__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

WINTER 2020

2018–19 Annual Report INCLUDED WITHIN


Solely for valued members of the Ridley community. The information contained herein may not be published without permission.

Andrea Carisse

CONTRIBUTORS

DIRECTOR, STRATEGIC COMMUNICATIONS & MARKETING

writing

design

Andrea Carisse Ed Kidd Tanya Rohrmoser

Michelle Scrivener

Mackenzie Fowler ’11 DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS COORDINATOR

Tanya Rohrmoser

editing

COMMUNICATIONS COORDINATOR

Andrea Carisse Tanya Rohrmoser

Michelle Scrivener

printing

GRAPHIC DESIGNER & PHOTOGRAPHER

Battlefield Press

photography Andrea Carisse Danny Custodio Ariadni Harper Amy Forte Mackenzie Fowler ’11 Michelle Scrivener


PUBLICATIONS MAIL AGREEMENT NO. 40069450 RETURN UNDELIVERABLE CANADIAN ADDRESS TO CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT P.O. BOX 3013 - ST. CATHARINES ONTARIO, CANADA L2R 7C3

P.O. Box 3013 - 2 Ridley Road, St. Catharines Ontario, Canada L2R 7C3 | 905-684-1889

ridleycollege.com


5

11

OUR SCHOOL

LIFE ON CAMPUS

Headmaster’s Headlines

Academics............ 24

Athletics................ 32

Poetry Prize Winner

Rugby Repeats CISAA Victory

Feeling Positively Inspired

U14 Rugby Takes the Title

Excited About Enrollment

Rowers Rewarded at CSSRA

Grade 9 Participates in WASE Conference

Go Black ’19 Go

Ridley Receives Top Marks

A Fishy Story

Home Court Victory Crews Get ‘A Head’ at Regatta

Ties That Bind

Hit the Ground Running

Arts........................ 28 Double, Double, Toil & Trouble

Hometown Hockey Features Coach Wark

Hitting the High Notes

Service.................. 36

An Evening of Bids & Buds

Generosity in Guatemala

Passion Meets Poison at Stratford

A World of Difference

Up for Debate

Students Fight for Climate Change Running with Heart Digging for a Cause Lest We Forget Uniforms for DIG Soccer Team

Halloween Party

2019–20 Prefects

Upper School Cross Country Run


40

50

60

70

FEATURE STORIES

ALUMNI STORIES

ALUMNI ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNUAL REPORT

The Value of Boarding

Alumni @ Work: Arts

Global Event Recaps

Best Foot Forward

Colm Feore ’77

• • •

Jane Lewis ’90 Alexander Rassmusen ’07 Brian Wannmaker ’82

Class Notes Marriages, Births, Obituaries Faculty and Staff Notes

in this issue

Homecoming 2019

MacBeth Parody


Michelle Scrivener

4

flourishing

Headmaster Kidd and Chair of the Board, Dave Carter ’88 honour Scott Paterson ’82 as a Ridleian of Distinction at our inaugural Founders’ Day dinner.


HEADMASTER’S HEADLINES

What a fulsome edition of Tiger magazine you hold in your hands, its density a symbol of the countless learning activities happening in our community. This issue is particularly ample with the inclusion of the appended 2018–19 Annual Report, which provides a view of the state of the college at the end of last school year. I’d like to express my sincere gratitude to the hundreds of loyal donors who are recognized within its pages. Since you last flipped through this publication, we’ve marked significant milestones, including Ridley’s 130th anniversary (page 18)—celebrated at our annual birthday party—and our inaugural Founders’ Day. It was a privilege to welcome a number of key stakeholders to campus in September for the occasion, which included workshops and the State of the College address. In this address, I discussed our school’s steadfast reputation, our short and long-term strategic priorities and the progress we’re making towards reaching our goals set out in The Campaign for Ridley. It was a time to reflect on how far we’ve come as a school, a time to listen to our participants and to cement our future ambitions. At Ridley, the future is bright: our efforts—and all that we do—continue to be grounded in a simple, yet compelling idea; to inspire flourishing lives. We are guided in these efforts by a learner-centric approach and the eternal values of Terar Dum Prosim— together, these ideas are what set us apart.

Our forthcoming campus transformation is a shining example of how we plan to create spaces that will inspire our students to thrive in all areas. Indeed, this campus project is very much the architecture of flourishing—spaces that bring Ridleians together, that cultivate community and inspire vitality, purpose and engagement in the three pillars of academics, athletics and the arts. In fact, the arts are the thread that runs through this issue. In its pages, you’ll learn about our students’ creative achievements, and discover just some of the notable alumni who have pursued successful careers in music, the performing arts, and visual arts in our Alumni @ Work section (page 50). One such artist, award-winning actor Colm Feore ’77, aptly states that artistic expression is what best fosters and connects community. We hope that you have been able to stay connected to the Ridley community through any number of the events we have hosted since June 2019. Our Global Event Recaps section (page 60) showcases our worldwide receptions and tournaments, while Class Notes (page 62) highlights our most recent reunion classes, the accomplishments of our Old Ridleians and pays tribute to those who are no longer with us. It continues to be my pleasure to lead our community through this exciting era and, whether we meet here on campus or on my travels to your city, I look forward to celebrating together what comes next.

Terar Dum Prosim, J. Edward Kidd

TIGER | WINTER 2020

5


RIDLEY RECEIVES

top marks Ridley College received two important report cards last spring, following a combined review conducted by the Canadian Accredited Independent Schools (CAIS) and the International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO). Judging by the pride that greeted the Visiting Committees campus-wide, you won’t be surprised to learn our school is flourishing.

WHY ACCREDITATION MATTERS • Ensures Ridley meets the highest standards of excellence in learning and leadership • A collaborative way to reflect as a community, not only on what we do well, but to identify opportunities for growth and development • A transparent, rigorous process that measures initiatives and holds the school accountable to parents, alumni and our Board • Reaffirms our commitment to self-improvement: our students are always at the centre

CAIS ACCREDITATION The main accrediting agency for more than 90 independent schools across Canada, CAIS’ accreditation process promotes educational excellence and identifies opportunities for growth. Members of CAIS are required to meet 12 National Standards that cover every aspect of a school’s mission and operations. Ridley passed with flying colours—and offers our constituents a commitment to do even more.

IB PROGRAMME EVALUATION With a global presence in 150 nations, the IBO offers the highest standard of educational programming in the world for students from three to 19 years of age. Schools that administer this gold-standard of learning frameworks are reviewed once every five years. Preparations for this evaluation (known as a self-study) at Ridley were led by internal IB Coordinators across the Primary Years Programme (PYP), Middle Years Programme (MYP) and Diploma Programme (DP), as well as heads of academic departments. “As a community that encourages our students to challenge themselves and to grow, it’s essential that we do the same,” noted Headmaster Kidd. “The whole school improvement process that took place in anticipation of our CAIS and IB reviews provided us with a powerful opportunity to self-reflect and see not only where we’re excelling, but where we can go from here.” This attitude toward on-going development was not lost on either committee. “Ridley promised to welcome us with open minds, open arms and a

6

flourishing


On the heels of glowing CAIS and IB Accreditation visits, Ridley looks forward to the next steps in our school improvement process.

commitment to self-improvement,’’ wrote David Robertson, former Head of Shawnigan Lake School and Chair of the CAIS Visiting Committee. “It delivered handsomely on that assertion.” The praise followed months of preparation that included an internal evaluation conducted by Ridley’s Leadership Team. Measuring all aspects of our programmes and operations against the CAIS and IB standards, seeking our strengths, weaknesses and future plans, and examining how well Ridley fulfils our mission, the team documented its findings in detailed written reports, incorporating input from each and every employee of our school. “The collaborative and transparent process leading up to our CAIS Accreditation and IB Evaluation visits was very beneficial,” shared Andrea Carisse, Director of Strategic Communications and Marketing. “It enabled us to reflect on how our current practices could be improved in order to better serve our entire school community.” Following the submission of the internal reports in late 2018, the assigned visiting committees came to campus in February 2019 to assess the accuracy of Ridley’s Internal Evaluation Report and IB Report, while challenging our school to reflect on opportunities for growth. The eight-person CAIS team—comprised of school leaders and expert educators from other member schools—spent two intensive days at Ridley, observing classes and activities, and meeting with parents, students, alumni, faculty and staff, and governors. At the same time, the IB evaluation team of six honed in on our self-study report, delivery of academic programming, the adoption of IB principles and IBO criterions. THE RESULT? “To enter the campus of Ridley is to get a sense of the place, the history, the pride, the promise of the future it holds,” was the CAIS committee’s eloquent conclusion. Its comprehensive 74-page report shows there is plenty for which Ridleians should be proud—and offered an admiring nod to the sense of community and shared identity which “spoke volumes about the effectiveness of the mission and vision statements.”

The report offers over 30 enthusiastic commendations on everything from the fulsome embrace of our school mission, to our effective fundraising programmes, to the on-going commitment to providing a diverse student body. It also includes helpful, focused recommendations to guide improvement over the next two years. “Ridley has an opportunity to tap into its essential creativity in devising whatever range of methods and vehicles is deemed necessary and appropriate,” David Robertson remarked. “The school is bigger and more complex than it has ever been, but it starts that process from a position of strength in that the sense of belonging is powerful.”

Similarly, the 50-page IB Evaluation Report applauded Ridley’s commitment to pedagogy and noted our school’s enthusiasm for the approach to learning by faculty and students alike. Incredibly, the IB visiting team determined that our school had “No Matters To Be Addressed,” a rare and high form of praise that indicates there are no necessary adjustments for Ridley to immediately make, relating to IB programming. Headmaster Kidd is enthusiastic about following through on both reports,

While we found the process of preparing productive and fulfilling, we’re really looking forward to coming together as a community to address our CAIS recommendations and becoming even stronger IB educators.

TIGER | WINTER 2020

7


Pride,

Praise and

Possibilities A summary of commendations and recommendations from our accreditation visits.

COMMENDATIONS The Visiting Committees commend Ridley on: § Its ‘flourishing’ mission and vision statements that have been embraced by the whole community. § The abundance of activities, programmes and learning opportunities for students. § The way students are encouraged to bring forth ideas that promote diversity, service, and passion. § The compulsory nature of the co-curricular programme. § The fostering of a stimulating learning environment based on understanding and respect. § How teachers and students convey a strong enthusiasm and commitment for their IB learning. § How Ridley values the importance of professional development and funds it beyond the minimal requirements. § The improvement in its overall financial management over the past seven years. § Having a plan to consolidate and focus on ancillary revenue. § The maintenance and grounds staff for their work and their pride in the campus. § The security team for its work and commitment to the safety of the campus and community. § Its commitment to child safety and employees for their dedication to student safety. § The integration of day students into the life, culture and ethos of each house. § The quality of the common spaces in the boarding residences. § The training and evaluation in place for the entire residential team.

8

flourishing


The school has found its essential identity and, as a result, the sense of community is as strong as it has ever been.

— DAVID ROBERTSON, CHAIR CAIS VISITING COMMITTEE

NEXT STEPS It is recommended that Ridley continues to: § Review its programmes to ensure every student participates in a physical activity each day. § Provide a variety of opportunities to educate parents and the governing body about IB programmes. § Review its practices to ensure a clear and common understanding of the IB Learner Profile as the key component of international-mindedness. § Focus on strengthening its relationship with the local community. § Maintain its ongoing commitment to explore new markets and areas to provide a diverse student body. § Develop and implement a plan to build an appropriate cash reserve. § Work toward formalizing key performance indicators for both finance and operations. § Complete an integrated long-range financial plan. § Complete a comprehensive review of all emergency response procedures. § Develop a business interruption plan. § Update and implement the Ridley Sustainability (environmental) Master Plan. § Deepen both its data collection tools and its capacity to analyze to become a more datainformed community.

The aim of school evaluation is for the IB to ensure that the standards and practices of each programme are being maintained, to acknowledge accomplishments and to provide guidance for school improvement.

— ADRIAN KEARNEY, DIRECTOR OF IB WORLD SCHOOLS TIGER | WINTER 2020

9


Michelle Scrivener


The hustle and bustle of our vibrant campus never ceases. Our students are perpetually deepening their knowledge, advancing their athletic abilities, uncovering new creative passions and serving others to make our world a better place. Above all else, they are developing meaningful relationships that will last a lifetime.

LIFE ON

campus TIGER | WINTER 2020

11


The 2018-19 Senior Women’s team, parents and alumni gathered at the home of Michael Colston ’49

12 prior flourishing to Henley Women’s Regatta.


henley HOPES TIGER | WINTER 2020

13


Mackenzie Fowler ’11

aiming high AT CAMP

14

flourishing


Michelle Scrivener

House competitions heat up at camp, with students vying for Bermuda Cup and Bradley Shield points.

TIGER | WINTER 2020

15


Michelle Scrivener

flourishing

16


RACE for

the cup

TIGER | WINTER 2020

17


Birthday celebrations on September 20, 2019 included activities and games for students of all ages.

18

flourishing


OUR 130 YEAR th

19

Michelle Scrivener

TIGER | WINTER 2020


Michelle Scrivener

Honouring Ridleians of Distinction at the Alumni Dinner reception.

photos: Michelle Scrivener


homeCOMING

TIGER | WINTER 2020

21


IN 22

flourishing

memoriam


Mackenzie Fowler ’11

Dedication ceremony of The Reverend Gerald Shantz Memorial Garden.

TIGER | WINTER 2020

23


academics To be an IB learner at Ridley is to be a globally minded inquirer. Our students develop their knowledge and human compassion with the intent of becoming citizens of the world. Here is a sampling of the ‘ah-ha’ moments that happen daily across all grades.

24

flourishing


Poetry Prize Winner Before the close of last school year, Alayah Osborne ‘28 was recognized by the Mayor of St. Catharines, Walter Sendzik for her poem on water in our community. Alayah was presented with a certificate in front of her peers for the 2019 Poetry Challenge.

Feeling Positively Inspired In July, Headmaster Kidd and members of Ridley’s senior leadership team attended IPPA World Congress on Positive Education in Melbourne, Australia. With 1,500 attendees from over 40 countries, this event is the largest conference in the world devoted to promoting the science of positive psychology and its research-based applications. Ed and Hanna Kidd presented on our positive education journey and progress. One particular keynote speaker captivated our leadership team members: Jonathan Haidt, whose talk on ‘antifragility’ uncovered why eliminating risk from children’s lives has detrimental effects.

Excited About Enrollment In late summer, the Admissions Office was jumping for joy as it enrolled 700 students from 61 countries in Upper School (497) and Lower School (203) for the 2019–20 academic year. The team has experienced more interest in a Ridley education than ever before and reached record enrollment in Lower School and in boarding. Incredibly, some students have already confirmed for September 2020!

Grade 9 Participates in WASE Conference Edgar Lai ’23 was featured in the Globe and Mail for his participation in the WE Are Social Entrepreneurs (WASE) conference. The Grade 9 student is working toward creating a reusable water bottle made out of bioplastic, and a portion of the proceeds will be donated to clean water initiatives. Edgar’s dream bottles would be made of sustainable materials that decompose in soil and marine waters, which would help limit the amount of plastic entering the ocean. Danny Custodio

TIGER | WINTER 2020

25


A Fishy Story As part of their Barcode of Life lab, our Grade 12 biologists are learning to extract DNA from different species of fish. The samples will be sent off and become part of a larger critical study, shedding light on the fishing industry and the mislabeling of species. The fish used in the science lab was purchased at the local grocery store; the St. Catharines Superstore is eager to find out the results of the study—which will help open a conversation with their seafood supplier.

Mackenzie Fowler ’11

26

flourishing


Ties That Bind Upper School Academic Ties were presented to over 90 students at a special ceremony on October 1 in Williams Hall. The tie has been awarded to Grade 9 to 11 scholars who achieve a 90 percent (or IB level six) at the end of the previous school year. These keepsakes have been distributed for the last 52 years and are generously sponsored by the Class of 1956.

RECIPIENTS Johnathan Avgousti

Daniel Jude-Monye

Mona Shivafard

Ciara Blew

Jemma Katzman

Maya Sirhan

Jason Chan

Mia Kidd

Noah Sloan

Jackson Charlton

Edgar Lai

Ayoninu Sobande

Olivia Chen

Natalie Lam

Abigail Sullivan

Maximilian Chu

Olivia Li

Claire Sun

Lauren Clarke

Thomas Lin

Riva Sun

William Clayton

Albert Liu

Mary Sweetapple

Katherine Culligan

John Lu

Veronica Tawiah

Angela Daudu

Tony Luo

Sakura Telfer

Debbie Deng

Lauren MacPhail

Pete Tran

Kristina Deng

Joshua Maloney

Lucie Urban

Adela Dunkley

Nathan Mandigo

Gideon Vernon

Kibati Femi-Johnson

Olivia Massis

Annie Wang

Abby Ferrante

Bradley Mattocks

Julia Wang

Venessa Ferrante

Hallie McClelland

Meriel Wehner

Tessa Fois

Hannah McMaster

Vincent Wei

Catherine Foulem

Riley McMaster

Vivian Wei

Ben Gao

David Meng

Vivian Wen

Humzah Gilani

Brendan Ng

Brandon White

Abygail Grexton

Adaeze Okafo

Chloe Winterbottom

Olivia Grubic

Ruhi Patwardhan

Sherry Yang

Natalya Guillaume

Yifei Peng

Tina Yang

Joshua Hanna

Kaka Peters

Jessica Zeng

Christopher Hayward

Geena Prestia

Ann Zhang

Simon He

Mahmoud Radwan

Claire Zhao

Tanya Henderson

Abhimanyu Rai

Ashley Zhou

Hassait Hilawe

Marianne Ri

Echo Zhou

Sam Howe

Vanessa Russell

Doris Zhu

Tom Hu

Niko Schramm

Jenny Zou

Areen Iqbal

Taylor Searle

Judy Jiang

Sophie Sharpe

TIGER | WINTER 2020

27


arts When the curtain is drawn, a chord struck, or a brush stroke meets the canvas, creativity ignites. This term, Ridleians have been discovering their artistic abilities and appreciation for the arts. You’ll be inspired at what our cohort has already accomplished.

28

flourishing


Double, Double, Toil and Trouble

Michelle Scrivener

Audience members left the Mandeville Theatre with smiles on their faces after witnessing the comedic magic of The Farndale Avenue Housing Estate Townswomen’s Guild Dramatic Society’s Production of Macbeth, a play which explores the problems an ensemble faces as they attempt to put on one of Shakespeare’s most cursed tragedies. And, as the original play has a history of ill fortune befalling its cast and crew, it was fun to tease out what some of these challenges might be. It wasn’t critical that the audience know the details of the original Macbeth; this production humorously pursued the sort of bad luck that could only happen to a dramatic troupe: actors missing their cues; infighting amongst the cast; malfunctioning props and costumes; and cast members hobbled by injuries— just to name a few. To the audience it might look like these are simply unfortunate mistakes; however, rest assured that they are the product of practice, planning and execution on the part of the troupe.

Hitting the High Notes

Amy Forte

It’s official! Ridley has a growing presence at both regional and international orchestras—and it’s music to our ears. Francis Yang ’21 was appointed Assistant Principal Horn in the Greater Buffalo Youth Orchestra, while Jacob Lytle ’21 was appointed second Trombone in the Toronto Youth Symphony Orchestra, as well as Principal Trombone in the Greater Buffalo Youth Orchestra. Amazing achievements that highlight the strengths of these talented musicians, and nod to our music programme.

An Evening of Bids and Buds On September 18, Ridley partnered with the Greater Niagara Chamber of Commerce (GNCC) for the annual Priceless Art Auction. The colourful event not only promotes local artists, but encourages community service. Attendees pledge volunteer hours to local non-profits in order to bring home the art. Lower School art teacher, Ariadni Harper was a featured artist, with her painting Chick Magnet, and it was great to see Bryan Rose ’96 from the Niagara Community Foundation co-chair the event.

TIGER | WINTER 2020

29


30

flourishing


Passion Meets Poison at Stratford Festival There’s no better time of year to hit the Stratford Festival, and our Grade 9 classes took in the crisp fall air and a moving performance of Othello—a bold, updated version of Shakespeare’s well-known tragedy that has been garnering rave reviews from critics.

Up for Debate Students headed to St. Clement’s School in Toronto in October for the first Fulford Debate of the year, where their skill at arguing and analysis was put to the test against peers from other independent schools. We’re pleased to report our team made an excellent effort, with some members ranking consistently amongst the most skilled at the event. A few weeks later, Debate Society members Abigail Sullivan ’21 and Alina Khasanova ’20 participated in the highly competitive Ontario Provincial Qualifier for the National Debate and Public Speaking Championships.

TIGER | WINTER 2020

31


athletics Our Tigers have been on the prowl since June— notching personal bests, breaking records, and signing university and college commitments. For these reasons, our youngest athletes aspire to follow in their paw prints.

32

flourishing


Rugby Repeats CISAA Victory While the sun wasn’t necessarily shining on May 22, our First Boys rugby team was beaming following its defense of the CISAA Sevens Championship on home soil. In front of an enthusiastic crowd, the Tigers won their second title of the season. A late try from Connor Childerhose ’19 sealed a come-from-behind thriller over St. Michael’s College School. The girls’ team was also in action, playing for their own CISAA Sevens Championship in a hard-fought battle coming up just a few points short in each fixture. It was an adjustment from full fifteens to sevens made in impressive fashion by this year’s team.

U14 Rugby Takes the Title On May 24, the U14 Boys rugby team travelled to Country Day School to compete in the CISAA Championships. By playing excellent defense and using their speed to take advantage of opportunities for attack, the boys swept all three games and brought home the title.

