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THE RO CKY MOUNTAIN

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30th Fall Pow Wow Get philanthropic with Lambda Theta NU sorority CSU Clue Annual Goose Masquerade Ball 2012 CSU Band Day

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Campus haunts

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CSU prof. puts on his booty shakin’ pants

No Halloween costume yet? Dont be afraid... How to get creepily covered in a hurry By Emily Smith The Rocky Mountain Collegian

Halloween is just five days away, and for many folks, the festivities will begin this weekend. If you’ve been slacking on preparing your costume(s) for this year’s frightening fetes, read on for a lastminute guide to 2012’s hottest get ups. Happy Halloween! Collegian writer Emily Smith can be reached at entertainment@collegian.com. FOR THE GUYS…

FOR THE GALS…

Replacement referee All you need for this costume is a Foot Locker uniform, a baseball cap and a whistle. Walk around all night like you’re confused and just generally don’t know what’s going on. If you really want to sell it, call incorrect party fouls and yell “after review, the ruling on the field stands!”

Honey Boo Boo Not only does her name reflect one of Halloween’s most common catchphrases (Boo), she is one of pop culture’s hottest reality TV child stars. To dress up as this pint-size pageant queen, all you need is a tutu, a tiara and a garbled Southern accent. If you really want to go all out, add in a “Little Miss Princess” sash and carry around a live pig with a name tag that says “Glitzy.”

Magic Mike If you’re looking for a certain kind of treat on Halloween night, this is the costume for you, fellas. Magic Mike’s “It’s Raining Men” number from the beginning of the movie inspires your outfit: dress pants, no shirt, a tie and a fedora. Also required for this costume: a six-pack, waxed chest and killer dance moves, all of which can be purchased secondhand at the Halloween WalMart (aka Goodwill). Felix Baumgartner This daredevil recently skydived from 24 miles above the earth in a history-making stunt sponsored by Red Bull. His astronaut suit is a fairly easy get-up to replicate and you’ll probably be regarded as the most radical guy at any party. Carry around a can of Red Bull…but please don’t try jumping from any high places.

Katniss Everdeen Girls want to be her, guys want to date her. Or maybe fight her? This “Hunger Games” heroine is an easy Halloween costume to pull off. Style your hair in a side-braid and wear green cargo pants, leather boots and a leather jacket. Add in a bow and arrows and “mockingjay” pin if you can. Now you just have to look tough. May the Halloween odds be ever in your favor. Hipster Disney princess This one’s super easy: bust out that old Cinderella or Sleeping Beauty costume from a few years ago and just add black, thick-rimmed glasses. Voila...you celebrated Halloween before it was cool.

IF YOU WANT TO MATCH WITH SOMEONE… Kim Kardashian and Kanye West To dress up as pop culture power couple “Kimye,” ladies should wear leopard print pants, absurdly tall high heels, a body-hugging shirt and a long, dark brunette wig. Dark sunglasses and lip-plumping makeup are good bets as well. Kanye impersonators will need fake (or real) facial hair to create his goatee, and the following items to reflect his signature look: jeans, a white button-up shirt, a long chain necklace, white shutter shades and an unbearable personality coupled with the inability to say anything intelligent. A microphone would be an added plus. Your costume will be the best Halloween costume of all time...of all time! The presidential candidates Barack mask. Mitt mask. American flag pins. Similar stances on major issues (but don’t admit it). Enough said.

The U.S. Women’s Gymnastics Team “The Fab 5” includes Olympic gymnasts McKayla Maroney, Kyla Ross, Alexandra Raisman, Gabby Douglas and Jordyn Wieber. If you want to be modest and/or warm, dress in athletic warm up pants and a jacket to which you’ve added a U.S. flag patch. Otherwise, rock a gymnastics leotard. For either look, fake gold medal around your neck and pull your hair back in a high ponytail or bun. Work that updo. “The Walking Dead” cast What could be better inspiration for a Halloween costume than TV’s most popular show about zombies? You’ll need all the main characters, including Rick (sheriff ’s costume), Lori (fake pregnant belly), Hershel (white wig, suspenders) and Daryl (camouflage, a crossbow). Other members of your group can dress up as — what else? — zombies. Everyone gets covered in fake blood, then eats each others’ faces off.

ILLUSTRATION BY ERIC GILL

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Basketball Preview Get your first look at the new 2012 Rams before they take to the hardwood

Enivronmentally friendly tailgaiting | Page 10


2 Friday, October 26, 2012 | The Rocky Mountain Collegian

weekender entertainment

Take a tour of CSU’s historical haunts By EMILY KRIBS The Rocky Mountain Collegian

It’s been available since last spring, but when’s a better time to take the Mystery of CSU History tour than Halloween night? This tour’s got everything: ghosts, free food, Buffalo Bill, a clinically insane architect, Abe Lincoln and much, much more. “[This tour] features the history of CSU, with legends and ghost stories along the way,” said Jennifer Lobermeier, tour guide and RamTrax’ assistant to the executive director. RamTrax Director Stacy Grant said, “This started as a

JTC Capstone course project. Students did a lot of the research and put it all together.” Another predecessor to the tour was James E. Hansen III, “a historian who’s done some ad hoc tours. We consulted with him,” Grant said. While the Halloween tour might be at capacity with students and youthful thrillseekers, the matinee tours are markedly different. At 2 p.m. on a Tuesday afternoon, the tour is dominated by the elderly.. They’re not old at heart, though. “I’m here for the free food,” one woman says; something many a college student can understand.

The tour begins in the Danforth Chapel. The ashes of its architect, James Hunter, are ensconced in the building. “I’m not sure if he haunts it or not,” Lobermeier said. If he does, he keeps quiet about it, but there are rowdier ghosts to meet along the way and a rich history extending all the way to 1870 that predates even the university. The tour then makes its way around the Oval, expounding on the history and mystery of CSU. Of particular interest is Student Services. Designed by architect Eugene Groves, who was committed to an insane asylum prior to its completion (he planned to

The rumored haunts of CSU’s architcture By MARCUS MORITZ The Rocky Mountain Collegian Let’s pretend you are a security guard for Ammons Hall (what’s now the Admissions building) a few decades ago. You hear an alarm go off, but instead of an intruder, all that you see is a set of small, wet footprints leading into the other room. There is no one else in the building, but you’ve heard stories of the building’s haunting and know that it originally had a pool … a pool that was filled with concrete in 1982. This is exactly what happened to a security guard a couple decades ago, as recounted in the book “Ghosts of Fort Collins,” by Lori Juszak. Colorado State University has a storied history, and sometimes it's not all freedom protests and football games. Ammons Hall was built in 1922 during the Great Depression. It's original purpose was a Women's Center built with a pool, gym and kitchen, among other amenities. Walk through Ammons Hall now, however, and you’ll see a very different building. After the pool was filled it became the music building, followed by the

Student Services building and is now the Admissions building. But the Ammons’ rumored haunt has stuck around through all of its various iterations. Just three months ago, Lee Sesker, head of the custodial staff for Ammons Hall, encountered what he believes to be the building’s ghost. “We were talking about the girl who supposedly died here,” Sesker said. “We walked over to TILT and I heard someone yell my name over the vacuum. I walked around and there was no one else near me in the building.” As creepy as a ghost is, it’s not the only sullied aspect of Ammons’ 90 year history. The building was designed by Eugene G. Groves, who also designed other buildings around CSU's campus, including the Military Science building (1927), Johnson Hall (1936) and the Student Services Building (1948). The Student Services building was originally designed as a men's dorm named Braiden Hall. “The men who lived in the dorm got scared living there,” said Becca McCarty, building proctor for the Student Services

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COLLEGIAN Lory Student Center Box 13 Fort Collins, CO 80523

This publication is not an official publication of Colorado State University, but is published by an independent corporation using the name ‘The Rocky Mountain Collegian’ pursuant to a license granted by CSU. The Rocky Mountain Collegian is a 10,000-circulation student-run newspaper intended as a public forum. It publishes five days a week during the regular fall and spring semesters. During the last eight weeks of summer Collegian distribution drops to 4,500 and is published weekly on Wednesdays. During the first four weeks of summer the Collegian does not publish. Corrections may be submitted to the editor in chief and will be printed as necessary on page 2. The Collegian is a complimentary publication for the Fort Collins community. The first copy is free. Additional copies are 25 cents each. Letters to the editor should be sent to letters@collegian.com.

building. “They said it was always drafty and cold; they would hear strange noises at times and always wanted to move out.” Fast forward to 1948 when the Student Services building was being designed. As the story goes, something went awry with Groves while he was designing the Student Services building. It only takes one walk through to know that it was not mapped by a clear mind. There are seven narrow staircases in the building, no way to get from one end to the other unless you’re on the bottom floor and an overall lack of hallways. In short, it’s a concrete maze. Rumor is that Groves planned to murder his wife and bury her in the walls of the Student Services building, but he was placed in an insane asylum before the building (or the murder) was completed. Chances are that, at some point, you’ll need to go wandering around the old part of campus for the oddly placed class. If you do, keep an eye out and an ear open for the past. Collegian Writer Marcus Moritz can be reached at entertainment@collegian.com.

murder his wife), the building’s layout makes no sense, originally lacked stairs and, according to Lobermeier, “The staff know better than to stay there after 5 p.m. You can go in there, but I don’t know if you’ll come out.” Scarier still, CSU only received $100 to permit the train to pass right through campus. Also on the tour are the Ammons building — formerly the site of a swimming pool and the current haunting ground of two possible ghosts — and Johnson Hall, claimed by Lobermeier to be, “the most haunted building on campus.” So grab a friend, and prepare for some spooky stuff ac-

CATASTROPHES

CSU HISTORY TOUR

Floods/sheet water events: 2 Buildings burnt to the ground: 3 Ghosts: At least 6

Who: RamTrax What: Mystery of CSU History Tour When: Oct. 31, 5 p.m. or 7 p.m. Where: The Oval Cost: Free

companied by a tour guide discussing the names of various buildings on campus, including Lory, Yates and Aylesworth, as if they used to be people. Also included is a presentation on the history of CSU, starting with its humble beginnings rooted in the Morrill Act in 1870, featuring the aforemen-

tioned free food. More information can be found at www.RamTrax.Colostate.edu. Collegian Writer Emily Kribs can be reached at entertainment@ collegian.com.

