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VOL. 26 NO. 2

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RICHMOND, VIRGINIA

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Free Press celebrating 25th anniversary Richmond Free Press www.richmondfreepress.com

JANUARY 12-14, 2017

Farewell, President Obama

Commander in chief returns to Chicago for his final speech where it all began

Free Press wire reports CHICAGO President Obama bid farewell to the nation Tuesday in an emotional speech that sought to comfort a country on edge over rapid economic changes, persistent security threats and the election of Republican Donald Trump. With a final call of his campaign mantra, “Yes we can,” the president offered a speech in his hometown of Chicago that — forceful at times and tearful at others — was a public meditation on the many trials the country faces as President Obama takes his exit. He urged Americans to stand up for U.S. values and reject discrimination. He gently prodded the public to embrace his vision of progress while repudiating some of the policies that President-elect Trump promoted during his campaign for the White House.

“So just as we, as citizens, must remain vigilant against external aggression, we must guard against a weakening of the values that make us who we are,” he told a crowd of 18,000 people in Chicago, where he celebrated his election in 2008 as the first African-American

His speech on A7 president of the United States. “Yes, our progress has been uneven,” he said. “The work of democracy has always been hard, contentious and sometimes bloody. For every two steps forward, it often feels we take one step back.” Yet President Obama argued his faith in America had only been strengthened by what he’s witnessed the past eight years, and he declared: “The future should be ours.” Please turn to A4

President Obama waves to the crowd as he takes the stage in Chicago on Tuesday to deliver his farewell address.

Longtime Wilder aide convicted of embezzlement By Holly M. Rodriguez

“Shocking” and “tragic.” Those are the words former Gov. L. Douglas Wilder used to describe his feelings about the embezzlement conviction Wednesday of his longtime and once trusted aide. Ruth M. Jones, who had served for more than 40 years as executive assistant to the esteemed former governor and former Richmond mayor, entered an Alford plea in Richmond Circuit Court to a charge that she embezzled $16,000 from Mr. Wilder’s 2004 mayoral campaign account.

Ms. Jones was indicted by a grand jury on Jan. 4, 2016, and arrested four days later, according to court records. In her court appearance Wednesday, she entered the plea that acknowledged there was enough evidence to convict her despite her assertion of innocence. She was given a five-year suspended sentence and ordered to repay the $16,000 to the campaign account, according to Assistant Commonwealth’s Attorney John Jung. Please turn to A5

John Gress/Reuters

Richmond Community ICU nurses told to apply for other jobs By Jeremy M. Lazarus

A Bon Secours memo provided to the Free Press undercuts the Catholic hospital group’s public claim that it intends to maintain its five-bed intensive care unit at Richmond Community Hospital in Church Hill. The memo, issued by Douglas Cofield, RCH’s director of nursing operations, counsels the ICU nursing staff on the process of transferring within RCH or to another Bon Secours hospital. Mr. Cofield states in the memo that there are registered nurse positions available either at Memo1994 File photo rial Regional Medical Center, another Bon Ms. Jones Secours hospital in Hanover County, or in the Emergency Department at RCH. “You will have to apply for the position of your interest, then submit it as a borhood streets would get more priority, and transfer,” he notifies the eight nurses who at least in some areas that happened. currently provide round-the-clock care to According to John Buturla, the city’s seriously ill or injured patients in the ICU. deputy chief administrative officer for “The Talent Consultant will be looking for operations, “For the first time, we were your applications,” he stated. Mr. Gordon Mr. Cofield issued the memo after the Please turn to A4 ICU nurses were told on Dec. 19 that their services no longer would be needed after midJanuary and that they had one week to make arrangements for continued employment with Bon Secours, a source told the Free Press. The Free Press received a copy of the memo last week following the publication of an article, based on source information, that Richmond Community Hospital’s ICU was to close by Monday, Jan. 22. The article included a statement from RCH’s chief executive, Mark Gordon, insisting that the ICU would remain open. Bon Secours re-issued that statement this week after being told about the Cofield memo. Sandra Sellars/Richmond Free Press However, the Free Press also was told this week that the hospital’s ICU actually would Harmony Ellis, right, enjoys Jazz Booker’s attempt to get moving down be closed sooner than Jan. 22. the slopes in Bryan Park on Monday as the youngsters and many families took to the outdoors to play in the snow. The much-anticipated snowfall A hospital staff member, who was accompanied with below-freezing temperatures, closing area public requested anonymity for fear

Stoney gets high marks on first on-the-job task

Richmond Mayor Levar M. Stoney appears to have passed the first big test for his new administration — clearing away the 8 inches of snow that fell on the city by last Saturday afternoon. During and after the snowstorm, Mayor Stoney, who will be ceremonially sworn in and deliver his inaugural address at noon Saturday, Jan. 14, at City Hall, was highly visible around the city. He visited the city’s emergency operations center before the snow arrived, then took time to ride with snowplow crews as they began to reopen the roads. He also took a sled ride at Forest Hill Park to the delight of the adults and children who

turned out to play in the snow. Overall, there was praise for the work that city employees accomplished. Most of the city’s main streets were plowed within a day and certainly by Monday when commuters poured into the city to return to work. That was a refreshing change for many who recall previous snows when the city had a harder time than its county neighbors in getting to bare pavement. Some workers were astonished to find that City Hall reopened at its regular time Monday as a result of the high level of clearing that was done. Mayor Stoney also promised that neigh-

Legality of severance pay to ex-mayor’s appointees questioned

elect L. Douglas Wilder, who tried and failed to halt the payIn November 2004, as Richment, City Council used the mond City Hall prepared for the law to provide outgoing City change to an elected mayorManager Calvin Jamison with a council form of government and severance package that included to abolish the city manager’s a year’s pay of $174,421 and an office, the outgoing City Council enhanced pension. rushed to approve an ordinance Despite Mayor Wilder’s vow Dr. Jones that authorized the council or the to have the law repealed, it stayed mayor to give severance pay to appointees on the books like an unexploded bomb. whose jobs were eliminated or who were Fast forward 12 years, and the law terminated for non-criminal reasons. has blown up in the face of another new To the frustration at the time of MayorBy Jeremy M. Lazarus

Please turn to A4

Snow day!

schools for three days. Please see more photos, A2.

Please turn to A5

Trump denounces intel reports of damaging info from Russian hacking A5


Richmond Free Press

A2  January 12-14, 2017

Local News

Sandra Sellars/Richmond Free Press

Intrepid pedestrians and motorists are quickly out and about after the snow stops falling Saturday. Location: Parham Road and Broad Street in Western Henrico.

Snow in Richmond Eight inches of snow and bone-chilling, pipebursting temperatures — that’s what slammed the Richmond area during the past week. The storm that began late Friday largely shut down the area, canceling most activities, from weekend gatherings to virtually all church services. Schools also stayed closed the first three days of this week before far warmer weather arrived Wednesday to help clear the remaining ice as temperatures soared into the 50s. The impact of the weather was more intense

avenues continued to have an icy glaze — too treacherous for school buses, school officials concluded — until the thaw arrived. Here is a sampling of snow scenes.

James Haskins/Richmond Free Press

Ribbons of clear roads and tracks cut through the snowy landscape in this drone’s view of Downtown in Sunday’s sunshine.

Cityscape

Slices of life and scenes in Richmond for hundreds of families who could not afford fuel or had no heat source. Temporary power outages in some parts of the Richmond area left other families bundled up and shivering until repairs were made. Despite the problems, many businesses, including grocery stores, drug stores and gas stations, maintained service. By Monday, most companies and government operations were operating on near normal schedules. The big reason: Successful operations to clear the roads in the city and other nearby localities. Interstates and main streets were back to bare pavement as a host of workers sprang into action to plow and spread salt and sand. Side streets, back roads and neighborhood

Sandra Sellars/Richmond Free Press

Parked cars at Muldoon Court and Shrader Road are blanketed with snow Saturday.

Martin Luther King Jr. holiday schedule In observance of the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday on Monday, Jan. 16, please note the following: City and county public schools: Closed. Government Federal offices: Closed. Richmond City and state offices: Closed. Chesterfield County offices: Closed. Henrico County offices: Closed. Courts State courts: Closed. Federal courts: Closed. Libraries Richmond City: Closed. Chesterfield County: Closed. Henrico County: Closed. Banks, credit unions and other financial institutions: Closed. U.S. Postal Service: No delivery. Trash and recycling: No pickups; all are pushed back one day. Department of Motor Vehicles customer service centers: Closed. Virginia ABC stores: Normal hours. Malls, major retailers, movie theaters: Varies; inquire at specific locations. GRTC: Buses operate on a Sunday schedule. Free Press offices: Closed.

Sandra Sellars/Richmond Free Press

Kelvin White clears away snow at 5th and Franklin streets in Downtown, just one of the legions who shoveled steps, sidewalks and parking places across the area.

McClellan wins; GOP holds Senate By Jeremy M. Lazarus

Veteran Richmond Delegate Jennifer L. McClellan will be moving up to the state Senate. As expected, the 44-year-old corporate lawyer and Democrat overwhelmed her opponent, Corey M. Fauconier, a Libertarian Party member, by a 9-1 margin in Tuesday’s special election for the Senate seat previously held by Congressman A. Donald McEachin, a Democrat now representing the 4th District. Unofficial results show Delegate McClellan received 7,847 votes to 691 for Mr. Fauconier in race for the 9th Senate District seat. The district includes northern and eastern parts of Richmond, a big swatch of Henrico County, Ashland and a sliver of Hanover County and all of Charles City County. However, Lynchburg attorney Mark Peake ensured Republicans will retain control of the 40-seat Senate by a 21-19 margin when he won a three-way race for a vacant seat to represent the Lynchburg area. Democrat Ryant Washington, a former Fluvanna County sheriff, raised more money, but Mr. Peake garnered 52 percent of the vote to beat him and independent Joseph C. Hines in the race to replace now 5th District GOP Congressman Thomas Garrett. The winners, though, will have to wait to take their seats until the state Board of Elections certifies the results, which is expected to happen Wednesday, Jan. 18. The delay is because of state holidays on Friday and Monday.

Delegate McClellan, howShe said her main purpose ever, was back in the House of would be to advocate for the Delegates on Wednesday when children of the 9th District, parthe General Assembly opened ticularly on education issues. its new session. Growing up, she said her late At her victory party Tuesday father told her, “We can’t leave night at The Speakeasy in the you an inheritance, but we can Hippodrome Theater complex, provide you with an education she said she is excited by the that will allow you to make it new opportunity. on your own.” Before the gathering of about Delegate McClellan Delegate McClellan said too 100 people, she thanked her many children “who are just as family, staff and supporters, including smart as I was, just as capable as I was, Richmond Mayor Levar M. Stoney, legisla- just as ambitious as I was, do not, for one tive colleagues and members of Richmond reason or another, have the same educational City Council and the School Board. opportunities that I did.” She pledged to work across party lines She said ensuring that all of the children where possible, but stand against proposals “have the same educational opportunities that would be damaging. that I did” is an unquenched passion.

Bourne to run

Richmond School Board member Jeff M. Bourne is no longer playing coy about running for the Richmond House of Delegates seat that Jennifer L. McClellan is about to vacate. Just a day after she won election to the state Senate, Mr. Bourne, who now represents the 3rd District on the School Board, announced he would seek the 71st House District seat, getting a jump on others who might be interested in running in the special election that could take place in March or April. Mr. Bourne “On the School Board, I’ve worked to strengthen our schools and expand opportunities for Richmond’s kids,” Mr. Bourne stated in his announcement Wednesday. “As delegate, I want to do so much more. I’ll fight for new jobs, common sense gun safety measures, equal pay for equal work, criminal justice reform and, of course, stronger schools.” The 40-year-old deputy attorney general for the state said he would give up his elective and government posts if he wins the special election.

Christmas tree recycling moved to Jan. 14 City Council approves CARITAS treatment center

Residents have a second chance to get rid of their live Christmas trees in an environmentally friendly manner. As a result of the snowy weather, the city’s annual “Bring One for the Chipper” Christmas tree recycling event has been rescheduled for 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 14, at 1710 Robin Hood Road, across from the Arthur Ashe Jr. Athletic Center, it has been announced. Residents also can bring up to five boxes of documents to be shredded and also drop off without charge old or broken electronic equipment, according to the Richmond Department of Public Works. Televisions also will be accepted for a fee of $10 to $20, depending on the size of the TV, the department stated. In addition, the department will collect trees left by the curb through Friday, Jan. 20, but residents must call either 311 or (804) 646-7000 to register for a pickup because a separate truck is used to collect trees.

Correction A Free Press article published in the Jan. 5-7 edition about Richmond area basketball players at Indiana University was accompanied by a photo that misidentified Curtis “Cujo” Jones. The correct photo of Mr. Jones, a former player at Highland Spring High School in Henrico County, is shown at right. The Free Press regrets the error.

Curtis ‘Cujo’ Jones

By Jeremy M. Lazaarus

In its first meeting of the new term, Richmond City Council cleared the way for faith-based CARITAS to develop a headquarters in South Side that is to include a treatment center for women addicted to drugs and alcohol. The decision came during a speedy 1 hour, 7 minute meeting Monday night when the council, with four new members, hit the pause button on a series of proposals so members could have a fresh review in committee. Among the continued items is the proposed $3.9 million sale of nearly a block of city property in Downtown. A private company is seeking to purchase the property at 6th and Grace streets to development an $86 million project that could include a hotel, apartment complex and 800-space parking deck. Seven council members would have to approve the sale of the land that is now occupied by a parking deck and surface parking. As yet, the project does not appear to have secured such a majority, according to City Council President Chris A. Hilbert. There was no hesitation from the nine-

member governing body in approving a special use permit to enable CARITAS, a nonprofit organization, to proceed with plans to transform a former tobacco warehouse at 2220 Stockton St. CARITAS plans to turn the building into offices, 47 apartments, retail space, a warehouse for furniture donations and a treatment center that could serve more than 200 women, according to city documents. Karen Stanley, chief executive officer for CARITAS, said previously the group’s goal is to start work by the summer and open the new center in 2018. The center would provide desperately needed treatment beds for female addicts and be comparable to the Healing Place, a 214-bed men’s addiction treatment center located a few blocks away at 700 Dinwiddie Ave., Ms. Stanley said. Founded 28 years ago, CARITAS, or Congregations Around Richmond Involved to Assure Shelter, is an alliance of 155 area religious congregations. It is best known for operating the largest homeless shelter in the Richmond area. Separately, the council also gave a thumbs up to the proposed $50 million development of 344 apartments in two, six-story build-

ings in the 1400 block of Roseneath Road in Scott’s Addition, the latest development for Louis Salomonsky and David White of Historic Housing LLC. Among the items put on hold are: • A resolution to support GRTC’s plan to revamp its bus routes to speed up service and reduce the number of stops; • A proposal to dramatically expand a parking district in the Carver neighborhood to limit the time nonresidents, particularly Virginia Commonwealth University students, can park; • A cooperation agreement that would provide more than $7.3 million to the Richmond Redevelopment and Housing Authority to develop new apartments and homes on the site of the former Armstrong High School; • A proposal to allow the Virginia Tourism Authority to set up a welcome center in the train shed at Main Street Station in Shockoe Bottom that is being redeveloped; and • A proposal to rezone properties in the 1200 block of School Street to clear the way for development of 200 apartments near Virginia Union University.


T:11 in Richmond Free Press

January 12-14, 2017

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Be King. A new generation now holds the torch ignited by his dream. Comcast NBCUniversal celebrates Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day by saluting him and all of those who work together to love and serve one another and the world.

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Personality rights and copyrights of Dr. King are used with the permission of The Estate of Martin Luther King, Jr., Inc. Represented by Greenlight. Š 2017 Comcast. All rights reserved.

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Richmond Free Press

A4  January 12-14, 2017

News

Jack Berry gets 3-month job in Petersburg He lost the Richmond mayor’s race. But Jack Berry has found a new role — as interim assistant city manager for struggling Petersburg. Robert C. Bobb, a consultant whom Petersburg hired to turn around the city’s finances, announced on Monday the appointment of Mr. Berry, former director of the Richmond booster group Venture Richmond and a former Hanover County manager. The two men are well acquainted as Mr. Berry served as a deputy city manager when Mr. Bobb was city manager of Richmond in the late 1980s. His 90-day appointment to beef up the government staff comes as Mr. Bobb and his team of

consultants are moving closer to getting Mr. Bobb has told the council the Petersburg back on its feet. 10 percent pay cut did not save money This week, Mr. Bobb disclosed to because the city has wound up paying Petersburg City Council that the pile more in overtime for employees after of unpaid bills has shrunk from around the pay slash was approved. $18 million to about $6 million. There have been some bumps. For Next week, he and his staff will example, last week, Petersburg agreed present the council with amendments to pay $800,000 as its share of a $1.35 to ensure the city ends the fiscal year million settlement with 28 current and with a balanced budget. former police officers who sued the city Mr. Berry Among other things, Mr. Bobb said for failing to pay required overtime. the amendments would allow the city to end a 10 The state has agreed to pay $550,000. percent pay cut for city police officers, firefighters Petersburg also had to be creative to clear and ambulance personnel in April and for the the snow from last weekend’s storm. The city was able to get help from the Virginia Departremaining city employees by July 1.

ment of Transportation to assist in clearing the main streets. Still, the city is moving ahead, Mr. Bobb indicated. He plans to present a proposed balanced budget in March for the next fiscal year, which begins July 1. He and his staff also are working to deal with the remaining trove of unpaid bills, with Mr. Bobb considering refinancing debt in March to raise additional funds for that purpose. At the same time, his staff is moving forward on a proposal to sell the city’s utilities to an outside company in order to help the city avoid the expense of having to improve or replace the underground water and wastewater pipes.

Farewell, President Obama Continued from A1

Brushing away tears with a handkerchief, President Obama paid tribute to the sacrifices made by his wife, First Lady Michelle Obama, and by his daughters, who were young girls when they entered the home on Pennsylvania Avenue. He praised his wife for taking on her role “with grace and grit and style and good humor” and for making the White House “a place that belongs to everybody.” Soon, President Obama and his family will exit the national stage, to be replaced on Friday, Jan. 20, by President-elect Trump, a man President Obama had argued poses a dire threat to the nation’s future with proposals to temporarily ban Muslims from entering the country, build a wall along the border with Mexico, upend a global deal to fight climate change and dismantle President Obama’s health care reform law. In his televised speech of just under an hour, President Obama made clear his opposition to those positions has not changed, and he said his efforts to end the use of torture and close the U.S. prison in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, were part of a broader move to uphold U.S. values. “That’s why I reject discrimination against Muslim Americans,” he said to applause. He said bold action is needed to fight global warming and said “science and reason” matter. “If anyone can put together a plan that is demonstrably better than the improvements we’ve made to our health care system, that covers as many people at less cost, I will publicly support it,” he said, in another prodding challenge to his successor, who has urged Congress to repeal Obamacare right away. He warned about the pernicious threat to U.S. democracy posed by purposely deceptive fake “news” and a growing tendency of Americans to listen only to information that confirms what they already believe. Get out of your “bubbles,” said President Obama, who rose to political leadership with a message of unity, challenging divisions of red states and blue states. President Obama also revived a call to activism that marked his first presidential campaign, telling Americans to stay engaged in politics. “If you’re tired of arguing with strangers on the internet,” President Obama said pointedly, “try to talk with one in real life.” While he came to office amid high expectations that his election would heal historic racial divides, he acknowledged in his speech that it was an impossible goal. “After my election, there was talk of a post-racial America,” he said. “Such a vision,

Stoney gets high marks Continued from A1

working in neighborhoods within the first 24 hours.” By Tuesday, crews had “treated or plowed 90 percent” of the city’s 1,860 lane miles, said Bobby Vincent, deputy director of operations for the city Department of Public Works, who led the effort to sand, salt and plow streets. The remaining 10 percent was done by Wednesday morning. Despite the effort, Richmond schools stayed closed through Wednesday as officials found too many streets and sidewalks still too treacherous for buses, teachers and students to navigate. Students were expected to be back in class Thursday. Other localities, ranging from Hopewell and Petersburg to Hanover, Henrico and Chesterfield counties, also kept their schools closed through Wednesday. One thing that is new with Mayor Stoney is the city’s swift effort to tackle potholes resulting from the cold or the plowing. City Hall has announced it would undertake a “pothole-palooza” between Thursday and Saturday to make repairs. — JEREMY M. LAZARUS

Photos by Jonathan Ernst/Reuters

President Obama wipes away tears during an emotional moment in his address. Below, First Lady Michelle Obama and daughter Malia embrace as President Obama warmly acknowledges them during his speech.

however well-intended, was never realistic. Race remains a potent and often divisive force in our society.” He urged racial minorities to seek justice not only for themselves, but also for “the middleaged white man who from the outside may seem like he’s got advantages, but who’s seen his world upended by economic, cultural and technological change.” Even as he said farewell, the anxiety felt by many about the future was palpable, not only in the Chicago convention center where he stood in front of a giant presidential seal. The political world was reeling from new revelations about an unsubstantiated report that Russia had compromising personal and financial information about President-elect Trump. When he noted he would soon be replaced by the Republican, the crowd began to boo. “No, no, no, no, no,” President Obama said. One of the nation’s great strengths, he said, “is the peaceful transfer of power from one president to the next.” Earlier, as the crowd of thousands chanted, “Four more years,” he simply smiled and said, “I can’t do that.” The former community organizer closed out his speech by reviving his campaign chant, “Yes we can.” To that, he added for the first time, “Yes we did.” Steeped in nostalgia, President Obama’s return to Chicago was less a triumphant homecoming than a bittersweet reunion bringing together loyalists and staffers, many of whom have long since left President Obama’s service, moved on to new careers and started families. They came from across the country — some on Air Force One, others on their own — to be present for the last major moment of President Obama’s presidency. Sitting in the front row with his wife and older daughter, Malia, were his mother-in-law, Marian Robinson, and Vice President Joe Biden and his wife, Jill Biden. Unexpectedly absent was President Obama’s younger daughter, Sasha. The White House said Sasha stayed in Washington due to a school exam Wednesday morning. After returning to Washington, President Obama will have less than two weeks before he accompanies President-elect Trump in the presidential limousine to the Capitol for the new president’s swearing-in. After nearly a decade in the spotlight, President Obama will become a private citizen, an elder statesman at 55. He plans to take some time off, write a book — and immerse himself in a Democratic redistricting campaign.

Legality of severance pay questioned Continued from A1

mayor, Levar M. Stoney. He has discovered that the law ignored by successive City Councils enabled his predecessor, former Mayor Dwight C. Jones, to authorize a total of $166,000 in severance pay to four people who reported to him. The payments were authorized just days before Mayor Jones left office on Dec. 31. The four appointees who have since left city government were the mayor’s press secretary, Tammy Hawley; executive assistant, Cheryl Ivey Green; chief of staff, Mark Kronenthal; and deputy chief of staff, Don Mark. The four also are to be awarded a collective total of $60,000 for unused vacation time and other pay, according to city records. The $226,000 in total payments are to go out Friday, Jan. 13, with other paychecks, according to city officials. Mayor Stoney has said the authorized payments will slash money left in the budget for the Mayor’s Office, impacting the hiring of new staff to replace the four who left. The payments were another budget blow to the new mayor and City Council on top of the $1.9 million in Christmas bonuses that Mayor Jones authorized and Chief Administrative Officer Selena Cuffee-Glenn approved for all city employees. City Attorney Allen L. Jackson has now advised that the city had no legal authority to pay the bonuses because City Council approval was needed. As for the severance payments, neither Mayor Stoney nor City Council has sought to stall them despite new questions about whether those payments violate the City Charter. Mayor Stoney has not responded to questions about whether his predecessor was authorized to grant the employee bonuses. There also has been no response from Ms. Cuffee-Glenn, whom Mayor Stoney has retained to manage his administration. City Council President Chris A. Hilbert cited

Former Mayor Jones’ severance payments Severance payments went to four appointees of former Mayor Dwight C. Jones: • Tammy Hawley, press secretary, $80,000, including $63,000 in severance and $17,000 in unused vacation and other pay. • Cheryl Ivey Green, executive assistant to the mayor, $64,000, including $49,000 in severance and $15,000 in unused vacation and other pay. • Mark Kronenthal, mayoral chief of staff, $30,000, including $19,000 in severance and $11,000 in unused vacation and other pay. • Don Mark, mayoral deputy chief of staff, $47,000, including $35,000 in severance pay and $12,000 in unused vacation and other pay.

the 2004 ordinance in telling his council colleagues Monday that there is no way to stop the payments to the four appointees who lost their jobs when the new mayor took office. However, Paul Goldman, a political strategist and former aide to Mayor Wilder, thinks the mayor and council are moving too quickly and should halt the severance payments. In 2003, he wrote the charter language that defined the powers of the mayor and CAO that Richmond residents approved to change to a mayor-council form of government. In Mr. Goldman’s view, the November 2004 ordinance is trumped by the charter language that voters approved, the General Assembly passed and that went into effect in 2005 when Mayor Wilder took office. “Legally, under the charter I wrote, the mayor has no authority to hire anyone except the chief administrative officer. Any suggestion that the mayor hired

those four people and thus can pay them severance violates the charter,” Mr. Goldman said Wednesday in calling on Mayor Stoney and the council to temporarily halt the payments until they take a closer look at whether they are legal. He noted that when he wrote the language, the idea was to “keep the politicians, including the mayor, from directly hiring or firing anyone.” That includes members of his staff, who are supposed to be hired by the CAO and then assigned to his office, Mr. Goldman said. That’s the way he was hired to work for Mayor Wilder. “Accordingly, the ordinance being cited for Dr. Jones’ authority to grant these ‘golden parachutes’ would not apply since he didn’t have the authority to appoint those four people in the first place.” In addition, the mayor is required to work through the CAO to take action involving city employees, Mr. Goldman said. The mayor, like the council, is barred from giving instructions to those who work for the CAO, including officials such as the director of human resources or the director of finance. Holding up the payments, he said, would give the council and the new mayor time to determine whether the former mayor violated the city charter by instructing lower level city officials to make the payments without the CAO’s knowledge and approval or whether Ms. Cuffee-Glenn actually authorized the payments. Ms. Cuffee-Glenn did not respond Wednesday to Free Press questions about her role. “There is no law that says that these payments have to be made this week,” Mr. Goldman said. “If the facts show that the payments were properly authorized, then they could be paid in two weeks.” He said the public has not been given enough information. He noted that Mayor Stoney promised more transparency, but Mr. Goldman said that pledge is being broken by the failure to determine the facts regarding these payments and to present them to the public. “That’s the kind of transparency people want,” Mr. Goldman said.


Richmond Free Press

January 12-14, 2017  A5

News

Ava Reaves

Lawmakers return to Richmond

Sandra Sellars/Richmond Free Press

Left, members of the Virginia House of Delegates recite the Pledge of Allegiance at the state Capitol on Wednesday on the opening day of the new General Assembly session. The 100-member House and 40-member Senate will amend the state budget and deal with more than 2,000 bills during the 46-day session. Above, ahead of the legislature’s opening, members of the Virginia Legislative Black Caucus gather Tuesday with Gov. Terry McAuliffe and Mayor Levar Stoney (both in the rear row) for a reception at the Black History Museum and Cultural Center of Virginia in Jackson Ward.

Congressional Black Caucus poised for tougher action under new administration Associated Press

WASHINGTON For almost eight years, the members of the Congressional Black Caucus existed in the shadow of the first African-American president. They praised President Obama’s achievements while at the same time pushing him to do more for their constituents who overwhelmingly supported his history-making campaign and administration. But with President Obama set to leave the White House on Friday, Jan. 20, African-American lawmakers in the House of Representatives and the Senate are recalculating and reassessing their place in Washington. And realizing they’re regaining the limelight as the most visible and powerful African-American politicians in the nation’s capital. President-elect Donald Trump will face a larger and more aggressive caucus, which will advocate for positions with “a bit more force,” said Rep. Danny Davis of Illinois, a longtime member. “Without President Obama being in office, there will be more forceful articulation vis-à-vis administration policy.” To the outgoing caucus chairman, Rep. G.K. Butterfield of

North Carolina, “The consequences are too enormous for us to be indecisive.” There are more African-American lawmakers in Congress than ever — 49 African-American men and women were sworn in Tuesday, including Sen. Kamala Harris of California, just the second African-American female senator. Also serving on Capitol Hill are the first Indian-American senator; 38 Hispanic lawmakers, including Democrat Catherine Cortez Masto of Nevada, the first Latina senator; and 15 AsianAmericans. The CBC never had a perfect relationship with President Obama, and several powerful members initially backed Hillary Clinton during President Obama’s first run for president in 2008. African-American lawmakers helped turn out the largest number of African-American voters in modern history for President Obama’s two presidential campaigns. African-Americans voted at a higher rate than non-Hispanic white people in 2012, 66.2 percent versus 64.1 percent. But those lawmakers felt disappointed when President Obama did not focus as much as they would have liked on issues their minority constituents valued — criminal justice

and policing, minority representation on the U.S. Supreme Court and other high offices, bringing jobs and industry to rural and inner city areas. “We didn’t make President Obama step to us all the time. We have to make leaders do their work. They’re not going to do it because they are essentially well intentioned. They have to be pushed,” said Julianne Malveaux, economist and author of “Are We Better Off? Race, Obama and Public Policy.” CBC members said they walked a delicate line, wanting to get behind the first African-American president but also promoting their own priorities, which didn’t always seem to be on the White House’s front burner. “There are times in which you’d like to go further than where the administration appears to be going. But at the same time, you also want to appear and be as supportive as you can possibly be,” Rep. Davis said. Republicans now control Congress and the White House, and African-American lawmakers, most of whom are Democrats, are left to figure out how to oppose and work with the new administration and the majority party on Capitol Hill.