Rowers Rewarded at CSSRA There was much to be celebrated at the 2019 CSSRA Championships on Martindale Pond, with eight of our crews rowing to podium finishes, including three gold medals! The Senior Womens team (Erin Broski ’19, Alexandra Cook ’19, Gabrielle Cook ’20 and Charlotte Drennan ’20) took home the school’s first gold of the regatta as a spirited Ridley crowd cheered on. Excitement from the grandstand continued to boom as the Junior Mens Eight and Senior Mens 66kg Quad claimed first place victories.

Go Black ’19 Go Lucy Black ’19 has had a banner year on the water, first competing for Ridley, then on a national stage with Team Canada. In early July she was named to the World Junior Team and competed alongside 15 teammates in Tokyo, Japan in early August. Lucy’s crew finished fourth overall at the competition that serves as a test event for the 2020 Olympics. TIGER | WINTER 2020

33


Ariadni Harper

Home Court Victory October 24th marked the Prep Boys basketball home opener against The Athletes Institute. The Tiger Dance team hit the court for a lively performance at half time, and the crowd cheered as our boys ratcheted up the defence in the fourth quarter, finishing the night with a 65-46 victory.

Crews Get ‘A Head’ at Regatta During first term, some of our crews competed at the Head of the Fish in Saratoga, New York. Both novice and senior rowers made their mark on the course with quick times, determination and team spirit, wrapping up the day with a number of top ten finishes, and three ‘fish heads’—the competition’s winner’s plaque! Congratulations to Autumn Crow ’23 on her win in the Novice 1x and to the Mixed 8+, who raced to victory with the fastest time.

34

flourishing


Hit the Ground Running In an energetic display of athletic effort and House team spirit, our Grade 4 to 8 students took part in the annual Lower School Cross Country Run in early October—one of our school’s long-standing traditions, which dates back over 100 years. Overall House team winners were Eastern Rock, who claimed the Peter B. Robinson Cup.

Hometown Hockey Features Coach Wark Ridley’s Prep Girls Hockey Director and Coach, Amanda Benoit-Wark was featured on Roger’s Hometown Hockey in early November. The television segment, which aired during the NHL pre-game broadcast, showcased Amanda alongside other hockey greats hailing from Welland, Ontario. The interview, filmed in Ridley’s arena, highlighted her experiences playing for the women’s national hockey team between 1996 and 2004, and World Championships in 1999 and 2000. Amanda also shared lessons learned off the ice along her journey, which eventually led her to Ridley.

TIGER | WINTER 2020

35


service When we give to others, we too become more whole. Our school motto lives on in our current student body, as Ridleians continually seek ways to positively impact communities—near and far.

36

flourishing


Generosity for Guatemala Back in June, Grade 8 leaders raised $6,135 for the Ridley DIGs Education fundraising campaign. We are grateful for all who gave, especially The Richard R.P. Court Innovation Foundation for matching this amount, as well as an Upper School family who gave a $1,000 donation. In total, $13,270 was raised for The Doppenbergs in Guatemala, enabling the construction of two classrooms at The Centre of Hope.

A World of Difference Students and faculty joined nearly 20,000 youth from across Ontario to celebrate WE Day Toronto, the powerful youth movement for global change. This year’s lineup included David Suzuki, Rupi Kaur, Nav Bhatia and Emilio Estevez—and, of course, WE Charity founders, Marc and Craig Kielburger. A day filled with motivational speakers and an energizing message, students and educators alike walked away from the event inspired and ready to transform our globe.

Mackenzie Fowler ’11

Students Fight for Climate Change On September 27, Ridleians joined the 7.6 million people worldwide taking a stand in the Global Climate Strike—the biggest climate mobilization in history. In St. Catharines, youth from surrounding schools marched on City Hall. Ridley was proud to support its 70 students who participated, recognizing the strike as an important opportunity for them to serve the community and become active global citizens.

Running with Heart The Prep Girls hockey team and Leonard Ladybugs turned up bright and early at Brock University one Sunday morning in October to participate in the Superhero Run 2019. The charitable event raised funds for the Niagara Children’s Centre. Meanwhile, G-West laced up its shoes in support of the CIBC Run for the Cure to support breast cancer research.

TIGER | WINTER 2020

37


Digging for a Cause Thanks to the coordination of Mr. Ben Smith, our junior boarders and some of our Grade 3 students spent an afternoon picking potatoes to give to Community Care—our students donated a whopping 750 pounds of potatoes! We were thrilled to see these hard-working volunteers exemplifying Terar Dum Prosim.

Lest We Forget Mia Kidd ‘21 and Abigail Sullivan ‘21 were keynote speakers at a special 10th Anniversary Operation Veteran event, held at the Fairmont Château Laurier in Ottawa. Their presentation “Not Everyone Comes Home,” was in memory of alumnus Lieutenant Norman H.V. Brown ‘38 who was killed in action at Juno Beach on D-Day. Following the presentations, Mia and Abby, along with Headmaster and Mrs. Kidd, attended the Remembrance Day ceremony at the National War Memorial. In St. Catharines, Jacob Lytle ‘21 laid a wreath as cadets paid tribute at the Cenotaph—a poignant moment that celebrated the brave Canadians who sacrificed so much for our country.

Uniforms for DIG Soccer Team Daniel Jude-Monye ’21 first realized he had the ability to make a difference in 2014, when he and fellow classmates arrived to Guatemala for a service-learning trip with The Doppenbergs in Guatemala (DIG). Last year, the Brampton native dedicated his year-long MYP personal project to designing and producing branded soccer jerseys for DIG’s Centre for Hope— a project he conceived of when he witnessed the Centres’ children competing barefoot and without uniforms. The meaningful emblem Daniel designed for the front of the jerseys combines the national quetzal bird, as well as the Centre’s ‘Hand for Hope’ logo and iconic blue colour. It was an emotional moment for the now Grade 11 student when he received word from Rita Doppenberg that his uniforms were being proudly sported by the soccer team.

38

flourishing


Ben Smith

The City of St. Catharines

39

TIGER | WINTER 2020


the value off BOAR Ridley College and boarding have been synonymous for the past 130 years. First housed in a former spa and hotel on Yates Street, the school has been founded on the principles and benefits of boarding since its inception. Today, the “Houses of Ridley” are comprised of ten historic homes, each led by a family of house parents, residential dons and faculty advisors offering the exceptional care and nurturing environment we have come to expect at Ridley. With 390 boarding students, and 140 Upper School day students who are immersed in boarding life, the culture of our Upper School is deeply influenced by the richness of the boarding experience. The Houses of Ridley are ‘micro-communities’ within the larger community and are infused with strong relational bonds and affiliations—from colours, mottos and symbols to unique local charities, each House inspires intense loyalty and pride.

It might surprise some of our readers that prior to my arrival at Ridley College in August 2012, I had no previous experience in boarding schools or of the nuances of a boarding style education. Some, possessing a similar lack of experience, ask me the existential question: “Why boarding?” My answer is direct. It took a mere two weeks of Ridley immersion to convince me that this particular form of education is transformative for young adults. I am a convert and now a proselytizer! Years of collaborating with fellow Heads of boarding schools, listening to Old Ridleians reminisce about the impact the experience had on their lives and witnessing the impact on our current generation of students has done nothing but further cement my opinion. Although no educational approach is necessarily the perfect fit for all children, for those who are prepared for the challenges and opportunities of a boarding education, the lifetime rewards are profound. Despite what I see as the rich benefits as a sector, North American boarding schools are experiencing serious enrollment challenges.

40

flourishing

THE DECLINE OF DOMESTIC BOARDING Unfortunately, the statistics and research emerging from organizations such as The Association of Boarding schools (TABS), the National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS) and the Canadian Accredited Independent Schools (CAIS) do not bode well for domestic boarding in North America. Such is the crisis that a collaborative effort between more than 400 U.S. and Canadian boarding schools was launched in 2017. The North American Boarding Initiative (NABI) was formed to respond to the evidence which “strongly suggests that we are facing a structural, sector-wide challenge—not merely a hiccup …” The initial statistics indicated that domestic (Canadian and American families choosing boarding schools) enrollment was on a consistent decline over a 15-year period, losing more than 400 students per year.


DING

BY HEADMASTER,

ED KIDD

Amidst all this doom and gloom, it is important to pause and note that Ridley has been bucking this trend over the last 10 years. Proudly, our school has witnessed a decade of incremental growth in domestic boarding numbers; Canadian and American families are choosing Ridley boarding and recognize its value. However, it would be unwise to ignore the sector-wide statistics and trends. The numbers don’t lie. In addition to NABI, Ridley belongs to a national effort known as the Canadian Boarding Collaborative (CBC). The reasons for this decline in domestic boarding are somewhat ambiguous—rising tuition is one possible culprit, the rise of quality public education, charter schools and homeschooling another. Some point to a change in social dynamics, perceptions and parenting styles as yet another phenomenon that undercuts the strong tradition of boarding from past generations. Many fear boarding schools are offering a product that is increasingly seen as socially unacceptable in certain parent networks of middle class North Americans. Altering this perception is the central challenge facing NABI and CBC. THE BENEFITS OF BOARDING The tangible benefits of boarding are clear. In 2013, research conducted by the Arts & Science Group of Baltimore for TABS revealed much of what we already knew intuitively: there are significant and tangible benefits of a boarding school education compared to a strictly day school experience (public or independent).

One survey question compared a student’s use of time throughout a typical week. Comparing where boarding students spend their time to where private day and public school students do, the survey provides compelling results that confirm our anecdotal experience with student engagement: Boarding school also provides a unique opportunity to develop the skills needed for college. The TABS study found that 78 percent of boarding school grads felt well-prepared for the non-academic aspects of college life, such as independence, social life and time management, compared to 36 percent of private day and 23 percent of public school students. THE POWER OF PEERS One of the powerful (and often indescribable) aspects of boarding schools like Ridley is the influence of positive peer interaction. By and large, being smart and ambitious is cool within our environment. Being labelled a “try hard” is not an aspersion at Ridley, rather a compliment. Students are stimulated intellectually in ways they never were in their previous schools and tend to be more motivated when surrounded by success-oriented peers. The TABS study found that 78 percent of boarders reported they are motivated by peers compared to 49 percent of public school students. Living with talented students with big dreams from diverse backgrounds informs the dialogue in their common room, in the Great Hall or in the library. Increasingly, educators understand the simple truth that learning rests on a solid foundation of relationships. The more one feels they belong, the deeper their engagement and more effective their learning. In a boarding school, community and relationships take centre stage. What better place to learn than in a school where relationships are 24/7?

TIGER | WINTER 2020

41


Another important factor is student choice. No longer are students sent to boarding school by their all-knowing parents who seek discipline, rigor and connections for their offspring. Today, we are inundated with enquiries from students who are making the choice, driving the research and, ultimately, making the decision. It is important that students concur, that “I made the choice to come to Ridley; I chose to be here.” In this regard, boarding is not for everyone, but for those who are ready, for those for whom this is the next logical step in their development, boarding is a gift—perhaps a gift that keeps on giving. READY FOR MORE? NABI’s two-year marketing campaign has been centred on the concept Ready for More? Indeed, we believe that boarding schools like ours are for students who are looking for more. Students who attend boarding school are usually among the most successful of their previous schools, or are students who truly want to embrace greater challenges, more learning opportunities and growth experiences. The development of independence, personal responsibility and initiative are also natural outcomes of the boarding experience. This summer, I had the pleasure of sitting down for coffee with Jonathan Haidt, NYU Stern School of Business professor and author of best seller, The Coddling of the American Mind to discuss the iGeneration, their needs and neuroses. He posits a

42

flourishing

dire forecast for the current generation of teens who are bubble-wrapped for protection by anxious parents and are now convinced of their own fragility, and of the need for trigger warnings on campus. Together, we hypothesized that a boarding school education— like summer camp—replete with opportunities for building independence, resilience, risk-taking and embracing discomfort, might just be a wonderful antidote to this coddling phenomenon. Translating the ideas of modern intellectual Nassim Taleb into education, Haidt suggested that we should be striving to raise a generation of “anti-fragile” students who emerge stronger from facing obstacles and failures in a fragile world, not broken by them. Quoting Taleb, Haidt shared an apt metaphor that could apply to the raising of our next generation: “Be the fire, but hope for the wind.” Unlike a candle that is snuffed out by a breeze of wind, a strong fire is energized by the same breeze. Increasingly, a number of high profile voices including Lenore Skenazy, founder of Free Range Kids, and Stanford professor Jean Twenge are weighing in on iGen and their parents. Post-modern ennui, boredom and lack of connection (coupled with hyper-connection and comparison on social media) are the hallmarks of the modern teenage existence. It is true that boarding students are busy and stick to a rigorous schedule of activities and routines. However, in the hands of a humane and reflective culture, guarded against excess and burnout, busyness and engagement are positives. Boarding


students do not find themselves alone after school, lost in the Snapchat cauldron of social comparison in the isolation of their bedroom. Instead, after class they are at play rehearsal, Model U.N. preparation or rowing training. Weekends, too, are filled with more classroom learning, tutorials and co-curricular experiences. I used the word “transformative” above to describe education at Ridley College. It’s a powerful word and a serious one. It means more than continuous development. It is more applicable to revolution than to evolution. It is what happens when a caterpillar becomes a butterfly. And that is just what happens when young people commit themselves wholeheartedly to our boarding school culture. They become new people. They become leaders.

I cannot count the number of students over the last seven years who have expressed their gratitude for Ridley’s beneficial impact on their lives. It’s not just that they have learned how to study and amassed knowledge, though these surely are important. But even more important is their new-found confidence and ability to be an effective and positive presence in any kind of situation—especially in difficult ones. Properly, Ridley is described as a university preparatory school. Our academic and co-curricular programmes are well-suited to this task. However, as a community with a solid boarding ethos, felt even among our day student population, we recognize that our preparation does not end at university. In addition to university prep, boarding schools like Ridley are devoted to preparing students for life.

BOARDING SCHOOL ENGAGEMENT VS. DAY/PUBLIC SCHOOLS HOURS PER WEEK

HOMEWORK

TV

SPORTS

MUSIC

TIGER | WINTER 2020

43


E Go

t

A rt

is h o p

flourishing

rham E

rgoyne

D e a n’s

B is h o p est

44

r hu

W

Art

Bu

e od

a st

B ur

as

h

TEN HOUSES. ONE HOME.


onard

t

M

rha m W

rit t N o rt

h

d e ville

M

M

an

er

e od

es

Go

Le

ri er

tt S o ut

h

TIGER | WINTER 2020

45


Best Foot Forward Head of Lower School, James Steward talks travel, service and returning to his roots—and explains how Ridley is fostering a new generation of global citizens.

He starts his mornings with a cup of hot Ginseng tea, sweetened with maple syrup, before heading to Lower School to walk the corridors. Making sure everything is in its place, he greets the teachers and gets a feel for the day, and then goes out for traffic duty. He wants to make sure the children are safe. Head of Lower School, James Steward joined Ridley fresh from Japan this past July, a return to his roots after nearly two decades working overseas. The first time he sat in Chapel and sang “O Canada,” he felt tears well as the sound filled the intimate space. “I hadn’t sung our anthem in nearly twenty years,” he remembers. “I felt such pride, both in my home country and in our school. It was an incredibly moving experience.”

46

flourishing

But if you think he’s all Canadian, think again. Speaking to him in his Wedgewood blue office, you quickly realize the North Bay native could be at home anywhere in the world; James has a refreshing, global mentality that fits the Ridley ethos. His answers to questions on everything from sports to cuisine to the signature orange Mizunos he wears to zip around campus are plucked from around the globe.


FEATURE STORY

Michelle Scrivener

Mid-chat, James’ son Kiyo wanders in to say hello, a soccer ball tucked under each arm. James moved here with his Japanese-Canadian wife, Alana—who does her share of travelling to accredit international schools—and 11-year-old Kiyo ’26, who’s in the sixth grade and poised to pick up the sax. James and Alana have two daughters as well: Marika, 22, and Taia, 20, who travel the world as professional figure skaters with Disney on Ice. “If you don’t travel, both within your own country and outside of it, you won’t be able to understand others as well as you could—or should,” James imparts thoughtfully. “Understanding where someone comes from and where they’re going helps you be a more useful person, not only in terms of your own existence, but to society in general.” This worldview has been largely informed by the geographic twists and turns of his career; James has been helping shape schools in Asia, North America and

Europe for years. An avid outdoorsman, he graduated from McMaster University with a degree in Physical Education, and then took Outdoor Experiential and Primary Education at Queen’s University. From there, he taught at Ganaraska Forest Centre, an outdoor school near Peterborough, Ontario. He then spent 10 years teaching in Waterloo County, where he met Alana, and the pair travelled to teach in Macau, China. James next ran a diplomatic school in Kyrgyzstan, following the fall of the Soviet Union, then over to teach in Singapore and the Vienna International School in Austria—which had over a hundred countries represented in its student population. After six years, James left Vienna to take a position as Head of School at the Tōhoku International School in Sendai, Japan, a four to fivehour drive north of Tokyo.

TIGER | WINTER 2020

47


Our students are our next generation—and society needs great human beings. We’re here to contribute to a greater cause. —James Steward, Head of Lower School

” Michelle Scrivener

If it seems like globetrotting was always glamorous, James makes clear that it came with its share of challenges— including one that made headlines worldwide. In 2011, Japan was rocked by the fourth largest earthquake in recorded history, which triggered a 30-metre tsunami that damaged several nuclear reactors south of the school James headed. “We were closed for a month,” he recalls bleakly. “There was no water or power, no food, or stores, or cell service. The roads were crumbling.” It was up to James to ensure the school was sound, that families were informed, and to find out which students would come back from the countries to which they had fled, many now afraid to return to the nuclear affected zones. Student enrollment dropped 30 to 40 percent that year, and it took hard work to instill the confidence needed for some families to return to Japan at all. After the Great Sendai Earthquake, the Stewards stayed eight more years helping to rebuild the school and surrounding community. By the time they left for Ridley, the Tōhoku International School was back in fine form. “Here in North America, we often do things to see what we, as individuals, can extract from an experience,”

48

flourishing

he remarks. “But if you look at cultures where they retain more of a group mentality, these cultures are more likely to engage in restorative undertakings that inform the collective rather than the individual.” It’s an impressive perspective which highlights just some of what James and his family bring to our campus now—and where, as Head of Lower School, he’ll take us next. The return home is proving to be as much an adventure as any other. “It’s good to come back to your roots,” he says, settling back in his chair, “to figure out who you are, to give you a fresh perspective.” With his first term now tucked under his belt, James looks forward to the challenges ahead, and to helping Ridley grow a new generation of global citizens. As he walks the school each morning, getting ready for the day ahead, James wants students to know there’s a big world out there, not only from which to learn, but to give back to. “Society needs great human beings,” he says simply. And as he settles into his new role, it becomes increasingly clear our Lower School is in the hands of one.


JAMES’S FAVOURITES TIVITIES:

SPORTS & AC

• canoeing • hiking

• sumo • biathlon • hockey • snooker

INTERNATIONAL HOCKEY EXPERIENCE: • Canada

• Japan

• Macau

• Austria

• Singapore

FOOD IN

PRO HOCKEY TEAMS:

DULGENC

• sushi (f resh tuna fro m the ma rket)

• Montreal Canadiens • Tōhoku Free Blades • Vienna Capitals

ASPECTS OF • incredible st

udents, faculty

and staff • a superb Fa • helping Mr.

RIDLEY:

mily Guild

Murray coach hock ey

• Chinese food (sweet and sour po rk, Dim Su m)

ES:

• maple sy rup

• chocola te peanut butter milksha kes • dark ch ocolate • jube jub es • cashew s

THINGS ABOUT NIAGARA: • how nice the people are • ample hockey rinks • Hockey Night in Canada • lots of snow • Ridley College!

8

70

SCHOOLS WORKED

COUNTRIES TRAVELLED

TIGER | WINTER 2020

49


alumni work @ “All the world’s a stage, and all the men and women merely players,” a famous dramatist once wrote—and, when it comes to the arts, it’s clear Ridlieans belong in the spotlight. With plans for the reimagining of the Iggulden Building already underway, we were inspired by the exciting possibilities the vibrant new arts hub will create for the next generation of students. And so, in this edition of Alumni @ Work, we’re turning to artists who got their start right here on campus— and uncovering how they turned talent and tenacity into careers. As Ridley readies for a new chapter, turn the page to learn the stories of award-winning actor, Colm Feore ’77; singer and songwriter, Jane Lewis ’90; abstract painter, Sandy Rasmussen ’07; and ‘artrepreneur,’ Brian Wannamaker ’82.

50

flourishing


ARTS FEATURE

TIGER | WINTER 2020

51


alumni work @ Speaking to one another, showing and telling our stories, exploring each other’s histories and lives—these give us a solid grounding in being part of a community.

