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COLLEGIAN.COM Thursday, June 14, 2018

FORT COLLINS FOCUS

Brent Winston halters a horse inside a trailer prior to leading it to its pen at the CSU Equine Sciences facility on June 5. The horse was one of 12 horses that recently arrived at the CSU Equine Science facility to be part of the Right Horse Initiative partnership with CSU. As part of the partnership, CSU works with the Denver Dumb Friends League Harmony Equine Center to provide training to equines that were rescued by law enforcement agencies across the Midwest and western U.S. PHOTO BY FORREST CZARNECKI COLLEGIAN

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CORRECTIONS “Please explain ‘Canvas Stadium.’” ”It represents a blank canvas on which the football team expresses its inner art.”

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Vol. 128, No. 2

Thursday, June 14, 2018

OPINION

SPORTS

A&C

RELIGION SHOULDN’T EXCUSE DISCRIMINATION

MEDVED IS ON THE SHORT TRACK TO SUCCESS

CSU CELEBRATES 50 YEARS OF THE PIPE ORGAN

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Lawsuit filed against CSU A former Colorado State University assistant professor filed a lawsuit against the University, claiming that she faced retaliation and was forced to resign from her position after reporting the incident. PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY ASHLEY POTTS COLLEGIAN

Former professor claims sexual harassment report affected tenure By Haley Candelario & Natalia Sperry @CSU_Collegian

A former Colorado State University assistant professor filed a lawsuit against the University, claiming she faced retaliation and was forced to resign from her position after reporting another professor sexually harassed her. In the lawsuit, Christina Boucher, who started working for CSU in fall 2012 as a tenuretrack assistant professor, claims computer science professor Asa Ben-Hur would stare at her chest and backside in a sexual manner. After reporting the harassment to Computer Science Department Chair Darrell Whitley and Dean

of the College of Natural Sciences Janice Nerger, Boucher said her ability to receive tenure at the University was attacked. According to court documents, Whitley told Ben-Hur about Boucher’s complaint, which led to Boucher not being invited to meetings by Ben-Hur, even when meetings concerned Boucher’s research or graduate student advisees. She was also removed from a student’s thesis committee by Ben-Hur. In the lawsuit, Boucher said a March 2015 email she received from Nerger indicated her sexual harrasment complaint could affect her annual evaluations from Whitley.

“Because you have come to see me about the climate in the department and I know things with (Ben-Hur) have been disruptive, these two things may well come up in your discussions with (Whitley),” wrote Nerger in the email, according to court documents. “I think having another pair of ears in the room could be useful.” The lawsuit alleges Boucher received two positive performance reviews from Whitley in March 2013 and March 2014 before reporting she was sexually harassed by Ben-Hur to Whitley and Nerger. In his March 2015 evaluation, Whitley rated Boucher below

expectations in two out of three categories and meets/below expectations overall, which had the potential to negatively impact Boucher’s likelihood to receive tenure, according to court documents. In an email to The Collegian, CSU Director of Public Affairs and Communications Mike Hooker wrote that CSU disputes Boucher’s claims, though it cannot comment on pending litigation in detail. “While CSU takes allegations of sexual harassment seriously, CSU strongly disputes Dr. Boucher’s claims and is actively defending against them,” wrote Hooker. “Also, there has been no action taken against any

employee based on Dr. Boucher’s allegations because the University has determined that none is warranted. We look forward to the opportunity to present the other side of the case in a court of law.” Tenure committee meetings allegedly impacted by retaliation During an April 3, 2015 meeting, the tenure and promotions committee was about to recommend Boucher for tenure track, but Ben-Hur, who sat on the committee, argued against her and claimed she treated him hatefully, according to court documents. On April 10, 2015, Whitley presented his negative evaluation see LAWSUIT on page 3 >>


NEWS Thursday, June 14, 2018

Lawsuit >> from page 1

of Boucher to the committee when it met again to discuss Boucher’s tenure case. The committee determined Boucher was “doing really well” and “making satisfactory progress toward tenure and promotion,” despite Whitley’s evaluation. Nerger allegedly asked the committee to reconsider its report based on Whitley’s negative evaluation of Boucher after receiving the April 10 meeting report. Whitley wrote in a letter to Boucher on April 15, 2015 that his primary concern was her “personal interactions with others on campus,” which allegedly referred to Boucher’s sexual harassment complaint against Ben-Hur. Whitley also tried to take lab space away from Boucher’s husband, former computer science professor Jamie Ruiz, after he and Ben-Hur argued over Boucher receiving tenure and refused to sign off on a research grant for Boucher, according to court documents filed by Boucher. Nerger is said to have held the funds to pay Boucher and Ruiz’s graduate students until

they confirmed they would resign from CSU, according to court documents filed by Boucher. In June 2014, Boucher also received a 2.5 percent raise, making her the highestpaid assistant professor in the department given the length of her employment, according to court documents. But when raises were distributed for the 2015-2016 academic year for the first time after Boucher reported the sexual harassment, she said she received a raise of 1.79 percent, which was below the 2-percent raise average for other members of the department. CSU questions merit of retatlion allegations In response to Boucher’s lawsuit, CSU motioned for a judge to rule that the retaliation claims have no merit in Larimer County District Court May 28. If approved, the judge could decide to throw out the case prior to the scheduled Aug. 20 jury trial. CSU disputes the accusation that Boucher faced retaliation after filing the sexual harassment report since the department and college supervisors were already discussing Boucher’s professional behavior and progress toward tenure prior to the report. In an email to The Collegian, Boucher wrote the allegations within the motion are part of the

University’s retaliation. “My annual evaluations from the department chair had been consistently on-track for tenure, but after I reported the sexual harassment, my next annual evaluation was highly negative, as was his comprehensive threeyear review of my performance,” Boucher wrote. “They punished me for reporting the harassment more than they reprimanded my harasser. Outrageously, my harasser was allowed to continue to evaluate me after I made the report.” According to court documents, CSU claims Boucher cannot establish causation of retaliation and allegations of adverse actions against her, including that her annual evaluation and pay raises were negatively impacted following the sexual harassment report. The CSU motion also states that Title VII anti-retaliation provisions in the law “do not allow employees who are already on thin ice to insulate themselves against termination or discipline by preemptively making a discrimination complaint.” CSU claims Boucher received a poor performance review and raise based “on well-documented issues concerning (her) performance,” according to court documents. Boucher wrote that before

reporting the harassment, she was on track for tenure and felt secure in her position at the University. “During my time at CSU, I published 20 scientific articles and was part of three funded grants worth over $2.5 million,” Boucher wrote. “I reported the harassment because I felt comfortable with my success at CSU and I wanted the harassment to stop.” The University cites several incidents as warning signs prior to Boucher’s reported allegations of sexual harrassment. Whitley and Nerger said in court documents that those incidents include Boucher’s interactions with the Denver Zoo over a grant, an alleged refusal to teach life sciences students, and a disagreement about the extent of her permission to edit Whitley’s draft of a letter in support of a National Science Foundation grant application. In Boucher’s annual evaluation from 2014, Whitley indicated the incidents as justification for Boucher’s ratings of below expectations, according to court documents. Boucher’s attorneys asked the court to deny CSU’s previous motion for summary judgment June 11. The response challenges the University’s motion by stating additional material facts, with the intent of reaffirming Boucher’s allegation that CSU retaliated

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against her, according to Boucher. “CSU’s effort to deny me access to a fair trial is just another example of how they’ve tried to bully me for simply reporting sexual harassment,” Boucher wrote. “Today I told the truth about what CSU put me and my family through.” According to Boucher’s statement, the sexual harassment and retaliation were not isolated events, and she wrote she is aware of other female professors who have stories similar to her own, but she filed the information as suppressed to abide by the court’s protective order and chose not to use their names to protect their identities. Boucher wrote the “campaign of retaliation” she experienced was part of a culture of gender discrimination and her primary concern is that CSU’s response might deter survivors of sexual harassment and sexual assault from speaking up in the future. “My ultimate hope is that what happened to me is not repeated and that sexual harassment, discrimination and assault victims find the help and support that they need rather than retaliation,” Boucher wrote. Haley Candelario and Natalia Sperry can be reached at news@ collegian.com.


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NEWS Thursday, June 14, 2018

CAMPUS

Officers arrest suspect for felony menacing, bias-motivated crime By Samantha Ye @samye4

Fort Collins police responded to a call about a male with a gun who was threatening a man while making derogatory racial statements on the morning of June 12, according to a press release from the City. The victim reportedly had to hide from the suspect, who was said to have left the area on bike. The incident took place at the Briarwood Apartment Complex which is in proximity to Poudre High School. A children’s camp taking place in the school led to the building being put on lockout, according to the release. Police were able to identify the suspect as Lawrence Roth and took him into custody. Roth was booked into the Larimer County Jail on the following charges: Felony Menacing (class 5 felony), Bias-Motivated Crime (class 1 misdemeanor), and Violation of Bond Conditions (class 6

Lawrence Roth was booked into the Larimer County Jail on the following charges: Felony Menacing, Bias-Motivated Crime, and Violation of Bond Conditions.