Trump denounces intel reports of damaging info from Russian hacking Free Press wire report

New York A defiant President-elect Donald Trump on Wednesday adamantly denied reports that Russia had compromising personal and financial information about him, calling it a “tremendous blot” on the record of the intelligence community if material with any such allegations had been released. The incoming president, in his first news conference since late July, firmly chided news organizations for publishing the material late Tuesday night. After weeks of scoffing at reports that Russians had interfered in the election, he conceded publicly for the first time that Russia was likely responsible for the hacking of the Democratic National Committee. “As far as hacking, I think it was Russia,” he said and quickly added that the United States is hacked by other countries as well, including China. Mr. Trump’s extraordinary defense against the unsubstantiated intelligence report, just nine days before his inauguration, dominated a highly anticipated press conference in which he also announced a

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new cabinet member, detailed his plans to disentangle himself from his sprawling global business empire, gave his outlook on the future of the Obamacare health care law and said he would soon nominate someone to fill the vacancy on the U.S. Supreme Court. “I think it’s a disgrace that information would be let out. I saw the information, I read the information outside of that meeting,” he said, a reference to a classified briefing he received last week from intelligence leaders. “It’s all fake news, it’s phony stuff, it didn’t happen,” Mr. Trump said in a news conference that saw him repeatedly joust with reporters. “It was gotten by opponents of ours.” Asked about his relationship with Russian President Vladimir Putin, Mr. Trump boasted that it is an improvement over what he called America’s current “horrible relationship with Russia” and did not criticize the Russian leader for any interference in the election. “If Putin likes Donald Trump, guess what, folks, that’s called an asset not a liability. I don’t know if I’m going to get along with Vladimir Putin — I hope I do — but there’s a good chance I won’t.” Mr. Trump, Vice President-

elect Mike Pence proven information and incoming White about close coorHouse press secredination between tary Sean Spicer also Mr. Trump’s inner denounced the report circle and Russians about Russia’s influhacking into Demoence on Trump. The cratic accounts, as incoming president well as unproven said it never should claims about unusual have been released. sexual activities by He thanked some Mr. Trump among Mr. Trump news organizations other suggestions atfor showing restraint. tributed to anonymous sources, A U.S. official told The that could possibly make him Associated Press on Tuesday a target of blackmail. night that intelligence officials The Associated Press has had informed Mr. Trump last not authenticated any of the week about an unsubstantiated claims. report that Russia had comproOnly days from his inauguramising personal and financial tion as the nation’s 45th presiinformation about him. The of- dent, Mr. Trump announced ficial spoke on the condition of that he would nominate David anonymity because the official Shulkin to lead the U.S. Dewas not allowed to publicly partment of Veterans Affairs, discuss the matter. elevating him from his curMr. Trump and President rent role as a Veterans Affairs Obama were briefed on the in- undersecretary. telligence community’s findings He promised that a relast week, the official said. placement for the health care Media outlets reported on the overhaul would be offered document late Tuesday and Mr. “essentially simultaneously” Trump denounced it on Twitter with the repeal of President before his news conference as Obama’s signature health law “fake news,” suggesting he was — something that would be being persecuted for defeating virtually impossible to quickly other GOP presidential hopefuls pass given the complexity of and Democrat Hillary Clinton the policy changes. in the election. Republicans agree on repealThe dossier contains un- ing the law, but nearly seven

years after its passage have failed to reach agreement on its replacement. Mr. Trump has repeatedly said that repealing and replacing “Obamacare” was a top priority, but has never fully explained how he plans to do it. House Speaker Paul Ryan has said that the House would seek to take both steps “concurrently.” Turning to his plans to build a border wall along the southern border, Mr. Trump said he would immediately begin negotiations with Mexico on funding his promised wall after he takes office. He again vowed that “Mexico will pay for the wall,” but the United States would be reimbursed for putting up the money. Mr. Trump recommitted to his plans to impose a border tax on manufacturers who shut plants and move production abroad. While the tax policy could retain jobs, it would also carry the risk of increasing prices for consumers. Mr. Trump also said he would probably name his choice to fill the vacancy left by the 2016 death of U.S. Supreme Court justice Antonin Scalia in about two weeks after the inauguration. And he announced his plans for the future of the Trump Organization, bringing to the

podium attorney Sheri Dillon of Morgan Lewis, who worked with the Trump Organization on the arrangement. Ms. Dillon said the Trump Organization would continue to pursue deals in the United States, although Mr. Trump will relinquish control of the company to his sons and an executive, put his business assets in a trust and take other steps to isolate himself from his business. She said Mr. Trump “should not be expected to destroy the company he built.” The move appears to contradict a previous pledge by the president-elect. In a tweet last month, Mr. Trump vowed to do “no new deals” while in office. The lawyer said Mr. Trump would donate all profits from foreign government payments to his hotels to the U.S. treasury. And pushing back against some ethics experts, Ms. Dillon said the so-called emoluments clause of the U.S. Constitution does not apply to foreign payments to Mr. Trump’s company. While some ethics officials have said that foreign leaders who pay for rooms and services at his various hotels would run afoul of the constitutional ban on foreign gifts or payments to the president, Ms. Dillon referred to it as a “fair-value exchange.”

Hospital ICU nurses told to apply for other jobs Continued from A1

of reprisal, said the staff has been told that ICU patient monitors are to be pulled out of the ICU as of Tuesday, Jan. 17, and relocated to four patient rooms on the second floor. Those rooms are to be designated as a Progressive Care Unit, or PCU, for more sickly patients, with the machines to be checked by nurses on the floor,

most of whom do not hold ICU credentials, the staff member said. “They will need training. No one is quite sure how this is to work,” the staff member said. “Make no mistake: A PCU does not provide the same level of care as an ICU,” the person said. “If a patient starts crashing or is in trouble, we have been told that patient would have to be moved immediately either to St. Mary’s or MRMC. We aren’t going to

keep them at RCH.” The reason for the ICU’s closure is unclear as Richmond Community has become a highly profitable arm of Bon Secours operations. According to a new report on earnings of Virginia hospitals that the Thomas Jefferson Institute for Public Policy issued Tuesday, RCH made a profit of $39.9 million in 2016, a 76 percent increase over the $22.7 million in profit RCH earned in 2015.

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Continued from A1

Ms. Jones began working with Mr. Wilder in his law office in the 1970s, handling receptionist and clerical duties, he told the Free Press during a brief phone interview Wednesday. She remained with Mr. Wilder, now 85, through his election as lieutenant governor, governor and mayor and then went with him to Virginia Commonwealth University, where he taught and has an office. She retired

two years ago. Mr. Jung said when a new executive assistant was hired in 2015, that person discovered that Ms. Jones wrote 35 unauthorized checks to herself from the mayoral campaign account. The checks’ memo lines indicated the payments were for consulting fees. However, the fees were not reported to the state, Mr. Jung said. That’s when the police got involved. Mr. Wilder said he was shocked. He said he never would have suspected Ms.

Jones of such a crime. “This isn’t a happy time for any of us,” he said. In a statement released to the media, Mr. Wilder said: “Needless to say, this has been a shocking and disturbing ordeal. I am thankful for the cooperation of the Richmond Police Department and the Commonwealth’s Attorney’s Office for investigating and resolving the matter appropriately.” Ms. Jones’ attorney, Jeffrey A. Oppleman, did not respond to Free Press

requests for comment. This is the second time Mr. Wilder’s campaign funds have been a source of legal troubles. In 2007, Mr. Wilder’s son, Lawrence D. Wilder Jr., pleaded guilty to two misdemeanor charges stemming from mismanaging more than $170,000 left from his father’s 1989 gubernatorial campaign fund. Mr. Wilder said he does not believe there is any connection between the two incidents.


Richmond Free Press

Leaves in snowdrift in the West End

Editorial Page

A6

January 12-14, 2017

Free Press celebrates 25 years A message to our readers by Free Press Publisher Jean P. Boone

Twenty-five years ago in January 1992, I often would refer to the Richmond Free Press as “a baby that wouldn’t stop crying.” Now, while the “baby” is as needy as ever, we have, like all parents, become better as the years have stacked up, one after another, each with new challenges. Embracing merciless deadlines and Publisher Jean P. Boone 14-hour plus workdays were just some of the adjustments to which this fledgling staff had to adapt. Some of us had come with hard-driving work ethics from other professions, yet we had steep learning curves. On Sunday, Jan. 15, the Free Press celebrates its 25th anniversary. Four of us from the original staff are still here. And while my major responsibility in 1992 and beyond was generating revenue to ensure and sustain Free Press profitability, it was difficult not to pay attention and have opinions about the issues, stories, headlines and editorials that founding publisher, the late Raymond H. Boone wrote every week. I understood then, and even more so today, that the mission-driven content of the Free Press was and is what makes our publication uniquely relevant then and definitively so today. In a city where enormous positive strides have taken place during the last two and a half decades, there is still much to do. We have a hopeful local future, Founder Raymond H. Boone led now by a newly elected, energetic mayor, accountable directly to the citizens of Richmond. Just think: Mayor Levar M. Stoney was 10 years old when the Free Press began. The dream of a newspaper that is relevant, well written, reader friendly and thought provoking began long ago for the founder, who shared his desire with his Boston University frat brothers in the early 1960s. When time came to support the new venture, the backing was there from the many friends accumulated throughout the years. The Free Press continues to be fueled by incredible support and goodwill that grows each year. Widespread, sustained reader support has been the bedrock of this publication for 25 years. Our intent each week — 52 weeks a year — has been to bring relevant, thought-provoking, information readers can use. “Kill the dull” was a refrain heard in the newsroom for years. The Free Press has never shied away from tackling tough issues. We believe our most important job is to be the people’s watchdog, holding government accountable to the people. The First Amendment is so sacred to our founder that the Free Press, by its very name, embodies its allegiance to free expression and open, robust debate. Tackling issues such as systemic poverty, racism, economic and legal system injustice by shining a light on ugly and hurtful situations and by speaking truth to power has been the signature of the Free Press. During our 25 years, the Free Press is proud of many achievements. Among them: Helped elect the first AfricanAmerican president of the United States, President Barack Obama; supported a hometown politician for vice president of the United States, Sen. Tim Kaine, who began his 1994 political journey to become a Richmond City Councilman supported by the Free Press; continually draw attention to quality of life issues affecting the people of Richmond and surrounding counties, including crumbling schools and potholes; and supported the Occupy Movement by giving protesters a place to stay on the founder’s front lawn when they were kicked off city property. The most persistent issue is economic unfairness, whether for the factory worker or the business owner of color. In today’s world, where a narcissistic billionaire who keeps company with KKK sympathizers and believes that religion should be a litmus test for who can live in the United States, will become the next president, the relevance of the Free Press has grown exponentially. Undaunted and unbowed, our pledge is to keep faith with our mission.

File photo

Inaugural officers and members of the board of directors of Paradigm Communications, parent company of the Richmond Free Press, in 1992. From left, the late Dr. Allix B. James; Dr. Elwood Boone Jr.; the late publisher, president and CEO Raymond H. Boone; the late Darrel Rollins, secretary; the late Dr. William S. Thornton, board chairman; Beverly Davis, the late Leonard Lambert, treasurer; Dr. Lerla Joseph and Clarence L. Townes Jr.

Sandra Sellars/Richmond Free Press

To improve schools, let’s work together The success of Richmond Public Schools, its students, and its families is critically important to the City of Richmond and will be a top priority in my mayoral administration. Voters in 2016 made it very clear that they want their leaders to prioritize education, and that they want to see public officials collaborate to support schools. R i c h mond Public Schools faces many challenges, none more so than the impact of poverty on both our neighborhoods and our children’s ability to learn. We, therefore, must take a comprehensive approach that addresses the needs of children and their families, inside and outside of the classroom, in order to succeed in our effort to improve educational outcomes and reduce poverty in the City of Richmond. This goal — to improve educational outcomes and reduce poverty — is challenging on its own, but it is even more challenging in a climate of scarce resources. About two in five children in the city live in poverty, and nearly four in five RPS students are classified as low-income. Helping these children reach their innate potential often requires extra support and attention. Yet resources in the city are limited. State funding has been flat in recent years, the statewide funding formula disadvantages Richmond and

the city itself has other critical needs such as infrastructure and public safety. Success thus demands that the mayor, City Council and School Board work together to establish not only clear goals and associated measures of accountability, but also a shared understanding of what resources are necessary to accomplish these goals. As

Levar M. Stoney we’ve learned during the past few years, without a commitment to work together toward common goals using a common plan, we have no hope of making durable progress or meeting all our funding needs. I am confident that we have an historic opportunity to permanently transform the City of Richmond if we are willing to work together, make difficult compromises when necessary and stand shoulder to shoulder to fight for the future of our city’s children. As mayor, I aim to support Richmond Public Schools so that we have a school system that provides a top tier education to all of our children, especially those who face extra challenges due to poverty. Past mayors have criticized the shortcomings of Richmond Public Schools and tried various approaches to influence the actions of schools. As mayor, I am trying something different. Rather than pit the needs of schools against the needs of other agencies in city government, I will lead the city to work collaboratively with RPS in a way that

addresses the whole child. That means that we must pay attention to critical needs within RPS, like recruiting and compensating great leaders for our schools and classrooms. It also means that we must pay attention to strong support services, to after-school and summertime programs and to what is going on at home. It means that we must not only engage parents and families, but also ways for parents and families to further their own education and bolster their own careers. It means that we have to invest in public safety, and it means that all those who interact with children in Richmond understand the history of our community and the impact of trauma on many kids. It means we have to cultivate hope, high expectations and high self-worth for all of our kids and all of our families. I call my approach the “Education Compact.” At its most basic level, the Education Compact is an agreement among the mayor, City Council and the School Board to work together on a shared vision to improve outcomes for Richmond’s children and families. The substance of the compact will include articulated goals, metrics for success and measures of accountability. It will also include commitments to regularly communicate, to build and sustain trust and to seek opportunities for cooperation. And it will include the development of a framework to ensure that we meet the long-term financial needs of schools and families. I do not expect the compact,

Why support the D.C. Women’s March? “Ain’t I A Woman? I have ploughed and planted and gathered into barns, and no man could head me! And ain’t I a woman! I could work as much and eat as much as a man — when I could get it — and bear the lash as well. And ain’t I a woman?  I’ve bourne thirteen children and seen most all sold off and when I cried out with my mother’s grief, none but Jesus heard me! And ain’t I a woman.” — Sojourner Truth The similarities and differences between black and white women are captured in Sojourner Truth’s famous December 1851 speech. She movingly talks about the men who say women should be “helped into carriages, and moved over ditches, and have the best place everywhere,” while “nobody ever helps me into carriages or over mud puddles, or gives me any best place.” Both black and white women cry a mother’s grief for the loss of a child, and both endure labor pains. Black women’s lives, while similar, are different and often disadvantaged because they lack the privilege that white women so easily take for granted and often fail to notice or remedy. Thus it did not surprise me that a white woman in Hawaii

called for a “Women’s March on Washington” on Saturday, Jan. 21, the day after the presidential inauguration.  And it did not surprise me when white women took up the call.  Too bad these same white women did not advocate more forcefully against the man who

Julianne Malveaux won the Electoral College vote for the presidency. My first inclination was to ignore this women’s march. The organizers have repeatedly struck me as tone deaf and indifferent to the diverse needs of women. But when I talked to Tamika Mallory, the dynamic young woman activist who was once executive director of the Rev. Al Sharpton’s National Action Network, I shifted my perspective.  Ms. Mallory shared that, just a few days after the initial call to march was issued, organizers reached out to her asking for help.  She said they said they “needed to ensure that women of color were involved.” Now, there are four co-chairs of the Women’s March on Washington, including AfricanAmerican leader Tamika Mallory; Latina activist and part of Harry Belafonte’s Gathering for Justice, Carmen Perez; a white woman entrepreneur whose T-shirts have been galvanizing, Bob Bland; and Palestinian activist Linda Sarsour. 

I applaud the diversity in leadership, but wonder how many women of color will turn out in Washington for the march. Many AfricanAmerican women have looked askance, perhaps with distaste from the cultural appropriation of the initial organizing descriptive, “Million Women’s March,” perhaps because we recoil from the strong support white women gave the president-elect, choosing race loyalty over gender, class or personal interest. Absent the involvement of young black women like Ms. Mallory, it would be extremely easy for me to ignore this march. But because some women have drawn a line in the sand and insisted on space for black women in this march, they deserve support.  They remind me of the women of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc., who, in 1913, elbowed their way into the Women’s Suffrage March when their involvement was unwelcome. They reminded the Women’s Suffrage Association that black women were also women, and we would not be excluded. This march is to remind all watching that “women’s rights are human rights.” Information on the women’s march is available from www. womensmarch.com. The writer is an economist, author and former president of Bennett College, an HBCU in Greensboro, N.C.

The Free Press welcomes letters The Richmond Free Press respects the opinions of its readers. We want to hear from you. We invite you to write the editor. All letters will be considered for publication. Concise, typewritten letters related to public matters are preferred. Also include your telephone number(s). Letters should be addressed to: Letters to the Editor, Richmond Free Press, P.O. Box 27709, 422 East Franklin Street, Richmond, VA 23261, or faxed to: (804) 643-7519 or e-mail: letters@richmondfreepress.com.

by itself, to solve all problems or to prevent all disagreement. Rather, I expect the compact to set the terms of a healthy civic discussion, based on this simple premise: All elected officials in Richmond have an interest in seeing schools succeed and children and families thrive. I applaud the statement adopted last week by the Richmond School Board in support of developing an Education Compact, as well as the supportive remarks made by City Council President Chris Hilbert and Vice President Cynthia Newbille. I look forward to working closely with both bodies in the next two months and over the longer term to develop and institutionalize the Education Compact. I am committed as mayor, and hereby commit my administration, to developing a healthy collaborative relationship with both the School Board and City Council. This is what our citizens expect and what our children need, and it’s the only way to attain sustainable success. Let’s make it happen! The writer is mayor of the City of Richmond. He can be reached at askthemayor@ richmondgov.com.

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Richmond Free Press

January 12-14, 2017

A7

Special from President of the United States

President Obama’s farewell speech Text of President Obama’s farewell speech Tuesday night in Chicago, as prepared for delivery.

It’s good to be home. My fellow Americans, Michelle and I have been so touched by all the well-wishes we’ve received over the past few weeks. But tonight it’s my turn to say thanks. Whether we’ve seen eye to eye or rarely agreed at all, my conversations with you, the American people — in living rooms and schools; at farms and on factory floors; at diners and on distant outposts — are what have kept me honest, kept me inspired, and kept me going. Every day, I learned from you. You made me a better president, and you made me a better man. I first came to Chicago when I was in my early 20s, still trying to figure out who I was; still searching for a purpose to my life. It was in neighborhoods not far from here where I began working with church groups in the shadows of closed steel mills. It was on these streets where I witnessed the power of faith, and the quiet dignity of working people in the face of struggle and loss. This is where I learned that change only happens when ordinary people get involved, get engaged, and come together to demand it. After eight years as your president, I still believe that. And it’s not just my belief. It’s the beating heart of our American idea — our bold experiment in self-government. It’s the conviction that we are all created equal, endowed by our Creator with certain unalienable rights, among them life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. It’s the insistence that these rights, while self-evident, have never been self-executing; that We, the People, through the instrument of our democracy, can form a more perfect union. This is the great gift our Founders gave us. The freedom to chase our individual dreams through our sweat, toil, and imagination — and the imperative to strive together as well, to achieve a greater good. For 240 years, our nation’s call to citizenship has given work and purpose to each new generation. It’s what led patriots to choose republic over tyranny, pioneers to trek west, slaves to brave that makeshift railroad to freedom. It’s what pulled immigrants and refugees across oceans and the Rio Grande, pushed women to reach for the ballot, powered workers to organize. It’s why GIs gave their lives at Omaha Beach and Iwo Jima; Iraq and Afghanistan — and why men and women from Selma to Stonewall were prepared to give theirs as well. So that’s what we mean when we say America is exceptional. Not that our nation has been flawless from the start, but that we have shown the capacity to change, and make life better for those who follow. Yes, our progress has been uneven. The work of democracy has always been hard, contentious and sometimes bloody. For every two steps forward, it often feels we take one step back. But the long sweep of America has been defined by forward motion, a constant widening of our founding creed to embrace all, and not just some. If I had told you eight years ago that America would reverse a great recession, reboot our auto industry, and unleash the longest stretch of job creation in our history ... if I had told you that we would open up a new chapter with the Cuban people, shut down Iran’s nuclear weapons program without firing a shot, and take out the mastermind of 9/11 ... if I had told you that we would win marriage equality, and secure the right to health insurance for another 20 million of our fellow citizens — you might have said our sights were set a little too high. But that’s what we did. That’s what you did. You were the change. You answered people’s hopes, and because of you, by almost every measure, America is a better, stronger place than it was when we started. In 10 days, the world will witness a hallmark of our democracy: the peaceful transfer of power from one freely elected president to the next. I committed to President-elect Trump that my administration would ensure the smoothest possible transition, just as President Bush did for me. Because it’s up to all of us to make sure our government can help us meet the many challenges we still face. We have what we need to do so. After all, we remain the wealthiest, most powerful, and most respected nation on Earth. Our youth and drive, our diversity and openness, our boundless capacity for risk and reinvention mean that the future should be ours. But that potential will be realized only if our democracy works. Only if our politics reflects the decency of the people. Only if all of us, regardless of our party affiliation or particular interest, help restore the sense of common purpose that we so badly need right now. That’s what I want to focus on tonight — the state of our democracy. Understand, democracy does not require uniformity. Our founders quarreled and compromised, and expected us to do the same. But they knew that democracy does require a basic sense of solidarity — the idea that for all our outward differences, we are all in this together; that we rise or fall as one. There have been moments throughout our history that threatened to rupture that solidarity. The beginning of this century has been one of those times. A shrinking world, growing inequality; demographic change and the specter of terrorism — these forces haven’t just tested our security and prosperity, but our democracy as well. And how we meet these challenges to our democracy will determine our ability to educate our kids, and create good jobs, and protect our homeland. In other words, it will determine our future. Our democracy won’t work without a sense that everyone has economic opportunity. Today, the economy is growing again; wages, incomes, home values, and retirement accounts are rising again; poverty is falling again. The wealthy are paying a fairer share of taxes even as the stock market shatters records. The unemployment rate is near a ten-year low. The uninsured rate has never, ever been lower. Health care costs are rising at the slowest rate in 50 years. And if anyone can put together a plan that is demonstrably better than the improvements we’ve made to our health care system — that covers as many people at less cost — I will publicly support it. That, after all, is why we serve — to make people’s lives better, not worse. But for all the real progress we’ve made, we know it’s not enough. Our economy doesn’t work as well or grow as fast when a few prosper at the expense of a growing middle class. But stark inequality is also corrosive to our democratic principles. While the top one percent has amassed a bigger share of wealth and income, too many families, in inner cities and rural counties, have been left behind — the laid-off factory worker; the waitress and health care worker who struggle to pay the bills — convinced that the game is fixed against them, that their government only serves the interests of the powerful — a recipe for more cynicism and polarization in our politics. There are no quick fixes to this long-term trend. I agree that our trade should be fair and not just free. But the next wave of economic dislocation won’t come from overseas. It will come from the relentless pace of automation that makes many good, middle-class jobs obsolete. And so we must forge a new social compact — to guarantee all our kids the education they need; to give workers the power to unionize for better wages; to update the social safety net to reflect the way we live now and make more reforms to the tax code so corporations and individuals who reap the most from the new economy don’t avoid their obligations to the country that’s made their success possible. We can argue about how to best achieve these goals. But we can’t be complacent about the goals themselves. For if we don’t create opportunity for all people, the disaffection and division that has stalled our progress will only sharpen in years to come. There’s a second threat to our democracy — one as old as our nation itself. After my election, there was talk of a post-racial America. Such a vision, however well-intended, was never realistic. For race remains a potent and often divisive force in our society. I’ve lived long enough to know that race relations are better than they were 10,

or 20, or 30 years ago — you can see it not just in statistics, but in the attitudes of young Americans across the political spectrum. But we’re not where we need to be. All of us have more work to do. After all, if every economic issue is framed as a struggle between a hardworking white middle class and undeserving minorities, then workers of all shades will be left fighting for scraps while the wealthy withdraw further into their private enclaves. If we decline to invest in the children of immigrants, just because they don’t look like us, we diminish the prospects of our own children — because those brown kids will represent a larger share of America’s workforce. And our economy doesn’t have to be a zero-sum game. Last year, incomes rose for all races, all age groups, for men and for women. Going forward, we must uphold laws against discrimination — in hiring, in housing, in education and the criminal justice system. That’s what our Constitution and highest ideals require. But laws alone won’t be enough. Hearts must change. If our democracy is to work in this increasingly diverse nation, each one of us must try to heed the advice of one of the great characters in American fiction, Atticus Finch, who said “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view until you climb into his skin and walk around in it.” For blacks and other minorities, it means tying our own struggles for justice to the challenges that a lot of people in this country face — the refugee, the immigrant, the rural poor, the transgender American, and also the middle-aged white man who from the outside may seem like he’s got all the advantages, but who’s seen his world upended by economic, cultural, and technological change. For white Americans, it means acknowledging that the effects of slavery and Jim Crow didn’t suddenly vanish in the ’60s; that when minority groups voice discontent, they’re not just engaging in reverse racism or practicing political correctness; that when they wage peaceful protest, they’re not demanding special treatment, but the equal treatment our Founders promised. For native-born Americans, it means reminding ourselves that the stereotypes about immigrants today were said, almost word for word, about the Irish, Italians, and Poles. America wasn’t weakened by the presence of these newcomers; they embraced this nation’s creed, and it was strengthened. So regardless of the station we occupy; we have to try harder; to start with the premise that each of our fellow citizens loves this country just as much as we do; that they value hard work and family like we do; that their children are just as curious and hopeful and worthy of love as our own. None of this is easy. For too many of us, it’s become safer to retreat into our own bubbles, whether in our neighborhoods or college campuses or places of worship or our social media feeds, surrounded by people who look like us and share the same political outlook and never challenge our assumptions. The rise of naked partisanship, increasing economic and regional stratification, the splintering of our media into a channel for every taste — all this makes this great sorting seem natural, even inevitable. And increasingly, we become so secure in our bubbles that we accept only information, whether true or not, that fits our opinions, instead of basing our opinions on the evidence that’s out there. This trend represents a third threat to our democracy. Politics is a battle of ideas; in the course of a healthy debate, we’ll prioritize different goals, and the different means of reaching them. But without some common baseline of facts; without a willingness to admit new information, and concede that your opponent is making a fair point, and that science and reason matter, we’ll keep talking past each other, making common ground and compromise impossible. Isn’t that part of what makes politics so dispiriting? How can elected officials rage about deficits when we propose to spend money on preschool for kids, but not when we’re cutting taxes for corporations? How do we excuse ethical lapses in our own party, but pounce when the other party does the same thing? It’s not just dishonest, this selective sorting of the facts; it’s self-defeating. Because as my mother used to tell me, reality has a way of catching up with you. Take the challenge of climate change. In just eight years, we’ve halved our dependence on foreign oil, doubled our renewable energy, and led the world to an agreement that has the promise to save this planet. But without bolder action, our children won’t have time to debate the existence of climate change; they’ll be busy dealing with its effects: environmental disasters, economic disruptions, and waves of climate refugees seeking sanctuary. Now, we can and should argue about the best approach to the problem. But to simply deny the problem not only betrays future generations; it betrays the essential spirit of innovation and practical problem-solving that guided our Founders. It’s that spirit, born of the enlightenment, that made us an economic powerhouse — the spirit that took flight at Kitty Hawk and Cape Canaveral; the spirit that that cures disease and put a computer in every pocket. It’s that spirit — a faith in reason, and enterprise, and the primacy of right over might, that allowed us to resist the lure of fascism and tyranny during the Great Depression, and build a post-World War II order with other democracies, an order based not just on military power or national affiliations but on principles — the rule of law, human rights, freedoms of religion, speech, assembly, and an independent press. That order is now being challenged — first by violent fanatics who claim to speak for Islam; more recently by autocrats in foreign capitals who see free markets, open democracies, and civil society itself as a threat to their power. The peril each poses to our democracy is more far-reaching than a car bomb or a missile. It represents the fear of change; the fear of people who look or speak or pray differently; a contempt for the rule of law that holds leaders accountable; an intolerance of dissent and free thought; a belief that the sword or the gun or the bomb or propaganda machine is the ultimate arbiter of what’s true and what’s right. Because of the extraordinary courage of our men and women in uniform, and the intelligence officers, law enforcement, and diplomats who support them, no foreign terrorist organization has successfully planned and executed an attack on our homeland these past eight years; and although Boston and Orlando remind us of how dangerous radicalization can be, our law enforcement agencies are more effective and vigilant than ever. We’ve taken out tens of thousands of terrorists — including Osama bin Laden. The global coalition we’re leading against ISIL has taken out their leaders and taken away about half their territory. ISIL will be destroyed, and no one who threatens America will ever be safe. To all who serve, it has been the honor of my lifetime to be your commander in chief. But protecting our way of life requires more than our military. Democracy can buckle when we give in to fear. So just as we, as citizens, must remain vigilant against external aggression, we must guard against a weakening of the values that make us who we are. That’s why, for the past eight years, I’ve worked to put the fight against terrorism on a firm legal footing. That’s why we’ve ended torture, worked to close Gitmo, and reform our laws governing surveillance to protect privacy and civil liberties. That’s why I reject discrimination against Muslim Americans. That’s why we cannot withdraw from global fights — to expand democracy, and human rights, women’s rights, and LGBT rights — no matter how imperfect our efforts, no matter how expedient ignoring such values may seem. For the fight against extremism and intolerance and sectarianism are of a piece with the fight against authoritarianism and nationalist aggression. If the scope of freedom and respect for the rule of law shrinks around the world, the likelihood of war within and between nations increases, and our own freedoms will eventually be threatened. So let’s be vigilant, but not afraid. ISIL will try to kill innocent people. But they cannot defeat America unless we betray our Con-