“Leaf experts are indeed shocked, but say that this sort of thing tends to happen every year.” RAM TALK ... THE REST OF THE STORY

Students say leaves aren’t the way they used to be By DAVIS ENGLISH

The Rocky Mountain Collegian This fictional column is based on the Ramtalk, “Dear Leaves, you’ve changed recently. It’s like I don’t even know you anymore,” which originally appeared in the Oct. 19 Collegian. In a radical move to get more attention, familiar faces around campus have started to change. The change was somewhat expected, but some say that it has come too soon. “I just wish that we had gotten a better heads up,” said Alix Pucheenee, sophomore communications major. “Nobody let me know.” Pucheenee is of course

EDITORIAL STAFF | 491-7513 Allison Sylte | Editor in Chief editor@collegian.com Matt Miller | Content Managing Editor news@collegian.com Hunter Thompson | Visual Managing Editor design@collegian.com Andrew Carrera | News Editor news@collegian.com Elisabeth Willner | News Editor news@collegian.com Kevin Jensen | Editorial Editor & Copy Chief letters@collegian.com copy@collegian.com Nic Turiciano | Entertainment Editor verve@collegian.com Cris Tiller | Sports Editor sports@collegian.com

talking about the transformation of the leaves. They went from a beautiful green to a dull brown in the past few weeks, leaving students puzzled and concerned. “It’s like — like I don’t even recognize them anymore,” Pucheenee said regarding the sudden and drastic leaf turn. “I’m worried.” Pucheenee, like countless others, are worried about the leaves. These concerned leaf lovers have started a new intervention group called “Turning a New Leaf”, which will confront the leaves about their recent turn in color and character. The goal is to revive the leaves to their old selves. “Yeah, I’m in the group,” said Mat Sullevin, sophomore marketing major. “I’ll

bet that by mid-November, all of the leaves will be gone. Something needs to be done!” The leaves had no comment regarding their sudden and drastic turn. Some of them have even decided to fall to the ground in protest of the media coverage. This reckless behavior truly illustrates the gravity of the situation. Leaf experts are indeed shocked, but say that this sort of thing tends to happen every year. They assured leaf enthusiasts that the buds will be back next spring, and that there is no need to panic, but that in the meantime, pine needles are nice. Collegian Writer Davis English can be reached at entertainment@collegian.com.

Kyle Grabowski | Assistant Sports Editor sports@collegian.com Kris Lawan | Design Editor design@collegian.com Nick Lyon | Chief Photographer photo@collegian.com

ADVISING STAFF

Kim Blumhardt | Advertising Manager Michael Humphrey | Journalism Adviser

KEY PHONE NUMBERS Newsroom | 970-491-7513 Distribution | 970-491-1146 Classifieds | 970-491-1686 Display Advertising | 970-491-7467 or 970-491-6834

Editor’s Note: News Editor Andrew Carrera interned with President Barack Obama’s reelection campaign this summer. He has removed himself from all political coverage including writing, editing and discussions – this include’s the paper’s daily editorial “Our View.”


The Rocky Mountain Collegian | Friday, October 26, 2012

weekender entertainment

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BESTinSHOW Dia de los Muetos Festival at Tap and Handle By Bailey Constas The Rocky Mountain Collegian

It’s a given this weekend that all shows will be encouraging costumes. So whether you’re sporting a Mozart or Metallica getup, there’s sure to be some concert to suit your eardrums. Declared the best in show this weekend is the Dia de los Muertos Festival at Tap and Handle Saturday. Izcalli, a Spanish rock/indie band will be headlining the festival. Ambassador Wolf, a Fort Collins folk-rock and gypsy rock band that sounds like the love child of Devotchka and Israel Nebeker

(for the non-nerds, he’s the lead singer of Blind Pilot) will be playing as well. The Buzz Brothers, a Chicago blues rock band from Greeley who formed in 2008, will also play. FRIDAY: Mamma Lenny and the Remedy will once again be playing at the Road 34 Friday. The Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band is bringing bluegrass from the hills of Indiana to the Mish Friday with Boulder’s the Yawpers. The Bright Side Tour featuring

Aer w/ Yonas and Matty Mac comes to Hodi’s Half note Friday as well. Aer synthesizes hip-hop with a tinge of reggae. Matty Mac, a stage name for Matt MacFarlane, is a mix tape artist who will join Aer. SATURDAY: An alternative country boy raised in rural Wyoming, Jalan Crossland will be coming to the Lincoln Center. He has toured as a solo artist and with a band for 20 years, and his lyrical content revolves around hobos, mobile homes and strippers.

WHAT’S UP THIS WEEKEND IN FOCO? 30th Fall Pow Wow Lory Student Center Theater Saturday, Oct. 27 10:30 a.m. - 10 p.m. Free Celebrating its 30th year, the pow-wow honors Native American culture and heritage through singing, food, dancing and regalia. The nine hour event includes gourd dancing at 10:30 a.m., the grand entry at 1 and 7 p.m. and the pow-wow feed at 5 p.m. There is also a dance expo and frybread sale in the LSC Plaza today from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Frybread is $3 (awesome!). For more information, visit www.engr.colostate.edu.

Get philanthropic with Lambda Theta Nu sorority Eloy’s Restaurant and Lounge Friday, Oct. 26 - Saturday, Oct. 27 10 p.m. - 2 a.m. $5 for ages 21+/$7 for ages 18-20 There are a couple things that feel really good in life. One of them is dressing up in costumes, the other is giving (money or otherwise) to a charitable cause. CSU’s Lambda Theta Nu sorority might have hit a homerun by connecting the two. Join the Lambdas at Eloy’s on Friday night for drinks, costumes and a general good time. All proceeds benefit the Lambdas philanthropic efforts for Latino Literacy and the Latina Youth Leadership Conference. For more information, visit www.calendar.colostate.edu.

BEST IN SHOW Show: Dia De Los Muertos Festival Where: Tap and Handle When: Saturday, Oct. 27 Time: 8 p.m. Cost: Free Bill Smith and Trichome are bringing funk and electronica to the Aggie. If you’re looking for pygmy mountain music, Reverend Deadeye at Ho-

di’s might just be something to look into.

SUNDAY: Skinned, who have been playing metal since 1995, are sure to pour blood all over the crowd a la Gwar style, at their Sunday Aggie show. Megan Burtt, a folk/pop singer-songwriter and winner of 2011 Kerrville NewFolk Competition, will perform at Avogadro’s Number Sunday night. Entertainment and diversity beat reporter Bailey Constas (@BaileyLiza) can be reached at entertainment@collegian.com.

By Nic Turiciano, design by Annika Mueller Check in with the Collegian’s Weekender every Friday to see what’s going on in Fort Collins over the weekend.

CSU Clue Lory Student Center Cherokee Park Ballroom Friday, Oct. 26 5:30 - 8:30 p.m. $5 Remember that game you played with your parents and cousins when you were a kid and the Nintendo 64 hadn’t been invented yet? Yeah, the one where candlesticks are murder weapons and people are stupidly named Col. Mustard and Mrs. Peacock? Well ASAP is helping to bring its awesome hilarity to life in the LSC Cherokee Park Ballroom Friday night with a real life game of Clue. For $5 you get to guess who killed who and finally play gumshoe — plus, the winner gets a prize. All kidding aside, this sounds like a really fun time. For more information, visit www.asap.colostate.edu.

Annual Goose Masquerade Ball Lory Student Center Main Ballroom Saturday, Oct. 27 8 - 11:30 p.m. $23 students/ $28 general public Alright, it’s pricey; $23 dollars is a lot of cash for a student. But when else will you have the chance to attend something called the “Annual Goose Masquerade Ball?” Answer: next year, I guess. Dance your feet off to the 50-piece Mostly Strauss (not Strauss-Kahn) Orchestra as they play waltzes, tango, swing, slow waltzes and polka. Attire is formal or semi-formal (bummer) with costume awards going to the best dressed. For more information, visit www.calendar.colostate.edu.

2012 CSU Band Day Hughes Stadium Saturday, Oct. 27 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Free (with ticket to the football game) Maybe football isn’t your thing. There’s no shame in that, and I’ll even admit that football games would be fairly boring if it weren’t for awesome halftime shows — wardrobe malfunctions and all. Catch the 2012 CSU Band Day during halftime at this weekend’s game (go Rams, woo!). Local high school bands will perform with the CSU Marching Band during halftime in front of a — ahem — “lively” college crowd. Go easy on ‘em. For more information, visit www.central.colostate.edu.


COLLEGIAN

OPINION Friday, October 26, 2012 | Page 4

YOUR TWO CENTS

YESTERDAY’S QUESTION: Would you trade your vote for a slice of pizza?

15% 15%

70% No. 15% Yes. 15% Only for pepperoni.

The hip hop lounge of the future

70% TODAY’S QUESTION: Which weekend are you celebrating Halloween?

*45 people voted in this poll.

Log on to http://collegian.com to give us your two cents.

This is an unscientific poll conducted at Collegian.com and reflects the opinions of the Internet users who have chosen to participate.

Politician versus Horoscopes: Which do I trust?

