN of the future will have its allocated resources judiciously and responsibly channelled to ensure mission accomplishment, and will benefit the navy as a whole and by extension #NavyPeople. Our business enterprise will be based on a resource informed planning process and will therefore be much more efficient. Every aspect

The increase Ships Days at Sea also means we will have a more visible presence at sea and as a consequence reduce the RM6 Billion yearly national losses from unreported, unregulated and illegal (IUU) fishing, RM4 Billion from smuggling and other illicit activities at sea, help preserve our marine ecosystems, instill confidence among maritime community, deter potential aggressor and criminals, respond to contingencies faster and provide us with more opportunity to train our people. Monetizing just 10% of those losses mean Malaysia would have been able to build 25 additional schools and hospitals each year.

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of the acquisition process will prioritize affordability, clearly defined specifications, fit for purpose based on objective evaluation. Outcome Based Budgeting, Reliability Centred Maintenance, Digital Data Management System, Just In Time Logistics, Green Navy, Revised Audit and Operational Readiness Evaluation are some of the efficiency and effective enhancing measures that will be the norm in the future. We will also institute significant changes to the way we operate as we utilize more technology and adapt to best practices. In 2030, RMN’s total strength in terms of personnel is expected to remain at present levels but our people will be operating bigger and better assets suited to meet the challenges of the future. As we collaborate and work more with our partners locally and abroad, we will be able to enhance our conversion capacity more rapidly. We will utilise new operating concepts, techniques and tactics that are developed, refined and validated through scenario planning, wargaming and exercises alongside our friends, partners and allies. This will support the needs of the Armada and allow #NavyPeople to perform better in various roles. While we make systemic changes and take prudent risks as we balance our investments in enhancing readiness and improving capability, the RMN will not lose sight of the most important determinant for our success – our people. Measures will be put in place to ensure that the Navy will be manned by highly proficient officers and sailors capable of undertaking complex operations at sea that require the integration of multiple technologically advanced assets operating in the surface, air, subsurface as well as in the electronic domains. Training and personnel development will be synchronised in accordance with how the Armada is organised to operate. We also envisage and encourage integrity and innovation as well as high morale and spiritual conviction to be the characters that define our officers and sailors. In this regard, we will make significant changes to the way we recruit, manage and develop our people. #NavyPeople in the future can expect to work in a competitive environment that cultivates, values and rewards intellectual capital as well as high performer. At the same time we will create an environment that looks after serving members and their family’s welfare better in order to recognise the extraordinary commitments and sacrifices they make. One of the tenets of #15to5 Transformation Programme is to construct almost all of our new vessels in the country. This plan will assist the government to deliver on its commitment to strengthen the Navy. At the same time the endeavour will provide jobs, create new high technology based industries and help build a strong, sustainable and innovative local shipbuilding industry. Locally built vessels will mean RMN will have more control over long term costs of ownership and minimise the dependency on and risk of foreign industry direction. Our commitment to this path means RMN will be an enabler and key contributor to the local shipbuilding industry. In short, a transformed RMN of the future will not only be able to provide more options to the government in deterring or dealing with threats to Malaysia’s maritime based interests, but will also actively contribute to Malaysia’s economic growth, social development and general wellbeing.


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#15TO5 TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME

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COMBATANTS OF FUTURE ARMADA Fighting elements of Combat Operations at Sea. Provide Access and Protection in Combat Operations From the Sea.

FUTURE MULTI-ROLE SUPPORT SHIP

Wider utility in support of National Contingencies.

Specialist lift and landing capability to land and establish a presence ashore and to support it with equipment and logistics. Command and control of the landing and forces ashore. Support elements in Combat Operations at Sea.

The combatant elements of the Future Armada are expected to possess or participate in achieving these “High Level Operational Capabilities”:

The “High Level Operational Capabilities” are further characterised by the following:

The MRSS will be designed to incorporate the following minimum capabilities :

The capabilities are further characterised by the following design features:

• Neutralize the effect of enemy underwater units that pose a threat to own forces.

• Sustain Sea Denial against a middle power adversary.

• Combat management system to support the naval force command and control function.

• Neutralize the effect of enemy surface units that pose a threat to own forces.

• Dedicated accommodation and support facilities for an embarked military force with the ability to carry additional troops/ civilians in an overload situation for shorter periods.

• Anti-access.

• Neutralize the effect of enemy air units that threaten own forces.

• Littoral Manoeuvre. • Force Protection. • Interoperability. • Survivability. • Availability. • Out of Area Operations. • Operates in Joint and Combined environments.

• Communications system to support naval, land and air command and control functions.

• Defend a maritime force against hostile acts committed by underwater threats.

• A Command Support System (CSS) to facilitate the planning and execution of an amphibious landing.

• Defend a maritime force against hostile acts committed by surface threats.

• Platform survivability.

• Defend a maritime force against hostile acts committed by air threats.

• Limited forward basing and logistic support capabilities.

• Ability to deny access to an enemy amphibious force against Malaysia’s land territory.

• Helicopter deck for airborne ship to shore connectors.

• Render enemy sea-based units ineffective to support tactical land operations on Malaysia territory. • Deliver and extract special/early entry forces into hostile territory. • Ability to sustain extended Sea Denial operations over critical areas.

• Well dock for seaborne ship to shore connectors.

• Vehicle decks for the carriage of a mix of vehicle types ranging from forklift to PT91 Main Battle Tanks together with the ability to load direct from the quay-side. • A floodable well dock accessed through a stern gate - this dock being capable of transporting and deploying several Landing Craft Mechanize (LCM) which in turn can carry troops, vehicles and stores between ship and shore. • Each LCM capable of carrying PT91, heavy vehicles or up to 80 fully equipped troops of the 10th Brigade PARA on assault missions. • A numbers of Fast Interceptor Craft (possibly on davits) each capable of carrying up to 18 person landing party. • Sufficient Cargo spaces for Embarked Force combat supplies or relief supplies.

• Ability to carry out maritime interdiction operations.

• 3 Spot flight deck capable of handling 3 medium lift helicopter operations simultaneously for rapid transfer of troops, light vehicles and their equipment.

• Exchange data with MAF and allied/ friendly sea-based military units.

• Sufficient speed and endurance to provide for relocation and reach.

• Operate or contribute to operations over MAF defined 3 defensive zones/layers (Core, Inner, Outer).

• Rapid liquid and solid transfers function to enable replenishment at sea with RMN or friendly force units.

• Re-locate inter-theatre.

• A relatively shallow draught enabling operations in most regional ports.

• Operate in a high density, Electro Magnetic threat environment.

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Leading platform for Human Assistance and Disaster Relief (HADR) particularly Naval Assistance to Civil Community, Search and Rescue, Evacuations and Disaster Relief.


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DISRUPTIVE TECHNOLOGIES AND THE FUTURE OF RMN New technology has been broadly categorized into two, nominally labelled Sustaining or Disruptive. Sustaining technology is the gradual development of existing technology. Disruptive technology does the opposite, it revolutionizes the field, but comes with risks attached because it is new, untested and initially limited in scope. Disruptive technology in the defence sector has been defined as “a technology or a set of technologies applied to a relevant problem in a manner that radically alters the symmetry of military power between competitors which within a short span of time outdates the policies, doctrines and organization of all actors”.

LEVERAGING ON UNMANNED MARITIME SYSTEMS (UMS) AND UNMANNED AERIAL SYSTEMS (UAS) Naval operations in the air, on the surface and in the ocean need accurate and timely information about the environment. For example, knowing the acoustic environment in the upper ocean enables the prediction of the performance of sonar sensors. Similarly, knowing the presence of bioluminescent organisms in a nearshore area could predict difficulty for a Special Operations operation or a mine counter measures activity. Beyond their original defence and scientific purposes, UMS and UAS also provide navies that operate them with a new and efficient capability to monitor and respond to seaborne activities such as human trafficking, smuggling, IUU fishing activities, threats to commercial shipping and offshore energy infrastructure, as well as identifying marine environmental hazards such as pollutions from an oil spill.

Today, the accelerating speed of technological development is profoundly changing the nature of warfare. The challenges include the pervasive use of robotics, advanced sensors, augmented reality, wearable tech, the ‘Internet of Battlefield Things’ and further revolution in cyber warfare. Experts world-wide agree that future warfighting will be dominated by developments in information technology. As the speed of technological development accelerates it revolutionizes warfare and state or nonstate actors who possess competitive edge in this regard will dominate.

At present, effective monitoring and protection of Malaysia’s areas of maritime interest is logistically challenging, costly and at times risky to implement. The deployment of personnel, vessels, aircraft and satellite imagery for maritime applications as practiced today requires intensive effort yet it provides limited coverage and resolution and fails to ensure that comprehensive and timely data is always available for various reasons. Unmanned maritime data acquisition systems can help overcome these limitations by providing mobile, timely and near persistent data acquisition from the ocean’s surface and beneath it. UMS and UAS comprise in part robotic marine drones (either Unmanned Surface Vehicle – USV or Unmanned Underwater Vehicle – UUV), enabling a more precise and selective approach compared to the deployment of conventional resources. These are multi-tasked robotic ocean drones that have a number of different sensor payloads for different applications on the same vehicle. Apart from military applications, UMS and UAS can also perform surveillance and marine environmental monitoring on the same mission, further enhancing their costeffectiveness. Acquiring and employing UMS and UAS as an enabling technology in the future will deliver significant cost, safety and productivity benefits to RMN as well as the country in general.