stitution and our principles in the fight. Rivals like Russia or China cannot match our influence around the world — unless we give up what we stand for, and turn ourselves into just another big country that bullies smaller neighbors. Which brings me to my final point — our democracy is threatened whenever we take it for granted. All of us, regardless of party, should throw ourselves into the task of rebuilding our democratic institutions. When voting rates are some of the lowest among advanced democracies, we should make it easier, not harder, to vote. When trust in our institutions is low, we should reduce the corrosive influence of money in our politics, and insist on the principles of transparency and ethics in public service. When Congress is dysfunctional, we should draw our districts to encourage politicians to cater to common sense and not rigid extremes. And all of this depends on our participation; on each of us accepting the responsibility of citizenship, regardless of which way the pendulum of power swings. Our Constitution is a remarkable, beautiful gift. But it’s really just a piece of parchment. It has no power on its own. We, the people, give it power — with our participation, and the choices we make. Whether or not we stand up for our freedoms. Whether or not we respect and enforce the rule of law. America is no fragile thing. But the gains of our long journey to freedom are not assured. In his own farewell address, George Washington wrote that selfgovernment is the underpinning of our safety, prosperity, and liberty, but “from different causes and from different quarters much pains will be taken to weaken in your minds the conviction of this truth;” that we should preserve it with “jealous anxiety;” that we should reject “the first dawning of every attempt to alienate any portion of our country from the rest or to enfeeble the sacred ties” that make us one. We weaken those ties when we allow our political dialogue to become so corrosive that people of good character are turned off from public service; so coarse with rancor that Americans with whom we disagree are not just misguided, but somehow malevolent. We weaken those ties when we define some of us as more American than others; when we write off the whole system as inevitably corrupt, and blame the leaders we elect without examining our own role in electing them. It falls to each of us to be those anxious, jealous guardians of our democracy; to embrace the joyous task we’ve been given to continually try to improve this great nation of ours. Because for all our outward differences, we all share the same proud title: Citizen. Ultimately, that’s what our democracy demands. It needs you. Not just when there’s an election, not just when your own narrow interest is at stake, but over the full span of a lifetime. If you’re tired of arguing with strangers on the internet, try to talk with one in real life. If something needs fixing, lace up your shoes and do some organizing. If you’re disappointed by your elected officials, grab a clipboard, get some signatures, and run for office yourself. Show up. Dive in. Persevere. Sometimes you’ll win. Sometimes you’ll lose. Presuming a reservoir of goodness in others can be a risk, and there will be times when the process disappoints you. But for those of us fortunate enough to have been a part of this work, to see it up close, let me tell you, it can energize and inspire. And more often than not, your faith in America — and in Americans — will be confirmed. Mine sure has been. Over the course of these eight years, I’ve seen the hopeful faces of young graduates and our newest military officers. I’ve mourned with grieving families searching for answers, and found grace in Charleston church. I’ve seen our scientists help a paralyzed man regain his sense of touch, and our wounded warriors walk again. I’ve seen our doctors and volunteers rebuild after earthquakes and stop pandemics in their tracks. I’ve seen the youngest of children remind us of our obligations to care for refugees, to work in peace, and above all to look out for each other. That faith I placed all those years ago, not far from here, in the power of ordinary Americans to bring about change — that faith has been rewarded in ways I couldn’t possibly have imagined. I hope yours has, too. Some of you here tonight or watching at home were there with us in 2004, in 2008, in 2012 — and maybe you still can’t believe we pulled this whole thing off. You’re not the only ones. Michelle — for the past 25 years, you’ve been not only my wife and mother of my children, but my best friend. You took on a role you didn’t ask for and made it your own with grace and grit and style and good humor. You made the White House a place that belongs to everybody. And a new generation sets its sights higher because it has you as a role model. You’ve made me proud. You’ve made the country proud. Malia and Sasha, under the strangest of circumstances, you have become two amazing young women, smart and beautiful, but more importantly, kind and thoughtful and full of passion. You wore the burden of years in the spotlight so easily. Of all that I’ve done in my life, I’m most proud to be your dad. To Joe Biden, the scrappy kid from Scranton who became Delaware’s favorite son: You were the first choice I made as a nominee, and the best. Not just because you have been a great Vice President, but because in the bargain, I gained a brother. We love you and Jill like family, and your friendship has been one of the great joys of our life. To my remarkable staff: For eight years — and for some of you, a whole lot more — I’ve drawn from your energy, and tried to reflect back what you displayed every day: heart, and character, and idealism. I’ve watched you grow up, get married, have kids, and start incredible new journeys of your own. Even when times got tough and frustrating, you never let Washington get the better of you. The only thing that makes me prouder than all the good we’ve done is the thought of all the remarkable things you’ll achieve from here. And to all of you out there — every organizer who moved to an unfamiliar town and kind family who welcomed them in, every volunteer who knocked on doors, every young person who cast a ballot for the first time, every American who lived and breathed the hard work of change — you are the best supporters and organizers anyone could hope for, and I will forever be grateful. Because yes, you changed the world. That’s why I leave this stage tonight even more optimistic about this country than I was when we started. Because I know our work has not only helped so many Americans; it has inspired so many Americans — especially so many young people out there — to believe you can make a difference; to hitch your wagon to something bigger than yourselves. This generation coming up — unselfish, altruistic, creative, patriotic — I’ve seen you in every corner of the country. You believe in a fair, just, inclusive America; you know that constant change has been America’s hallmark, something not to fear but to embrace, and you are willing to carry this hard work of democracy forward. You’ll soon outnumber any of us, and I believe as a result that the future is in good hands. My fellow Americans, it has been the honor of my life to serve you. I won’t stop; in fact, I will be right there with you, as a citizen, for all my days that remain. For now, whether you’re young or young at heart, I do have one final ask of you as your president — the same thing I asked when you took a chance on me eight years ago. I am asking you to believe. Not in my ability to bring about change — but in yours. I am asking you to hold fast to that faith written into our founding documents; that idea whispered by slaves and abolitionists; that spirit sung by immigrants and homesteaders and those who marched for justice; that creed reaffirmed by those who planted flags from foreign battlefields to the surface of the moon; a creed at the core of every American whose story is not yet written: Yes We Can. Yes We Did. Yes We Can.


Richmond Free Press

A8  January 12-14, 2017

Sports Stories by Fred Jeter Tavon Mealy excels at most aspects of basketball, especially the winning part. You can say the same about Walter Williams. Virginia Union University’s Mealy and Virginia State University’s Williams both have danced to a steady drum beat of team success throughout their young careers. Both will try and add to their legacy of victory in the 22nd Annual Freedom Classic Sunday, Jan. 15, at the Richmond Coliseum. Under Coach Lonnie Blow Jr., defending CIAA champion VSU entered the week 11-3 overall and 3-1 in conference play after last Sunday’s victory over Livingstone College. VUU, much improved under second-year Coach Jay Butler, began the week 12-4 overall and 4-0 in the CIAA with an 83-75 win Monday over visiting St. Augustine’s University. Both squads have their sights set on a CIAA title and a berth in the NCAA Division II playoffs. While VUU and VSU recruit nationally, it’s always a blessing to land quality local players such as Mealy and Williams.  Consider their glossy credentials: Mealy, a 6-foot-3, 250-pound senior, looks more suited to the gridiron than the basketball court. But don’t let his appearance fool you. As a senior at Richmond’s Armstrong High School, Mealy earned All-Region honors in helping Coach Darryl Watts’ Wildcats to a 24-4 record, arguably the best in school history. Moving to Richard Bland College in Peters-

VUU takes on VSU Sunday at the 2017 Freedom Classic Coach Butler

Coach Blow

burg, Mealy was a ringleader Williams is another inspirin the Statesmen’s drive to ing success story. When: 7 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 15 As a junior at Henrico the National Junior College Where: Richmond Coliseum, High School, he spurred Division II crown. 601 E. Leigh St. Ti c k e t s : $ 2 0 a t w w w. the Warriors to a runner-up In the two seasons prior freedomclassicfestival.com or finish in the state 5A Divito Mealy arriving at VUU, by calling VSU at (804) 524-5030 sion. During his senior year, the Panthers were 15-38. or VUU at (804) 342-3887. Henrico High won the title, With Mealy, VUU has gone routing Norfolk’s Norview 26-18 over two seasons. He High School 78-64 in the has been a catalyst with his powerful inside play. He averages 11.3 points state final to finish 28-1. “Walter is a talent, that is for sure,” said per game and six rebounds while hitting .547 VSU Coach Blow. “He’s the kind of guy we from the field. “Tavon is so strong and he has great foot- like to bring in. He understands the sacrifice, work,” said Coach Butler. “He played a lot of what it takes to win.” Coach Blow said either he or one of his soccer when he was younger and it shows in assistants attended “almost every game” Wilhow swiftly he moves his feet.”

VCU beats UMass; ready for Davidson on Saturday

Rachael Pecota, 26, brings uniqueness to Lady Panthers Small, private HBCUs such as Virginia Union University sometimes must explore off the beaten path for talent. Even area health clubs can be on the search list. Rachael Pecota had been away from organized basketball some five years when her jump shot was spotted at American Family Fitness in Midlothian. “I saw Rachael at open gym and thought to myself, ‘This girl can really play,’ ” said VUU Assistant Coach Jasmine Young. “So we started talking.” The chitchat led to Pecota, who had been working at a kindergarten, enrolling at VUU and joining the powerhouse Lady Panthers. She has quickly emerged as a bona fide 3-point threat. “Rachael has an amazing shot with a quick release,” said VUU head Coach AnnMarie Gilbert. “Also she has a tremendous basketball IQ.” The 6-footer joined the Lady Panthers at the start of spring semester and has become a dangerous long-distance hit. During the last three games, all VUU victories, she has connected with the basket. On Jan. 2 against Winston-Salem State University, she connected on three of four treys, scoring nine points. On Jan. 5, in VUU’s game against Shaw University, she hit four of seven 3-pointers for 16 points. And last Saturday against Fayetteville State University, she made two of four treys for six points. Her 60 percent accuracy from behind the arc helped the Lady Panthers go to 12-0 and look very much like the clear favorite to win a second straight CIAA title. “I know it’s a unique situation, but I’ve never felt more at home,” Pecota told the Free Press. Pecota is surely “unique” in terms of her age —  she turns 26 this month  — and her race. The tall blonde becomes the first Caucasian ever to suit up for VUU women’s hoops. On the men’s side, there have been two white players, Tommy Leary in the early 1970s and Vance Harmon in the early 1990s.

Pecota arrives on Lombardy Street with an intriguing hoops résumé, albeit one that needs freshening up. From San Francisco, she graduated from The Urban School in San Francisco’s HaightAshbury neighborhood in 2009 and was rated the 25th best wing in the nation by ESPN/HoopGurlz. From numerous offers, she chose Northeastern University in Boston and led the Colonial Athletic Association school in scoring (13.8) and rebounding (6.2) in 2011. In a notable game against Syracuse University, Pecota nailed seven 3-pointers en route to 25 points. Then things became complicated. It almost reads like a sequel from “The Natural” — the mysterious, older athlete coming out of nowhere to defy Father Time and rediscover stardom. She speaks of a “hardship back home” that led to taking time off. Then there was an ACL tear for Pecota that required major surgery and rehabilitation. She transferred to Fresno State and San Francisco State University, but never played at either California school. Having given up the college dream, she moved to Powhatan County two years ago to be near her mother, Jennifer. “I’ve always had a thing for the East Coast going back to when I was playing AAU,” she said. “It’s like I was destined to live on this side of the country.” She landed a job caring for children during the day and returned to the basketball court at night, facing almost all-male competition at American Family Fitness in Midlothian. “I scouted out all the gyms, looking for one with an open gym,” she recalled. “Growing up, I was always the only girl in the pickup games, so that (playing men) didn’t bother me at all.” Despite wearing a heavy knee brace, Pecota held her own against the men and, in so doing, caught Coach Young’s eye. “I had been going to American Family for years, and before Rachael, I was usu-

Anna Wilson playing at Stanford after previous injury Anna Wilson’s clean bill of health spells trouble for upcoming opponents of Stanford University’s women’s basketball team. Wilson, a Richmond native and sister of Seattle Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson, was held out of the Pac-12 school’s early action due to a concussion suffered last March at the McDonald’s All-America Classic in Chicago. The touted freshman debuted for Anna Wilson Stanford on Dec. 28 with 11 points against Yale. In her first three games, she played 34 minutes, averaging six points for the 12-3 Cardinal. The 5-foot-9 guard played her eighth- through 11th-grade seasons at Collegiate School in Western Henrico County. She moved for her senior year to Bellevue, Wash., with her mother Tammy, where she led Bellevue High School to a 29-0 record and a Washington 3A state title. Bellevue is a short distance from Seattle, just across Lake Washington.  Wilson committed to Stanford University while a sophomore at Collegiate.

liams played for Henrico during its glory run to the state title. Landing Williams helped jump-start a VSU program long overdue for a first-place trophy. When Williams arrived at VSU in the fall of 2015, VSU hadn’t won a CIAA title since 1988. With his help, the Trojans won the CIAA and advanced to the NCAA playoffs. As a sophomore, the 6-foot-4, 205-pound wing is averaging eight points and three rebounds per game, with 15 3-point hits. When it comes to spectacular dunks, few are more entertaining than the high flyer from Henrico. “I just try and get better every day, to be a good teammate,” said Williams. “If you put the time in during practice, it becomes muscle memory in games.” This will be the first of two VUU-VSU matchups this winter that will go a long way in determining the CIAA Northern Division champ. The backyard rivals will meet again at 4 p.m. Feb. 4, at VUU’s Barco-Stevens Hall. It marks first time VSU will have traveled to VUU’s gymnasium in some time. Last year, VSU played VUU at the Arthur Ashe Jr. Athletic Center in Richmond. For several years previously, the Trojans and the Panthers met at Madison Square Garden and the Barclays Center as part of the Big Apple Classic. One person who might be riding the fence for this year’s Freedom Classic is Vance Harmon. VUU alumnus Harmon was a member of the Panthers’ 1992 NCAA Division II national championship team. But more recently, he was Williams’ coach at Henrico High School.

ally t h e only girl,” s a i d Coach Yo u n g , w h o starred at Monacan High School in Chesterfield County and East Carolina University before getting into coaching. Pecota hails from athletic stock. Her father, the late Scott Pecota, was a football lineman at Idaho State University, and a cousin, Bill Pecota, played eight seasons in Major League Baseball, mostly with the Kansas City Royals. Pecota has the remainder of this season and one more at VUU, where she plans to major in sociology or criminal justice. “I’m in a great situation,” she said, her brown eyes sparkling. “I’m back in school, playing with a great bunch of girls,” she said. “I’m expecting nothing less than a national championship.”

Just prior to the Atlantic 10 tournament in March, conference coaches will gather in Pittsburgh to vote on the A-10 Player of the Year. Two top candidates for the honor will be facing off Saturday, Jan. 14, when Virginia Commonwealth University travels to Davidson College in suburban Charlotte, N.C. The Rams’ JeQuan Lewis and the Wildcats’ Jack Gibbs are compiling credentials worthy of postseason hardware. Lewis, a 6-foot-2 senior from Tennessee, averages 16 points, 4.4 assists, 2.3 steals and is the most consistent reason why VCU carried a 13-3 record — 3-0 in the A-10 — and a seven-game winning streak into this week. Lewis saved all 17 of his points for the second half in the Rams’ 81-64 win last Saturday over the UniRams on Tobacco Road  versity of Massachusetts Saturday, Jan. 14   at the Siegel Center. Virginia Commonwealth University Lewis’ effort offset a plays at Davidson College in North 22-point, 11-rebound, Carolina four-blocked shot efTipoff: 2 p.m. Game to be televised fort by Rashaan Holloon the CBS Sports Network. way, UMass’ 6-foot-11, 320-pound center. Gibbs, a 6-foot senior from Ohio, averages 22.3 points, 4.3 assists and leads the A-10 with 2.9 3-point hits per game. While Gibbs has slightly better individual numbers, Lewis has the clear edge in team performance. Davidson was 8-6 overall, 1-2 in the conference entering this week. VCU has been the A-10’s dominant team since entering the league in 2012, compiling an overall 63-21 mark against conference foes. The Rams are still looking for their first Player of the Year, however. Last year, senior Melvin Johnson was All-Atlantic-10, joining Gibbs on first team. Last year’s Player of the Year, St. Joseph’s DeAndre Bembry, left school a year early and is now with the NBA’s Atlanta Hawks. Despite its 15 NCAA appearances, including six straight years, VCU has a relatively short list of conference Players of the Year. They are Calvin Duncan (1983, Sun Belt Conference), Bernard Hopkins (1996, Colonial Athletic Association) and Eric Maynor (2008 and 2009, CAA). Following its victory over UMass, VCU moved to 30th (out of some 350) on the Ratings Percentage Index (RPI), which largely determines NCAA selections and seeds. Also VCU’s schedule is rated 46th toughest nationally to this point.

Mike London headed to Howard Howard University is a perennial football underdog perhaps known more for its dynamic “Showtime” Marching Band than for its gridiron success. Michael London, HU’s new football Coach London coach at age 56, hopes to change that image by sandwiching some improved football around the glitzy halftime performances. London, the former University of Richmond (2008-2009) and University of Virginia (2010-2015) head coach, has been named to succeed Gary Harrell at the MEAC school in Washington. A formal announcement is expected this week. Coach London doesn’t have a hard act to follow in the nation’s capital. Coach Harrell’s Bison were 18-27 four previous seasons, including 2-9 this past autumn. Howard’s trophy case isn’t exactly bursting at the seams. Having started football in 1893, the Bison has won just two CIAA titles — 1912 and 1914 — and just one MEAC

crown in 1993. Howard moved from the CIAA to MEAC in 1970. By comparison, the “Showtime” Marching Band has been invited to play at six NFL stadiums, including in their hometown, Washington. Other notable invites for the band have been for the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City and the 56th Inaugural Parade for President Obama. Coach London, a former UR defensive back, has felt the thrill of victory as well as the agony of defeat on the coaching sidelines. At UR, he directed the Spiders to a 2008 NCAA Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) title and an overall 24-5 record. It didn’t go nearly as well at U.Va., where he was 27-46 in six seasons, including 0-6 against archrival Virginia Tech. He resigned following the 2015 campaign. Coach London’s combined record coaching at the two schools is 51-51. This past season, he served as an assistant coach for a University of Maryland squad that went 6-7. Pigskin optimism is brewing in D.C., despite a lackluster history.

A likely quarterback candidate for Coach London will be Caylin Newton, the younger brother of former Heisman Trophy winner and current NFL star Cam Newton. Caylin Newton The younger Newton has committed to Howard University and plans to enroll this semester. As a senior quarterback this past season at Henry W. Grady High School in Atlanta, Newton passed for 3,322 yards and 33 touchdowns and ran for 1,036 yards and 13 touchdowns. Returning for the Bison is running back Anthony Philyaw, who rushed for 1,230 yards as a junior while earning All-MEAC honors. Howard is hoping some combination of London’s coaching, Newton’s quarterbacking and Philyaw’s running might add up to better results on football Saturdays. No one likes seeing the fans leaving after the halftime show.


January 12-14, 2017 B1

Section

B

Richmond Free Press

Happenings

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Personality: Roslyn C. ‘Roz’ Tyler

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Spotlight on new chair of Virginia Legislative Black Caucus Delegate Roslyn C. “Roz” Tyler of Sussex says she has always wanted to help people. Since 2006, the 56-year-old has represented a district in the House of Delegates that runs from Dinwiddie County to Emporia and Isle of Wight County. She now holds a top leadership role as chairwoman of the Virginia Legislative Black Caucus. She says she took on the new role because she wants African-Americans and other underrepresented groups to continue to have a strong voice in Virginia’s legislative process. The 2017 Virginia General Assembly started Wednesday and will consider laws impacting all facets of life for Virginians. The VLBC, with 18 members, plans to put forth an aggressive agenda during this year’s legislative session. Among them are expansion of early voting in Virginia, increasing the minimum wage and more funding for K-12 public education and higher education. When she isn’t helping to shape the Virginia legislature, Delegate Tyler, a professional physical therapist, is a clinical coordinator of rehabilitative services at Southern Virginia Regional Medical Center in Emporia. She was drawn to the profession after observing the care her mother received as she recuperated from a stroke. “I was impressed with the motivation and encouragement of the physical therapists because they helped my mother return to a functional lifestyle,” she says. Delegate Tyler says the encouragement of her family has been a great motivator and helped fuel her success in public and private life. “I felt that this was a career that I could enjoy because it presented an opportunity for me to make a difference,” she says. Delegate Tyler recommends that people make a difference by letting their voices be heard during this legislative session. She says people can find out what the issues are and what legislators are proposing and how they vote on issues by visiting the General Assembly website: www. virginiageneralassembly.com. The site also provides information on how to get in touch with all 140 of Virginia’s lawmakers via telephone, email and mail. Meet an advocate for the people and this week’s Personality, Delegate Roslyn C. “Roz” Tyler. Latest leadership role: Chairwoman, Virginia Legislative Black Caucus. Duties of position: To make sure we continue to address issues that affect our economic, education, political and social positions for African-Americans and other underrepresented groups.

Date and place of birth: July 18 in Emporia. Current residence: Sussex County. Alma maters: Bachelor’s in biology, Virginia State University; bachelor’s in physical therapy, Old Dominion University; and master’s in education, Virginia State University. Family: Husband, Rufus Tyler Sr.; four children, Rufus Tyler Jr., Ronecia, Rosche and Rameka; and one granddaughter, MacKenzie. How long a member of the Virginia House of Delegates: Since 2006. District she represents in the legislature: 75th District, which includes the City of Emporia and part of Franklin, Greensville and Brunswick counties and part of Dinwiddie, Isle of Wight, Lunenburg, Southampton, Surry and Sussex counties. Why I accepted chairmanship of Virginia Legislative Black Caucus: I wanted to continue to provide the leadership needed to make sure that the Legislative Black Caucus continues to have a strong voice in the Virginia General Assembly and in the Commonwealth. When elected VLBC chairwoman: December 2016. Length of term: Two years. Virginia Legislative Black Caucus is necessary because: I believe we are the voice of the African-American and underrepresented groups in the Commonwealth. Number of members in the VLBC: 18. VLBC’s No. 1 objective: Education is always one of our main goals, and not just making higher education affordable, but

also preserving K-12 public education and creating other career paths. Strategy for achieving it: Well, first it’s the basics — the budget. The budget is always our No. 1 concern to protect education funding and to maintain health care options and social services. Top issues the VLBC will focus on during the 2017 General Assembly session: In addition to education, voting rights is still a big issue. The VLBC disagrees with efforts aimed at disenfranchising citizens. We want to focus on early voting because we want voters to have easy access to vote. Other issues are increasing the minimum wage and criminal justice reform. Perception of the VLBC by other members of the legislature: Very well respected. We bring diversity of knowledge and abilities to the legislature. Also, we bring a knowledge base that many may not be aware of. Status of African-American involvement in Virginia politics: I think we’ve made big strides over the years by making people aware that every vote counts. The most recent election is evidence and an example of that. Politics is: Participation that everyone should be involved with to make positive changes in our communities and our state. What the VLBC can do to advance economic justice: Economic and workforce development is dependent not just on higher education, but training that will develop skills. What influenced you to become involved in politics: I was voted to the Sussex County Board of Supervisors. In rural communities, I became a spokesperson for the elderly. I brought attention to water issues and health care. A good political leader: Is one who listens and is willing to work hard for the community they serve. Best late-night snack: Microwave popcorn. Outlook at start of day: Every morning when I get up, I say, “Thank you, Lord, for helping me live to see another day.” Outlook at end of day: I’ve done my best to make a positive change in someone’s life. When people first meet me

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they think: That I’m friendly and easy to talk to. No. 1 pet peeve: Disorganization. Person who influenced me the most: I think my mother influences my behavior quite a bit as far as motivation, and the same with my husband. They feed my motivation, with a focus on doing the best I can and letting the good Lord do the rest. The book that influenced me the most: “James Weldon Johnson,” Black Americans of Achievement series by Jane Tolbert-Rouchaleau. What I’m reading now: “Say What You Mean and Mean What You Say! Saving Your Child from a Troubled World” by Judge Glenda Hatchett. The one thing that I’ve learned in life is: Treat people the way you want to be treated. My next goal: To retire in a few years and just travel around and enjoy our beautiful country.

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Richmond Free Press

B2 January 12-14, 2016

Happenings

Area events to honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. the keynote speaker. As leader of the National Urban League since 2003, the former New Orleans mayor has raised more than $280 million over five years for the organization. In 2013, he launched “Jobs Rebuild America: Educate, Employ, Empower,” a $100 million, five-year 50-city public-private-nonprofit partnership to boost employment through job training, college prep, entrepreneurship support, tax credits and small business financing. The event is sold out. Free events in the Richmond area include: “City Wide Mass Meeting”: 10 a.m., Monday, Jan. 16, at Cedar Street Baptist Church of

The Richmond community has more than a week’s worth of activities to celebrate the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. this year. Beginning with the Virginia Union University Community Leaders Breakfast on Friday, Jan. 13, and film screenings to community service projects, there are many opportunities to participate in recognizing Dr. King’s legacy. This year marks the 39th year for the Community Leaders Breakfast that will be held at 7:30 a.m. at the Claude G. Perkins Living and Learning Center on the VUU campus, 1500 N. Lombardy St. Marc H. Morial, president and CEO of the National Urban League, will be

‘March on Monument’ set for Saturday A Richmond march on seven blocks of Monument Avenue is to take place this weekend to promote social justice and serve as a counterpoint to Donald Trump’s upcoming inauguration as the 45th president. The aim, say organizers of the March on Monument, is to “peacefully assemble as one diverse and inclusive community to send a message that Richmonders are standing up for those in danger of oppression and being marginalized.” “We aim to galvanize our diverse community and move forward in positive action together,” according to a statement on the march’s Facebook site. Open to all, the march will be 1 to 3 p.m.

Saturday, Jan. 14. The marchers will walk on Monument between North Allen and the Boulevard. Organizers have not said why they chose to march in the shadow of statues to Confederate defenders of slavery, Robert E. Lee, Jefferson Davis and Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson. The Richmond march is an offshoot of the Women’s March on Washington to be held in the nation’s capital on Saturday, Jan. 21, to protest President-elect Trump’s inauguration. Local march organizers are asking community groups and nonprofits to bring information about their organizations for networking.

God, 2301 Cedar St., Richmond. Highlights include “The Journey,” a theatrical production by Margarette Joyner, an instructor at Virginia Union University; message by the Rev. Kenneth E. Rioland Jr., pastor of Union Branch Baptist Church in Chesterfield County; singing; and awards to Richmond Public Schools students. Sponsored by Living the Dream Inc. “A Day On, Not a Day Off” Neighbor-toNeighbor event: Noon Monday, Jan. 16, members of Richmond City Council and volunteers will participate in community service projects organized by the city’s Neighbor-to-Neighbor program. Service projects include tree planting at George Wythe High School, street cleanup at Rady Street and Meadowbridge Road in Highland Park, community garden work and cleanup at Powhatan Hill Park, cleanup at Gillies Creek Park in Fulton and volunteering Brookdale Imperial Plaza on North Side. Part of the National MLK Day of Service. To volunteer, www.handsonrva.org “A Celebration of the Life and Legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.”: 1 p.m., Monday, Jan. 16, Sharon Baptist Church, 22 E. Leigh St. Elijah Coles Brown will present, Dr. King’s “I Have a Dream” speech. Sponsored by Living the Dream Inc. “Breaking the Silence, Stop the Violence MLK Peace March”: 2:30 p.m. Monday, Jan. 16, rally and march. Starts at the parking lot behind Nick’s Market, 1513 Mechanicsville Turnpike. Sponsored by Coaches Against Violence Everywhere, or C.A.V.E. “Virginia Commonwealth University MLK Day Celebration”: 7:06 p.m. Monday, Jan. 16, a silent candlelight vigil and march commemorating the life of Dr. King. Starts at VCUArts Depot, 814 W. Broad St. The vigil kicks off six days of events on campus ending Sunday, Jan. 22, with a community dinner at the University

Student Commons, 907 Floyd Ave. Details: www.MLKDay.vcu.edu. “Honoring the Legacy, Engaging the Dream”: 5:30 p.m., Monday, Jan. 16, University of Richmond, 28 Westhampton Way. Breakfast in the Heilman Dining Center kicks off a day of events that concludes with a commemoration ceremony in Camp Concert Hall featuring keynote speaker Eboo Patel, founder and president of Interfaith Youth Corps. Sponsored by the University of Richmond. 31st Annual Henrico County MLK Celebration: 11 a.m. Monday, Jan.16, at Henrico High School, 302 Azalea Ave. “Remembering the Dream”: 10 a.m. Monday, Jan. 16, at Tabernacle Baptist Church, 418 Halifax St., Petersburg. Dr. Dwight Riddick Sr., pastor of Gethsemane Baptist Church in Newport News, will speak about the legacy of Dr. King. “Randolph-Macon College Celebrating the Life of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.”: Noon, Monday, Jan. 16, Blackwell Auditorium in the Randolph-Macon Center for the Performing Arts, 205 Henry St., Ashland. Dr. Joseph F. Johnson, acting president of Virginia Union University, will be the keynote speaker. The university’s Ujima Gospel Choir will perform. Potluck dinner and screening of the film “Selma”: 6 p.m. Monday, Jan. 16, at First Baptist Church’s Flamming Hall, 2709 Monument Ave. Co-sponsored by First Baptist Church and Mount Tabor Baptist Church. “Living the Dream 2017”: 7 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 17, Ebenezer Baptist Church, 216 W. Leigh St. A panel discussion on black wealth and economics. Sponsored by the Howard University Alumni Club of Richmond and Ebenezer Baptist Church College Ministry. Info: Amie McLain Carter, (202) 423-8752 or amie.j.mclain@ gmail.com.

74th Golden Globe Awards hit notes of inclusion The lack of racial and ethnic diversity in Hollywood was a running joke during last year’s Academy Awards ceremony. This year, several African-Americans were recognized at the 74th Annual Golden Globe Awards, a star-studded event televised from Beverly Hills, Calif. The event is put on by Hollywood Foreign Press Association to honor the best in film and American television during the past year. “Moonlight,” a film that chronicles an African-American man’s journey of self- realization from childhood to adulthood, received six Golden Globe nominations, and was the winner of one: Best Drama. “Please tell a friend, tell a friend, tell a friend,” Barry Jenkins, director of the film, said in accepting the award and trying to boost the film’s box office performance. Viola Davis earned the Best Actress award for her role in the movie adaptation of August Wilson’s play, “Fences.” In her acceptance speech, she said the lead male character in the film, played by co-star Denzel Washington, was her father, “… a man who had a fifth-grade education and did not learn to read until he was 15.” His life may not have been big and loud, she told the audience, but “he had a story and it deserved to be told, and August Wilson told it.” “Atlanta,” an FX original series about two cousins working in the city’s rap music scene, received the award for Best Television Series for a Musical or Comedy. The series’ lead actor, Donald Glover, also received the award for Best Actor in the category, while Tracee Ellis Ross received the award for Best Actress in a TV Comedy for her role as a scattered mom in the ABC series “Black-ish.” “This is for all the women, women of color and colorful people, whose stories, ideas, thoughts are not always considered worthy and valid and important. But I want you to know that I see you,” said Ms. Ross, the daughter of legendary singer Diana Ross. “We see you. “The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story” won for Best Television Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for

ving The i L Deltas reschedule D

Actors shine at Sunday’s Golden Globe Awards in Beverly Hills, Calif. From left, Viola Davis wins Best Actress for the movie “Fences,” Tracee Ellis Ross celebrates her award for Best Actress in a TV Comedy Series for “Black-ish” and Donald Glover gets Best Actor in a TV Comedy Series and Best Comedy Series awards for “Atlanta.”