PHOTO COURTESY OF FORT COLLINS POLICE SERVICES

felony). All charges are merely accusations by law enforcement officers, and the arrested party will be presumed innocent until proven guilty in court, according to FCPS. Samantha Ye can be reached at news@collegian.com.

CITY

Fort Collins community remembers Joe Allen By Matt Bailey @matnes1999

Robert Joseph Allen, a 50-year-old Fort Collins man who worked at Fossil Ridge High School as an Alternative Cooperative Education coordinator and teacher, died last Wednesday in the waters of the Pacific Ocean by Rockaway Beach, Ore. while trying to save his son, Samuel Vicente Allen, who has since been presumed dead. In the week that has passed since Joe Allen’s death, several FRHS coworkers, friends and a student have reached out to The Collegian and shared their stories and comments. “Joe was the kindest person I ever met!” Carol Petruska, a friend and former Safeway coworker of Joe Allen, wrote in an email to The Collegian. “He was a hard worker. He loved his family more than anything. As you can see, he would even risk his own life for them.” Petruska wrote Joe Allen would always greet her with a warm smile and with the utmost kindness, and he offered her a job when she thought there was no opportunity left for her. “He will be missed greatly,” Petruska wrote.“God must have needed Joe for something else. What a beautiful soul!” Lisa Murphy, whose son Michael was in Joe Allen’s ACE program for one semester, described Joe Allen as a person who always had a caring smile who was able to relate to kids with special needs in a way which they enjoyed. “After my son graduated from high school, we didn’t see Mr. Joe unless we went to the local Safeway store where he was also working,” Murphy wrote to The Collegian. “When he would see my son Michael come into the store, they would immediately start making this sound towards each other that had started when Michael was

at the high school and Michael has never forgotten it. It was their thing.” Murphy wrote that their family is very thankful Joe Allen was a part of their son’s life. David Van Skiver, a FRHS students who was also in Joe Allen’s ACE program, said that he was a very nice person who helped him a lot, especially during tough times. Joe Allen taught Van Skiver individual living skills and how to get a job. Van Skiver said that when he failed and advisory class, Joe Allen helped him figure out what to say to his parents. “I’ll remember the good times I had with him in class, like all the funny jokes he told,” Van Skiver said. “He and I would be able to talk sometimes before and after class. I’m going to miss him so much.” Shawna Schade, whose son Dominic was also in Joe Allen’s ACE program, explained how Joe Allen helped her son who suffers from epilepsy in an email to The Collegian. “My son started Fossil five years ago,” Schade wrote. “I was so worried that he would have a hard time fitting in or be bullied because of his disability. Mr. Allen helped Dominic become a little bit more independent.” Joe Allen, who was a part of Dominic’s life for the past five years, taught Dominic working skills, such as how to count money and give change back, and he built up Dominic’s confidence overall. “He was a great man and individual,” Schade said. “He was the type of person that was so selfless and always had a smile on his face. All the kids loved him. He was just a great person all around. He will be greatly missed.” Jesse Mathews, who taught at FRHS with Joe Allen, described Joe Allen as a friendly, empathetic guy

who made FRHS a much more enjoyable place. Mathews said the way Joe Allen worked with kids was especially inspiring, saying that Joe Allen would never seem to grow impatient and was very exuberant. “Mainly every day, I would get a coffee and/or a burrito from the School Grounds where he’d work with the kids, teaching them skills,” Mathews said. “He’d help them count change and make drinks. Sometimes when things got hard at work, just taking a little break to go and get a coffee and talk to him was a nice thing to look forward to at work.” The coffee cart program Mathews would meet Joe Allen at was one of a number of student-run school businesses Joe Allen helped build, FRHS Principal Julie Chaplain said. “Every morning, our staff members would go there to get coffee, and Joe’s welcoming face would be there every morning to greet them as they came in,” Chaplain said. Chaplain explained how she worked with Joe Allen as she moved through the administration, saying that as a special education teacher herself, she worked with many kids together with Joe Allen and was able to watch her students grow because of him. Chaplain said that Joe Allen helped change students’ lives, making efforts to partner with other local businesses who could help kids and frequently applying for grants for his students. “He had a unique way of making kids feel so connected and so valuable,” Chaplain said. “As a person, Joe was one of the kindest, most patient men I’ve ever known, and everybody who came into contact I think immediately felt his warmth and his love.” Matt Bailey can be reached at news@collegian.com.


NEWS Thursday, June 14, 2018

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POLITICS

Guide to the 2018 Colorado primaries By Samantha Ye @samxye4

Larimer County voters will see five contested races for federal, state and local seats in the June 26 primary election, the first primary to allow unaffiliated voters to participate. The Colorado governor’s race now has eight candidates running, with the Republican and Democratic Parties each putting up four. The secretary of state position will also be contested on both sides, while the Democratic Party will be deciding their candidate for state attorney general. At a local level, Democrats have two options for house representative in District 2, which encompasses Larimer County. The Republican Party has put forth two candidates for a Larimer County commissioner seat. How to Vote For the first time, major Parties must allow Colorado’s nearly 1.2 million unaffiliated voters, the state’s largest segment of active voters, to vote in their primaries due to Proposition 108  passing in the 2016 election. There are more than 84,000 unaffiliated voters in Larimer County, according to State records.

DROPBOX LOCATIONS The following drop box locations will accept ballots 24 hours day until 7 p.m. election night: ■ Larimer County Courthouse, 200 W Oak St, Fort Collins ■ Loveland Vehicle Licensing Branch Office, 205 E 6th St, Loveland ■ Estes Park Vehicle Licensing Branch Office, 1601 Brodie Ave, Estes Park Unaffiliated voters who did not request a specific Party’s ballot by the deadline will receive ballots for both the Democratic and Republican Party. However, those who want their vote to be counted must vote using only one of the ballots. Voting on both, even if they are for different seats, will

result in the ballots being thrown out. The primary Party someone votes in will also be public record to ensure there is no double voting. The voter, however, will remain unaffiliated. Party-affiliated voters will still only receive their designated Party’s ballot. Mail-in ballots must be received by the County Clerk’s office by 7 p.m. on election night. If ballots are not mailed in by June 18, the clerk’s office recommends dropping it off in-person at one of the ballot drop box locations to ensure the ballot will be delivered on time. Those who still need to register to vote can do so on the Colorado Secretary of State website. Governor Democrats Mike Johnston: Johnston has proposed increased funding to education and infrastructure by repealing the “worst” parts of TABOR or the Taxpayer Bill of Rights in the Colorado Constitution. His #4NoMore gun safety plan outlines a ban on high capacity magazines, bump stocks and implementing universal background checks for every firearm purchase, according to his campaign website. Cary Kennedy: In her campaign announcement, Kennedy spotlighted public education reform as one of her reasons for running and has promised to make education Colorado’s number one priority with increased funding and teacher pay. Her campaign website includes issues such as increased gun control for gun violence prevention, accessible and affordable healthcare through a public option and affordability in the face of growth. Donna Lynne: According to her campaign website,  Lynne plans to make insurance more affordable by potentially allowing employees of school districts, local governments and small businesses to join the health plan offered to state employees.  Her campaign also highlights protecting the environment and moving to clean energy through strengthening the Colorado