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While we do not envisage a situation where we stand at the forefront of military technology in the foreseeable future, we must ensure that in the event where we are confronted with disruptive technology, we will be able to either quickly exploit some or all of the advantages offered by these advancements or ensure our policies, doctrines and organizational capability remain relevant. This is where a transformative culture, changes in our mindset, widespread understanding of information technology, and being IT literate are important. The ability of our people to master information technology will be an important determinant in enabling them to readily adapt to the technology of the future. To remain relevant we must begin to explore the possibilities of learning and adopting civilian commercial innovation models and enterprise processes, integrating the concepts and developments as applied in artificial intelligence, additive manufacturing and predictive analytics to enhance our future capability.


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GAPS & FUNCTIONAL SOLUTION ANALYSIS DOCTRINE : The doctrine analysis examines the way we

LEADERSHIP

AND EDUCATION : Studies have indicated that leadership influences up to 57% of an organization’s performance. The leadership and education analysis examines how we prepare our leaders, not only to lead in battle but also in time of peace. It primarily encompasses the leader at unit level to 4-star Admiral. The focus is on their professional development and how we manage our talents.

conduct our enterprise or operate with particular attention given to combat capability. Other aspects include how RMN is managed and prepared to conduct its missions. This domain provides the focus on the possibilities that enhance our efficiency and effectiveness and on finding solutions to address gaps in intended capability.

ORGANIZATION : The organization analysis examines how RMN is organized and structured in accomplishing assigned missions in general. It goes beyond headquarters, formations and unit levels of organization to include how effective different teams work towards certain objectives using the existing organizational set-up. This domain questions whether there is a better organizational structure or capability that can be developed to solve a capability gap.

E

I

LI

K N O W LE

DG

TIES

SKILLS

COMPETENCY :

The competency and training systems analysis examines how we prepare our forces to accomplish our mission from basic training, advanced individual training, various types of unit training, joint exercises, and other ways to see if improvements can be made to offset capability gaps. In other words, this domain looks at whether RMN’s personnel as individuals and as a unit/organization - have the necessary training systems that provide them with the skill sets required to accomplish what they are expected to.

AB

HARDWARE : The hardware analysis examines all the necessary equipment and systems that are needed by RMN to fight and operate effectively. This include capital assets such as ships and submarines which form the mainstay of our Navy, as well as the less expensive, supporting equipment and systems which also play a key role in determining whether a capital asset is able to perform at its optimum capacity.

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Gap analysis is the first step in Functional Solution Analysis. Gap analysis involves comparing current performance with desired performance. The analysis is important as it allows RMN to identify the extent of the gap between the two, thus helping us to understand the reasons for the gap based on a structured and holistic approach. RMN identified eight variables that form the basic framework from which gap analysis was conducted.

HUMANWARE

: The humanware (people) analysis deals with the availability and general quality of qualified individuals for peacetime, wartime, and various contingency operations to support a capability gap. It mainly deals with manning strength, qualification of personnel and their disposition throughout the navy.

INFRASTRUCTURES : The Infrastructure analysis examines military properties, bases, installations and related industrial facilities, such as shipbuilding and ship repair facilities that support the conduct of the RMN’s tasks. The analysis includes the type, scale and geographical location or disposition of those properties, bases, installations and related industrial facilities to determine their suitability.

VALUES : RMN’s personnel abide by a time-tested set of core values and a military ethos. These core values and ethos lead to personal integrity and strength of character, which in turn provide the moral authority for command as well as ensure cohesiveness of the Navy. This domain looks at whether these core values and ethos have been properly inculcated as well as their effectiveness in preventing breach of military discipline.


ROYAL MALAYSIAN NAVY

#15TO5 TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME

RMN’S 10-STEP APPROACH TO TRANSFORMATION STRATEGY EXECUTION STEP 1

One of the most pressing challenges in the process of strategising is to understand what a strategy is. An effective way to improve this understanding is to visualise the strategy via an illustration that shows both the important elements of the strategy and how each relates to one another. A Transformation Map coupled with the Strategy Map by Kaplan and Norton has been selected as the primary visualisation and communication tool.

VISUALISE THE STRATEGY

STEP 2

Key elements of the visualised strategy were assigned as an easily understood performance measure. The full set of strategic performance measures has been organised further into a dashboard so that stakeholders can determine that progress is being made towards completion of the strategy.

MEASURE THE STRATEGY

STEP 3

In the same way that a budget is viewed monthly to ensure financial commitments are being kept, the strategy is also to be viewed regularly. However, more attention will be directed towards determining if it is producing results rather than controlling performance. RMN#15to5 Transformation Programme progress are reported regularly to the Board of Adrimarlty.

REPORT PROGRESS

STEP 4

Strategy execution is much like sailing towards a planned destination. A defined course needs to be fully complemented by navigational charts as well as a vigilant assessment of the environment that allows for corrections to be made as surrounding conditions change. In this regard as well as part of regular reporting, process owners and leadership must make strategic decisions to keep the strategy current and on course.

MAKE DECISION

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STEP 5

There are over 100 ongoing specific projects at any one point, but it is difficult to have a firm grasp of the type and range of these projects. RMN’s approach towards improving project-oriented strategy execution is to identify, capture, organize and report to the Strategic Management Board (Lembaga Pengurusan Strategik, TLDM) all specific projects considered as strategic, high impact or critical well underway throughout the Navy.

IDENTIFY STRATEGY PROJECTS

STEP 6

Once projects are captured they are then aligned to the strategies or goals for the organization. This step entails comparing each project, either proposed or ongoing, to the strategic goals to determine if an alignment exists. Only those projects that directly impact the strategy should be resourced and continued.

ALIGN STRATEGY PROJECTS

STEP 7

Effective project management is necessary in order to execute the strategy effectively. That said, not all projects require high level attention from the leadership. On the other hand, certain adjustments may result in projects persisting well beyond their scheduled completion. All projects, however, are coordinated and executed by nominated Assistant Chiefs of Staff as the process owner, while high level monitoring of both progress and performance is led by the Naval Transformation Office.

MANAGE PROJECTS

STEP 8

It is difficult to execute strategy when the strategy itself is not well understood, or when the performance relative to it is not communicated. In this regard, the RMN leadership has chosen to communicate their visualized strategy to the navy people by utilizing all available means to increase their understanding of not only what needs to be done, but also why it needs to be done.

COMMUNICATE STRATEGY

STEP 9

The RMN is aware that officers and sailors are keen to make a meaningful contribution to the success of the navy. To do so, they need to know what and how they can contribute as an individual. A strong emphasis has been given to leaders at all levels to ensure that every individual under their command is aware and therefore able to articulate and evaluate their personal role towards the achievement of specific strategic goals.

ALIGN INDIVIDUAL ROLES

STEP 10

It is well accepted that what gets measured gets done. The RMN has taken this one step further. We believe that REWARD what gets measured and rewarded gets done faster. After PERFORMANCE explaining the strategy and aligning the efforts of every personnel towards the same goals, RMN has instituted incentive and recognition programmes that drive behaviours that are consistent with the strategy. This excites our people and raises enthusiasm in moving the navy forward.


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The leadership of the navy has decided for the progress report of RMN #15to5 Transformation Programme as a permanent agenda in the Board of the Admiralty - The highest decision making body within the navy

WHAT GETS MEASURED GETS DONE Success of the #RMN 15to5 Transformation Programme depends not just on how well the strategy has been conceived. It also depends to a large extent on how the strategy will be implemented and monitored. To ensure systematic execution and continuous monitoring, it is imperative that the Owner of the Initiative and the Project Managers formulate their own Key Performance Indicators (KPIs). In promulgating KPIs, each Initiative Owner and Project Manager must align their efforts to be in support of Goals, Objectives and Key Strategies as outlined in this document. What are Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)? KPIs are the critical indicators of progress toward an intended result. KPIs provide a focus for strategic and operational improvements, create an analytical basis for decision making and help focus attention on what matters most.

Setting the KPI

SETTING THE KPI

Monitoring and Reporting

Set targets and thresholds

Select the right measurement(s) for each objective

Define composite indices as needed

Understand alternative measures Describe the intended result(s)

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Define and document selected performance measures

A monitoring and reporting mechanism needs to be established to provide the systematic gathering of accurate, timely, objective and reliable information on the achievement of the KPIs in relation to goals set, as well as the project’s implementation progress. Utilization of the KPI metrics is an effective way of regularly quantifying initiatives/project objectives of an Initiative Owner and Project Managers against performance, and to determine where they have been successful and what needs to be improved. KPIs should be used to track progress and determine how best to fine tune processes to achieve the best results. Performance of the KPIs, initiatives and projects will be monitored by the Naval Transformation Office of the RMN. As agreed, the Initiative Owner and Project Managers must therefore monitor and report their progress on a regular basis. These reports shall include but not be limited to: • • • • •

The achievement of KPI target. The updates of initiatives implemented. The progress of project implementation status. Issues/challenges related to the KPIs, initiatives and projects. Proposal on the review/improvement to the projects.