Photos by Jordan Strauss/Invision/Associated Press

Willy Sanjuan/Invision/Associated Press

Television, with Sarah Paulson, who portrayed Simpson prosecutor Marcia Clark, winning for Best Performance by an Actress in the category. Meryl Streep, an eight-time Golden Globe Award winner who has been nominated 30 times, received the Cecil B. DeMille Lifetime Achievement Award. Without mentioning his name, Ms. Streep criticized President-elect Donald Trump for mocking a disabled reporter during the presidential campaign. “It was that moment when the person asking to sit in the most respected seat in our country imitated a disabled reporter — someone he outranked in privilege,

power and the capacity to fight back. It kind of broke my heart when I saw it,” she told the audience in an impassioned speech. “I still can’t get it out of my head because it wasn’t in a movie. It was real life. “And this instinct to humiliate, when it’s modeled by someone in the public platform, by someone powerful, it filters down into everybody’s life because it kind of gives permission for other people to do the same thing.” The musical “La La Land” received seven Golden Globe Awards, including Best Motion Picture. Jimmy Fallon, host for the awards show, opened with a taped “La La Land”-themed number in which several stars participated.

Livin

, Inc. am re

Founders event

Delta Sigma Theta Sorority has rescheduled its Central Virginia-Tidewater Founders Day Celebration for Saturday, Feb. 18, at the Greater Richmond Convention Center in Downtown. The program was postponed last weekend because of the snow. The Richmond Alumnae Chapter is hosting this year’s program for sorority members from Central and Southeastern Virginia. The annual event commemorates the sorority’s launch 104 years ago on Jan. 13, 2013, at Howard University.

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Living The Dream, Inc. 2017 Events

The Richmond Chapter of the National Caucus & Center on Black Aged, Inc. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Seniors Program Wednesday, January 11, 2017 11:00 AM Fifth Baptist Church

1415 W. Cary Street, Richmond 23220

For Further Information Contact: Mrs. Saundra Rollins 231-9306

“City Wide Mass Meeting”

Monday, January 16, 2017 • 10a.m. Cedar Street Baptist Church 2301 Cedar Street, Richmond, VA 23223

A Theatrical Production by Margarette Joyner Theater Instructor Va. Union University

“THE JOURNEY”

An Inspirational Moment by Pastor Kenneth Rioland,

Union Branch Baptist Church, Chesterfield County, and Great Singing. In addition, selected students of the Richmond Public School System will be honored for their character and achievements. For further information contact Rev. Ricardo Brown at 355-1044

“A Celebration of the Life and Legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.” Monday, January 16, 2017 1:00 pm Sharon Baptist Church

22 East Leigh St. Richmond, VA 23210

Featured Presenter: Elijah Coles Brown “The I Have A Dream Speech” Generation Dream Youth EduConcerts (Music, Dance and spoken word honoring the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.) Friday, February 3, 2017 7pm

Richmond Public Library

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Martin Luther King, Jr. Middle School Sunday, February 19, 2017

Grace Street Theatre For further information contact Mr. Paul Fleisher 232-1002


Richmond Free Press

January 12-14, 2017

B3

Faith News/Directory

Photos by Sandra Sellars/Richmond Free Press

Creating a church home

for about $50,000. Since then, the congregation has spent another $50,000 transforming the exterior. The photo at right was taken Tuesday. Pastor Lee said the church’s next step is to redo the interior so it can be used for worship and other activities. Until that work is done, and there is no firm timetable as yet, he and his congregation will continue to hold services at the Our House community center in Mosby Court.

Pastor Jeffrey A. Lee Sr., left, is on a mission to turn the once roofless building at 2700 Q St. in Church Hill into a home for the church he founded, Spirit of God Ministries International. A full-time Pepsi salesman, Pastor Lee, 52, and his 20-member congregation are making progress, as the before and after photos show. The left photo was taken in September 2012, when the small congregation purchased the building from Greater St. Beulah Holiness Church

Mission Statement: People of God developing Disciples for Jesus Christ through Preaching and Teaching of God’s Holy Word reaching the people of the Church and the Community.

Sharon Baptist Church 22 E. Leigh Street, Richmond, VA 23219 • 643-3825 thesharonbaptistchurch.com Rev. Dr. Paul A. Coles, Pastor

Monday, January 16, 2017 Sunday, January 15, 2017 1:00 PM – MLK, JR. Day of Service 8:30 a.m. ... Sunday School Theme: Bridging The Gap – Hold On 10:00 a.m... Morning Worship

“I Have A Dream” Speech by Elijah Coles Brown

Broad Rock Baptist Church

Mount Olive Baptist Church

5106 Walmsley Blvd., Richmond, VA 23224 804-276-2740 • 804-276-6535 (fax) www.BRBCONLINE.org

Rev. Darryl G. Thompson, Pastor

2017 Theme: The Year of Elevation

Early Morning Worship ~ 8 a.m. Sunday School ~ 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship ~ 11 a.m. 4th Sunday Unified Worship Service ~ 9:30 a.m. Bible Study: Wednesdays, 11:30 a.m. & 7 p.m. Sermons Available at BRBCONLINE.org

(First Peter 5:6)

Noon Day Bible Study

Wednesdays

6:30 p.m. Prayer and Praise 7:00 p.m. Adult Bible Study

Pastor Kevin Cook

Good Shepherd Baptist Church

8:00 a.m. Early Morning Worship 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 11:00 a.m. Morning Worship

Tuesdays

8775 Mount Olive Avenue Glen Allen, Virginia 23060 (804) 262-9614 Phone (804) 262-2397 Fax www.mobcva.org

“MAKE IT HAPPEN”

Sundays

1127 North 28th St., Richmond, VA 23223-6624 • Office: (804) 644-1402 Dr. Sylvester T. Smith, Pastor “There’s A Place for You”

2300 Cool Lane, Richmond, Virginia 23223 804-795-5784 (Armstrong High School Auditorium)

Tuesday Sunday 10:30 AM Bible Study 9:30 AM Church School 6:30 PM Church-wide Bible Study 11:00 AM Worship Service 6:30 PM Men's Bible Study (Each 2nd and 4th) (Holy Communion Thursday each 2nd Sunday) Wednesday (Following 2nd Sunday) 6:30 PM Prayer Meeting

Reverend Dr. Lester D. Frye Pastor and Founder

… and Listen to our Radio Broadcast Sundays at 10:15 a.m. on WCLM 1450 AM

1858

“The People’s Church”

216 W. Leigh St. • Richmond, Va. 23220 • Tel: 804-643-3366 Fax: 804-643-3367 • Email: ebcoffice1@comcast.net • web: ebcrichmond.org Sunday Worship Sunday Church School Service of Holy Communion Service of Baptism Life Application Bible Class Mid-Week Senior Adult Fellowship Wednesday Meditation & Bible Study Homework & Tutoring Scouting Program Thursday Bible Study

11:00 a.m. 9:30 a.m. Every 3rd Sunday 2nd Sunday, 11 a.m. Mon. 6:30 p.m. Tues. 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. Wed. 6:45 p.m. Wed. 4:30 p.m. Wed. 6:00 p.m. Thurs., 11:45 a.m.

Dr. Levy M. Armwood, Pastor  Dr. Wallace J. Cook, Pastor Emeritus

St. Peter Baptist Church

Dr. Kirkland R. Walton, Pastor

Rev. Dr. Kirkland R. Walton for Come and Join us in Worship as we Honor & Celebrate

32

Dr. & Mrs. Walton

Years of Pastoral Service

To empower people of God spiritually, mentally and emotionally for successful living.

Riverview

Baptist Church 2604 Idlewood Avenue Richmond, Va. 23220 (804) 353-6135 www.riverviewbaptistch.org

Rev. Dr. Stephen L. Hewlett, Pastor Rev. Dr. Ralph Reavis, Sr. Pastor Emeritus

Sunday, January 15, 2017

A Prelude To Black History Month

Preached Word delivered by:

SATURDAY, January 14, 2017 9:30 AM

Worship Service at 10:00 am

Rev. Earl Pendleton

Mount Zion First African Baptist Church

Ministry of Music by The Senior Choir, The S. H. Thompson Memorial Choir & Special Guest Saxophonist: Mr. James “Plunky” Branch 2040 Mountain Road • Glen Allen, Virginia 23060 Office 804-262-0230 • Fax 804-262-4651 • www.stpeterbaptist.net

1701 Turner Road, North Chesterfield, Virginia 23225 (804) 276-0791 office (804)276-5272 fax www.ndec.net

Come Join Us!

11:00 AM Mid-day Meditation

Ebenezer Baptist Church

New Deliverance Evangelistic Church

Sunday Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.

SUNDAY, January 15, 2017 Unity Sunday Service – 11:00 AM

REVIVAL

2017

Jesus went throughout Galilee teaching in their synagogues, preaching the good news of the kingdom and healing every disease and sickness among the people. - Matthew 4:23

 

Monday, thru Wednesday, January 23 January 25

Wednesday Services



Noonday Bible Study 12noon-1:00 p.m. Attendance - 73



Sanctuary - All Are Welcome!

 ile Su

1 p.m.

 e ercies iisr  a.m. ul ile Su :0 p.m. ie oore Sree o 

21st Founders’ and Church Anniversary

Sunday



8:45 a.m. 10 a.m.

Save the Date

8:00 a.m. Sunday School 9:00 a.m. Worship Service

1408 W. eih Sree  ichmo a. 0 804 5840

Church School Worship Service

7:30 PM nightly

Bishop G. O. Glenn D. Min., Pastor Mother Marcietia S. Glenn First Lady

Wednesday Evening Bible Study 7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. Attendance - 109

Saturday 8:30 a.m. Intercessory Prayer

You can now view Sunday Morning Service “AS IT HAPPENS” online! Also, for your convenience.

ST. JAMES’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH

l e sp

Friday, March 3 - 7:30 PM Sunday, March 5 - 9:00 AM

Tune in on Sunday Morning to WTVR - Channel 6 - 8:30 a.m. THE NEW DELIVERANCE CHRISTIAN ACADEMY (NDCA)

ENROLL NOW!!! Accepting applications for children 2 yrs. old to 3rd Grade Our NDCA curriculum also consists of a Before and After program. Now Enrolling for our Nursery Ages 6 weeks - 2yrs. old. For more information Please call (804) 276-4433 Monday-Friday, 9am-5pm

1205 West Franklin St., Richmond, Va.

o G Evensong

Martin Luther King Jr.

Sunday, January 15 5:00 PM A service in celebration of the life and work of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Featuring the

Concert Choir of Norfolk State University Dr. Carl W. Haywood, Director For more information, please call (804) 355-1779, ext 323


Richmond Free Press

B4 January 12-14, 2017

Faith News/Directory Richmond Free Press

Faith News/Directory Jury sentences white supremacist Charleston ‘on in eggshells’ 2 racially charged trials to death S.C. with church massacre

B4 November 10-12, 2016

A4

Richmond Free Press

June 25-27, 2015

News

Reuters Free Press wire reports

CHARLESTON, S.C. S.C. CHARLESTON, Trials in two South shootings that rocked country Unrepentant white Carolina supremacist Dylann Roof wasthe sentenced lastdeath year and raisedfor questions racenine in America started last to Tuesday fatally about shooting African-American week, putting the city of Charleston on edge as the community church members during Bible study at a landmark Charleston, awaitschurch, the testimony andthe jury decisions. S.C., becoming first person ordered executed for a Jury hate selection federal crime.continued Nov. 7 in the federal death penalty trialA jury of Dylann Roof,fora about whitethree supremacist whoreturning was charged deliberated hours before with Clementa Cynthia Ethel Tywanza Myra Susie Daniel Sharonda DePayne Pinckney Hurd Lance Sanders Thompson Jackson Simmons Coleman-Singleton Middleton Doctor with federal hate crimes after the shooting deaths of thewhite pasthe decision, capping a trial in which the 22-year-old avowed Clementa Pinckney, supremacist did not fight for his tor, life or show any remorse.who removed the Confederate flag from its Statehouse for the first of murder charges in a pending state trial. the NAACP branch in North Charleston, whereattorney black resiknown its cuisine well-preserved and 19th-century a state senator, and and never eight time He served as his own attorneywas during sentencing in for more than 50and years. Other states18thfollowed suit, taking of Whether he was competent to serve as his own will dents have long complained of racial profi ling by the largely architecture. But Mr. Bamberg said the cases have important parishioners during Bible study asked for forgiveness or mercy or explained the massacre. down Confederate banners and monuments. Mr. Roof had posed be a fundamental issue in the appeals process, Robert Dunham, white police force. of the Washington-based nonprofit Death distinctions. historic Emanuel African Hours earlier, Mr. Roof threw at away one last chance to plead with the Confederate flag in photos.“We have shown how we, as a group, executive Continued frombattle A1 can comedirector together and selling. Walmart, Amazon, Sears, Google, eBay and a host of Mr. Slager was arrested and charged withof murder aftershelves in- and Mr. Roof’s trial iswhose less about his guiltpray orandinnocence than Episcopal Church work slain, out things.” others are pulling symbol hatred off their for his life, telling jurors, “I still Methodist feel like I had to do it.” Malcolm Graham, sister Cynthia Hurd was said Penalty Information Center, said in athetelephone interview. outrage overhe Mr. Roof’s racially motivated attack given More incredibly, is theMr. resolve Mr. Roof has created to banisha bystander’s Internet sales sites. vestigators watched celllikely phonewill video that showed whether will be sentenced to has life in prison or death, in June 2015. The slain included the Rev. Clementa Pinckney, the churchnewThe the jury made the right decision. Mr. Dunham said defense lawyers use the trial to energy to longstanding efforts to eliminate symbols of the the most notorious symbol of racial hatred — the Confederate And flag manufacturing companies, north and south, him fight fiappellate ring eightjudges times promising at back 50-year-old Scott as are said. Mr.theRoof’s lawyers have jail said hefor plead The proceedings un-hate heBamberg pastor and a state senator, as well as other pillars ofgetting the comembodies, notably Confederate flag. smallest Proposals “Theremost is no room in America’s cell hatred, racshow thatthemental illness prevented him battle flag —would the symbol of the Southern for slavery during to stop of making replicas of theMr. flag, nowfrom viewing the remove the flag from license plates andobstruction store the Civilof War, of the Klan’s on black freedom banner as a symbol of hatred and division to be eradicated. heto flstomp ed from the officer. guilty todiscrimination,” 33 statehouses, counts ofstate hate crimes, religion andeffortsadequately at thesexton, U.S. courthouse munity: A high school track coach,derway the church a librarianto ism and he said from his home in Charlotte, N.C. representing himself. shelves are winning wide support in numerous states. during Reconstruction and beyond and the Jim Crow fight tosay the Still,video fringe does groups not are angry, including the Sons of ConDefense lawyers show the whole story firearms charges if prosecutors agreed to seek the death in Charleston as another and an aspiring poet. Theyunfold all shared deep The“The journey for me my family today not has come to supremacy an end.” “We are sorry our best the legal proceedatrocity immediately stirredand memories of the outrages maintain white through separation of the races.that, despite federate Veterans and efforts, the Virginia Flaggers, who eagerly flaunt of what happened after Mr. Scott was pulled over for a broken penalty. Rights Most cited — other the Ku Klux Klan bombcharged trial progresses a few social media imagesings of Mr.have Roof posing withlittle the light the flag.on the reasons for this tragedy,” said devotion to racially the church, Emanuel Africanof the CivilOne ofera. Ms. Hurd’s brothers, MelvinJust Graham, said the shed so ing of a Birmingham, Ala., church. Four little girls werehand, killed could infamousproduce Stars and Bars has been enoughlight. to swiftly change But most once embraced the flag as a symbol brake They will argue thatpeople Mr.who Slager, who has pleaded Mr. Slager’s case, thehollow other asister rare across the street.known Michael Methodist Episcopal Church, asand dozens jury’s “was aon very victory” because his Mr. Roof’s lawyers, who represented for have the been guilt phase. of decision other worshippers and passers-by were maimed attitudes about the flag and regenerate talk in Richmond and of “heritage, not hate”him suddenly forced to recognize not guilty, felt threatened by Mr. Scott as the men struggled result: A guilty verdict against a police offi cer charged with Slager, a white former police and injured. elsewhere about removing statues and symbols the Confederate flag is seen through others’ eyes. Mother Emanuel, and passed that faith along is still gone. Mr.other Roof sat offorthe40how minutes with parishioners gathered for The purpose of these acts: To terrorize African-Americans Confederate and Jim Crow periods. Many have seen the light, transformed in part by attitude over the officer’s gun. fire as they closed their eyestheto or manslaughter. officer in of North Charleston, is murder to their families, many whom offered Mr. “Hecivil decided the day, the hour and minute my sister was going Bible study beforestun opening and halt their rights efforts. From Virginia to Alabama and beyond, governors and other of the Charleston victims’ family members. The defense has asked for Mr. Slager’s trial to be moved to Since 2005, 27 of the 77 officers charged across the beingwhen triedheforappeared murder in in court state Thetoshooter Roof forgiveness in Charleston began is a racial ranttoasdo he it fired die. Now someone going for state him,” heare said. pray, AssistantflagU.S. Jayfrom Richardson said will in only his travel finalso far. leaders hustling to remove the Confederate from Attorney The ripples this tragedy, though, unsuspecting church members. Amanslaughter survivor, who said after a different venue, saying theVirginia security measuresgovernment needed istolikely pre-to tear with murder or anplates on-duty fatal license and take it down from public flagto posts to show Neither nor Richmond’s court the shooting death ofon thecountry just days after the in attack. The jury convicted Mr. Roof last month of all 33 federal statement jurors. Mr. Roof spared her so she could tell what happened, reported support for the Charleston church martyrs and their families. down any Confederate statues. Nor is thewill Richmond School serve order amid the two, high-profi le proceedings make shooting were convicted, according to Philip Stinson, a black motorist Walter Scott in As Mr. Roof spoke during the court hear-him saying: charges including hate crimes. his announced Mr. Roof pulled the trigger 75 totimes asthehenames methodically killed “Youhe rapefaced, our women, and you’re taking over ourHe never Virginiaexplained Gov. Terry McAuliffe Tuesday he would Board likely replace of Confederate leaders on thethearea aroundflag41; the courthouses look “more like anpolicymaking armed camp Bowling Green State University associate professor 2015.five minutes, everycountry. And youtohave to go.” saying join three other states inwho eliminating Confederate from buildings. The majority-black body has ing Tuesday April for about actions jurors, only that “anyone who hates anything Rev. Pinckney, Ms.school Hurd, 54; DePayne Middleton Doctor, Walter Scott This new act such of domestic terrorism comes on the heels of the vanity license plates, though he rejected calls Holy to get rid of the never considered such action. thanSharonda the City.” tracks cases. Blackatcommunity juror looked directly him. A fewactivists nodded“Blackin their mind has a good reason for it.” 49; Coleman-Singleton, 45; Susie Jackson, 87; Ethel Lives Matter” campaign — prompted by police killings huge statues of traitorous Confederates inside and around the President Obama wants to see the outrage over the Confeder“The temporally and territorially, of he Twenty-nine of cases ended no call convicsaid the outcomes will the calm thatthat prevailed after theof unarmedHe black men. One tookthose place incriminal early in Northill Capitol who sought to dismantle Union in70; anjuxtaposition, effort to protect ateboth flag provide fuel to power changes inSr., gun 74; laws, and though as hetest reminded them they said during insisted that he was notApril mentally and with did not any theLance, Myra Thompson, 59; Daniel Simmons Charleston, awhile few miles from for the AME church whose foundthe buying and selling of human beings. has few expectations that will happen. Dylann and Roofcould jury the United States v. Dylann Roof trial taking place literally tion, cases 21 of those offi cers, including Mr. Slager, shootings trigger unrest if those angry about the killselection they could fairly weigh theers included witnesses orVesey, present any evidence. Tywanza Sanders, 26. In his remarks about the Charleston massacre, he said that he has Denmark who plotted a slave uprising that Alabama’s governor just removed the flag from the Capitol across street the simultaneously with Slager’s trial will no areIn pending. ings feel is not factors of justice his case. Onlyserved. one of them, he noted, had to disagreeultimately failed 200journals, years ago.he wrote that he did not onenearly of his believe in psycholThreethepeople the attack. in Montgomery; Mississippi is considering eliminatingsurvived had to speak too often about multiple murders during his tenure. many, theNorth outrageous attack was invention” more a hitthat against bring a media spectacle tobefore, rivalheany ever inmore thisagain, The Charleston casethantriggered national concerns about Confederate symbol from its flag.doubt As was the case said, “We doseen know that once “The him community is, for injection. lack of better words, on eggshells,” Forogy, to spare from a lethal calling it “a Jewish “does nothing but invent Jurors heard four days of heart-rending testimony from peaceable people engaged in expressing their faith; this was a Even South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley,town, who previously innocent people were killed, in part, because someone who wanted or any in addition to hordes of supporters, detractors racial bias in law enforcement, with both trials underscoring said“IJustin Bamberg, a state legislator and lawyer who represents have the right to ask you to give me a life sentence, buthit against diseases andof tell when they don’t.” 20from of the thestatehouse victims’ toloved ones,hadwho described their a symbol blackpeople freedom.they have problems rebuffed NAACP calls to removethan the flag inflict harm no trouble getting his handslegacies on a gun. andfaith activists from every philosophical bent,” Mr. concerns about justice United Mr. not Scott’s “That’s why so many folksequal are so upset. Thisin is athe church that inStates. Columbia, wants this symbol ofcommunity hatred from “Now is the timeby for Mr. mourning and for healing,” he said. I’m surefamily. what good it would do anyway,” he said. His attorneys said he did not want to present anynowevidence of andremoved the devastation wrought Roof’s brutality. so muchconfi about the rich history andin tradition of African-process public property. She is is winning in thelawyer, state legislature “But let’s be wrote clear. At in some point, we as a country will have Slager’s Andy Savage, aracism, motion that has not “Our dence level the justice working like support Both trials are expected to last weeksSeveral and draw na-represents When the verdict was read, he several stood stoic. family that might embarrass him or his family. “What’s wrong here is the calculated the choice to Americans,” said Dr. Robert Greene, who teaches the history of for such action. Two-thirds of the South Carolina House and to reckon with the fact that this type of mass violence does not yet been taken up. sitting and needles,” said Edward Bryant III,need tional attention to thewiped port city abouttears. 133,000 people that isthe 20th-century South at the University of South Carolina. members of victims awayofquiet Senate would to approve thetarget removal. happen in other advanced Afteron hepins was sentenced, Mr. Roof asked a judge topresident appoint a church, particularly the people incountries. a church,” Mr. RichThe saving balm from this horrific slaughter has been the Meanwhile, giant retailers are rushing to distance themselves officials “It doesn’t happen in other places with this kind ofhelp frequency. Law enforcement have asked the community Mr. Roof told FBI agents when they arrested him after thealmosthim new attorneys, but the judge said he was not inclined to do ardson told jurors. “What’s wrong here is whytothis is universal reaction of grief, support, unity and love — from the Confederate flag that they previously profited from And it is in our power to doprecisely something about it.” keep things under control during what Charleston Police Chief June 17, 2015, slayings that he wanted the shootings to bringclearlysonotbecause they had “admirably.” a case that justifies the death penalty.” what the murderer hopedperformed for. He toldMr. authorities wanted to trigger “race war.” sentenced by a judge during Gregory Mullen be death “a very and Marathon important back segregation or perhaps start a race war. Roof,hewho was to beaformally The last personsaid sent would to federal rowdelicate was Boston Instead, in Richmond and elsewhere, he has sparked vigils time for the city.” Instead, the slayings had a unifying effect, as South Carolinaand conversations a hearingabout Wednesday, also faces the death penalty if convicted bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev in 2015. faith and forgiveness. Local civil rights leaders and lawmakers said they fear what The families of the martyrs helped make it happen. At a time when fear, religious doubt and the desire for revenge might have Continued from A1 Robinson tells us intrials no uncertain terms particularly build businesses, if schools and fi institutions might happen as the conclude, jurors nd been expected, the response to Mr. Roof’s hate was love. “what white America owes blacks and that lift and reward us. Mr. Slager not guilty. “I forgive you,” Nadine Collier, daughter of slain church we are and just live in this country. what blacks owe themselves.” We must promise ourselves that we can member Ethel Lance, told Mr. Roof when he was arraigned Even in a social context, a people must “We will justice work, buta lifeif people Whenlet history thrusts upon us live ourperceive lives in suchthat a wayjustice that would do Friday, typical of the views of family members. “I will never determine and analyze the price they pay changing event like Charleston, we must honor and justice to the nine who died at doesn’t work, you’re not sure where this is going,” said Dot hold her again. But I forgive you, and may God have mercy for progress, acceptance and violence and should make promises that we will Mother Emanuel. By Adelle M. Banks Scott, NAACP Death chapter. quiet on your soul.” perpetrated against them. The massacre in president not allow thisoftoCharleston’s happen again. where“There’s is your victory? “Lots ofgives folks expected us to do something strange and break South Carolina reminds of the rumbling terrible hosting ReligionFree News Service Press wire reports We must now.” promise ourselves will prosperity The writerpreachers is interim over executive the preachers a new Hemedefended suburb, and that fiveweother right out in a riot. Well they just don’t know us,” the Rev. Norvel price we have paid in America. protect and defend our community. director of Virginia State Conference kind of prominence. Mr. Trump, saying at the their spending, but the inquiry ended in 2011 In his book, “The Debt,” Randall Goff preached Sunday in leading the reopening of the church. We must promise ourselves that we will NAACP. Two daysWayne after a black MisBishop T. Jackson, who hosted “You’ve got millions of time, “It’s not about being a with no penalty for the televangelists. sissippi church was torched and with his Detroit President-elect Donald Trump people who will see them Judas to my people. I love Pastor White first gained national prominence marked within “Vote Trump” congregation September, is among the religious perform,” Dr. Pinn said. my people. I feel that we as a preacher on B.E.T. in the early 2000s. She graffiti, chosen more than $180,000 has at the new presileaders to offer prayers “There’s a tremendous should be better off than calls Bishop T.D. Jakes of The Potter’s House of the school year in OctoJeff M. Bourne, 3rd District, recalled more than 30 students in some of Donald Coleman, 7th District, backed Continued from A1 dent’s swearing-in nextit.week in Washington. been raised to repair amount of benefit thatbeginning goes what are. This is nother classes. in Dallas her mentor anda “spiritual ber, which was disastrous and highly those sceneswe as “so chaotic, so messed plan from Ms.father.” Larson for the adThe inaugural committee announced that withendorsement. a kid not knowing whether B. “Kim” Gray,TV, 2nd radio ministration move forward with the Thousands of people with Thisto is Kimberly Pastor White’s and tomegachurch the budget along to continue thosethat.” classes. emotional,” he said. “We’re trying to up,an get ahead of it.” go to lunch or go to class.” District, said she was torn on whether leveling plan, while within the School administration officials prosperity gospel The four otheres-religious engagement for him to tell ministries have been lucrative. In 2007, aworking Florida pledged to raisepreachers money Bishop for Jackson, who He said it was the first time RPS Vice Chair Kristen N. Larson, 4th or not to back the leveling plan. budget to try and offer the electives timated they could save up to $1.7 leads GreatMissionary Faith Ministries leaders included us what wants to do.” newspaper that she a $2.1 million Hopewell BaptistInternational, and had the finalized its master schedules District, said shehe thought it would hurt “It almost feelsreported like ‘Sophie’s andowned to work with the board “on district million by implementing Dr. Bedden’s in school in several those students andthe teachers who meet Choice,’ ” she said of the classichad movie, core values” related toTower the arts. plan to cut certain classes andare reassign Pastor White, a friend inaugural the before Rev.the end of During visit, Bishop house in Florida, a condo in Trump ChurchPaula in Greenville, Miss.,of the president- Bishop Jackson White In addition to Ms. Taylor, two other the purpose was to in overcrowded classrooms “to push in deciding between keeping the arts teachers and improve the student- years. He said Pastor elect, will3,join others selected Franklin Graham, son ofscenes like in past years when pause” Jackson placedplan.anSheIsraeli in New York City and bought Bishop Jakes by Nov. farfour exceeding the to participate on the leveling said and music programs intact or keeping board members — Dr. DerikaJones, prevent teacher ratio in certain schools. class sizes convertible manageable. 8th District, and Tichi Pinkney Eppes, some returning studentsshawl would sit in she Mr. received a letter from Huguenot Assistant Superintendent RalphCatholic in the inauguration on Friday, Jan. 20. evangelist Billy Graham; Roman prayer around Trump and agave himcoreBentley for his 50th birthday. original goal of $10,000. After a respectful debate, Mr. 9th District — were not present at Westbay estimated it would cost the auditoriums with no schedules for High School teacher who was “happy” It will be the first preachers who teach Cardinal Timothy Dolan of New York; the a Bible. to past “When I ginned uptime this page the meeting. she first met about the change because she had Bourne, According Ms. Gray and board Chairinterviews, district up to $1.4 million if the level- weeks on end. that God make the faithful rich will be Rev. SamuelingRodriguez, head of the Bishop Jackson also has been criticized for Mr. Trump when he gave her a call after seeing plan were shot down because moreNational before my will first meeting at work teachers would have to be Conference, hired. included in the Hispanic Christian Leadership an his prosperity gospel message, including blessing her preach on TV. They became friends. today, I had no ceremony. earthly clue it The biggest outcry against the levWhile the prosperity gospel movement is evangelical group; and the Rabbi Marvin Hier, water and claiming his faith healings can cure In the past year, Pastor White has spoken eling plan came from those students, would get so big,” writes J. 2011-2049 Grayland Avenue staff, parentsWiesenthal and alumni at the city’s which Continuedsuch from A1as cancer. He areportedly widely popular, many Christians consider it governor can come to automatically restoring gathered for the news conferencemeetings in Highland Park founder of the Simon Center, diseases owns a at Trump rallies and helped organize Blair Reeves Jr., who organized smallest high schools — Open High rights of felons without first changing the state’s on North Side. A few people shed tears. heretical. Ministers in the tradition often hold conducts education about the Holocaust and 39,000-square-foot home with 10 marble firebetween the candidate and evangelical leaders. Richmond, Virginia 23220 and Richmond Community High — a ballot, run for office, serve on juries and become constitution. the GoFundMe fundraising An emotional Mr. Branch thanked God and said up their own wealth as evidence their teachings where students benefit from much a notary no matter howinmuch they still owe. speaks out against anti-Semitism and bias. places the Palmer Woods section of Detroit. She delivered a closing prayer at the Republican Like his predecessors, Gov. McAuliffe has not the restoration of his rights means he will be able initiative last week. “Responses smaller class sizes. Estimates suggest that upreportedly to 350,000 Virginia (804) been able to winby General approval for 358-9177 to “move forward without having to look in the work. Mr. pouring Trump, in a Republican, campaigned Bishop Jackson owns Impact Network, a The home once was owned the Assembly National Convention. have been from all After a series of community dem- adults are barred from voting because of felony automatic restoration of rights of felons upon the rearview mirror.” in parttheonworld, his record a wealthy real estate station that he claims is the theplanlargest Archdiocese Detroit. Shesupervised has been called “Donald Trump’shadGod onstrations against — whichAfricanrecords, withCatholic the largest share unable to getof their completion of their sentence, including Richard Walker, who previously his rights over and as they’re many of the affectedtelevision teachers onlynetwork. rights restored because they havethe unpaid court probation or swearingparole, although that fight is expected restored and now leads a felon advocacy group developer and businessman. American-owned Christian He is to give benediction at the whisperer.” truly extraordinary. Christians, heard about on June 12, the final day debts, including fines, court costs, fees and restitu- to continue. called Bridging the Gap in Virginia, said the Anthony B. Pinn, a Rice University religious He was criticized for— interviewing Mr. Trump onvictims. in ceremony. Pastor said in statement will “I’m of classes the board had passed a tion to While the nextJoseph governorJenkins, could throw theWhite new (Dec. governor’s announcement was ashe surprise. Jr.,outFounder 19,a1938 - Dec. 9,that 2006) Muslims, Jews, Hindus, athemotion from Ms. Taylor a week at earlier “These men and women will stillFinance be requiredCommittee to McAuliffe had studies professor, described prosperity gospel “as the station and policy,investhat would pray not impact anyoneat ecstatic,” he said. having him speak his church The Senate to God the inaugural “that He would ists and many more — from III. • Jason K. Jenkins •said Maxine T.immediately Jenkins Joseph Jenkins, seek more community input and pay their costs and fees,” the governor said, “but whose rights Gov. McAuliffe restores. Mr. Stoney his office will begin a way to religiously rationalize material acqui- during the fallto campaign because tigated White, head of the New Destiny richly bless our extraordinary home, the United learn more specifics about of theMr. planTrump’s their court debts will noPastor longer serve as a financial The policy change expands the governor’s reconsidering applications that were rejected since all over the United States and sition.” He said participating in the inaugural racist remarks before votingminorities. on it. barrier to voting, just as poll taxesV.did for so many Press about Christian Center in Apopka, Fla.,aggressive an Orlando of America.” already approach States to restoring rights Gov. McAuliffe took office in January 2014. OthRogelio Solis/Associate many other countries.” The two dissenting board members years in Virginia.” and builds on the efforts to streamline the process ers whose applications were rejected for failure to A fi re marshal investigates damage at Hopewell Missionary Baptist Church in Greenville, in Monday’s vote were Shonda HarrisIn addition, he will offer those whose rights are that began under his predecessor, former Gov. Bob pay court costs, fines and fees before January 2014 The FBI said it is investigatMuhammed, 6th District, Glen H.1 fi restored vandalized in and a Nov. re. the option to have a notation of that action McDonnell, who began the push to provide felons would need to send in a new request, he said. ing the fire, which Greenville Miss., which was burned and Sturtevant, 1st District. added to their criminal records. a second chance. Hampton Democratic Sen. Mamie Locke, chair Jan. 15, 2017 Mr.together. Sturtevant offered an unsucnew policy, drew immediFire Chief Ruben Brown Sr. NBC News reported. … Y’all continueThetogovernor’s for this crimewhich against people of Since taking office 17 months ago, Gov. McAu- of the Virginia Legislative Black Caucus, is among cessful motion to back the leveling ate bipartisan praise, embraces a recommendation liffe already has restored the rights of 8,250 people those who publicly applauded the governor “for tak10:30 A.M. also said heavily damaged the faith. But ofthey should “Our church was a historicplan topray reducefor classus.” sizes, but to find that the Virginia affiliate the American Civil anTheme forin2016-2020: Ministry — more than any other governor state history, Mobilizing ing aggressiveFor action to put Virginia at the forefront” the money to fund electives slated for Liberties Union advanced to ensure swifter restora- including Mr. McDonnell. church on Nov. 1. Join Us of Emerging restoring rights. The caucus unsuccessfully has Republican Gov. Phil Bryant swer to man’s law.for Authorities church that has been there for Refreshing TheRoad, Old and The New 1701 Turner North Chesterfi eld, Virginia 23225 elimination. tion of rights of felons. He has continued the McDonnell process of championed automatic restoration of rights. Pastor Carolyn Hudson said over 111 years,” Pastor Hudson “I said of Officers lastconfidence week: that “First, are investigating and we expect (804) virtually 276-0791 officefor (804)276-5272 fax www.ndec.net have full this anyone Levar M. Stoney, the Installation member of the governor’s making rights restoration automatic Henrico Sen. A. Donald McEachin, chair of A 21st Century Church We Embrace Diversity — Love For All! could aover the next the 200-member church hadn’t said. “This has left our heartsadministration cabinet who oversees the restoration of rights prowho burns place of worship a suspect will be identifi ed and during Morning Worship! nonviolent felons, but went further in classifying the Senate Democratic Caucus, also commended With Ministry For Everyone months get this done and find a gram, said the governor found the change warranted drug offenders as nonviolent. the governor for keeping his campaign promise to received any recent threats, broken, but we are strongtwo will answer to almightyafter God brought to justice.” Join us for worship solution,” said Mr. Sturtevant. realizing that felons are the only group whose