Oil and Gas Conservation Commission and advancing “an aggressive clean transportation agenda.” Jared Polis: Polis’ campaign website  emphasizes  providing quality education for students, specifically universal, free, fullday preschool and kindergarten through state funding.  He is also the only candidate to support universal single-payer health care or Medicare for All. His website states such a system would increase health care options and accessibility while taking administrative burden off of small businesses.  Republicans Greg Lopez: In a gubernatorial candidate forum in March, Lopez emphasized ensuring state actions represent both urban and rural priorities. Lopez’s campaign website emphasizes public education, Second Amendment rights and civil liberties as being his priorities. Additionally, he advocates for Public Employees Retirement System reform and the rights of small businesses.  Victor Mitchell: In a visit to Colorado State University, Mitchell said there will be no public college tuition increases while he is governor. He also advocates for cutting business regulations, setting up primary care “health-wagon clinics” and complete transparency on the allocation of cannabis revenue, according to his campaign website. Doug Robinson: In an interview with Colorado Public Radio, Robinson said the single biggest problem facing the state right now is roads. He would fund thestate’sneglectedinfrastructure through bonds, since he does not support a tax increase at this time. His campaign website also states he would ensure those who use marijuana recreationally are not buying from the medical marketplace and would use increased revenue to educate kids on the dangers of cannabis. Walker Stapleton: In a question and answer session with the Arvada Press, Stapleton said his two major goals as governor would include prioritizing transportation and affordable housing, making their

development more streamlined in order to reduce costs. According to his campaign website,  he opposes sanctuary cities and will defend the second amendment by repealing the “misguided 2013 gun control laws” and will allow teachers to carry firearms for protection. State Treasurer Republicans Justin Everett: A state representative since 2013, the Jefferson County native promotes small government and fiscal conservatism, according to his campaign website.  Polly Lawrence: Lawrence has been a Republican member of the Colorado House of Representatives since 2013, and according to her campaign website she plans to reform PERA and move to a multi-year budget. Brian Watson: The real estate CEO has positioned himself as a Colorado business leader with significant financial experience and has pledged not to take a salary from the government if elected, according to his campaign website.  Democrats Bernard Douthit: An experienced businessman with no prior time spent in public office, Douthit hopes to work with legislature to streamline the tax filing process and create a Colorado public bank to help local businesses, according to his campaign website.  Dave Young: Young has worked as a teacher, a state representative and a member of the Joint Budget Committee in Colorado government and proposed funding for education and reforming TABOR, according to his campaign website.  Attorney General Democrats Joe Salazar: Elected to the Colorado House of Representatives in 2012, Salazar has experience practicing civil rights and constitutional law in Colorado as well as policy making, according to his campaign website. Phil Weiser: Under Barack Obama, Weiser worked as Deputy Assistant Attorney General in the Justice Department’s Antitrust Division and later participated in

policy initiatives as senior advisor for technology and innovation to the National Economic Council Director, according to his campaign website. Republican George Brauchler: The only Republican candidate, Brauchler is currently a district attorney representing the 18th Judicial District.  House Representative for District 2 Democrats Joe Neguse: According to his campaign website,  his stances include fighting for a clean DREAM Act, banning fracking on all federal public lands, and encouraging states to pass “Red Flag” laws to prevent people deemed at risk to themselves or others from accessing firearms.  Mark Williams: His campaign website includes issues such as removing big money out of political campaigns, ending the war on drugs and supporting Medicaid for All.  Republican Peter Yu: The only Republican candidate, Yu’s campaign website states that he is an experienced business executive who hopes to curb government spending. Larimer County Commissioner for District 1 Republicans Sean Dougherty: Dougherty, now a real estate agent, has spent a significant portion of his 19 years in Larimer County on community involvement including chairing the Larimer County Planning Commission and spending 16 years as a member of the Fort Collins Chamber of Commerce, according to his campaign website.  Chalon Kintzley: the fourth generation Larimer County native’s campaign page states he is “not a politician.” With his pilot’s license and local business, Kintzley pledges to find solutions and do work with long-term goals and effects in mind. Democrat John Kefalas: The only Democratic candidate, Kefalas is currently a state senator for District 14, which includes Fort Collins. Samantha Ye can be reached at news@collegian.com.


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OPINION Thursday, June 14, 2018

COLLEGIAN COLUMNIST

Religion shouldn’t excuse discriminatory attitudes Tony VillalobosMay @TheTonyVM

Editor’s Note: All opinion section content reflects the views of the individual author only and does not represent a stance taken by The Collegian or its editorial board. “No Gays Allowed” is trending on Twitter following a Supreme Court decision last week. While this case might not directly affect many laws and discrimination policies, it does have negative consequences on how people will follow it up. Following a few months of controversy and confusion, SCOTUS agreed to view the case of Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission, a case that started in Littleton,Colorado. The shop refused service to samesex couple Charlie Craig and David Mullins in 2012.

The shop’s owner, Jack Phillips, declined the service citing his Christian beliefs as the reason why he would not make them a wedding cake, but they were allowed to buy other baked goods from the store. At the time, Colorado did not recognize same-sex marriages. After a round of appeals and complaints the couple filed through the Colorado Civil Rights Commission, the decision eventually reached the Supreme Court, and Phillip’s decision was narrowly defended 7-2. Yes, I said narrowly. While the tally says something different, the court’s opinions were segmented and calculated. The decision was made particularly due to the specific facts of this case. Regardless of the intentions of neutrality of religious affiliations, the courts allowing a form of action that leads to some kind of discrimination against LGBT individuals has the potential to open a plethora of potential issues. The SCOTUS handled this

case with care and seemingly with very specific rulings that would appear to try and prevent further segmentation on the issue. But the case still emboldens others to refuse service to LGBTQ customers, it compromises equality in the name of religious liberty and it continues perpetuating an idea of LGBTQ as a microculture that is easy for others to dismiss. “No Gays Allowed” started trending on Twitter. The sign was placed up by a Tennessee based Amyx Hardware store nearly three years ago after the legalization of same-sex marriage in 2015, but attention was brought back last week. “The reason I put up the sign is to let the homosexual people know that there are Christian people that are willing to take a stand,” owner Jeff Amyx told a local news organization. The fact that “No Gays Allowed” is trending in and of itself is problematic. While the issues are not the same and should not

be treated as such, the mirroring of “No Gays Allowed” with dozens of different identities and races is concerning. Religious freedom is not an excuse to discriminate against other people.

“The real problem is more than allowing businesses to refuse services to individuals of protected classes. now the court has provided them with a legitimate justification for being homophobic.” The freedom of practice in this situation is as big of an issue as everyone is making it seem. As a citizen and freelance photographer, I do like the idea of being able to refuse to work for individuals  that would prefer

COLLEGIAN COLUMNIST

Trump’s name calling represents a bigger problem By Rory Plunkett @jericho_wav

Editor’s Note: All opinion section content reflects the views of the individual author only and does not represent a stance taken by The Collegian or its editorial board. During a May 23 White House meeting on immigration President Donald Trump referred to illegal immigrants saying that, “these aren’t people, these are animals.” Trump later said that he was referring to the MS-13 gangs that are coming through our border. “When the MS-13 comes in, when the other gang members come into our country, I refer to them as animals. And guess what – I always will,” Trump said.   Ironically MS-13 is a major gang that originated in the United States While its first members were immigrants of mainly Salvadorian descent, MS-13 was established in Los Angeles in the 80s. Trump’s remarks are prejudiced and an attempt to justify the administration’s preparations to split families apart who cross the U.S. and Mexican border illegally and hold their children on military bases. The use of dehumanizing rhetoric is a consistent trend in American history and a common weapon in white nationalism’s

arsenal. From the pseudo-science that claimed that African people have differently shaped skulls and smaller brains, to the language in our justice system that allowed children to be tried as adults, labeled murderers or felons, and then put on death row to await an execution date; all of this language is devised and methodically crafted in order to dehumanize and justify the killing, enslavement and imprisonment of real people. It is no mistake that the people whoareconsistentlydehumanized throughout American history are not considered white. This is why the President’s remarks are so disturbing and pertinent to our nation’s conversation. The President’s language describing real people with families, friends and relationships as something other than humans makes it easier for us as a nation to condemn groups of people. We then fall into the trap that is fear, anger and detachment from those who we deem lesser. To call another human being an animal is an offense to their experiences, ideals and humanity. This type of language opens the door for legal capital punishment, and is a contributor to why America is one of the most developed countries with the most executions and why

America was a global leader in the execution of juveniles. In his book “Just Mercy”, Bryan Stevenson, founder of the Equal Justice Initiative, said that “capital punishment means ‘them’ without the capital get the punishment.” It would be easy to look at specific groups as “others” and separate them from Americans, or a person who has committed a crime and say that they are the issue and that they are a criminal. But what does that say about us as a people, as a society? When we accept these words that our President spews, we accept that it is possible to become un-human, that it is possible to be born un-human. I do not advocate for crime, but it must be said that many criminals are not monsters. When you make a mistake, you would hope that people wouldn’t lose grasp of their humanity. What we deem as “criminals” are still people. The words we use and things we say are what we will remember and what our society will be remembered for. I do not want to remember our President referring to and treating real people as animals, for that shames us as a nation. Rory Plunkett can be reached at letters@collegian.com.

I cease to exist, and there are situations I feel like refusing services to others is perfectly valid, but do not blame a religion for your own prejudices. The real problem is more than allowing businesses to refuse services to individuals of protected classes.  Now the court has provided them with a legitimate justification for being homophobic. It wasn’t about the cake, it wasn’t about the sign. And it isn’t about the Bible.  It’s about being a decent person. We need to be able to recognize that when we start sacrificing individual rights in the name or religion, we are opening the door for continued intolerance under the pretense of “religious liberty”. A line must be drawn when one person’s beliefs can actively harm another person. Tony Villalobos-May can be reached at letters@collegian.com.