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SCOPE OF TRANSFORMATION RMN #15to5 Transformation Programme is designed to focus on three main thrusts: People, Processes and Platforms. These three trusts are the pillars which govern how we develop and manage our people, how we conduct our enterprises as well as what kind of force structure we will construct to accomplish our missions.

Encourage diversity

Better reflect Malaysia’s demography

Empower/ employ women into more fields

Prioritise development of future leaders

Increase number of officers with graduate & post graduate qualifications from 67% to 100% Diversify from Strategic Studies to include MBA/MPA/MPP

PEOPLE THRUST

Promote Ethics & Integrity

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Re-invent the way we train Class Management

Select & groom potential leaders based on merit Provide high quality education, training & broad experience early

Triple other rank with Diploma

“Train as we fight”

Stronger focus on values Core Values & Military Ethos

Breach of Military dicipline Effectiveness

Training Time, Availability for deployment


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THE PEOPLE THRUST Human Resource Development and Management (HRDM) is central to the RMN #15to5 Transformation Programme. Human capital is the single most important asset that we have. It is the foundation upon which we build our capability to deliver the selfless services expected of us in the Navy. We must ensure that investments are made to develop and grow our human and intellectual capital. While we plan to equip our people with the right skillsets and employ them to the right position at the right time, we must also strive to recognize and select potential leaders with talent to develop so that these future leaders possess the right perspectives and qualifications to lead the Navy. To do so, we will institute personnel policies that value our people and treat intellectual capital as an important asset. To achieve this, we will introduce the following changes to policy: a. Increase and encourage diversity. For an organization to be innovative, it requires a large number of creative people within the organization. Studies show that the number of creative people is a function of diversity within an organization. Today, personnel composition in RMN does not reflect the diverse demographics of Malaysia. Ethnic Malays constitute over 90% of RMN personnel. Women are only a handful at about 8.2% of the total staff strength. From an academic point of view, an overwhelming majority of our admiralty is made up of flag officers with a Masters Degree in Strategic Studies or an equivalent field of studies. This overwhelming uniformity in academic qualification may have its strengths but does not encourage diverse perspectives and therefore innovativeness within our ranks. As such existing imbalances will be corrected in a manner that will promote greater diversity and equality not just in ethnicity and gender, but also in terms of background and educational qualifications. The different backgrounds and in-depth knowledge in various fields of study will be a critical enabler that will turn the RMN into a stronger and more innovative organization in the future. b. Increase the number of our people with graduate and post graduate qualifications. A formal educational qualification will provide our people with the necessary platform for acquiring professional military skills. At present only 8% of our enlisted and senior ratings have a diploma or degree. Even though 67% of our officers have first degrees, only 15% are with a postgraduate qualification. RMN intends to triple the number of our ratings with tertiary level education (diploma and above at 25% of the total rating strength), aim for 100% officers with degrees and triple the number of those with post-graduate qualification by 2030. We envisage the future Navy leadership to be composed of not only warriors who are proficient at combat operations, but also those who are warrior–scholars; leaders that are effective in combat and schooled with in-depth knowledge in various field of studies at the service of their King and country.

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c. Reinvent the way we train our people. Apart from general naval skill sets, our current training system is geared towards preparing our people to man various classes of ships that we currently have in the Armada. Due to the large number of different classes of ships, our trainers are only able to provide the general skills required, with the expectation of further training to be carried out on board as ‘on the job training’ at sea. With the streamlining of our Armada into five classes of ships, we will be able to provide a more focused training based on the types of ships that we have. We will also concentrate our efforts on resolving the root cause of the challenges and adapt to incoming developments instead of only addressing symptoms. The focused training coupled with streamlined career progression based on the Class Management Approach will allow us to apply a “train as we fight” concept, better institutionalized knowledge and experience, increased morale, reduced training time and, as a consequence, increased personnel availability time for operational deployments. d. Promote ethics and integrity consistent with our values. Ethics and integrity are central to our ability to function as an organization. Although there are breaches of military discipline, particularly with cases involving integrity, it is not at an alarming rate. It causes embarrassment to the Service, deprives us of resources that could have been used elsewhere, leads to low morale and increases the risks in what we do. To change this, we intend to cultivate a professional climate that reinforces our respect to our core values and military ethos, promote a culture of compliance and accountability, and at the same time appreciate positive contributions made by #NavyPeople. e. Prioritise selection and development of potential leaders. Beyond professional proficiencies, integrity, innovation, vision, adaptability and the ability to inspire are some of the important virtues we intend to instil in our future leaders. We believe that these qualities are the foundation for innovative future leaders. We plan to cultivate them through a combination of good education, innovative training, and the provision of broad experiences and opportunities to develop appropriate skill sets. To do so, potential leaders; officers or senior ratings, will be identified early so that the process of grooming future leaders can also start early. On their part, they must prove that they are firstly committed to the Service and that they possess the ability to work creatively and innovatively for the betterment of the RMN.


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Right-size the Navy

Collaboration & leverage on partners

Qualitative & quantitative strength without increasing number of personnel

Aim for synergy, reduce cost, better result

Consolidate/eliminate redundant/inefficient process

MoUs with Universites

International partners for enhancement of conversion capacity

Laverage on Technology : New ship 20%-45% less crew Establish and strengthen Eastern & Western fleets

THE PROCESS THRUST Operating with limited resources in a fiscally challenging environment has caused the RMN to take a harder look at the costs of conducting our enterprise. Despite efforts to reduce and rationalize costs in the past, the Navy is certain that there are still opportunities that can further transform and enhance existing enterprise practices without sacrificing its capability and effectiveness in executing its role and duties. In this regard, the navy interpretation of “efficiency” goes beyond simple cost-cutting measures and supply chain efficiency. Creative approaches such as leveraging on other agencies and partner’s capabilities too will help in enhancing our own capability at a minimal cost. The goal is to reach a state in which every resource is optimally allocated to serve each requirement or entity in the best possible way, while minimizing waste yet maintaining or in some areas enhancing the RMN’s capability. Among the focus of our transformation effort in this regard are: a. Demand for greater effectiveness and efficiency.

Resource Informed Planning Process Transparency & accountability in use of public funds

PROCESS THRUST

Change mindset Leadership intervention

Outcome Based Budgeting

Change inefficient, archaic practices

Digital Data Management System (DDMS)

Foster Culture of Innovation & Compliance Be a leader in good governance and best practices

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Demand greater effectiveness & efficiency

Improve result of Operational Readiness Evaluation and Audits

Better Audits mechanism & benchmarking

Just in Case to Just in Time Legacy maintenance cycle to Reliability Centered Maintenance

We must strive to be a better steward of our resources. Many of our enterprise processes are still based on legacy systems and archaic practices. Changes to these practices require both a shift in mindset and leadership interventions. We must not be averse to questioning existing practices that are inefficient and hinder effectiveness. Despite the understandable desire to preserve traditional practices and customs, we must be able to draw the line between what is good and what is no longer practicable, sustainable or relevant to the needs of the future Armada. For a start, we will be taking bold steps to increase efficiency by rationalizing the way we contract our maintenance. Legacy maintenance cycle systems will be gradually replaced by Reliability-Centered Maintenance, a much more efficient and cheaper practice that is new to us but has been in place for many years in commercial shipping. We will also make the transition from an overwhelmingly Just-in-Case supply chain to Just-in-Time, another common practice in the commercial world.

We wish to reinforce RMN’s reputation as a trusted organization through good governance. To achieve this goal, we designed measures in the RMN #15to5 Transformation Programme based on the following 4 principles: a. Focus on delivering better results based on stakeholder expectations. b. An emphasis on collaborative approach. c. Adopt medium to long term perspectives, and d. Be transparent in our enterprise processes.


ROYAL MALAYSIAN NAVY

#15TO5 TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME

b. Collaborate and leverage on our partner’s capability. We recognise and value our partners. The cooperative relationship between the RMN as an organisation or as part of the MAF/Ministry of Defence with other organisations designed to achieve mutually beneficial goals is an important multiplier to our effort in transforming the Navy. Carefully managed collaboration allows for synergy, reduced cost and produces better results. Our international partners have over the years helped develop our capacity and we are reciprocating in areas that we are good at. At a regional level, the Malacca Straits Patrol and the Tri-lateral Cooperative Arrangement has proven to be instrumental in reducing security risks to their respective geographical areas. At an organisational level, our recent collaboration with local universities will see our partners offering MBAs to our people at a much reduced cost and time frame. We plan to expand our network of partners that will allow us to leverage on each other’s competitive edge, particularly in enhancing our conversion capacity, Maritime Domain Awareness, professional training, education and the welfare of our people and veterans. c. Right-size the Navy.