Even when he’s travelling, he’s working. But after forty odd years in the business, Colm Feore ’77 will tell you it’s the key to his success. With Stephen Greenblatt’s Tyrant: Shakespeare on Politics at one elbow, and a thick history of the Bard at his other, we spoke with Colm recently when he was visiting his wife—acclaimed director, Donna Feore—while she brought Bernhardt/Hamlet to life at the Goodman Theatre in Chicago. “She promised me a birthday dinner,” laughs the Stratford-based actor, who just turned 61. “So, I came to collect.” These days, Colm is delving into the ways in which Shakespeare explores the lust for power in his plays— and how society suffers at the hands of his ‘fictional’ kings. One of Canada’s most celebrated actors, the proud Old Ridleian has played many of Shakespeare’s leading characters at the Stratford Festival, and will soon be taking on the role of Richard III this upcoming season. For artistic director Antoni Cimolino, choosing Colm to utter the powerful first words at the new Tom Patterson Theatre was easy, touting the thespian as “part of the Festival’s DNA” in a recent press release. And, though rehearsals are still months away, for Stratford’s latest king there’s plenty of reading to be done. But if you haven’t seen him on the stage, you’ll know him from the screen. “To make a living in Canada as an actor, you have to be able to do everything,” Colm wisely imparts—and over the years he’s proved he has the chops. His career has taken him from stage to film, television and Netflix, where you’ll catch outstanding 52

flourishing

performances in everything from Chicago, Bon Cop, Bad Cop and Thor; to the critically acclaimed ThirtyTwo Short Films About Glenn Gould; to his awardwinning performance as Pierre Elliot Trudeau. You’ll also find him capturing small screen audiences in a number of popular series: think The Borgias, The West Wing, House of Cards, 24, The Umbrella Academy, and more. It’s an impressive body of work that reflects his mantra—just keep showing up—in many ways developed here at Ridley. “That was always the lesson: you’ve got to be here to play,” he reflects. “And it became a very simple mantra. If you show up, you’ll learn; if you learn you’ll get better.” Though Colm enjoyed a diverse career on campus— becoming a Prefect, taking an active role in public speaking and debate, participating in a range of athletics, and becoming editor of the Acta’s sports and literary sections—it was the acting bug that got him. Colm credits Ridley’s teachers with instilling in him a genuine love for words and the stage. “We weren’t just doing the standard production of West Side Story, or whatever was making the rounds at school gymnasium plays,” he remembers. “Faculty [like David Cosgrove, Victor Bohlmann and Richard B. Wright] engaged us in a serious commitment to drama, and to the idea that there might be a life in the arts. And when you have masters and fellow students, above and below you, all into the same thing…” Colm trails off. “Well, a guy could dream.” And as his parents returned to Ridley to see him act, they were learning just how talented their son was.


“Once someone leaned over to them during a play and said, ‘This is very good, but it’s not really fair for them to bring in professional actors,’” he smiles. But it was when he was applying to post-secondary school that Colm really received their endorsement, learning they’d accepted an offer from Montreal’s National Theatre School on his behalf—and suddenly the dream was off and running. That mantra kept Colm showing up right through theatre school and onto stage and screen, helping him navigate the ebbs and flows of the biz. “Ridley’s a school based on hard work and determination,” he shares, crediting the cultivation of this ethic with his success. “Your effort is going to matter just as much as your talent. Because for every six miracles in this industry, there are a thousand people behind them who just keep doing the work. Professionally, that pays dividends.” And as the accolades keep coming, with peers and critics alike applauding his ability to “disappear into roles,” it’s clear that both talent and hard work pay off. In 2002, Colm received a Gemini for his performance in Trudeau, and the Gascon-Thomas Award by the National Theatre School of Canada in 2013. That same year he was made an Officer of the Order of Canada, for “bridging Anglophone and Francophone cultures as a fluently bilingual performer.” This past spring, Colm was recognized for Lifetime Artistic Achievement at the Governor General’s Performing Arts Gala in Ottawa. “This is an award that

says, ‘you’re done, you’re finished,’” he chuckles goodnaturedly, hearkening back to the film short featured at the ceremony—a playful riff on what the seasoned actor might do in the afterlife. But though he’s moved by the recognition, Colm takes his success in stride. “The whole point of my job is to disappear,” he remarks simply. “That’s the job. Be something else.” In true Ridley fashion, Colm is also giving back, donating his time to organizations like Shakesperience and REEL CANADA, which empower youth through Shakespeare and film. “REEL CANADA brings Canadian film into Canadian classrooms,” he explains, passionate about the project which promotes Canada’s cultural identity and connects students with directors, writers, actors, and producers. “It says, ‘Here’s our story. Here’s who we are—and you’re going to see yourselves reflected in these spaces.’” As he sits in his Chicago room, thinking back to his time on the Ridley stage, and of the hallways he once walked, Colm hopes his story will inspire the students who walk them now. Because he knows, perhaps more than most, that telling stories is what brings communities together. “There’s a great application of these skills we learn communicating in the arts: speaking to one another, showing and telling our stories, exploring each other’s histories and lives. We learn from each other,” the actor thoughtfully concludes. “And one of the best ways to do that is to take a risk, to stand up in front of people and to say, ‘I think this—and I trust that you will find some value in it.’” TIGER | WINTER 2020

53


ea n

Pa lm er

The singer in the video is Jane Lewis ’90, and the song, Carry You Home, is dedicated to her late father, Paul, a teacher, coach and historian whose name many Ridleians will recognize. For the daughter of two long-time faculty members— her mother, Janet was the first housemaster of Dean’s House the year girls started boarding and eventual Assistant Head—it was the perfect place to be. “I started writing it when he was sick, and we knew his time was limited,” Jane responds, when asked about the song. “It was really special to be able to film it in the Chapel.”

D

The girl who once wrote poetry and was one of Ridley’s first environmental activists is now a musician based in Guelph, Ontario. Her passionate vocals and piano accompaniment have been compared to legendary singer Carole King, her songs described as “intelligent, poetic and cinematic.” (You’ll want to get to know her playful Beatles cover of Come Together—it won the Independent Music Award for Best Cover Song in 2015.) Speaking to her, it’s easy to see why. She’s thoughtful, reflective, empathetic—and if you read through the yearbooks, you’ll see that early writer’s voice slowly take shape; listen to her lyrics now and you’ll still find those echoes. It’s unsurprising that she finds inspiration in confessional songwriters like James Taylor and Joni Mitchell, and perhaps even less so when she says she’ll often choose silence, as it gives space for the ideas to come. When she’s not busy writing, singing solo, or teaching vocals in the popular workshops she runs, Jane is half of the award-winning folk duo Gathering Sparks. Their compelling new album, All That’s Real was just released this fall.

Jane with her parents, Janet and Paul, and brother Andrew ’92.

54

flourishing

For Jane, the road to music was a winding one. A philosophy major in university, she was already working in publishing when the opportunities to perform started popping up. And, by 2009, she found herself wandering a different, surprisingly natural path—“a decision that came out of what was already happening,” she eloquently puts it.


As someone who herself was at first shy to perform, Jane kept hearing from people who wished they could sing. She soon realized she could fill a need. “If you don’t go to church or aren’t a musician yourself, if you don’t have a family that sits around the piano, then where’s your outlet for singing?” she asks. Jane founded All Together Now, a singing workshop series in Guelph. There’s no pressure to attend, no public performance; it’s simply about being in the moment, about embodying music. “It can be a powerful thing to get in touch with your voice, or the reason you’ve felt blocked,” she says. “But to share your authentic voice as a human being can be an act of courage. That really motivated me.” For some, these workshops have become a place where they learn to use that voice; for others, it’s a place to stop in and just let it all out. “I’ve had people say this is better than therapy,” she laughs. “And cheaper.” Jane is also co-founder of the Women’s Music Weekend, an annual retreat where women of all musical abilities can perform in a supportive, inclusive community. There are powerful moments at these events, moments where a woman gains confidence, where she feels brave enough to step out front and sing on her own.

an artistic lineup at the Toronto Branch Reception at the Art Gallery of Ontario. “It was a celebration of the arts,” remembers Jane, “and felt like a recognition that this is an important career path a lot of people are taking.” When asked what advice she has for Ridley’s budding musicians, she takes a moment to reflect. On where she came from. On the work she puts in now. On the new album that’s taken years to come together—and the recognition that’s already trickling in. “It might not be the way you initially imagined,” she muses, “but if you have a passion for something, if it’s authentic to you, you’ll find a way to manifest it.” And, if she’s learned anything, it’s that you never know what’s next. Looking back at the road which led her to this point, in some ways not where she thought she’d be, in others right back here at home, Jane seems content. “Maybe the road is still winding.”

The Women’s Music Weekend also has a bursary programme, now in its third season, where women can apply for financial aid. Having herself received assistance for a workshop she’d once found challenging to attend, Jane quickly saw an opportunity to pay it forward. “That definitely ties back to my time at Ridley,” she recognizes. “The motto, ‘may I be consumed in service’— that’s important.” Ridley feels those ties pulling right back. Last year, Gathering Sparks performed as part of

TIGER | WINTER 2020

55


alumni @work

Abstractionist and Old Ridleian, Alexander ‘Sandy’ Rasmussen ’07 always knew he would work in the arts. His grandfather, an artist and set designer at the Canadian Broadcast Corporation (CBC), encouraged Sandy from a young age, and his time at Ridley was largely spent hanging around the art department, fascinated by stories of the abstract expressionists who broke visual traditions and found new ways to communicate. From his mother’s tablecloth, to the famous grids of Agnes Martin, to the linoleum tile floors of the former gas station in which he used to paint, the Niagara-based artist is looking to explore that tension, earning kudos from critics at his recent show at the Christopher Cutts gallery in Toronto for his “riveting works” and “delectable passages of paint that almost shimmer.” “The act of putting on paint impasto like I do is kind of a bold statement. What mark do I make now? Do I touch the canvas with that colour? What if I do this? It’s totally subversive,” he concludes. “I’m going to do what I want.” After graduating from Ridley, the St. Catharines native left to study at the Emily Carr University of Art and Design, but soon realized he was looking for a different kind of experience. “As much as art can seem welcoming and nurturing, it can also be a towering history of knowledge that you may not possess,” he admits. “It’s a steep hill.” The following year, Sandy headed east to take Sociology at St. Francis Xavier University—but he didn’t leave art far behind. “I started seeing parallels between the things we were discussing in class and in art,” he says, looking back. And, a year into his degree, painting pulled him home. Sandy came back, borrowed $500 from his dad (former faculty member Rick Rasmussen) for supplies, and got to work. He sold pieces and secured commissions. He travelled home to paint on weekends and school breaks. He immersed himself in art history. After graduation, Sandy started painting full-time in his parents’ garage, then rented out space at an old rural gas station before spending two tough years working in a cold, dim-lit barn out in Jordan Station—an experience which he says hardened him as an artist.

56

flourishing


The grid started out as a pattern resembling my mom’s tablecloth,” Sandy laughs. “We would have dinner outside, and she’d put a tablecloth on the counter and tell us not to make a mess. I’d wonder, why have it? But that tension, that feeling of do not spill anything—I love that.

Michelle Scrivener

He now paints in a light-filled barn not far from campus, the rustic surroundings informing his work in pleasant, unexpected ways. And a barn is likely the best place for him to spread out. For Sandy, painting is a sport—and he likes to play large, whether he’s physically stretching across a wide expanse of canvas or stretching out an idea twenty feet. He points to influential artists like Jackson Pollock, Mark Bradford and Joe Bradley, artists whose physicality enters their work. “The thing I loved most about basketball was doing layups during warmup, feeling hyped and excited,” he explains, looking back to his days on the Ridley team. “And with big paintings I get that same shiver down the back of my neck; I’m anxious to get going.” You can see that energetic sprawl across Samosas, the 8-by 24-foot abstract which now hangs at Brock University. Sandy donated the painting to brothers Taylor ’07 and Clark ’09 Robertson in memory of their parents and sister, Joe, Anita and Laura ’11, who were tragically killed in a plane crash the summer of 2018. Their loss was felt across the Niagara Region; the warm-hearted Robertsons were known widely as philanthropists and community leaders, and they were generous supporters of both Ridley and Brock. The family was very familiar with Samosas, having admired its progression at the gas station where Sandy painted, and then rolled out on his barn floor mere days before the accident. “They’d seen it so many times,” Sandy recalls. “When I heard the news, I knew pretty quickly what I wanted to do. It was always theirs.” Taylor and Clark chose to display the painting in Market Hall, now a permanent memorial at the university where Anita volunteered and whose Board of Trustees Joe had served on for nearly a decade. “I had nearly exhausted the look by the time I got to the right side of that canvas,” Sandy smiles. “It was like finishing a marathon.” If you see it, you’ll see why. Standing in front of that painting is like going on a contemplative journey; its pathways and rivulets thread across the wide expanse, and you can’t help

but follow—all the way off the canvas edge. Samosas was unveiled at Brock this past April. Sandy’s paintings often slip to matters of time and nostalgia, his large-scale abstractions christened with playful names like Fresh Fresh (a nod to the woman who makes his favourite samosas), Horse Play (a sweet response to his late grandmother’s living room warnings), or Fat Chance (the gamble that is all art, really—and the piece that kicked off his Toronto show). His work incorporates memory, but he’s also conscious of it as a deliberate reflection of the present, with the occasional happy accident of an unplanned gesture, the quick scoot of a brush in an unexpected way. “My paintings have their own timeline, their own journey,” he explains thoughtfully. “And I just have to trust that, I suppose, because chances are what you’re working on right now will have a small and fleeting impact. To get an ego about a particular piece—that’s not going to last.” But as time goes on, Sandy’s proving to the art world that his has staying power. “Rasmussen is already some way on his journey into figuring out those techniques that give his paintings the desired emotional content,” noted Toronto critics this past spring. “He is definitely onto something.” As for the up-and-coming artist? “There’s no turning back,” he says resolutely. And there may be some delicious irony in that statement, as Sandy’s paintings often capture a textured and abstract past, even as his brush keeps going. TIGER | WINTER 2020

57


alumni @work

Having redeveloped Portland neighbourhoods for two decades while creating living and work spaces for artists, alumnus Brian Wannamaker ’82 can be most fittingly described as a passionate ‘artpreneuer’.

58

flourishing

An Oakville, Ontario native, Brian relocated to Oregon in 1986 following his studies at Ridley and York University. He recalls not being entirely certain where his path would lead, but began saving his earnings in order to acquire property. With a strong creative compass and solutions-oriented mindset, he soon found himself working in real estate redevelopment. Brian recalls that in the early 1990s, his then business partner exposed him to art collecting, which served to reignite an appreciation he had always had for artistic expression. In the years that followed, Brian was drawn to reimagining properties of cultural and architectural significance around the west coast city, and eventually discovered Falcon Apartments, a diamond-in-therough for which he saw immense potential. When Brian bought the property in Portland’s north end in 1997, it was a languishing, partially inhabited apartment building with low- and fixed-income tenants. However, he was able to envision how it could evolve into a hub for working artists without displacing the existing tenants. Brian felt compelled to breathe new life into the neglected building and to support the struggling tenants living within.


My insight for Falcon Art Community came from spending so much time living at Ridley. It’s that basic concept that you want to be around people who you enjoy being around and who you find inspiring. —BRIAN WANNAMAKER ’82

Soon, his plan to transform Falcon Apartments shifted from a business opportunity into a vision to build and empower an arts community. Brian came up with a value strategy to blend the higher renovated apartments rent with the existing tenants rent and the midpoint being profitable without rental increases to fixed income residents. The “cost average” approach allowed judicious rent to existing resident and artists, while directing a portion of the market rent to support a 14,000-square-foot multi studio space in the lower level. This way, creators (painters, sculptors, musicians, writers and more) could work in dedicated studios and feel connected to a broader creative community. The building and guild of artists are now aptly named Falcon Arts Community. Brian recognizes that his care for the community comes in large part from his seven years at Ridley. “It’s a compassion piece that happened at Ridley; it’s about having a big enough perspective to want others to succeed,” he explains. ”There seemed to

be a wrong in the world where artists could work on their craft so hard and barely make ends meet. I just wanted to do a little bit to help these people,” Brian adds, demonstrating his embodiment of our school motto. Throughout his career, Brian has found countless innovative ways to integrate urban renewal with his passion for artistic creativity— whether he’s beautifying a stretch of Portland’s North Mississippi Avenue, leasing converted cold storage unit spaces to a general arts college, conceptualizing an inspiring venue for musicians, or as owner of the stunning Wannamaker Estate Vineyard in Washington. When asked what advice he has for current Ridleians and youth exploring careers in the arts, Brian imparts, “I think it’s critical to learn how to be inventive…If you learn how to be a creative problem solver, that will help take you further in whichever endeavour you follow through with.”

TIGER | WINTER 2020

59


JUNE

10

Muskoka Lakes Golf Club Despite the conditions, the RCA Golf Tournament was a day of friendship, laughter, grit and resilience! This past tournament was held in memory of Don McFarlane ’76 and we’re pleased to announce that nearly $20,000 was raised for scholarships and bursaries.

GLOBAL EVENTS RECAPS

Since June 2019, Headmaster Kidd and members of the Advancement Office have been connecting with alumni and extended members of our school community on campus and around the globe. We hope to soon be in a city near you, so be sure to subscribe to the monthly RCA e-newsletter and check ridleycollege.com/alumni for upcoming events.

Educators Flourish at Conference

JUNE

Like-minded educators flocked to Ridley for the first-ever Flourish: Positive Education Conference. Dedicated to advancing the global movement, professionals participated in engaging workshops, soaked up inspiring keynotes and gathered valuable resources.

16/17

Henley, U.K.

JUNE

21

The senior women’s quad travelled to the United Kingdom to race on the River Thames during the Henley Women’s Regatta. Prior to hitting the water, our rowers, their coach, Siobhan McLaughlin ’96 and Old Ridleians were hosted by Michael Colston ’49.

JULY

17

Halifax, NS Old and new Ridleians alike convened at the Juno Tower in Halifax for a summer reception. With graduates from across the decades, members of our current Prep Girls hockey team and new families in attendance, the celebration was lively. 60

flourishing


JULY

28

AUGUST

Muskoka, ON

9

More than 75 Ridleians enjoyed a beautiful evening in cottage country, where Headmaster Kidd provided a summary of the last school year and updated guests on our major capital campaign.

Birdies & Pucks Golf Tournament Twenty Valley Golf & Country Club was an ideal setting for the fifth annual tournament in support of Ridley hockey. A record number of alumni hit the links and raised over $12,000.

Founders’ Day In honour of Ridley’s 130th anniversary, governors, trustees, advisors and Campaign Cabinet members attended the inaugural Founders’ Day. Participants attended ‘State of the College’ presentations, joined breakout discussions with students and took a campus tour, before recognizing our Ridleians of Distinction at a reception and dinner.

SEPTEMBER

20

SEPTEMBER

23

OCTOBER

3

Jack Nicholson Memorial Golf Tournament Nearly 100 golfers teed off at Niagara’s Lookout Point Country Club for the occasion, co-hosted by Ridley Rowing and Brock University Rowing. The round raised an astounding $50,000 for the Jack Nicholson Memorial Boathouse on Henley Island.

Buffalo, NY The U.S. foundation directors gathered at The Buffalo Club for their annual general meeting. It was also an opportunity to recognize outgoing President, Hal Wilson ‘67 for his wonderful leadership and service. Congratulations to new President, Tim Coffin ‘81 and Treasurer, Alex Hansen ‘87.

Homecoming Homerun Campus was bustling with alumni from graduation years ending in four and nine this fall. Old Ridleians enjoyed a number of festivities in celebration of their reunions and got to know our current cohort during a welcome reception, Tiger Talks, campus tours, and a spirited alumni game against the First Boys soccer team.

OCTOBER

4 to 6

OCTOBER

10

London, UK Alumni young and old came together at the Cavalry and Guards Club to celebrate our school and its recent successes. The group also received an update from Rob Black ’99 and Director of Development, Susan Hazell on the exciting improvements that are underway for the redevelopment of the Iggulden Building. TIGER | WINTER 2020

61


1950s

CLASS NOTES WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU! Share a few short words with your fellow Old Ridleians about important milestones, career moves, or philanthropic endeavours. Please include your full name and the year you graduated from Ridley.

A number of Tigers from the Class of 1954 joined us at Homecoming to celebrate their 65th reunion!

’54

Paul Elgie ’54 recently authored and published a book entitled His Sandals. Chris Snyder ’59, author of four books, most recently released Be Smart with your Money.

1960s Old Ridleians from the Class of 1969 celebrated their 50th reunion, becoming the latest Golden Tigers.

’69 Gord Powell ’62 and son Mark spent a week in Labrador fishing with Tom Collingwood ’62. The ORs were joined by Robbie Cole ’98 and NHL hockey player Sidney Crosby.

High resolution images (300dpi, 2MB minimum) are welcome to accompany your Class Note. SEND TO: development@ridleycollege.com

62

flourishing


Gord Durnan ’64 received an Honorary Doctor of Education from Nipissing University on June 12.

1990s

Tim Griffin ’68 won the United States Tennis Association (USTA) Mens 70 Singles National Tennis Championship on October 20, 2019 in North Carolina.

1970s Owner of Southbrook Vineyards, Bill Redelmeier ’71 proudly accepted the Canadian Health Food Association (CHAF) East Organic Achievement Award in 2018. On May 29, Headmaster Kidd had the pleasure of introducing Bruce Croxon ’79 as keynote speaker for Entrepreneurs Organization (EO) Niagara, an event organized in part by Hilary Caters ’89.

’94 Celebrating their 25th reunion, numerous members of the Class of 1994 returned to campus to reminisce. Sean Moran ’90 started a new position as Senior Vice President, Head of Business Development at Clarien Bank Limited in Bermuda.

1980s

William Prendiville ’90 published his debut novella, ‘Atlantic Winds’ earlier in July 2019. Kate Nickerson-Crowe ’93 and Ridley parent, Karen Natho-Mandigo, qualified to represent Canada at the 2019 Swim Run Championships In Grado Italy— between five islands in the Adriatic Sea. Certified meditation ayuerveda and yoga instructor, Vish Chatterji ’94 recently launched his book called The Business Casual Yogi.

Georgina Black ’85, Scott Paterson ’82 and C.B. Ross ’83 teamed up (and themed up) at the CNIB fundraiser in Toronto this past August. Georgina Black ’85 is now Managing Partner, Government & Public Services at Deloitte Canada. Marko Bukovec ’85 has brought the popular franchise, COBS Bread, to St. Catharines with the intent to give back to the local community.