By QUINN SCAHILL

Your Facebook and Twitter feeds have probably been blowing up with political issues for months. I don’t know about you, but I always take to heart what my friends say about candidates and their policies, but…. wait, just kidding. No I don’t. I also make sure to tune in to every debate, because hearing two talking heads banter back and forth about money and lies appeals to me. Who knows, maybe one of the candidates will actually change my mind about who I should vote for. But then again, that will probably never happen to me, ever. In high school I was an active Young Democrat, but since I’ve been in college I’ve slowly transformed into a Young I-Don’t-Give-aCrap. I worked closely with a few local politicians only to learn that they were not the type of people I ever wanted to associate myself with, and certainly not people I ever wanted to give power to. However, I’m a patriot, and I’m going to vote for someone just out of principle. I’ll let my voice be heard now so I have the right to complain later. And because I don’t trust anything a politician says I’m going to ignore candidates’ campaign promises and views on divisive issues. Instead, I will rely on a far more practical, no-nonsense method of selection. I’m going to base my vote this year wholly on what candidate has the best horoscope. It can’t be any less practical than separating the facts from the lies and making an informed decision, can it? I’ll start off with President Barack Obama. He was born on Aug. 4, 1961, which makes him a Leo and his horoscope says that he needs to release tension from his life. It also says, “You may have become habitually used to high pressure environments, forgetting that peace and quiet also have their own special value too.” It also mentioned that Obama has difficulty maintaining stable relationships, and that his lucky color is electric blue. Next up we have Mitt Romney, born on March 12, 1947. Mitt is a Pisces, and although this makes him highly ambitious, he will apparently have more impartiality than others, so his

fairness will be evident. It also urges him to, “…try to select a job where you have plenty of scope to determine your own path which will assure you material success.” Mitt’s lucky colors are lemon and other sandy shades. Just for giggles I looked up Paul Ryan’s horoscope. He was born on Jan. 29, 1970, and his horoscope urges him to slow down and says that his motto would be, “More is better.” It also says that some of his friends are unreliable and, “…may in fact be taking advantage of you.” As any good American does while voting, I am also going to consider a few alternative candidates. Perhaps the Cosmos have written a grand destiny for them, too. I’ll now turn to Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson, born on Jan. 1, 1953. This makes Gary a Capricorn, and endows him with a sobering, down-to-earth approach to life. Apparently the Sun causes him to be independent, but also stubborn and creative. It seems that he will excel as a leader, and his competitive instincts will help him “climb the ladder of success”. Last but certainly not least, we have Jill Stein of the Green Party, and her birthday is May 14, 1950, which makes her a Taurus. The horoscope predicts that she will have many lucky breaks, and will be fearless in the face of danger. However, she also needs to learn persistence, “…and mustn’t change mid-stream lest you forfeit the results of your hard work.” So now we have it; the infinite wisdom from the Cosmos have spoken. Or rather, the horoscope generator from www.astrology.com.au has spoken. Earlier I said I don’t trust politicians. Well, I actually don’t believe in horoscopes either. I think from a statistical standpoint, the likelihood of a horoscope coming true is about the same as a candidate sticking to his/ her campaign promises. They’re both at the same level when we’re talking about trustworthiness, and that is a pitiful thought for a young voter like myself. I think voting is important, but I won’t let myself drown in a cesspool of forgotten promises and convoluted ideas. But if you’re still wondering who I’m going to vote for — it’s actually tie between my dad and Stephen Colbert. Quinn Scahill is a senior English major. His columns appear Fridays in the Collegian. Letters and feedback can be sent to letters@collegian.com.

By NIC TURICIANO

Flash back a few nights: I’m at a jazz lounge in Fort Collins listening to a group perform standards from John Coltrane, Horace Silver and Hoagy Carmichael, among others. The musicians all wore suits, the lighting was romantic and subdued and the patrons weren’t scared away by $9 libations. In short, this was no spot for a ruffian. Counterculture was happily checked at the door. There’s nothing wrong with that, but rewind the clock 100 years and there wouldn’t have been a jazz group anywhere near a club as swank as this one. The same musicians I watched would have played in a brothel, on a street corner or — maybe on a good night — a dive bar. What would the early jazz musicians — those who were playing tunes despised by mainstream U.S. citizens for their looseness and difference — think if they saw what’s happened to their art form? Who knows, but it’s a

safe bet that they never imagined how far public opinion would eventually sway. There’s a long history of (with time) accepting ideas, movements, food and figures that were originally deemed abhorrent: notable examples range from potatoes to Jesus. Those examples are on a large scale, and examining music by genre acceptance is certainly on the micro when compared. Changes in music taste, however, can tell us a lot about our culture. It took a little more than 100 years for jazz to go from a marginalized art form of the American black community to a widely embraced, consumed and practiced art form by people from all backgrounds, and its significance went beyond simply evolving tastes. From Louis Armstrong — arguably the most popular jazz artist of the ‘20s and ‘30s — who sang “My only sin/Is in my skin/What did I do/To be so black and blue?” in his 1929 tune “Black and Blue,” to Benny Goodman, who led the first racially integrated jazz band at a time when Jim Crow was still strong, jazz was at the heart of this country’s early efforts to erode racial barriers. Equal parts in spite of and because of its musical and political history, jazz became one of the most popular stylings and is now identified as a uniquely American art form … it’s also played in upper middle class bars by people in suits to crowds with cash to spare. There’s one other art form that will likely fit that bill in the near future: hip hop.

DJ Kool Herc, who is credited for the birth of hip hop, wrote of the genre in “Can’t Stop Won’t Stop: A History of the Hip Hop Generation” that, “It’s about you and me, connecting one to one. That’s why it has universal appeal. It has given young people a way to understand their world, whether they are from the suburbs or the city or wherever.” It’s evolved since its birth, but contemporary hip hop (and rap: really the roots are the same), whether it be Lil B or Common, still embodies the soul that DJ Kool Herc wrote of. Along with that soul comes a cultural significance that hip hop may only share with jazz. These two genres have influenced United States pop culture more than any other American art form, and because of that, hip hop will have a shelf life equally as long as its older brother. Right now it seems crazy to think of someone performing “Illmatic” in a romantic club, but in 30 years that might not be the case. Imagine checking your coat, buying expensive drinks and hearing a hip hop standard from Nas as performed by someone in a suit? It might sound absurd, but to say that hip hop hasn’t had the same impact on our culture, come from the same roots or followed the same trajectory as jazz is even crazier. It only seems logical that that similar trajectory will continue. Entertainment Editor Nic Turiciano can be reached at entertainment@collegian.com.

Fight mid-semester stress with Halloween fun

By LAUREN STIERITZ

I had a feeling it was true, and my suspicions were confirmed when I saw a status on my newsfeed last night that read "That point in the semester." Don't we know it. We are stuck again at that awkward point between summer and Thanksgiving "break" (where we usually have tests and essays to do over the week anyways) when we all start dying and turning into zombies. It's that point where exams and essays begin to overwhelm us and apathy kicks in. Not to mention the fact that we are swarmed in phone calls, commercials and people on campus pushing politics on us multiple times a day. I like to call it the mid-semester crisis. Where we all start to go a little crazy and put off homework, skip a few more classes here and there — you know the deal. However, keep your heads up Rams because there's only 12 days until the election is over, 21 days until Thanks-

giving break and 49 till the last day of finals (which you're probably done before). The light at the end of the tunnel is coming! So how do we push through? How do we keep our motivation and sanity for these last few months before we turn into The Walking Dead ourselves? Lucky for us, Halloween falls on a Wednesday this year. I know, it seems horrible that it doesn't fall on a Friday or Saturday, but I believe we can make it work to our advantage. I've heard some discussion in class and around campus lately on whether or not to dress up the weekend before or after. The pre-Halloween party side states that we should dress up and party the weekend before, because it’s still October and the next weekend will be November, so that's "weird." The post-Halloween side states that the weekend before doesn't "feel right" and because it falls on a Wednesday we should go out Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday of Halloween week. It's getting quite confusing, and I say we just do both. I say we deserve it at this point in the semester. We've worked hard, we've survived midterms and now it's time to celebrate. Raid your closets and the local thrift stores, and get ready for the biggest, longest Halloween party you've ever had. If my math is correct (I got a D in MATH 130 so don't hold me to it), we have six available nights of Halloween this year. Fox 31 Denver recently report-

ed that, "Despite earlier findings that binge drinking in this age group is linked to academic stresses, personal risks or alcoholism, the study has now found that it’s the happier kids that are drawn to heavy drinking." I believe with the two opposing sides of when to party this year for Halloween, this is one election we can come to a compromise on. Being in costume lets us be someone we are not for a night, lets us get out of our student skin and turn into zombies, or nurses or whatever. And studies show that those who indulge from time to time in college are happier — so let’s dress up, get weird and go all out. Forget about school for the weekend, or at least until Sunday. Don't party too hard on Wednesday and Thursday as a hangover on campus is one of the worst things I've ever experienced. But nonetheless, let���s get it all out of our systems and fight off the mid-semester crisis. I promise you, come Nov. 5th (or maybe 6th depending on how far you took it) you'll be ready to get back to school and never want to drink again. At least until the next Friday, of course. If you don't enjoy alcohol though, there's always other things. Like yoga. Or reading. Or meditating. Or something like that, right? Copy Editor Lauren Stieritz is a senior communication studies major. Her columns appear Fridays in the Collegian. She can be reached at letters@ collegian.com or on Twitter @laurenstieritz.

Collegian Opinion Page Policy

The columns on this page reflect the viewpoints of the individual author and not necessarily that of The Rocky Mountain Collegian or its editorial board. Please send any responses to letters@collegian.com.

