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AW2009: World Architecture Workshop, Lianyungang, China

后 滨水城市 次世代的 规划 设计 生活

Post-Waterfront Post-Waterfront City City The planning and design of next generation living The planning and design of next generation living

展覽 Exhibition Staff and Students:

Lianyungang, China, 2009

FACULTY

E

Marco Lavit Nicora Hannah Rowe

Coline Giardi

Yasuaki Kodashima

Zhu Cheng

Cao Xinpei

GROUP

GROUP

A

World Architecture Workshop

Shu yi Even Braenne Olstad Selene Wong

Marie Chapuy

Satoshi Yamada

Zhang Xue

Host organizer LYG city planing bureau

Zhang Lei

NanjinForesty University

Liu Tao

Stuart Harrison

Jan van Schaik


Contributors

Participating Universities

Lianyungang WAW coordinator

ENSAM: l’Ecole Nationale Superieure d’Architecture de Montpellier, France Miyagi University, Japan Nanjing Forestry University, China RMIT Universty, Australia Sanjiang University, China Tohoku Institute of Technology, Japan Tohoku University, Japan

Shu Yi

Teaching Faculty

Supporters

Elodie Nourrigat Gretchen Wilkins Jacques Brion Jan van Schaik Masashige Motoe Paul Minifie Romain Jamot Stuart Harrison Toshikazu Ishida Senhiko Nakata Wu Yibai Yasuaki Onoda Zhang Lei Zhou Lin 4

Assistants Chen Liu Hiroya Uranami Selene Wong Zang Yifan

Australia China Council Exchange Committee, Tohoku University French Ministry of Culture Lianyungang City Planning Bureau RMIT Design Research Institute

Book production Gretchen Wilkins Khai Ling Chan


Contents

World Architecture Workshop: description

07

Teaching Faculty

10

Writings: Towards a Wetland Urbanism

15

Thinking • System • Model

18

Toshikazu Ishida Zhou Lin

About Chinese Architecture

Journey to the West

22

Jan van Schaik

Our Future in All

20

Xiao Song Lee

23

Elodie Nourrigat & Jacques Brion

Workshop participants Urban Pprojects Architectural projects Acknowledgements

26 32 50 72

5


Post-Waterfront City Lianyungang, China

World Architecture Workshop Since 2002 the World Architecture Workshop has operated in cities around the world. This year the workshop is focussed on the urbanism of population bursts in the context of water urbanism in Lianyungang. Seven groups each containing a students from Australia, China, France and Japan have produced projects which address global warming, complexity in the instant city, diversification of traffic systems and the inclusion of salt and fresh water systems as urban design tools in the city. Given China’s current rate of urbanisation the projects go on to propose engagement with primary industries as employment generators for recently relocated populations from rural areas. Massive population increase raises questions of identity for a city. The projects thus treat the histories of the city as building blocks for designing new identities for Lianyungang to guide it through the shifts, growth and iterations of change that its extraordinary ambition will bring.

7


Network

l'Ecole Nationale Su de Montpellier, Franc

8


uperieure d'Architecture ce

Miyagi University, Japan Lianyungang, China Nanjing Forestry University, China

Tohoku University, Japan Tohoku Institute of Technology, Japan

Sanjiang University, China

RMIT University, Australia

9


Faculty

10

Jan van Schaik

is a co-director of Minifie van Schaik Architects and a lecturer and PhD candidate at at RMIT University’s School of Architecture & Design. He is also member of the MCC Creative Spaces Working Group

Stuart Harrison is a practicing architect, lecturer, and broadcaster. He is director of Harrison and White Architects in Melbourne and teaches architecture at RMIT University. He co-hosts ‘The Architects’ on Melbourne RRR radio.

Gretchen Wilkins is a Senior Lecturer at RMIT University in Melbourne, and editor of Distributed Urbanism: Cities After Google Earth (Routledge) and Entropia: Incremental Gestures Towards a Possible Urbanism (WAW 2007).

Jacques Brion is an architect and professor at the National and Superior School of Architecture of Montpellier and director with Elodie Nourrigat of N+B Architectes in Montpellier, France.

Romain Jamot

Elodie

is an architect and teacher at the National and Superior School of Architecture in Montpellier, France

Paul Minifie is an Associate Professor of Architecture at RMIT University and co-director of Minifie van Schaik Architects in Melbourne, whose work includes residential, educational, public and urban projects.

Nourrigat Tohru Horiguchi is an

is an architect, Phd and professor at the National and Supérior School of Architecture in Montpellier. She is director whith Jacques Brion of N+B architectes in Montpellier.

architect and research associate at Tohoku University in Sendai, Japan.


Toshikazu Ishida is a Yasuaki Onoda

Masaghige

professor of architecture at Tohoku University in Sendai, Japan.

is an Associate Professor at IT Communication Lab at Tohoku University in Sendai, Japan. His research and projects focus on the field of spatial design in relation to information technology.

is an architectural planner and professor of architecture at Tohoku University in Sendai, Japan.

Zhou Lin is a lecturer in Yu Architecture at Sanjiang University in Jiangsu Province, China.

Wubai teaches architecture at Sanjiang University in Jiangsu Province, China.

Shu

Motoe Senhiko Nakata is

Yi works for Lianyungang City Planning Bureau in Lianyungang China.

an architect and professor at Miyagi University in Sendai, Japan and

Zhang

Lei teaches architecture at Nanjing Forestry University in Nanjing, China.