NOPE DOPE Packages that get destroyed in the mail.

Homemade ice cream!

Summer Classes

Stanley Cup viewing parties

Double-digit days of work without a day off When you are trying to take someone’s order and they won’t get off their phone Hail damage

Actually finding parking in Old Town because the crowds are down in summer. Employee discounts

People that open the Ram’s Village pool gate for “visitors”


SPORTS Thursday, June 14, 2018

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MEN’S BASKETBALL

Watch out for CSU’s rejuvenation under Medved Luke Zahlmann @lukezahlmann

A dream job forced the hand of new men’s basketball coach Niko Medved to journey from Drake University to the mountain ranges of Fort Collins, and the program will not only recover, but thrive in the aftermath. The first step along the path for Medved was to acclimate himself with the returning Rams, building a path to minimal turnover from a roster perspective. Keeping dominant big man Nico Carvacho, as well as guards Kris Martin and Anthony Bonner was a big step for Medved. Though Martin and Carvacho looked to move elsewhere at the onset of the offseason, they will both be suiting up in green and gold for the 2018-2019 season. Key contributors remaining with the program was a big move for a team looking to compete in the rigorous Mountain West with Carvacho coming off his best season as a Ram, averaging a near doubledouble for the season, with an increase in production in the conference season.

The loss of leading scorer Prentiss Nixon, who moved on to Iowa State, will sting. As one of under 30 players for the Rams to have 1,000 career points, Nixon leaves a legacy as a Ram for better or worse as a scoring threat from all areas of the court. Fortunately, Medved was able to replace the losses with point guard Kendle Moore, along with the addition of a pair of forwards in Adam Thistlewood and Jack Schoemann with Thistlewood posing as the first Colorado player to commit to the program in half a decade. Alongside convincing his standouts to stay put, Medved was also tasked with creating a coaching staff that fits his vision of collegiate basketball in Fort Collins, a duty that was fulfilled soundly. The hiring of Ali Farokhmanesh was a big step toward continuity for the former Drake head coach as Farokhmanesh helped the rebuilding of the Bulldogs as well. A former pro in Europe, Farokhmanesh has a solid foundation of knowledge and has shown an ability to mesh with Medved as well as a potency for recruiting as shown with Thistlewood’s commitment; a big plus for the upcoming season. Medved also brought assistants JR Blount and Dave

Thorson to round out his staff. With the inclusion of assistants from Drake, Medved will be able to continue the trend set at his former job, and attempt yet another accelerated rebuild. Success off the court has proven to be of vital importance to Medved as well as he seeks to erase the memory of silence from the program under coach Larry Eustachy. Medved has gone to greet fans multiple times, exemplified with media and fans alike at the CSU Green and Gold scrimmage. The inclusion in the activities of other programs along with students will go a long way toward filling the stands of Moby once again and revitalizing the acclaimed “Moby Madness.” The return of a true home-court advantage can grow the program’s success on and off the hardwood. With the recent announcement of the conference schedule, the Rams are slated to begin their conference season shortly after the new year on Jan. 2 with a matchup in Las Vegas, their first trip back to Sin City following their first-round exit in the Mountain West Tournament. Along the way, Medved will also be faced with the Martin twins in Nevada once again as they return for their senior seasons, as well as the rest of

Niko Medved calls out a play during the first round of the CollegeInsider. com tournament game between Drake University and Abilene Christian University on March 12 in the Knapp Center. PHOTO COURTESY OF KELSEY KREMER THE DES MOINES REGISTER

the top-heavy Mountain West conference. Though he will be tested, Medved has worked wonders elsewhere and plans to continue the trend at the helm of the Rams. The Rams will only be tasked with facing San Diego State Aztecs once, with the San Jose Spartans being the other unbalanced portion of their conference schedule. Though their trips to the west coast will be lessened, the Rams received a lucky draw with the Aztecs being featured only once. From the beginning, Medved has brought his charisma in the face of adversity, with his colors of competitiveness shining through.

“My goal is to build a program that is seen as one of the best programs in the Mountain West, that can contend year in and year out,” Medved said in an interview with the Loveland ReporterHerald. Medved has the right staff, the right core of players and the right mindset to turn the program around. This would be a feat that will land the Rams in the upper-echelon of the conference by mid-season, a deep run in Vegas awaiting them. Luke Zahlmann can be reached at sports@collegian. com.

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Columbia Crest H3 Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, Merlot, Red Blend, Sauvignon Blanc ............................ $11.99 Fetzer All Types ............................... $6.99 Fog Mountain  Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, Field Blend, Pinot Noir - Save $5 .. $9.99 Gnarly Head All Types ................. $7.99 Hess  Select: Chardonnay, Pinot Gris, Sauvignon Blanc ................................ $9.99 Select: Cabernet Sauvignon, Malbec, Pinot Noir, Treo Red Blend .......... $14.99 Artezin Zinfandel............................ $12.99 Collection: Napa Chardonnay ... $17.99 Collection: Allomi Cabernet....... $24.99 Collection: Block 19 Cuvee......... $29.99 Collection: Lion Tamer ................ $36.99 Collection: Cabernet Sauvignon ..$49.99

Clos du Bois Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, Merlot, Pinot Grigio, Pinot Noir, Sauvignon Blanc, Zinfandel ....... $9.99 Lightly Bubbled Chardonnay.. $11.99 Russian River Reserve: Chardonnay................................. $14.99 Alexander Reserve: Cabernet Sauvignon ................. $19.99

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14 Hands

All wines 750 ml unless noted otherwise

AMERICAN WINES

Brandy Grand Amber VS 1.75 L ................................................. $16.99 Courvoisier VS Cognac 750 ml................................................ $24.99 Hennessy VS Cognac 750 ml................................................ $34.99 Sambucca Di Puglia  Sambucca Liqueur 750 ml................................................ $14.99 Baileys Irish Cream 750 ml................................................ $17.99 Disaronno Amaretto Liqueur 750 ml................................................ $17.99 Kahlua Coffee Liqueur 1.75 L ................................................. $25.99 Rum Chata Rum Cream Liqueur 750 ml................................................ $17.99 Angel’s & Demons  Cinnamon Whiskey 750 ml................................................... $9.99 Paisley & Sage  Triple Sec, Sour Apple or Peach 750 ml................................................... $7.99 Buccia Limone Limoncello Liqueur 750 ml................................................ $13.99

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FRENCH WINE

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Predicat Priorat - Save $5 ........ $12.99

El Jamon Garnacha, Tempranillo ................ $6.99 Crianza ............................................. $9.99

Campo Viejo Tempranillo ......................................... $8.99 Reserva.............................................. $12.99 Gran Reserva ................................... $22.99 El Circo  Cabernet Sauvignon, Garnacha, Tempranillo .................... $8.99

SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE WINE

Gascogne Blanc ................................. $7.99 La Domeliere Rasteau .............. $10.99 La Ferme du Mont  Cotes du Rhone Blanc, Cotes du Rhone Rouge................. $14.99 Chateauneuf-du-Pape Blanc Save $20 ........................................... $39.99 Le Carredon  Cabernet Sauvignon......................... $7.99

Delatour All Types ......................... $6.99 Domaine de Maubet 

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Sancerre - Save $10 ...................... $22.99

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IMPORTED WINES

Mile High Winery Cabernet Sauvignon, Grateful Red........................... $16.99 Port 375 ml ..................................... $16.99

Colorado Wines

Zinfandel Howell Mountain Save $10 ........................................... $24.99 Sutter Home All Types ...... $2 for $10 Undaunted  Malbec - Save $5 ........................... $14.99 Wente  Riesling................................................. $7.99 Morning Fog Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc ............................. $11.99 Cabernet Sauvignon...................... $12.99 Riva Ranch Chardonnay ............... $14.99

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Second Growth Pinot Gris, Rosé - Save $5 ....... $13.99

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Orin Swift Abstract Red ................................ $30.99 Machete Red, Palermo Cabernet Sauvignon.. $44.99 Papillon Red ................................ $57.99

Mark West Chardonnay, Pinot Grigio, Pinot Noir............................................ $8.99 Pinot Noir Black ............................. $11.99 Meiomi  Chardonnay ..................................... $16.99 Pinot Noir, Rosé.............................. $18.99 Mind Bender Chardonnay......... $9.99 Mud Pie  Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, Petite Syrah, Red Blend, Sauvignon Blanc, Zinfandel ........... $9.99 Murphy Goode  Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, Merlot, Red Blend, Pinot Noir, Sauvignon Blanc ............................. $11.99 Liar’s Dice Zinfandel ...................... $15.99