We shall overcome

The people, price, promise Miss. church torched, vandalized with Trump graffi ti receives support Prosperity preachers to pray at Trump inaugural

For You In This Difficult Hour” School Board votes 4-2 “Working to back ‘leveling’ plan

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Joseph Jenkins, Jr. Funeral Home, Inc. Gov. McAuliffe expands rights restoration

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New Deliverance Sixth Baptist Church Evangelistic Church

He also has reduced the waiting period from championRemember... restoration of rights. Abe Jeffers, who oversees sixth debts can keep them from voting. five years to three years for felons classified as “Individuals who have paid their debt to society Upcoming Events January 15,Deliverance, 2017 through 12th grade education for RPS, “People who owe back taxes can still vote,” violent to apply for rights restoration. He also cut andAt areNew working to be constructive, productive said his staff has worked since February said Mr. Stoney, who serves as secretary of the the 13-page application to one page, “ending the members of their Worship communities should have the 10:45 AMYou Divine Are Home! to craft master schedules for the 2015- commonwealth, and so can others who have debts bewildering tangle of red tape.” opportunity to be full participants,” Sen. McEachin 16 school year. He said it would be all and judgments to the governent. Mr. Branch, who operates a landscaping business said. See you Christ Kids And Christthere Teens but impossible to make new schedules He 2017 said the Republican Sen. Jill Holtzman Vogel of January 27, @policy 7:00 change P.M. could result in an in Chesterfield County, learned he still had court Sunday by the time school starts again if the avalanche of applications from people who want debts when he tried to apply for restoration of hisWorship andEvery bring friend. Loudoun County alsoapraised the governor and board rejected the leveling plan. rights restored. Dynamic, alternative, funtheir worship experience sharingpeople.” with youth rights a few years ago and was rejected. those whose rights he restored for their “courage into a topic of profound different Nursery During Church Dr.moral Beddendisagreement said the delay already different “I may things need moretostaff,” he said, “but that’s a The governor restored Mr. Branch’s civil rights and hard work in pursuit of this opportunity.” andreligious young adult ministriesgood throughout thesaid, Greatershe Richmond hadMany caused some teaching candidates throughout America. groups Rather, fearedarea! that thing.” she and Worship and those of two other people when he announced School Henrico Republican Follow peaceDelegate withPeter allFarrell also to withdraw and take positions elseVirginia is among 12 states with the most restricthe policy change at a news conference at Boaz & cheered. “The importance of participation in voting that believe death should rest only in God’s physician-assisted dying could not be where. tive laws governing the restoration of civil rights Ruth, a faith-based Richmond nonprofit that pro- and civic men, and holiness, engagement cannot be undervalued,” he 400 South Addison Street Twitter hands consider the practice sinful. andhighest that itrate would foster Bishop O. other Glenn He said a delay also could cause properly for felonsmonitored and has the fourth of felony vides job training, housingG.and servicessixthbaptistrva to said. “It is a good thing for the commonwealth that Richmond, Va. 23220 Weekly Worship: Sundays @ 10:30 A.M. without which no(neargranted man Byrd Park) chaosthat similar to last disabled year when the mistrust disenfranchisement according to the people who have served D. Min., their Pastor time and are trying many of our citizens are being a second Opponents also fear elderly, betweenin the thecountry, medical community (804) 359-1691 or 359-3498 Rev.lives. Dr. Yvonne administration had to shuffle teachersSchool: Church Sundays @ the 9:00 A.M.is empowered to rebuild their governor’s office. Only governor chance after serving their debt to society.” Mother Marcietia S. Glenn Facebook shall see the Lord: and poor people could be pressured into and residents. Fax (804) 359-3798 ,greeted Pastorwith shouts and around well into theBible schoolStudy: year. Wednesdays to restore rights. His announcement was For more details, go to https://commonwealth. sixthbaptistrva First Lady @ Noon & 7:00 P.M. www.sixthbaptistchurch.org “Wepremature moved 19 teachers The suggested governor’s policy shift comes as close as the agreeing to their own deaths.in the She before the vote that Hebrew 12:14 (KJV) applause from the several dozen activists and others virginia.gov/judicial-system/restoration-of-rights/

Night D.C. approves ‘Death with Hype Dignity Act’ Religion News Service

WASHINGTON The City Council in the nation’s capital has overwhelmingly voted for a bill that would allow terminally ill people a medically assisted death. That makes Washington the sixth Mechanicsville Turnpike, 23223 jurisdiction nationwide to approve what Some African-Americans2901 in what was council was notRichmond, the properVA place to decide www.ndec.net Sunday opponents often call “physician-assisted until recently a majority-black city argued the question. (804) 648-2472 ~ www.mmbcrva.org 8:00 a.m. Sunday School suicide.” The bill would legalize it for those in the months before the vote thatDr. poor “Given the nature this bill, being a 9:00 a.m. Worship Service Price London Davis, Seniorof Pastor who have six months or less to live, who and elderly black people in this quickly literal life-or-death issue, I believe this is Tune in do not suffer from depression and who gentrifying town are particularly vulnerable a matter that is best left to the decision of Wednesday Services on Sunday Morning to request the option several times. to such abuses. the residents of the District of Columbia by Noonday Bible Study WTVR 6e-v8:30 erena.m. th ce e w- iChannel 12noon-1:00 p.m. e evanc “It allows someone who is on death’s But several African-American members adding it as a referendum on the ballot,” R g n Attendance i Dr. Morris Henderson, Senior Pastor doorstep the option to choose a peaceful of the council, speaking before castCommunity Ms. Alexander said,tonoting that Loving, the state “A they Caring Committed Listening, bin THE NEW DELIVERANCE death,” council member Mary Cheh, the votes in favor of the “DeathLearning with Dignity statuteWhile on which the Washington measure o Sanctuary - All Are Welcome! ❖ and Leaning Launching into our Future.” C CHRISTIAN ACADEMY (NDCA) sponsor of the bill, said just before the Act,” drew upon personal experience. is modeled — Oregon’s — was approved Wednesday Evening Bible Study ENROLL NOW!!! vote on Nov. 1. “My family had to watch him suffer,” by referendum. 7:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. Accepting applications for “To deny it to those who competently council member Kenyan McDuffie said Ms. Cheh said no matter how heartfelt Attendance children 2 yrs.9:30 old toa.m. 3rd Grade Church School choose it is simply to prolong the process of the death of his father. “I wouldn’t or oft-repeated the fears Third of abuse, the evi- of Advent: “Love” Sunday Our NDCA curriculum also consists Morning Worship 10:30 a.m. Saturday of death, to prolong suffering, to rob a wish that on anybody else,” he said as he dence for such concerns is baseless. of a Before and After program. 8:30 a.m. Intercessory Prayer person of autonomy, and in some cases to choked backed tears. The D.C. council is expected to take a ❖ Now Enrolling for our Nursery simply impose one’s own moral or religious He called his decision “my toughest vote final vote on the measure during the next WEDNESDAYS Ages 6 weeks - 2yrs. old. choice on another To person,” she your said. church:in four and a half years in this body.” few weeks. Mayor Muriel Bowser has said advertise You can now view For more information Bible Study The council passedWorship the measure 11-2 Council member Yvette Alexander, who she expects it to become law. call (804) 276-4433 Sunday Morning Service 12:00Please Service p.m. & 7:00 p.m. on a voice vote, withGospel dissenters asking voted “no” on the bill, said she put aside In addition to Oregon, physician-assisted Monday-Friday, 9am-5pm “AS IT HAPPENS” online! Concert ❖ 2011-2049 Grayland Avenue that their names be recorded. religious or moral objections in her delib- death is legal in four states — California, Also, for your convenience. Vacation Bible School Upcoming Events MONDAY-FRIDAY The debate leading up to the vote delved erations. “That is subjective and it means Washington, Vermont and Montana. Homecoming Richmond, Virginia 23220 th Nutrition Center 109 Church Anniversary Revival (804) 358-9177 and Clothes Closet Saved by Grace, Goodness and Greatness Strengthen your Faith Journey call 11:30 a.m. & 1:00 p.m. Sunday, October 9, 2016 @ 2:30 P.M.

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Mosby Baptist “Working ForMemorial You In This DifficultChurch Hour”

Thirty-first Street Baptist Church

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SUNDAYS

Joseph Jenkins, Jr. Funeral Home, Inc.

Good Shepherd Baptist Church 804-644-0496

1127 North 28th St., Richmond, VA 23223-6624 • Office: (804) 644-1402

Richmond Free Press

Dr. Sylvester T. Smith, Pastor “There’s A Place for You”

The People's Paper.

Tuesday Sunday 10:30 AM Bible Study 9:30 AM Church School 6:30 PM Church-wide Bible Study 11:00 AM Worship Service 6:30 PM Men's Bible Study (Each 2nd and 4th) (Holy Communion Thursday each 2nd Sunday) Wednesday (Following 2nd Sunday) 6:30 PM Prayer Meeting

11:00 AM Mid-day Meditation

Riverview

Putting

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Baptist Church

Rev. Dr. Price L. Davis, Pastor

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Exploring the Liturgical Seasons823 of North the 31st Street Music, Colors and Themes! Richmond, VA 23223

Joseph Jenkins, Jr., Founder (Dec. 19, 1938 - Dec. 9, 2006) 2604 Idlewood Avenue This Week Year through Richmond, Va. 23220 III. • Jason K. Jenkins • Maxine T. Jenkins Joseph Jenkins, (804) 353-6135 Christian Education Sunday www.riverviewbaptistch.org Rev. Dr. Stephen L. Hewlett, Guest Minister: Rev. Zita Lee Pastor Rev. Dr. Ralph Reavis, Sr. Pastor Emeritus

pieces

together!

SUNDAY SCHOOL - 9:45 A.M. SUNDAY WORSHIP SERVICE 11:00 A.M.

(804) 226-0150 Office

www.31sbc.org NOVEMBER 20, 2016

10:30 AM

ST. PHILIP’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH

2900 Hanes Avenue, Richmond, Virginia 23222 (804) 321-1266 stphilipsrichmond@comcast.net • www.stphilipsva.org • Phoebe Roaf, Priest


Richmond Free Press

January 12-14, 2017 B5

Legal Notices City of Richmond, Virginia CITY COUNCIL PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given that the Council of the City of Richmond has scheduled a public hearing, open to all interested citizens, on Monday, January 23, 2017 at 6:00 p.m. in the Council Chamber on the Second Floor of City Hall, located at 900 East Broad Street, Richmond, Virginia, to consider the following ordinances: Ordinance No. 2016-300 As amended To authorize the Chief Administrative Officer, for and on behalf of the City of Richmond, to execute a Cooperation Agreement, as amended, between the City of Richmond and the Richmond Redevelopment and Housing Authority for the purpose of facilitating the design, planning, engineering, and construction of certain infrastructure improvements to support a mixed-income rental housing development at 1501 North 31st Street and 1611 North 31st Street in the city of Richmond. Ordinance No. 2017-001 To amend City Code § 2-302, concerning when certain fiscal and economic impact statements are required, for the purpose of requiring that, at the time of introduction, the impact statements be attached to each ordinance authorizing an economic development project and to each written motion to amend such an ordinance. Interested citizens who wish to speak will be given an opportunity to do so. Copies of the full text of all ordinances are available by visiting the City Clerk’s page on the City’s Website at www.Richmondgov. com and in the Office of the City Clerk, City Hall, 900 East Broad Street, Suite 200, Richmond, VA 23219, from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday. Jean V. Capel City Clerk

Divorce VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE COUNTY OF HANOVER SANDRA SUMLER, Plaintiff v. JOHN SUMLER, Defendant. Case No.: CL16003467-00 ORDER OF PUBLICATION The object of this suit is to obtain a divorce from the bond of matrimony from the defendant on the ground of living separate and apart without any cohabitation and without interruption for a period exceeding twelve months. It is ORDERED that the defendant, whose whereabouts are unknown, appear here on or before the 22nd day of February, 2017 at 9:00 a.m. and protect his interests. A Copy, Teste: FRANK D. HARGROVE, JR., Clerk I ask for this: Dorothy M. Eure Counsel for Plaintiff VSB# 27724 8460 Mount Eagle Road Ashland, VA 23005 (804) 798-9667 VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE COUNTY OF HANOVER CYNTHIA JONES, Plaintiff v. ELI JONES, III, Defendant. Case No.: CL16002940-00 ORDER OF PUBLICATION The object of this suit is to obtain a divorce from the bond of matrimony from the defendant on the ground of living separate and apart without any cohabitation and without interruption for a period exceeding twelve months. It is ORDERED that the defendant, whose whereabouts are unknown, appear here on or before the 13th day of February, 2017 at 9:00 a.m. and protect his interests. A Copy, Teste: FRANK D. HARGROVE, JR., Clerk I ask for this: Dorothy M. Eure Counsel for Plaintiff VSB# 27724 8460 Mount Eagle Road Ashland, VA 23005 (804) 798-9667

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A Copy, Teste: FRANK D. HARGROVE, JR., Clerk I ask for this: Dorothy M. Eure Counsel for Plaintiff VSB# 27724 8460 Mount Eagle Road Ashland, VA 23005 (804) 798-9667

the above-named Court and protect his interests on or before March 22, 2017 at 12:00 P.M.

Limited Liability Company, et al., Case No. CL15-27611, a suit for the sale of real estate for delinquent taxes pursuant to Section 58.13965, et seq. of the Code of Virginia, the undersigned Special Commissioner will offer for sale at public auction at Motleys Asset Disposition Group, 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road, Richmond, Virginia 23234, on February 8, 2017, at 3:00 p.m., the real estate together with any improvements thereon, known as 1630 NORTH 28TH STREET, Richmond, Virginia, and more particularly described in the above mentioned court file. TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $2,500.00 or 20% of the purchase price, whichever is greater, will be required in cash, certified check or such other form as the Special Commissioner may in his sole discretion determine. A buyer’s premium of 10% of the successful bid will be added to equal total purchase price. All bidders shall be required to certify by affidavit that they do not own, either directly or indirectly, any real estate with outstanding Notices of Code Violations under local environmental, zoning and building code law, or delinquent real estate taxes, other taxes or any other finance related matter related to the City of Richmond. The property is being sold “AS IS” without any representations or warranties, subject to the rights of any person in possession and to all easements, liens, covenants, defects, encumbrances, adverse claims, conditions and restrictions, whether filed or inchoate, to include any information a survey or inspection of the property may disclose. Conveyance will be made by either a Special Commissioner’s Deed and/ or a Special Warranty deed, with adjustment of real estate property taxes made as of the date of confirmation of the sale. All settlement, recordation fees and prorated taxes are to be paid by Purchaser. Risk of loss shall be upon Purchaser from time of confirmation by the Circuit Court. In the event the tax delinquent property is subject to a Notice of Code Violation under the Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code, city zoning codes or environmental codes, the high bidder shall be required to submit a written work schedule and plan to abate all code violations which shall be approved by the appropriate department, in its sole discretion. The acceptance of the bid by the Special Commissioner shall not be construed as limiting any powers vested in the City. Additional terms may be announced at the time of sale. The successful bid is subject to confirmation by the aforementioned Circuit Court pursuant to Section 58.13969 of the Code of Virginia. Settlement shall occur at the time of the confirmation by the Circuit Court, TIME BEING OF THE ESSENCE; otherwise, the Special Commissioner may require the Purchaser to forfeit the deposit and seek other legal or equitable rights against the defaulting Purchaser, including costs of resale and any deficiency resulting from resale. Gregory A. Lukanuski Special Commissioner For More Information Contact: Gregory A. Lukanuski, Esq. 900 East Broad St, Rm 400 Richmond, VA 23219 (804) 646-7940

matter related to the City of Richmond. The property is being sold “AS IS” without any representations or warranties, subject to the rights of any person in possession and to all easements, liens, covenants, defects, encumbrances, adverse claims, conditions and restrictions, whether filed or inchoate, to include any information a survey or inspection of the property may disclose. Conveyance will be made by either a Special Commissioner’s Deed and/ or a Special Warranty deed, with adjustment of real estate property taxes made as of the date of confirmation of the sale. All settlement, recordation fees and prorated taxes are to be paid by Purchaser. Risk of loss shall be upon Purchaser from time of confirmation by the Circuit Court. In the event the tax delinquent property is subject to a Notice of Code Violation under the Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code, city zoning codes or environmental codes, the high bidder shall be required to submit a written work schedule and plan to abate all code violations which shall be approved by the appropriate department, in its sole discretion. The acceptance of the bid by the Special Commissioner shall not be construed as limiting any powers vested in the City. Additional terms may be announced at the time of sale. The successful bid is subject to confirmation by the aforementioned Circuit Court pursuant to Section 58.13969 of the Code of Virginia. Settlement shall occur at the time of the confirmation by the Circuit Court, TIME BEING OF THE ESSENCE; otherwise, the Special Commissioner may require the Purchaser to forfeit the deposit and seek other legal or equitable rights against the defaulting Purchaser, including costs of resale and any deficiency resulting from resale. Gregory A. Lukanuski Special Commissioner For More Information Contact: Gregory A. Lukanuski, Esq. 900 East Broad St, Rm 400 Richmond, VA 23219 (804) 646-7940

acceptance of the bid by the Special Commissioner shall not be construed as limiting any powers vested in the City. Additional terms may be announced at the time of sale. The successful bid is subject to confirmation by the aforementioned Circuit Court pursuant to Section 58.13969 of the Code of Virginia. Settlement shall occur at the time of the confirmation by the Circuit Court, TIME BEING OF THE ESSENCE; otherwise, the Special Commissioner may require the Purchaser to forfeit the deposit and seek other legal or equitable rights against the defaulting Purchaser, including costs of resale and any deficiency resulting from resale. Gregory A. Lukanuski Special Commissioner For More Information Contact: Gregory A. Lukanuski, Esq. 900 East Broad St, Rm 400 Richmond, VA 23219 (804) 646-7940

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA N000-0450/001

successful bid will be added to equal total purchase price. All bidders shall be required to certify by affidavit that they do not own, either directly or indirectly, any real estate with outstanding Notices of Code Violations under local environmental, zoning and building code law, or delinquent real estate taxes, other taxes or any other finance related matter related to the City of Richmond. The property is being sold “AS IS” without any representations or warranties, subject to the rights of any person in possession and to all easements, liens, covenants, defects, encumbrances, adverse claims, conditions and restrictions, whether filed or inchoate, to include any information a survey or inspection of the property may disclose. Conveyance will be made by either a Special Commissioner’s Deed and/ or a Special Warranty deed, with adjustment of real estate property taxes made as of the date of confirmation of the sale. All settlement, recordation fees and prorated taxes are to be paid by Purchaser. Risk of loss shall be upon Purchaser from time of confirmation by the Circuit Court. In the event the tax delinquent property is subject to a Notice of Code Violation under the Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code, city zoning codes or environmental codes, the high bidder shall be required to submit a written work schedule and plan to abate all code violations which shall be approved by the appropriate department, in its sole discretion. The acceptance of the bid by the Special Commissioner shall not be construed as limiting any powers vested in the City. Additional terms may be announced at the time of sale. The successful bid is subject to confirmation by the aforementioned Circuit Court pursuant to Section 58.13969 of the Code of Virginia. Settlement shall occur at the time of the confirmation by the Circuit Court, TIME BEING OF THE ESSENCE; otherwise, the Special Commissioner may require the Purchaser to forfeit the deposit and seek other legal or equitable rights against the defaulting Purchaser, including costs of resale and any deficiency resulting from resale. Gregory A. Lukanuski Special Commissioner For More Information Contact: Gregory A. Lukanuski, Esq. 900 East Broad St, Rm 400 Richmond, VA 23219 (804) 646-7940

CUSTODY virgiNia: iN thE JuvENiLE aND DOmEstic rELatiONs District cOurt Of the City of Richmond Commonwealth of Virginia, in re A’miracle Gassoway, Juvenile Case No. JJ090866-12 OrDEr Of puBLicatiON The object of this suit is to: Terminate the residual parental rights (“RPR”) of Darrell Meredith (Father) and Unknown, (Father), of A’miracle Gassoway, child, DOB 4/8/2015, “RPR” means all rights and responsibilities remaining with parent after transfer of legal custody or guardianship of the person, including but not limited to rights of: visitation; adoption consent; determination of religious affiliation; and responsbility for support It is ORDERED that the defendant Darrell Meredith (Father) and Unknown (Father), appear at the abovenamed Court and protect his/her interest on or before March 22, 2017, at 2:30 PM, Court Room #5. virgiNia: iN thE JuvENiLE aND DOmEstic rELatiONs District cOurt Of the COUNty of NEW KENT Commonwealth of Virginia, in re SIANNA KAY PINN, Juvenile Kenneth R. Gumbs, Carolyn Gumbs v. Daniel Reid Pinn Case No. JJ006429-03-00 OrDEr Of puBLicatiON The object of this suit is to: Determine legal and physical custody of a child known as Sianna Kay Pinn, born June 10, 2011, to Katherine Lindsey Gumbs and Daniel Reid Pinn. It is ORDERED that the defendant Daniel Reid Pinn appear at the above-named Court and protect his/her interest on or before March 27, 2017, at 9:00 A.M. virgiNia: iN thE JuvENiLE aND DOmEstic rELatiONs District cOurt Of the City of Richmond Commonwealth of Virginia, in re A’Lijah Holmes, Juvenile Case No. JJ089216-12 OrDEr Of puBLicatiON The object of this suit is to: Terminate the residual parental rights (“RPR”) of Richard Thomas Holmes, Sr., (Father), of A’lijah Holmes, child, DOB 7/30/2012, “RPR” means all rights and responsibilities remaining with parent after transfer of legal custody or guardianship of the person, including but not limited to rights of: visitation; adoption consent; determination of religious affiliation; and responsbility for support It is ORDERED that the defendant Richard Thomas Holmes, Sr. (Father), appear at the above-named Court and protect his/her interest on or before March 16, 2017, at 2:00 PM, Court Room #3. virgiNia: iN thE JuvENiLE aND DOmEstic rELatiONs District cOurt Of the City of Richmond Commonwealth of Virginia, in re RICHARD THOMAS holmes, jr., Juvenile Case No. JJ089215-12 OrDEr Of puBLicatiON The object of this suit is to: Terminate the residual parental rights (“RPR”) of Richard Thomas Holmes, Sr., (Father), of Richard Thomas Holmes, Jr., child, DOB 12/25/2009, “RPR” means all rights and responsibilities remaining with parent after transfer of legal custody or guardianship of the person, including but not limited to rights of: visitation; adoption consent; determination of religious affiliation; and responsbility for support It is ORDERED that the defendant Richard Thomas Holmes, Sr. (Father), appear at the above-named Court and protect his/her interest on or before March 16, 2017, at 2:00 PM, Court Room #3.

VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE COUNTY OF HANOVER TONY JOHNSON, Plaintiff v. LISA JOHNSON, Defendant. Case No.: CL16003420-00 ORDER OF PUBLICATION The object of this suit is to obtain a divorce from the bond of matrimony from the defendant on the ground of living separate and apart without any cohabitation and without interruption for a period exceeding twelve months. It is ORDERED that the defendant, whose whereabouts are unknown, appear here on or before the 13th day of February, 2017 at 9:00 a.m. and protect her interests.

virgiNia: iN thE JuvENiLE aND DOmEstic rELatiONs District cOurt IN the COunty of Chesterfield Commonwealth of Virginia, in re ZULMA ROXANA claros cabrera, ZULMA JEANNETTE CABRERA ORTEGA v. JORGE ALBERTO CLAROS CARCAMO Case No. JJ090395-01-00 OrDEr Of puBLicatiON The object of this suit is to: Determine custody of Zulma Roxana Claros Cabrera (DOB: 3/19/03),whose mother is Zulma Jeannette Cabrera Ortega, and whose father is Jorge Alberto Claros Carcamo,pursuant to Virginia Code Section 16.1-241A3. Make factual findings that will permit Zulma Roxana Claros Cabrera to petition the United States citizenship and immigration services for special immigrant juvenile status pursuant to 8 U.S.C. Section 1101(A)(27)(J) and 8 C.F.R. Section 204.11. It is ORDERED that the defendant Jorge Alberto Claros Carcamo appear at

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virgiNia: iN thE JuvENiLE aND DOmEstic rELatiONs District cOurt IN the COunty of Chesterfield Commonwealth of Virginia, in re OBANDO SAMAYOA, JACKELINE MARIELA YESSICA C SAMAYOA ORREGO v. ERICK OTTONIEL OBANO Case No. JJ090394-01-00 OrDEr Of puBLicatiON The object of this suit is to: Determine custody of Jackeline Mariela Obando Samayoa (DOB: 3/10/12),whose mother is Yessica Carlota Samayoa Orrego, and whose father is Erick Ottoniel Obando,pursuant to Virginia Code Section 16.1-241A3. Make factual findings that will permit Jackeline Mariela Obando Samayoa to petition the United States citizenship and immigration services for special immigrant juvenile status pursuant to 8 U.S.C. Section 1101(A)(27)(J) and 8 C.F.R. Section 204.11. It is ORDERED that the defendant Erick Ottoniel Obando appear at the abovenamed Court and protect his interests on or before March 22, 2017 at 11:00 A.M. virgiNia: iN thE CIRCUIT cOurt FOR THE COUNTY OF Chesterfield Charles J. Huddleston, ROSE P. OGLE, and DAVID WAYNE OGLE, Petitioners, v. wesley w. huddleston, Respondent. Case No. CA16-84 In re: Charles J. Huddleston (DOB 06/25/1997) OrDEr Of puBLicatiON The object of this suit is to obtain an adoption of Charles J. Huddleston. WHEREFORE, an affidavit having been filed by the Petitioners that due diligence has been used without effect to ascertain the location of Wesley W. Huddleston, it is ORDERED that Wesley W. Huddleston appear before this Court on the 24th of February, 2017 at 8:30 a.m. to protect his interests herein. An Extract Teste: WENDY S. HUGHES, Clerk Mary Ashby Brown, Esquire (VSB #74718) Friedman Law Firm, P.C. 9401 Courthouse Road, Suite A Chesterfield, VA 23832 (804) 717-1969 (telephone) (804) 748-4161 (telecopier) mabrown@friedmanlawva.com Counsel for the Petitioners

Tim Dudley Motley’s Asset Disposition Group 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road Richmond, Virginia 23234 (804) 232-3300 COMMISSIONER’S SALE OF 511 HUNT Avenue, RICHMOND, VIRGINIA N000-1558/006

Pursuant to an Order of Sale entered in the Circuit Court of the City of Richmond on October 31, 2016 in the matter City of Richmond v. Clayton Investment Group, L.L.C., A Cancelled Virginia

Pursuant to an Order of Sale entered in the Circuit Court of the City of Richmond on October 31, 2016 in the matter City of Richmond v. Tower Building Properties, L.L.C., A Cancelled Virginia Limited Liability Company, et al., Case No. CL15-31211, a suit for the sale of real estate for delinquent taxes pursuant to Section 58.13965, et seq. of the Code of Virginia, the undersigned Special Commissioner will offer for sale at public auction at Motleys Asset Disposition Group, 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road, Richmond, Virginia 23234, on February 8, 2017, at 3:00 p.m., the real estate together with any improvements thereon, known as 417 NORTH 33RD STREET, Richmond, Virginia, and more particularly described in the above mentioned court file. TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $2,500.00 or 20% of the purchase price, whichever is greater, will be required in cash, certified check or such other form as the Special Commissioner may in his sole discretion determine. A buyer’s premium of 10% of the successful bid will be added to equal total purchase price. All bidders shall be required to certify by affidavit that they do not own, either directly or indirectly, any real estate with outstanding Notices of Code Violations under local environmental, zoning and building code law, or delinquent real estate taxes, other taxes or any other finance related

Pursuant to an Order of Sale entered in the Circuit Court of the City of Richmond on December 19, 2016 in the matter City of Richmond v. GEORGE TUNSTALL a/k/a GEORGE HERBERT TUNSTALL, Who May Be Deceased, and THE HEIRS, DEVISEES, ASSIGNEES OR SUCCESSORS IN INTEREST OF GEORGE TUNSTALL a/k/a GEORGE HERBERT TUNSTALL, et al., Case No. CL16-4426-4, a suit for the sale of real estate for delinquent taxes pursuant to Section 58.13965, et seq. of the Code of Virginia, the undersigned Special Commissioner will offer for sale at public auction at Motleys Asset Disposition Group, 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road, Richmond, Virginia 23234, on February 8, 2017, at 3:00 p.m., the real estate together with any improvements thereon, known as 511 HUNT Avenue, Richmond, Virginia, and more particularly described in the above mentioned court file. TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $2,500.00 or 20% of the purchase price, whichever is greater, will be required in cash, certified check or such other form as the Special Commissioner may in his sole discretion determine. A buyer’s premium of 10% of the successful bid will be added to equal total purchase price. All bidders shall be required to certify by affidavit that they do not own, either directly or indirectly, any real estate with outstanding Notices of Code Violations under local environmental, zoning and building code law, or delinquent real estate taxes, other taxes or any other finance related matter related to the City of Richmond. The property is being sold “AS IS” without any representations or warranties, subject to the rights of any person in possession and to all easements, liens, covenants, defects, encumbrances, adverse claims, conditions and restrictions, whether filed or inchoate, to include any information a survey or inspection of the property may disclose. Conveyance will be made by either a Special Commissioner’s Deed and/ or a Special Warranty deed, with adjustment of real estate property taxes made as of the date of confirmation of the sale. All settlement, recordation fees and prorated taxes are to be paid by Purchaser. Risk of loss shall be upon Purchaser from time of confirmation by the Circuit Court. In the event the tax delinquent property is subject to a Notice of Code Violation under the Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code, city zoning codes or environmental codes, the high bidder shall be required to submit a written work schedule and plan to abate all code violations which shall be approved by the appropriate department, in its sole discretion. The

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virgiNia: iN thE CIRCUIT cOurt FOR THE COUNTY OF Chesterfield ROSE P. OGLE, and DAVID WAYNE OGLE, Petitioners, v. wesley w. huddleston, Respondent. Case No. CA16-83 In re: Austin J. Huddleston (DOB 05/21/1999) OrDEr Of puBLicatiON The object of this suit is to obtain an adoption of Austin J. Huddleston. WHEREFORE, an affidavit having been filed by the Petitioners that due diligence has been used without effect to ascertain the location of Wesley W. Huddleston, it is ORDERED that Wesley W. Huddleston appear before this Court on the 24th of February, 2017 at 8:30 a.m. to protect his interests herein. An Extract Teste: WENDY S. HUGHES, Clerk Mary Ashby Brown, Esquire (VSB #74718) Friedman Law Firm, P.C. 9401 Courthouse Road, Suite A Chesterfield, VA 23832 (804) 717-1969 (telephone) (804) 748-4161 (telecopier) mabrown@friedmanlawva.com Counsel for the Petitioners virgiNia: iN thE CIRCUIT cOurt FOR THE COUNTY OF Chesterfield ROSE P. OGLE, and DAVID WAYNE OGLE, Petitioners, v. wesley w. huddleston, Respondent. Case No. CA16-82 In re: Hunter W. Huddleston (DOB 01/14/2002) OrDEr Of puBLicatiON The object of this suit is to: Obtain an adoption of Hunter W. Huddleston. WHEREFORE, an affidavit having been filed by the Petitioners that due diligence has been used without effect to ascertain the location of Wesley W. Huddleston, it is ORDERED that Wesley W. Huddleston appear before this Court on the 24th of February, 2017 at 8:30 a.m. to protect his interests herein. An Extract Teste: WENDY S. HUGHES, Clerk Mary Ashby Brown, Esquire (VSB #74718) Friedman Law Firm, P.C. 9401 Courthouse Road, Suite A Chesterfield, VA 23832 (804) 717-1969 (telephone) (804) 748-4161 (telecopier) mabrown@friedmanlawva.com Counsel for the Petitioners

PROPERTY COMMISSIONER’S SALE OF 1630 NORTH 28TH STREET, RICHMOND, VIRGINIA E000-0864/016

Tim Dudley Motley’s Asset Disposition Group 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road Richmond, Virginia 23234 (804) 232-3300 COMMISSIONER’S SALE OF 417 NORTH 33RD STREET, RICHMOND, VIRGINIA E000-0884/026

Tim Dudley Motley’s Asset Disposition Group 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road Richmond, Virginia 23234 (804) 232-3300 COMMISSIONER’S SALE OF 1202 North 33RD STREET, RICHMOND, VIRGINIA E000-0802/010 Pursuant to an Order of Sale entered in the Circuit Court of the City of Richmond on November 28, 2016 in the matter City of Richmond v. H AT T I E B R O O K S a/k/a HATTIE BROOKS GRAHAM, Who May Be Deceased, and THE HEIRS, DEVISEES, ASSIGNEES OR SUCCESSORS IN INTEREST OF HATTIE BROOKS a/k/a HATTIE BROOKS GRAHAM, et al., Case No. CL16-4491-4, a suit for the sale of real estate for delinquent taxes pursuant to Section 58.13965, et seq. of the Code of Virginia, the undersigned Special Commissioner will offer for sale at public auction at Motleys Asset Disposition Group, 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road, Richmond, Virginia 23234, on February 8, 2017, at 3:00 p.m., the real estate together with any improvements thereon, known as 1202 North 33RD STREET, Richmond, Virginia, and more particularly described in the above mentioned court file. TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $2,500.00 or 20% of the purchase price, whichever is greater, will be required in cash, certified check or such other form as the Special Commissioner may in his sole discretion determine. A buyer’s premium of 10% of the successful bid will be added to equal total purchase price. All bidders shall be required to certify by affidavit that they do not own, either directly or indirectly, any real estate with outstanding Notices of Code Violations under local environmental, zoning and building code law, or delinquent real estate taxes, other taxes or any other finance related matter related to the City of Richmond. The property is being sold “AS IS” without any representations or warranties, subject to the rights of any person in possession and to all easements, liens, covenants, defects, encumbrances, adverse claims, conditions and restrictions, whether filed or inchoate, to include any information a survey or inspection of the property may disclose. Conveyance will be made by either a Special Commissioner’s Deed and/ or a Special Warranty deed, with adjustment of real estate property taxes made as of the date of confirmation of the sale. All settlement, recordation fees and prorated taxes are to be paid by Purchaser. Risk of loss shall be upon Purchaser from time of confirmation by the Circuit Court. In the event the tax delinquent property is subject to a Notice of Code Violation under the Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code, city zoning codes or environmental codes, the high bidder shall be required to submit a written work schedule and plan to abate all code violations which shall be approved by the appropriate department, in its sole discretion. The acceptance of the bid by the Special Commissioner shall not be construed as limiting any powers vested in the City. Additional terms may be announced at the time of sale. The successful bid is subject to confirmation by the aforementioned Circuit Court pursuant to Section 58.13969 of the Code of Virginia. Settlement shall occur at the time of the confirmation by the Circuit Court, TIME BEING OF THE ESSENCE; otherwise, the Special Commissioner may require the Purchaser to forfeit the deposit and seek other legal or equitable rights against the defaulting Purchaser, including costs of resale and any deficiency resulting from resale. Gregory A. Lukanuski Special Commissioner For More Information Contact: Gregory A. Lukanuski, Esq. 900 East Broad St, Rm 400 Richmond, VA 23219 (804) 646-7940 Tim Dudley Motley’s Asset Disposition Group 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road Richmond, Virginia 23234 (804) 232-3300 COMMISSIONER’S SALE OF 2118 LAMB AVENUE, Continued on next column

Pursuant to an Order of Sale entered in the Circuit Court of the City of Richmond on October 31, 2016 in the matter City of Richmond v. JOHN BICK WINSTON, Who May Be Deceased, and THE HEIRS, DEVISEES, ASSIGNEES OR SUCCESSORS IN INTEREST OF JOHN BICK WINSTON, et al., Case No. CL16-2602-4, a suit for the sale of real estate for delinquent taxes pursuant to Section 58.1-3965, et seq. of the Code of Virginia, the undersigned Special Commissioner will offer for sale at public auction at Motleys Asset Disposition Group, 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road, Richmond, Virginia 23234, on February 8, 2017, at 3:00 p.m., the real estate together with any improvements thereon, known as 2118 LAMB AVENUE, Richmond, Virginia, and more particularly described in the above mentioned court file. TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $2,500.00 or 20% of the purchase price, whichever is greater, will be required in cash, certified check or such other form as the Special Commissioner may in his sole discretion determine. A buyer’s premium of 10% of the successful bid will be added to equal total purchase price. All bidders shall be required to certify by affidavit that they do not own, either directly or indirectly, any real estate with outstanding Notices of Code Violations under local environmental, zoning and building code law, or delinquent real estate taxes, other taxes or any other finance related matter related to the City of Richmond. The property is being sold “AS IS” without any representations or warranties, subject to the rights of any person in possession and to all easements, liens, covenants, defects, encumbrances, adverse claims, conditions and restrictions, whether filed or inchoate, to include any information a survey or inspection of the property may disclose. Conveyance will be made by either a Special Commissioner’s Deed and/ or a Special Warranty deed, with adjustment of real estate property taxes made as of the date of confirmation of the sale. All settlement, recordation fees and prorated taxes are to be paid by Purchaser. Risk of loss shall be upon Purchaser from time of confirmation by the Circuit Court. In the event the tax delinquent property is subject to a Notice of Code Violation under the Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code, city zoning codes or environmental codes, the high bidder shall be required to submit a written work schedule and plan to abate all code violations which shall be approved by the appropriate department, in its sole discretion. The acceptance of the bid by the Special Commissioner shall not be construed as limiting any powers vested in the City. Additional terms may be announced at the time of sale. The successful bid is subject to confirmation by the aforementioned Circuit Court pursuant to Section 58.13969 of the Code of Virginia. Settlement shall occur at the time of the confirmation by the Circuit Court, TIME BEING OF THE ESSENCE; otherwise, the Special Commissioner may require the Purchaser to forfeit the deposit and seek other legal or equitable rights against the defaulting Purchaser, including costs of resale and any deficiency resulting from resale. Gregory A. Lukanuski Special Commissioner For More Information Contact: Gregory A. Lukanuski, Esq. 900 East Broad St, Rm 400 Richmond, VA 23219 (804) 646-7940

Tim Dudley Motley’s Asset Disposition Group 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road Richmond, Virginia 23234 (804) 232-3300 COMMISSIONER’S SALE OF 3126 5TH AVENUE, RICHMOND, VIRGINIA N000-0998/017

Pursuant to an Order of Sale entered in the Circuit Court of the City of Richmond on October 31, 2016 in the matter City of Richmond v. Clayton Investment Group, L.L.C., A Cancelled Virginia Limited Liability Company, et al., , Case No. CL15-3781-1, a suit for the sale of real estate for delinquent taxes pursuant to Section 58.13965, et seq. of the Code of Virginia, the undersigned Special Commissioner will offer for sale at public auction at Motleys Asset Disposition Group, 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road, Richmond, Virginia 23234, on February 8, 2017, at 3:00 p.m., the real estate together with any improvements thereon, known as 1816 BAINBRIDGE STREET, Richmond, Virginia, and more particularly described in the above mentioned court file. TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $2,500.00 or 20% of the purchase price, whichever is greater, will be required in cash, certified check or such other form as the Special Commissioner may in his sole discretion determine. A buyer’s premium of 10% of the

Pursuant to an Order of Sale entered in the Circuit Court of the City of Richmond on October 31, 2016 in the matter City of Richmond v. James H. White a/k/a James Hampton White Jr., et al., Case No. CL15-41861, a suit for the sale of real estate for delinquent taxes pursuant to Section 58.13965, et seq. of the Code of Virginia, the undersigned Special Commissioner will offer for sale at public auction at Motleys Asset Disposition Group, 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road, Richmond, Virginia 23234, on February 8, 2017, at 3:00 p.m., the real estate together with any improvements thereon, known as 3126 5TH AVENUE, Richmond, Virginia, and more particularly described in the above mentioned court file. TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $2,500.00 or 20% of the purchase price, whichever is greater, will be required in cash, certified check or such other form as the Special Commissioner may in his sole discretion determine. A buyer’s premium of 10% of the successful bid will be added to equal total purchase price. All bidders shall be required to certify by affidavit that they do not own, either directly or indirectly, any real estate with outstanding Notices of Code Violations under local environmental, zoning and building code law, or delinquent real estate taxes, other taxes or any other finance related matter related to the City of Richmond. The property is being sold “AS IS” without any representations or warranties, subject to the rights of any person in possession and to all easements, liens, covenants, defects, encumbrances, adverse claims, conditions and restrictions, whether filed or inchoate, to include any information a survey or inspection of the property may disclose. Conveyance will be made by either a Special Commissioner’s Deed and/ or a Special Warranty deed, with adjustment of real estate property taxes made as of the date of confirmation of the sale. All settlement, recordation fees and prorated taxes are to be paid by Purchaser. Risk of loss shall be upon Purchaser from time of confirmation by the Circuit Court. In the event the tax delinquent property is subject to a Notice of Code Violation under the Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code, city zoning codes or environmental codes,

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Tim Dudley Motley’s Asset Disposition Group 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road Richmond, Virginia 23234 (804) 232-3300 COMMISSIONER’S SALE OF 1816 BAINBRIDGE STREET, RICHMOND, VIRGINIA S000-0242/001


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Legal Notices Continued from previous page

the high bidder shall be required to submit a written work schedule and plan to abate all code violations which shall be approved by the appropriate department, in its sole discretion. The acceptance of the bid by the Special Commissioner shall not be construed as limiting any powers vested in the City. Additional terms may be announced at the time of sale. The successful bid is subject to confirmation by the aforementioned Circuit Court pursuant to Section 58.13969 of the Code of Virginia. Settlement shall occur at the time of the confirmation by the Circuit Court, TIME BEING OF THE ESSENCE; otherwise, the Special Commissioner may require the Purchaser to forfeit the deposit and seek other legal or equitable rights against the defaulting Purchaser, including costs of resale and any deficiency resulting from resale. Gregory A. Lukanuski Special Commissioner For More Information Contact: Gregory A. Lukanuski, Esq. 900 East Broad St, Rm 400 Richmond, VA 23219 (804) 646-7940 Tim Dudley Motley’s Asset Disposition Group 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road Richmond, Virginia 23234 (804) 232-3300 COMMISSIONER’S SALE OF 200 JEFFERSON DAVIS HIGHWAY, RICHMOND, VIRGINIA S000-0352/008 Pursuant to an Order of Sale entered in the Circuit Court of the City of Richmond on November 28, 2016 in the matter City of Richmond v. AMAZING ENTERPRISES, An Entity Not Registered with the Commonwealth of Virginia State Corporate Commission, et al., Case No. CL16-14054, a suit for the sale of real estate for delinquent taxes pursuant to Section 58.13965, et seq. of the Code of Virginia, the undersigned Special Commissioner will offer for sale at public auction at Motleys Asset Disposition Group, 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road, Richmond, Virginia 23234, on February 8, 2017, at 3:00 p.m., the real estate together with any improvements thereon, known as 200 JEFFERSON D AV I S H I G H W AY, Richmond, Virginia, and more particularly described in the above mentioned court file. TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $2,500.00 or 20% of the purchase price, whichever is greater, will be required in cash, certified check or such other form as the Special Commissioner may in his sole discretion determine. A buyer’s premium of 10% of the successful bid will be added to equal total purchase price. All bidders shall be required to certify by affidavit that they do not own, either directly or indirectly, any real estate with outstanding Notices of Code Violations under local environmental, zoning and building code law, or delinquent real estate taxes, other taxes or any other finance related matter related to the City of Richmond. The property is being sold “AS IS” without any representations or warranties, subject to the rights of any person in possession and to all easements, liens, covenants, defects, encumbrances, adverse claims, conditions and restrictions, whether filed or inchoate, to include any information a survey or inspection of the property may disclose. Conveyance will be made by either a Special Commissioner’s Deed and/ or a Special Warranty deed, with adjustment of real estate property taxes made as of the date of confirmation of the sale. All settlement, recordation fees and prorated taxes are to be paid by Purchaser. Risk of loss shall be upon Purchaser from time of confirmation by the Circuit Court. In the event the tax delinquent property is subject to a Notice of Code Violation under the Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code, city zoning codes or environmental codes, the high bidder shall be required to submit a written work schedule and plan to abate all code violations which shall be approved by the appropriate department, in its sole discretion. The acceptance of the bid by the Special Commissioner shall not be construed as limiting any powers vested in the City. Additional terms may be announced at the time of sale. The successful bid is subject to confirmation by the aforementioned Circuit Court pursuant to Section 58.13969 of the Code of Virginia. Settlement shall occur at the time of the confirmation by the Circuit Court, TIME BEING OF THE ESSENCE; otherwise, the Special Commissioner may require the Purchaser to forfeit the deposit and seek other legal or equitable rights against the defaulting Purchaser, including costs of resale and any deficiency resulting from resale. Gregory A. Lukanuski Special Commissioner For More Information Contact: Gregory A. Lukanuski, Esq. 900 East Broad St, Rm 400 Richmond, VA 23219 (804) 646-7940 Tim Dudley Motley’s Asset Disposition Group 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road Richmond, Virginia 23234 Continued on next column

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(804) 232-3300 COMMISSIONER’S SALE OF 630 NORTH 30TH STREET, RICHMOND, VIRGINIA E000-0573/011 Pursuant to an Order of Sale entered in the Circuit Court of the City of Richmond on October 31, 2016 in the matter City of Richmond v. Clayton Investment Group, L.L.C., A Cancelled Virginia Limited Liability Company, et al., , Case No. CL15-4190-1, a suit for the sale of real estate for delinquent taxes pursuant to Section 58.13965, et seq. of the Code of Virginia, the undersigned Special Commissioner will offer for sale at public auction at Motleys Asset Disposition Group, 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road, Richmond, Virginia 23234, on February 8, 2017, at 3:00 p.m., the real estate together with any improvements thereon, known as 630 NORTH 30TH STREET, Richmond, Virginia, and more particularly described in the above mentioned court file. TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $2,500.00 or 20% of the purchase price, whichever is greater, will be required in cash, certified check or such other form as the Special Commissioner may in his sole discretion determine. A buyer’s premium of 10% of the successful bid will be added to equal total purchase price. All bidders shall be required to certify by affidavit that they do not own, either directly or indirectly, any real estate with outstanding Notices of Code Violations under local environmental, zoning and building code law, or delinquent real estate taxes, other taxes or any other finance related matter related to the City of Richmond. The property is being sold “AS IS” without any representations or warranties, subject to the rights of any person in possession and to all easements, liens, covenants, defects, encumbrances, adverse claims, conditions and restrictions, whether filed or inchoate, to include any information a survey or inspection of the property may disclose. Conveyance will be made by either a Special Commissioner’s Deed and/ or a Special Warranty deed, with adjustment of real estate property taxes made as of the date of confirmation of the sale. All settlement, recordation fees and prorated taxes are to be paid by Purchaser. Risk of loss shall be upon Purchaser from time of confirmation by the Circuit Court. In the event the tax delinquent property is subject to a Notice of Code Violation under the Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code, city zoning codes or environmental codes, the high bidder shall be required to submit a written work schedule and plan to abate all code violations which shall be approved by the appropriate department, in its sole discretion. The acceptance of the bid by the Special Commissioner shall not be construed as limiting any powers vested in the City. Additional terms may be announced at the time of sale. The successful bid is subject to confirmation by the aforementioned Circuit Court pursuant to Section 58.13969 of the Code of Virginia. Settlement shall occur at the time of the confirmation by the Circuit Court, TIME BEING OF THE ESSENCE; otherwise, the Special Commissioner may require the Purchaser to forfeit the deposit and seek other legal or equitable rights against the defaulting Purchaser, including costs of resale and any deficiency resulting from resale. Gregory A. Lukanuski Special Commissioner For More Information Contact: Gregory A. Lukanuski, Esq. 900 East Broad St, Rm 400 Richmond, VA 23219 (804) 646-7940 Tim Dudley Motley’s Asset Disposition Group 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road Richmond, Virginia 23234 (804) 232-3300 COMMISSIONER’S SALE OF 1107 NORTH 35TH STREET, RICHMOND, VIRGINIA E000-1275/004 Pursuant to an Order of Sale entered in the Circuit Court of the City of Richmond on October 31, 2016 in the matter City of Richmond v. Clayton Investment Group, L.L.C., A Cancelled Virginia Limited Liability Company, et al., , Case No. CL15-3508-1, a suit for the sale of real estate for delinquent taxes pursuant to Section 58.13965, et seq. of the Code of Virginia, the undersigned Special Commissioner will offer for sale at public auction at Motleys Asset Disposition Group, 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road, Richmond, Virginia 23234, on February 8, 2017, at 3:00 p.m., the real estate together with any improvements thereon, known as 1107 NORTH 35TH STREET Richmond, Virginia, and more particularly described in the above mentioned court file. TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $2,500.00 or 20% of the purchase price, whichever is greater, will be required in cash, certified check or such other form as the Special Commissioner may in his Continued on next column

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sole discretion determine. A buyer’s premium of 10% of the successful bid will be added to equal total purchase price. All bidders shall be required to certify by affidavit that they do not own, either directly or indirectly, any real estate with outstanding Notices of Code Violations under local environmental, zoning and building code law, or delinquent real estate taxes, other taxes or any other finance related matter related to the City of Richmond. The property is being sold “AS IS” without any representations or warranties, subject to the rights of any person in possession and to all easements, liens, covenants, defects, encumbrances, adverse claims, conditions and restrictions, whether filed or inchoate, to include any information a survey or inspection of the property may disclose. Conveyance will be made by either a Special Commissioner’s Deed and/ or a Special Warranty deed, with adjustment of real estate property taxes made as of the date of confirmation of the sale. All settlement, recordation fees and prorated taxes are to be paid by Purchaser. Risk of loss shall be upon Purchaser from time of confirmation by the Circuit Court. In the event the tax delinquent property is subject to a Notice of Code Violation under the Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code, city zoning codes or environmental codes, the high bidder shall be required to submit a written work schedule and plan to abate all code violations which shall be approved by the appropriate department, in its sole discretion. The acceptance of the bid by the Special Commissioner shall not be construed as limiting any powers vested in the City. Additional terms may be announced at the time of sale. The successful bid is subject to confirmation by the aforementioned Circuit Court pursuant to Section 58.13969 of the Code of Virginia. Settlement shall occur at the time of the confirmation by the Circuit Court, TIME BEING OF THE ESSENCE; otherwise, the Special Commissioner may require the Purchaser to forfeit the deposit and seek other legal or equitable rights against the defaulting Purchaser, including costs of resale and any deficiency resulting from resale. Gregory A. Lukanuski Special Commissioner For More Information Contact: Gregory A. Lukanuski, Esq. 900 East Broad St, Rm 400 Richmond, VA 23219 (804) 646-7940

Uniform Statewide Building Code, city zoning codes or environmental codes, the high bidder shall be required to submit a written work schedule and plan to abate all code violations which shall be approved by the appropriate department, in its sole discretion. The acceptance of the bid by the Special Commissioner shall not be construed as limiting any powers vested in the City. Additional terms may be announced at the time of sale. The successful bid is subject to confirmation by the aforementioned Circuit Court pursuant to Section 58.13969 of the Code of Virginia. Settlement shall occur at the time of the confirmation by the Circuit Court, TIME BEING OF THE ESSENCE; otherwise, the Special Commissioner may require the Purchaser to forfeit the deposit and seek other legal or equitable rights against the defaulting Purchaser, including costs of resale and any deficiency resulting from resale. Gregory A. Lukanuski Special Commissioner For More Information Contact: Gregory A. Lukanuski, Esq. 900 East Broad St, Rm 400 Richmond, VA 23219 (804) 646-7940 Tim Dudley Motley’s Asset Disposition Group 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road Richmond, Virginia 23234 (804) 232-3300 COMMISSIONER’S SALE OF 1401 OAKWOOD AVENUE, RICHMOND, VIRGINIA E000-1273/009

Pursuant to an Order of Sale entered in the Circuit Court of the City of Richmond on October 31, 2016 in the matter City of Richmond v. Clayton Investment Group, L.L.C., A Cancelled Virginia Limited Liability Company, et al., , Case No. CL15-2700-1, a suit for the sale of real estate for delinquent taxes pursuant to Section 58.13965, et seq. of the Code of Virginia, the undersigned Special Commissioner will offer for sale at public auction at Motleys Asset Disposition Group, 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road, Richmond, Virginia 23234, on February 8, 2017, at 3:00 p.m., the real estate together with any improvements thereon, known as 1122 NORTH 24TH STREET, Richmond, Virginia, and more particularly described in the above mentioned court file. TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $2,500.00 or 20% of the purchase price, whichever is greater, will be required in cash, certified check or such other form as the Special Commissioner may in his sole discretion determine. A buyer’s premium of 10% of the successful bid will be added to equal total purchase price. All bidders shall be required to certify by affidavit that they do not own, either directly or indirectly, any real estate with outstanding Notices of Code Violations under local environmental, zoning and building code law, or delinquent real estate taxes, other taxes or any other finance related matter related to the City of Richmond. The property is being sold “AS IS” without any representations or warranties, subject to the rights of any person in possession and to all easements, liens, covenants, defects, encumbrances, adverse claims, conditions and restrictions, whether filed or inchoate, to include any information a survey or inspection of the property may disclose. Conveyance will be made by either a Special Commissioner’s Deed and/ or a Special Warranty deed, with adjustment of real estate property taxes made as of the date of confirmation of the sale. All settlement, recordation fees and prorated taxes are to be paid by Purchaser. Risk of loss shall be upon Purchaser from time of confirmation by the Circuit Court. In the event the tax delinquent property is subject to a Notice of Code Violation under the Virginia

Pursuant to an Order of Sale entered in the Circuit Court of the City of Richmond on November 28, 2016 in the matter City of Richmond v VIRGINIA M. GAINES a/k/a VIRGINIA BLAND GAINES, Who May Be Deceased, and THE HEIRS, DEVISEES, ASSIGNEES OR SUCCESSORS IN INTEREST OF VIRGINIA M. GAINES a/k/a VIRGINIA BLAND GAINES, et al., Case No. CL16-457-4, a suit for the sale of real estate for delinquent taxes pursuant to Section 58.1-3965, et seq. of the Code of Virginia, the undersigned Special Commissioner will offer for sale at public auction at Motleys Asset Disposition Group, 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road, Richmond, Virginia 23234, on February 8, 2017, at 3:00 p.m., the real estate together with any improvements thereon, known as 1401 OAKWOOD AV E N U E , R i c h m o n d , Virginia, and more particularly described in the above mentioned court file. TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $2,500.00 or 20% of the purchase price, whichever is greater, will be required in cash, certified check or such other form as the Special Commissioner may in his sole discretion determine. A buyer’s premium of 10% of the successful bid will be added to equal total purchase price. All bidders shall be required to certify by affidavit that they do not own, either directly or indirectly, any real estate with outstanding Notices of Code Violations under local environmental, zoning and building code law, or delinquent real estate taxes, other taxes or any other finance related matter related to the City of Richmond. The property is being sold “AS IS” without any representations or warranties, subject to the rights of any person in possession and to all easements, liens, covenants, defects, encumbrances, adverse claims, conditions and restrictions, whether filed or inchoate, to include any information a survey or inspection of the property may disclose. Conveyance will be made by either a Special Commissioner’s Deed and/ or a Special Warranty deed, with adjustment of real estate property taxes made as of the date of confirmation of the sale. All settlement, recordation fees and prorated taxes are to be paid by Purchaser. Risk of loss shall be upon Purchaser from time of confirmation by the Circuit Court. In the event the tax delinquent property is subject to a Notice of Code Violation under the Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code, city zoning codes or environmental codes, the high bidder shall be required to submit a written work schedule and plan to abate all code violations which shall be approved by the appropriate department, in its sole discretion. The acceptance of the bid by the Special Commissioner shall not be construed as limiting any powers vested in the City. Additional terms may be announced at the time of sale. The successful bid is subject to confirmation by the aforementioned Circuit Court pursuant to Section 58.13969 of the Code of Virginia. Settlement shall occur at the time of the confirmation by the Circuit Court, TIME BEING OF THE ESSENCE; otherwise, the Special Commissioner may require the Purchaser to forfeit the deposit and seek other legal or equitable rights against the defaulting Purchaser, including costs of resale and any deficiency resulting from resale. Gregory A. Lukanuski Special Commissioner For More Information Contact: Gregory A. Lukanuski, Esq. 900 East Broad St, Rm 400 Richmond, VA 23219