Steve Laine ’94, Resident Manager of Pan Pacific Signapore, won Stelliers Asia Hotel/Resident Manager of the Year 2019 by exemplifying sincerity, graciousness and dependability. Steve is also the author of the recently published novel, Root Cause. Cynthia Kumar ‘97 received the Distinguished Service Award at the Elevate Awards Gala in June. Hosted by Chartered Professional Accountants (CPA) Alberta, she was nominated for her outstanding work as both a mentor and leader.

In the recent issue of Professionally Speaking, the magazine of the Ontario College of Teachers, Raine Maida ’88 reveals how Ridley and two of its faculty members made a positive impact on his career and life.

TIGER | WINTER 2020

63


2000s CEO Ransom Hawley ‘04 is receiving high praise for his Niagarabased business, Caddle. The budding tech company was celebrated in Canadian Business and Maclean’s magazines, and was named Canada’s Top New Growth Companies 2019 by Startup 50.

’09 Young alums from the Class of 2009 turned out at Homecoming for their 10-year reunion.

The Royal Gazette

Tyler Burton ’06, was a defensive standout and faceoff specialist for the Calgary Roughnecks, who secured the National Lacrosse League (NLL) championship with a win over the Buffalo Bandits on May 25.

Kristen Darrell ’04 can be seen on the big screen in Spider-Man: Far From Home, starring Tom Holland, Jake Gyllenhaal and Samuel L. Jackson, and directed by Jon Watts. The London-based actress plays a New York City police officer, in the blockbuster that was released this past July. Alex Little ’03 and Development Officer, Lachlan Macintosh won the United Way St. Catharines Croquet Tournament—continuing in the footsteps of former long-standing champs Jay Tredway ’96 and Bryan Rose ’96.

64

flourishing

CBC’s The National featured Margaret Coons ’08, sharing the success of her company, Nuts for Cheese, which makes plant-based alternatives to cheese from cashew milk. As the popularity of plant-based products grows, so has her company—tripling revenue.


2010s

’14 Young alums from the Class of 2014 represented at Homecoming for their 5-year reunion.

Caroline Sherk ’12, United Way Niagara’s 2019 campaign chair, announced the agency’s $5.25 million campaign goal during its kickoff breakfast in September. Matthew Cairns ‘13 is becoming a force to be reckoned with in the world of classical music. The opera singer can now add CBC Music 30 Under 30 to his resume. Former Prep Hockey player, Will Lochead ‘16 recently attended the Florida Panthers training camp and has signed his first professional contract with its AHL affiliate, the Springfield Thunderbirds.

Known as Merry Lamb Lamb to her fans, Merry Fung ’11 partnered with Gucci for their #GucciGig collaborative project, which invites musicians and artists to showcase their creative expression while sporting Gucci’s new line of eyewear.

Trinity Russell-Marques ’17 completed the Pre-Vet programme at Dalhousie University and has begun her Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine degree at Ross University in St. Kitts, West Indies. Congratulations to Ethan Enns ’18 and Clark Schultz ’17 on their Canadian University Rowing Championship with University of British Columbia.

Mackenzie Copp ’12 captured a bronze medal for Canada with the Men’s Eight at the World Rowing Cup in Poznan, Poland this past June.

TIGER | WINTER 2020

65


MARRIAGES Craig Hatch ‘03 married Lindsay Schwenker on New Year’s Eve, December 31, 2018.

Max Fischer ’10 popped the question to Jess Dykstra on May 4, 2019. The couple will wed in the Memorial Chapel in September 2020 on Max’s 10-year reunion.

Ally Roberts (Bolton) ’07, Omar Dill ’06, Stevey Brown-Darrell ’08 and Dave Boersma ’04 all gathered for the wedding of Dominique Nanette ’05 to Rhiannon Fox-Nanette on June 16, 2019 in Port Royal, Southampton, Bermuda.

September 28, 2019 in Park City, Utah, Nicholas Desantis ’98 married Haley Gruber. Nicholas’ classmate, Dmitri Smidovich ’98 and brother-inlaw, Michael Iggulden ’01 stood by their side in the wedding party.

BIRTHS Shawn Moulden ’01 and his wife Kristen welcomed Charlee on June 21, 2019. Adalyn Fowler was born to Kyle Fowler ’03 and Trish (Petrie) Fowler ’05 on October 29, 2018. Jordan Brock Fowler ’05 and Whitney (Peterson) Fowler ’05 welcomed Melody on August 30, 2018. Christy (Hanna) ’06 and Cory Guttin welcomed Elodie Violet on August 27, 2019. Emmett Gilbert Earl was born February 12, 2019 to Meaghan Elder-Vendromin ‘06 and her husband Adam. Britt (Franklin) ‘08 and Seaver Call ‘07 were overjoyed to welcome son, Merrick Henry Call to the world on October 4, 2019. Brett Walker ‘84 welcomed daughter Frida Rose into the world on June 17, 2019.

Charlee


OBITUARIES William ‘Bill’ Foulds ‘36 died at the age of 99 (just shy of his 100 birthday) on April 1, 2018. Edward C. Atwater ’44 died on April 27, 2019 at 93 years of age. Dr. Armand Pierre Guillermin ’55 died at age 82, on July 16, 2019. Glyn Osler ’48 died on August 9, 2019 at the age of 89.

FACULTY & STAFF NOTES FACULTY/STAFF Former school nurse, Joyce ‘Joy’ Hazel Williams died at the age of 90 on January 30, 2019. J. David Mackey, former faculty member from 1962 to 1999, died at 87 years of age on September 25, 2019.

John Carter ’61 died October 29, 2019. John Matthews ’61 died July 22, 2019 at the age of 76.

Head of House, Jess Roud and her husband Dan welcomed their second daughter, Layla on August 15, 2019. Big sister, Peyton ’30 and her Dean’s House “brothers” immediately fell in love.

Harry Powell ’63 died on July 7, 2019 at the age of 75. Former Ridley governor, Anthony Geoffrey ‘Geoff’ Tooton ’70 died on February 19, 2019 at the age of 67.

Lower School teacher, Kate Shaw became a mother to Piper on October 26, 2019.

Denver Chamberlain ‘11 died unexpectedly on September 8, 2019 at 26 years of age.

Elodie

Merrick

Emmett

Frida


RIDLEY’S ARCHITECT: How an Old Boy breathed new life into campus

I

n 1919, a young group of architects gathered almost daily at Bloor Street’s Diet Kitchen Tea Room in Toronto, to “complain, plot and dream of a better city.” Fondly referred to as “The Diet Kitchen School of Architecture,” the eclectic group included Ridley’s own Ferdinand ‘Ferdie’ H. Marani 1912 — an up-andcoming architect who would change the cityscape in the years that followed. The son of an instructor at the University of Toronto’s (U of T) School of Architecture, you might say Ferdie came by it honestly. For over fifty years, the Vancouver-born, Toronto-based architect was “amongst the aficionados of the postwar period of Toronto architecture and city building,” known widely for his Neo-Georgian style. The geometric, modular aesthetic became the main architecture of the public realm in the U.K. during the period of the 1920s to 1960s; its influence quickly reached North America and was soon seen popping up everywhere in the form of banks, shops, universities and military buildings. Ferdie founded a succession of firms credited with the design of hundreds of well-known buildings, from Ottawa’s Bank of Canada, to the Canadian Forces Headquarters in Washington D.C., to Toronto’s famous Medical Arts Building, Sheridan College and the CNE grandstand. And, as you walk the paths of Ridley’s campus, you’ll see evidence of that classic Georgian style everywhere you look. Because Ferdie was not only an Old Boy and a Toronto trailblazer—he was also Ridley’s architect. Ferdie was part of a virtual Ridley dynasty of Maranis who attended the school. His grandfather, J. Herbert Mason was responsible for setting up the Mason Gold Medal, still awarded every year, not only at Ridley, but also at Havergal and UCC. Ferdie, himself, won the medal in 1912. During his time here from 1901 to 1912, he proved to be a dedicated student, “a very fair tackler, and one of the hardest workers on the line” on Ridley’s football team, and a self-proclaimed military enthusiast.

He joined the Cadet Corps the day it formed and was a member for six years, becoming Captain the year Ridley competed in the Imperial Cadet Competitions at the Toronto Exhibition. “I was constantly pestering [Lieutenant-Colonel George Thairs],” Ferdie laughingly admits in his 1924 ‘In Memoriam’ for the Colonel. “I would go into his office one day to ask, ‘When are the uniforms coming,’ then ‘When are the rifles coming,’ then another day, ‘Why not start a Bugle Band?’ and many other questions more ridiculous.” But his persistence paid off: by 1912, Ridley’s first bugle band was formed, “organized through the hard work and interest of Cadet Captain F.H. Marani.” Ferdie was studying architecture at U of T when the Great War broke out, and he left school to enlist with the Canadian Expeditionary Forces. He became a captain in the Third Battalion of the Toronto Regiment and was posted overseas, wounded in June of 1916. From 1932 to 1936, Ferdie served his country again as LieutenantColonel of the Royal Regiment of Canada, and then as Group Captain of the Royal Canadian Air Force during the Second World War. Colonel Ferdinand Marani was awarded the Order of the British Empire for his war service in the summer of 1945. Throughout his life, Ferdie’s passion for the military remained strong. In 1946, the War Memorial Committee of the Osgoode Law Society approached the architect who had served his country so faithfully, seeking his recommendation for a way in which to honour members who had lost their lives during the Second World War. Ferdie’s suggestion, a moving memorial by leading sculptor Cleeve Horne, still stands in the lower Rotunda of Osgoode Hall.


ARCHIVES CORNER

“The Diet Kitchen School of Architecture” circa 1919.

Though he left campus in 1912, Ferdie never strayed too far from Ridley, and became the Honorary President of the Old Boys’ Association. His wife, Constance, was also deeply involved in the Ridley community, presenting prizes for Sports Days in the postwar years, and an active member of the then Women’s Guild. Her detailed history of the Guild not only acted as a tribute to its hardworking women—mothers, wives and sisters who were also considered “staunch Old Ridleians”— but served as an important document for the Ridley record. The Guild’s aim, as Mrs. Marani expressed it, was “to help in making Ridley a greater power for good in our country.”

As you wander the grounds, you’ll find Ferdie’s trademark Georgian style dotted becomingly across our lush campus: he led his firms in designing the Lower School in 1926, remodelled the Upper School (School House) in 1930, and completed Merritt House in 1932, merging it into the quiet impressiveness of the older buildings. The distinctive Marriott Gates went up in 1934, their arch an ornamental wrought-iron over-throw, with the shield of Ridley’s Coat-of-Arms as the centre-piece, topped by a bishop’s mitre. In the late-thirties, Ridley turned to Ferdie to design a new gymnasium, later named for the Iggulden family, in response to an urgent need for indoor playing space. Built of red brick with white stone facings, the 1939 build was as good as that of any on the continent—and it quite literally revolutionized the school. Ridley enriched its athletic offerings beyond the traditional trio of football, hockey and cricket, giving way to a wider opportunity to represent the school and develop different talents; the impressive space also had all the bells and whistles needed to revive drama. A decade later, The Schmon Infirmary and Memorial Great Hall both rose up under Ferdie’s watch.

By the 1960s, nearly twenty years of discussion about expanding the Memorial Chapel turned to action. Due to space limitations, the Lower School had worshipped separately from the Upper School since the 1930s, and an extension was needed that would be built in absolute harmony with the rest of the structure. Naturally, the job was turned over to Ferdie, who had, coincidentally, trained at Sproatt & Rolph, the Chapel’s original architects. The seamless expansion was completed in time for the Old Boys Weekend of 1964. Over the years, Ferdie’s firms won multiple awards, including an Honorable Mention at the 1948 London Olympics in the Architectural Design category, and one of the first Massey Silver Medals for Architecture in 1950. He was elected as Fellow of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada, became a Full Academician of the Royal Canadian Academy, chairman of the Ontario Association of Architects and a member of the Governing Council of the Ontario College of Art, serving two terms as Chair—Ontario College of Art and Design (OCAD) now has an award given in his name. Ferdie Marani was part of an old age of architecture that’s now gone, “a time in which the mayor phones up Ferdie or Ron Dick and says, ‘We need a courthouse, University Avenue, OAA fees, okay, good, click.’” notes Bob Goyeche, a current principle at the firm Ferdie once founded. “That era changed.” The firm still stands, though it has since shuffled partners, now less Georgian and more concept-driven and elite. However, that’s one of the most amazing things about architecture: Ferdie’s unmistakeable prints are all over this country, its cities and its suburbs, and all across this campus. And, as we now look to our grounds with an eye to expand and improve, to breathe new life into the Iggulden Gymnasium Ferdie Marani designed nearly eighty years ago, it’s a good moment to remember that Ridley’s past will always inform its future—and that the transformation of the gym and surrounding buildings will send ripples of positive change, not only across our campus, but across time. To learn more about The Campaign for Ridley, as well as plans for a reimagined campus, visit: ridleycollege.com

TIGER | WINTER 2020

69


Michelle Scrivener

2018–2019

ANNUAL REPORT 70

flourishing


FROM THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS

Dear Ridley Community, When I reflect on the 2018–19 school year, it is with pride—not only in the accomplishments of our students, but also in Ridley’s many successes, firsts and continued health and strength. As last year began, I was particularly proud of the opportunity to champion our community as the 20th Board Chair—a responsibility passed to me by our Board of Governors—and outgoing chair Georgina Black ’85—on the eve of my 30th reunion weekend. I am also proud of the fine leadership of Headmaster Kidd and his excellent team. This annual report demonstrates what good stead our school is in. I offer you here some of the most notable examples. We opened the gates in September 2018 with the (then) largest enrollment to date and most diverse range of nationalities ever represented. By Prize Day, graduates had collectively applied to more than 250 universities, with an impressive 77 percent acceptance rate. In February 2019, Ridley welcomed the Canadian Accredited Independent Schools (CAIS) and the International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO) to campus for separate schoolwide accreditation visits. After more than a year of preparation, we received glowing commendations and valuable recommendations from both bodies, as well as a rare “no matters to be addressed” from the IBO. Annual Fund participation and significant early support of The Campaign for Ridley were clear, with hundreds of community members contributing and several transformational gifts graciously realized. There is much work still to do, but gratitude is owed to our faithful donors and dedicated volunteers, listed herein. Lastly, I am proud of the work of the Board this past year. We have been fine-tuning the nomination and succession planning for governors and board committees. (Please visit our revised ‘Leadership & Governance’ page on ridleycollege.com). Special thanks to my valued board colleagues who retired in 2019, including Phil Court ’85, LeighAnn Epperson and Louise Taylor Green. It is an honour for me to serve our great institution and I thank and encourage you to discover how you can continue, or re-ignite, your contribution to your Ridley as well. Terar Dum Prosim, David K. Carter ’88 CHAIR, BOARD OF GOVERNORS TIGER | WINTER 2020

71


Michelle Scrivener

2018–19 SCHOOL LEADERSHIP TEAM J. Edward Kidd

Julie A. Cameron

HEADMASTER

DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS

Michele A. Bett

Andrea K. Carisse

HEAD OF UPPER SCHOOL

DIRECTOR OF STRATEGIC COMMUNICATIONS & MARKETING

Stephen A. Clarke HEAD OF LOWER SCHOOL

James D. Parke DIRECTOR OF FINANCE & OPERATIONS

Susan E. Hazell DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT

Margaret E. Lech ASSISTANT HEAD OF UPPER SCHOOL

Scott McLean MANAGER OF CAMPUS SAFETY & SECURITY

Andrea L. Nauf DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESOURCES

Jay W. Tredway ’96 DIRECTOR OF ATHLETICS

Scott D. Walker DIRECTOR OF FACILITIES

72

flourishing


GOVERNANCE 2018–19 BOARD OF GOVERNORS BOARD CHAIR David K. Carter ’88

SECRETARY

BOARD MEMBERS

James D. Parke, Director of Finance & Operations

Kelvin S. Chen ’70

Scott G.A. Lampard ’88

Timothy J. Coffin ’81

Alison A.C. Loat ’94

Philip D. Court ’85

Dragan Matovic

BY INVITATION:

Leigh Ann Epperson

Don McMurtry ’82

J. Edward Kidd, Headmaster

Sarah E. Eyton ’86

Maria Menechella

Louise Taylor Green

Yanick Pagé ’84

Brian A. Hutchings ’84

G. Scott Paterson ’82

C. Michael Kray ’88

COMMITTEES ADVANCEMENT

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT

FINANCE, AUDIT & HUMAN RESOURCES

GOVERNANCE & NOMINATION

COMMITTEE CHAIR

COMMITTEE CHAIR

COMMITTEE CHAIR

COMMITTEE CHAIR

Timothy J. Coffin ’81

Philip D. Court ’85

Scott G.A. Lampard ’88

C. Michael Kray ’88

SECRETARY

SECRETARY

VICE CHAIR

SECRETARY

James D. Parke, Director of Finance & Operations

James D. Parke, Director of Finance & Operations

Christopher D. Cooke ’88

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

David K. Carter ’88

David K. Carter ’88

James D. Parke, Director of Finance & Operations

James D. Parke, Director of Finance & Operations

Keddy A. Chandran ’03

Kelvin S. Chen ’70

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Timothy J. Coffin ’81

Kelvin S. Chen ’70

Joseph Ferrante

David K. Carter ’88

Philip D. Court ’85

Sarah E. Eyton ’86

Justin J. Goulding ’96

Brian A. Hutchings ’84

Scott G.A. Lampard ’88

Jeanie Hendrie ’05

Brian A. Hutchings ’84

E. Allison Griffiths ’95

Alison A.C. Loat ’94

D. Andrew Lind ’88

A. Dean Karachi ’87

Robin E.A. Lampard ’85

Maria Menechella

Don McMurtry ’82

Paul S. Kundrat ’92

Dean McCann

BY INVITATION:

Maria Menechella

Dragan Matovic

Louise Taylor Green

G. Scott Paterson ’82

BY INVITATION

BY INVITATION:

J. Edward Kidd, Headmaster

BY INVITATION:

J. Edward Kidd, Headmaster

J. Edward Kidd, Headmaster

Scott D. Walker, Director of Facilities

Brenda Lockhart, Manager of Financial Reporting

J. Edward Kidd, Headmaster Julie A. Cameron, Director of Admissions

SECRETARY

COMMITTEE MEMBERS David K. Carter ’88

Andrea K. Carisse, Director of Strategic Communications & Marketing Susan E. Hazell, Director of Development

TIGER | WINTER 2020

73


UNIVERSITY APPLICATIONS: 1058 | UNIVERSITIES: 253 ACCEPTANCE RATE: 77% | APPLICATIONS PER STUDENT: 7.7

HIGHLIGHTS OF THE CLASS OF 2019

USA Arizona State University American Academy of Dramatic Arts American University

153

GRADUATES

Babson College Boston University Brigham Young University Brown University California Northstate University College

10

COUNTRIES REPRESENTED IN OFFERS ACCEPTED

of Health Sciences

Canisius College Carnegie Mellon University Colgate University Columbia University Cornell University Florida State University

TOP FIVE ACCEPTANCES BY #

21

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO

Fordham University Georgia Insitute of Technology John Hopkins University King’s College Lehigh University Lynn University Mercyhurst University New York University Niagara University

8

UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA

6

QUEEN’S UNIVERSITY

Northeastern University Northwestern University Oberlin College of Arts and Sciences Santa Clara University Sarah Lawrence College Savannah College of Art and Design School of Art Institute of Chicago St. Andrews University St. Lawrence University Stanford University The New School

6

MCGILL UNIVERSITY

6

CARLETON UNIVERSITY

The University of Iowa University of California, Berkeley University of California, Davis University of California, Los Angeles University of California, Santa Barbara University of Colorado at Boulder University of Hartford University of Illinois at Chicago University of Miami University of Notre Dame University of Pennsylvania University of Rochester University of Southern California Unniversity of Tennessee University of Washington University of Wisconsin

74

flourishing

Yale University


MATRICULATION 2015–19 INTERNATIONAL

CANADA

Brunel University London, United Kingdom

Bishop’s University

Ecole Hoeliere de Lausanne, Switzerland

Brock University

IE University - Segovia, Spain

Carleton University

Imperial College London, United Kingdom

Concordia University

King’s College London, United Kingdom

Dalhousie University

Les Roches International School of Hotel

Fanshawe College

Humber College

Management, Switzerland

Ludwig Maximilians University Munich, Germany

Huron University College

Neuchatel Junior College, Switzerland

King’s University College

NYU Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

McGill University

Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Ireland

McMaster University

The London School of Economics and

Memorial University of Newfoundland

Mount Allison University

Political Science, United Kingdom

The University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Niagara College

The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Ontario College of Art & Design University

The University of Manchester, United Kingdom

Queen’s University

The University of Western Australia, Australia

Ryerson University

Toulouse Business School Barcelona, Spain

Saint Mary’s University

Universidad Anahuac, Mexico

Sheridan College Institute of Technology

University College Dublin, Ireland

Universidad Iberoamericana, Mexico

St. Francis Xavier University

University of Bristol, United Kingdom

St. Thomas University

University of Leeds, United Kingdom

Toronto Film School at RCC Institute of Technology

University of London, United Kingdom

University of St. Andrews, United Kingdom

University of Alberta

University of Sussex, United Kingdom

University of British Columbia

University of the Arts London, United Kingdom

University of British Columbia - Okanagan Campus

Universiteit van Amsterdam, Netherlands

University of Calgary

Waseda University, Japan

University of Guelph

& Advanced Learning

& Advanced Learning

University of King’s College Universlty of Lethbridge University of New Brunswick University of Ottawa University of Regina University of Toronto University of Victoria University of Waterloo Western University Wilfrid Laurier University York University TIGER | WINTER 2020

75


4650

$80K

$10K

VOLUNTEER HOURS IN SUPPORT OF RIDLEY COLLEGE

DONATION TO THE ANNUAL FUND

DONATION TO THE FAMILY GUILD SCHOLARSHIP & BURSARY FUND

THE DAVID A. MACLACHLAN VOLUNTEER AWARD The RCFG was pleased to join Headmaster Kidd in awarding Thomas Ng with the David A. Maclachlan Volunteer Award for his service—Thomas truly exemplifies Terar Dum Prosim. His commitment to leading marketing and communications for the Guild has helped to establish an effective presence, and includes videography, design, organizing and maintaining social media platforms, creating schedules and calendars, as well as establishing consistent and effective RCFG branding.