11


LIANYUNGANG Post-Waterfront City Design in Future China


Towards a Future Wetland Urbanism Toshikazu Ishida

The economical boom of the last decades and the related escalating development in China is an extraordinary phenomenon, both in scale of urban development and the concerns regarding habitable space expansion. The waterfront and surrounding wetland of the Yangtze river delta in Jiangsu province, one of the largest and main vein for the transportation throughout the country, shows distinctive examples in these regards. Along its shores there are several population five-million-and-over cities such as Suzhou, Wuxi, Nantong, Taizhou, Yangzhou and Nanjing. Together with Shanghai of 20 million people, these belts hold approximately 10% or over a billion population of the country within a relatively compact area of 150km by 300km. From the Yangtze River mouth to Nanjing has been the center of power, growth and consumption in China, however the impact of water environmental issues these cities generate affects the rest of China’s territory simultaneously. Despite the rapid and vast evolution in the region, water environmental issues such as water over-consumption and pollution have become growing and controversial social concerns throughout China together with CO2 emission control, a sharp contrast to the previous growth generated by industrial expansion. In other words the area could provide the potential profile of wetland urbanism in the future China including carbon-neutral strategies, flood resilient habitable land and amphibious living designed to address ecological and global warming concerns. Positioned within these issues, WAW 2009 focused on the Yangtze river delta region, where water issues and waterfront design are crucial concerns for design of the built environment. Strategies were based on carbon neutral wetland urbanism in the Jiangsu region, more specifically focusing on the provincial northern port city of Lianyungang, a unique example where Historical Heritage and contemporary rapid developments intersect as a future melting spot. Unlike the provincial capital city of Nanjing and largest metropolitan region of Shanghai, Lianyungang is a relatively smaller scale provincial northern port city in Jiangsu with population of 700,000. However Haizhou, the former city name of Lianyungang, is one of the four ports opened in the 17th century as a node of international commerce in the Qing Dynasty, and has a long history as a trading port in the Eastern China Seafront since ancient times. 15


Currently Lianyungang is developing as a container terminal and distribution port connected with NECB : New Eurasian Continental Bridge as an Eastern gate going westward to its terminal at the Rotterdam Europort in the Netherlands. The China Government has clearly stated its intention to build an economic belt along this NECB in the 9th Five-year plan of National Economy and Social Development and Long-range Goal for the year 2010 and on the China’ s 21st century agenda. The significance of this vision could be summarized as a shift from development along the eastern coastal area to evolution of an inland axis. The recent rapid growth in China is needless to say concentrating not in the inland but mostly in the seafront coastal cities, such as Hong Kong, Shanghai, Macau and Qingdao. The former western settlement city became the front port of international trading activities in the 20th century eventually has led serious disparities in current economic power. In contrast to the coastal wing development, future evolution of the inland spine is expected. Post Waterfront City : Lianyungang Post Waterfront City implies two meanings, a Waterfront City connecting the NECB hinterland, and a revised and elaborated idea for waterfront design in the 20th century. The aim of WAW2009 is not only to propose technologically advanced design that is economically feasible and sensitive to both water-environmental issues and human needs but also an optimum bridge between the historical background and future perspective on developing Lianyungang city as the new inland gate. According to the existing urban planning scheme of Lianyungang city toward 2030, two oppositional design features between the old and new districts can be found. The old urban area of Haizhou is located on the relatively higher, southwestern ground and holds historical and cultural heritage dating back to the Ming Dynasty. The new district called CBD : Central Business District, is planned on the existing salt and fishery farm area including Haizhou bay front and Lianyun district, where vast artificial reclamation will be executed. In between these two areas is the Xinpu district, where the current municipal city center of business, commerce and industry is located. 16


WAW2009 focuses on two sites: the Xinpu district of Salt Haven Export: SHE, and the Central Business District, CBD. Because of the large development plan of CBD on the future reclaimed land the new city center will be moved from Xinpu to the bay front area soon or later. In this evolution the urban connection between Xinpu to the CBD is essential, a matter of creating an integrated urban living corridor consisting of two centers without the impression of being isolated from one another. This requires a master plan not only for the design of new traffic infrastructure but also to generate a transitional ambience between old and new as a total cityscape design. Master Plan phase The master plan could be divided into 2 levels; level one is the master plan for either of the two individual sites and level 2 is the inter-relation between the them, referring to requirements for new traffic infrastructure, transition between old and new, total cityscape design and also the definition of Post Waterfront City vision by WAW participants. Architectural Design phase In this phase design of an architectural proposal for each two sites is required. SITE 1: SEH holds a unique key-form structure of the existing salt manufacturing port. A new renovation plan based on the existing industrial heritage is requested. SITE 2 holds a free sphere for the potential Post Waterfront City Living and Design to disregard the existing land utility plan and propose an optimum and innovative Post Waterfront City idea. It is often pointed out that current economical expansion in the Chinese East Coastal region is strongly connected with a wetland environment, such as how the Pearl River delta of Shenzhen, the Yangtze River delta of Shanghai, or the Hai River delta of Tianjin, are connected with provincial capital city growth of Hong Kong, Nanjing and Beijing, respectively. The design target of WAW2009 in this regard could be summarized by saying that wetland urbanism design in Lianyungang should have a strong inland axis of NECB, as the expected future economy will necessitate strategies for multi-centered cities and resilience between coastal development and the potential of the hinterland tomorrow. 17