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1.75 L ................................................. $18.99 Monkey Shoulder Scotch 750 ml................................................ $24.99 Johnnie Walker  Red Label Scotch 1.75 L ................................................. $31.99 Black Label Scotch 750 ml................................................ $30.99 Green Label Scotch 750 ml................................................ $54.99 18 yr old Scotch 750 ml................................................ $64.99 Blue Label Scotch 750 ml..............................................$189.99 Ghost Blue Label Scotch 750 ml..............................................$324.99 Odyssey Scotch 750 ml..............................................$799.99 Glenmorangie 10 yr old Single Malt 750 ml................................................ $28.99 Glenfiddich  12 yr old Single Malt 750 ml................................................ $31.99 14 yr old Single Malt 750 ml................................................ $44.99 15 yr old Sherry Cask Single Malt 750 ml................................................ $44.99 IPA Cask Single Malt 750 ml................................................ $59.99 18 yr old Single Malt 750 ml................................................ $79.99 21 yr old Single Malt 750 ml..............................................$139.99 26 yr old Single Malt 750 ml..............................................$449.99 Talisker  Storm Single Malt 750 ml................................................ $39.99 12 yr old Single Malt 750 ml................................................ $59.99

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SCOTCH & SINGLE MALTS

1.75 L ................................................. $13.99 New Amsterdam Gin 1.75 L ................................................. $17.99 Gray’s Peak Small Batch Gin 1.75 L ................................................. $24.99 Hendrick’s Ultra Premium Gin 750 ml................................................ $26.99 Beefeater Gin 1.75 L ................................................. $29.99 Tanqueray Gin & Rangpur Gin 1.75 L ................................................. $33.99 Taaka Vodka 1.75 L .................................................... $8.99 Le Beau Imported Vodka 750 ml................................................ $13.99 New Amsterdam Vodka 1.75 L ................................................. $17.99 Smirnoff Vodka & Flavored Vodkas 1.75 L ................................................. $17.99 Finlandia Vodka 1.75 L ................................................. $17.99 Gray’s Peak Small Batch Vodka 1.75 L ................................................. $19.99 Belvedere Ultra Premium Vodka 750 ml................................................ $23.99 Stoli Vodka 1.75 L ................................................. $24.99 Tito’s Texas Vodka 1.75 L ................................................. $26.99

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750 ml................................................ $13.99 Tullamore Dew Irish Whiskey 750 ml................................................ $19.99 12 yr old Irish Whiskey 750 ml................................................ $39.99 14 yr old Irish Whiskey 750 ml................................................ $59.99 15 yr old Irish Whiskey 750 ml................................................ $64.99 18 yr old Irish Whiskey 750 ml................................................ $99.99 Jameson Irish Whiskey 1.75 L ................................................. $37.99

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IRISH WHISKEY

1.75 L ................................................. $11.99 Seagrams 7 Whiskey 1.75 L ................................................. $16.99 Pendleton Canadian Whiskey 750 ml................................................ $19.99 Crown Royal Canadian Whiskey 1.75 L ................................................. $39.99

Cuervo Authentics Pre Mixed Margs 1.75 L ................................................. $10.99 Cuervo Silver & Gold Tequila 1.75 L ................................................. $22.99 Black Box Tequila 1.75 L ................................................. $19.99 Patron  Silver Tequila 750 ml................................................ $34.99 Reposado Tequila 750 ml................................................ $39.99 Anejo Tequila 750 ml................................................ $49.99 Sauza Hornitos  Reposado or Plata Tequila 1.75 L ................................................. $24.99 Don Julio  Silver Tequila 750 ml................................................ $39.99 Reposado Tequila 750 ml................................................ $42.99 Anejo Tequila 750 ml................................................ $44.99 70th Anniversary Tequila 750 ml................................................ $44.99 1942 Tequila 750 ml................................................ $94.99

TEQUILA

1.75 L ................................................. $12.99 Malibu Coconut Rum 1.75 L ................................................. $17.99 Captain Morgan Spiced Rum 1.75 L ................................................. $21.99

Admiral Nelson Spiced Rum

Louis Martini Cabernet Sauvignon Sonoma $14.99 Cabernet Sauvignon Alexander Valley ....................... $24.99 Cabernet Sauvignon Napa ...... $34.99

Long Path Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay ........................................ $8.99

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Peter Vella Delicious Blush, Delicious Red, Delicious White, Sangria 5.0 L ................................................... $12.99 Burgundy, Cabernet Sauvignon, Chablis, Chardonnay, Merlot, White Zin 5.0 L ................................................... $15.99

La Vieille Ferme Blanc, Rosé, Rouge 3.0 L ............................................... $19.99

Yellow Tail All Types 1.5 L ....................................................... $9.99 Bota Box All Types 3.0 L ................................................... $16.99

Woodbridge All Types 1.5 L................................................ $10.99

Frontera All Types 1.5 L ....................................................... $8.99 Livingston Cellars All Types 1.5 L ....................................................... $5.99 Meridian  Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay 1.5 L ....................................................... $9.99 Montecampo  Montepulciano d’Abruzzo - Save $5 1.5 L .................................................... $14.99 Ruffino All Types 1.5 L .................................................... $15.99

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Brut, Extra Dry, Sweet Cuvee, Sweet Rose....................................... $12.99 Natural, Organic Brut .................... $14.99 Lamarca Prosecco ..................... $12.99 Moet & Chandon  Imperial ............................................ $44.99 Nectar ............................................... $49.99 Brut Rosé, Nectar Imperial Rosé....$64.99

Korbel

Devaux Cuvee Rosé - Save $10 ............ $39.99 Cuvee D - Save $10 .................. $49.99

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Barefoot Bubbly All Types......... $9.99 Borgo SanLeo Prosecco Brut . $12.99 Chandon 

SPARKLING WINES

Cono Sur Organic Cabernet/Carmenere, Pinot Noir, Sauvignon Blanc ....................... $9.99

Organic & Sustainably Grown Wine

Prophecy Sauvignon Blanc ........ $9.99 Whitehaven Sauvignon Blanc ...$14.99

Bin Series: All Types ......................... $5.99

Lindemans

Jacobs Creek Reserve All Types ......................................... $8.99

Cabernet Sauvignon, “Banished” Dark Red, Red Wine, “The Uprising” Red............................. $8.99

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AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND WINE

Cabernet Sauvignon, Malbec, Pinot Noir............................................ $7.99

Graffigna Malbec ...................... $8.99 Spice Block  Malbec.................. $11.99 Trapiche  

Rosado, Torrontes/Riesling ............ $8.99 Malbec .............................................. $12.99 Casillero del Diablo All Types ............................................... $7.99 Cono Sur  All Types (excluding organics)........ $6.99

Amalaya

SOUTH AMERICAN WINE

Sant’Agata “Baby Barb” Barbera ....................... $10.99 Barbera d’Asti Altea ....................... $13.99 Santa Margherita  Pinot Grigio, Chianti Classico ..... $21.99 Tenuta Novare  Valpolicella Ripasso ....................... $14.99

Dolcelina Sweet Red, Nero d’Avola, Primitivo ............... $6.99 Barbera d’Alba, Barbera Passito, Brachetto, Chianti, Gavi, Moscato d’Asti ............................ $10.99 Chianti Classico .......................... $11.99 Barbaresco ................................... $13.99

ITALIAN WINE

Cavit All Types ................................. $6.99 Ink Monster “Zinfandel” .......... $10.99 Natale Verga 

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CANADIAN WHISKEY

Black Velvet Canadian Whiskey

RUM

Glenlivet 12 yr old Single Malt 1.75 L ................................................. $59.99 Lagavulin 16 yr old Single Malt 750 ml................................................ $79.99

La Vieille Ferme

Wilbur the Wine Wizard

50 ml................................................ $14.99 Old Crow Whiskey .75 L ................................................. $16.99 Black Box Whiskey .75 L ................................................. $19.99 Basil Hayden Small Batch Whiskey 50 ml................................................ $34.99 Jack Daniels  Whiskey .75 L ................................................. $35.99 Gentleman Jack 50 ml................................................ $24.99 Single Barrel Jack 50 ml................................................ $35.99