Letter submissions are open to all and are printed on a first-received basis. Submissions should be limited to 250 words and need to include the author’s name and contact information. Anonymous letters will not be printed. E-mail letters to letters@collegian.com


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The Rocky Mountain Collegian | Friday, October 26, 2012

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Under new leadership the goal remains the same: Go dancin’

“What makes this team different is there’s competition. If somebody doesn’t feel like playing, or isn’t playing the right way, we have depth and that wasn’t the case last year.”

PROJECTED STARTING LINEUPS

Larry Eustachy | men’s head coach

Forward #4 Pierce Hornung 6’5” Senior

Forward #44 Greg Smith 6’6” Senior

Foward #45 Colton Iverson 6’10” RS Senior

DYLAN LANGILLE | COLLEGIAN

Senior guard Dorian Green (22) eyes the basket as fellow senior Wes Eikmeier (10) applies pressure on the perimeter during practice at Moby Arena on Oct. 24. Both Green and Eikmeier will lead the Rams in 2012.

Guard #10 Wes Eikmeier 6’3” Senior

Battle-tested Rams open season full of expectations By KYLE GRABOWSKI The Rocky Mountain Collegian CSU’s opponents this season will have more to think about defensively than new coach Larry Eustachy did when he came to Moby last season as the head coach of Southern Miss. Though the Rams return three starters and four other letterwinners, there are seven newcomers on the team that all have the potential to impact games. The most prominent newcomers for CSU are newly-eligible transfers Daniel Bejarano and Colton Iverson. They sat out last season due to NCAA transfer rules after coming from Arizona and Minnesota, respectively, but played on CSU’s scout team and regularly bested the Rams’ starters. Bejarano played in eight games for the Wildcats during his freshman season, but came to CSU after legendary Arizona coach Lute Olson retired and was replaced by Sean Miller. Rivals.com ranked Bejarano as a four-star prospect and the No.18 point guard in the nation when he came out of North High School in Phoenix, Ariz. Iverson scored 517 points in three seasons at Minne-

sota and collected two double-doubles. He will add some much-needed size to CSU’s front line and provide the experience of playing in the Big Ten conference. “He’s going to make a huge impact and make everybody’s job a little easier,” CSU senior guard Dorian Green said. “Last year we had to double the post a lot and this year we won’t have to do that.” The Rams added even more size with junior college transfer Gerson Santo. Originally born in Brazil, Santo averaged 7.4 points and four rebounds in two seasons at the College of Southern Idaho and was a member of the 2011 National Junior College Athletic Association national championship team as a freshman. CSU had a logjam of talent at the guard position coming into 2012, but senior Jesse Carr tore his ACL during an offseason workout and will miss the entire year, opening up time for younger guards like sophomore transfer Johnathan Octeus and freshman Jordan Mason and Joe De Ciman. Mason already made his mark on the team during a full squad scrimmage. His team was down by 20 at the halfway point, and he sparked them to an eight point win. With all of these new, pro-

RETURNING LEADERS Wes Eikmeier: 15.5 points/ game, 1.8 rebounds/game, 2.0 assists/game Pierce Hornung: 8.8 points/ game, 8.7 rebounds/game, 65.7 percent FG percentage Dorian Green: 13.1 points/ game, 3.5 rebounds/game, 42.6 percent 3-point FG percentage Greg Smith: 9.7 points/game, 5.3 rebounds/game, 41.3 percent 3-point FG percentage

NICK LYON | COLLEGIAN

Guard #3 Hayley Thompson 6’1” Junior

ductive additions, the Rams possess a depth absent in recent seasons. “What makes this team different is there’s competition. If somebody doesn’t feel like playing, or isn’t playing the right way, we have depth and that wasn’t the case last year,” CSU coach Larry Eustachy said. That depth will allow the Rams to execute Eustachy’s fast, aggressive style with little fear of fatigue or a dropoff when the second unit takes the floor. “You get to play harder and when you’re in there your minutes will be more efficient,” Green said. “We won’t have guys playing the amount of minutes we had last year, so we can play with more energy.” Assistant Sports Editor Kyle Grabowski can be reached at sports@collegian.com.

Forward #11 Meghan Heimstra 6’2” RS Senior

Freshman, tranfers add valuable depth, talent to CSU roster By ANDREW SCHALLER The Rocky Mountain Collegian

PLAYERS TO WATCH

Last year, the CSU men’s basketball team’s season ended in the second round of the NCAA Tournament in Louisville, Ky. This year, with four returning seniors, the expectations are even higher for the Rams. “Even though we did exceed a lot of expectation last year and did some things that people didn’t quite expect out of that group, we’re still playing with a chip on our shoulder,” senior guard Wes Eikmeier said. “The way we’ve battled in all of our three years here so far, I mean, we’re not going to take any opponent lightly, (because) we know what it’s like to be at the bottom.” Although excitement around the program has been building, the Rams have said that they are more focused on taking the season one game at a time while knowing that they have a lot of growing to do before March. “We’re not nearly where we need to be, we’re where we should be,” CSU coach Larry Eustachy said. “We’re gonna play our best basket-

Daniel Bejarano : Sophomore : 6’4” : 202 : Arizona

Colton Iverson : Senior : 6’10” : 261 : Minnesota

Jonathan Octeus

: Redshirt sophomore : 6’4” : 170 : Wabash Valley College

ball in February, so we’re not nearly where we need to be eventually, but we’re where we should be right now.” For the Rams, that means getting better in practice and in their scrimmage against Metro State on Sunday in preparation for the season opener against Montana on Nov. 9. “My goal is to win the next game,” forward Pierce Hornung said. “Obviously I have big goals for this season, for our team, but you can’t focus on down the road. It’s such a

Guard #22 Dorian Green 6’2” Senior

DYLAN LANGILLE | COLLEGIAN

New basketball recruits from left, Jordan Mason, Jonathan Octeus and Gerson Santo recieve pointers from assistant coach Leonard Perry during a break in the team scrimmage at practice in Moby Arena Wednesday morning.

grind and college basketball is so tough and every team can come out and beat you on any night.” A big part of the success of the Rams in 2012 will hinge upon the play of six returning

lettermen from last year, however, CSU will have to make do without its sixth-man from last year, senior guard Jesse Carr, who tore his ACL in the preseason and likely will miss the whole season.

Carr provided a spark off the bench last year, particularly toward the end of the year, when he averaged 10.4 points per game and 5.6 assists per game in the Rams’ final four games.

“He was more than just another body on the floor, he was a leader,” Eikmeier said of Carr. “Taking him away from our team, it kind of hits us a lot, especially with the core group that we have, and it’s just one of those things, nature of the game. But we’re gonna have to be better for it and work that much harder to get to where we wanna go.” Getting back to the NCAA Tournament this year will not likely come easily for the Rams particularly when they get into Mountain West play. CSU was projected to finish fourth in the conference in preseason polls. “I know they’re smart enough to know that it’s not just gonna happen, they’re gonna have to earn it,” Eustachy said. “I don’t think they’re pleased with how they performed in the NCAA Tournament. I think they wanna (be) better (than) that. But getting to the tournament’s gonna be difficult in its own (right), getting through this league...I just really like this group.” Men’s Basketball Beat Reporter Andrew Schaller can be reached at sports@collegian.com.

CSU sophomore forward Kara Spotton goes through shooting drills at practice Oct. 25 in Moby Arena. Spotton and her teammates hope to bring a new level of intensity to the 2012 season.

Guard #1 LeDeyah Forte 5’4” Sophomore

Bringing the nasty in 2012

By KYLE GRABOWSKI The Rocky Mountain Collegian

Forward #12 Sam Martin 6’2” Junior

Forward #20 Kara Spotton 6’2” Sophomore

“Last season when we were winning a lot of games, I kind of kept cringing to myself thinking, ‘I’m happy we won, but I don’t wanna lose Ryun.’” David Sayler | South Dakota athletic director

Expect more nasty from this incarnation of the CSU women’s basketball team. New coach Ryun Williams has emphasized the importance of effort and individual accountability with his team, particularly due to its lack of athleticism. “We aren’t blessed with great athleticism, we lack a little foot speed,” Williams said. “But that doesn’t mean you can’t shut somebody’s tail down, dive on the floor for a loose ball or take a charge. That’s what we’re trying to develop in these kids.” CSU finished last season 13-17, but its 9-5 record in the Mountain West placed it second in the conference. This year’s schedule features seven opponents that reached some form of postseason tournament last year, highlighted by four straight home games to open the season against teams the Rams lost to in 2011. CSU will play Montana State, Northern Colorado, Seattle and Toledo in Moby Arena before embarking on a four game road stretch against Loyola Maramount, Bowling Green, CU-Boulder and Tulsa. “They’re good payback

games to play at home,” senior forward Megan Heimstra said. The Rams return 10 players, including three starters and the reigning Mountain West Sixth Player of the Year in Heimstra. CSU possesses depth it has not enjoyed in recent years, which will allow the players to fully commit to Williams’ allout, effort driven style. “If you’re going 100 percent, coach is going to give you a break,” junior forward Sam Martin said. “It will be easier to make sure you’re going in and doing everything you can because that’s what coach wants.” Martin leads the returning players in scoring and rebounding. She averaged 13.1 points and 5.8 rebounds per game to be named second team all-conference. Williams’ biggest change has been an attempt to change the culture of the program. “This group needs to play with a new level of intensity, a new level of toughness and develop a little nasty,” he said. “Combine that with organized execution and I think that can be a winning formula for this group.” Williams has high expectations for his team, but not a number of wins. He expects

KEY PLAYERS Junior forward Sam Martin

2011 Second team all Mountain West 13.1 points per game in 2011 5.8 rebounds per game in 2011

Senior forward Megan Heimstra

2011 Mountain West Sixth Player of the Year 5.5 rebounds per game in 2011 1.1 blocks per game in 2011

them to put forth maximum effort on the defensive end and believes that commitment will lead to results on the hardwood. “You’ve gotta believe in your kids. We’ve got strengths and it’s our job to utilize our strengths as coaches,” Williams said. “It’s easy to believe in a kid like Sam Martin. It’s easy to believe in a kid like Megan Heimstra.” That faith has convinced the Rams to set their goals high for the 2012 season: to have a winning record and make a postseason tournament, ideally the NCAA Tournament. “We want to to start new tradition here,” Martin said. “You’ve got to look for the future and set your goals high.” Assistant Sports Editor Kyle Grabowski can be reached at sports@collegian.com.