Thinking • System • Model Zhou Lin

The Eighth Annual World Architecture Workshop (WAW) was held in Lianyungang City, Jiangsu, China from November 23, 2009. The location of the workshop determined this year’s theme, Post Waterfront City. The Workshop is designed to include a design competition between groups of architecture students with an objective to enhance cooperation and understanding, improve the students’ organization, management and communication skills, promote the importance of international collaboration and develop integrated architectural education. Forty-two students from Australia, France, Japan and China were randomly divided into seven design groups for the competition. This was a good opportunity for students from various countries in a mutual learning environment to develop different ways of thinking and new design methodologies from different backgrounds, perspectives and insights. Through this work a gap between the Chinese and other international approaches to architectural design and education was revealed, mainly in the following areas: 1. Conceptual design The approaches adopted by all seven design groups were relatively similar, with inspiration drawn from various contexts of the city, regional characteristics and memories of the site. However, the foreign students were more interested in an idea of context between the source and evolution of the similar system, focusing on logical aspects and rational thinking to interpret design ideas. On the other hand the traditional Chinese mind-set was to focus more on programmatic ideas and a form of mimicry between the source and identity, the result being a question of “valid resemblance” of the two. This has greatly limited the derivation of a rational development of design thinking. 2. Development of multi-disciplinary knowledge, thinking and background In contrast, the Chinese students on the one hand are lacking the knowledge of multi-disciplinary background, innovative thinking and not daring enough in design; this is coupled with the degree of self-awareness and weak self-confidence, often due to economic, feasibility and other issues are the factors that give up the valuable design ideas. Therefore, the future teaching environment should give students a 18


broader space for developing their thinking. Practical factors should not be tied too early to student imagination, and stifle innovative thinking. 3. Design methodologies The slogan for WAW design groups is: No leader, only group (no leadership, only the team), which is also the core interest of WAW. Teams require a lot of discussion and exchange of ideas, and even controversy. This allows each member of the teams have the opportunity to express and share their ideas with other members of the group and maximize the potential of the work while simultaneously maintaining individual personality. 4. Design Analysis and Presentation The singular use of computer-aided design software and the ability to switch between software packages to produce presentation materials is insufficient for Chinese students; also the ability to convert and develop ideas between software packages is similarly limited. Foreign students however, have made extensive use of rational design grids, coverage and topology to transform an expression of rational design methods through the analysis of charts and diagrams or mapping coordinate systems. Resultant curves are a rational derivation of programs and ideas, reflecting a clear and logical design idea. The diagrams produced by Chinese students remained at a more simple level of interpretation, lacking the methods of superimposition, cross-array and comparisons of both horizontal and vertical direction to interpret information. 5. Design performance The presentation materials produced by foreign students drawing were bold and interesting, the strategic use of “montage� with the art of collage to produce the final images in conveying ideas was equally effective. Describing the final reality is not the emphasis but rather it is to provide a strong visual impact, giving people a deep impression and inserting various contemporary products to create a strong personalized collage with mixture of concepts, spanning of eras and time. Chinese students however, influenced by commercial renderings in the market, emphasized the reality of the subjects, the result is almost like a photograph, it is difficult to experience the creative passion of the authors, the missing design intent and the amount of information being superimposed in layers. This clearly reflects the collision of differences in the teaching and communication of eastern and western architectural education. Indeed, as the emergence of the Internet and the digital age, how to narrow the gap between the professional architectural education in Chinese universities and the developing world in terms of the recognition of local Chinese architects is a key issue, this is in effect the future direction of architectural education in China. The theme and objective of the WAW competitions have represented the latest system of international architectural education, and new teaching models for China to meet demands in the modern world. 19


About Chinese Architecture Xiao Song Li China Sanjiang University, Department of Architecture

At the WAW 8th International Design Competition in China, it is indeed a great pleasure to be able to discuss common interest issues in architectural theory and design with colleagues and friends from many countries. I think architecture is the human transformation of the natural environment in order to meet material and spiritual needs, and the creation of space which improves and complements the existing environment. Architecture and the environment are inseparable; buildings that are suitable in any context would never exist. Only the perfect harmonic combination of the building and its environment is able to meet the human needs. The contextual environment dictates architecture, and in turn buildings effect the environment. Ancient Chinese architecture is based on timber structure. However the resistance of fire, corrosion and termites for timber is relatively poor, hence there are only a handful of century old buildings saved and becoming precious cultural relics. There are iconic ancient Chinese buildings such as the palace architecture, religious buildings, houses with local cultural significance and styles and not forgotten, such as the Great Wall. Due to the lack of proper records and preservation of complete design drawings, the designers and architects are mostly unknown. According to text records, the architects and designers were mostly well known artisans or competent officials. The social status and the level of cultural knowledge of the building practitioners was not standing in a very substantial position in society; and the intellectuals were not very interested in the area of architecture, very few books were written or published in the area of architectural theory. There are only four major books known today, all produced 200 to 2000 years ago. Some buildings designed by foreign architects were found in the early 20th century near China’s coastal cities. Meanwhile, a group of young architects returned from Europe have designed a series of unique brick-timber buildings now known as the “Republic Buildings.�

20


In 1949 China began to reference the former Soviet Union model, a large number of industrial and civic buildings were built. In general, the urbanization process was relatively slow and the living standards were below average. In 1978, China began an unprecedented modernization and has achieved remarkable achievements, the urban population reached about 50%. The urban landscape and people’s living standards were improved significantly. China is a country with five thousand years of civilization history and 56 ethnicities. Today many ancient architectural sites and relics still can be found in many parts of China. Architecture is the footprint of human civilization, it has witnessed and recorded the history of mankind; in reality protecting history is to protect a significant cultural value. Yesterday has become history, the people would not have enough space for development and expansion hence it is impossible to protect everything that was left behind from yesterday, nor is it necessary. The preservation work should follow in sequence the historical age, cultural significance in a selective manner. Reconstruction of the buildings that no longer exist is not to protect history but creating an artificial landscape. The Earth is home to every human being. Since the 20th century, the earth’s ecological environment has started to deteriorate, this has becoming a significant threat to our living environment. The Chinese government sees energy conservation an important issue, and has formulated corresponding policies and regulations and taken practical measures. This includes the use of solar energy, geothermal, wind and other clean energy research, processes of industrial waste water, rivers, lakes, water quality, air pollution control, etc., all as national key projects in progress, and achieved some results.