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To ensure that we are doing the right thing is to measure our performance and minimize risks, therefore, enhancing our audit mechanisms is a must. Inspections, Operational Readiness Evaluations and various form of audits will be strengthened and we will strive to ensure the highest possible standards of compliance. e. Pay particular attention to resource-informed planning process. Like every other government agency, the Navy too is facing growing emphasis on expanding transparency and accountability in the use of public funds. We welcome this as it is a positive trend that indicates we are moving towards a more responsible society. In line with government aspirations and policies, RMN will make a transition to Outcome Based Budgeting (OBB). It is a comprehensive mechanism that translates planning into results through effective policy and programme implementation using public funds. By focusing on outcomes, planning, budgeting, implementation, monitoring and evaluation, resource allocations will be optimised and integrated properly into an efficient system. Under this system, we will pay particular attention to detailed planning with the requisite horizontal and vertical linkages that contribute to shared or common outcomes.

The Fleet #15to5 Transformation Programme entails a significant leap in our qualitative and quantitative strength. Despite these enhancements and provided that we stay true to plan, our projections indicate that there is no necessity to request additional personnel. We plan to achieve this by leveraging on technology. Our incoming vessels will be designed with higher levels of automation. This means that we will have an equivalent or more capable number of vessels but with a reduced crew. That translates into 20% to 45% reduction in personnel requirements from vessels with equivalent capabilities that they are replacing. Additionally, we will consolidate offices and programmes, eliminate redundant functions and make careful transitions between vessels that are being phased out and those entering the service. We have also just crossed the threshold of the first major reorganization in RMN’s history that has resulted in the creation of 2 fleets. Both Eastern and Western Fleets will be able to provide better services within their respective geographical areas and advance our national interests more effectively.

RMN ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE

CHIEF OF NAVY

DEPUTY CHIEF OF NAVY

NAVY HEADQUARTERS

d. Be at the forefront of best practices, good governance, and fostering innovation and compliance. Best practices can be defined as a set of guidelines, ethics or ideas that have been generally accepted as superior to alternative standards as it represents the most efficient or prudent course of action that will deliver superior results. To do so, we will continue to benchmark ourselves and learn from those better than us. At the same time, we must also foster the culture of good governance, innovation and creativity. Other than good governance and having highly motivated people within the organization, a strong and successful organization often maintains a strong culture of innovation, one that always asks the question, “how can this be done better?”.

70

WESTERN COMMAND FLEET HEADQUARTERS

SUBMARINE COMMAND HEADQUARTERS

NAVAL EDUCATION & TRAINING COMMAND HEADQUARTERS

NAVAL SPECIAL FORCES COMMAND

NATIONAL HYDROGRAPHIC CENTRE

NAVAL READINESS COMMAND

EASTERN COMMAND FLEET HEADQUARTERS

NAVAL RESERVES HEADQUARTERS


ROYAL MALAYSIAN NAVY

#15TO5 TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME

Balance, Credible & Versatile Armada Current Armada

15 Classes of ships

73

Transform our capability

Averages Age

55

Vessels

44

1 30 2 Years

Vessels

Medium Size Task Group for Military Roles

5 classes of ships and supporting platform

Effective & efficient conduct of Constabulary Roles

Transform force structure and force level

Cater for diplomatic roles Capability and needs driven

PLATFORM THRUST Improve Efficiency Streamline composition of Armada leads to : • Reduce cost • Improve availability • Simplified training • Efficient logistic support “Fit for purpose” Catalyst for National Shipbuilding plan

Addresses challenges of legacy fleet

THE PLATFORM THRUST Our future capability is dependent to a large extent on the types of equipment our Navy operates and the technologies that underpin them. In order to be able to cope with increasing operational demands at an acceptable cost, the RMN will have to develop a different approach from the past. It must, from the onset, consider specialised platforms that are not only capable of defending our nation’s interests in high intensity combat, but also look for platforms that are cost effective in defending our interests in a situation where the use of force is not necessarily required. Such operations typically fall under the constabulary and diplomatic role. Fiscal challenges now drive the Navy to focus on acquiring platforms or equipment that are determined by realistic analysis and actual requirements rather than perceived as “nice to have” as practiced before. Our answer to this is the Fleet #15to5 Transformation Programme, which in a nutshell is a plan to consolidate the composition of our Armada from 15 classes of ships into just 5. The desired end state is the recapitalisation of legacy fleet with a balanced yet versatile future fleet made up of specialised as well as reconfigurable vessels so that RMN will be able to meet both core requirements; to engage in combat operations from or at sea when required and also to meet the increasing demand for other more frequent peacetime role where the navy is able to actively achieve tasks economically without employing expensive combat capabilities. Transforming the Armada is also critical for the following reasons:

Enhance Readiness & Availability

7000

5000 2018

2030

Ship Days at Sea

40%

Reduce >10% losses from IUU and other illicit activities at sea Result in.. • Economic Dividend • Social Dividend • Security & Safety Dividend

The MAHARAJA LELA Class Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) will be the first out of five classes of new vessels under the transformed Armada

72


#15TO5 TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME

75

17 P M

a. Address challenges of legacy fleet

FIC FLEET

1 LCS 2 LMS

2016 -20 20

-2

0

2031-203 5 5 PV 1 Sub 1 MRSS

HELO

UAS

30

AUV MDV

20

2

6 PV 8 LMS SFB

M 5

M

P1

TRAINING HELO ASW HELO ASUW HELO

3

36

04

5 LCS 8 LMS 2 MRSS

20

20 1 PV 4 LCS 1 Sub

55 Platform 12 LCS 18 PV 18 LMS 3 MRSS 4 Submarine

6-

MP16

2 LCS 3 PV

HELO

FIC

MP12

50 -20 46 0 2

P1

3 PV 4 LMS

b. Transform our capability The Fleet #15to5 Transformation Programme will result in a significant leap in our qualitative and quantitative strength. The number of vessels in our Armada will increase from 44 to 55, a 25% improvement in numerical strength. Total tonnage, on the other hand, is estimated to almost double from the current level by 2030. Upon completion of the transformation programme by 2050, it is envisaged that the RMN will be able to deploy a small-medium sized task group as and when required, while the lesser capability but more cost effective vessels will be dispersed throughout Malaysian waters in support of more benign functions. The combatant role will be assigned to ships from the 12 LCS (Guided Missile Frigates), 4 submarines (SSK), 3 MRSS (Landing Platform Helicopter/Dock) with supporting elements from enhanced capability NGPV (with the flexibility to upgrade the NGPV to Corvettes – FSG). The constabulary functions and other peacetime roles on the other hand will be assumed primarily by 12 NGPV and the more versatile 18 LMS (Large Patrol Craft).

MDA HELO

HELO

1-2025 202

The legacy fleet faces increasing challenges to meet our operational objectives. Currently the Armada comprises 15 classes of ships that include frigates, submarines, corvettes, strike craft, support and auxiliary platforms. These ships were built in 7 different countries by various shipyards. Today, not only are they ageing and facing various obsolescence issues, they also represent a mismatch between inventory and actual needs. These vessels were built in a different era and were meant for purposes relevant at that time. Increasing number of breakdowns coupled with declining reliability has affected their overall readiness and capabilities. The single biggest contributing factor to this unwelcome trend is the age of the vessels within the Armada. Today, it averages at 30.1 years – double the age of most modern navies such as the United States which averages out at about 15 years old.

MP 11

SUPPORTING/ ORGANIC ELEMENT

2041-20 45

ROYAL MALAYSIAN NAVY

USV

FIC

c. Enhance readiness and availability; as a result contributes to national economy Enhancing readiness and availability will help RMN contribute to the national economy. With the new Armada, we will be able to deploy more vessels on operations to protect our interests at sea. Presently, approximately 5000 Ships Days at Sea are required annually for operational tasking, exercises and various contingencies. Despite the same number of vessels from today (44 platforms), by 2030 we foresee increasing Ships Days at Sea to over 7000 – a 40% increase from the present level. This will be possible because of better availability afforded by newer vessels in the future Armada. The increase in Ships Days at Sea also means we will have a more visible presence at sea and as a consequence reduce the RM6 Billion yearly national losses from unreported, unregulated and illegal (IUU) fishing, RM4 Billion from smuggling and other illicit activities at sea, help preserve our marine ecosystems, instill confidence among the maritime community, deter potential aggressors and criminals, respond to contingencies faster and provide us with more opportunities to train our people. Monetizing just 10% of those losses means Malaysia would have been able to build 25 additional schools and hospitals each year.

74

M P14 Planned aquisition from Malaysia Plan (MP) 11 to 17

d. Improve efficiency Apart from escalating maintenance costs, ships forming the legacy fleet pose significant challenges to logistics and training. Studies show that streamlining the composition of the fleet will significantly reduce costs, improve availability and simplify training. A challenging fiscal environment also dictates that RMN put a laser sharp focus not only on the initial acquisition cost, but also the life cost of ownership. With the Fleet #15to5 Transformation programme, RMN will be able to achieve long term savings and reduce initial acquisition costs through the implementation of concepts such as “fit for purpose”, modularity, relevancy and close collaboration with our industrial partners with a long term financing structure backed by the government.