CSU pries new women’s coach away from the place he loves By ANDREW SCHALLER The Rocky Mountain Collegian It’s not everyday that a Division-I college coach willingly leaves his alma mater to coach a school more than 500 miles away. But that’s exactly the decision Ryun Williams made when in May when he chose to leave the University of South Dakota and become the head coach for the CSU women’s basketball team. “South Dakota’s a very special place. I mean that’s where I played, it’s my alma mater,” Williams said. “There’s great people there, fond memories of that place, but this is the best thing for me and my family.” Williams took over as

the women’s basketball head coach at South Dakota in 2008 and inherited a team that would be entering its first season in Division-I basketball. Under the leadership of Williams, South Dakota put together two seasons winning 20 or more games and made an appearance in the WNIT just four years after it became a Division-I team. “The fact that WILLIAMS he did what he did here while we were in transition to Division-I, it was a very difficult time for most, just is a testament to how good of a job he really did

do,” South Dakota athletic director David Sayler said. “Last season when we were winning a lot of games, I kind of kept cringing to myself thinking, ‘I’m happy we won, but I don’t wanna lose Ryun.’” While winning games at South Dakota, Williams also managed to make an impact both on and off the court for many of the players he coached. Senior guard Tempestt Wilson has said that Williams helped her develop as a player and a person, even allowing her to get math help from his wife,

Lyndy, on occasion when she needed it. “He was a great person off the court,” Wilson said. “There was a lot of things I could go to him for, and especially his wife too.” Now Williams and his new coaching staff will bring their style of coaching to a CSU women’s basketball team that hasn’t made postseason play in seven years. “You just kind of bring who you are and bring your system,” Williams said. “We’ve always had, I think, a winning style of play and that’s what we’re just gonna bring to these kids and make sure that these kids believe that they’re winners, that’s step one.” It’s a system that focuses on playing tough half-court

COACH PROFILE RYUN WILLIAMS

17 years of head coaching experience Coached men’s and women’s basketball and women’s volleyball 2-time Northern Sun Intercollegiate Conference coach of the year 4-time Wyoming Conference coach of the year Overall head coaching record: 312-190 (.622)

defense and one that the Rams have said they believe fits the personnel they are bringing to the 2012-13 season. “This system that they have is set up to our strengths,” CSU forward Sam Martin said. “So it’s nice because we’re kind of getting to do the things that we’re good

at instead of being put in situations where we’re like iffy.” The transition into Williams’ style of play has been a work in progress and in order to be successful this season, the Rams will need to continue to grow each day in practice. “What we’ve asked these girls to do is challenging,” Williams said. “The try has been good, the execution hasn’t always been good, but there’s constant improvement … and if we can just keep getting better every single day and just come to work and try to improve every day, this group can play some good basketball.” Women’s Basketball Beat Reporter Andrew Schaller can be reached at sports@collegian.com


8 Friday, October 26, 2012 | The Rocky Mountain Collegian

“You can’t rely on just one player to win games. Although I’d love to have her here, we have to learn to move on.” Meghan Heimstra | senior forward

Replacing Kim Mestdagh: A task done by committee By QUENTIN SICKAFOOSE The Rocky Mountain Collegian

NICK LYON | COLLEGIAN

Meghan Heimstra, left, and Sam Martin will help lead the Rams, and Coach Ryun Williams this 2012 season.

Bob Dylan once wrote that the times are a-changin’. The CSU women’s basketball team might not be the biggest Dylan fans, but they can sure relate to that particular song. As if coming back this year to an all new coaching staff wasn’t enough change to take in, the returning players are also learning to deal with an emptiness caused by something missing. That hole was once filled by Kim Mestdagh, the Rams’ leading scorer and arguably star player of last season. “It is really weird not having her around here anymore. I think about her a lot. I wish she would have redshirted sometime so we could have played our last year with the new coaches together,” senior forward Meghan Heimstra said. That’s the kicker about college athletics, getting the exact same team for more than one season is nearly impossible. Players are constantly coming and going due to graduation and transferring schools. However, the Rams are persistent on believing that Mestdagh’s absence is merely an obstacle they will be

Women’s 2012-2013 Schedule Date

Opponent / Event

Location

Time / Result

able to work around. “You can’t rely on just one player to win games. Although I’d love to have her here, we have to learn to move on — it’s the harsh reality of Division-I athletics,” Heimstra said. “Her little sister being here really reminds me that there’s something missing.” The Mestdagh name in a CSU uniform is carried on by Kim’s sister, Hanne, who is redshirting this year as a sophomore. “It’s way different. With her gone, I don’t get to speak in my own language anymore,” Hanne Mestdagh, a native of Belgium, said. “I learned a lot from her. Last year was my freshman year and it was always nice to have someone around that close to you because she helped me with everything.” The Rams are also faced with adjusting to an all new coaching staff that they haven’t worked with before this season. The coaching staff never got the opportunity to work with Kim Mestdagh, so they are starting to build their team without her in mind. “Do I think it feels empty without her here? No. This is our group, we’ve had some pretty good practices up to this point. Onward,” CSU coach Ryun Williams said. The plan to go on with-

PRODUCTION LOST Kim Mestdagh’s 2011-12 stats Games played: 30 Minutes/ game: 32.7 Points/ game: 14.8 FG percentage: 39.7

RETURNING LEADER Sam Martin’s 2011-12 stats Games played: 30 Minutes/ game: 28.7 Points/ game: 13.1 FG percentage: 53.2

out Mestdagh isn’t to replace her with one single player, but instead the entire team. “I think the way we have to replace Kim is collectively because we don’t have another Kim. She’s gone,” Williams said. “We do have a group that has some strengths and we have to play through each kid’s strengths and do it together.” It’s a plan that the entire team has good feelings about. “We’re going to have to do it as a group. If every player contributes a little more we’ll be fine,” Hanne Mestdagh said. Women’s Basketball Beat Reporter Quentin Sickafoose can be reached at sports@ collegian.com.

Men’s 2012-2013 Schedule Date

Opponent / Event

Location

Time / Result

11/01/12

vs. Colorado School of Mines

Fort Collins, Colo.

7:00 p.m. MT

10/28/12

vs. Metro State (exhibition)

Fort Collins, Colo.

2:00 p.m. MT

11/11/12

vs. Montana State

Fort Collins, Colo.

2:00 p.m. MT

11/09/12

vs. Montana

Fort Collins, Colo.

7:00 p.m. MT

11/13/12

vs. Northern Colorado

Fort Collins, Colo.

7:00 p.m. MT

11/15/12

vs. Chadron State

Fort Collins, Colo.

7:00 p.m. MT

11/17/12

vs. Seattle University

Fort Collins, Colo.

2:00 p.m. MT

11/21/12

at Denver

Denver, Colo.

7:00 p.m. MT

11/20/12

vs. Toledo

Fort Collins, Colo.

7:00 p.m. MT

11/24/12

at Washington

Seattle, Wash.

5:30 p.m. MT

11/28/12

at Loyola Marymount

Los Angeles, Calif.

8:00 p.m. MT

11/26/12

vs. Northern Colorado

Fort Collins, Colo.

7:00 p.m. MT

12/01/12

at Bowling Green

Bowling Green, Ohio

2:30 p.m. MT

12/01/12

vs. Evansville

Fort Collins, Colo.

2:30 p.m. MT

12/05/12

at Colorado

Boulder, Colo.

5:50 p.m. MT

12/05/12

at Colorado

Boulder, Colo.

8:30 p.m. MT

12/08/12

at Tulsa

Tulsa, Okla.

1:30 p.m. MT

12/08/12

at UIC

Chicago, Ill.

2:00 p.m. MT

12/16/12

vs. CSU Bakersfield

Fort Collins, Colo.

2:00 p.m. MT

12/20/12

vs. Denver

Fort Collins, Colo.

7:00 p.m. MT

Fordham Holiday Classic

Continental Tire Las Vegas Classic 12/17/12

vs. North Florida

Fort Collins, Colo.

7:00 p.m. MT

12/19/12

vs. CSU Bakersfield

Fort Collins, Colo.

7:00 p.m. MT

12/29/12

vs. Providence

Bronx, N.Y.

12:00 p.m. MT

12/22/12

vs. Portland

Las Vegas, Nev.

8:30 p.m. MT

12/30/12

at Fordham/Lafayette

Bronx, N.Y.

TBA

12/23/12

at Virginia Tech/Bradley

Las Vegas, Nev.

7/9:30 p.m. MT

01/04/13

vs. South Dakota Tech

Fort Collins, Colo.

7:00 p.m. MT

12/29/12

vs. Adams State

Fort Collins, Colo.

2:30 p.m. MT

01/13/13

vs. San Diego State

Fort Collins, Colo.

2:00 p.m. MT

01/02/13

vs. UTEP

Fort Collins, Colo.

8:00 p.m. MT

01/16/13

at Air Force

Colorado Springs, Colo. 7:00 p.m. MT

01/05/13

vs. St. Bonaventure

Fort Collins, Colo.

2:30 p.m. MT

01/20/13

at UNLV

Las Vegas, Nev.

2:00 p.m. MT

01/12/13

at San Diego State

San Diego, Calif.