21


Journey to the West Jan van Schaik

In November 2009 Lianyungang, China, delivered a massive culture shock to a group of lecturers from France Japan and Australia, and their students. The correct pronunciation was beyond our western tongues and its name we quickly abbreviated to LYG, its international airport moniker. We gawked at the ad-hoc vehicles recycled from agricultural equipment and the absence of road rules. Farm animals and pedestrians alike shared the generous streets who’s crossing was only made possible by pairing with a local doing the same. Each meal represented an enormous culinary challenge, breakfast being the hardest to absorb. English was not spoken anywhere and our lack of Chinese language was met with bemusement. The city is dusty, agricultural, chaotic, underdeveloped and in stark contrast to Beijing and Shanghai. But beneath this surface impression lies a promise of dramatic change about to burst forth, for LYG serves as the designated starting point for the New Eurasian Land Bridge, a rail link from Rotterdam to LYG and from here it is 1000km by sea to Korea or Japan. As such, its population is set to increase twenty fold in the next 15 years. The journey to enlightenment in “The Journey to the West”, first published anonymously in the 1590’s, begins in Lianyungang. The low lying plains below the mountain made famous by Monkey are now dotted with gargantuan public transport networks, public buildings and roads in anticipation of this mass urbanisation. Almost no development has yet to occur but when it does, instantly a city will appear. Beyond the role of rapidly documenting designs for construction of this impending city what is the role of architects in this race to instant enlightenment? The building, demolishing, layering and shifting that politics, economies, environments and societies bear upon cities gives them the shape, texture and detail to which we attribute the value “good” do not have time to happen here. Instead they will need to happen all at once, if at all. If they are to appear, they will need to be invented and designed in the form of architecture.

22


So, faced with the problem of an instant city, we addressed the attention of our three very different pedagogies designing a new identity for Lianyungang through a cultural approach to its built environment. Taking observed phenomenon, collected histories and external ideas and building from them a new city culture we produced a polemic on the architecture of Lianyungang’s built environment, the results of which are documented in this publication.

23


Our Future in All Elodie Nourrigat and Jacques Brion

Lianyungang, November 2009. This is the eighth time that international workshop is organized. Partnerships are fair and student’s motivation is the same as that of previous meeting - in that each of these workshops proposes a very specific theme stemming from a local context. Students are confronted to problematic that they will never be confronted by in their cultural framework. This crossing of perspectives is always the major stake in this network. An objective is to bring students to penetrate into a culture, into a history, into a mode of thinking by putting them in situation, project, and context which is not theirs. To learn of the other one, with the other one and especially learn by making, through the project. Nevertheless this year the theme was, for us all, completely unusual. We were not in an understood context anymore, with a WAW host member, but in a totally unknown situation. The context of the development of the Chinese cities exceeds by far what it is possible to take from a European context. So all marks, references, and modes of thinking about the city were no longer effective. Here we had to modify our thought and approach, it is the totally different process to think and build the city where it must be set up. Confronted by the scale of the work to be done - to think and draw a whole city capable of taking in four million inhabitants while its current structure contains only seven hundred thousand - an essential question appeared. Here, everything seems still possible, it seems then as a kind of “luck”, the luck to act in the large scale, that real of the territory, thanks to the architect. Conscious that the economic, cultural, even temporal data are far from similar, this workshop attempted to reinterpret the question of “Post-Waterfront City” to propose coastal arrangements that registered in the consideration of an existing structure. Indeed, the question of the inscription in time towards a sustainable

24


development became an area of inescapable work. We asked the question of sustainable development in the sense of its first official definition, following Brundtland’s text in 1987 entitled «Our future in all “, where it is defined as a development “whichs answers the present needs without compromising the capacity of the future generations to satisfy theirs “. In this objective are thus the conditions of other responsible relations and other complicities which require being passed by environmental protection and by an integration of new technologies. We are thankful that techniques are crossed with the state of subjects dominated by nature in that of masters of the nature. Today it is different, we have to collaborate with the nature. The big natural disasters remind us very often. So, the question of architecture’s capacity to take place in agreement with nature, and also the inhabited landscape, is completely relevant and is approached as real contemporary problem. It is through combining our different cultures and through the project that this approach was differentiated by the architecture, in a context which was previously unknown us. As for each of the workshops, it was not about producing directly applicable solutions, but the work was positioned in a spirit which proposes us that of Hans Jonas “ we do not at first have to estimate the perspectives and decide afterward on what we owe or do not have to make. But we have to recognize on the contrary the obligation and the responsibility and act consequently, as if we were lucky, and even though as it would be doubted it. “. So through reflections, and openmindedness it is established, by capitalizing each of our knowledge, each of our lives, each of our cultures.