ROYAL MALAYSIAN NAVY

#15TO5 TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME

77

FLEET #15TO5 TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME CURRENT RMN FLEET CLASS

FUTURE RMN FLEET CLASS

15

New Generation Patrol Vessel -6-

5

Multi Purpose Command Support Ship -2-

rt uppo S e l Ro 3Multi

Ship

Corvette -4-

Fast Attack Craft (Missile) 1 -4-

Littoral Combat Ship -6 Under Construction-

Frigate -2Fast Attack Craft (Missile) 2 -4-

t omba C l a r Litto -12-

Auxillary Ship -2-

Fast Attack Craft (Gun) -6Hydrography Ship -2-

rine

Corvette -2-

on Missi l a r o Litt -18-

Ship

a Subm4-

Mine Counter Measure Vessel -4-

Patrol Craft -2-

76

Training Ship -1-

Ship

Submarine -2-

Ne

l Vesse l o r t a tion P a r e n -18w Ge


ROYAL MALAYSIAN NAVY

#15TO5 TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME

79

RMN #15TO5 TRANSFORMATION GOALS

CREDIBLE

85% average state of readiness

SHIPS NAVY by year 2050

in readiness, inspection and administrative auditss

THRUST

PEOPLE

PROCESS

PLATFORM

78

OBJECTIVES

1 2 3

Enhance RMN performance through development of human capital

Maximise return on investment from spending and increase efficiencies in enterprise process across all commands, formations and units

Maximise Armada readiness, sustainability, fighting capacity and contribution to joint force through optimum mix of capabilities

RELEVANT

RMN #15to5 Transformation Programme is crafted to accomplish our vision for the future. To do so, specific Goals, Objectives and Key Strategies that took into account current capability gaps, available resources and alignment of efforts is imperative. These goals are important because it provides a sense of purposes of what the Navy wanted to achieve in its journey towards vision of the future, facilitate planning at various levels, motivate and inspire #NavyPeople as well as help the Navy control and evaluate our performance and progress. These goals are supported by strategies and projects that are specific, measurable, achievable, relevant to the vision and time-bound. They serve as the guiding principles or the “initiating directives” for various process owners to develop their projects.

85% Score 4.5 or more in Maritime increased in ship of headquarters/units Security Index inspected score 5 stars days at sea

VERSATILE

KEY STRATEGIES

1 2 3 4 5 6

Re-align training, doctrine and #NavyPeople professional development based on the needs of future Armada and how we plan to operate Escalate propagation of positive values and ethics that results in #NavyPeople of character who execute their responsibility with strong sense of accountability, integrity and professionalism consistent with core values and military ethos Attract, develop and retain diverse pool of highly trained, motivated and talented people by increasing investment in selective recruiting and development of human capital while cultivating the culture of “#NavyPeople first” Prioritise affordability and resource informed planning in every aspect of acquisition process. Right sizing the navy, Fit for Purpose, Cradle to Grave and Integrated/Comprehensive Management concept will be our guiding principles Restructure and reduce size of staff in Support HQ, eliminate tiers of management and functions that provide little or no added value and consolidate overlapping or duplicative process. At the same time enhance utilisation of our reservists Acquire, organize, operate and maintain a balanced and agile navy comprises of specialised and reconfigurable assets designed to meet existing as well as future needs


#15TO5 TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME

ROYAL MALAYSIAN NAVY

PAC CONOPS N3

81

O C P R

MARINE GEOSPATIAL 2030 NHC

RMN DIGITAL ORGANIZATION N6

RMN e-LOG SYS N4-1

NAVY ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY & HEALTH (NESH) N10

THRUSTING THE FLEET N4-2

CREDIBLE VERSATILE RELEVANT

E

FLEET TRANFORMATION PROGRAMME N5

S S

P

L

E

INTEGRATED OPERATIONAL INTELLIGENCE CENTER N2

P L A T F O R M

RMN #15TO5 TRANSFORMATION MAP HORIZON 1 : 2018-2030 (T-MAP 18-30)

80

JAN 18

Strategising • Formulate Goals & Strategy • Communicate

• Initiatives & Projects • Resource

APR 18

• Execute Initiatives/Projects • Focus, discipline, adjustments • Evaluate progress, impact • Measure, Align, Resource,

APR 24 Sustainment

PLAN PROPELLERS N1-1

O

• Establish Vision for the future • Buy in

Implementation ASSETS DISPOSSAL MANAGEMENT N4-1

PLAN RUDDERS N1-1

E

• Identify Gaps

PLAN POLARIS NETC

T-RESERVIST N8

P

APR 17

Visioning

NAVY CARE N1-2

CIS-T N6

PHASES OF RMN #15to5 TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME HORIZON 1

• Re-evaluate Initiatives/Projects • Review strategies • Keep momentum • Show results

APR 30


ROYAL MALAYSIAN NAVY

#15TO5 TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME

83

82

PROPOSED PROJECTS

LEGACY/CURRENT CHALLENGES

EXPECTED OUTCOME

IN WHAT WAY DOES IT SUPPORT #15TO5 TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME?

HR-Plan People RUDDERS

Transforming Human Resource Management into one that is focussed on a merit system, talent management, recognising high performers and selective recruiting in order to produce effective military officers and leaders of quality. A revised performance assessment system and a Class Management approach will also be adopted as the basis for career development to meet future requirements.

1. Develop new career structure. (Jun 2018-Jun 2019) 2. Create career Development and Planning. (May 2018-May 2020) 3. Review and change existing HR policy. (Mar 2018-Mar 2019) 4. Establish RMN Information Automation System (RMNIAS). (Jan 2019-Jan 2023) 5. Review training principles and priorities. (Jul 2018-Jul 2021) 6. Establish Squadron Commander type Organization. (Jan 2019-Jan 2025) 7. Establish Rehabilitation & Motivation programme. (Apr 2020-Apr 2028) 8. Transformational Leadership Institution. (Jan 2019-Jan 2030) 9. Empowering Warrant Officer. (Apr 2018-Apr 2020) 10. Revise recruitment policy. (May 2018-May 2020).

1. Competency-Improve qualifications, skills & experiences. 2. Leadership-Systematic approach to succession planning, leaders of characters. 3. Values- Propagation of core values and military ethos. 4. HumanwareStrengthen class management. 5. Humanware, DoctrinesInstitutionalised knowledge and experience.

1. Officers with character, excellent leadership quality, motivated and ethical. 2. Matching international/ modern navy standard. 3. Potential public sector leaders and captains of industry. 4. 100% with tertiary education from diverse fields of studies. 20% with Master degree or PhD.

Effective and innovative leadership will be the mainstay of future navy. These leaders are expected to not only lead the Navy, but also steer it to become an effective fighting force that contributes to the security and development of the country.

HR-Plan People PROPELLERS

Shift in Other Ranks HRM toward a system that focused on the principle of Suitability, Qualification and Experience with Potential (SQEP). More emphasis will be given on qualification based system for career progression. Similarly, appropriate recognition will be provided to high performing individuals.

1. Reassessment of existing HR capacity and policy. (Feb 2018-Dec 2018) 2. Identification of suitable talent. (Feb 2018-Apr 2019) 3. Device and employ cradle to grave career planning. (Feb 2018-Jan 2023) 4. Promulgate new career structures. (Jun 2018-Jun 2019) 5. Review training principles and priorities. (Jan 2018-Jan 2020) 6. New career development plan. (Feb 2018-Jul 2020) 7. Revise Billets Pre-Requisite. (Feb 2018-Jan 2020) 8. Incorporate new HR policy into BR. (Feb 2018-Jan 2020) 9. Incentivise and empower high performers. (Feb 2020-Jan 2025)

1. Competency-Improve qualification, skills & experiences. 2. Leadership-Improve leadership qualities among other ranks. 3. Values- Propagation of core values and military ethos. 4. Humanware-Enhance compliance to billet prerequisite. 5. Humanware, DoctrinesInstitutionalised knowledge and experience.

1. Personnel that is safe, proficient, motivated and ethical. 2. Matching international/ modern navy standard. 3. Right man for the right job. 4. Increase pool of Subject Matter Expert. 5. 25% Other Ranks with tertiary education. (diploma and above)

Safe, proficient and motivated personnel will be a pre-requisite to man future navy. Correct skill set will be the pre-requisite to optimise the capability of future assets.

*Per first round of consultation Mac - April 18. Subject to review.

TIMELINE

INITIATIVE DESCRIPTION

PROCESS OWNER

DEPENDENT/ IMPACTED INITIATIVE

2018-2030

N1-1 TRANSFORMATION INITIATIVE DESCRIPTION

INITIATIVE MAIN NAME THRUST

N1-1 (Assistant Chief of Staff (ACoS) Human Resource)

NETC

2018-2025

* TRANSFORMATION INITIATIVE DESCRIPTION

N1-1 (ACoS Human Resource)

N4-1 N4-2 NETC


#15TO5 TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME LEGACY/CURRENT CHALLENGES

EXPECTED OUTCOME

IN WHAT WAY DOES IT SUPPORT #15TO5 TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME?

Navy Care People

Taking better care of #NavyPeople on our own and in collaboration with our partners by adopting ‘Cradle to Grave’ concept. Standardise #NavyPeople-centric programme in all bases will be institutionalised. Enhance engagement with Veterans. Disposition and chain of command for provost and legal profession will be rationalised to have better deal in legal, security and disciplinary matters.