6:00 p.m. MT

01/23/13

vs. New Mexico

Fort Collins, Colo.

7:00 p.m. MT

01/16/13

vs. Air Force

Fort Collins, Colo.

7:00 p.m. MT

01/27/13

vs. Fresno State

Fort Collins, Colo.

2:00 p.m. MT

01/19/13

vs. UNLV

Fort Collins, Colo.

5:00 p.m. MT

01/30/13

at Boise State

Boise, Idaho

7:00 p.m. MT

01/23/13

at New Mexico

Albuquerque, N.M.

6:00 p.m. MT

02/02/13

at Wyoming

Laramie, Wyo.

2:00 p.m. MT

01/26/13

at Fresno State

Fresno, Calif.

8:00 p.m. MT

02/06/13

vs. Nevada

Fort Collins, Colo.

7:00 p.m. MT

01/30/13

vs. Boise State

Fort Collins, Colo.

7:00 p.m. MT

02/13/13

at San Diego State

San Diego, Calif.

8:00 p.m. MT

02/02/13

vs. Wyoming

Fort Collins, Colo.

2:30 p.m. MT

02/16/13

vs. Air Force

Fort Collins, Colo.

2:00 p.m. MT

02/06/13

at Nevada

Reno, Nev.

8:00 p.m. MT

02/20/13

vs. UNLV

Fort Collins, Colo.

7:00 p.m. MT

02/13/13

vs. San Diego State

Fort Collins, Colo.

8:00 p.m. MT

02/23/13

at New Mexico

Albuquerque, N.M.

6:00 p.m. MT

02/16/13

at Air Force

Colorado Springs, Colo.

2:00 p.m. MT

02/27/13

at Fresno State

Fresno, Calif.

8:00 p.m. MT

02/20/13

at UNLV

Las Vegas, Nev.

8:00 p.m. MT

03/02/13

vs. Boise State

Fort Collins, Colo.

2:00 p.m. MT

02/23/13

vs. New Mexico

Fort Collins, Colo.

2:00 p.m. MT

03/06/13

vs. Wyoming

Fort Collins, Colo.

7:00 p.m. MT

02/27/13

vs. Fresno State

Fort Collins, Colo.

7:00 p.m. MT

03/09/13

at Nevada

Reno, Nev.

5:00 p.m. MT

03/02/13

at Boise State

Boise, Idaho

6:00 p.m. MT

03/06/13

at Wyoming

Laramie, Wyo.

TBA

03/09/13

vs. Nevada

Fort Collins, Colo.

6:30 p.m. MT

Reese’s Mountain West Championships 03/12/13

First Round

Las Vegas, Nev.

8:30 p.m. MT

03/14/13

Quarterfinal Round

Las Vegas, Nev.

TBA

03/15/13

Semifinal Round

Las Vegas, Nev.

TBA

03/12/13

First Round

Las Vegas, Nev.

6:00 p.m. MT

03/16/13

Championship

Las Vegas, Nev.

8:00 p.m. MT

03/13/13

Quarterfinal Round

Las Vegas, Nev.

12/2:30/6:30/9 p.m. MT

03/15/13

Semifinal Round

Las Vegas, Nev.

6/8:30 p.m. MT

03/16/13

Championship

Las Vegas, Nev.

3:00 p.m. MT

Reese’s Mountain West Championships


weekender entertainment

The Rocky Mountain Collegian | Friday, October 26, 2012

PRESENTS

This week’s top 2 albums: By ALEX HALL 90.5 KCSU Fort Collins

A Fine Frenzy – “Pines” Released Oct. 9

Getting your debut album released on Virgin Records is no small feat. That puts you squarely in the company of the Sex Pistols, among others. Yet Alison Sudol, who records under the name A Fine Frenzy and released her first album on Virgin in 2007, is immensely different from the Sex Pistols, and not just because she plays cute indie pop. “Pines,” her new album, is almost 20 minutes longer than “Never Mind the Bullocks…” and as the Sex Pistols were praised for their economy, A Fine Frenzy must be commended for her patience. Each song is beautiful in similar ways, one of those being the way they seem to swoop in and out rather than being constant. It’s a dynamic album, and while there are the anticipated quirky singles, even those feel like an important checkpoint on this hilly road of an LP. Nearly 70 minutes in length(!) A Fine Frenzy has released two other albums, “Bomb in a Birdcage” and “One Cell in the Sea” Highlights of this album include “Sailingsong,” “It’s Alive” and “Avalanches”

Black Moth Super Rainbow – “Cobra Juicy” Released Oct. 23

I’m going to be honest with you: “Cobra Juicy” seems a bit misplaced to be released in late October, as it’s one of the sunny psychedelic pop records found so commonly in the summer. This record is a burst of weird refracted light, and it certainly isn’t a Beach House or Best Coast record, but it’s still too sunny for the middle of fall. That being said, if you do some research on the band, that discrepancy dissolves quickly. Black Moth Super Rainbow are from Pittsburgh, where they have been recording since 2003, releasing five full-length albums and a slew of EPs. The band is also notoriously shy and mysterious, rarely granting interviews; moreover, members all go by pseudonyms, including Tobacco, Iffernaut, Bullsmear, and The Seven Fields of Aphelion. They’ve marketed themselves as an enigma, and “Cobra Juicy” is a microcosm of that. Band member Ryan Graveface also contributes to the Casket Girls, a group currently in KCSU’s rotation Tobacco also has a prolific solo career, as does past member Power Pill Fist Past incarnations of Black Moth Super Rainbow include Allegheny White Fish and satanstompingcaterpillars

Top 10 albums for the week of Oct. 21 1. Black Pistol Fire — “Big Beat ‘59” 2. Flying Lotus — “Until the Quiet Comes” 3. Local H. Hallelujah! — “I’m a Bum” 4. Melody’s Echo Chamber — “Melody’s Echo Chamber” 5. Tame Impala — “Lonerism” 6. Reptile Youth — “Reptile Youth”

7. Brother Ali — “Mourning in America and Dreaming in Color” 8. The XX — “Coexist” 9. Callers — “Reviver” 10. Turbo Fruits — “Butter”

9

CSU student dance recital gets creative By LIANNA SALVA The Rocky Mountain Collegian

DANCE CONCERT

From sassy jazz with stilettos to exploring modern marriages, the CSU Dance department offers a wide range of styles and themes in the first student dance concert of the season. A CSU tradition since 1987, the concert is a student-run performance and is the only event of its kind within the dance department. Auditions were held in the first week of classes with weekly rehearsals since. Students direct, choreograph, publicize and perform — sometimes more than one piece. Cami McCullough, senior dance and journalism major, is one of the 11 student directors for the show. She is also performing in three other pieces besides her own in which she also choreographed. “By being a director you get to see what goes in to the whole production. You have to coordinate everything from auditions to marketing to being on the production crew,” she said. Some of the students are performing as part of their Choreography II class. For the class, the students must incorporate a prop or spoken word in their performance. Sophomore dance major Genevieve Waterbury is using mirrors as her prop as a way to express the human experience of learning through reflecting others’ ideas. Waterbury described her piece as the modern performance she has choreographed. “I think the student dance concert is a way for everybody to expand their techniques. I think a lot of people have an idea that

What: Student Dance Concert Where: University Dance Theater. UCA When: Oct. 26, 8 p.m. and Oct. 27, 2 and 8 p.m. Cost: $8 student, $12 general public

dance is only ballet, and I think they’ll be surprised to see that’s not all that we do here,” she said. Other students were given more freedom with their choices of music and choreography. “My piece is by a cello quartet, another girl is using Lil Wayne. The music is very diverse,” said Brittany Adams, senior dance major, student director and performer. One performer is using spoken word through journal entries for her performance about depression. “We all get influenced by different genres. Everything we’re doing relates to the human experience,” Adams said. By dancing in very diverse performances and directing, the students get a glimpse of the professional dance world. “If you’re ever a part of a dance company, every member has to contribute to a show. It’s important for the curriculum to have to direct the show,” McCullough said. “I have to switch gears every time I go on stage.” “The quality of dancers in this program is really high. The faculty here all have professional experience and always give us great advice and prepare us for the professional world,” McCulloughsaid. UCA Beat Reporter Lianna Salva can be reached at entertainment@collegian.com

CSU professor brings booty shaking music to the Aggie By BAILEY CONSTAS The Rocky Mountain Collegian You might be familiar with Jason Downing as a sociology professor, but there’s much more behind Downing’s beard than academia. Away from CSU he is known as Monkey Paw Patterson in the band Musketeer Gripweed. He plays guitar and vocals for the band as well as “screams, harp, dobro mobro, dancin' chair routine and spilling drinks,” accord-

ing to the band’s profile. Downing prefers to describe their sound as “ass-shaking revival stomp holla.” “It’s rock and roll, it’s get down music, it’s dance music,” Downing said. This weekend the band is playing at the Aggie for the second annual Halloween and Gasoline concert, which will be the band’s last show in Fort Collins for 2012. “We’re hiring a person who does stage design for [the] String Cheese [Incident] and Wide-

spread Panic, so the Aggie is going to be decorated,” Downing said. Also playing is Patti Fiasco and Erica Brown, a gospel singer from Denver. In addition to their own material, Musketeer Gripweed will be playing Ray Charles, the Rolling Stones and Led Zeppelin. Downing grew up surrounded by rock and blues, and this weekend those roots are coming to meet him. “My dad is flying out from Chicago. He’s 72 and he plays in

a band and he’s a rocker. I haven’t played with him for a long time,” Downing said. As a sociology professor who lectures to a few hundred students, and then rocks out in front of a few hundred fans, Downing says the approach for both has the same roots. “Sociology is all about life and so is rock and roll. It’s like our story of people, music is our story of how people relate to each other,” Downing said. The group just released