Stetson Whiskey

AMERICAN WHISKEY

LIQUEUR

Dundee 30 pack cans .................................... $14.99 Bud, Bud Light & Budweiser Select  24 pack cans .................................... $17.99 Coors & Coors Light  20 pack btls ...................................... $15.99 Miller Lite  8 pack cans .................................... $14.99 Land Shark  2 pack btls ...................................... $11.99 Elysian  Dayglow IPA & Space Dust IPA 6 pack btls ........................................ $10.99 Immortal IPA & Superfuzz Blood Orange Pale 6 pack btls ........................................... $8.99 Four Peaks  Hop Knot IPA, Kilt Lifter Scottish Ale & Peach Ale 6 pack btls ........................................... $8.99 Four Noses  Bout Damn Time IPA 6 pack cans ......................................... $9.99 Bareback Blonde & Simcoe Pale Ale 6 pack cans ......................................... $8.99 Laika Boss Russian Imperial Stout 4 pack cans.......................................... $8.99 Anchor Brewing Variety Pack 2 pack btls ...................................... $16.99 Liquid Mechanics  Hopacity, Hop Nectar American Ale, IPA & Kolsch 6 pack cans ......................................... $8.99 Steamworks  Colorado Kolsch, Steam Engine Lager & Third Eye Pale 6 pack cans ......................................... $8.99 Estes Park  Blueberry Wheat, Raspberry Wheat, Renegade IPA, Samson Stout & Stinger Honey Wheat 6 pack btls ........................................... $8.99 Prost  Maibock 6 pack btls ........................................... $8.99 Dunkel, Kolsch, Pils & Weissbier 6 pack btls ........................................... $7.99 Montucky Cold Snacks 2 pack cans ....................................... $8.99 Kokanee  2 pack btls ...................................... $10.99 Tecate & Tecate Light  2 pack cans .................................... $12.99 Duval  Belgian Golden Ale & Tripel Hop 4 pack btls ........................................ $14.99 Paulaner Hefe Weizen & Oktoberfest 2 pack b tls ..................................... $13.99 Singha  6 pack btls ........................................... $7.99 Pilsner Urquell  2 pack btls ...................................... $14.99 Amstel Light  2 pack btls ...................................... $13.99 Heineken & Heineken Light  2 pack btls ...................................... $13.99 McEwans Scotch Ale 4 pack btls ........................................... $8.99 Murphy’s Draught Style Stout 4 pack cans.......................................... $7.99 Palm Breeze  Pineapple Mandarin Orange, Ruby Grapefruit & Strawberry Pineapple 6 pack cans ......................................... $6.99

Hudson Single Barrel Bourbon 750 ml................................................ $39.99 High West Single Barrel Bourbon 750 ml................................................ $39.99 Bulleit  Small Batch Whiskey or Rye Whiskey 1.75 L ................................................. $39.99 Stranahan’s  Small Batch Colorado Whiskey 750 ml................................................ $44.99 Sherry Cask Colorado Whiskey 750 ml................................................ $64.99 Makers Mark Whiskey 1.75 L ................................................. $44.99 Private Select Whiskey 750 ml................................................ $64.99 Jefferson’s Single Barrel Bourbon 750 ml................................................ $52.99

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8 Thursday, June 14, 2018 | The Rocky Mountain Collegian The Rocky Mountain Collegian | Thursday, June 14, 2018

9


10

SPORTS Thursday, June 14, 2018

SOFTBALL

Rams have reason to be optimistic after up-and-down 2018 By Mack Beaulieu @Macknz_James

The Colorado State Rams had one of their best seasons in recent memory this year as a season with highs and lows that led to the team’s first postseason selection in 15 years, as well as wins over major conference opponents. The Rams rode the strength of their pitching throughout the season, but with a team that would go cold for long stretches, the Rams never reached the peak of where they might go. Despite that, the relatively young Rams put together a season to remember. “We had a couple of program-changing wins,” said coach Jen Fisher. “I think we proved to ourselves that we can beat some of those top 50 teams. Secondly, I think their leadership and their teamwork was really exceptional. Moving forward, they’ll leave that legacy of a strong team that will become important to future generations.” The Rams started the 2018 season with its longest win streak of the season and showings against power five conference teams that made it seem like the Rams were poised to do big things. They picked up wins against Wisconsin and Texas along the way before their first loss of the season to Arizona. The stretch included some

of the best run support the Rams would get in a year that saw some rough offensive stretches for the Rams, but through their 7-1 start they produced big offenses from Sarah Muzik, Corina Gamboa and Amber Nelson. Bridgette Hutton started six games and got off to a 4-1 start in what amounted to an All-Mountain West season. After beating rival Northern Colorado to follow up the Arizona game, the Rams dropped five-straight games and could not manage more than three runs in any game during the streak. It was the first of the cold stretches that plagued the Rams throughout the season, despite having the conference’s third best batting average. The Rams took their five straight losses into the Colorado State Classic where they seemingly flipped the script during a five-game sweep against St. Johns, Idaho State and Utah Valley University. Going into conference play with a 14-6 record, the Rams had reason to believe they were in for a special season. While their conference heightened, conference play was rocky in the Mountain West with four teams winning over 30 games and six of nine teams finishing over .500 for the year. The Rams proceeded through conference series much like they did the non-

conference, with the difference often being whether or not the Rams were leaving runners on base. At times the Rams would explode, at others great pitching was being wasted. Seven of the nine teams in the Mountain West had an under 4.00 ERA for the season. The bottom half of the Rams lineup often struggled mightily. Nevertheless, the Rams began alternating wins and losses for nine straight games after the Classic, with a series win against Kansas mixed into conference play. The Rams would win their last non-conference game against UNC. Players like Haley Donaldson, Nelson, Muzik and Gamboa kept the Rams afloat on offense while Hutton continued a dominant season, and sophomore pitcher Alison Petty emerged as a player to watch. “(Hutton’s) a strong pitcher in our conference,” Fisher said. “I think we get (a) little more consistent and we add maybe one more, we have a freshman and a transfer coming in next year, if one of those two or both of them can help with some innings with Bridgette then we have a chance to be really strong again.” After that game came a critical moment off the field when the team held a sit in  at the Universities’ indoor practice facility. At the time, the football team was

supposed to be setting up for spring practice. The protest came because of what the team said was lack of equality in equipment and facilities as well as respect for the women’s athletic teams and their time, particularly while in season. The team received a good deal of attention for their protest, but the young women seemed to take their cause in stride as the team won its next two series against the University of New Mexico and Utah State. Unfortunately, the team then ran into San Jose State and the season started another plummet. The Rams would get beaten by a combined score of 31-8 in their first two games against SJSU, seemingly returning to their old ways when they won their next two games. At that point the Rams were 24-14 and could still make a run at the Mountain West crown, but the Rams had another cold streak. The Rams would lose seven of their last eight regular season games, with their lone win in the final game of the season at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas. Posing as a slight morale boost to end the season, with Madison Kilcrease helping to assure a victory in her last Mountain West game, the bout turned out not to be the last stroke of good fortune the Rams would receive. “She really made a difference,” Fisher said. “She

did a nice job at the plate and she really helped a young outfield improve and I think we’ll be better in the future because of a lot of the ground work that she laid this year with them.” The Rams earned an invite to the National Invitational Softball Championships. A postseason tournament in its second year, the field was considered strong as most of the teams were conference runners-up or 30-game winners. After an up and down season that showed some great flashes, the Rams were rewarded with their first postseason in 15 years. Unfortunately, the Rams offensive struggles continued in the postseason against the very solid pitching of South Dakota State. The Jackrabbits beat the Rams in both of their losses in the double elimination tournament, with a win against the UNC bears sandwiched in between to finish 27-23. The Rams will return most of their roster next season, composed of two All-Region performers and four of five AllMountain West recipients. “I think we’ll play back to this season as a kind of turning point,” Fisher said. Mack Beaulieu can be reached at sports@collegian. com.