1. Establish Navy Care Centre.(2018-2024) 2. Family Smart Programme.(2018-2020) 3. Health Enrichment Programme. (2018-2022) 4. Ahoy Veteran - Veteran’s Programme. (2018-2022) 5. Engagement with civillian agencies (secondment/courses). (2018-2020) 6. Review process related to enforcement and legal matters. (2018-2024)

1. Values-Management welfare and spiritual programmes for the #NavyPeople. 2. Values/HumanwareImprove welfare and discipline through engagement with community. 3. Values- Strengthen relationship between veterans and RMN. 4. OrganisationUnify structure and standardise welfareoriented programmes.

1. Improved welfare and well-being of serving personnel. 2. Improved customer/ stakeholder satisfaction. 3. Reduced breach of military discipline, strengthen integrity and positive values. 4. Improve services to #NavyPeople. 5. Better administration of justice.

Motivated and inspire #NavyPeople will be driven to perform better under any circumstances.

Integrated Platform Operational Intelligence Centre

Acquisition of Geographic Information System (GIS) to support Integrated Intelligence Centre (IIC) in providing real-time information for intelligence component of Common Operation Picture.

1. Procurement of GIS with database capability. (Jan 2018 – Dec 2019) 2. Integrating database into the GIS. (Jan 2019 - Dec 2020) 3. Integration of GIS with related agencies (National Hydrographic Centre and Defence Intelligence Application Centre, Malaysian Remote Sensing Agency). (Sep 2018 – Dec 2020) 4. Development of competent intelligence analyst. (Mar 2018 – Dec 2020) 5. Broad-based intelligence sharing application with operation centre. (Dec 2020 - Dec 2024)

Doctrines-Improve production and disseminate of actionable intelligence for operation. Humanware-Improve competency and employability of personnel. Hardware-Availability of more capable system.

Timely dissemination of N2 actionable intelligence to support safe and effective conduct of maritime operations.

Provide foundation for intelligencedriven maritime operations.

N2 TRANSFORMATION INITIATIVE DESCRIPTION

84

*Per first round of consultation Mac - April 18. Subject to review.

TIMELINE

PROPOSED PROJECTS

PROCESS OWNER

DEPENDENT/ IMPACTED INITIATIVE

2018-2024

INITIATIVE DESCRIPTION

N1-2 TRANSFORMATION INITIATIVE DESCRIPTION

INITIATIVE MAIN NAME THRUST

85

N1-2 (ACoS Administration)

N1-1

2018-2024

ROYAL MALAYSIAN NAVY

N2 (Director of Naval Intelligence)

N1-1 N3 N6 N8


#15TO5 TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME

86

PROPOSED PROJECTS

LEGACY/CURRENT CHALLENGES

EXPECTED OUTCOME

IN WHAT WAY DOES IT SUPPORT #15TO5 TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME?

PAC CONOPS Process (Partnership and Collaboration as Concepts for Future Operations)

Achieving strategic and operational objectives through collaboration with domestic and international partners focusing on Maritime Domain Awareness for effective conduct of Maritime Security Operation. Enhanced capacity to operate within a joint/ combined environment. Elevation of maritime warfare competency will be a key component.

1. Establish Shared Awareness Programme with strategic partnership through MOU with following agencies (Jan 2019-Jan 2022): a. Marine Dept (Coastal AIS – VTMS) b. Fishery Dept (FISH.com – VMS) c. IMB d. PETRONAS Bhd, O&G Co e. MISC f. MASA 2. Establish effective collaboration with various Centre of Excellence domestically and internationally (Jan 2019-Jan 2022): a. Domestic-IDFR, NDUM, MIMA, ISIS, ICRC, INTAN b. International-US Naval War College, SPC 3. Enhance our reputation in international forum (Sep 2018-Sep 2022): a. Increase N2NT from 13 to 19. b. Gain IONS full membership. 4. Increase the effectiveness of Warfighting Competency through professional training development (Jan 2019-Jan 2023): a. Training roadmap align with #15to5. b. Way forward of doing exercise internally -PW, BW, TW, OSTEX, Keris Mas 5. Increase effectiveness of Multilateral Operation-MSP, TMP. (Jun 2018-Jun 2023) 6. Participate in the MSTF UN deployment. (Jan 2019-Jan 2023)

1. Doctrines/Organisation - Strengthen cooperations among agencies domestically and internationally. 2. Organisation/Leadership - Increase strategic engagement and increase opportunity for RMN in international leadership position. 3. Humanware/Competency - Enhance competency and knowldge to match international standard. 4. Doctrines/Organisation Boost information sharing.

1. A trusted partner and dependable agency domestically and internationally with regards to the conduct of MSO and management of maritime disputes. 2. Sustain, effective and timely response to any maritime related security issues. 3. Significant increase in Warfighting Capacity enabling optimisation of Future Fleet capability.

Collaboration and partnership wil provide RMN with access to much needed information to support MSO and build our capacity in cost effective manner.

RMN E-Log Sys

Transition from 80:20 to 20:80 ratio between Just in Case (JIC) and Just in Time (JIT) through comprehensive contracting reform, establishment of modern and effective supply chain system by eliminating archaic and duplicating process, maximising the use of digital infrastructure and rationalising/minimising existing stores and it’s inventory.

1. Develop Integrated Logistics System between RMN and Vendors (Vendor Management System). 2. Develop effective Strategic Partnership with industries and agencies. 3. Digitalizing demand, order, delivery, payment and monitoring system. 4. Review/rationalise point to point work process flow/work process. 5. Develop Smart Contracting.

1. Infrastructure - Integration 1. Lean but responsive of inventory system with other N4-1 logistics stores in RMN and vendors. organisation with 2. Infrastructure - Excess of 24/7 accessibility stocks held in stores. that meet customers 3. Values - Strengthen control satisfaction. mechanism and safeguard 2. End to end visibility against risk of misappropriation. of Supply Chain 4. Doctrines-Modern and Management (SCM). digitalisation documentation 3. Enhance process of minimise processing stakeholders lead time. satisfaction through 5. Infrastructure - Better access efficient SCM to system and records retrieval. system.

Process

*Per first round of consultation Mac - April 18. Subject to review.

Efficient and effective service delivery in order to meet the fleet and base demand for supply services.

TIMELINE

INITIATIVE DESCRIPTION

PROCESS OWNER

DEPENDENT/ IMPACTED INITIATIVE

2018-2023

N4-1 TRANSFORMATION INITIATIVE DESCRIPTION

N3 TRANSFORMATION INITIATIVE DESCRIPTION

INITIATIVE MAIN NAME THRUST

87

N3 (ACoS Operations and Exercise)

N1 N2 N4 N5 N6 N7 N8 HYD

2018-2024

ROYAL MALAYSIAN NAVY

N4-1 (ACoS Materiel)

N3 N4-2 N5 N8 HYD NETC


#15TO5 TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME PROPOSED PROJECTS

LEGACY/CURRENT CHALLENGES

EXPECTED OUTCOME

IN WHAT WAY DOES IT SUPPORT #15TO5 TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME?

Assets Disposal Management

Platform

Transform assets phasing out and disposal process focusing on minimising time and cost while ensuring a systematic and seamless transition between phasing out and phasing in of platform.

1. Phasing Out of Hydrographic Survey vessel. (Apr 2018 & 2022) 2. Phasing Out of HANG TUAH. (Apr 18) 3. Phasing Out of Corvette 24. (2019 - 2020) 4. Phasing Out of MCMV 26. (2019 - 2021) 5. Phasing Out of MPCSS 31. (2020 & 2023) 6. Phasing Out of FTV, PC & FAC. (2021 - 2027)

1. Harware - Duration required to dispose assets and associated costs. 2. Doctrines - Efficiencies in disposal process.

Timely fleet recapitalisation and transition to minimise loss of operational time and financial resource and associated with assets disposal.

Optimising scarce resource and promote efficiency savings.

Thrusting the Fleet

Process

Transitioning from legacy maintenance philosophy to Reliability Centred Maintenance (RCM) oriented philosophy coupled with transformation in collaboration/ engagement with industrial partners and technical expertise to address readiness challenges due to nonperformance and inefficient spending.

1. Packaged refit. (Jan 2018 -Jan 2019 and onwards) 2. Commonality without monopoly for fleet equipment/system. (Jan 2019 -Dec 2030) 3. Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM). (Jan 2019 -Dec 2022 and onwards) 4. Establishment of RMN Centre of Excellence for Maritime Engineering (RMN CME). (Jan 2018 - Dec 2024) a. Empowering Class management, Configuration/Obsolescence Management, Technical Seaworthiness. b. Set up Naval Research Lab. c. Develop/Restructure SMEs. 5. Augmenting workshop facilities. (Jan 2018- Dec 2024) 6. Adopting Smart Contracting approach. (Aug 2018-Dec 2021) - Dedicated Contract; Performance based for high value assets; Contract for Availability (CFA) for vital equipment; and Panel Contract for auxiliary equipment. 7 Establish and utilise Maritime Working Group-Towards self-reliance. (Jan 2018Dec 2022)

1. Humanware/ Infrastructure - Improve number of competent personnel, machines and facilities in supporting fleet’s needs. 2. Doctrines- Application of modern maintenance strategies with highperformance and efficient spending. 3. Doctrines/Organisation - Meeting seaworthiness assurance in conducting designated missions and operations. 4. Doctrines/ Infrastructure Innovative engineering environment. 5. Organisation/ Infrastructure Dedicated establishment for centre of excellence.