YPO show says ‘goodbye theater death’

Colorado State theater performance embraces the ‘crazy’ By COLLEEN McSWEENEY The Rocky Mountain Collegian Senior performing arts major Tony Vessels was tired of seeing dead bodies on the stages of the CSU theatre department. “You know, people die a lot in plays here. It was starting to get really depressing,” Vessels said. So Vessels, the student director of the Young Producers Organization’s rendition of “The Bald Soprano,” playing Friday and Saturday at the University Center for the Arts, decided it was time to lighten the mood a bit. “It’s just a really, really funny play,” he said. The absurdist-style play “The Bald Soprano,” written by French playwright Eugene Ionesco in 1950, is probably unknown to most students at CSU, but Vessels assures that while it is obscure, students shouldn’t be turned off: it’s not simply for elitist theatre connoisseurs. “There are two types of audience members at a show like this,” Vessels said. “There are those who analyze everything

and look for a deeper social commentary, and there are those who just like being lighthearted and watching ridiculous things happen on stage.” The majority of those “ridiculous things” stem from the play’s seemingly nonsensical dialogue, since the main characters are typical 1950s American couples, dressed in cardigans and ties and conversing in a typical American home. “The absurd nature of ‘The Bald Soprano’ allows the seemingly boring setting and time period to settle the audience. and then the crazy happens,” said Jack Krause, freshman journalism major who plays the Fire Chief in the play. In one scene, Krause’s character enters the room in which the main characters, Mr. and Mrs. Smith and Mr. and Mrs. Martin, are chatting — he becomes depressed after finding out there isn’t a fire, even though no one told him there was. Mr. and Mrs. Martin don’t remember how they know each other (they’re married), but they are

delighted that they happen to have so much in common. Mrs. Martin tells everyone how wonderful it was to have seen a man tie his shoe. They are all fascinated. “So, I guess, [this play] is fun and exciting for all those weird reasons,” Krause said. The playwright Eugene Ionesco was inspired to write this play after he first started learning English — he was amused by what he saw as the absurdity of all language and communication. But, he was also seemingly touched by the humor the absurd can create. Because, as Mrs. Smith says in the play, “[The bald soprano]

CONCERT What: Young Producers Organization’s “The Bald Soprano” Where: University Center for the Arts’ Large Acting Lab When: Friday, Oct. 26 and Saturday, Oct. 27, 8 p.m. Cost: Free always wears her hair in the same style.” Collegian Writer Colleen McSweeney can be reached at entertainment@collegian.com.

“Straight Razor Revival,” which involves contributions from the Black Crows’ Luther Dickinson and the Mississippi Allstars. “It’s a step up each album, and each time we do something,” Downing said. As for the show this weekend, it’s going to be a freak show, according to Downing. “It’s about rock and roll and treating each other better. My class is doing a food drive,” Downing said. “But in the midst it’s just a freak show rock and

CONCERT What: Musketeer Gripweed w/ the Patti Fiasco Where: The Aggie Theatre When: Friday, Oct. 26, 8 p.m. Cost: $8

roll party. It’s conscious, but also a lot of fun.” Entertainment and diversity beat reporter Bailey Constas (@ BaileyLiza) can be reached at en-


10 Friday, October 26, 2012 | The Rocky Mountain Collegian

Honoring our heros CSU honors Colo. law enforcement after recent tragedies By HALEIGH HAMBLIN The Rocky Mountain Collegian It’s not a common thing for local law enforcement to be recognized, according to CSU Police Department Police Chief Wendy Rich-Goldschmidt. But Thursday, thanks to the efforts of two students, Fort Collins and CSU law enforcement officials were honored for their continual contributions to the community. In the Newsom Events Center Thursday night, 25 local law enforcement officials talked with organizers and students in the residence halls over pizza and drinks. Lexie Wissler, third-year resident assistant in Newsom Hall, initiated the officer dinner, personal card distribution and movie for local law enforcement and students. “What we were doing today represents the appreciation of law enforcement not just in Fort Collins, but the entire state of Colorado,” Wissler said. The event recognized all local law enforcement, even though it was inspired by the tragedies that took place in Colorado over the summer. The High Park Fire and the Aurora shooting brought the importance of police and other officials to the forefront. Some of those honored helped with those tragedies, but all law enforcement officials were recognized.

Rich-Goldschmidt, who was recognized, has worked for Colorado State for the past three years and 22 years with Northern Colorado. “This is our job... t’s why we are here,” Rich-Goldschmidt said. “We choose to work with students and educate them to safe habits on and around campus.” Wissler and Resident Assistant (RA) Alexandra Cluxton co-organized the event with Ashleigh Rose, the CSUPD liason with the Residence Halls. “My focus as an officer is community orientation, educate awareness and how to keep safe,” said Rose, who has worked at CSUPD for five years. “This is the first time we are being recognized, and it is truly an honor.” CSUPD, the Fort Collins Police Department and the Poudre Valley Fire Authority were contacted by Cluxton a month ago to be honored at a dinner. Cluxton and Wissler look to recognized local law enforcement regularly. “CSUPD keeps us safe,” Cluxton said. “I live in Colorado Springs and I feel safe going out on campus everyday because CSUPD works so hard for the student community.” Active member in Braiden Hall Council, Sierra Hastings, a sophomore English literature major, personally connects to the recent tragedies in Colorado. The hall council

THE EVENT Officers that attended

“We think it’s very important that if we are telling students to be more environmentallyfriendly that we should do the same.” Taylor Jackson | Director of student services

Smash pumpkins and go green

5 from Poudre Valley Fire Authority 20 from CSUPD 2 from Fort Collins Police Department

Student gov. introduces sustainable tailgating

made over 25 cards to be presented at Thursday’s event. Aurora resident and active moviegoer, Hastings reflects on those friends and local residents that made it out safely from the shooting thanks to the responding efforts of Aurora law enforcement. “I appreciate what the Colorado law enforcement has done to keep people safe,” Hastings said. “It is not an easy job.” Prior to a showing of The Avengers, 160 cards were given to CSUPD, Fort Collins PD and the Poudre Valley Fire Department. Never before honored by the students of Colorado State University, officers in attendance constantly used the word “honored” by the lengths students did for them. Honoring our heroes recognizes those law enforcement officials that are not told “thank you.” “I wanna tell CSUPD that their work is appreciated and that I would not feel safe without them,” Hastings said. Collegian writer Haleigh Hamblin can be reached at news@collegian.com.

Student government will be holding a Halloween-themed tailgate this weekend to encourage a sustainable way of tailgating, as well as to better connect students to the Associated Students of CSU, according to Taylor Jackson, director of Student Services. Jackson said this year’s tailgate is more centered on going “green” than previous ones. “The Department of Student Services has been working closely with the Department of Sustainability to really try to change the way students tailgate,” Jackson said. “We want to make sure they know how to tailgate in an environmentally responsible way.” A pumpkin-smashing contest will also be part of

By CARRIE MOBLEY The Rocky Mountain Collegian

the festivities, with all the waste generated from the contest being composted. “We think its very important that if we are telling students to be more environmentally-friendly that we should do the same,” Jackson said. “Composting all the waste we are generating will help achieve that goal.” The tailgate will feature a costume contest and bike parade starting on campus and ending at the tailgate area in Hughes, with extra bike racks set up around the stadium to accommodate the extra cyclists. “We wanted to do this so that we could get out there and let students see us in a different light,” said Regina Martel, ASCSU president. “The orange-out game in particular is a great time to do it. It’s im-

EVENT DETAILS Every year ASCSU hosts a tailgate event at football, basketball, and softball games. This year’s football tailgate will include: Free food for the first 75 people A costume competition and bike parade from campus to Hughes A pumpkin-smashng contest CSU and ASCSU trivia games

portant we all remember where we came from and are able to remember all the history.” The tailgate can also be used as a way for students to let out pent-up midterm stress, Jackson said. “What's better than taking out all your frustration on a pumpkin?” ASCSU Beat Reporter Carrie Mobley can be reached at news@collegian.com.

“Up-top you’ll see the snow glowing (literally) on the Front Range and the Never Summers.” WEEKEND EXCURSION GUIDE

Climb a staple: Greyrock By KEVIN BARTZ The Rocky Mountain Collegian

Remember how I said that the Poudre Canyon is not a burnt wasteland? It is even better than I thought! It’s true that you have to drive quite far to get past the burn area, but there are a few hikes that are open through the burn area, and it’s really fascinating to see! Might as well take advantage of the weather and see it before we get more snow! This weekend, you all should climb Greyrock. It is not too far and can actually be seen from campus. It is that really big, rocky, cone-shaped mountain to the north. You can get a real good look at it from the library. From the trailhead, you’ll cross a footbridge over the Poudre River. The trail then follows the river for a ways before pitching upward through a ravine. During spring and early summer, a creek trickles through the bottom of the ravine. But now-a-days it is dry

as a bone. Along this part of the trail you will actually walk by scorched trees. The greenery has already come back quite a bit. So the forest, at spots, looks like an endless carpet of fall foliage and golden grass, flecked with the blackened monoliths of tree trunks. Breathtaking and absolutely bizarre! But no worries, there are plenty of trees that are alive and well. Once you make your way up the ravine a bit, you’ll come to a crossroads. To the left is the shorter (though much steeper) trail that continues up the ravine in a series of seemingly endless switchbacks. Get your quads ready for this route. This will take you straight up to the base of the rock. The other route is a little longer, but less steep. This way slips out of the ravine and cuts through some wide-open meadows. Then you approach the rock from the side. The view of Greyrock from this angle is second to none. This

route is much less traveled and great for some solitude. The trails converge at the same spot and then it is a bit of a scramble to the summit. Up-top, you’ll see the snow glowing (literally) on the Front Range and the Never Summers. You’ll also see the patchwork of burnt trees and the ones that survived the fire. Of course, you’ll get a good view of the northern half of fabulous Fort Collins. To get there, take College Avenue North. It will turn into Highway 287 and curve west. Take the exit on the right on 287 North and 14 West. Continue on and then take a left on 14 West; you’ll see a big flagpole and a little shack called Ted’s Place. Drive on up the Poudre Canyon. The parking lot for the canyon is about 15 minutes from the turn, on the left. The Trailhead is on the right. No worries about a fee. It’s free! Collegian writer Kevin Bartz can be reached at entertainment@ collegian.com.