25


Workshop participants

26


Jonathan Valtat

27


design PROCESS SITE WORK


Urban Projects


0.48km

1-2story

2.4ha

3-4st

BASIC GRADATED MODEL

0.50km

1block/ 0.5 bus stop open space market promenade

TRANCEFORMED GRID MODEL

small road

ECOLOGICAL SYSTEM

Tall Tree

View of central market/public space

Roof Garden urban farm

Biotope

residence

Basic Grid Model

Algae

salt/algae production

Low Tree

retail/ leasure urban farm public buildings residence industry/ factory salt/algae production retail/ leasure public buildings industry/ factory 0

0.5

0

0.5

1km

Low Density

Middle Density

1km

Site Plan

Aerial Photo Montage SUSTAINABLE

+ MIX CITY EDUCATION OFFICE AGRICULTURE RESIDENCE

Ecological System

+ EXISTING GRID  NODE

Aerial Diagram 1x1km detail plan

34

=


tory

Aerial photomontage

Agricultural Farm

1 x 1km Detail Plan

Solor Panel

Aerial diagram

High Density

Site Plan

The Industrial Mountain focuses on sustainability of both society and environment. A city that takes on the characteristics of nature both visually and actively, formally referencing the Huaguoshan Mountain made famous in “Journey to the West” whilst maintaining a sustainable living environment through energy and water conservations. The city combines the cultural and industrial sides of Lianyungang, the Multi-use Mountains drawing in the local salt industries and combining them with urban farms, retail, commercial and residential facilities. These Industrial Mountains takes a new look at what it means to be green city.

Industrial Mountain

“山之领域”关注于社会和环境的可持续性发展。一个城市 对自然的传承,不仅要体现在视觉上,更要体现在行动上。 我们不仅引用了因经典著作“西游记”而闻名天下的花果 山,更是主张通过节能和节水来保持一个可持续发展的居住 环境。我们设计的城市考虑到了连云港的文化特色和工业现 状。“山之领域”吸收了当地的盐工业的因素,并且将其与 城市农业、零售业、商业及住宅设施相结合。“山之领域” 将对绿色城市的阐述提供新的视角。

AGRICULTURE WORKING

SALT LAND RESIDENCE

Group A: The Industrial Mountain focuses on sustainability of both society and environment. A city that takes on the characteristics of nature both visually and actively, formally referencing the Huaguoshan Mountain made famous in “Journey Site 1+Linkage Area: 23km to the West” whilst maintaining a sustainable living environment through energy people/ha: 260 and water conservations. The city combines the cultural and industrial sides of Lianyungang, the Multi-use Mountains drawing in the local salt industries and combining them with urban farms, retail, commercial and residential facilities. These Industrial Mountains takes a new look at what it means to be green city. AGRICULTURE

RESIDENCE

station

50 0m

SALT LAND

50 0m

=

4-12story

WORKING

station

2

Group A: Coline Giardi, Marco Lavit, Hannah Rowe, Yasuaki Kodashima, Zhu Cheng

35


Lane-way low tide and high tide

Road-way temporary flooding

36

Parkland temporary flooding


1 x 1km Detail Plan Density Distribution

Fleeting City Group B: This scheme opens up to the sea and embraces the tidal changes that come with such a gesture. The carving of rivers along existing axis and sculpting of the earth pays respect to the past, whilst looking to the future. Much like the pause between breaths, the density of the city along the water clusters together, and then there is relief before the next. Buildings respond to the existing grid-like network of salt farms, increasing and decreasing in size, intertwining program and experience. The flooding of laneways creates ephemeral spaces, fleeting between tides. The absence of a space for an hour, a day or maybe even a week, makes these locations more special, more appreciated and celebrated. The future will see these laneways continuously flooded and perhaps on days of exceptionally low tide will give that generation a glimpse into the past. The loss and gain of these spaces is a reference to the impermanence of all things; everything is subject to change.

37


Views of city as water level rises and time passes

38


SIte plan after 300 years and 25m water rise

Progress of land retreat as water level rises

Future Past City Group C: This urban strategy responds to a hypothetical situation of rapid and severe global warming; and rather than fighting against it, we propose a framework that works with this. Through analysis of building activity and rising sea levels, this scheme synchronises point of flooding with urban decay, at which point a strategic retreat is formed, creating and exploring the opportunities that arise. This scheme considers the extremes in an attempt to gain insight into the median, thus generating the following ideas: 1. Consider the futile nature of the completed master plan. 2. Enjoy and plan for decay. Decay can be a generator of culture. 3. Look at working with the nature rather then against it. 4. To look beyond 2030, what & who are we planning for? How can these plans be adaptive?

39


Aerial View

195,69 m2

Development around footprint waterpools

Low-density housing cluster with flooding courtyards 195,69 m2

1x1km area

Curve Graph of Dynamic Density 1x1km area

Site plan

Laid Rope Traffic Sitesection Plan Site

40

Urban Pattern

Main Street


Development around footprint waterpools

1x1km Area

Site Plan

1x1km Area

Low-density housing cluster with flooding courtyards

Three design strategies: Link: to connect site one and site two. We designed the whole way from the old part of the city to Site 2; Site 1 is a part of this link. Transport: To distribute the emphasis of the main street. The design divides the transportation system in different parts/ways/roads and uses the physical structure of a “laid rope“ to connect the proposed streets from Site 2 with existing roads with the old part of Lianyungang. Water connections: the design endeavours a new way of treating the spaces between the different transport systems between living, work, and recreational area. That includes three levels of density, starting from the lowest density around the footprint waterpools as the centre and grows up with the level of development. We form three strategies together as a new part of Lianyungang and as a new way of relationship between urban planning and community, with short (walking) distance between working and living.

Encircle City

Group D: Three design strategies: Link: to connect site one and site two. We designed the whole way from the old part of the city to both sites is a part of三大设计理念: this link. Transport: to distribute the em新与旧的对话 与其强调猴嘴区与新CBD的关系,我们设计了整个连接体贯穿新 phasis of the main street. The design divides the transportation system in different CBD与旧城区,而猴嘴区成为了这个连接体中的一点。 parts/ways/roads and uses the physical structure of a “laid rope“ to connect the 绳索型立体交通系统 为了减少城市主干道的交通负担,同时降低尺度巨大的主干道 proposed streets from Site 2 with existing roads with the old part of Lianyungang. 对行人造成的不愉悦感,我们设置多条曲线型次干道增多了与 Water: integrate spaces between living, work, and recreational area to includes 居住区的接触点,并提供多种类多层次的交通方式, 绳索形态 Main street 让城市更紧凑。 three levels of density, the lowest around the footprint waterpools increasing at Site 1+Linkage 水游城 Area: 38km the centre and with future development. 将水引入居住区,公共水上交通与景观设计结合相结合,为居 people/ha: 158 2

民及游客提供宜人的视觉体验。城市发展从人工湖开始分三步 向外扩张,密集度随之越来越高。 结合以上三点设计理念,为连云港创造新的城市规划与社区关 系,让城市居住者的工作与生活效率更加高效与便捷。

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Shore.