1. A pool of expertise/ SMEs with sufficient facilities in related/ establishments to provide engineering services, function, support, researches and innovations. 2. Implementation of an effective and efficient maintenance strategy. 3. Strengthening Class Management, Configuration Management and Technical Seaworthiness. 4. Contribute to efficiency savings. 5. Meaningful collaborations with related academic institutions and local industries in ensuring through life support of the fleet.

Optimising scarce resource and promote efficiency savings to better support the Armada.

88

*Per first round of consultation Mac - April 18. Subject to review.

TIMELINE

INITIATIVE DESCRIPTION

PROCESS OWNER

DEPENDENT/ IMPACTED INITIATIVE

2018-2027

MAIN THRUST

N4-1 (ACoS Materiel)

N4-2 N5

2018 - 2030

INITIATIVE NAME

N4-1 TRANSFORMATION INITIATIVE DESCRIPTION

89

N4-2 TRANSFORMATION INITIATIVE DESCRIPTION

ROYAL MALAYSIAN NAVY

N4 -2 (ACoS Engineering)

N3 N4-1 N5 NETC


#15TO5 TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME

Platform

CIS-T Process (Communication And Information System Transfiguration)

90

PROPOSED PROJECTS

LEGACY/CURRENT CHALLENGES

EXPECTED OUTCOME

IN WHAT WAY DOES IT SUPPORT #15TO5 TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME?

Recapitalise Armada with specialised and reconfigurable platform through affordable and innovative financing packages in collaboration with industry partner’s Naval Shipbuilding Master Plan to meet future maritime security challenges. Modern, fit for purpose infrastructure will be established to ensure safe, effective and efficient support of future platforms and capabilities.

1. 2. 3. 4.

1. Hardware - Enhance readiness and availability. 2. Hardware/ Infrastructure Control over cost and obsolescence. 3. Infrastructure - Improve as effectiveness to support the need of future Armada.

1. RMN to operate 41 out of 55 ships under 25 years old by 2030 (from 17% ships under 25 years old currently to 75% ships under 25 years old/”New Ship” in 2030). 2. Infra development aligned to and in support of RMN future need.

Anchor initiative of the RMN #15TO5 Transformation Programme.

Significant enhancement of CIS that provides the chain of command with complete, timely and unified situational awareness. Future network will include capability for seamless integration of legacy systems, scalable and ability for independent operations. Transformation of PPE TLDM and EW related specialisation will be key component to strengthening RMN EW capability.

1. Establish ‘Hybrid Communication Station’ that is capable of transmitting and receiving all band (voice and data). (2020-2025) 2. Transform existing analog radio to IP Based Radio. (2018-2023) 3. Integrate RMN communication network with SATCOM. (2017-2027) 4. Optimise the ‘Crypto Centric’ technologies into a secured security transmission. (2018-2022) 5. Utilize Tac-Mesh Technology for tactical communication (Smart Sailor). (2018-2024) 6. Enhance EW Data Fusion Centre (PPE TLDM). (2019-2025) 7. Elevate the efficiency and competency of human capital. (2018-2030)

5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

EC endorsement. (Feb 2018) RMN Blue Plan. (Jan 2019) Naval Shipbuilding Master Plan. (Jan 2019) Signing of #15to5 Phase 1 - LOI/LOA (Apr 2019) Delivery of LCS Batch 1. (2020 - 2023) Delivery of LMS Batch 1 (2019 - 2021) Delivery of MRSS 1 to 2. (2021 - 2026) Delivery of PV Batch 2 (2025 - 2030) Delivery of LMS 5 to 18. (2022 - 2030)

*Per first round of consultation Mac - April 18. Subject to review.

1. Hardware/ 1. A reliable networked Infrastructure CIS that is able to Manage obsolescence function as effective of communication tools for decision equipment and facilities. making throughout 2. Doctrines/Hardware RMN, Joint and – Ability of legacy friendly forces chain system to adapt to of command. future communication 2. Transition from network. mostly voice 3. Doctrines/ to secure data Organisation – as means of Cooperative working communication. environment. 3. Enhance PPE TLDM 4. Hardware/Doctrines capability into a - Modernisation of EW centre that is able to equipment in processing be networked with EW data. sisters service EW 5. Humanware/ Centres with the Competency – ability to provide Enhance efficiency and actionable input to competency in human operational assets. capital.

Provide effective and seamless communication.

TIMELINE

Fleet Transformation Programme

INITIATIVE DESCRIPTION

PROCESS OWNER

DEPENDENT/ IMPACTED INITIATIVE

2018 - 2030

N6 TRANSFORMATION INITIATIVE DESCRIPTION

N5 TRANSFORMATION INITIATIVE DESCRIPTION

INITIATIVE MAIN NAME THRUST

91

N5 (ACoS Plan Development)

N3 N4-1 N4-2

2018-2030

ROYAL MALAYSIAN NAVY

N6 (Director of Communication and Information System)

N2 N3 N4-1 N5 NETC


#15TO5 TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME PROPOSED PROJECTS

LEGACY/CURRENT CHALLENGES

EXPECTED OUTCOME

IN WHAT WAY DOES IT SUPPORT #15TO5 TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME?

Adaptation of latest technology landscape to transform and change existing practices and culture into a secured digitalised working environment with high level of ICT literate naval personnel to meet future technology challenges.

1. Develop a total security solution. (2019-2025) 2. Converge IT network through trusted. SATCOM. (2018-2027) 3. Integrate RMN information (IMS) systems and work processes. (2018-2025) 4. Change to latest ICT equipment and system. (2018-2030) 5. Expand digital storage capability using Big Data Technology. (2018-2025) 6. Merge RMN Data Centre (2018-2021) 7. Utilize Internet of Things (IOT) Capabilities for RMN smart bases. (2018-2027) 8. Elevate efficiency and competency of human capital. (2018-2030)

1. Doctrines/Infrastructures – Ensuring integrity Secured System. 2. Doctrines/Infrastructures/ Hardware – Managing segregation of system and communication network. 3. Hardware/Infrastructures – Manage obsolescence of existing technology and equipment. 4. Infrastructures/Hardware – Manage cost due to multiple IT maintenance contracts. 5. Doctrines/Organisation – Cooperative working culture. 6. Humanware/Competency – Improved efficient and competent human capital.

1. Fully integrated system with reliable ICT equipment. 2. Reliable network connectivity that drives and enable transition toward digital organisation. 3. Secured information and security system.

Provide an effective and productive digital environment within the organisation.

Capitalise diverse and dynamic capability of reservists to complement/augment RMN’s strength in order to address existing/potential gaps. Enhancement of reservist human capital management policy, restructuring of reservist training and engaging in smart partnership will be a key component of this programme.

1. Develop MyPSSTLDM Website & Mobile application. (Jan - Apr 2018) 2. Establishing Centralised Administration & Management. (Jan 2018 - Jan 2019) 3. Develop BiDAS & MEPS Systems. (Jan 2018 - Jul 2019) 4. Restructure RMN Reserve Force. (Jan 2018 - Dec 2020) 5. Develop HRMIS & BPR System. (Mar 2018 - Jun 2019) 6. Restructure Training. (Mar 2018 - May 2020) 7. Produce Reservist Training Doctrine. (Jan 2019 - Aug 2020) 8. Optimise Reservist Contributions. (Jun 2018 - Dec 2019) 9. E-Learning. (Mar 2019 - Jan 2021) 10. Establish Specialised Units. (Kumpulan Pakar). (Jan 2020 - Dec 2022)

1. Humanware/Competency/ Organisation - Augment/ compliment regular forces. 2. Leadership/OrganisationAccess to specialised field of expertise which is not available in MAF. 3. Organisation/Humanware - More access to operation and logistic support for specific maritime fields when operating away from home ports.

1. Ready pool of competent & highly motivated reservist to complement/ augment RMN’s strength for up to Level 3 competency. 2. A small pool of highly qualified and specialised prominent individuals that contribute in niche areas to RMN development. 3. Specialised Units from specific maritime fields established in strategic locations ready to support RMN operational and logistical need.

The provision of relevant, focused and competent Reserve Force throughout the country which will be able to support the roles and functions of RMN during war and peace time.

*Per first round of consultation Mac - April 18. Subject to review.

TIMELINE

Transformed People Reservist (T-Reservist)

92

Process

INITIATIVE DESCRIPTION

PROCESS OWNER

DEPENDENT/ IMPACTED INITIATIVE

2018 - 2030

N6 TRANSFORMATION INITIATIVE DESCRIPTION

RMN Digital Organisation

N8 TRANSFORMATION INITIATIVE DESCRIPTION

INITIATIVE MAIN NAME THRUST

93

N6 (Director of Communication and Information System)

N2 N3 N4 N5 NETC

2018-2022

ROYAL MALAYSIAN NAVY

N8 N1-1 (Director of N3 Naval Reserves) NETC


#15TO5 TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME

Process

Plan POLARIS - People Human Capital Development (HCD) Transformation Programme

94

PROPOSED PROJECTS

LEGACY/CURRENT CHALLENGES

EXPECTED OUTCOME

IN WHAT WAY DOES IT SUPPORT #15TO5 TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME?