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Tim Dudley Motley’s Asset Disposition Group 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road Richmond, Virginia 23234 (804) 232-3300 COMMISSIONER’S SALE OF 1122 NORTH 24TH STREET, RICHMOND, VIRGINIA E000-0517/003

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(804) 646-7940 Tim Dudley Motley’s Asset Disposition Group 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road Richmond, Virginia 23234 (804) 232-3300 COMMISSIONER’S SALE OF 1420 SPOTSYLVANIA STREET, RICHMOND, VIRGINIA E000-0606/001 Pursuant to an Order of Sale entered in the Circuit Court of the City of Richmond on November 28, 2016 in the matter City of Richmond v. INTEGRITIES, INC., a/k/a INTEGRITIES I N C O R P O R AT E D , A Te r m i n a t e d V i r g i n i a Corporation, et al., Case No. CL16-2823-4, a suit for the sale of real estate for delinquent taxes pursuant to Section 58.1-3965, et seq. of the Code of Virginia, the undersigned Special Commissioner will offer for sale at public auction at Motleys Asset Disposition Group, 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road, Richmond, Virginia 23234, on February 8, 2017, at 3:00 p.m., the real estate together with any improvements thereon, known as 1420 SPOTSYLVANIA STREET, Richmond, Virginia, and more particularly described in the above mentioned court file. TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $2,500.00 or 20% of the purchase price, whichever is greater, will be required in cash, certified check or such other form as the Special Commissioner may in his sole discretion determine. A buyer’s premium of 10% of the successful bid will be added to equal total purchase price. All bidders shall be required to certify by affidavit that they do not own, either directly or indirectly, any real estate with outstanding Notices of Code Violations under local environmental, zoning and building code law, or delinquent real estate taxes, other taxes or any other finance related matter related to the City of Richmond. The property is being sold “AS IS” without any representations or warranties, subject to the rights of any person in possession and to all easements, liens, covenants, defects, encumbrances, adverse claims, conditions and restrictions, whether filed or inchoate, to include any information a survey or inspection of the property may disclose. Conveyance will be made by either a Special Commissioner’s Deed and/ or a Special Warranty deed, with adjustment of real estate property taxes made as of the date of confirmation of the sale. All settlement, recordation fees and prorated taxes are to be paid by Purchaser. Risk of loss shall be upon Purchaser from time of confirmation by the Circuit Court. In the event the tax delinquent property is subject to a Notice of Code Violation under the Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code, city zoning codes or environmental codes, the high bidder shall be required to submit a written work schedule and plan to abate all code violations which shall be approved by the appropriate department, in its sole discretion. The acceptance of the bid by the Special Commissioner shall not be construed as limiting any powers vested in the City. Additional terms may be announced at the time of sale. The successful bid is subject to confirmation by the aforementioned Circuit Court pursuant to Section 58.13969 of the Code of Virginia. Settlement shall occur at the time of the confirmation by the Circuit Court, TIME BEING OF THE ESSENCE; otherwise, the Special Commissioner may require the Purchaser to forfeit the deposit and seek other legal or equitable rights against the defaulting Purchaser, including costs of resale and any deficiency resulting from resale. Gregory A. Lukanuski Special Commissioner For More Information Contact: Gregory A. Lukanuski, Esq. 900 East Broad St, Rm 400 Richmond, VA 23219 (804) 646-7940 Tim Dudley Motley’s Asset Disposition Group 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road Richmond, Virginia 23234 (804) 232-3300 COMMISSIONER’S SALE OF 1421 GARBER STREET, RICHMOND, VIRGINIA E010-0076/010 Pursuant to an Order of Sale entered in the Circuit Court of the City of Richmond on November 28, 2016 in the matter City of Richmond v. LONG BEACH MORTGAGE COMPANY, A Delaware Corporation, et al., Case No. CL16-2393-4, a suit for the sale of real estate for delinquent taxes pursuant to Section 58.1-3965, et seq. of the Code of Virginia, the undersigned Special Commissioner will offer for sale at public auction at Motleys Asset Disposition Group, 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road, Richmond, Virginia 23234, on February 8, 2017, at 3:00 p.m., the real estate together with any improvements thereon, known as 1421 GARBER STREET, Richmond, Virginia, and more particularly described in the above mentioned Continued on next column

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court file. TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $2,500.00 or 20% of the purchase price, whichever is greater, will be required in cash, certified check or such other form as the Special Commissioner may in his sole discretion determine. A buyer’s premium of 10% of the successful bid will be added to equal total purchase price. All bidders shall be required to certify by affidavit that they do not own, either directly or indirectly, any real estate with outstanding Notices of Code Violations under local environmental, zoning and building code law, or delinquent real estate taxes, other taxes or any other finance related matter related to the City of Richmond. The property is being sold “AS IS” without any representations or warranties, subject to the rights of any person in possession and to all easements, liens, covenants, defects, encumbrances, adverse claims, conditions and restrictions, whether filed or inchoate, to include any information a survey or inspection of the property may disclose. Conveyance will be made by either a Special Commissioner’s Deed and/ or a Special Warranty deed, with adjustment of real estate property taxes made as of the date of confirmation of the sale. All settlement, recordation fees and prorated taxes are to be paid by Purchaser. Risk of loss shall be upon Purchaser from time of confirmation by the Circuit Court. In the event the tax delinquent property is subject to a Notice of Code Violation under the Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code, city zoning codes or environmental codes, the high bidder shall be required to submit a written work schedule and plan to abate all code violations which shall be approved by the appropriate department, in its sole discretion. The acceptance of the bid by the Special Commissioner shall not be construed as limiting any powers vested in the City. Additional terms may be announced at the time of sale. The successful bid is subject to confirmation by the aforementioned Circuit Court pursuant to Section 58.13969 of the Code of Virginia. Settlement shall occur at the time of the confirmation by the Circuit Court, TIME BEING OF THE ESSENCE; otherwise, the Special Commissioner may require the Purchaser to forfeit the deposit and seek other legal or equitable rights against the defaulting Purchaser, including costs of resale and any deficiency resulting from resale. Gregory A. Lukanuski Special Commissioner For More Information Contact: Gregory A. Lukanuski, Esq. 900 East Broad St, Rm 400 Richmond, VA 23219 (804) 646-7940

Commissioner’s Deed and/ or a Special Warranty deed, with adjustment of real estate property taxes made as of the date of confirmation of the sale. All settlement, recordation fees and prorated taxes are to be paid by Purchaser. Risk of loss shall be upon Purchaser from time of confirmation by the Circuit Court. In the event the tax delinquent property is subject to a Notice of Code Violation under the Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code, city zoning codes or environmental codes, the high bidder shall be required to submit a written work schedule and plan to abate all code violations which shall be approved by the appropriate department, in its sole discretion. The acceptance of the bid by the Special Commissioner shall not be construed as limiting any powers vested in the City. Additional terms may be announced at the time of sale. The successful bid is subject to confirmation by the aforementioned Circuit Court pursuant to Section 58.13969 of the Code of Virginia. Settlement shall occur at the time of the confirmation by the Circuit Court, TIME BEING OF THE ESSENCE; otherwise, the Special Commissioner may require the Purchaser to forfeit the deposit and seek other legal or equitable rights against the defaulting Purchaser, including costs of resale and any deficiency resulting from resale. Gregory A. Lukanuski Special Commissioner For More Information Contact: Gregory A. Lukanuski, Esq. 900 East Broad St, Rm 400 Richmond, VA 23219 (804) 646-7940

Purchaser, including costs of resale and any deficiency resulting from resale. Gregory A. Lukanuski Special Commissioner For More Information Contact: Gregory A. Lukanuski, Esq. 900 East Broad St, Rm 400 Richmond, VA 23219 (804) 646-7940

Tim Dudley Motley’s Asset Disposition Group 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road Richmond, Virginia 23234 (804) 232-3300 COMMISSIONER’S SALE OF 1619 ROGERS STREET, RICHMOND, VIRGINIA E000-1235/010

Pursuant to an Order of Sale entered in the Circuit Court of the City of Richmond on October 31, 2016 in the matter City of Richmond v. CHARLES L. JANUARY a/k/a CHARLES L. JANUARY, SR., Who May Be Deceased, and THE HEIRS, DEVISEES, ASSIGNEES OR SUCCESSORS IN INTEREST OF CHARLES L. JANUARY a/k/a CHARLES L. JANUARY, SR, et al., Case No. CL16-3406-4, a suit for the sale of real estate for delinquent taxes pursuant to Section 58.1-3965, et seq. of the Code of Virginia, the undersigned Special Commissioner will offer for sale at public auction at Motleys Asset Disposition Group, 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road, Richmond, Virginia 23234, on February 8, 2017, at 3:00 p.m., the real estate together with any improvements thereon, known as 1503 WILLIS STREET, Richmond, Virginia, and more particularly described in the above mentioned court file. TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $2,500.00 or 20% of the purchase price, whichever is greater, will be required in cash, certified check or such other form as the Special Commissioner may in his sole discretion determine. A buyer’s premium of 10% of the successful bid will be added to equal total purchase price. All bidders shall be required to certify by affidavit that they do not own, either directly or indirectly, any real estate with outstanding Notices of Code Violations under local environmental, zoning and building code law, or delinquent real estate taxes, other taxes or any other finance related matter related to the City of Richmond. The property is being sold “AS IS” without any representations or warranties, subject to the rights of any person in possession and to all easements, liens, covenants, defects, encumbrances, adverse claims, conditions and restrictions, whether filed or inchoate, to include any information a survey or inspection of the property may disclose. Conveyance will be made by either a Special

Pursuant to an Order of Sale entered in the Circuit Court of the City of Richmond on November 28, 2016 in the matter City of Richmond v. TIFFANY LOU HENDERSON SCOTT p/k/a TIFFANY LOU HENDERSON, et al., Case No. CL16-2621-4, a suit for the sale of real estate for delinquent taxes pursuant to Section 58.1-3965, et seq. of the Code of Virginia, the undersigned Special Commissioner will offer for sale at public auction at Motleys Asset Disposition Group, 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road, Richmond, Virginia 23234, on February 8, 2017, at 3:00 p.m., the real estate together with any improvements thereon, known as 1619 ROGERS STREET, Richmond, Virginia, and more particularly described in the above mentioned court file. TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $2,500.00 or 20% of the purchase price, whichever is greater, will be required in cash, certified check or such other form as the Special Commissioner may in his sole discretion determine. A buyer’s premium of 10% of the successful bid will be added to equal total purchase price. All bidders shall be required to certify by affidavit that they do not own, either directly or indirectly, any real estate with outstanding Notices of Code Violations under local environmental, zoning and building code law, or delinquent real estate taxes, other taxes or any other finance related matter related to the City of Richmond. The property is being sold “AS IS” without any representations or warranties, subject to the rights of any person in possession and to all easements, liens, covenants, defects, encumbrances, adverse claims, conditions and restrictions, whether filed or inchoate, to include any information a survey or inspection of the property may disclose. Conveyance will be made by either a Special Commissioner’s Deed and/ or a Special Warranty deed, with adjustment of real estate property taxes made as of the date of confirmation of the sale. All settlement, recordation fees and prorated taxes are to be paid by Purchaser. Risk of loss shall be upon Purchaser from time of confirmation by the Circuit Court. In the event the tax delinquent property is subject to a Notice of Code Violation under the Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code, city zoning codes or environmental codes, the high bidder shall be required to submit a written work schedule and plan to abate all code violations which shall be approved by the appropriate department, in its sole discretion. The acceptance of the bid by the Special Commissioner shall not be construed as limiting any powers vested in the City. Additional terms may be announced at the time of sale. The successful bid is subject to confirmation by the aforementioned Circuit Court pursuant to Section 58.13969 of the Code of Virginia. Settlement shall occur at the time of the confirmation by the Circuit Court, TIME BEING OF THE ESSENCE; otherwise, the Special Commissioner may require the Purchaser to forfeit the deposit and seek other legal or equitable rights against the defaulting

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Tim Dudley Motley’s Asset Disposition Group 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road Richmond, Virginia 23234 (804) 232-3300 COMMISSIONER’S SALE OF 1503 WILLIS STREET, RICHMOND, VIRGINIA S007-1329/036

Tim Dudley Motley’s Asset Disposition Group 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road Richmond, Virginia 23234 (804) 232-3300 COMMISSIONER’S SALE OF 1704 HICKORY Street, RICHMOND, VIRGINIA N000-0364/033 Pursuant to an Order of Sale entered in the Circuit Court of the City of Richmond on December 19, 2016 in the matter City of Richmond v. WILLIAM GREEN a/k/a WILLIAM GREENE, Who May Be Deceased, and THE HEIRS, DEVISEES, ASSIGNEES OR SUCCESSORS IN INTEREST OF WILLIAM GREEN a/k/a WILLIAM GREENE, et al., Case No. CL16-3433-4, a suit for the sale of real estate for delinquent taxes pursuant to Section 58.1-3965, et seq. of the Code of Virginia, the undersigned Special Commissioner will offer for sale at public auction at Motleys Asset Disposition Group, 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road, Richmond, Virginia 23234, on February 8, 2017, at 3:00 p.m., the real estate together with any improvements thereon, known as 1704 HICKORY Street, Richmond, Virginia, and more particularly described in the above mentioned court file. TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $2,500.00 or 20% of the purchase price, whichever is greater, will be required in cash, certified check or such other form as the Special Commissioner may in his sole discretion determine. A buyer’s premium of 10% of the successful bid will be added to equal total purchase price. All bidders shall be required to certify by affidavit that they do not own, either directly or indirectly, any real estate with outstanding Notices of Code Violations under local environmental, zoning and building code law, or delinquent real estate taxes, other taxes or any other finance related matter related to the City of Richmond. The property is being sold “AS IS” without any representations or warranties, subject to the rights of any person in possession and to all easements, liens, covenants, defects, encumbrances, adverse claims, conditions and restrictions, whether filed or inchoate, to include any information a survey or inspection of the property may disclose. Conveyance will be made by either a Special Commissioner’s Deed and/ or a Special Warranty deed, with adjustment of real estate property taxes made as of the date of confirmation of the sale. All settlement, recordation fees and prorated taxes are to be paid by Purchaser. Risk of loss shall be upon Purchaser from time of confirmation by the Circuit Court. In the event the tax delinquent property is subject to a Notice of Code Violation under the Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code, city zoning codes or environmental codes, the high bidder shall be required to submit a written work schedule and plan to abate all code violations which shall be approved by the appropriate department, in its sole discretion. The acceptance of the bid by the Special Commissioner shall not be construed as limiting any powers vested in the City. Additional terms may be announced at the time of sale. The successful bid is subject to confirmation by the aforementioned Circuit Court pursuant to Section 58.13969 of the Code of Virginia. Settlement shall occur at the time of the confirmation by the Circuit Court, TIME BEING OF THE ESSENCE; otherwise, the Special Commissioner may require the Purchaser to forfeit the deposit and seek other legal or equitable rights against the defaulting Purchaser, including costs of resale and any deficiency resulting from resale. Gregory A. Lukanuski Special Commissioner For More Information Contact: Gregory A. Lukanuski, Esq. 900 East Broad St, Rm 400 Richmond, VA 23219 (804) 646-7940 Tim Dudley Motley’s Asset Disposition Group 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road Richmond, Virginia 23234 (804) 232-3300 COMMISSIONER’S SALE OF 1823 ROSE AVENUE, RICHMOND, VIRGINIA N000-0330/003 Pursuant to an Order of Sale entered in the Circuit Court of the City of Richmond on November 28, 2016 in the matter City of Richmond v. W. E . R O B I N S O N a/k/a WALTER EDWARD ROBINSON, Who May Be Deceased, and THE HEIRS, DEVISEES, ASSIGNEES OR SUCCESSORS IN I N T E R E S T O F W. E . ROBINSON a/k/a WALTER EDWARD ROBINSON, et al., Case No. CL16-2005-4, a suit for the sale of real estate for delinquent taxes Continued on next page


Richmond Free Press

B7 January 12-14, 2017

Legal Notices Continued from previous page

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pursuant to Section 58.13965, et seq. of the Code of Virginia, the undersigned Special Commissioner will offer for sale at public auction at Motleys Asset Disposition Group, 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road, Richmond, Virginia 23234, on February 8, 2017, at 3:00 p.m., the real estate together with any improvements thereon, known as 1823 ROSE AVENUE, Richmond, Virginia, and more particularly described in the above mentioned court file. TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $2,500.00 or 20% of the purchase price, whichever is greater, will be required in cash, certified check or such other form as the Special Commissioner may in his sole discretion determine. A buyer’s premium of 10% of the successful bid will be added to equal total purchase price. All bidders shall be required to certify by affidavit that they do not own, either directly or indirectly, any real estate with outstanding Notices of Code Violations under local environmental, zoning and building code law, or delinquent real estate taxes, other taxes or any other finance related matter related to the City of Richmond. The property is being sold “AS IS” without any representations or warranties, subject to the rights of any person in possession and to all easements, liens, covenants, defects, encumbrances, adverse claims, conditions and restrictions, whether filed or inchoate, to include any information a survey or inspection of the property may disclose. Conveyance will be made by either a Special Commissioner’s Deed and/ or a Special Warranty deed, with adjustment of real estate property taxes made as of the date of confirmation of the sale. All settlement, recordation fees and prorated taxes are to be paid by Purchaser. Risk of loss shall be upon Purchaser from time of confirmation by the Circuit Court. In the event the tax delinquent property is subject to a Notice of Code Violation under the Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code, city zoning codes or environmental codes, the high bidder shall be required to submit a written work schedule and plan to abate all code violations which shall be approved by the appropriate department, in its sole discretion. The acceptance of the bid by the Special Commissioner shall not be construed as limiting any powers vested in the City. Additional terms may be announced at the time of sale. The successful bid is subject to confirmation by the aforementioned Circuit Court pursuant to Section 58.13969 of the Code of Virginia. Settlement shall occur at the time of the confirmation by the Circuit Court, TIME BEING OF THE ESSENCE; otherwise, the Special Commissioner may require the Purchaser to forfeit the deposit and seek other legal or equitable rights against the defaulting Purchaser, including costs of resale and any deficiency resulting from resale. Gregory A. Lukanuski Special Commissioner For More Information Contact: Gregory A. Lukanuski, Esq. 900 East Broad St, Rm 400 Richmond, VA 23219 (804) 646-7940

easements, liens, covenants, defects, encumbrances, adverse claims, conditions and restrictions, whether filed or inchoate, to include any information a survey or inspection of the property may disclose. Conveyance will be made by either a Special Commissioner’s Deed and/ or a Special Warranty deed, with adjustment of real estate property taxes made as of the date of confirmation of the sale. All settlement, recordation fees and prorated taxes are to be paid by Purchaser. Risk of loss shall be upon Purchaser from time of confirmation by the Circuit Court. In the event the tax delinquent property is subject to a Notice of Code Violation under the Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code, city zoning codes or environmental codes, the high bidder shall be required to submit a written work schedule and plan to abate all code violations which shall be approved by the appropriate department, in its sole discretion. The acceptance of the bid by the Special Commissioner shall not be construed as limiting any powers vested in the City. Additional terms may be announced at the time of sale. The successful bid is subject to confirmation by the aforementioned Circuit Court pursuant to Section 58.13969 of the Code of Virginia. Settlement shall occur at the time of the confirmation by the Circuit Court, TIME BEING OF THE ESSENCE; otherwise, the Special Commissioner may require the Purchaser to forfeit the deposit and seek other legal or equitable rights against the defaulting Purchaser, including costs of resale and any deficiency resulting from resale. Gregory A. Lukanuski Special Commissioner For More Information Contact: Gregory A. Lukanuski, Esq. 900 East Broad St, Rm 400 Richmond, VA 23219 (804) 646-7940

3969 of the Code of Virginia. Settlement shall occur at the time of the confirmation by the Circuit Court, TIME BEING OF THE ESSENCE; otherwise, the Special Commissioner may require the Purchaser to forfeit the deposit and seek other legal or equitable rights against the defaulting Purchaser, including costs of resale and any deficiency resulting from resale. Gregory A. Lukanuski Special Commissioner For More Information Contact: Gregory A. Lukanuski, Esq. 900 East Broad St, Rm 400 Richmond, VA 23219 (804) 646-7940

delinquent taxes pursuant to Section 58.1-3965, et seq. of the Code of Virginia, the undersigned Special Commissioner will offer for sale at public auction at Motleys Asset Disposition Group, 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road, Richmond, Virginia 23234, on February 8, 2017, at 3:00 p.m., the real estate together with any improvements thereon, known as 3209 FENDALL AVENUE, Richmond, Virginia, and more particularly described in the above mentioned court file. TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $2,500.00 or 20% of the purchase price, whichever is greater, will be required in cash, certified check or such other form as the Special Commissioner may in his sole discretion determine. A buyer’s premium of 10% of the successful bid will be added to equal total purchase price. All bidders shall be required to certify by affidavit that they do not own, either directly or indirectly, any real estate with outstanding Notices of Code Violations under local environmental, zoning and building code law, or delinquent real estate taxes, other taxes or any other finance related matter related to the City of Richmond. The property is being sold “AS IS” without any representations or warranties, subject to the rights of any person in possession and to all easements, liens, covenants, defects, encumbrances, adverse claims, conditions and restrictions, whether filed or inchoate, to include any information a survey or inspection of the property may disclose. Conveyance will be made by either a Special Commissioner’s Deed and/ or a Special Warranty deed, with adjustment of real estate property taxes made as of the date of confirmation of the sale. All settlement, recordation fees and prorated taxes are to be paid by Purchaser. Risk of loss shall be upon Purchaser from time of confirmation by the Circuit Court. In the event the tax delinquent property is subject to a Notice of Code Violation under the Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code, city zoning codes or environmental codes, the high bidder shall be required to submit a written work schedule and plan to abate all code violations which shall be approved by the appropriate department, in its sole discretion. The acceptance of the bid by the Special Commissioner shall not be construed as limiting any powers vested in the City. Additional terms may be announced at the time of sale. The successful bid is subject to confirmation by the aforementioned Circuit Court pursuant to Section 58.13969 of the Code of Virginia. Settlement shall occur at the time of the confirmation by the Circuit Court, TIME BEING OF THE ESSENCE; otherwise, the Special Commissioner may require the Purchaser to forfeit the deposit and seek other legal or equitable rights against the defaulting Purchaser, including costs of resale and any deficiency resulting from resale. Gregory A. Lukanuski Special Commissioner For More Information Contact: Gregory A. Lukanuski, Esq. 900 East Broad St, Rm 400 Richmond, VA 23219 (804) 646-7940

person in possession and to all easements, liens, covenants, defects, encumbrances, adverse claims, conditions and restrictions, whether filed or inchoate, to include any information a survey or inspection of the property may disclose. Conveyance will be made by either a Special Commissioner’s Deed and/ or a Special Warranty deed, with adjustment of real estate property taxes made as of the date of confirmation of the sale. All settlement, recordation fees and prorated taxes are to be paid by Purchaser. Risk of loss shall be upon Purchaser from time of confirmation by the Circuit Court. In the event the tax delinquent property is subject to a Notice of Code Violation under the Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code, city zoning codes or environmental codes, the high bidder shall be required to submit a written work schedule and plan to abate all code violations which shall be approved by the appropriate department, in its sole discretion. The acceptance of the bid by the Special Commissioner shall not be construed as limiting any powers vested in the City. Additional terms may be announced at the time of sale. The successful bid is subject to confirmation by the aforementioned Circuit Court pursuant to Section 58.13969 of the Code of Virginia. Settlement shall occur at the time of the confirmation by the Circuit Court, TIME BEING OF THE ESSENCE; otherwise, the Special Commissioner may require the Purchaser to forfeit the deposit and seek other legal or equitable rights against the defaulting Purchaser, including costs of resale and any deficiency resulting from resale. Gregory A. Lukanuski Special Commissioner For More Information Contact: Gregory A. Lukanuski, Esq. 900 East Broad St, Rm 400 Richmond, VA 23219 (804) 646-7940

pursuant to Section 58.13969 of the Code of Virginia. Settlement shall occur at the time of the confirmation by the Circuit Court, TIME BEING OF THE ESSENCE; otherwise, the Special Commissioner may require the Purchaser to forfeit the deposit and seek other legal or equitable rights against the defaulting Purchaser, including costs of resale and any deficiency resulting from resale. Gregory A. Lukanuski Special Commissioner For More Information Contact: Gregory A. Lukanuski, Esq. 900 East Broad St, Rm 400 Richmond, VA 23219 (804) 646-7940

STATES CURRENCY, AND DOMINIQUE STEWART; CASE NO. 15-4061 $ 3288.60 IN UNITED STATES CURRENCY AND MICHAEL TYSON; CASE NO. 12-2926 $ 1019.00 IN UNITED STATES CURRENCY, AND BRIANA PATTERSON; CASE NO. 13-954 $ 2452.00 IN UNITED STATES CURRENCY, AND NICHOLAS GRAHAM; Defendants. ORDER The object of the above captioned suits is to forfeit to the Commonwealth the described property or currency pursuant to V a . Code Ann. § 19.2-386 et. seq. (which includes former Section 18.2-249) (Michie 1999). It appearing by affidavit filed according to law that due diligence has been used by or on behalf of the Commonwealth to ascertain the whereabouts of the Defendants and effect service of process, without success, it is therefore ORDERED that the Defendants do appear on or before February 13, 2017, at 9:30 a.m. in the Circuit Court for the City of Richmond, John Marshall Courts Building, 400 North Ninth Street, and do what is necessary to protect his or her interests. I ask for this: Janet Jin Ah Lee Assistant Commonwealth’s Attorney

COMMONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA Plaintiff, v. CASE NO. 13-2787 2003 DODGE RAM VIN# 1D7HU18D73S280213, AND ANTONIO KING; CASE NO. 14-997 $ 4162.00 IN UNITED STATES CURRENCY, AND ARCHIE DAWKINS; CASE NO. 12-999 $ 2073.97 IN UNITED STATES CURRENCY, AND LINWOOD TUNSTALL; CASE NO. 15-335 $ 3277.00 IN UNITED STATES CURRENCY AND CURTIS BROADIE; CASE NO. 12-4088 $ 2466.00 IN UNITED STATES CURRENCY AND SHANESHA HILL; CASE NO. 13-1118 $ 12692.50 IN UNITED STATES CURRENCY AND ROBERT RICHARD; CASE NO. 13-2261 $ 1301.07 IN UNITED STATES CURRENCY AND KYLE JOHNSON Defendants. ORDER The object of the above captioned suits is to forfeit to the Commonwealth the described property or currency pursuant to V a . Code Ann. § 19.2-386 et. seq. (which includes former Section 18.2-249) (Michie 1999). It appearing by affidavit filed according to law that due diligence has been used by or on behalf of the Commonwealth to ascertain the whereabouts of the Defendants and effect service of process, without success, it is therefore ORDERED that the Defendants do appear on or before February 14, 2017, at 9:00 a.m. in the Circuit Court for the City of Richmond, John Marshall Courts Building, 400 North Ninth Street, and do what is necessary to protect his or her interests. I ask for this: Janet Jin Ah Lee Assistant Commonwealth’s Attorney

Tim Dudley Motley’s Asset Disposition Group 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road Richmond, Virginia 23234 (804) 232-3300 COMMISSIONER’S SALE OF 2712 ALEXANDER Avenue, RICHMOND, VIRGINIA S008-0844/048

Pursuant to an Order of Sale entered in the Circuit Court of the City of Richmond on November 28, 2016 in the matter City of Richmond v. DEBORAH S. TAYLOR n/k/a DEBORAH J. AGEE, et al., Case No. CL16-23214, a suit for the sale of real estate for delinquent taxes pursuant to Section 58.13965, et seq. of the Code of Virginia, the undersigned Special Commissioner will offer for sale at public auction at Motleys Asset Disposition Group, 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road, Richmond, Virginia 23234, on February 8, 2017, at 3:00 p.m., the real estate together with any improvements thereon, known as 2410 ROYALL AVENUE, Richmond, Virginia, and more particularly described in the above mentioned court file. TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $2,500.00 or 20% of the purchase price, whichever is greater, will be required in cash, certified check or such other form as the Special Commissioner may in his sole discretion determine. A buyer’s premium of 10% of the successful bid will be added to equal total purchase price. All bidders shall be required to certify by affidavit that they do not own, either directly or indirectly, any real estate with outstanding Notices of Code Violations under local environmental, zoning and building code law, or delinquent real estate taxes, other taxes or any other finance related matter related to the City of Richmond. The property is being sold “AS IS” without any representations or warranties, subject to the rights of any person in possession and to all