The Rocky Mountain Collegian | Thursday, June 14, 2018

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12

SPORTS Thursday, June 14, 2018

TRACK & FIELD

CSU track and field sees outdoor season come to an end By Mamadou Balde @mamadoubalde62

The 2018 outdoor track and field season came to a close at the NCAA Championships in Eugene, Ore. The Rams sent four qualifying athletes to the event. While none of the athletes were able to lead the field in their respective events, all competing athletes earned All-America honors. Day one of was highlighted by the performances of the Ram’s Grant Fischer and Mostafa Hassan. Fischer competed in the 10,000 meters where he placed 11th with a time of 29:20.73, earning him Second-Team All-America honors. This is Fischer’s fourth career All-America honors and his second consecutive in the 10,000 meters. “We thought there could be a chance that the three from Alabama could set the pace really hard,” distance coach Art Siemers said. “So the plan going in was that Grant was just going to stick his nose out there and try to finish among the top guys. He knew it’d take the race of his life to get on the podium, but he did everything in his power to try. He ran really gutsy, never quit and

clawed back to give himself a shot,” Bedard said, speaking highly of Fischer’s progress. “He worked really hard, and finished as one of the best runners in the country,” Bedard said. In the shot put, Hassan placed third with a throw of 20.44 meters on his second attempt. He earned First-Team All-America honors, the sixth of his accolade-ridden career. For Hassan, the road to the NCAA Championships was slightly different than that of previous years. The Egypt native battled an injury that kept him sidelined from competition during most of the outdoor season. Hassan did not make his season debut until the Mountain West Championships and despite the lack of competition during the season, he was still able to claim the crown in the shot put event at the MW Championships. “Considering that he had a major injury two weeks after indoor nationals, the fact that he was here and in contention to win a championship is almost a miracle,” Bedard said. Bedard also credited the training room staff. “Between our training

room staff – Anne and Dray – and Coach Longo in the weight room, they did everything they could from a support staff standpoint to get him back. They deserve a lot of credit, and this is a big tribute to them, but also a big tribute to Mostafa,” Bedard said. “He didn’t lose faith and was consistent with his rehab. For him to go through that and be in a position to win a national title really speaks to what kind of competitor and man he is.” Kelcey Bedard served as the Rams’ sole representative on day two of the NCAA’s. She finished 16th in the women’s hammer throw with a toss of 60.94 meters. The junior earned Second-Team AllAmerica honors, the first of her career. “Obviously Kelcey wanted to PR today and make a run at making the finals,” Bedard said. “I think that was in range for her, and I think she knows that after looking at the final results. It was her first time here and there’s a lot more at stake in this meet, so it’s a learning experience for her and part of the growing process. ... As a father, I’m proud of the fact that she got here, because it’s not an easy process. She

also almost had an opportunity to get in in the discus, so it was a big growing year for her. Next year, if I do my job right, she’ll have a chance to do even better.” Rounding out the NCAAs for the Rams was Cole Rockhold. The junior placed 11th in the 5,000 meters with a time of 14:00.96. Rockhold earned Second-Team AllAmerica honors, the sixth All-America honors of his career. In CSU history, only Bryan Berryhill has more All-America honors among distance runners. “Cole has had a great year,” Siemers said. “I think he might have been a bit disappointed - he was sixth indoor in the mile and sixth in the 3k, so he wanted to get on the podium today. He never gave up, and that’s what I told him I was most proud of. He kicked as hard as he could down the last 100 meters even though he wasn’t in the position he wanted to be in. That’s what we have to have if we’re going to get to the next level as a distance program – a ‘noquit’ attitude. He showed that today. With this year under his belt, it’s good to know that we have Cole back next year. He’s

The Senior Track athletes gather for a group photo during the last local meet of the season on April 15 in Greeley. PHOTO BY MATT BEGEMAN COLLEGIAN

a great leader for our team and he’s definitely hungry after today.” Of all the things the Rams earned during the NCAA championships, the biggest story remains what they lost. The conclusion of the 2018 outdoor season marks the end of Hassan’s career as a Ram. During his time at CSU Hassan earned many accolades, including one NCAA Championship, four MW Championships (two outdoor and two indoor) and six All-America honors. “In all my years of coaching, I don’t know if I’ve had an athlete as composed and disciplined as he is, and I’ve had some great ones that I don’t want to discount,” Bedard said. “Mostafa’s a special person. He’s a dominant performer, but more than that, he represents everything that you look for in a student-athlete. He’s serious about his academics, respected his teammates and bought into what we’re trying to do at CSU. He was a leader, and the ultimate student-athlete for us.” Mamadou Balde can be reached at sports@collegian. com.


ARTS & CULTURE Thursday, June 14, 2018

13

MUSIC

CSU celebrates 50 years of the pipe organ with weeklong concert series By Maddie Wright @MaddieRWright

The organ stands as one of the most underrated instruments. But luckily Colorado State dedicates a whole week each year to the magnificent instrument and the artists who can make the pipes sing. This past week marked the 6th annual Colorado State Organ Week, complete with four concerts, daytime lectures and classes by world-renowned organists from across the country. This year also marks the  50th anniversary of the CSU Casavant Organ. This was the first year to include multiple masterclasses and lectures June 4 through June 7. “Somebody told me today that they were excited that they actually got to play organ here for the first time just to touch these keys, some of you actually went inside, climbed ladders, and

learned all about it,” said CSU associate professor of organ, Dr. Joel Bacon while addressing the audience during the closing concert. “It’s really pretty special.” The concerts had a generous and attentive audience of both students and community members alike. “It means so much to see so many friends and friends of the organ,” Bacon said. The events began June 4 and after the day’s activities, ended a with Baroque Concertos for Organ and Harpsichord. This evening concert featured three organists and two harpsichordists from the Fort Collins Symphony all conducted by Wes Kenney, CSU’s Director of Orchestras. Two harpsichords were used throughout the show in different pieces as another key based instrument used during the Renaissance and Baroque periods. Tuesday ended with Ken Cowan, Solo Organ Recital.

Cowan is a well-known organist who has performed internationally in major concert venues and churches. “That last piece was just the fanciest footwork I have seen in quite some time,” said community member Mary Gibson, about the Cowan concert. Wednesday featured Music for Trumpet and Organ. This was a duo recital featuring CSU’s Dr. Bacon and Juilliard alumnus Caleb Hudson of Canadian Brass on the trumpet. This was the only performance not performed at the UCA but rather at the First United Methodist Church in Fort Collins, providing emphasis to the religious connotation of the organ. Dr. Bacon also joked that the organ and trumpet go together like Bacon and eggs, in reference to his own name. The week ended with what could be called a whole organ spectacular experience. Back in

June 20 Little Kids Rock: Julia Kirkwood Headliner: Danielle Ate the Sandwich

Wednesday Night 6–8:30 • FREE! Little Kids Rock: 6–6:30 PM • Headliner: 6:30–8:30 PM

June 20: Danielle Ate the Sandwich

Food Trucks:

June 27: Strange Americans

• The Rollin’ Stone Wood Fired Pizzeria

July 11: Equally Challenged

• Austin Taco

July 18: Jake Gill July 25: Edison August 1: The Jakarta Band

• The Goodness Truck • The Human Bean Coffee Truck • A-Maize’n Kettle Corn

August 8: The Wendy Woo Band

Before the concert, stop by the New Belgium Porch at the CSU Stadium from 4-6 p.m.

•••

Bring your lawn chair and blankets to the Lagoon. Need dinner? We have food trucks!

Last week marked the sixth annual Colorado State Organ Week. The celebration included four concerts, daytime lectures and classes taught by world-renowned organists from across the country. This year also marks the 50th anniversary of the CSU Casavant Organ. PHOTO BY REBECCA EISELE COLLEGIAN

the UCA Organ Recital Hall with an almost bare stage except for the immense and breathtaking pipe organ, five organists performed pieces including worldly acclaimed organists, CSU alumni and Dr. Joel Bacon for the CSU organ week closing concert. “I think that more people need to find out about organ week and come out next year,”

Gibson said. “I know Joel puts a lot of work and effort into it and it’s just a love of his to be able to share it with the community and he wants to share this beautiful music with everybody. So I really just hope that it continues to be as popular as it has been and grows even more.” Maddie Wright can be reached at entertainment@collegian.com.


14

ARTS & CULTURE Thursday, June 14, 2018

MUSIC

Mission Earth fosters climate discussion with concert series By Miranda Moses @mirandasrad

Music and science may seem like vastly different disciplines, but when combined, they have the ability to make a huge impact. Off the Hook Arts Academy seeks to do just this by presenting Colorado with SummerFest 2018: Mission Earth, a concert series with an environmentally-just message to share. The event pays ode to the life of late astronaut and scientist Piers Sellers, who dedicated his life to environmental advocacy even in the midst of decaying health. This inspired artist Kate Doyle to initiate a collaborative project melding arts and science to raise consciousness. SummerFest 2018: Mission

Earth is described on its website as a festival that “takes a deep and thoughtful look at climate change and its impact on the planet by bringing together music, the visual arts and science.” Off the Hooks Arts Academy is dedicated to accessible music education for K-12 students in the Poudre School District and surrounding community. From June 24 to July 20, the music series will be chock-full of more than 25 events including classical concerts, lectures, films, art exhibitions and STEAM-based educational events hosted by talented artists and merited intellectuals. The scientist line-up includes local Colorado State University faculty such as Michele Betsill, associate

professor and chair of the Department of Political Science. Sellers’ Climate Science Team, including David Randall  of CSU,  Compton Tucker  of NASA and CSU colleague Scott Denning will also join Hook Arts for Mission Earth. World premieres by composer and Off the Hook Arts Artistic Director Bruce Adolphe and Artist-inResidence Kate Doyle will be presented as well. Executive Artistic Director Jephta Bernstein  moved back to Fort Collins seven years ago after 25 years away from her hometown. She is the daughter of two chemists and is a renowned violinist that has held positions in the Palm Beach Opera as principal violin, American Symphony Orchestra, Seacliff Chamber

Players, Portland Opera and the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Philharmonia Virtuosi. Bernstein said SummerFest is an opportunity to retrieve vital information about our world outside the media in an interactive way. Artists that usually play in huge concert halls and scientists that study in acclaimed spaces and labs around the world will be interacting with the Fort Collins community in a unique way. “Everyone should have beauty, music and art and experience this coming together of all kinds of different people in the same space, listening to the same kind of music,” said Bernstein. “It joins people together in a common experience, and that’s a real

impact and beauty of what a concert or art exhibit can do. ... I’ve always been an advocate of music education, and I want to continue that kind of idea here.” Venues for SummerFest 2018 are located throughout Fort Collins, and tickets, as well as performance lineups, can be found on the Off The Hook Arts website. All ages are welcome  and themes of the event will include the arts, humanities and sciences alongside topics on  ecology, environment, atmosphere, weather, and climate change. Collegian reporter Miranda Moses can be reached at entertainment@collegian.com. 