Transforming navy work culture to inculcate understanding, analysing and addressing risks in order to ensure the health and safety of workforce via implementation of risk management. Attention will be given to sustainable environment by implementing Green Navy initiative. Significant additional effort will be put into strengthening audit capacity in order to ensure compliance.

1. Developing and implementing RMN Risk Management Plan. (Jan 2019 - Dec 2018) 2. Implementing RMN OHS Plan. (Jan 2019) 3. Implementing Low Carbon City Framework Pilot Project. (Jun 2018 - Jan 2020) 4. Low Carbon RMN Naval Base. (Jan 2020 - Jan 2022) 5. Executing Green Ship Plan (Jan 2021) 6. NESH Strategic Partnership Programme. (Jan 2019) 7. Review and strengthen audit mechanism. (Jan 2019 – Jan 2021)

1. Doctrines - Increase awareness in safety practices, prevent damages and defects from negligence and reduce degradation of environment caused by operational activities. 2. Humanware/Competency - Moving toward culture of excellence and compliance. 3. Values - Minimise wastage of resources. 4. Values – Strengthen integrity and accountability.

1. Reduced workplace injuries and death. 2. Reduced healthcare cost. 3. Reduced risk of fines and litigation 4. Increased productivity and staff morale. 5. Improved energy efficiency. 6. Reduced carbon emission. 7. Promote culture of compliance. innovativeness, adherence to core value and military ethos.

The risk management framework will minimise harm to #NavyPeople and damage/defects which will affect readiness. Green Navy initiatives will support sustainable environment. Instil integrity and compliance to support core values.

Design new training approach that is class managementoriented. Extensive utilisation of e-Learning will be made as part of future training process. Qualification-based PJT will also be introduced.

1. Reformulation of training syllabus. (Jan 2019 - Jan 2021) 2. Introduce new training methodology to increase knowledge retention. (Jan 2019 - Jan 2022) 3. New training package centred on behavioural development geared promoting towards core value and military ethos. (Jan 2019 - Jan 2022) 4. Training Authority Review focusing on decentralising training authority. (Mac 2019 - Sep 2019) 5. Reengineer NETC and training units business model. (Jun 2019 - Jun 2021) 6. Shifting existing formal training method to ICT based with the ratio of 40:60 focusing on e-Learning. (Jan 2019 - Jan 2021)

1. Doctrines/Organisation 1. Establishment – Improve effectiveness of effective and and efficiency of training efficient training delivery. system which is 2. Competency – Producing geared toward skill set that meets the needs of the needs of RMN and future future. Armada. 2. Proficiency 3. Humanware/Value – #NavyPeople Adherence to core value and with the ability military ethos. to effectively administer, operate and maintain future Armada. 3. Foster culture of IT literacy and technical proficiency.

1. Providing training system that support the requirement of the future. 2. Produce human capital with the skill set.

*Per first round of consultation Mac - April 18. Subject to review.

TIMELINE

Navy Environment, Safety & Health (NESH)

INITIATIVE DESCRIPTION

PROCESS OWNER

DEPENDENT/ IMPACTED INITIATIVE

2018- 2022

NETC TRANSFORMATION INITIATIVE DESCRIPTION

N10 TRANSFORMATION INITIATIVE DESCRIPTION

INITIATIVE MAIN NAME THRUST

95

N10 (Inspector General)

N1-1 N1-2 N3 N4-1 N4-2 NETC

NETC (Commander Naval Education and Training)

N1-1

2018 – 2023 Review and establish 2024 – Implementation

ROYAL MALAYSIAN NAVY


#15TO5 TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME

Marine Geospatial 2050

96

Process

INITIATIVE DESCRIPTION

PROPOSED PROJECTS

LEGACY/CURRENT CHALLENGES

EXPECTED OUTCOME

IN WHAT WAY DOES IT SUPPORT #15TO5 TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME?

Production and translation of Marine Geospatial Data as a key component for maritime operation and security, maritime boundary delimitation, safety of navigation and protection of marine environment.

1. 1st Leasing Ship. (2016 – 2025) 2. 2nd Leasing Ship/National Research Vessel. (2019 – 2030) 3. Procurement of 2 x Survey Launch. (2019 – 2030) 4. Enhance Marine Geospatial Database. (2019 – 2030) 5. Establish RMN Metoc Centre. (2020 – 2022) 6. Enhance Printing Concept. (2020 – 2021) 7. Commercialise Public Domain Product. (2018 – 2030) 8. Realignment with 1Gov Enterprise Architecture. (2020 – 2023) 9. Review feasibility of having NHC directly under MINDEF. (2019) 10. National Charting Plan. (2019-2020) 11. Hydrography Act and Domestic Law. (2020)

1. Doctrines/Hardware – Adequate asset and mechanism of data acquisition to complete Geospatial Marine Database in area of responsibility. 2. Doctrines – Digitalise data sharing and distribution. 3. Organisation – Improve access to exercise authority.

As national authority to ensure effective dissemination and sharing of comprehensive and official Marine Geospatial Data to support the following: a. Maritime operation and security. b. Maritime boundary delimitation. c. Safety of navigation. d. Protection of the marine environment. e. Maritime based national infrastructure development. f. Coastal zone management. g. Marine exploration. h. Marine resource exploitation. i. Coastal disaster management.

To provide high quality and official marine geospatial products and services to support national security, sovereignty and development as well as the human’s wellbeing.

*Per first round of consultation Mac - April 18. Subject to review.

TIMELINE

NHC TRANSFORMATION INITIATIVE DESCRIPTION

INITIATIVE MAIN NAME THRUST

97

PROCESS OWNER

DEPENDENT/ IMPACTED INITIATIVE

2018- 2030

ROYAL MALAYSIAN NAVY

HYD (Director General National Hydrographic Centre)

N3 N5 N6


ROYAL MALAYSIAN NAVY

#15TO5 TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME

99

Pedoman Pelaut Kami adalah pelaut Lautan adalah dunia kami Anak kapal adalah saudara kami Cekap, selamat dan bekerjasama adalah rukun hidup kami Kami adalah Perwira Darah kami darah pahlawan Keberanian, kesetiaan dan kemuliaan jadi pegangan Membelah ombak, mengharung lautan Demi Raja dan negara, nyawa kami pertaruhkan Kami adalah Patriot Bangga berkhidmat Sedia Berkorban! EDITORIAL TEAM AUTHOR ORIGINAL IDEA & CONCEPT ADVISOR CO-AUTHOR/ CHIEF EDITOR

Admiral Tan Sri Ahmad Kamarulzaman bin Haji Ahmad Badaruddin Vice Admiral Datuk Mohd Reza bin Mohd Sany First Admiral Baharudin bin Wan Md Nor

PUBLICATION TEAM First Admiral Ahmad Shafirudin bin Abu Bakar Commander Shahril Amir bin Mohd Mokhtar RMN Commander Mohd Zulkarnain bin Mohd Rawi RMN Commander Shamsul Amery bin Zainuddin RMN Lieutenant Commander Karimah binti Awi RMN Lieutenant Commander Ir. Ahmad Azahari bin Mohmmad RMN Lieutenant Commnder Ir. Lee Juan Jym RMN

CREDIT • Ministry of Defence Malaysia • Ministry of Finance Malaysia • Bank Negara Malaysia • Sea Power Centre - Australia • Defence Governance and Management Team. US DoD • CIMB Bank Berhad

98


ROYAL MALAYSIAN NAVY

#15TO5 TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME

5

RMN #15TO5 AS A BRAND Success of RMN #15TO5 Transformation Programme depends to a large extend on buy in from various stakeholders. In view of this requirements, the leadership of the Navy has decided that stake holder perception must be given special attention. This led to the development of RMN #15TO5 Transformation Programme Branding Strategy. Branding is a long-term plan for the development of a successful product in order to achieve specific goal. A well-defined and executed brand strategy include all aspects of promotion process and is directly connected to perception management. The proliferation of social media in our daily lives has influence how the Navy’s execute its branding strategy. Platforms such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram are used to disseminate information to both internal and external stakeholders with each platform having their own focus in terms of content and strategy. Smart partnerships have also contributed to building the RMN #15TO5 Brand. In January 2018, the RMN has released a limited edition Touch ‘n Go card in collaboration with CIMB Bank and the pre-paid electronic cash card provider. 2018 also saw the Navy being featured on the silver screen with the production of PASKAL: The Movie which premiered in September. The film showcased the Navy’s Special Forces and strategic assets and received very positive response with a total receipts of RM22 million within 18 days of screening – a box office by local film industry standard. The overwhelmingly encouraging response to the movie is not only an endorsement on the smart partnership between the RMN and Asia Tropical Films Sdn Bhd which produce the movie, but carry with it further awareness and support for RMN #15TO5 Transformation Programme.

@tldm_rasmi

4 100

RoyalMalaysianNavy

@tldm_rasmi

Tentera Laut Diraja Malaysia


ROYAL MALAYSIAN NAVY

6

#15TO5 TRANSFORMATION PROGRAMME