Pursuant to an Order of Sale entered in the Circuit Court of the City of Richmond on December 19, 2016 in the matter City of Richmond v. BAYOU PROPERTIES, LLC., A Cancelled Virginia Limited Liability Company, et al., Case No. CL16-29421, a suit for the sale of real estate for delinquent taxes pursuant to Section 58.13965, et seq. of the Code of Virginia, the undersigned Special Commissioner will offer for sale at public auction at Motleys Asset Disposition Group, 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road, Richmond, Virginia 23234, on February 8, 2017, at 3:00 p.m., the real estate together with any improvements thereon, known as 2712 A L E X A N D E R Av e n u e , Richmond, Virginia, and more particularly described in the above mentioned court file. TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $2,500.00 or 20% of the purchase price, whichever is greater, will be required in cash, certified check or such other form as the Special Commissioner may in his sole discretion determine. A buyer’s premium of 10% of the successful bid will be added to equal total purchase price. All bidders shall be required to certify by affidavit that they do not own, either directly or indirectly, any real estate with outstanding Notices of Code Violations under local environmental, zoning and building code law, or delinquent real estate taxes, other taxes or any other finance related matter related to the City of Richmond. The property is being sold “AS IS” without any representations or warranties, subject to the rights of any person in possession and to all easements, liens, covenants, defects, encumbrances, adverse claims, conditions and restrictions, whether filed or inchoate, to include any information a survey or inspection of the property may disclose. Conveyance will be made by either a Special Commissioner’s Deed and/ or a Special Warranty deed, with adjustment of real estate property taxes made as of the date of confirmation of the sale. All settlement, recordation fees and prorated taxes are to be paid by Purchaser. Risk of loss shall be upon Purchaser from time of confirmation by the Circuit Court. In the event the tax delinquent property is subject to a Notice of Code Violation under the Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code, city zoning codes or environmental codes, the high bidder shall be required to submit a written work schedule and plan to abate all code violations which shall be approved by the appropriate department, in its sole discretion. The acceptance of the bid by the Special Commissioner shall not be construed as limiting any powers vested in the City. Additional terms may be announced at the time of sale. The successful bid is subject to confirmation by the aforementioned Circuit Court pursuant to Section 58.1-

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Tim Dudley Motley’s Asset Disposition Group 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road Richmond, Virginia 23234 (804) 232-3300 COMMISSIONER’S SALE OF 2410 ROYALL AVENUE, RICHMOND, VIRGINIA S007-1578/005

Tim Dudley Motley’s Asset Disposition Group 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road Richmond, Virginia 23234 (804) 232-3300 COMMISSIONER’S SALE OF 2716 ALEXANDER Avenue, RICHMOND, VIRGINIA S008-0844/049 Pursuant to an Order of Sale entered in the Circuit Court of the City of Richmond on December 19, 2016 in the matter City of Richmond v. BAYOU PROPERTIES, LLC., A Cancelled Virginia Limited Liability Company, et al., Case No. CL16-29421, a suit for the sale of real estate for delinquent taxes pursuant to Section 58.13965, et seq. of the Code of Virginia, the undersigned Special Commissioner will offer for sale at public auction at Motleys Asset Disposition Group, 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road, Richmond, Virginia 23234, on February 8, 2017, at 3:00 p.m., the real estate together with any improvements thereon, known as 2716 A L E X A N D E R Av e n u e , Richmond, Virginia, and more particularly described in the above mentioned court file. TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $2,500.00 or 20% of the purchase price, whichever is greater, will be required in cash, certified check or such other form as the Special Commissioner may in his sole discretion determine. A buyer’s premium of 10% of the successful bid will be added to equal total purchase price. All bidders shall be required to certify by affidavit that they do not own, either directly or indirectly, any real estate with outstanding Notices of Code Violations under local environmental, zoning and building code law, or delinquent real estate taxes, other taxes or any other finance related matter related to the City of Richmond. The property is being sold “AS IS” without any representations or warranties, subject to the rights of any person in possession and to all easements, liens, covenants, defects, encumbrances, adverse claims, conditions and restrictions, whether filed or inchoate, to include any information a survey or inspection of the property may disclose. Conveyance will be made by either a Special Commissioner’s Deed and/ or a Special Warranty deed, with adjustment of real estate property taxes made as of the date of confirmation of the sale. All settlement, recordation fees and prorated taxes are to be paid by Purchaser. Risk of loss shall be upon Purchaser from time of confirmation by the Circuit Court. In the event the tax delinquent property is subject to a Notice of Code Violation under the Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code, city zoning codes or environmental codes, the high bidder shall be required to submit a written work schedule and plan to abate all code violations which shall be approved by the appropriate department, in its sole discretion. The acceptance of the bid by the Special Commissioner shall not be construed as limiting any powers vested in the City. Additional terms may be announced at the time of sale. The successful bid is subject to confirmation by the aforementioned Circuit Court pursuant to Section 58.13969 of the Code of Virginia. Settlement shall occur at the time of the confirmation by the Circuit Court, TIME BEING OF THE ESSENCE; otherwise, the Special Commissioner may require the Purchaser to forfeit the deposit and seek other legal or equitable rights against the defaulting Purchaser, including costs of resale and any deficiency resulting from resale. Gregory A. Lukanuski Special Commissioner For More Information Contact: Gregory A. Lukanuski, Esq. 900 East Broad St, Rm 400 Richmond, VA 23219 (804) 646-7940 Tim Dudley Motley’s Asset Disposition Group 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road Richmond, Virginia 23234 (804) 232-3300 COMMISSIONER’S SALE OF 3209 FENDALL AVENUE, RICHMOND, VIRGINIA N000-1037/044 Pursuant to an Order of Sale entered in the Circuit Court of the City of Richmond on October 31, 2016 in the matter City of Richmond v. RICHMOND REAL ESTATE, LLC, Entity No. S065139-0, A Cancelled Virginia Limited Liability Company, et al., Case No. CL16-2708-4, a suit for the sale of real estate for Continued on next column

Tim Dudley Motley’s Asset Disposition Group 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road Richmond, Virginia 23234 (804) 232-3300 COMMISSIONER’S SALE OF 1718 NORTH 29TH STREET, RICHMOND, VIRGINIA E000-0951/022

Pursuant to an Order of Sale entered in the Circuit Court of the City of Richmond on December 19, 2016 in the matter City of Richmond v. Rosalyn Powell, Jerone Powell, and Gerald Powell, et al., Case No. CL16-25024, a suit for the sale of real estate for delinquent taxes pursuant to Section 58.13965, et seq. of the Code of Virginia, the undersigned Special Commissioner will offer for sale at public auction at Motleys Asset Disposition Group, 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road, Richmond, Virginia 23234, on February 8, 2017, at 3:00 p.m., the real estate together with any improvements thereon, known as 3301 FLORIDA Avenue, Richmond, Virginia, and more particularly described in the above mentioned court file. TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $2,500.00 or 20% of the purchase price, whichever is greater, will be required in cash, certified check or such other form as the Special Commissioner may in his sole discretion determine. A buyer’s premium of 10% of the successful bid will be added to equal total purchase price. All bidders shall be required to certify by affidavit that they do not own, either directly or indirectly, any real estate with outstanding Notices of Code Violations under local environmental, zoning and building code law, or delinquent real estate taxes, other taxes or any other finance related matter related to the City of Richmond. The property is being sold “AS IS” without any representations or warranties, subject to the rights of any

Pursuant to an Order of Sale entered in the Circuit Court of the City of Richmond on October 31, 2016 in the matter City of Richmond v. Clayton Investment Group, L.L.C., A Cancelled Virginia Limited Liability Company, et al., , Case No. CL15-3834-1, a suit for the sale of real estate for delinquent taxes pursuant to Section 58.13965, et seq. of the Code of Virginia, the undersigned Special Commissioner will offer for sale at public auction at Motleys Asset Disposition Group, 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road, Richmond, Virginia 23234, on February 8, 2017, at 3:00 p.m., the real estate together with any improvements thereon, known as 1718 NORTH 29TH STREET, Richmond, Virginia, and more particularly described in the above mentioned court file. TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $2,500.00 or 20% of the purchase price, whichever is greater, will be required in cash, certified check or such other form as the Special Commissioner may in his sole discretion determine. A buyer’s premium of 10% of the successful bid will be added to equal total purchase price. All bidders shall be required to certify by affidavit that they do not own, either directly or indirectly, any real estate with outstanding Notices of Code Violations under local environmental, zoning and building code law, or delinquent real estate taxes, other taxes or any other finance related matter related to the City of Richmond. The property is being sold “AS IS” without any representations or warranties, subject to the rights of any person in possession and to all easements, liens, covenants, defects, encumbrances, adverse claims, conditions and restrictions, whether filed or inchoate, to include any information a survey or inspection of the property may disclose. Conveyance will be made by either a Special Commissioner’s Deed and/ or a Special Warranty deed, with adjustment of real estate property taxes made as of the date of confirmation of the sale. All settlement, recordation fees and prorated taxes are to be paid by Purchaser. Risk of loss shall be upon Purchaser from time of confirmation by the Circuit Court. In the event the tax delinquent property is subject to a Notice of Code Violation under the Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code, city zoning codes or environmental codes, the high bidder shall be required to submit a written work schedule and plan to abate all code violations which shall be approved by the appropriate department, in its sole discretion. The acceptance of the bid by the Special Commissioner shall not be construed as limiting any powers vested in the City. Additional terms may be announced at the time of sale. The successful bid is subject to confirmation by the aforementioned Circuit Court

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Tim Dudley Motley’s Asset Disposition Group 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road Richmond, Virginia 23234 (804) 232-3300 COMMISSIONER’S SALE OF 3301 FLORIDA Avenue, RICHMOND, VIRGINIA N000-1264/014

Tim Dudley Motley’s Asset Disposition Group 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road Richmond, Virginia 23234 (804) 232-3300 COMMISSIONER’S SALE OF 1303 WILLIS STREET, RICHMOND, VIRGINIA S007-1180/008 Pursuant to an Order of Sale entered in the Circuit Court of the City of Richmond on May 20, 2016 in the matter City of Richmond v. James R. Marchand, et al., Case No. CL16-756-4, a suit for the sale of real estate for delinquent taxes pursuant to Section 58.1-3965, et seq. of the Code of Virginia, the undersigned Special Commissioner will offer for sale at public auction at Motleys Asset Disposition Group, 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road, Richmond, Virginia 23234, on February 8, 2017, at 3:00 p.m., the real estate together with any improvements thereon, known as 1303 Willis Street, Richmond, Virginia, and more particularly described in the above mentioned court file. TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A bidder’s deposit of $2,500.00 or 20% of the purchase price, whichever is greater, will be required in cash, certified check or such other form as the Special Commissioner may in his sole discretion determine. A buyer’s premium of 10% of the successful bid will be added to equal total purchase price. All bidders shall be required to certify by affidavit that they do not own, either directly or indirectly, any real estate with outstanding Notices of Code Violations under local environmental, zoning and building code law, or delinquent real estate taxes, other taxes or any other finance related matter related to the City of Richmond. The property is being sold “AS IS” without any representations or warranties, subject to the rights of any person in possession and to all easements, liens, covenants, defects, encumbrances, adverse claims, conditions and restrictions, whether filed or inchoate, to include any information a survey or inspection of the property may disclose. Conveyance will be made by either a Special Commissioner’s Deed and/ or a Special Warranty deed, with adjustment of real estate property taxes made as of the date of confirmation of the sale. All settlement, recordation fees and prorated taxes are to be paid by Purchaser. Risk of loss shall be upon Purchaser from time of confirmation by the Circuit Court. In the event the tax delinquent property is subject to a Notice of Code Violation under the Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code, city zoning codes or environmental codes, the high bidder shall be required to submit a written work schedule and plan to abate all code violations which shall be approved by the appropriate department, in its sole discretion. The acceptance of the bid by the Special Commissioner shall not be construed as limiting any powers vested in the City. Additional terms may be announced at the time of sale. The successful bid is subject to confirmation by the aforementioned Circuit Court pursuant to Section 58.13969 of the Code of Virginia. Settlement shall occur at the time of the confirmation by the Circuit Court, TIME BEING OF THE ESSENCE; otherwise, the Special Commissioner may require the Purchaser to forfeit the deposit and seek other legal or equitable rights against the defaulting Purchaser, including costs of resale and any deficiency resulting from resale. Gregory A. Lukanuski Special Commissioner For More Information Contact: Gregory A. Lukanuski, Esq. 900 East Broad St, Rm 400 Richmond, VA 23219 (804) 646-7940 Tim Dudley Motley’s Asset Disposition Group 3600 Deepwater Terminal Road Richmond, Virginia 23234 (804) 232-3300 VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE CITY OF RICHMOND JOHN MARSHALL COURTS BUILDING COMMONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA Plaintiff, v. CASE NO. 14-2530 $ 1748.00 IN UNITED STATES CURRENCY, AND ALI RIZVI; CASE NO. 14-243 $ 12943.00 IN UNITED STATES CURRENCY, AND D’JAN ROBINSON; CASE NO. 12-680 $ 1113.00 IN UNITED Continued on next column

VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE CITY OF RICHMOND JOHN MARSHALL COURTS BUILDING COMMONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA Plaintiff, v. CASE NO. 15-2790 $ 1066.00 IN UNITED STATES CURRENCY, AND BRANDON CARMON; CASE NO. 13-959 $ 1026.00 IN UNITED STATES CURRENCY, AND MONTEE STEWART; CASE NO. 12-4508 2007 CHRYSLER VIN# 1A4GJ45R67B180328, AND FATEH AL-HAYANI; CASE NO. 13-1120 $ 1422.00 IN UNITED STATES CURRENCY AND GERALD WARD Defendants. ORDER The object of the above captioned suits is to forfeit to the Commonwealth the described property or currency pursuant to V a . Code Ann. § 19.2-386 et. seq. (which includes former Section 18.2-249) (Michie 1999). It appearing by affidavit filed according to law that due diligence has been used by or on behalf of the Commonwealth to ascertain the whereabouts of the Defendants and effect service of process, without success, it is therefore ORDERED that the Defendants do appear on or before February 15, 2017, at 9:00 a.m. in the Circuit Court for the City of Richmond, John Marshall Courts Building, 400 North Ninth Street, and do what is necessary to protect his or her interests. I ask for this: Janet Jin Ah Lee Assistant Commonwealth’s Attorney VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE CITY OF RICHMOND JOHN MARSHALL COURTS BUILDING COMMONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA Plaintiff, v. CASE NO. 13-2786 $ 2230.00 IN UNITED STATES CURRENCY, AND ANTONIO KING; CASE NO. 15-1613 $ 834.00 IN UNITED STATES CURRENCY, AND DAVON DAVIS; CASE NO. 16-1310 $ 1599.00 IN UNITED STATES CURRENCY, AND BRANDON J. EPPS; CASE NO. 12-595 $ 1160.00 IN UNITED STATES CURRENCY AND DAVID BEIRNE; CASE NO. 12-4087 ONE LOT OF ELECTRONICS [(1) VIZIO 32” TV Serial# LAQKHLMM3305942, (2) SONY Wii Serial #LU83917251, AND (3) SONY PS3 Serial# CG157904138CECH-20001A] AND SHANESHA HILL Defendants. ORDER The object of the above captioned suits is to forfeit to the Commonwealth the described property or currency pursuant to V a . Code Ann. § 19.2-386 et. seq. (which includes former Section 18.2-249) (Michie 1999). It appearing by affidavit filed according to law that due diligence has been used by or on behalf of the Commonwealth to ascertain the whereabouts of the Defendants and effect service of process, without success, it is therefore ORDERED that the Defendants do appear on or before March 1, 2017, at 9:00 a.m. in the Circuit Court for the City of Richmond, John Marshall Courts Building, 400 North Ninth Street, and do what is necessary to protect his or her interests. I ask for this: Janet Jin Ah Lee Assistant Commonwealth’s Attorney VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE CITY OF RICHMOND JOHN MARSHALL COURTS BUILDING Continued on next column

VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE CITY OF RICHMOND JOHN MARSHALL COURTS BUILDING COMMONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA Plaintiff, v. CASE NO. 14-4233 $ 1932.00 IN UNITED STATES CURRENCY, AND COREY DARK; CASE NO. 14-1382 $ 20285.00 IN UNITED STATES CURRENCY, AND EARL HILL; CASE NO. 13-39 $ 1933.00 IN UNITED STATES CURRENCY, AND ANDY MATTHEWS; CASE NO. 12-1243 $ 4205.60 IN UNITED STATES CURRENCY AND ANTHONY CANNELLA; CASE NO. 15-2009 $ 308.00 IN UNITED STATES CURRENCY AND SHARHONDA LEE; CASE NO. 13-1114 $ 107328.62.00 IN UNITED STATES CURRENCY, AND ROBERT GETFIELD; Defendants. ORDER The object of the above captioned suits is to forfeit to the Commonwealth the described property or currency pursuant to V a . Code Ann. § 19.2-386 et. seq. (which includes former Section 18.2-249) (Michie 1999). It appearing by affidavit filed according to law that due diligence has been used by or on behalf of the Commonwealth to ascertain the whereabouts of the Defendants and effect service of process, without success, it is therefore ORDERED that the Defendants do appear on or before February 13, 2017, at 2:00 p.m. in the Circuit Court for the City of Richmond, John Marshall Courts Building, 400 North Ninth Street, and do what is necessary to protect his or her interests. I ask for this: Janet Jin Ah Lee Assistant Commonwealth’s Attorney

BID COUNTY OF HENRICO, VIRGINIA CONSTRUCTION ITB # 16-1302-12CE – Water Reclamation Facility Replacement of PLC 2, PLC 12, and PLC 12-1 This project consists of the demolition of PLC back panels and installation of three PLC units. Due 3:00 pm, January 31, 2017. Additional information available at: http:// henrico.us/purchasing/.

REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL The University of Virginia seeks a firm to provide: Name: Research and Development Goods and Services (Generation 2) To view a copy of RFP # KF042916 (2) go to Procurement Services Site:http://www.procurement. virginia.edu/main/ publicpostings/RFP.html, or email pur-rfp@virginia.edu

REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL The University of Virginia seeks a firm to provide: Name: Masonry, Concrete, Waterproofing, and Related Trades To view a copy of RFP # JG010417 go to Procurement Services Site:http://www.procurement. virginia.edu/main/ publicpostings/RFP.html, or email pur-rfp@virginia.edu


Richmond Free Press

B8 January 12-14, 2017

Sports Plus

Richmond area athletes land spots in NFL conference semifinals By Fred Jeter

NFL conference semifinals

Seattle Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson and Houston Texans offensive tackle Duane Brown both earned an A-plus on their NFL first round playoff report cards. The former Richmond area athletes were nearly flawless in helping their teams advance to this Saturday’s conference semifinals. Seattle travels to Duane Brown Atlanta to play the Atlanta Falcons, while Houston will play the New England Patriots in Foxborough, Mass. Wilson, a Collegiate School alumnus, hit 23 of 30 passes for 224 yards, three touchdowns and no interceptions in sparking Seattle to a 26-6 home win over the Detroit Lions. He was always a step or two ahead of the Lions’ pass rush. Feeling frisky, Wilson was playing for the first time in months without a cumbersome brace on his right knee. He suffered an MCL sprain during the third week of the season. “I’ve been not wearing it in practice. But my philosophy is that we wanted to be smart and wanted to make sure we had the opportunity to make the playoffs, then cut loose,” he said

Saturday, Jan. 14

NFC: Seattle Seahawks at the Atlanta Falcons, 4:35 p.m., broadcast on FOX

AFC: Houston Texans  at the New England Patriots, 8:15 p.m., broadcast on CBS

in a postgame news conference. Brown, an alumnus of Henrico County’s Hermitage High School who also is bouncing back from a leg injury, blocked brilliantly in Houston’s 27-14 victory over the visiting Oakland Raiders. He helped shut down a usually fierce Raiders’  rush, led by Khalil Mack, with zero sacks. Texans quarterback Brock Osweiler wasn’t so much as knocked down all day. The 6-foot-4, 315-pound Brown finally is feeling at full strength following recovery from a quadriceps tendon tear suffered late last season. “At this time last year, I was recovering and watching from the couch,” Brown told the Houston press. “Now I can contribute. I’m very thankful to be here with my guys.” Both Wilson and Brown are recalled as tremendously versatile

athletes in high school. Wilson starred in basketball and baseball at Collegiate, while Brown was a standout in basketball and track for Hermitage. Wilson went on to play football at North Carolina State University and the University of Wisconsin. He was a third round draft choice of the Seattle Seahawks. Brown helped Virginia Tech to an ACC football title before Russell Wilson becoming a Texans first round draft pick (26th overall). He has been a three-time All-Pro. Another similarity between the two is that they both have celebrity wives. Wilson married popular singer-songwriter Ciara on July 6, 2016. In 2011, Brown married Devon Anjelica, aka “Devi Dev,” who has hosted and entertained on such shows as Sirius XM Shade 45 and Sway in the Morning. Football has been good to both men’s pocketbooks. In 2012, Brown inked a six-year contract worth $53.4 million, with $22.08 million guaranteed. In 2015, Wilson signed a four-year pact worth $87.6 million.

Employment Opportunities 2 PCA’S or 2 CNAS’

REQUEST FOR LETTERS OF INTEREST and Statements of Qualifications The University of Virginia, Charlottesville, invites highly qualified firms to submit Letters of Interest and Statements of Qualifications along with background information on Form HECO-16 (obtain adapted version from http://fpc.fm.virginia.edu/Pages/Ads.aspx) for construction services related to the:

CENTER FOR HUMAN THERAPEUTICS Renovation RFP # 16-106 The University seeks to retain a Construction Manager to join our team during the design phase to provide constructability review, scheduling and optimal phasing scenarios, cost estimating, early bid package assistance, with the option of initiating Mechanical Design Assist partnerships and to provide full construction services for the University in accordance with the provisions of the University of Virginia Higher Education Capital Outlay Manual. The contract will be awarded as a Competitive Negotiation utilizing the Construction Management at Risk with Design Phase Services project delivery method. The project consists of renovating existing research laboratory space to create the Center for Human Therapeutics within Pinn Hall (formerly Jordan Hall). Project Overview: The Center for Human Therapeutics project (Center) will create a series of core facilities designed as clinical manufacturing facilities that meet the regulatory requirements of the US FDA cGMPs), and will include provisions for the co-location of the Medical Center’s expanded Cytotherapy program. The new Center is to be located in the existing Pinn Hall (formerly Jordan Hall) building on UVA Health System grounds in Charlottesville. The scope of renovation will include complete removal of existing finishes and utilities back to shell condition in the area of construction as well as provisions for a new, dedicated air handling unit (AHU) and all new distribution systems to meet ISO 7 regulations for FDA certified processing labs.

Program SuPPort trainee - HomeownerSHiP Servicing VHDA is currently seeking a Program Support Trainee to work in the Homeownership Servicing division. Successful candidate will be provided a unique opportunity to learn more about mortgage industry. The incumbent would be responsible for performing a variety of tasks to support the management team within the Servicing area. The responsibilities would include preparing monthly reporting to senior level management, act as the Sharepoint administrator and liaison to external partners. The work requires good understanding of the projects and department structure and workflow. This position reports to the Director of Servicing. The successful candidate should have the ability to learn and understand the Servicing line of business, the ability to work effectively and collaboratively with a team of individuals on a variety of complex tasks, and the ability to leverage technology to enhance processes. A bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university is required along with a desire to learn the mortgage industry. If you feel you meet these qualifications, please submit your cover letter and resume, online only at: http://www.vhda.com/about/careers An EOE Credit and background checks will be performed as a condition of employment. This position is a VHDA Market Range 3.

needed for 12 hour shift at Assisted Living Facility. Need 1 PCA or CNA to work as a relief person on 12-hour shift and 1 activity person. Please bring a current TB report when applying. All references will be checked.  Good pay  Good days off Call for appointment (804) 222-5133.

Richmond Free Press is seeking a reliable and creative person for a part-time graphics position. Enthusiastic individual must be proficient in Indesign and Photoshop to develop accurate, high quality camera-ready advertisements and engaging news page layouts for print production. Meticulous attention to details. Ability to be flexible and work under deadline cooperatively in a team environment is essential. Submit resumé and samples of work to address below. Human Resources, Richmond Free Press, P.O. Box 27709, Richmond, Virginia 23261

News specialist NBC12 seeks part-time news/content specialist. The successful candidate will be required to shoot and run live shots for Richmond’s number one morning news. The candidate must also have experience in editing, graphics, camera and audio. Good computer and internet skills are a must. Work schedule will include early mornings. Apply on line at https://careersraycommedia.icims.com Drug Screen and MVR check required. EOE M/F/D/V.

The anticipated start of Construction Start will be summer 2017 through fall 2018.

Part-time Job Opening

TransiT sysTem

Mount Olive Baptist Church in Glen Allen, Virginia has the following part-time job opening:

Staff Pianist/Hammond Organist/ Auxiliary Accompanist

Director of Human Resources Administration

DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING Hiring Range: $15.00 Posting Closes: January 18, 2017

Please visit the church’s website at www.mobcva.org to view the complete job announcement for this position. This position will be open until �illed. A Criminal History Background Check and/or credit history check are required.

The College of Humanities and Sciences (CHS) and Virginia Commonwealth University invites applications for a professional faculty appointment to serve as the Director of Human Resources. This position is a key member of the Dean’s Administrative team and is responsible for human resources initiatives in the College of Humanities and Sciences, while understanding financial needs and providing guidance to allow the school to grow effectively and efficiently. This position is responsible for oversight and supervision of human resources administration within the College of Humanities and Sciences, promoting an inclusive and rewarding work environment and recognizing the importance of diversity. This 12-month position has responsibility for supervising individuals in the Deans Office. The successful candidate will have a demonstrated record of fostering a diverse environment and a plan for continuing to do so as Director.

PLANNING INTERNS (2) PART-TIME (TEMPORARY-GRANT) GRTC Transit System Planning Department seeks a undergraduate candidate to assist with various planning functions. Undergraduate degree required, preferably in urban planning or a related field. Excellent written and interpersonal communication skills are critical. The successful candidate will be proficient in Microsoft Office and Adobe programs. For a more detailed job description and the ability to apply online, please visit www.ridegrtc.com. A pre-employment drug screening will be required. GRTC Transit System is an equal opportunity employer with a drug-free work environment that values diversity in the workplace.

The City of Richmond is seeking to fill the following position: Assistant Registrar I 17M00000009 Registrar Apply by 01/22/17 Equipment Operator II – Pavement Marking 29M00000188 Department of Public Works Apply by 01/22/17

Vice President, Community College Workforce Alliance (Position #FA400) (Richmond, VA) J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College (Reynolds) and John Tyler Community College (JTCC) seek an entrepreneurial and innovative leader. Reports to both the presidents of J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College and John Tyler Community College and provides executive leadership, vision, and management to the Community College Workforce Alliance with the primary objective of helping individuals prepare for work and careers through credential attainment and doing so in partnership with the traditional academic operations of both colleges, with local business and industry, and with regional K-12 partners as appropriate. Promotes both colleges throughout the greater Richmond region and CCWA as part of both colleges. Engages external leadership throughout the greater Richmond region in positioning CCWA to be the premier workforce training provider by creating strategic partnerships with regional business and industry in both credit and non-credit areas, with other workforce-related organizations (i.e., Goodwill, Workforce Investment Boards, etc.). TYPE OF APPOINTMENT: Full-time, twelve-month administrative faculty-ranked appointment. Salary commensurate with the education and experience of the applicant. $93,434-$178,599. Approximate maximum hiring salary: $115,000. Additional information is available at the College’s website: www.reynolds.edu. APPLICATION PROCESS: Application reviews will begin FEBRUARY 9, 2017, and will be accepted until the position is filled. AA/EOE/ADA/Veterans/ AmeriCorps/Peace Corps/ Other National Service Alumni are encouraged to apply.

Executive Assistant II 85M00000009, 016 Office of the Mayor Open Until Filled Family Service Worker – Family Preservation 27M00000580 Department of Social Services Apply by 01/22/17 Family Service Worker – Resource Family 27M00000569 Department of Social Services Apply by 01/22/17 Family Services Supervisor – Adult Services 27M00000156 Department of Social Services Apply by 01/22/17 Pretrial Probation Officer – Investigator 15Grant0026 Department of Justice Services Apply by 01/22/17 Senior Policy Advisor (Part-Time) 85M00000007 Office of the Mayor Open Until Filled ****************** For an exciting career with the City of Richmond, visit our website for additional information and apply today! www.richmondgov.com EOE M/F/D/V

Required Qualifications This position oversees human resources within the College and ensures compliance with applicable Federal and State laws and regulations, and University policies and procedures. This position works to resolve complex personnel issues. Responsibilities include, but are not limited to: • provide leadership and guidance on HR issues and participate in decision making and implementation of HR policies, procedures, programs and functions; • provide guidance on complex and confidential issues and employee relations and performance management issues with oversight from the Provost’s Office, VCU Human Resources, University Counsel; • oversees central HR administrative processes relative to faculty appointments including coordination of faculty personnel matters with respective Chairs/Directors, monitoring of the College’s recruitment activities, and administration of the various faculty processes (e.g. salary administration, scholarly leave, retirement programs, overloads, etc); • oversees central HR administrative processes relative to classified staff appointments including coordination of classified personnel matters with respective Chairs/Directors, monitoring of recruitment activities, performance and appraisal processes, compensation actions, and recognition awards; documents for new hires and changes in status; • oversees staff in faculty contract renewals, off-cycle salary increases, study- research/educational leaves, faculty early retirement programs, etc.; • consults with Associate Dean for Finance and Administration on all facets of daily operations as needed and communicates changes in University personnel policies and procedures and ensures proper compliance is followed; • participates with Deans/Associate deans in planning, research and effectiveness; policy development and problem resolution; • participates in the resolution of “crisis-like” issues and provides triage and management of personnel issues, equity, Title IX and other matters that arise in the College; • serves as primary contact for Threat Assessment Team and Title IX Director; • manages compensation issues to include pay adjustments, bonuses, faculty merit, recognition awards, FLSA, and other requests by providing advice and guidance, while working closely with central HR and Office of Faculty Recruitment and Retention; • makes recommendations regarding equity issues; • in conjunction with supervisors, leads on all employee terminations in the College; • charges faculty search committees; • serves as “Reviewer” for the College on all staff performance plans and evaluations before they are presented to the employee; • reviews staff performance and performance evaluations; oversight of progressive discipline, coordination of staff disputes and grievance procedures in accordance with applicable Federal and State laws, and University policies and procedures; • supervises and works with the Staff and Leave Personnel Manager in all matters related to classified staff including performance plans, evaluations, staff and faculty medical leaves, etc.; • conducts exit interviews and reports data as appropriate; • routinely reviews policy library, laws, and best practices to stay current and suggest improvements; • identifies skills possessed by employees and tries to strengthen the workforce by nurturing those strengths; • facilitates actions designed to improve workplace climate; • implements strategies to meet goals of the College’s Diversity Initiatives; and • serves on various University committees. Only electronic applications will be accepted. Please apply online at www.vcujobs.com. Please submit a CV, cover letter and names of three references with your online application. Please contact Donald Young, dyoung@vcu.edu with any questions. Application review will begin immediately. Start date will be February 1, 2017 Virginia Commonwealth University is an equal opportunity affirmative action company. Women, minorities, veterans and persons with disabilities are encouraged to apply.


January 12 14, 2017 issue