76

flourishing

SERVING OUR COMMUNITY When it comes to supporting the Ridley community, the RCFG is our most dedicated ally! Whether it’s welcoming new families, planning events (think: book fairs, holiday parties and staff appreciation days), being on judging panels, or baking tasty treats for our youngest boarders, the Guild is there for our school every step of the way. Make sure to check out the Recycled Uniform Boutique—new this year from the RCFG!


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

ACTING VICE PRESIDENT Jo Hanna

EXECUTIVE BY INVITATION: COMMUNICATIONS & IT

ACTING PRESIDENT

ASSOCIATE VICE PRESIDENT

Hannah Ulrich

Charmaine Bellefleur PAST PRESIDENT

VOLUNTEER COORDINATOR

Fil Stabile

Jen Dunn

TREASURER

RIDLEY COLLEGE LIAISON

Gabi Guderjahn SECRETARY

Thomas Ng

Valerie Parke

Nancy McLeod-Elder

TAKING INITIATIVE The hustle and bustle of today’s modern world calls for a modern Guild! last year, the RCFG rolled out their new strategic planning process—designed to streamline and improve organization, tailor communications, and increase their social media presence across platforms. The Guild also expanded their leadership team with an eye toward improving both parent and community relations, and closely examined the strength and quality of programmes.

COMING TOGETHER ON CAMPUS With community in mind, the RCFG organized a medley of outstanding events on campus this past year, with proceeds going to support scholarships and bursaries for deserving students, as well as Ridley’s Annual Campaign. Designer Purse Bingo and Trivia Night were both sold-out successes, the Christmas Market got us all into the holiday spirit, and Tigerfest was, as always, a kid-approved hit!

TIGER | WINTER 2020

77


CONDENSED BALANCE SHEET CONDENSED BALANCE SHEET

YEAR ENDED as atJUNE June30, 30,2019 2019

2019

2018

Total

Total

$

$

Cash & Short term Investments

20,247,270

19,207,190

ASSETS Current assets Receivables

6,802,886

4,601,912

Deferred financial assistance & prepaid expenses

2,225,608

2,154,734

Inventories

272,178

283,316

29,547,942

26,247,152

1,681,041

860,641

31,754,603

31,847,112

62,983,586

58,954,905

Accounts payable and accrued liabilities

3,208,309

4,074,173

Prepaid fees and refundable deposits

32,222,165

30,860,385

35,430,474

34,934,558

3,602,006

2,820,861

39,032,480

37,755,419

Operating - unrestricted

(3,692,520)

(4,837,790)

Capital assets - restricted

31,754,603

31,847,112

Expansion - restricted

(7,740,892)

(7,533,120)

613,775

581,650

3,016,140

1,141,634

23,951,106

21,199,486

62,983,586

58,954,905

Construction in progress Capital assets

LIABILITIES Current liabilities

Pension and post-retirement obligations

FUND BALANCES

Specified donation - restricted Expansion 2 - restricted

students who might not otherwise be able to afford a Ridley education. We continue to invest in new information technology solutions and the required infrastructure to support such technology. Ridley’s WiFi system was dramatically enhanced to provide faster and more extensive campus-wide coverage.

Ridley’s year-end financial statements have been audited by Deloitte LLP. The auditors have provided a clean opinion. I am pleased to share with you, in the attached report, some details of our financial position for the 2018–2019 school year. Please contact me with any questions.

We are very fortunate to have a strong philanthropic base at Ridley. The generous donations from our alumni, parents, employees and friends are a key element in Ridley’s ongoing success. Your continuing support is greatly appreciated. STATE OF THE COLLEGE | 21

78

flourishing


The Class of 1968 celebrating its 50th reunion at Homecoming 2018 after being inducted as Golden Tigers TIGER | WINTER 2020

79


STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS AND CHANGE IN FUND BALANCES

2019

2018

Total

Total

$

$

Tuition

32,400,202

31,493,803

Financial support

4,093,611

3,093,281

Fees

1,513,147

1,444,917

Summer Programmes

1,182,799

1,180,497

Store and book sales

764,701

862,174

Facility rentals

680,269

714,891

Interest income

502,428

431,208

Other

276,586

111,724

Busing

173,545

130,420

REVENUE

-

332,923

41,587,288

39,795,838

Teaching, athletics, activities

14,727,731

13,664,520

Maintenance of properties and equipment

3,882,119

3,908,615

Board and care of students

3,832,387

3,453,984

Financial aid

3,578,215

3,488,188

General and administration

2,684,151

3,151,938

Information technology

1,352,480

1,304,915

Admissions and marketing

1,315,076

1,658,561

Development

1,191,123

1,069,228

Summer Programmes

1,065,581

871,620

Store and book sale costs

689,701

787,174

Facility rental costs

397,769

396,691

Communications

363,219

318,883

Busing costs

257,893

162,697

Transfer of Gala revenue to Ridley College Foundation

-

245,224

Gala expenses

-

87,699

Amortization of capital assets

2,326,417

2,439,484

37,663,862

37,009,421

3,923,426

2,786,417

Fund balances, beginning of year

21,199,486

19,178,908

Pension remeasurements

(1,171,806)

(765,839)

Fund balances, end of year

23,951,106

21,199,486

Gala revenue TOTAL REVENUE

EXPENSES

TOTAL EXPENSES Excess (deficiency) of revenue over expenses for the year

80

flourishing


YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2019

SOURCES OF REVENUE Tuition & Fees - 82%

Miscellaneous - 2%

Financial Support - 10%

Hank’s sales - 2%

Summer Programmes - 3%

Facility rentals - 2%

EXPENDITURES Teaching, Athletics & Activities - 39%

Amortization of Capital Assets - 6%

Physical Plant - 10%

Information Technology - 4%

Board & Care of Students - 10%

Summer Programmes - 3%

Financial Assistance - 10%

Hank’s - 2%

Admissions, Development, Comm - 8%

Rentals - 1%

General & Administration - 7%

Miscellaneous - 1%

TIGER | WINTER 2020

81


Michelle Scrivener

RIDLEY COLLEGE FOUNDATION TRUSTEES R. Michael H. Stevens ’77 CHAIR Gregory B. Souter ’85 SECRETARY/TREASURER

John R. Anderson ’65 Robert D. Evans ’77 Sean P. Gallaway ’87 John P. Hynes ’96 Donald S. McFarlane ’76 † Duncan M. McGregor ’84 W. Darcy McKeough ’51 Bruce H. Mitchell ’64 William O. Wallace ’77 BY INVITATION: David K. Carter ’88 Susan E. Hazell J. Edward Kidd James D. Parke

† denotes deceased 82

flourishing


RIDLEY COLLEGE FOUNDATION

year ended June 30, 2019

TOTAL ASSETS AT JUNE 30, 2019 - CDN$ 35,000,000

$30,185,667 30,000,000

$28,417,250 $26,380,632 $24,188,162

25,000,000

$22,746,511

$23,570,049

20,000,000

15,000,000

10,000,000

5,000,000

0 2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

GRANT RECEIVED WAS EXPENDED ON THE FOLLOWING

2019

during 2018–19

Scholarships & Bursaries - 63.4% Academic Funds - 11.5% Unrestricted - 9% Faculty Maintenance - 7.4% Athletic & Activity Prizes - 5.7%

TOTAL RECEIVED

$1,141,880

Prizes - 2% Professional Development - 1%

TIGER | WINTER 2020

83


RIDLEY COLLEGE FUND USA, INC.

TOTAL ASSETS AS OF JUNE 30, 2019 - US$ 7,200,000

$7,132,298

7,000,000

6,800,000

$6,592,914

$6,647,594

6,600,000

6,400,000

$6,238,230

$6,256,828

$6,260,063

2014

2015

2016

6,200,000

6,000,000

5,800,000

5,600,000 2017

GRANT RECEIVED WAS EXPENDED ON THE FOLLOWING

2018

2019

during 2018–19

Scholarships & Bursaries - 98% Great Hall Project - 1.5%

TOTAL RECEIVED

$337,000

84

flourishing

Other Restricted Projects - 0.5%


BOARD OF DIRECTORS Harold A. Wilson ’67 PRESIDENT William S. Cleary ’81 VICE PRESIDENT Robert McD. Wilson ’81 SECRETARY Timothy J. Coffin ’81 TREASURER Michele-Elise Burnett ’86

SCHOLARSHIPS & BURSARIES

$ 3,578,215 TOTAL TUITION ASSISTANCE

Bruce L. Carrow ’74 John K.S. Cleary ’84 Peter B. Coffin ’78 Britt R. Franklin Call ’08 Alexander C.O. Hansen ’87 Brian A. Iggulden ’67 Michelle M. Mandeville ’95 James C. Rogers ’81 Andrew McD. Wilson ’90

I am grateful for the opportunities that Ridley has given me over the past 11 years,

130

RECIPIENTS

and for the many activities, teams and clubs I’ve been able to take part in. But mostly, I’m grateful for the relationships I have developed with friends who have become more like family.

$ 649,750 SCHOLARSHIP FUNDS AWARDED

—KIANNA GEMMELL ’18

181

RECIPIENTS

$ 2,928,465 BURSARIES AWARDED

TIGER | WINTER 2020

85


RIDLEY COLLEGE FOUNDATION ENDOWED FUNDS AS OF JUNE 30, 2019

BURSARY & SCHOLARSHIP FUNDS 125 Renaissance Bursary Fund

$

449,023

Class of 1972 Bursary

53,245

Alberta Ridley College Scholarship/ Centennial Endowment Fund

Class of 1974 Bursary

90,505

66,068

Class of 1975 Bursary

53,635

Katharine Alexander and Kitty Miller Scholarship Fund

28,163

Class of 1976 Bursary

49,361

544,513

Class of 1977 Bursary

11,453

Alumni Scholarship Anderson Memorial Scholarship Fund

62,186

Class of 1978 Mark Preece Memorial Bursary

44,740

J.J. Arnold Maritimes Scholarship

22,020

Class of 1979 Robert Malone Memorial Bursary

56,154

Bahamas Scholarship Fund

17,616

Class of 1980 Bursary

30,432

Banville Winnipeg Scholarship Fund

58,044

Class of 1982 Bursary

32,085

L. Clarke Bell Memorial Scholarship Fund

98,968

Class of 1985 Bursary

76,346

Bermuda Ridley College Scholarship Endowment Fund; including David B. Wadson Memorial Scholarship 191,648

Class of 1988 Bursary

44,716

Class of 1989 Bursary

43,509

Class of 2005 Bursary

38,855

Nat Caters Bursary Fund

39,914

André Buller ’54 Scholarship Fund

319,434

Bullied Award Scholarship

45,207

Dorothy Burgoyne Doolittle & Henry B. Burgoyne ’67 Memorial Bursary

31,564

Richard R.P. Court ’50 Innovation Fdn Bursary

20,000

Burn Memorial Fund

39,329

Stephen R. Court ’89 Memorial Scholarship

931,975

36,193

Crawford, Smith & Swallow Bursary

37,861

Carley Family Bursary

164,779

John B. & Terence Cronyn Bursary

71,124

Carthy Foundation Centennial Bursary Fund

284,139

Harry J. Daniel Scholarship

G. Mark Curry ’62 Bursary

426,270

Michael R. Davies ’78 Memorial Scholarship

14,824 25,990

Isobel Burton Memorial Scholarship Fund

66,282

Nan and Laddie Cassels Scholarship Fund

32,639

L. Robert S. deLangley ’48 Scholarship

Tony Cassels Award

28,486

Desmarais Family Bursary

Charlton Family Scholarship

46,848

Richard James Dickinson B.A. L.L.B. Scholarship Fund

Class of 1938 Bursary

33,062

Evelyn Dobson Memorial Scholarship

Class of 1939 Samuel G. Heaman Bursary

95,214

Andrew A. Dodge ’24 Bursary

Class of 1940 Bursary

25,747

John S. Drake ’35 Bursary

59,107

106,805

Margaret A. Drake Bursary

58,913

Class of 1942/Class of 1957 - Matheson Bursary

100,743 25,612 25,271 159,365

45,116

George D. Enos Jr. ’41 Bursary

22,201

Class of 1947 Bursary

58,947

Robert Evans ’77 Bursary

66,292

Class of 1951 Bursary

69,072

Eyton Family Scholarship

59,573

Class of 1953 Bursary

47,395

Faculty and Staff Bursary

102,992

Class of 1954 Bursary

747,394

Female Prep Hockey Bursary/Scholarship

150,020

48,328

Roderick Ferguson ’87 Memorial Bursary

122,379

Harry E. Foster Memorial Scholarship

102,140

Class of 1945 Bursary

Class of 1955 Bursary Class of 1957 - Matheson Bursary (see class of 1942) Class of 1959 Bursary Class of 1961 Karen Chaplin Memorial Bursary Class of 1962 Michael Ross Mandeville Memorial Bursary

214 70,388 155,189 150,106

Alex Friesen Memorial Bursary

51,474

Donna Gauley-McCarthy Memorial Bursary

29,803

Gooderham Family Memorial Scholarships

260,373

Peter S. Gooderham ’44 Bursary Fund

106,842 108,844

Class of 1963 Bursary

60,913

Kendra A. Watts - Gransden ’84 Bursary

Class of 1964 Bursary

44,472

John Grant Memorial Scholarship

74,236

Class of 1965 Bursary

43,579

Griffith-Hamilton Scholarship Fund

40,235

Class of 1966 Bursary

65,388

John and Cosie Guest Memorial Bursary

54,691

76,899

Hamilton Stone Memorial Scholarship

65,138

Class of 1967 Bursary Class of 1968 Douglas Utting Memorial Bursary

1,003,227

George M. Hendrie ’49 Bursary

197,253

Class of 1969 Bursary

61,785

Nicholas D. Holmes Bursary

70,066

Class of 1970 Bursary

31,499

Donald and Nancy Hunt Scholarship

52,352

Class of 1971 Bursary

44,386

Robert L. Hunter ’33 Memorial Scholarship

41,148

86

flourishing


(cont.) $ Brian ’67 & Rosemary Iggulden Bursary Mac ’46 and Elinor Irwin Fund

62,477 296,846

Kenmore Construction Company Limited Scholarship

23,755

Rupert & Judy Lane Bursary

58,174

Leonard Foundation Scholarship and Reuben Wells Leonard Memorial Awards Fund Kenyon Lett Scholarship Lewis Family Bursary Donald H Lie ’52 Bursary

1,192,586 28,422 62,119 695,308

W.H. Lind ’33 Family Bursary Fund

64,133

Alan Maclachlan Memorial Scholarship

93,323

Graham M. MacLachlan Memorial Scholarship

208,261

Peter Maclachlan Memorial Fund

86,293

E.W. 'Peter' Mandeville ’38 Bursary Fund

375,179

Brian Martin Fund Anthony V. Mason ’42 Memorial Scholarship

1,964 53,918

Janet L. Matthews Memorial Scholarship Fund

120,623

Kelly Matthews Award

210,955

John L.C. McCarthy ’32 Memorial Scholarship

196,773

Alex McIntosh Memorial/Beaver Foods Scholarship

88,159

R.S. McLaughlin Foundation Bursary

960,489

Donald S. McMurtry ’82 Bursary

102,135

Dr. John Ormsby Miller Scholarship

686,257

James B. Milligan Character Scholarship Bruce H. Mitchell ’64 Bursary

93,932 1,128,055

Newfoundland Ridley College Scholarship Endowment Fund

77,330

Allan V. Orr Family Bursary

41,584

B.B. Osler ’21 Scholarship

31,339

Ernest Gregory Powell Memorial Scholarship

712,137

Ridley College Family Guild Bursary

539,932

Ridley College Family Guild Scholarship Robertson Family Bursary and Scholarship Fund Scandrett Family Bursary The Robert M. Schmon Memorial/Quebec and Ontario Paper Company Scholarship

150,118 250,000 40,143 250,732

School Scholarship Fund - World War I Memorial

54,392

Sears Family Bursary

48,897

Stanley Family Scholarship

28,696

Strasenburgh Bursary Stevens Family Bursary

63,648 100,000

Leonard Sutcliffe Memorial Scholarship

40,558

Albert W. Taylor Fund

86,279

James Gordon Thompson ’44 Bursary Women of Ridley Bursary Fund

TOTAL BURSARY & SCHOLARSHIP FUNDS

164,270 3,005

19,691,525 TIGER | WINTER 2020

87


PRIZE ENDOWMENT FUNDS

$

ACADEMIC & SPECIAL ACHIEVEMENT PRIZES

$

Dr. J.A. Arnell ’34 Science Prize

7,502

The Adam Hutt Memorial Award

45,963

Judge Benson Memorial Prize for Diligence

3,845

John Hastings Kerr Memorial Prize

Margaret M. Bentley & Eleanor M. Wakeman-Long Memorial History Prize

1,960

Rosemary Reid Iggulden House Zealous Achievment - Gooderham East

3,156

Gerald Blake Memorial Prize

2,128

Elizabeth Bae Kurusi ’07 Gr. 11 Drama Prize

1,885

Boreal Laboratories Prize

1,571

W.B. Leach Memorial

2,128

906

E.M. Boyd Memorial Prize

917

Robert J. Malyk Scholarship

9,262

The Richard A. Bradley Trophy

729

M.R. Mandeville Prize

3,079

W.T. Bright ’58 Prize

1,075

The J. Herbert Mason Medal

6,416

Colin G Brzezicki English Prize

1,228

Kelly Matthews Memorial Prize

3,079

Bullied Award

Dr. M.A. McElligott Art Prize

1,126

Dorothy Burgoyne Award

3,609

T.R. Merritt ’44 Fund

4,177

Isobel Burton Memorial Prize

1,538

Dr. W.H. Merritt Prize

1,085

E.H.M. Burn Memorial Prize

765

106

C.E. Miller Prize for Creative Writing

280

Nan Cassels Award Fund

670

Michelle A. Morrissey Intermediate 'Always Artistic' Award 1,093

Chapel Service Prize - A.E. Mix Memorial

990

James Nesbitt Award for Excellence in Dance

921

Chapel Reading Prize - Brian J. Maher ’83 Memorial Prize 990

The Kenneth Albert Nordheimer Prize for IB History

Dr. J.W. Chapman Memorial Prize

The Scott Paterson ’82 Stock Market Challenge

979

Anthony M. Partington ’65 History Prize

976

The Frederick C. Clarkson ’62 - Latin Prize The Sgt. Herbert Charles Clitheroe Prize for Art Stephen R. Court ’89 Memorial Prize – Successful Participation

2,121 976 2,344 3,079

23,971

Ernest Gregory Powell Memorial Prize

1,538

Daniel H.T. Oh ’09 Prize for Gr. 8 Math

976

Sean S.T. Oh ’07 Prize for Gr. 10 Math

976

Stephen R. Court ’89 Shield

765

Plener Perseverance Prize

Stephen R. Court ’89 Art Prize

765

1,130

E. Osborne and George C. Powell Prize

765

Class of 1939 Dr. J.R. Hamilton Memorial Science Award 25,907

Price Memorial Prize

650

Terence Cronyn ’20 Prize

Dr. Alan & Mrs. Jean Rice Memorial Award - Mathematics 1,075

H.J. Daniel Prize David Dodge ’61 IB Award

494 3,453 30,052

Dr. Alan & Mrs. Jean Rice Memorial Prize

4,790

C.N.D. Rosmarin Prize

4,195

Endeavour Award

1,075

Klaus Peter Schoenefeld Memorial Prize - Art

441

Feagan-Davies Memorial Award

4,237

Gerald S. Shantz Prize for Poetry

979

Evelyn Dobson Memorial Prize Keith Dorrington Science Award

765

A.J. Silver Leadership Award

3,919

26,853

Julian Street Memorial Prize

1,126

The John S. Drake ’35 Memorial Prize

3,930

Charlotte Francis Norah Thomas Prize

216

Dunkley Prize for Senior Music

2,025

W.G. Trethewey Memorial Prize

465

Family Guild Zealous Achievment - Merritt South

4,294

Tricolour Award

2,458

Fischer Family Lower School Valadictorian Award

3,623

Akshay Shetty ’04 Valedictorian Prize

3,887

The Hanna Flandrak Memorial Prize

5,369

F. Kenneth Venables History Prize - Grade 8

885

The Dr. Ellen Smoor Foster Award

1,052

Viriginia Vickers Essay Award

990

The J.Z. Given Senior Art Prize

27,658

H.G. Williams Prize for Public Speaking

2,093

The Grace Family Prize for Wellroundedness

10,685

Harold A. Wilson ’30 Memorial Prize

4,525

E.A. Woolley ’80 Music Prize

2,071

Herald B. Greening ’51 Memorial Music Awards

5,090

S.O. Greening ’26 Prize

4,018

O. Michael G. Hamilton Prize for AP Calculus

4,761

Mrs. Ada F. Harris Memorial Prize

2,128

Headmaster’s Zealous Achievement Award

3,944

Frank Hollinrake ’57 Memorial Prize for Science

1,327

House Zealous Achievement - Arthur Bishop East

2,250

J. David Mackey/Anthony P. Sherman Arthur Bishop West House Zealous Achievement

5,447

Robert L. Hunter Prize

3,079

88

flourishing

SUBTOTAL ACADEMIC & SPECIAL ACHIEVEMENT PRIZES

373,821


Bryan Groff

ACTIVITY PRIZES

$

Ruth E. Brown Acta Editor’s Award

1,368

Gwyn Morris Librarian Award

1,040

Colin G. Brzezicki Prize for Thought Provoking Writing

1,250

Richard Naylor ’79 Drama Prize

1,431

H. 'Tony' Cassels Tuesday Night Trophy

1,538

Newman-Rigby Band Trophy Prizes

2,091

Hume Cronyn ’31 Trophy for Outstanding Performance

1,208

Prefect Prize

1,257 1,841

Terence Cronyn ’20 Prize for Best News Story Matthew A. Davis ’94 Memorial Prize

5,248

990

Don and Karen Rickers International Student Leadership Award

James Filby Memorial Prize

1,075

Ridley College Family Guild Junior Public Speaking Prize

905

Harry 'Red' Foster Prize for Social Service

2,095

Ridley College Family Guild Public Speaking (M.S. Jr.)