Shore.

Masterplan

建设密度比例

DENSITY DISTRIBUTION

Aerial View

BUILT UP COMMERCIAL & OFFICE AREAS RESIDENTIAL PUBLIC SERVICES & RECREATIONAL FACILITIES

1x1km area

1x1km Area

Detail section

Short.

42 Shore.


Masterplan

SEA

Density Distribution

Dynamism DENSITY

LAND SHAPES

LAND

Like a hand reachingDetail out from the shore line, the waterfront is represented as Section groups of archipelago gradually breaking away from the mainland, graduating into the sea. This creates maximised shoreline, also a balanced scenario of land reclamation, that the masses of excavated marsh land around those archipelagos are in equal volume of the landmasses. The further land subdivision utilises the ‘fissure pattern’ that is culturally specific to the region, within a series of Cartesian grid overlay inherited from existing salt farms. This gives an organic community infrastructure with intimate pedestrian only laneways, to reduced environmental noise and pollution in residential areas. Finally, the gradient of density changes as the land masses becomes smaller in a calculated hierarchy specific to the proposed density.

Group E: Like a hand reaching out from the shore line, the waterfront is represented as groups of archipelago gradually breaking away from the mainland, graduating Site 2 如一只手冲破岸线的禁锢,东进入海,又如一系列群岛逐渐从 Area: 50km into the sea. This creates maximised shoreline, also a balanced scenario of land 海滨分离,渐变聚集。 people/ha: 40 这创造出了最绵延的岸线,也提供了土地开拓的自然平衡模 reclamation, that the masses of excavated marsh land around those archipelagos 式,即这些群岛周围的大量湿地与陆地相协调。 而进一步细分土地形态的“裂模式”,对这一区域具有特殊的 are in equal volume of the landmasses. The further land subdivision utilises the 文化意义,裂变从现有的盐场开始向外延伸。这种模式营造了 ‘fissure pattern’ that is culturally specific to the region, within a series of Cartesian 一个行人,小路,私密空间相协调的宜人社区,减少了居民区 grid overlay inherited from existing 的环境噪音和污染。 salt farms. This gives an organic community 最后,密度变化梯度随着陆地的变小逐渐改变最终达到一种理 infrastructure with intimate pedestrian only laneways, to reduced environmental 论上的合理密度水平。 noise and pollution in residential areas. Finally, the gradient of density changes as the land masses becomes smaller in a calculated hierarchy specific to the proposed density. 2

43


STORAGE

ce

existing

9.87 km

gov. proposed

7.81 km

port city

47.6 km

400M

CAR PARKS THEN CAR FREE ZONE

PRIMARY, SECONDARY, TERTIARY ROADS

View from longest port finger back

Aerial View

Water-based living scenarios

Site Plan

44

pa

BEACON

rn

100 200

SHOPPING / HOUSING

s

PORT COMPANY ADMIN

ENTERTAINMENT

scale

conflict

waterfront port bleeds into city

HIGH ACTIVITY MULTI USE - CULTURAL /

vs publ ic

program


vs mod

18 m depth

Aerial view

PRIMARY PIER PROGRAM

Detail section

Dovetail Port

On analysis our group agreed that the shipping industry and its ports are the main reason for the growth and expansion of Lianyungang. Although the ports are the city’s strongest link with the ocean the current government proposal separates them from the people. We believe this is a mistake and that the port should be distinguished. To do this we propose building a second port combined with the city CBD location. This hybrid port city would place the shipping industry on show in a celebration of progress and development as Site Plan areas shared become richly layered, complex and potent. Our symbol of the city is a massive 4 km long pier of dominance that thrusts out into the eastern sea carrying the people within the dense urban fabric upon its back. Based on the efficiency of industry and supported through layers of history our proposal combines the old and new to push Lianyungang into the future.

经过分析我们小组一致认为,航运业和港口,可作为连云港发 展和扩大的主要原因。然而港口是城市与海洋最主要的联系 地,可当前政府却准备将海洋和人们分开。我们相信这是一个 Group F: On analysis our group agreed that the shipping industry and its ports 错误,港口应被区别对待。为此,我们建议建立第二个港口, are the main reason for the growth and expansion of Lianyungang. Although 可以使其与城市的中心商务区很好地结合。这种混合的港口城 市将会发展航运业可以作为自己的发展特色,在此基础上多层 the ports are the city’s strongest link with the ocean the current government 次,多彩的,有效地展现这座城市的风采。我们设计的城市的 proposalseparates them from the people. We believe this is a mistake and that 标志就是一条巨大的长达4千米的码头,这也是一个优势。它就 the port should be distinguished. To像手指一样插入中国东部海域,并且上面可承载城市稠密的人 do this we propose building a second port 口。基于提高产业效率,还有连云港文化底蕴的支持,我们建 combined with the city CBD location.议结合新老城市的发展理念共同推动连云港走向繁荣。 This hybrid port city would place the shipping Site 2 Area: 33km2 people/ha: 115

industry on show in a celebration of progress and development as areas shared become richly layered, complex and potent. Our symbol of the city is a massive 4 km long pier of dominance that thrusts out into the eastern sea carrying the people within the dense urban fabric upon its back. Based on the efficiency of industry and supported through layers of history our proposal combines the old and new to push Lianyungang into the future. Water-based living scenarios