Daily Horoscope

ART

Awkward Family Photos brings humor to Fort Collins Art Museum By Ashley Potts @ashleypotts09

Everyone loves their family, but to some extent family can also be incredibly embarrassing. Awkward Family Photos has been capitalizing on that hilarious embarrassment on awkwardfamilyphotos.com since 2009, where users can share and view each others’ embarrassing family photos. If that wasn’t enough, the photos also travel as an exhibition. The most recent stop is the Fort Collins Museum of Art. The website is pretty popular and includes sections for awkward family videos, articles reminiscing on the past decades of said awkwardness and a hall of fame page. There is also a section to submit a photo and a shop that features card games, calendars, postcards and books. The exhibition transforms the website into a gallery space that feels like a kitschy living room where an average American family would gather. The walls are donned with gloriously awkward photos, complete with averagely awful looking frames. There are walls for every awkward situation: Fourth of July,

Funny vacation photos are featured in the Awkward Family Photos exhibition at the Fort Collins Museum of Art. The exhibition will be on display until July 15. PHOTO BY ASHLEY POTTS COLLEGIAN

family vacation, Halloween, Christmas, Easter and, of course, the typical family portrait. There is a wall for pets, a wall for grandparents, a wall for siblings and a wall for mom and dad. Some of the standout images that had museum visitors laughing out loud included a child happily posing with a large red vacuum, a family hanging from what seems to be a stripper pole with their Christmas tree lit up behind them, a dad changing a diaper below a display of rifles and a punk rock sibling portrait with a galaxy background. Not a single photo could

be easily forgotten, and every shot felt painfully relatable. They are the type of photos you dread your mom will pull out when a friend or significant other comes over. Whether you’re into art or just into humor, the exhibition will have some entertainment factor. The exhibition will be on display through July 15, the museum is open Wednesday through Friday from 10 a.m.5 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from noon-5 p.m. Ashley Potts can be reached at entertainment@ collegian.com.

Nancy Black

TODAY’S BIRTHDAY

(06/14/18). This year fresh energy floods you. Revise budgets for maximum gain. Revelations offer new options. Maintain physical and financial practices. Summer money can resolve an adventurous challenge before your creativity blossoms. Build family savings this winter. Pull for the ones you love. To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging. ARIES (March 21-April 19)— 6— Talk with family about structural domestic upgrades. Break free from an old chore. Handle practical matters and rest. Someone’s in a quiet mood. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — 8 — Review and edit communications tightly before publishing. Thoughtful messaging is well repaid. Unexpected breakdowns could require adaptations. Strengthen foundational elements and structures. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — 8 — Revise financial plans. Spend time on marketing, sales and invoicing to increase positive cash flow and handle an unexpected expense. Polish your resume or portfolio. CANCER (June 21-July 22) — 8 — You’re especially sensitive and intuitive. Focus on practical plans. Avoid expense or traffic by keeping a low profile. Pamper yourself with hot water and rest. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — 5 — Reflect on how things used to be. Indulge nostalgic reverie and retrospection. Consider breaking news without responding. Watch, listen and

learn.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — 7

— Disappointing results require attention. Use teamwork to tackle a structural problem with a group project. Look at the issue from multiple angles. Collaborate on solutions. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) — 8 — Your work is attracting the attention of someone influential. Abandon fears, and smile for the cameras. Get support from your team, and return the favor. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) — 8 — Adventure calls. Get out and explore. Learn by trying new flavors, ideas and tricks. Take detailed notes. Avoid risks or gambles; stick to tested routes. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) — 8 — Manage financial details for shared accounts. A lack of funds would threaten your plans. Stick to tested routines and strategies. Listen to experience. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — 7 — Resolve an unexpected breakdown with your partner. A little communication goes a long way. Negotiate and compromise. Look at the issue from another perspective. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) — 8 — Pick up the pace. Adjust and refine your technique. Don’t push beyond your capabilities. Slow to avoid accidents. Focus on health and fitness. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) — 7 — A romantic or family puzzle requires getting back to basics. Strengthen foundational bonds by having fun together. Listen to another’s view. Love is fundamental.


COLLEGIAN.COM Thursday, June 14, 2018

15

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

specialist 23 Cause commotion ... or what the circled letters do? 25 Smallish, as an apartment 26 Tapped-off remnant 27 Uncouth sort 29 Oklahoma people 34 Use a microdermabrasion agent, say 35 Make fully content 38 Hound for payment Rocky Mt. Collegian 5/7/18 Sudoku40 Submissions to eds. 42 Quebec neighbor 48 Brownish gray 49 Elizabeth of beauty products 50the FAA overseer To solve Sudoku puzzle, each row, column and box must contain the numbers 1 to 9. 52 Été month 53 Gift-giving occasion, for short 54 Shave-haircut link 55 No longer in port 2 56 Not a good look 7 59 Land 8 in la mer 1

Across 1 Common borrowing result 5 Add one’s two cents, with “in” 10 “So that’s what that means!” 13 Novelist John le ___ 15 Resort near Vail 16 “Hansel and Gretel” figure 17 Pigmented eye parts 18 Devour, with “down” 19 Outback bird 20 Longtime network symbol 22 Historical display 24 Lucy’s co-star 25 Sandal features 26 Hardly helpless 28 Solemn oath 30 Subj. that may include a lab 31 Potting need 32 Skater who lit the Olympic cauldron in Nagano 33 Responses from a sycophant 36 Refine 37 House of __ 39 Student stressor 41 Cut even shorter, as a green 43 Loophole 44 Times in classifieds 45 “Bambi” doe 46 A 47 Small deer

2 9 5 4 7

4 6 5 2 1

48 Not a good fit 3 7 51 Heavy hammer 53 They’re run in taverns Rocky Mt. Collegian 6/14/18 4 6Yesterday’s solution 54 Standoffish 57 Cracker lacking pop 7 58 Producer Scott with Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony wins 3 2 4 5 60 Tsar’s decree Copyright ©2018 PuzzleJunction.com 61 Mimic 62 Poker declaration 63 Private student 64 Strong desire 65 Spot __ 66 Scorch Down 1 Bra spec 2 Holiday lights may be under one 3 Depression Era sight 4 Cobalt in the human body, e.g. 5 Wine container 6 TV buying channel 7 Apple Store buys 8 Promotion criteria 9 Carry out, as laws 10 Lots 11 Actor Jon and others 12 Rio contents 14 Those, in Tijuana 21 Certain 19th-century history

THE FOGDOGS RYAN GREENE

Sudoku Solution

Yesterday’s solution

6 7 1 5 8 2 4 9 3

3 4 2 1 7 9 6 5 8

PuzzleJunction.com

5 8 9 4 3 6 7 1 2

9 2 8 7 5 1 3 6 4

4 5 3 6 9 8 2 7 1

1 6 7 2 4 3 9 8 5

2 9 4 8 6 5 1 3 7

8 1 6 3 2 7 5 4 9

7 3 5 9 1 4 8 2 6

Sudoku

To solve the Sudoku puzzle, each row, column and box must contain the numbers 1 to 9.

SUDOKU

9

5

2 4 7

3 2 1 4 1 3 6 5

3 6 5

5 3

2 9 1

8

Copyright ©2018 PuzzleJunction.com

THE FOGDOGS RYAN GREENE

KCSU IS OUT OF THIS WORLD Sudoku Solution

7 9 6 5 8 1 2 4 3


16 Thursday, 14, 2018 | The Rocky Mountain Collegian

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Vol. 128, No. 2 6/14:/18  
Vol. 128, No. 2 6/14:/18  
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