765

1,151

R.J. Rumble ’42 Trophy

936

Lt. Col. S.G. Heaman ’39 Prize

1,075

S.F.D. Sampson Memorial Rose Bowl Band Prize

990

The Captain F.A. Hollinrake ’57 Memorial Bowl

1,192

Stephen L. Souter ’81 Memorial Tech Prize

8,131

Tiger Tribune Prizes

1,096

The Mackenzie S. Fowler ’11 Trophy

A. Stoddard Jones Prize Fund

13,478

The Hon. Mr. Justice A. Courtney Kingstone (1892) Memorial Prize

11,094

Lt. Col. A.C. Iggulden Memorial Shield Lt. Col. A.C. Iggulden Trophy

UK Branch Prize for Dramatic Monologue 1,003 106

Kennedy Family Dance Spirit Trophy

1,075

Tony Kwok Memorial Public Speaking Prize

1,228

John K.H. Mason ’39 Public Speaking

1,678

SUBTOTAL ACTIVITY PRIZES

961

69,301 TIGER | WINTER 2020

89


ATHLETIC PRIZES Athena Award for Girls Rugby The Bartlett Trophy - Girls Hockey Becken-Whitty Trophy Colin G. Brezicki Girls Hockey

$ 1,093 744 1,825

2,302

J.P. Matheson Trophy

3,424

The W.C. Montgomery Award

1,239

The Mentone Cup

1,289

Browne Family Rugby Cup

1,192

Michael J. Moulden ’70 Coaches Award

1,044

Bunston Hockey Trophy

1,075

Ohio Ironman Award for Hockey

Bulldog Trophy - 1 Team Squash

693

Brian Martin Coaches Award

856

976

Old Boys Trophy - Soccer

Bulldog Trophy - U/16 Squash

976

Karen Oude-Reimerink Award - Gymnastics

Gary Burroughs ’64 Trophy - Football

398

Paton Trophy

1,150

st

2,040 990

A.J. Corolis Award

1,190

Penney Squash Trophy

1,110

The Kristine Corolis Trophy

1,035

A.C. ‘Sandy’ Peters Squash Award

1,313

Coy-Devellis Trophy Nan Cassels 1914 Steeplechase Trophy - Sr. Girls Cross Country Neil Campbell ’51 Trophy - Rowing

765 976 1,178

The Rob Poe Award

110

Peter B. Robinson ’71 Cross Country Award

1,075

Michael A. Scott Trophy

1,093

Seymour Award Fund

74,293

Barry Cromarty ’63 Trophy

905

Caroline L. Sherk ’12 Field Hockey Award - Top Defender 1,250

Ingrid Cronin Field Hockey Prize

794

David ’83 & Andrea Shemilt Trophy - 2nd Team Swimming 1,272

Captain Terence Cronyn ’20 Trophy - Novice Oarsperson 1,897

W.H. Somerville ’75 Trophy

990

Scott Daniel ’83 Trophy

H.A. Staples Trophy

106

Crossingham Field Hockey Award The William Dick Award

990 2,393 976

Carl F. Dorland Trophy

1,335

Faes Trophy for Soccer

765

Greenshields Harriers Award (Most Improved)

1,104

Henry James Taylor Trophy Fund R.P. Tidy ’38 Award

705 1,028

S.D. Vaughan Tier II Girls Hockey - MVP Award Crossingham Cup - 1 Field Hockey Rookie of the Year Trophy

955

st

469

Jill Hopkins ’92 Trophy

655

Dr. Adam Wright Memorial Prize

1,032

Michael J. Johnson ’05 Award - MVP Golf

976

The Dr. Angela M. Zuliani ’88 Memorial Trophy

1,364

The Hal Gould ’69 Football Colours Endowment

765

N.A. Ronald Award for Determination (Jr. Girls; Volleyball) 3,397

Captain Terence Cronyn ’20 Trophy - Novice Oarsperson 1,026 The Simon Hall Award Dr. Bryan A. Henry ’91 Track Prize Jose Huerta ’00 Rugby Trophy

1,446 837 1,238

Rod Jack ’80 Memorial Prize

1,126

The Kindellan Cup - Girls Rugby Trophy

1,088

Judy Lane Volleyball Trophy

1,075

P.E. Lewis Cup

1,318

C.J. Loat ’62 Award MVP U16 Soccer

990

Mann Family Trophy MVP 1st Girls Tennis

999

SUBTOTAL ATHLETIC PRIZES

TOTAL PRIZE ENDOWMENTS

90

flourishing

144,709

587,831


Bryan Groff

RESTRICTED ENDOWMENTS

$

ACADEMIC FUNDS

$

Sam Anderson ’45 Chair for History & Modern Languages Class of 1956 Academic Tie Fund Terence Cronyn ’20 Chair in English and Drama MGI-Crawford ’56 & Eve Gordon Speaker Series Endowment Fund

Frank Hollinrake ’57 Memorial Fund for Science 431,825 5,377 452,506 177,664

Curriculum on Ethics & Morals

10,765

J.M. Gould Fund - Visiting Scholars

91,077

Dr. J.R. Hamilton Chair in Mathematics and Science

15,851

Lett Family Endowment for Information Technology 1,215,308 Donald S. McMurtry ’82 Environmental Fund

205,893

Siebens Business Lecture Series Fund

109,636

Technology Endowment Fund

129,422

467,546

SUBTOTAL ACADEMIC FUNDS

3,312,870

ACTIVITY FUNDS

$

W.E.N. Bell Memorial Games Fund

105,128

The Laine Family Fund

Butterfield Global Services Fund

137,256

Nitsopoulos Athletic Fund

Carthy Centennial Cadet Fund

166,170 20,592

W. Darcy McKeough Public Speaking/ Debating Endowment Fund

12,909

Residential Life Program

Class of 2003 Fund for Arts & Athletics Class of 2004 Fund for Arts & Athletics Green Tiger Endowment Fund Peter David James Jacobs Athletic Fund

SUBTOTAL ACTIVITY FUNDS

19,123 8,285 522,315 5,989

133,241

Hugh A. Slater ’44 Athletic Endowment Fund

170,467

14,974

Ian Wood ’53 International Summer Program

117,660

Derek Zavitz ’97 Memorial Fund for Athletics

22,215

1,456,324

TIGER | WINTER 2020

91


RESTRICTED ENDOWMENTS (cont.) $ DISCRETIONARY FUNDS

$

The Headmaster’s Discretionary Fund

29,201

C.C. Hopper Operating Fund - Bursar’s Discretionary

22,424

SUBTOTAL DISCRETIONARY FUNDS

51,625

LIBRARY FUNDS

$

Anderson Book Fund

4,217

G.D. Enos Jr. ’41 Library Fund

3,140

Glassco Book Fund

20,772

SUBTOTAL LIBRARY FUNDS 28,129 FACILITY/MAINTENANCE FUNDS

$

Ron Angleman Endowment Fund

91,303

Ridley College Memorial Chapel Endowment Fund

189,051

Class of 1944 Maintenance Fund

73,436

Walker Maintenance Fund

248,348

Fitness Studio Endowment Fund

174,070

Mandeville Maintenance Fund

1,051,765

23,903

McKeough Maintenance Fund

144,483

92,649

Ridley College Memorial Chapel Endowment Fund

189,831

Mandeville Grove Endowment

4,423

Walker Maintenance Fund

249,373

Mandeville Maintenance Fund

1,047,444

McKeough Maintenance Fund

143,889

F.W. Hillock Maintenance Fund D.A. MacLachlan ’45 Memorial Auty Cricket Library/Archives Fund

SUBTOTAL FACILITY/MAINTENANCE FUNDS 2,088,516 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT FUNDS Class of 1953 Headmaster’s Fund

$ 46,837

Faculty Professional Development Fund

102,048

Neil Campbell ’51 Fund

122,374

SUBTOTAL PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT FUNDS 271,259

TOTAL RESTRICTED ENDOWMENTS 92

flourishing

7,208,723


UNRESTRICTED ENDOWMENT FUNDS

$

G.W. Gooderham Memorial Fund

308,237

Donald C. ’44 & Frances M. McFarlane Memorial Fund 212,392

H.S. Gooderham Fund

767,067

Charles A. Thompson ’28 Fund

R.S. Leach Memorial Fund J.E. McConnell ’31 and Malcolm H. McConnell ’63 Family Fund

21,298

Unrestricted Funds

92,629 575,170

637,754

TOTAL UNRESTRICTED ENDOWMENT FUNDS

2,614,547

IN TRUST FUNDS

$

Class of 2010 Graditude Fund

517

Class of 2017 Graditude Fund

52

Class of 2011 Graditude Fund

2,479

Class of 2018 Graditude Fund

37

Class of 2012 Graditude Fund

161

Class of 2019 Graditude Fund

545

Class of 2013 Graditude Fund

1,761

TOTAL IN TRUST FUNDS

5,552

GRAND TOTAL CAPITAL

30,108,178

TIGER | WINTER 2020 93


gifts by ALUMNI AS OF JUNE 30, 2019. 1930–1939 A.C. Gordon Jarvis ’39 Estate of John H. Milnes

1940–1949 Edward C. Atwater ’44 † Julian W. Atwater ’49 J. Alexander Boyd ’46 Arthur D. Charlton ’49 Michael Colston ’49 Frank W. Convery ’43 L. Robert S. deLangley ’48 James R. Digby ’45 John W. Digby ’48 Hugh C.W. Franklin ’48 David V. Geary ’45 Harry D.L. Hill ’47 Richard M. Ivey ’43 Frederick L. Moffat ’45 Hugh L. Smith ’44 A. Raymond Tooton ’47 H. Donald Williams ’48

1950–1959 George D.B. Butterfield ’57 Clemente A. Cohen ’56 David H. Cook ’55 J. Douglas Court ’53 † William H. Cowen ’54 William A.B. Davis ’55 J. Edward T. Dillane ’55 G. Leiter Doolittle ’53 William E. Duffield ’50 Estate of Donald H. Lie ’52 Estate of John M. Lind ’54 Daniel A. Evans ’55 J. Dale Falkenhagen ’58 David C. Finlay ’59 Douglas L. Hay ’52 Douglas A. Hughes ’56 Richard A. Hutchison ’53 † Anthony B. Jerauld ’59 Anthony L. Kemp ’56 Robert C. Kinnear ’59 Robert W. Korthals ’50 Kenneth J. Lampman ’54 Douglas R. Leggat ’54 Robert F. Lee ’58 Michael C.H. Locke ’56 Robert O. Matthews ’56 Wilmot L. Matthews ’54 J. Gordon Maw ’54 David R. McBride ’51 W. Darcy McKeough ’51 C. Paul Montgomery ’54 Kenneth P. Powell ’58 Gordon D. Rice ’54 Edwin R. Shepherd ’54 Robert D. Sheppard ’53 Robert L. Sillcox ’50 94

flourishing

J. Christopher Snyder ’59 Jeremy F. Sturgeon ’58 Matthew A. Terborg ’53 Norris W. Walker ’52 Ernest L. Wilson ’57 James K. Wood ’57

1960–1969 Anonymous John R. Anderson ’65 David M. Baer ’68 Brian W. Barr ’61 James H. Belton ’60 Thomas G. Belton ’61 David C. Bewley ’61 Henry M. 'Mac' Borden ’64 Donald E. Bradford ’67 James H. Burrows ’62 Michael R. Carson ’64 Christopher Carter ’68 Peter T. Christensen ’61 Chris Collingwood ’66 Richard A. Coy ’60 Gord H. Durnan ’64 J. Michael Durnan ’61 Anthony C. Dyson ’68 John H. Fisher ’61 Ian Gibson ’63 Gordon Glass ’66 D. Harold W. Gould ’69 Archie N. Grace ’66 Timothy K. Griffin ’68 Jay B. Hansen ’68 Paul A. Head ’68 Robert C. Howard ’63 Brian A. Iggulden ’67 Richard W. Ivey ’68 Daniel O. Jarvis ’68 Russell E. Jones ’61 William N. Kinnear ’63 Steven D. Latner ’69 Christopher J. Loat ’62 Ronald N. Mannix ’66 Leighton W. McCarthy ’62 Donald G. McLean ’63 Bruce H. Mitchell ’64 David R. Morgan ’65 David L. Muir ’61 Paul J. Muller ’63 Douglas C. Nadherny-Borutin ’69 M. Moore Newell ’68 Frederick M. Partington ’67 Andrew Paton ’64 Christopher W. Paton ’65 John M. Proctor ’68 Terence H. Rapsey ’66 Howard Reichart ’64 Ian B. Reid ’63 George C. Reifel ’69 Michael A. Rice ’61 Timothy H. Rigby ’60 John H. Sandham ’66

James E. Savory ’66 Marshall I. Soules ’67 Michael R. Spurling ’60 Richard D. Spurling ’65 Campbell N. Stewart ’68 John O. Stubbs ’62 Timothy N. Taylor ’68 Donald A. Thompson ’62 F. Gregory Thompson ’68 Donald A.B. Turner ’61 Allan J. Tyson ’65 Ian K. Upjohn ’69 Jonathan C. Vick ’61 Robert B. Waind ’63 D. Stephen Walker ’61 Robert A. Walker ’61 David G. Whiting ’61 D. Michael Whittle ’64 David S. Willmot ’68 Harold A. Wilson ’67 David P. Worts ’66 Colin E. Wykes ’60

1970–1979 Michael D. Baker ’78 R. Scott Barron ’75 Peter R. Bennett ’72 G.A. 'Sandy' Boa ’74 R. Geoffrey Browne ’72 Thomas G. Brownlee ’77 J. David Bunston ’76 John M. Burnes ’74 James B. Butterfield ’70 Bruce L. Carrow ’74 A. Frank Cecchini ’74 Christopher J.D. Chappell ’74 Kelvin S. Chen ’70 Peter B. Coffin ’78 James G. Daly ’72 Michel G. Debiche ’79 Ian A. Dunbar ’78 Robert D. Evans ’77 Thomson D. Fischer ’77 William A. Folland ’73 Derek D. Fraser ’79 Ian M. Fraser ’72 James E. Gibson ’75 Andrew J. Goodman ’76 J.D. Jay Gould ’73 Timothy M. Gould ’74 David S. Grant ’72 James D. Greenshields ’76 Thomas H. Greenwood ’73 Michael S. Hazell ’73 Richard C. Hazell ’74 George C. Hendrie ’74 Robert S.L. Ho ’77 C. Leigh Hogg ’71 J. Anthony D. Hooper ’72 John M. Hopmans ’77 James R. Howie ’71 Douglas E. Hunt ’70

Philip S.W. Hunt ’76 William T. Hutton ’76 Paul G. Iggulden ’72 David S. Irwin ’71 Peter M. Irwin ’74 William B. Irwin ’72 William L.C. Jackson ’77 David A. Jarvis ’70 E. James Kingstone ’75 Martin C.Y. Lam ’76 Geoffrey W. Lind ’71 Philip A. Macdonald ’79 Robert B. Macdonald ’79 William H. Mayor Jr. ’73 Gordon R. McBride ’74 Ian R. McClelland ’70 David A. McElheny ’73 David C. McFarlane ’71 Donald S. McFarlane ’76 † John L.B. Milne ’71 Michael J. Moulden ’70 Donald W. Naylor Jr. ’75 Gordon A. Naylor ’73 Richard D. Naylor ’79 Gregory G. O’Hara ’71 Robert J. Orr ’74 Ross 'Buck' Orr ’76 Timothy S. Pfohl ’76 Amanda J. Preece ’79 Anthony W. Pylypuk ’71 William L. Redelmeier ’71 Craig Rice ’75 Robert J.B. Rumble ’75 Ward H.M. Seymour ’74 David W. Sharpe ’76 Grant R. Skelly ’78 William H. Somerville ’75 Robert W. Sterne ’73 John W. Stevens ’74 R. Michael H. Stevens ’77 Thomas A. Stevens ’79 William G. Stewart ’75 Robert S. Stratton ’71 Paul W. Szczucinski ’72 Robert M. Thom ’74 Andrew Tymoszewicz ’76 William H. Verity ’71 James S. Vick ’70 James D.D. Walker ’77 William O. Wallace ’77 Luke A. Weinstein ’72 Harold G. Wilson ’77 J.W. Timothy Witzel ’76 John A. Wright ’73 George R.H. Wyatt ’73 J. Christopher Young ’78

1980–1989 Ian M. Anderson ‘81 David H. Anderson ‘88 Katherine A. (Burpee) Anderson ’88 Leighan S. (Leggat) Basadur ’83


† denotes deceased

Graham M. Beck ’80 Jeffrey R.C. Bell ’88 Anu Bhalla ’86 Georgina H. Black ’85 Richard M. Bojankiewicz ’80 K. Norman Bradshaw ’89 Thomas W. Bright ’81 Deborah J. (Stevens) Bryant ’89 Michael L. Bryden ’80 Marko R. Bukovec ’85 Noeline L. Burk ’85 Gregory A. Carlyle ’85 John K.S. Cleary ’84 William S. Cleary ’81 Timothy J. Coffin ’81 Christopher D. Cooke ’88 Michael C. Court ’82 Philip D. Court ’85 Suzanne W. Court ’86 Miye K. (Kadonaga) Cox ’85 Tricia L. Crawford ’86 Andrea J. Dan-Hytman ’85 Stephen A. DeKuyper ’87 James M. Dunwoody ’84 Ian K. Duquemin ’82 Kirsten Eastwood ’82 Hugh D. Evans ’87 Sarah E. Eyton ’86 Paul Filion ’86 Sean P. Gallaway ’87 Alexander C.O. Hansen ’87 Joanne (Carley) Haydon ’85 Lyle B. Himebaugh ’82 David A. Hunt ’88 Stephen E. Hunt ’82 Brian A. Hutchings ’84 Charlene J. (Ebert) Hutton ’83 Robert A.F. Ingall ’85 Peter Kaal ’88 A. Dean Karachi ’87 Nina Karachi-Khaled ’85 Grant Kedwell ’86 Eleanor (Cowen) Kling ’89 Johannes Kling ’89 Ellen E. Kolbert-Cornelissen ’84 Newell P. Kraik ’81 C. Michael Kray ’88 Noel B. Langhorne ’87 Malcolm I. Macdonald ’83 Douglas M. MacKenzie ’82 Thomas P. Marian ’81 Robert B. Mason ’82 Duncan M. McGregor ’84 Donald S. McMurtry ’82 Anne M. Mitchell ’85 Wendy A. (Walker) Mitchell ’85 Michael A. Moore ’81 F. Kelly Neill ’81 James C. O’Brien ’81 Wendy D. O’Brien ’88 Yanick Pagé ’84 Joey D. Palov ’88 Geoffrey R. Park ’80

G. Scott Paterson ’82 Tracy L. Patterson ’82 James C. Rogers ’81 Lisanne S. Rogers ’85 Sandra Schlieman ’81 W. Carter Siebens ’82 Robert E. Silk ’83 Jenifer J. Smith ’88 Gregory B. Souter ’85 James R. Swayze ’82 Petra Kern-Swayze ’83 Thomas N. Urban ’84 William G. Urban ’86 Peter C. Ventin ’89 Sandra M. (Bourk) Ventin ’89 Dennis J. 'DJ' Williams ’88 Robert M. Wilson ’81 Kai-Yen Wong ’88

1990–1999 Marc A. Beaudry ’96 Jennifer L. Birmingham ’93 Susan C. (MacDonnell) Calder ’92 Jeffrey W. Campbell ’92 Patrick Canning ’96 Thomas P. Clarkson ’99 Wendy E. (Crossingham) Darby ’99 John W.D. Dill ’95 Christopher C. Drake ’97 Faye E. Gagné ’97 Esther S. (Copland) Hagerman ’96 Elizabeth A. (Coote) Hardy ’92 Rupert C. Hardy ’90 Lara E. Housez ’98 John P. Hynes ’96 Richard W.R. Kennedy ’99 Steven L. Laine ’94 Victoria A. Laine ’97 Yolanda H. Lewczuk ’91 H. Jane Lewis ’90 Jessica R. (Locke) Lindsay ’95 Alison A.C. Loat ’94 Christopher J.E. Loat ’97 Imran H. Malik ’98 Mark A. McGaw ’97 Karen C. McGlone ’95 Shawn A. Naylor ’97 Stephanie L. Perry ’93 Matthew J. Picken ’93 Miranda D. (Ionson) Rand ’95 Matthew P.W. Rogers ’99 Bryan J. Rose ’96 Derek M. Surka ’90 Heather J. (Rigby) Thomas ’95 Christine M. Wellenreiter ’90 Paul A. Wylie ’98