45

Water-ba


View of different Atolls looking back to land

Main Atolls

46


Site plan with transport links

China Attol Group G: Our urban planning project of Lianyungang is about responding to the natural environment and the inevitable seawater rise by creating a waterfront atoll city. In an effort to prepare for this change in landscape we have adapted the idea of atolls, derived from the natural drying process from the sites existing salt farm, to become contemporary city blocks. The usual roads and freeways of a city have become waterways offering an alternative and cleaner mode of transport with underground subways and highways and pedestrian and cycling bridges above ground. These waterways opening up the city for industry, with large ports sited throughout the city connecting to the New Eurasian land bridge. The atolls additionally generate power via water turbines and hydrogen power.

47


Development of crystal form for new waterfront

Aerial view across waterfront

Development of crystal form for new waterfront

Aerial view across waAerial view across waterfront

+

Site plan showing transport connections

This project for Lia to generate the de lead the CBD Site new organic coas rigid condition. Pla of a natural coastl traditional Chinese generated by wate

Concept

Concept

+

Site plan showing transport connections

+

我们的连云港海 个功能作用不同 城的气势。设计 岛屿的晶体形状 生物在岛屿周围 岸线地一部分。 以中国传统祥云 收敛的河道采用

Section through typical block

Concept

Aerial view across waterfront

This project for Lianyungang strives to use nature and par to generate the design. Crystal-like islands with different fu lead the CBD Site 2 area, in a powerful gesture for the city new organic coastline embraces the fluctuations of the tid View of typical block rigid condition. Plant life of the water’s edge can grow free View of typical blockof a natural coastline. Highways, secondary roads and str traditional Chinese cloud pattern and connect the islands Concept generated by water turbines located in the narrow channe

+

Development of crystal form for new waterfront

Site plan showing transport connections

+

Section through typical block

This project for Lianyungang strives to use nature and particularly the crystal to generate the design. Crystal-like islands with different functions and design lead the CBD Site 2 area, in a powerful gesture for the city. Using nature, the new organic coastline embraces the fluctuations of the tides to create a fluid and rigid condition. Plant life of the water’s edge can grow freely to make them part of a natural coastline. Highways, secondary roads and streets are based on the traditional Chinese cloud pattern and connect the islands together. Energy is generated by water turbines located in the narrow channels between land forms.

Daily time-based change in coastline

我们的连云港海滨新城CBD规划项目,引用东海水晶形象建造多 个功能作用不同的晶体状岛屿,创造出CBD商业区现代、统领全 城的气势。设计力求以自然创造自然的海岸线,利用海水涨落和 岛屿的晶体形状营造出圆润、尖锐的地动态化的自然岸线。海洋 生物在岛屿周围自由生长,最终将填海岛屿融入自然,成天然海 岸线地一部分。在交通上以城市快速路连接,快速路和其余干道 以中国传统祥云形道路连接。在能源利用上,利用晶体岛屿狭长 收敛的河道采用潮汐涡轮发电,自然环保。

水晶城 我们的连云港海滨新城CBD规划项目,引用东海 个功能作用不同的晶体状岛屿,创造出CBD商业 Crystal City 城的气势。设计力求以自然创造自然的海岸线

Daily time-based change in coastline

WAW2009_masterplan_H.indd 1

Site 2 Area: 35.1km2 people/ha: 82

岛屿的晶体形状营造出圆润、尖锐的地动态化 生物在岛屿周围自由生长,最终将填海岛屿融 岸线地一部分。在交通上以城市快速路连接, 以中国传统祥云形道路连接。在能源利用上, 收敛的河道采用潮汐涡轮发电,自然环保。

View of typical block

Site 2 Area: 35.1km2 people/ha: 水晶城 82

Site plan showing transport connections

Cao Xinpei, Liu Too, Shen Yajun, Lifang Zheng, Zhang Chen, Zhan Yonghua

Section through typical block

Daily time-based change in coastline

Section through typical 第八届WAW世界建筑研讨会,2009于中国江苏省连云港

Crystal City

Section through typical block

View of typical block WAW2009_masterplan_H.indd 1

ystal esign , the fluid and em part d on the gy is nd forms.

建造多

+

Development of crystal form for new waterfront

WAW2009: World Architecture Workshop, Lianyungang, China This project for Lianyungang strives to use nature and particularly the crystal to generate the design. Crystal-like islands with different functions and design lead the CBD Site 2 area, in a powerful gesture for the city. Using nature, the new organic coastline embraces the fluctuations of the tides to create a fluid and rigid condition. Plant life of the water’s edge can grow freely to make them part of a natural coastline. Highways, secondary roads and streets are based on the traditional Chinese cloud pattern and connect the islands together. Energy is generated by water turbines located in the narrow channels between land forms.

我们的连云港海滨新城CBD规划项目,引用东海水晶形象建造多 个功能作用不同的晶体状岛屿,创造出CBD商业区现代、统领全 城的气势。设计力求以自然创造自然的海岸线,利用海水涨落和 岛屿的晶体形状营造出圆润、尖锐的地动态化的自然岸线。海洋 生物在岛屿周围自由生长,最终将填海岛屿融入自然,成天然海 岸线地一部分。在交通上以城市快速路连接,快速路和其余干道 以中国传统祥云形道路连接。在能源利用上,利用晶体岛屿狭长 收敛的河道采用潮汐涡轮发电,自然环保。

48 Daily time-based change in coastline

04/12/2009 17:23:37

Daily time-based change in coastline

Site 2 Area: 35.1km2 people/ha: 82


Aerial view across waterfront

Concept

Development of crystal form for new waterfront Development of crystal form for new

Concept

Site plan showing transport connections Site plan showing transport connections

Section through typical block

Section t

rticularly the crystal unctions and design y. Using nature, the des to create a fluid and ely to make them part reets are based on the together. Energy is els between land forms.