Office Hours: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Monday-Friday

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Office: Lory Student Center, Lower Level, South End Deadline to submit classified ads is 4 p.m. the day prior to publication.

To Place an ad:

(970) 491-1686 • classads@lamar.colostate.edu • www.collegian.com

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The Rocky Mountain Collegian | Friday, October 26, 2012

11

#Room-Antics

Daily Horoscope

Nancy Black and Stephanie Clement

JADE

Today’s Birthday (10/26/12). This is a great year to build up your nest egg. Career opportunities arise; flexibility and willingness to try something new propel you forward. Expect changes. Adaptability can be fun. Keep it all grounded with love.

To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

Tim Rickard

Brewster Rockit

Rochelle Peeler

Meh Comex

Ctrl+z

Chelsea London

Aries (Mar. 21-April 19) –– 5 –– Speak from the heart. You can get whatever you stand for, even if romantic issues challenge you. You’re stronger for the next two days. Make plans that generate income. Taurus (April 20-May 20) –– 6 –– It’s a time of introspection. Have your partner represent you. It’s hard to decide what to buy, and what to put on hold for later. Focus on long-range goals, and don’t stress. Not worth it. Gemini (May 21-June 20) –– 6 –– You can easily do two things at once, but watch out for toes you don’t want to step on (especially those of a loved one). Moderate a clash between normally gentle souls. Cancer (June 21-July 22) –– 6 –– Make sure you know what’s required to get the job done. Consult a female expert, and listen to new ideas. Stand outside the controversy as much as possible for the next two days. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) –– 5 –– You’re full of wild and crazy ideas, and some of them might work, but when it comes to romance, not right this second. Present your thoughts with compassion. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) –– 6 –– You may hit a bump in the tunnel of love. Don’t worry, you’ve got the words. Compromise is required. There’s room for financial improvement, too. Keep in action. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) –– 5 –– Postpone a romantic moment, for just a little bit. Let somebody else take care of you for the next two days. Learn to take risks from interesting people. Music enhances mental focus. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) –– 7 –– Make time for love, despite possible confrontations. Listening with special attention pays dividends. You’re entering a very busy phase. Bath or shower meditations generate brilliance. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) –– 7 –– Make up a wish list for the perfect romance, and watch love blossom with some help from your friends. You may as well pop the question, today or tomorrow. Share feelings. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) –– 6 –– Opposites attract, even now. The action is behind the scenes. It’s a good day to file away papers and get the household in order. Enjoy the results. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) –– 5 –– You’re very attractive now, and extra brilliant. Others ask your advice. Invest in communications infrastructure. Add some relaxation to the equation. Write, record and get it down. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) –– 7 –– Make money while you can, but don’t lose your passion in that focus. There are so many other things to celebrate and experience. Doing what you love increases interest and money.

Wondermark

RamTalk

David Malki

Compiled by Kris Lawan

Daily cartoons and games available at Collegian.com. Send feedback to design@collegian.com.

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword

Why do Americans choose from just two people to run for president but 50 for Miss America?

Yup, your leopard print thong fell out of your bag in class today. And people noticed. That’s embarrassing...

God put me on this earth to accomplish many goals and tasks. Thus, I am only to assume that if I procrastinate, I will never die!!

Wilbur’s Total Beverage... You turn my Thursday frown upside down when I see your ad in the Collegian

Text your rants to 970-430-5547. Want more?

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Find out if you got in! “Like” us on Facebook. Search for The Rocky Mountain Collegian.

Follow us on Twitter @RMCollegian.

Submit RamTalk entries to ramtalk@collegian.com . Libelous or obscene submissions will not be printed. While your comment will be published anonymously, you must leave your name and phone number for verification.

Today’s RamTalk sponsored by:

Yesterday’s Solution

Today’s Sudoku sponsored by:

49¢ Wings on

Mondays

Monday Night Football 1 3 3 5 W . E l i z a b et h • 9 7 0 - 4 8 2 - 9 4 6 4

Across 1 Emulate a sous chef 5 Alcohol awareness-raising org. 9 Lands by the sea 14 Facetious “I see” 15 Farm fraction 16 Troop formation 17 Buccaneer? 20 IRS info 21 Jackie’s designer 22 Wikipedia policy 23 Part of a flight 24 Vendetta 25 Pasteurize? 32 SASE inserts, sometimes 33 “Sweet!” 34 Feel poorly 35 Like many college texts 36 MapQuest owner 37 “So Big” author Ferber 38 A, in Austria 39 Fishing hook 41 Hilarious 42 Propaganda? 46 Donald, to Dewey 47 Masters statistics 48 Coffee go-with 50 Right on el mapa 51 IV-covered areas 54 Melancholy? 57 Consumed 58 Wall St. debuts 59 Reject, in a way 60 It’s “when the moon hits your eye like a big pizza pie” 61 Suffragist Lucretia 62 Catches on Down 1 Tom Brady’s team, to fans 2 Frat letters 3 Place to watch the 1-Down 4 Break noisily 5 “Marilyn: A Biography” author 6 Say yes 7 Barrel-bottom bit 8 Hi-__ 9 Party hearty 10 Skee-Ball spot 11 Cow poke 12 Big-grin borders

Yesterday’s solution

Today’s Crossword sponsored by:

STEAK-OUT SALOON

13 Thesaurus entry: Abbr. 18 Rosters 19 Year in Augustus’ reign 23 “Monk” org. 24 Frustrate 25 More faithful 26 “Do the Right Thing” actor Davis 27 Hot spots 28 Switch type 29 A ham might be on one 30 Chiantis, e.g. 31 Cheer 36 Colgate-Palmolive shaving lotion 37 Cupid’s counterpart 39 Suitable for a serious collector 40 S&L units 41 Bury the hatchet 43 Sex Pistols fan, e.g. 44 Outcome 45 Up-to-date 48 Geom. figure 49 Aware of 50 Beantown hockey nickname 51 Actress Falco 52 It’s assumed 53 Pvt. instructors 54 Space cadet’s brain size? 55 Pronoun that’s a homonym of a song 56 Under-cover duds?

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12 Friday, October 26, 2012 | The Rocky Mountain Collegian

“The first couple years we usually got dominated, but everyone stayed positive through it and kept coming back. We continue to grow a lot every year.” Kelly Stabenau | Junior forward SPORTS

Women’s hockey: Colorado State’s best kept secret By QUENTIN SICKAFOOSE The Rocky Mountain Collegian

CSU WOMEN’S HOCKEY

Any athlete can tell you how difficult performing well at their sport is when there is a lack of fan turnout at each event. A club sport athlete can tell you their fan turnout is limited in comparison to the crowds that show up for varsity athletics. And any female club sport athlete can tell you how their turnout is simply inadequate. Along with playing their opponent, fan support is a battle the CSU women’s hockey team faces every time they take the ice. What may be most surprising to the CSU community isn't that they have a women’s hockey team, but they play in a higher division than the men’s team does, with some of the best teams in the nation. “We play in the ACHA just like the boys, but we’re Division-I,” CSU coach Alan Brown said. “We’re off to the University of Wisconsin next week and we also play Robert Morris, Ohio State and Michigan shortly after. Big schools in unbelievable places where we go play.” On top of its ACHA games, CSU also sees ice time in the upper-division of the Women’s Association of Colorado Hockey. The WACH matches allow the Rams to earn themselves more ACHA play by facing off against their in-state rivals. “The ACHA games are more important because

Who: CU-Boulder Where: EPIC (Edora Pool and Ice Center) When: 9:15 p.m. Friday Cost: Free

those are the games that will give us a bid to go to nationals,” junior forward Alex Kuhn said. “We’re put at a disadvantage because we have to travel out of town for the majority of those.” The CSU women’s hockey team is having to deal with proving itself because it is a club that is fresh on the scene. The program is entering its fourth season and forward Kelly Stabenau is one of the two seniors on the team who has watched it grow since day one. “The first couple years we usually got dominated, but everyone stayed positive through it and kept coming back. We continue to grow a lot every year,” Stabenau said. “This year looks more promising than it ever has before.” The Rams have been working hard both on and off the ice to keep their program from running out of their love for the sport. They volunteer their time with fundraisers and publicity on top of their multiple practices every week, some even on the same days. “The majority of people don’t realize that these girls are really dedicated,” assistant coach Jill Vande-

ERIN MOSS | COLLEGIAN

The CSU women’s hockey team practices at the Eudora Pool and Ice Center (EPIC) Thursday morning. The next CSU match is against CU today at EPIC.

grift said. “They have a lot of heart and it’s fun to watch them play.” If there were ever a time to get involved with CSU women’s hockey, it would

be now, as the Rams take on CU-Boulder this Friday before hitting the road for other key ACHA games that will ultimately decide the team’s ability to make their goal of

going to nationals. “Friday will be our most competitive game in Colorado,” junior forward Bre Snyder said. “To get a nice send off before our trips and get a

fan base going would be really encouraging.” Club Sports Beat Reporter Quentin Sickafoose can be reached at sports@collegian. com.


The Rocky Mountain Collegian, Friday, October 26, 2012