2000–2019 Hadil A. Abdalla ’19 Muhammad Abdullah ’19 Justine A. Adesina ’19

Anjolaibukun J. Adeyemi ’19 Maria M. Ajukwu ’19 Afam D. Akaraiwe ’19 Jordan R. Allan ’19 Ayooluwasubomi K. Aluko ’19 Oluwalanoayo T. Aluko ’19 Asmatullah Azizi Arab ’19 Michael E. Ashworth Cochrane ’19 Jean E. (Hendrie) Ault ’05 Braulio R. Bastida Manjarrez ’19 Jaden A. Bediako ’18 Sophie X.Q.F. Blaikie-Sloan ’19 Maxime R. Blanchard ’19 Tessa L. Boudreau ’08 Efe S. Bozdag ’19 Eve Bradley ’19 Alyssa Bryan ’19 Austin M. Bukovec ’14 Nina D.O. Bukovec ’17 Bradley C. Burgess ’11 Destiny S.A. Campbell Burrowes ’19 Cameryn Cappellazzo ’19 Nicole Cappellazzo ’19 Claire J.R. Casey ’19 Raylon W.L. Chan ’19 Keddy A. Chandran ’03 Kejia Chen ’19 Connor Childerhose ’19 Chak Lam Choi ’19 Evan R.V. Clarke ’05 Alexandra V. Cook ’19 Andrew J. Cook ’19 Ronan T. Cordeaux ’19 Laura E. Court ’14 Sarah J. Court ’19 Savannah J. Cowherd ’11 Rhiannon Davies ’01 Guilherme de Cavalcante Martins ’19 Christopher M.W. de Haydu ’02 Keming Dong ’19 Yiwen Dou ’19 Chidilim C.T. Ejeh ’19 Daniel G. Ephrat ’19 Anisa V. Estrada Karachi ’19 Christian J. Ferrante ’19 Marcos Flegmann ’08 Mackenzie S. Fowler ’11 Seaver S. Call ’07 Britt R. (Franklin) Call ’08 Juan Carlos Funtanet Fernandez ’19 William J. Generous ’09 Cosimo Gherardini ’19 Lena M. Gill ’19 Sarah E. Greenwood ’11 Chongyuan Guo ’19 Vida J. Han ’19 Kevin J. Hawkes ’19 Alula Y. Hilawe ’19 Cheuk Yin (Jenny) J. Ho ’19 Aaron G. Horvath ’19 Colt Iggulden ’03 Michael B. Iggulden ’01 Adebimpe A. Ireyomi ’19

Teagan K. Iwanowich ’19 Eugenio Jimenez Dominguez ’19 Dayne P.A. Johnson ’14 Tomisin O. Johnson ’19 Evan P. Johnston ’19 Chidera Jude-Monye ’19 Matthew G.S. Keeley ’19 Luke M. Kelshall ’19 Vincent L. Kenn de Balinthazy ’19 Jaden Kidd ’19 Arika Kotoda ’19 Mirabelle A. Kuku ’19 Lydia P.Y. Lam ’19 Tyler H. Larocque ’19 Lily Lee ’19 Kensley J. Leung ’19 Marcie A. Lewis ’03 Alexandra M. Little ’03 Ya Luo ’19 Youchen Luo ’19 Jacob V. Lutwyche ’19 Chang Ma ’19 William J. MacMillan ’05 Ira T. Madill ’19 Mark F. Magavern ’05 Benjamin U.J. Mandigo ’19 Rodney M. Mbaguta ’19 Sara Monica N. Mbega Botoho ’19 Chloe C. McAlpine ’19 Mark Merzon ’19 Georgia R.M. Mitchell ’08 Jordan Mitchell ’19 Ridley A. Mohammed ’19 Edynn T.M. Murphy ’19 Georgie A. Murphy ’19 Lorenzo Nani ’19 Elana T. Nicholls ’06 Isabella G. Nitsopoulos ’19 Erin F. O’Rourke ’11 Oluebube R. Okafor ’19 Godwin C. Ossi ’19 Olivia P. Park ’11 Paige A. Peterkin ’19 Jack E.A. Petrunick ’19 Justin J. Pintwala ’03 Alessandro Pisa Paulon ’19 Gleb Poliakov ’19 Christian Potolicchio ’14 Bronwen E.K. Prince ’19 Kevan S. Quinn ’04 William L. Reich Jr. ’19 Christopher J. Robinson ’11 Alexander L. Root ’19 Laura T. Rosic ’19 Salomon Rubio Sanchez ’19 Colin D. Ruzylo ’02 Jose Rafael Saenz Arelle ’03 James M. Shaw ’19 Edward Z. Shen ’19 Haotian Sheng ’19 Adia M. Sisson ’19 Bartholomew J. Skala ’19 Jared D. Sloan ’19 TIGER | WINTER 2020

95


Michelle Scrivener

96

gifts by ALUMNI (cont.)

gifts by COMPANIES OR SUPPLIERS

Courtney M. Smith ’06 Shailynn R. Snow ’19 Cole D. Spencer ’19 P. Cosmo Steier ’14 Gordon M.H. Sze ’02 Sofia N. Tchamova ’19 Kyoko C.H. Telfer ’19 Marlize Van Sittert ’19 Luiza Vlasenko-Mischenko ’19 Antonius B.J. von Schlabrendorff ’11 Arnav Wadhawan ’19 Rahul Walia ’19 Madeleine V. Wanklyn ’19 Cameron J.D. Warren ’19 Janneke J.L. Watt ’19 Christopher D. Weld ’03 Mackenzie L. Wiens ’14 Alexander M. Wilson ’00 George T. Witzel ’11 Horace K.H. Wong ’19 Brennan J. Wood ’01 Meihui Yang ’19 Shuoyuan Yang ’19 Qingnan Yao ’19 Dahlgren Yu ’09 Isabelle E. Zarazua ’19 Chenxiao Zhang ’19 Guorui Zhang ’19 Jiamu Zhang ’19 Tianchen Zhang ’19 Xiaozhuang Zhu ’19 Elliott Ziolkowski ’16 Isabella G. Ziolkowski ’19

A-1 Flooring Canada Alpha Textbooks Inc. Aquarius Salon Ask Re Inc. Beatties Basics Office Products Beutel, Goodman & Company Ltd. Brand Blvd Breckinridge Capital Advisors, Inc. Brian Cullen Motors Limited Butterfield Family Foundation Canadian Tire Canadian Tire Retail Store - Louth Street Canso Investment Counsel CDC Berkeley Chrome Deposit Corporation Inc. Citrus Inc. Clean Works Inc. Clifton Blake Bridge Fund IV LP Compass Group Canada Adrian & Mary Coote Family Trust Corvus Gold Inc. Country Basket Garden Centre Court Holdings Limited Courtyard by Marriott CPG Executive Search Credit Bureau Services Canada Culligan Niagara Water Technologies Inc. Daniel & Partners LLP Devries Landscaping & Maintenance Inc. Ellison Travel & Tours Ltd. ESN Electrical Solutions Niagara Inc. Fiera Capital Corporation Foundry Mortgage Capital

flourishing

Foyston, Gordon & Payne Inc. Franklin Templeton Investments Corp. Front Row Sports Excellence Gales Gas Bars Limited Game on Stream Inc. GB Environmental Services (Niagara) Inc. Goodwill Industries Niagara Guardian Capital Inc. Hall Ironworks Inc. Heart of Niagara Hotels Hub International Ontario Limited Intelligo Ivest Properties Ltd. J.A. Macdonald London Ltd. JDI Cleaning Systems Jeffrey Robinson Construction Inc. Kaupp Electric Ltd Manulife Financial Maserati/ Alfa Romeo Of London Milestone Millwork Moyer’s Apple Products Inc. National Steel Car Ltd. Nelson Education Ltd. Newton Financial Ltd. Niagara 21st Group Inc. Niagara Airbus Inc. Niagara North AAA Zone Hockey Association Niagara Piston Inc. Niagara Protective Coatings PEC Roof Maintenance Perspectives Eduscho Ltd P.I. Incentives Limited Power Pause Inc.


PLANNED gifts AS OF JUNE 30, 2019. INCLUDING BEQUESTS TO RIDLEY COLLEGE, THE RIDLEY COLLEGE FOUNDATION, AND THE RIDLEY COLLEGE FUND USA, INC.

† denotes deceased

Promotions Plus Niagara Propack Processing & Packaging Systems Inc. Revel Realty Inc. Brokerage Ridley College Family Guild Ridley College Foundation Ridley College Fund USA, Inc. Roll Technology West Royal LePage State Realty RP Investment Advisors (RPIA) Spiritwear Promotions Stolk Construction Ltd. Subaru Of Niagara T. Johns Consulting Group Ltd. The Mad River Golf Club The MBTW Group Two Sisters Vineyards Corp. Union Bus Terminal Van Am Mechanical Ltd. Vancouver Foundation Vineland Manufacturing Ltd. Webley Construction Ltd.

Peter R. Bennett ’72 Georgina H. Black ’85 Henry M. Borden ’64 Richard A. † & Mary Bradley John N. Bragg ’39 † Marko R. Bukovec ’85 Donald M. ’72 & Margaret Burton John C. Cairns ’42 Robert E. Campbell ’55 Hilary D. Caters ’89 Arthur D. Charlton ’49 R. Gordon Chaplin ’61 John ’51 † & Sandra Cleave Harry J. Daniel † G. Leiter & Ricky Doolittle ’53 Carl F. † & Eleanor Dorland Bruce W. & Karen Etherington Denis R. † & Janet Evans Jane Feagan Ian M. Fraser ’72 Crawford ’56 † & Eve Gordon Timothy K. Griffin ’68 Richard C. Hazell ’74 George C. Hendrie ’74 Stephen N. Hooper ’49 † William T. Hutton ’76 Brian A. ’67 & Rosemary Iggulden Richard M. Ivey ’43 Jeffrey K. Jakobsen ’91 Frederick N.C. Jerauld III ’53 Joan H. Larkin ’76 † Elizabeth Larmond-Elliot Donald H. Lie ’52 † John M. Lind ’54 † Brian H. Love ’71 William Marler ’66 James A. McCabe ’94 W. Darcy ’51 & Joyce McKeough

John H. Milnes ’31 † Bruce H. Mitchell ’64 Paul Montgomery ’54 Christa L. Moulden ’98 Michael J. ’70 & Karen Moulden Shawn A. Moulden ’01 Donald W. Naylor † Robert J. Pyne ’76 Joan R. Randall Timothy G. T. Reid ’78 Michael A. Rice ’61 Joseph C. † & Anita E. † Robertson D.S. ‘Bill’ Rudd ’47 John C. Rudd ’80 John Sandham ’66 James H.H. Scandrett ’39 † Terence P. Scandrett ’61 William H. ’58 & Carole Sears Geoffrey M. Seymour ’69 † Jon D.B. Silver Hugh A. Slater ’44 † Joan Stevens William H. Verity ’71 A. Ross Webster ’60 Andrew Whiteley D. Michael ’64 & Eillen Whittle David S. Willmot ’68 F. Ian & Barbara Wood ’53 George R.H. Wyatt ’73 Adam H. Zimmerman ’44 †

Michelle Scrivener

TIGER | WINTER 2020

97


Michelle Scrivener

gifts by CURRENT AND FORMER FACULTY AND STAFF Brian Amyote Justin N. Baird Kimberly A. Becken Christine E. Boyko Catherine G. Burke Julie A. Cameron Andrea K. Carisse Linda Chang Rhonda Corris-Collee Ruth E. Court Heather Cousins Richard A. ’60 & Woody Coy David & Wendy (Crossingham ) ’99 Darby D. Clyde Dawson Clifton Dean Paul S. DeVellis Mary DiFranco Peter Doyle Paul ’86 & Bobbie Filion Mackenzie S. Fowler ’11 Derek D. Fraser ’79 W. Wayne Fraser & Eleanor I. Johnston Simon J. Hall Jay B. Hansen ’68 Michael S. Hazell ’73 Susan E. Hazell Angie Hicks Stephen E. Hunt ’82 Kenneth & Charlene (Ebert) ’83 Hutton Brian A. ’67 & Rosemary Iggulden Stacey Iggulden

Zachary R. Jones Vinitha Kahandaliyanage J. Edward & Hanna Kidd E. James Kingstone ’75 Anne E. Kubu Peggy J. Lampard Andrew D. Leach Margaret E. Lech Nina L. Lee Janet M. Lewis Marcie A. Lewis ’03 Kory Lippert Alexandra M. Little ’03 Christopher J. ’62 & Patricia Loat Robert B. Lockey Brenda Lockhart Christina Loewen Alexandra Lucenti Allison M. Lukac Xiaohong Sylvie Luo Lachlan D. Macintosh Michael M. Maki & Nicole M. Seguin R. Gerardo Martinez Scott McLean Andrew & Erin McNiven James B. Milligan Kirk W. Mitchell & Kathy E. Anderson Michael J. Moulden ’70 F. Kelly Neill ’81 Paul O’Rourke Kristy Onclin

Karen P. Oude-Reimerink Barbara V. Papp Geoffrey R. ’80 & Stephanie Park James & Valerie Parke R. Brent Pfab Marilyn G. Prociuk Michael A. Rice ’61 Jennifer Roberge Nicholas A. Ronald Lara A. Rootes Bryan J. Rose ’96 Jessica Roud Lori Schultz Rachael A. Scott Courtney M. Smith ’06 Annick C. Stark Teresa Stevens Suzanne Tisi Sarah Thompson Angela Urqhart-Osborne Jessica Doyle Virginia R. Vickers Blake Walker Andrew Whiteley David C. & Sarah C. Whitty Eugenie Wiley

† denotes deceased 98

flourishing


gifts by CURRENT AND PAST PARENTS, GRANDPARENTS & FRIENDS Omar Alajaji & Shams Barazi Larry & Patty Allen Brian & Tanya Amyote David ’88 & Katherine (Burpee) ’88 Anderson John R. Anderson ’65 Muhammad & Najam Ayub Arthur & Barbara Bailey Bob & Leighan (Leggat) ’83 Basadur Brian W. Barr ’61 Patricia Bauer Howard & Mary Bell Gilles Bellefleur James & Elizabeth Bennett Peter R. ’72 & Heather Bennett Kelly Blair Pamela Blair Sean & Joan Booth Larry & Joan Bourk James & Cynthia Bridge Donald & Roberta Brien Joan M. Brook Frederick & Priscilla Brooks-Hill Charles Brown & Filomena Stabile William R. Brunt Brent Brydon & Nelda Farrington Marko R. Bukovec ’85 Lawrence & Veronica Buganto Catherine G. Burke Michael Burr & Kelley Boettcher Xiang Cao & Xiaoyan Liu Richard & Toby Cavers Brian & Freedom Chan Steve & Heather Charlton Anna Chen Ning Qi & Cong Chen Changsoon Choi & Minjie Ryu Peter Chu & Asa Gustafsson Cameron Clayton & Linda Chang Angela C. Cluett Janet Cluett Brian Collins & Amanda Demers Timothy ’81 & Amy Coffin Charles & Aimee Cook Ted & Betty Cook Grant Cottrelle Douglas ’53 † & Nancy Court Michael C. Court ’82 Philip D. Court ’85 & Karen Murray Ruth E. Court Suzanne W. Court ’86 William H. Cowen ’54 Richard A. ’60 & Woody Coy Cathie Crawford Browning Norma Y. Croxon Larry Culver ’66 & Eva Riis-Culver Michael Cvetanovic Cort M. Day L. Robert S. deLangley ’48 Katherine E. Dembroski Alexander & Kara Digenis Wilson & Nellie Dow

John Duffy Ian ’78 & Laura Dunbar Madeleine Duquemin Chris Dyck & Nicole Reid John L. Easson Erwin & Natascha Edelmann Ingrid Efstathiou Patti Ensor Leigh Ann Epperson Bruce & Karen Etherington Janet Evans Robert ’77 & Nancy Evans Zhentong Fan & Hongyan Wang Joseph & Cathy Ferrante Paul ’86 & Bobbie Filion John Firstbrook Paul Fleury George Fowlie James & Ruth Fraser Barbara Fraser W. Wayne Fraser & Eleanor I. Johnston Chunziang Gao & Hui Xu Dejun Gao & Song Ye Jun Gao & Hong Yu Niu Shunjun Gao & Chunhong Zhou Elliot Gardiner Doris Gauthier John and Kim Gibson Dave & Lesley Giles Randolph & Tina Gillen Geoffrey & Elspeth Goad D. Harold ’69 & Kim Gould Jay ’73 & Janet Gould Steven Graff & Jennifer Strasberg Timothy ’68 & Darka Griffin Sally Gunderson Chaoyang Guo & Jiangyue Ding Simon J. & Susan Hall Daphne Hamlin Gregory & Jo Hanna Corinne Hansen † Daniel Hardie & Barbara Jewell Sandra E. Hartman William & Joanne (Carley) Haydon ’85 Richard ’74 & Cindy Hazell George C. ’74 & Janet Hendrie Ningyi He & Wei Hu Victoria Hend Timothy & Judy Higgin Thomas & Stacy Hildreth Lyle ’82 & Kelly Ann Himebaugh Diana S. Hindess Leigh ’71 & Dinah Hogg Iain & Susan Howieson Xiao Huang & Hong Zhang Terry & Melissa Hutton Kenneth & Charlene (Ebert) Hutton ’83 Brian A. ’67 & Rosemary Iggulden Paul G. Iggulden ’72 Edward & Margaret Huycke Richard M. Ivey ’43 Charlotte Janssen

Yufeng Jiang & Ying Li Andres Johnson & Lisa Marie Elovie Fex Paul & Lynn Johnston Chris & Vinitha Kahandaliyanage Yun Kang Dean Karachi ’87 Nimet Karachi Cydney J. Kaster Jamie ’90 & Erin Katzman Peter R. Kedwell Andre & Stephanie Kelshall John & Samantha Kenny J. Edward & Hanna Kidd Margaret Kingstone Edwin & Marian Klimek Johannes Kling ’89 & Eleanor (Cowen) Kling ’89 Vahan Kololian Robert Korthals & Janet Charlton Adam Kronick Ignacio Kume & Naomi Kiyota Lavender Lai Martin Lam ’76 & May Sam Peter & Viola Lam Peggy J. Lampard G. Edward Langdon Andrew Leach & Nicky Adamou-Leach Douglas ’54 & Maryella Leggat Bonnie Lesser Janet M. Lewis Zhaoying Li & Ying Jin Ge Li & Yang Xie Geoffrey ’71 & Jane Lind Yongdong Liu & Yaling Xiong Christopher ’62 & Patricia Loat Peter & Sandra Lochead Fabien Loranger & Diane Martin Jamie Lougheed Allison M. Lukac Feng Luo & Hongmei Liu Qun Luo & Qun Li Xiaohong Sylvie Luo Thomas Lynam & Kimberly Becken Stephen MacCulloch Philip ’79 & Robin Macdonald Robert Macdonald ’79 & Heather Morris Sandra Macdonald Paige Maclean James & Jill MacPhail Michael Maki & Nicole Seguin Shelia A. Marks Elizabeth Mason Steven & Margy Massis Dragan & Lisa Matovic Edward Matwichuk David ’51 & Jennifer McBride David ’71 & Susan McFarlane Donald ’76 † & Marie McFarlane Megan McKee Del McLennan & Jackie Lautens W. Darcy ’51 & Joyce McKeough Patrick & Marleen McMaster

TIGER | WINTER 2020

99


Michelle Scrivener

gifts by CURRENT AND PAST PARENTS, GRANDPARENTS & FRIENDS (cont.) William Mengebier Don Miller & Susan Clarke Philip Miller James & Ann Milligan Bruce H. Mitchell ’64 Kirk Mitchell & Kathy Anderson Frederick ’45 & Molly Moffat Jude Monye Edward Morabito & F. Kelly Neill ’81 Natalie Morgan Allan Morison John & Les Anne Morrison Michael J. ’70 & Karen Moulden Andrea Murray David & Anna Murray Stewart & Christine Murray David Napp & Ivette Felix Romero John & Brenda Newell Christopher Nitsopoulos James ’81 & Chantal O’Brien Paul & Kim O’Rourke Obeahon A. Ohiwerei Chukwuma & Folashade Okafo Babatunde & Olaide Orangun Ross 'Buck' ’76 & Marilyn Orr Ebru & Naci Tamer Ozerden Alan Palmer Geoffrey ’80 & Stephanie Park George & Gillian Park Wayne & Diane Patten Fei Peng & Hui Liu Walter Peracchia & Diana Continenza Ralitza Perduhova & Ivo Petroff Ilemilu & Francis Peters John F. Philip Abdul & Nicole Pirani Robert & Patricia Poe Elizabeth Poulin

100

flourishing

Mark W. Poynton William Prestia & Laura Menechella Sarah J. Priebe Dean Pushka & Caryn Paupst Ning Qi & Cong Chen Marcelo Rivero Quintanilla ’91 & Amelia Arrache Castillo Jun Qiu & Fang Wang Mohammed Radwan & Omnia Sherif Brad Ralph & Charmaine Bellefleur Donna Ralph Terence ’66 & Denyse Rapsey Xihao Rao & Jian Guo Michael ’61 & Margaret Rice Timothy ’60 & Gini Rigby Malcolm & Angela Roantree Jennifer Robertson Brigitte Robinson Donna B. Rogers John & Lara Rootes Lawrence & Suzanne Ross Daniel & Jessica Roud Simo Rudan & Liliana Cardenas Douglas & Claire Russell Troy & Jenn Russell Christopher & Michelle Sambrano Sandra Savo Jan Seaborn David Searle & Lorrie Shellnutt Salvador Leobardo Moreno Segura Ward ’74 & Lori Seymour Bin Shao & Hui Sun Fuyong Sheng & Fengxia Pu Laura Silk Helen Sinclair Kevin & Meshanthi Sloan Brian & Hazel-Ann Smith Jenifer J. Smith ’88

E. Anne Snowden Ralf Sodian & Jenny Lohr-Sodian William ’75 & Bronwen Somerville Binchuan Song Alfred & Brenda Spearing Cora Sperry Brendan & Olga Staples Donald Steele Patrick Steier & Maria Menechella Margaret Stephenson Robert ’73 & Sandra Sterne Teresa Stevens Yvette Stewart Robert ’71 & Martha Stratton Francis Sun & Tieying Shi Yongqiang Sun & Lifen He Adeline E. Swabey Jo Ann Sweeney Xiaohua Tang & Stella Yu James M. Tarbutt Clifford Tattersall Henry J.G. Taylor Jerome & Nancy Taylor Timothy ’68 & Kathy Taylor William & Dian Taylor David Telfer & Atsuko Hashimoto Colin Thatcher Ward Thomas & Lisa Guyer Jun Tian William & Ruth Todd Jay ’96 & Donna Tredway Jeannine Turgeon Axel & Hannah Ulrich Peter J. Van Schaik Ryan & Nicoletta Serravalle Lambert & Louiza Van Sittert Kevin & Angela Sweitzer Mark & Mary Vanderveen


OUR

alumni

11,516 LIVING ALUMNI

6,610*

ACTIVE ALUMNI Julio Vazquez Ventura & Yolanda Gloria Medina William ’71 & Katie Verity Scott & Alissa Vernon Lorenzo & Lori Vigna Srdjan & Darija Vujosevic D. Stephen Walker ’61 Margaret R. Walker Norris W. Walker ’52 Joachim Walther & Karin Holland William ’77 & Valerie Wallace Yehua Wang & Guangwen Zhai Yingchun Wang & Dongmei Qiu Shirley Ward William Watson & Georgina Black ’85 Dennis Webb & Helen Bryk-Webb Andrew & Annette Whiteley David C. Whitty David ’68 & Susan Willmot George & Janet Wilson Jim Winterbottom & Sarah Thompson J.W. Timothy ’76 & Lauri Witzel Kin Tong Wong & Kin Hoi Clara Lee Marcy Wydman Xiaofeng Xu & Jihui Su Chao Yang & Rong Zhao Mu Yang & Fei Su Zhiming Yang & Xianmei Zhou Bai Li Ye & Wei Jun Sun Yoshikazu & Patricia Yonemushi J. Christopher ’78 & Donez Young Minjian & Ning Zhang Thomas & Tiffany Zhou James & Beverly Zinck Michael & Rosa Ziolkowski Shilong Zu & Wei Zhao

2,111

4,499

WOMEN

4,085

CANADIANS

MEN

1,371

INTERNATIONAL

767

AMERICANS

114

582

406

269

UNITED KINGDOM

CARIBBEAN

ASIA

EUROPE

*Alumni for whom we have valid contact information TIGER | WINTER 2020

101


CUMULATIVE GIVING* AS OF JUNE 30, 2019 TO RIDLEY COLLEGE, THE RIDLEY COLLEGE FOUNDATION AND THE RIDLEY COLLEGE FUND USA, INC. * electronic records maintained by the Development Office beginning in 1986.