海水晶形象建造多 业区现代、统领全 线,利用海水涨落和 化的自然岸线。海洋 融入自然,成天然海 ,快速路和其余干道 ,利用晶体岛屿狭长

Crystal City

This project for Lianyungang strives to use nature and particularly the crystal to generate the design. Crystal-like islands with different functions and design lead the CBD Site 2 area, in a powerful gesture for the city. Using nature, the new organic coastline embraces the fluctuations of the tides to create a fluid and rigid condition. Plant life of the water’s edge can grow freely to make them part of a natural coastline. Highways, secondary roads and streets are based on the traditional Chinese cloud pattern and connect the islands together. Energy is generated by water turbines located in the narrow channels between land forms.

Group H: This project for Lianyungang strives我们的连云港海滨新城CBD规划项目,引用东海水晶形象建造多 to use nature and particularly the 个功能作用不同的晶体状岛屿,创造出CBD商业区现代、统领全 Daily time-based in coastline crystal to change generate the design. Crystal-like islands with different functions and 城的气势。设计力求以自然创造自然的海岸线,利用海水涨落和 design lead the CBD Site 2 area, in a powerful岛屿的晶体形状营造出圆润、尖锐的地动态化的自然岸线。海洋 gesture for the city. Using nature, 生物在岛屿周围自由生长,最终将填海岛屿融入自然,成天然海 岸线地一部分。在交通上以城市快速路连接,快速路和其余干道 the new organic coastline embraces the fluctuations of the tides to create a fluid 以中国传统祥云形道路连接。在能源利用上,利用晶体岛屿狭长 收敛的河道采用潮汐涡轮发电,自然环保。 and rigidSitecondition. Plant life of the water’s edge can grow freely to make them 2 Area: 35.1km partpeople/ha: of a natural coastline. Highways, secondary roads and streets are based on 82 the traditional Chinese cloud pattern and connect the islands together. Energy is generated by water turbines located in the narrow channels between land forms.

Daily tim

Area peop

2

View of typical block

水晶城 Crystal City

第八 49


Industrial Mountain Group A

Urban Mountain

Central Hub

52


53


Fleeting City Group B

Vertical Landscape

Water Landscape

54


Salt Building

55


连云港

Future Past City 20m

5m 0m

3nd dyke

10m

0 years

15m

第 三 阶 段 海 堤 位 置

4th dyke

第 二 阶 段 海 堤 位 置

3nd dyke

第 一 阶 段 海 堤 位 置

第 三 阶 段 海 堤 位 置

4th dyke

15m

第 二 阶 段 海 堤 位 置

2nd dyke

1st dyke

20m 第 一 阶 段 海 堤 位 置

2nd dyke

1st dyke

Group C

第 四 阶 段 海 堤 位 置

第 四 阶 段 海 堤 位 置

30 years

60 years

90 years

10m

0km

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3km

6km

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0m

0 years

30 years

0km

60 years

3km

90 years

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Plan 1 规划1

9km

Plan 1 规划1

01

KE

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:

02

规划1-水平面上升后

Plan 2 - meet water

规划2

规划2-水平面上升后

As the rising contours of the mountain, the Post Waterfront increases and evolve over time as the water gets higher.

DY

KE

:

03

03

5 年

10 YEARS 10 年

15 YEARS 15 YEARS

15 年

15 年

20 YEARS 20 年

25 YEARS 25 年

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规划2-水平面上升后

Rooftop connections still be able to be close/view the water when it rises. 屋顶平台之间互相连接- 水平面上升后仍然可以近距离接触水面 0m 100 m

As the rising contours of the mountain, the Post Waterfront increases and evolve over time as the water gets higher.

02

5 年

10 YEARS 10 年

Plan 2 - meet water

规划2

01

5 YEARS 5 YEARS

Plan 2

Rooftop connections still be able to be close/view the water when it rises. 屋顶平台之间互相连接- 水平面上升后仍然可以近距离接触水面 0m 100 m

随着海平面逐渐上升,海水 渐渐淹没山脉,海滨景观也 在岁月中不断演变。

:

KE

Plan 1 - meet water

Plan 2

KE

DY

DY

DY

:

:

规划1-水平面上升后

KE

KE

DY

DY

Plan 1 - meet water

20 YEARS 20 年

25 YEARS 25 年

Time Wall Time Wall

Time Wall

随着海平面逐渐上升,海水 渐渐淹没山脉,海滨景观也 在岁月中不断演变。


Programmatic Dyke

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建设密度比例

DENSITY DISTRIBUTION

Dynamism Group E

建设密度比例

DENSITY DISTRIBUTION

Tower’s design concept

Floor

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Ciculation

Structure

Facade


Density Distribution

Density Distribution

New cocept with the symbol of China

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Dovetail Port Group F

Public Places & Circulation Hub - start of main hub

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Beacon Entertainment Point - end of main pier

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China Attol Group G

Building Atoll

62


Natural Atoll

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Public Presentations


Final Events


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Public exhibitions

RMIT University,Melbourne (upper) Lianyungang City Planning Exhibition Center (lower) 70


Lianyungang, 2009

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73


Participants and Sponsors Universities:

MYUシンボル・基本形

THANK YOU: Lianyngang City Planning Bureau

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Post Waterfront City