DIAMOND $1,000,000+ Samuel I.A. Anderson ’45 † Frederick K. Ashbaugh † Christopher Carter ’68 Clarence J. Chandran Patrick F. Lett ’67 † Hubert T. Mandeville ’40 † Frederick P. Mannix ’60 The R. Samuel McLaughlin Foundation Bruce H. Mitchell ’64 G. Scott Paterson ‘82 Ridley College Family Guild Ridley College Foundation Ridley College Fund USA, Inc. Stewart D. Siebens ’64 In honour of John M. Stevens ’42 † & Robert W. Stevens ’44 † R. Michael H. Stevens ‘77 Norris W. Walker ’52

PLATINUM $250,000–$999,999 Anonymous Chartwells Peter B. Coffin ’78 J. Douglas ’53 † & Nancy Court John B. Cronyn ’39 † Dorothy & Ridley Doolittle † John C. Drake ’65 Estate of André Buller ’54 Estate of Marjory E.J. Cain Estate of Donald Lie ’52 Estate of John Lind ’54 Estate of Joseph † & Anita Robertson † Robert D. Evans ’77 Peter S. Gooderham ’44 † H. Stephen Gooderham ’41 † S. MacDonald 'Mac' ’46 † & Ellie Irwin † Richard M. Ivey ’43 E.W. Mandeville Jr. ’38 † Ronald N. Mannix ’66 Leighton W. McCarthy ’62 James E. McConnell ’31 † Gilbert E. McElheny † W. Darcy McKeough ’51 Donald S. McMurtry ’82 Michael & Kelly Meighen John H. Milnes ’31 † John B. Mitchell ’71 Yanick Pagé ’84 Ridley Graduate Boat Club William H. Sears ’58 Hugh A. Slater ’44 † John W. Stevens ’74 James G. Thompson ’44 Robert † & Joan Utting

102

flourishing

John G. Walker ’58 † Luke A. Weinstein ’72

GOLD $100,000–$250,000 B. Wallace Anderson ’49 Anonymous Brian W. Barr ’61 Real & Anne Bergevin Burgoyne Holdings Inc. Henry B. Burgoyne ’67 † George D.B. Butterfield ’57 James B. Butterfield ’70 Centrinity R. Gordon Chaplin ’61 Philip D. Court ’85 G. Mark Curry ’62 Harry J. Daniel † André & France Desmarais David A. Dodge ’61 Estate of J. Ronald Angleman Estate of Alexander J. Carley ’53 Estate of Dorothy M. Cooke Estate of Joan H. Larkin ’76 Estate of Graham M. MacLachlan ’33 Bruce & Karen Etherington Denis † & Janet Evans J.D. Peter Franks ’42 † Crawford Gordon ’56 † D. Harold W. Gould ’69 Bryan & Angela Gransden James D. Greenshields ’76 Timothy K. Griffin ’68 George C. Hendrie ’74 George M. Hendrie ’49 † Richard W. Ivey ’68 & Donna L. Smith Fabien C. Loranger & Diane E. Martin Chenzhong Luo & Hongyue Wang Ronald N. Mannix ’66 Wilmot L. Matthews ’54 Donald S. McFarlane ’76 † Joseph † & Anita Robertson † Michael J. Sabia ’72 & Hilary Pearson Ward H.M. Seymour ’74 W. Carter Siebens ’82 Patrick Steier & Maria Menechella Joan Stevens Thomas & Mary Urban Vancouver Foundation The Weathertop Foundation David S. Willmot ’68 F. Ian Wood ’53 Adam H. Zimmerman ’44 †

SILVER $50,000–$99,999 Edward † & Ana Abady John R. Anderson ’65

Edward J. Berkhout ’76 Georgina H. Black ’85 William J. Burke ’77 John S. Burns ’60 † Alexander J. Carley ’53 † Denise Chan James D. Chaplin ’51 † Richard R.G. Chaplin ’78 † Richard R.P. Court ’50 † Allan & Lynn Day Leigh Ann Epperson Estate of Allan Bond Jr. ’46 Estate of John H. Gooderham ’57 Estate of Donald W. Naylor Fernando Estrada & Nadine Karachi-Estrada ’87 Hugh D. Evans ’87 W. Palmer Goetz ’18 † Anthony & Helen Graham Arthur ’19 & Joan Harrison † Harry C. Hatch ’67 Brian A. ’67 & Rosemary R. Iggulden Robert J.A. Irwin Jr. ’46 † William B. Irwin ’72 Daniel O. Jarvis ’68 Anthony B. Jerauld ’59 Frederick N.C. Jerauld III ’53 † A. Dean Karachi ’87 J. Edward & Hanna Kidd The Kohler Family Mei Kou H.S. Henry Lee ’79 Douglas R. Leggat ’54 Janet M. Lewis Geoffrey W. Lind ’71 Philip B. Lind ’61 Walter H. 'Jed' ’33 & Susan Lind † Lind Family Foundation Philip A. Macdonald ’79 Robert B. Macdonald ’79 Pasquale Marra Tony ’42 † & Judy Mason Donald C. McFarlane ’44 † McLean Budden Cosmo & Gina Menechella Microsoft Corporation A. Hoadley † & Ruthie Mitchell Paul A.G. Morabito ’82 Michael J. Moulden ’70 Eleanor Osler Anthony M. Partington ’65 William Prestia & Laura Menechella John M. Proctor ’68 Joan R. Randall Ridley College Women’s Guild Toronto Branch Terence P. Scandrett ’61 Arthur A. Schmon ’67 Geoffrey M. Seymour ’69 † J. Griffin Strasenburgh ’66 †


Charles A. Thompson ’28 † Charles F.S. Tidy ’36 † William H. Verity ’71 William O. Wallace ’77 John S. Walton ’49 Yingchun Wang & Dongmei Qiu Robert C. Watson ’63 Donald G. & Ivy Willmot †

BRONZE $25,000–$49,999 Linda M.E. Alexanian ’85 David ’88 & Katherine ’88 Anderson Gregory J. Aziz ’68 Brian R. Babcock Birchall Family Foundation Allan Bond ’46 † Henry M. 'Mac' Borden ’64 Joseph C. Botticelli ’97 William A. Bryden ’43 † J. David Bunston ’76 Kenneth C. Bunston † Michael K. Bunston ’79 Gary F. Burroughs ’64 Huntley H. Bush John C. Cairns ’42 Giles B. Campbell John W. Carlisle ’44 † Peter T. Christensen ’61 Christopher Collingwood ’66 Steven S. Copp ’84 Michael C. Court ’82 John K. Coutts † Crawford, Smith & Swallow D. Bruce Croxon ’79 Jad & Lola Damouni Frederick W. Derry † Mary Drope † Doris M. Drummond E. Peter Elwood ’66 Estate of Donna Gauley-McCarthy Estate of George Gooderham Estate of Edward B. Magee Jr. Mark Evans ’81

Charles O. Fairbank ’59 Roderick & Margaret Ferguson Tony & Cindy Fischer Macquorn R. Forrester ’51 Ian M. Fraser ’72 David Friedman Chi Chuen Fung & Yee Hung Chan Peter D.H. Greenwood ’78 Corinne Hansen Stig-Ove ’59 † & Marja-Liisa Hansen Sandra Henderson Frank W. Hillock † Terence & Patricia Hinan Juan A. Hinestrosa ’80 Thomas E. ’45 † & Ruth Hodgins Holt Renfrew Steven ’49 & Betty Hooper G. Peter Horne ’51 Robert C. Howard ’63 Paul G. Iggulden ’72 George M. Irwin ’69 Babatunde & Kehinde Ismail Daniel O. Jarvis ’68 David & Joanne Jones John P. Kennedy ’74 Stewart † & Peggy Kingstone Robert C. Kinnear ’59 Lorenzo Kling ’85 Rudolf & Rosario Kling C. Michael Kray ’88 Roy E. Laine Martin C. Lam ’76 Gary Last & Cori Simms Suzanne Lévesque Kwing-Tong & Tinna Li Christopher J. ’62 & Patricia M. Loat Brian H. Love ’71 R. Fraser ’73 & Karen MacKay Richard C. Malone ’59 Michael L. ’41 † & Myrna Mandeville Thomas P. Marian ’81 Donald L. Matthews ’60 David R. McBride ’51 Dean & Susan McCann John L.C. ’32 † & Ruth McCarthy

John A. McLeish ’66 Patrick & Nancy McNally MDS Capital Corp. Robert & Nancy Meehan Katharine M.O. Miller ’21 † Edwin M. Mills ’48 David R. Morgan ’65 Peter Naylon Niagara Airbus Inc. Niagara/Baie-Comeau Community Foundation George S. Niblett ’50 Harry P. Oakes Allan & Pauline Orr † Glyn W. Osler ’48 Paul & Mary Oster David & Tracy Overbeeke Frederick M. Partington ’67 Vanessa Partington Robert J. Pyne ’76 Michael A. Rice ’61 Thomas E. Richardson ’58 Bryan J. Rose ’96 Robert Schmon ’70 Edward M. Sellers ’59 Peter H. Sims ’51 † Neil & Patricia Smith Philip R.L. Somerville ’65 William H. Somerville ’75 John F. Storm ’53 Robert S. Stratton ’71 William N. Sun ’09 Michael & Ira Tatham Graham E. Taylor ’71 † F. Gregory Thompson ’68 Donald & Connie Tigert Nora Walker Paul H. Wang ’75 Yongzhong Wang & Zhongqi Zhou Andrew & Annette Whiteley Michael L. Willmot ’60 Douglas S. Wilson J.W. Timothy Witzel ’76 Victor C. Woo ’98 † denotes deceased

TIGER | WINTER 2020

103


gifts IN HONOUR OR IN MEMORY OF IN HONOUR OF REN XIANG GAO ’20 Jun Gao & Hong Yu Niu

IN MEMORY OF RICHARD R.P. COURT ’50 Suzanne W. Court ’86

IN HONOUR OF CHONGYUAN (ANDY) GUO ’19 Chaoyang Guo & Jiangyue Ding

IN MEMORY OF DOUGLAS COURT ’53 Aquarius Salon Ask Re Inc. Arthur & Barbara Bailey Brian Cullen Motors Limited Lawrence & Veronica Buganto Greg A. Carlyle ’85 CDC Berkeley Chrome Deposit Corporation Inc. Clean Works Inc. Angela C. Cluett Janet Cluett Court Holdings Limited Ruth E. Court Suzanne W. Court ’86 William Cowan Richard A. ’60 & Woody Coy Paul Fleury James W. Fraser A. Elliot Gardiner Doris Gauthier Randolph & Tina Gillen Sally Gunderson Iain E. & Susan Howieson Patricia R. Hutchison Terry K. & Melissa Hutton Dean Karachi ’87 Nina Karachi-Khaled ’85 E. James Kingstone ’75 Margaret Kingstone Jamie Lougheed Shelia A. Marks Wendy A. (Walker) Mitchell ’85 Allan & Carisa Morison John H. & Les Anne Morrison Moyer’s Apple Products Inc. Andrea Murray David & Anna Murray Stewart & Christine Murray Niagara Piston Inc. Wayne & Diane Patten John F. & Pamela Philip Mark W. Poynton Jennifer Robertson Roll Technology West Lawrence B. & Suzanne Ross Sandra Savo Cora Sperry Patrick Steier & Maria Menechella Adeline E. Swabey James M. & Pauline Tarbutt William E. & Dian Taylor Jeannine Turgeon Peter J. Van Schaik Mark & Mary Vanderveen

IN HONOUR OF YIZOU HUANG ’20 Xiao Huang & Hong Zhang

IN HONOUR OF DAVID B. MACNAUGHTON ’67 John Duffy IN HONOUR OF SOPHIA ’27 & SYDNEY ’24 REID Chris Dyck & Nicole Reid IN MEMORY OF RUTH ATWATER Hugh L. Smith ’44 IN MEMORY OF NATHANIEL “NAT” CATERS A. Frank Cecchini ’74 Thomas P. Clarkson ’99 James M. Dunwoody ’84 Ian M. Fraser ’72 J. Edward & Hanna Kidd W. Carter Siebens ’82 IN MEMORY OF WILLIAM G. CHARLTON ’60 Janet Charlton IN MEMORY OF STEPHEN R. COURT ’89 Nancy Court

104

flourishing

Vineland Manufacturing Ltd. Margaret R. Walker Shirley Ward James & Beverly Zinck IN MEMORY OF DAVID S. FENSOM Donald A. Thompson ’62 IN MEMORY OF LAURENCE P.B. HAMLIN ’89 Daphne Hamlin IN MEMORY OF BARBARA HELMKAY Anonymous Marilyn G. Prociuk

IN MEMORY OF DONALD P. HUNT Michael D. Baker ’78 Howard & Mary Bell Bishop’s College School Joan M. Brook Frederick & Priscilla Brooks-Hill Richard & Toby Cavers Court Holdings Limited Richard A. ’60 & Woody Coy Katherine E. Dembroski Barbara Fraser Ian M. Fraser ’72 Goodwill Industries Niagara Simon J. & Susan Hall Diana S. Hindess David A. Hunt ’88 Philip S.W. Hunt ’76 Stephen E. ’82 & Carolyn Hunt Brian ’67 & Rosemary Iggulden Peter R. Kedwell Margaret Kingstone William & Sara Eliz Laidlaw Peggy J. Lampard Janet M. Lewis Christopher J. ’62 & Patricia Loat Megan McKee W. Darcy ’51 & Joyce McKeough Hazel Milne Moore Newell III ’68 George & Gillian Park Michael A. ’61 & Margaret Rice Helen Sinclair E. Anne Snowden Donald & Shirley Steele Andrew & Annette Whiteley IN MEMORY OF RICHARD A. HUTCHISON ’53 Nancy Court William E. Duffield ’50


John L. Easson Del McLennan & Jackie Lautens William Mengebier Doug & Claire Russell IN MEMORY OF BRIAN MARTIN Tessa L. Boudreau ’08

IN MEMORY OF DONALD S. MCFARLANE ’76 Larry H. Allen Patricia Bauer Kelly Blair Pamela Blair James & Cynthia Bridge Clifton Blake Bridge Fund IV LP Corvus Gold Inc. Janet Evans Robert D. Evans ’77 John Firstbrook George Fowlie Dave & Lesley Giles D. Harold W. Gould ’69 Timothy M. Gould ’74 Daniel Hardie & Barbara Jewell Victoria Hend Timothy & Judy Higgin Edward J. & Margaret Huycke Brian ’67 & Rosemary Iggulden Richard W. Ivey ’68 Jeffrey Robinson Construction Inc. Cydney J. Kaster Vahan Kololian Douglas R. ’54 & Maryella Leggat Bonnie Lesser Stephen MacCulloch Elizabeth Mason Don Miller & Susan Clarke Philip Miller Frank & Barbara Milligan Wendy A. (Walker) Mitchell ’85 Brigitte Robinson Jan Seaborn

Robert W. Sterne ’73 Colin Thatcher The Granite Club The Mad River Golf Club William H. Verity ’71 George & Janet Wilson IN MEMORY OF ROBERTSON FAMILY Heather Cousins Savannah J. Cowherd ’11 Estate of Joseph and Anita Robertson Mackenzie S. Fowler ’11 Sarah E. Greenwood ’11 Stacey Iggulden Edwin & Marian Klimek My Tribute Gift Foundation Erin F. O'Rourke ’11 Olivia P. Park ’11 Stephanie L. Perry ’93 Christopher J. Robinson ’11 Antonius B.J. von Schlabrendorff ’11 IN MEMORY OF MICHAEL ’69 AND PETER ’63 ROGERS Matthew P.W. Rogers ’99 IN MEMORY OF PETER W. ROGERS ’63 William N. Kinnear ’63 IN MEMORY OF JAMES H.H. SCANDRETT ’39 Elizabeth Mason

IN MEMORY OF GEOFFREY M. SEYMOUR ’69 Canso Investment Counsel Wilson & Nellie Dow G. Edward & Lynda Langdon Paige Maclean Michael J. ’70 & Karen Moulden Elizabeth Poulin Timothy H. ’60 & Gini Rigby

IN MEMORY OF GERALD S. SHANTZ Bob & Leighan S. ’83 Basadur Marc A. Beaudry ’96 Marko R. Bukovec ’85 Patrick Canning ’96 Keddy A. Chandran ’03 Thomas P. Clarkson ’99 Rhiannon Davies ’01 John W. Dill ’95 Christopher C. Drake ’97 Hugh D. Evans ’87 Simon J. & Susan Hall Lyle B. Himebaugh III ’82 Lara E. Housez ’98 Brian ’67 & Rosemary Iggulden Colt Iggulden ’03 Victoria A. Laine ’97 Janet M. Lewis Jessica R. (Locke) Lindsay ’95 Justin J. Pintwala ’03 Marilyn G. Prociuk Kevan S. Quinn ’04 Miranda D. Rand ’95 Bryan J. Rose ’96 Hugh J. Silk ’87 Gordon M. Sze ’02 Henry J. Taylor Heather J. (Rigby) Thomas ’95 Virginia R. Vickers Alexander M. Wilson ’00 Brennan J. Wood ’01 Paul A. Wylie ’98 IN MEMORY OF ELIZABETH ANN STEVENS W. Darcy ’51 & Joyce McKeough IN MEMORY OF JONATHON YOUNG AND JOHN WALKER James D. Walker ’77 IN MEMORY OF DEREK ’97 AND AARON ’00 ZAVITZ Christopher C. Drake ’97

TIGER | WINTER 2020

105


P.O. Box 3013 - St. Catharines Ontario, Canada L2R 7C3

ridleycollege ridleycollege Ridley_College

ridleycollege.com

community events FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO REGISTER, VISIT: ridleycollege.com/alumni

FEBRUARY 7 & 8 Winter Homecoming 11 Palm Beach, Florida Reception 29 Rowing Legacy Event APRIL 02 26

106

flourishing

Toronto Branch Dinner at The Hockey Hall of Fame Cadet Day - Church Parade & Inspection

JUNE 05

31st Annual RCA Golf Tournament

JULY TBA

Muskoka Branch Reception


THE

EX

FACTOR

Discover a Boarding Education Beyond your EX PECTATIONS

EX CEED SO MUCH MORE THAN STATUS QUO Customize your educational experience and realize your full potential through advanced curriculum—it’s not only what you learn, but how you learn it. Boarding schools embody a student-centred ethos that help prepare them to become the leaders of tomorrow.


make THEIR MOMENTS historic

VIEW SUPPORT OPPORTUNITIES:

ridleycollege.com/give

Profile for RIDLEY_COMMS

Tiger Magazine - Winter 2020  

Tiger Magazine - Winter 2020  

Advertisement